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YOUR COMPLETE SUNSHINE COAST LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

AUTUMN ’16 saltmagazine . com . au

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FROM THE EDITOR

Signs of the

NEIL PASKIN COVER PHOTOGRAPHER

I have always had a passion for nature and the outdoors, so capturing it through the art of landscape photography is a challenge I relish. My aim is to capture nature’s amazing palette of colours, textures and form that may not always be obvious to the viewer but through my photography the scene can be enjoyed forever. We can be found at The Caloundra Street Fair at Bulcock Street every Sunday. neilpaskin.com ON THE COVER The image is titled Stone Script and was taken at Pincushion Island in 2007. The image was captured using a Canon 5D, 1/2s, f/16.0 at 105.0mm, ISO 50.

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I’VE ALWAYS BEEN a big fan of symbolism. Growing up in a religiousbased family, we were specialists at looking for the meaning in everything. While other kids were counting blue Mini Minors on road trips, we were looking out for signs of the fish and having spotted one, would wave and smile madly as we drove by. Looking back, I can only imagine the other drivers were wondering if their boot had been left open or petrol cap was dangling wildly in the breeze. In high school, I can specifically remember how excited I was to be given a 2000 word essay on the symbolism inherent in William Golding’s Lord of The Flies. Pffft – piece of cake. I wrote it all in one go – back in the good ol’ days of handwriting too. Maybe I remember it so well partly because despite getting full marks, half the marks were deducted because I’d handed it in a day late! And today I’m still looking for meaning in everything. Is it a sign? What does it mean? I’m busy trying to decipher personalised number plates while my very patient partner beside me suggests, “maybe it just is what it is”. And maybe that’s why I love salt so much. Because she MEANS something. She’s true to herself and the Sunny Coast. Her masthead stands for the real, down-to-earth, you-and-me-type people who make this place so wonderful – just turn to page 32. And it really is the people who make it so, with their amazing talents and inspiring stories. The beautiful backdrop is just a bonus. And that’s why Lynne Delany, salt’s new owner, fell in love with her too. While sad to say goodbye to Kate and Angus Johns is a wild understatement, (over 11 years, they’d grown salt from nothing but a fierce desire to create a publication that was different from the rest to the amazing creation she is today) we’re thrilled Lynne has every intention of leaving salt just as she is – sincerity and soul intact. Love to you Kate and Angus – and thank you from the bottom of all our Sunny Coast hearts. And welcome Lynne; we’ve arms wide open for you. Enjoy the read.

KARINA EASTWAY EDITOR

CONTRIBUTING TALENTS: WHAT WAS YOUR FAVOURITE ‘BEHIND THE SCENES’ MOMENT THIS EDITION?

THANKS GO TO OUR OTHER CONTRIBUTING TALENTS TOO: LYNNE DELANY PUBLISHER JANE FYNES-CLINTON SUB-EDITOR, COLUMNIST JANE TODD PROOFREADER BRISEIS ONFRAY DESIGNER, WRITER KRISTA EPPELSTUN PHOTOGRAPHER

EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES editorial@saltmagazine.com.au ADVERTISING & SUBSCRIPTIONS info@saltmagazine.com.au GENERAL ENQUIRIES 0412 210 281 2 Park Court Noosaville QLD Australia 4566 © Copyright 2016 salt is a free quarterly magazine published by ATD Management P/L. Distribution area between Bribie and Fraser Island and inland to Kenilworth and select areas throughout Brisbane. 4

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ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS PHOTOGRAPHER

LAYNE WHITBURN WRITER

MARINE HACQUIN WRITER

If I had to pick one, it would be meeting the chooks and the gorgeous Walker family out at their farm, and the incredible lightning storm I drove through getting there. Nature put on one of the best shows I’d ever seen and then switched to glorious sunshine just as I pulled up to take the photographs.

Any moment including food is a favourite of mine. So take a fashion show, all sorts of bridal nick-knacks and throw in tastetesting wedding cake samples – and we have one long series of delicious behind-the-scenes moments. Searching for the latest wedding trends at the Sunshine Coast Bridal Expo was by far a highlight!

ALEX FYNES-CLINTON WRITER

LILJANA FREY WRITER LUCY EMLYN-JONES WRITER CELESTE MITCHELL WRITER LIBBY MUNRO WRITER CLAIRE PLUSH WRITER LINDA READ WRITER PENNY SHIPWAY WRITER TYSON STELZER WRITER SALLY TRUDE WRITER AARON WYNNE WRITER

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SALT-MAGAZINE

SALTMAG

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CONTENTS

autumn

’16

FEATURES

6 FEATHERED FREEDOM

A Sunshine Coast farm has taken free range to a whole new level.

16 JUST SING

The Sunshine Coast has a host of top-notch choirs, each with its own sound and purpose.

TASTES

38 TABLE TALK

Chef at Flame Hill Adam Lugg taps into the heartbeat of the Montville hillside.

PEOPLE

42 NOSH NEWS

Morag Gamble has always lived an eco-aware life, and she shares her growing knowledge in creative ways.

44 CULINARY CREATIONS

24 PURSUIT OF PASSION

28 FOR A CAUSE

Beaches are cleaner – and spirits are lifted – thanks to two men with one vision.

32 LOOK AT ME

There are no obstacles Sarah can see in her multi-coloured life.

92 BOLD VISIONARIES

Jewellery designer Renee Blackwell’s travels have stimulated her creativity in wondrous ways.

Delicious snippets from the industry that gives us food, glorious food. Spirit House Restaurant and Cooking School shares a fresh, favourite recipe.

46 PRODUCE PEOPLE

Pete and Claire Harvison treat and educate marketgoers with their raw, whole, healthy sugarcane juice.

50 RELAXED RECIPES

No cooking is needed with these easy, tasty dishes.

56 PADDOCK TO PLATE

Marcel Desbiens sees beauty in fine detail.

Synergy provides a unique experience at The Long Apron restaurant at Spicers Clovelly Estate.

122 MEET THE DESIGNER

60 SALT CELLAR

106 ARTIST

Noosa tattooist Sam Clark works his magic with big dollops of coolness and style.

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It is time to give riesling another look, wine writer Tyson Stelzer says.

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LOVESTRUCK 64 KEEPING IT REAL

Klarissa and Brenton Campbell happily shared their wedding day with a beautiful little starlet.

70 FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

Jim and Jean Duncan have been together for almost all their lives – and love is the centrepiece.

72 TO HAVE AND TO HOLD Fashionable, must-have products for the loved up.

74 MAGIC MAKER

A beautiful vehicle with a remarkable history is a Sunshine Coast celebrity.

STAPLES 12 SIX SENSES

IS BORN OF THE PUREST PARENTS, THE SUN & THE SEA. PYTHAGORAS

LIFE

78 FASHION

A playful spread of the must-have styles for autumn.

96 INDULGENCE

A treatment at the hands of Grace Kovac leaves our writer feeling years younger.

A selection of items based on the special powers that we humans use to experience the world – touch, see, hear, smell, taste and feel.

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SECRETS ONLY A LOCAL WOULD KNOW

Get authentic information on the best hidden things on the Sunshine Coast from the only people who really know – the locals.

22 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

98 BEAUTY

salt has hand picked a variety of events on the Sunshine Coast that are guaranteed to please throughout autumn.

100 PAMPER & PREEN

34 BOOKS & BLOGS

Rejuvenating products are essentials this autumn. Our writer dives into a treatment at Lagoon Day Spa at Novotel Twin Waters Resort.

102 HEALTH

A week at Living Valley Health Retreat made a lasting impression on our writer’s approach to health.

114 IN YOUR DREAMS

Clothing designer Dui Cameron’s home is colourful, airy and full of quirkiness.

120 HOMEWARES

A refreshing arrangement of colours, textures and styles for autumn.

Inspiration comes in many fresh forms this autumn.

36 A DOSE OF SALT

salt columnist Jane Fynes-Clinton explores the modern popularity of ancient wisdom.

110 ART DATES

The Sunshine Coast has some of the best art galleries in the nation. Find out what will be on show, where in autumn.

126 TOURIST INFORMATION

Essential info for all visitors to the coast, including travel times, surf safety and market details.

128 MAP saltmagazine . com . au

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FEATURE

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Freedom

FEATHERED

WORDS JANE FYNES-CLINTON PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

THE MAGIC HAPPENS every couple of nights. The girls climb aboard their trusty caravan, have a bit of a chat, then hunker down in their beds and slumber. But when they wake, they are somewhere new, and the grass is fresh and rolling green. Life is one long caravan holiday for these spunky chicks, and they enjoy the newness of every day. This is as perfect as life gets – for laying hens. >

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Walker Farm Foods is located on a 330ha property at Cambroon, in the Sunshine Coast hinterland behind Maleny. A family farm for several generations, they mix a conventional dairy and beef component with innovative, free-range approaches for chickens.

There was a downturn in the beef prices that year as part of the worldwide economic slump, and the couple knew they would have to diversify to be able to support their family of five. Kacey has university qualifications in applied science and rural management. Her passion for sustainable farming and improving the land of her heritage was ignited when she came across the work of American farmer, lecturer and author Joel Salatin. Salatin is considered something of a farming rebel, raising his livestock using holistic, chemical-free animal husbandry practices and spreading the word of his success internationally.

Kacey and George bought the farm from Kacey’s dad Colin in 2012. George is a builder and the couple had been renovating and reselling houses in Brisbane. Kacey had grown up in the home, which was in desperate need of some tender loving care. She knew they were the ones to do it.

“It fell into place for me,” Kacey says. “I realised that rather than running a conventional farm, I wanted to improve the land and initially, I dragged the family along. It was a bit like jumping off a cliff to start with. I am from an ag science background, so everything I had practised was evidence-based. The body of

To every other chook in the nation, Kacey and George Walker give their chooks a true life of luxury. The chooks produce eggs that are truly free range, given they have limitless space in which to roam. The chickens they raise for meat have a similarly free and healthy life, being moved every couple of days to scratch in fresh pasture.

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Colour love has a shape, life has a

BOY AND BIRDS Kacey and George’s eldest child Lachlan, 13, is something of an entrepreneur. He has played an intrinsic part in promoting his family farm’s products, coming up with marketing pitches and packaging wording. He handles inquiries at public events and media inquiries with courtesy and aplomb. As well as helping his parents, this newly-minted teenager has his own business – Lachie’s Chooks. He builds his own light-weight, easy-to-move mini pens, so that people can have their own hand-reared chooks and freshly-laid backyard eggs. The pens are built with poly pipe, PVC and wire netting, have a roost and a laying box. He also fixes a handle to make it easy to move the hutch to a fresh patch of grass – essential to raising a healthy, happy, unstressed chook. Each of Lachie’s chook pens will accommodate a couple of feathered friends. Lachie also can provide black or brown point-of-lay hens, laying mash, grit, feeders and drinkers.

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walkerfarmfoods.com.au/lachieschooks/ or 5472 4094

peer-reviewed evidence may not have been there in 2012 when we started researching this, but these practices worked. I could see that when I visited farms that used them. I had a growing desire – a need – to grow food with integrity and build a business on sustainable and healthy principles.” Kacey spent a great deal of time visiting farms mostly in Victoria that implemented sustainable, chemical-free principles. She says George being alongside her is essential, because of his building skills and because the venture into ethical, humane, healthy farming needed a lot of research, planning and manpower. They make a complementary and energetic team. The property is an unusual shape, with a beautiful mountain on one side and lush alluvial Mary River flats on the other. But the Walkers were determined to make best use of the land. >

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5443 1955 Member of the Gold and Silversmiths Guild of Australia

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I HAD A GROWING DESIRE – A NEED – TO GROW FOOD WITH INTEGRITY.

Kacey and George have taken “free range” to a whole new level. In fact, they have cast the term aside for more apt words for how they raise their 2500 laying chooks – “pasturing” or “nomadic” fit far better. Part of the reason for adopting these words is that free-range in relation to eggs has been revealed as a deceiving and fluid term in Australia, being applied to anything from chickens that live 10,000 to the hectare – the Queensland standard, which means each chicken has a paltry 1m2 – to 1500 to the hectare, which is the RSPCA’s requirement. There is ongoing talk about bringing in long-needed national measures. Kacey and George started with 500 laying chooks, but demand forced expansion quickly. They’re still considered a small operation, but now organise five groups of lady travellers, with 500 chooks in each modified caravan. The vans are positioned in large paddocks and named, ranging from the custom-built, state-of the-art Peckingham Palace to the 1970s converted Millard number, Kaylene. Their meat birds are similarly raised, but reside in hoop houses that are moved about on skids. The holistic farming approach the Walkers use means that the meat and laying chickens help with the work: with all their scratching and pecking, they effectively till the soil, blessing it in turn with their manure. In wonderful symbiosis, the cows receive the benefit of the chicken’s busy work when they are pastured there later, in the endless rotation of plots. Moving the chickens is very labour-intensive, and they are moved at night because they are all safely roosting in their vans then, quiet and sleeping. “We have to move the chickens every couple of nights because as animals, they are very destructive,” Kacey says. “They very quickly turn the land into a moonscape, but we use that behaviour as part of our farming practice. The combination of us providing them with healthy, fresh grass and sunshine – nature’s number one disinfectant – and them working the soil so thoroughly is a win-win.” 12

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There is a trend towards people caring more about where their food comes from, and increasingly being concerned about the welfare of the animals whose products they consume. Alone, the free-range egg market now makes up about 40 per cent of retail sales and the category is growing by about 20 per cent a year. Thoughtful consumers want to eat the meat of chickens that have been humanely raised in a chemical-free environment. This means demand for the Walkers’ 1500 eggs a day and 75 whole chickens a week is happily increasing. The operation at the Walkers’ farm is an all-in affair. George and Kacey’s children Lachlan, 13, Abbie, 10 and David, 7, are part of the workings of the place, helping on holidays to collect the eggs and tending to gardens and chores. Lachlan, a remarkably bright and buoyant young fellow, has his own sideline business in laying chickens and actively helps with the public relations and promotion of his parents’ farm products. George’s mum Jane and Kacey’s dad live in cottages on the farm, and are actively involved in helping the farm and household run. The Walkers also solicit the help of four Maremma guard dogs to stand sentry over their chooks to protect them from predators. The breed has an instinctive, deep and historic bond to the livestock they protect. In addition, the chooks are not limited by fencing, instead being penned by electric netting in a broad, sweeping perimeter to herd them roughly close to their caravan. Living an ethical, humane and complete lifecycle pays dividends in the quality of the product, but for the Walkers, it is also about connectedness to the land, leaving it better than they found it and improving it for coming generations. Given standard farming practices, it is said that a happy chicken is the rarest breed of all. But at the Walkers’ farm, the air virtually buzzes with joy. The chickens peck, dust bathe and scratch, leading good animal lives. Integrity is an essential, core life and business value for Kacey.


SMART CHOOKS • Chickens have been found to be able to distinguish between up to 100 faces • Their “pecking order” has been found to be a complex social structure, in which each chicken knows and feels secure in its place • Chickens have Rapid Eye Movements when they sleep – leading scientists to believe they dream like humans • Chickens have up to 30 different vocalisations, a kind of primitive communication • They protect their young from threats and teach them what to eat and how to scratch • They are believed to be biologically the closest living relative to the tyrannosaurus rex

“It is still a work in progress,” Kacey says. “What I know to be true is that there is something bigger to this than us. I just want to grow food with integrity and to connect people back to where their food comes from.” For the Walkers, aiming for anything less would simply be birdbrained. Fresh Walker Farm eggs are available at local markets, restaurants and independent grocers. For a complete list, check out walkerfarmfoods.com.au or order online at openfoodnetwork.org.au/walkerfarmfoods/shop

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SIX SENSES

SEE Balanced precariously on the knife edge of mental illness while blessed with a singular musical genius, Brian Wilson (of The Beach Boys) possessed a talent that was consistently undervalued and a sensitivity that was perniciously tortured. Based on his complex, fascinating, tragic, and yet ultimately uplifting life, Love and Mercy delves into the onslaught of early fame and his anxiety induced by an oppressive and abusive father. Intertwined are the lesser-known aspects of his life such as the detailed creation of layered, profound music and his middle age spent under the control of a manipulative doctor. Like most biopics, it is an emotional rollercoaster, but this one is well worth the ride. I cannot recommend this highly enough. REVIEW LIBBY MUNRO

FEEL

Illustration courtesy of TWIGSEEDS STUDIO, twigseeds.com.au

six senses The world is a sensory place. salt takes a peek at items that evoke us to see, hear, smell, taste and touch and we have tossed in an extra just for fun … feel.

HEAR To the untrained ear and the younger generations, The Beach Boys sounds like fun trashy pop songs better left to the ’60s, but history has proven yet again that genius lives on! No.2 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of 500 greatest albums of all time, Pet Sounds was composed almost entirely by Brian Wilson and uses the most bizarre and beautifully composed sounds including bicycle horns, vibraphones, timpani, finger cymbals, Coke cans, water jugs and Brian’s pet dogs barking. All but rejected by his record company and some of his band members at the time, it is now considered a complete work of art. REVIEW LIBBY MUNRO

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TOUCH We’re touched by the human story behind Klaylife’s clay beaded chandeliers. Hand crafted by local women in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa, each clay bead is individually rolled, dried, kiln fired, dip-dyed and strung onto its wrought iron frame to create a unique focal point which supports the local community. From $1998 in colours ranging from black to charcoal, sea spray and white. Available at Art Nuvo Gallery, 25 Gloucester Road, Buderim. 5456 2445 or artnuvobuderim.com.au

ART NUVO BUDERIM MENTION ‘SALT’ AT DISCOUNT IN APRIL. FOR A 10 PER CENT

TASTE Handcrafted on the Sunshine Coast from ethically sourced, certified organic herbs, Yukti Botanicals Ayurvedic tea blend for autumn is a warming blend of herbs traditionally used to calm the mind and body while aiding digestion. The calming blend of tulsi, licorice, cinnamon, ashwagandha, ginger, clove, sweet orange and fennel is best enjoyed during autumn and spring. Available at Yukti Botanicals, 59 Rene Street, Noosaville. 5447 1122 or yukti.com.au

SMELL Wrap your nose around this great new product from the Crackling Candle Co. The car scents range comes in 12 delicious fragrances including black raspberry, coconut lime and frangipani (yum!) or think outside the box – cupboards and bathrooms need your help too. Lasts at least two to three months at $10. Look out for the 1953 Holden FX at local markets including Eumundi Markets every Wednesday and Saturday, 80 Memorial Drive, Eumundi. 5442 7106 or eumundimarkets.com.au

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SECRETS

CAPA WHAT? Not many locals have heard of capoeira but check it out and you’ll be hooked! It’s Brazilian martial arts, but instantly recognisable for its acrobatic skill and fluid dance-like movements. And just as impressive is its history. Created in the 16th century by West African slaves who were prohibited from fighting, capoeira was a self-defence tool cleverly disguised as dance, even protected by UNESCO for its cultural significance. Closer to home, Brazilianborn Lucas Bastos teaches capoeira every Wednesday and Friday with classes for both kids and adults. MOJO365, 1/128 Greenoaks Drive, Coolum Beach. mojo365.com.au Map reference N15

secrets

THAT LITTLE FLOWER SHOP at North Buderim is the kind of florist you would stumble across in a Melbourne alleyway. It’s vintageinspired, uber-cool, retro and overflowing with style, perfume and colour. Locally-owned and operated, this floristry not only arranges supersweet and stylish bouquets, but also stocks a fun range of unique gifts such as succulents in brightly-coloured pots (think hippos and dinosaurs), delicious locally-produced soy candles and wax melts, pamper hampers, and hand-crafted chocolates and cards. 6/1-5 Pittards Road, Buderim. thatlittleflowershop.com.au Map reference M18

ONLY A LOCAL WOULD KNOW

THE MAROOCHY BUSHLAND BOTANIC GARDENS has long been a local fave for its palm-filled valleys and wide range of fauna. However, it’s the 22 monumental stone statues and crafted bench seats in the sculpture garden which are a well-kept secret. Dotted throughout a small forest walk, the sculptures were made as part of the 2005 Stone International Sculpture Symposium; crafted over 16 days right in the gardens so visitors could watch them evolve. 32 Palm Creek Rd, Tanawha. Map reference M18

FOR MAP REFERENCES SEE MAP ON PAGE 128

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IF YOU FANCY ADDING MORE CREATIVITY 16 saltto your wardrobe, Eumundi Vintage Clothing has a colourful collection of affordable and authentic vintage fashion from the ’40s to the ’80s. And there is something for everyone or every occasion: casual day dresses to formal wear and bridal fashion. It’s a friendly space to browse and have fun trying things on. Open 8am to 2pm Wednesdays and Saturdays or 8.30am to noon on Fridays. Online shop launching soon. Located inside Humdrum Espresso Cafe, 100 Memorial Drive, Eumundi. Map reference L14


FOR THAI FOOD IN ACTION, you can’t go past Thai Mangoes! Owner Duan Tolley established this restaurant more than 12 years ago and makes regular visits home to Thailand for inspiration. The fresh veggie display at the counter and watching chefs Duan and Boo honing their skills in the kitchen will get your mouth watering. This place is a real find! 4/59 Sixth Ave, Maroochydore. Map reference N17

HIDDEN IN THE COMMERCIAL HUB of Maroochydore is a raw-foodie haven for hippies and food lovers alike. Those on the raw and dairy-free food trail will love Cafe Nurcha tucked inside family-owned business Coastal Wellbeing Centre. The centre has all the usual health and spiritual-junkie products such as vitamins, crystals and natural foods. But it’s the cafe that has locals lining up for coconut lattes, fruit and veg smoothies, cold-pressed juices and blueberry raw cheesecakes. And their salads are phenomenal. The Zone, 32 Wises Rd, Maroochydore. Map reference N17

My place for convenience With a variety of stores including Coles, Kmart, fashion, accessories, health, beauty, jewellery, gifts, and a great range of services, you can get all your shopping done in the one place; giving you more time to relax and do the things you enjoy. Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/stocklandcaloundra

Caloundra

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FEATURE

JUST

SI NG WORDS LINDA READ

YOU COULD CALL IT a wonder drug. It can lift depression, improve memory and promote a healthy immune system. It soothes the mind, heals the body, feeds the soul, and is an antidote to stress and loneliness. Its psychological and physical benefits are well documented, with some research showing it can even prolong life. It’s called singing – and there’s no better way to do it than in a group. At least that’s what seems to be the ethos of the thriving and varied choirs that populate the Sunshine Coast, who are collectively proving they have a whole lot to sing about. To witness the 18

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magical process that takes place when words become music, then combine in rhythm and harmony, is truly inspirational. Just ask Kim Kirkman, professional singer and founding member of the legendary Ten Tenors, and now musical director of four very different choirs on the Sunshine Coast. Kim says there’s a choir for every type of singer in the region, from Noosa to Caloundra, and threaded through the hinterland. In fact, there are even choirs for those who cannot sing – like the “phenomenally successful” Maleny-based Inspiration Choir, which Kim directs. The choir consists of people who think they can’t sing, or have no training or experience. There are 60 members, aged from around 50 to 84 years old.


Merryatric Players

FROM OPEN PM 0 4.3

Photo Greg Gardner Photography

“We started with the concept that you just turn up; even if you don’t think you can sing, you just turn up,” Kim says. “I’ve got lots of stories about people in the Inspiration Choir who have been really reclusive or really shut away, and suddenly they’re out singing and they’re enjoying it and they’re making friends and meeting new people.” And although the original intention was for the Inspiration Choir not to perform, but to simply enjoy rehearsing each week together (they sing uplifting songs in a variety of music styles from classical to contemporary) the group performed last year at the Sunshine Coast Choral Festival and are now starting to make performance appearances in venues around the coast. >

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New World Rhythm

FOLLOW THE MUSIC There are so many choirs on the Sunshine Coast, according to Kim Kirkman, that if anyone has an interest in discovering or renewing a love of singing, they will not have to look too far. “All the choirs have different abilities, different direction, different types of songs and repertoires that they’re singing,” Kim says. “I strongly suggest for people to try all the different groups out. It really depends on the singer for what they want to do.”

their lives that’s been missing; it’s been taken away for them, and suddenly they’re reclaiming it for themselves. That breaks open a whole lot of wonderful feelings for these people and they can celebrate life in new ways. “It’s very rewarding; I see it in their expressions. You can see them coming to life, and through the social interactions they have with the other people around them who are also going through a similar process; it really creates a lovely bond.” Another choir on the coast making its collective voice heard loud and clear is New World Rhythm, an auditioned community choir that sings acapella music (without the accompaniment of any instruments) from around the world.

Dani Jones

“Because singing is quite wonderful – it’s good for you – it’s really creating a new life for these people. From that energy, it really creates a bit of a buzz. And that’s why there are so many people coming along, because they get such a buzz out of it,” Kim says. A common theme among the Inspiration Choir members is a childhood love of singing that was dampened in some way, only to resurface later in life. They may have sung in a school choir only to be told by a teacher they were out of tune, which can scar them and stop them from wanting to sing. “I see them again when they’re 60 and they decide they want to get over that problem and learn how to sing,” says Kim. “And through that process, which is big psychological work, they really discover more joy and fulfilment in their lives. The energy they create when they realise that actually they can sing, that this is a part of 20

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New World Rhythm sings in over 40 different languages and dialects, in up to eight different parts, from descant soprano down to bass. Their passionate musical director Dani Jones says the members come from all walks of life and range in ages from “early 20s to mature”. Originally formed in the late 1990s, the choir’s numbers have steadily grown, along with its reputation of being an entertaining and unique choral performance troupe. “The choir has an immensely broad repertoire – from gospel to Macedonian, Torres Strait islands to Japanese, Swahili to Celtic, Zulu to Israeli,” says Dani. “We never read our music, but rather learn material by heart, which increases the connection to our audiences. The connection between the choir members is authentic and significant – this is clearly portrayed through the joy during rehearsals and performances. “We have created our own singing family.” Based in Maroochydore, New World Rhythm performs regularly at venues on the coast including the Woodford Folk Festival. They have recorded an album and are working towards a European tour in 2018. So what is the inspiration behind the success?


Photo Nic Saw

Photo by Ela iela.com.au

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Kim Kirkman

“Definitely the enduring friendships that exist within the group,” says Dani. “We are inspired by beautiful harmonies and connecting with audiences; we relish in giving the gift of music to our fans. We are inspired when they tell us we give them goose bumps.” Moving an audience to feel is par for the course for another group of singers on the coast known as the Merryatric Players, formed in 2013 and based at Caloundra. Directed by the indomitable former conductor Norma Fox, 81, the Merryatric Players consists of about 40 senior performers who found they were increasingly unable to get the parts in plays and musicals that they used to. They are all over the age of 60, but Norma says age is no barrier to musical talent. “They don’t look old on the stage,” she says. “When we performed a tribute to the Anzacs [A Bit of A Stoush, 2015] three of the men in it were over 60 and played the parts of three 21-year-olds that went away to war. After about a quarter of an hour, you were looking at them and thinking they were 21.” The group performs regularly at The Events Centre Caloundra and has been an instant success since its formation, with its members drawing on lifetimes of talent to breathe new life into their musicals, which range from comedy to drama and old time music hall theatre. “It’s given everyone, I suppose you’d say, a new life; a new working life,” Norma says. “I’m just astounded at what they’ve achieved. All the performers had been well known on the coast – and other places – before they joined the group. I’ve got people in the group who have come from other places to retire on the coast. >

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Photo Paul Smith Images

Hot Ginger Chorus

BECAUSE SINGING IS QUITE WONDERFUL – IT’S GOOD FOR YOU – IT’S REALLY CREATING A NEW LIFE FOR THESE PEOPLE. “I think another thing too is we are all senior citizens, but we’ve all got a very young outlook on life – young at heart, you know? We all think singing is so good for the soul and it’s just so good for you. “What we like the look of, when you’re looking out at the audience, is that it’s just lovely to see everyone smiling back at you.” Making people smile is also one of the features of The Sunshine Statesmen, a 30-member male barbershop chorus choir that sings in four parts – tenor, lead, baritone and bass. Unique on the coast as the only male barbershop chorus singing four-part harmonies, they regularly perform at corporate events, special events such as Australia Day, shopping centres and nursing homes. They will also be competing in the Queensland Barbershop Competition this April on the Gold Coast. The Sunshine Statesmen performers are inspired, according to their program manager Bill Leivesley, by the joy singing brings to their lives, as well as their audiences. “Our inspirations are our individual love of singing, magnified by being part of a greater chorus,” Bill says. “The Statesmen enjoy serving the community by entertaining diverse groups. Singing increases longevity, prevents depression and is uplifting to the audience and our singers.” Their female counterparts, Hot Ginger Chorus, has also formed a strong presence in the region, with about 40 members based at Maroochydore. Also directed by Kim Kirkman, the auditioned choir is going to be competing this year at the National Barbershop Titles in Wollongong, New South Wales.

sound”. They range in age from about 30 to 80 years old and compete in the Queensland Eisteddfod. Then there’s Tapestry, a chamber choir of 18 voices ranging in age from 30 to 65 who sing music acapella based in an acoustic setting. Tapestry performed at some major events and venues last year such as the Neerum Creek Festival and the Caloundra Art Gallery, and also made a recording. With the chorus – and variety – of choral voices growing stronger around the Sunshine Coast, there’s good reason to believe that maybe singing really is some kind of feel-good drug after all. There’s certainly a fair amount of anecdotal evidence to back the claim. According to Dani Jones, it sparks a kind of “contagious joy”. “Many members [of New World Rhythm] talk about their weekly rehearsals as being their therapy,” she says. “Singing itself can be a very challenging thing to do – people can feel vulnerable,” she says. “To take the risk and sing with others opens previously unexplored opportunities and empowers people. The connection that we feel with each other is very evident in performances, as we have a high fun element.” Kim agrees that there is a lot to be gained from joining a choir, apart from making beautiful music – such as people crossing paths with others whom they may never have met otherwise, and making life-long friendships. “I really like the demographic variety,” he says. “It is really exciting for people to be involved in because you just learn so much about others across generations and you get to really experience that, and that’s rewarding.”

Kim describes them as “very motivated women” who are continually pushing their vocal boundaries.

Or, put very simply, Kim also offers this explanation: “Singing is awesome.”

“They are highly focussed and they do a lot of stuff my other groups wouldn’t do because they’re so focussed on getting things right. It’s all about precision.”

And there’s a harmonious chorus of voices who would say “encore” to that.

Kim also directs the Caloundra Chorale, a big choir of about 50 voices which he describes as having a “full theatrical kind of 22

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The 2016 Sunshine Coast Choral Festival will be held at Lake Kawana Community Centre on Saturday May 28. sunshinecoastchoralfestival.yolasite.com


shopping

Enjoy a relaxing shopping escape Take some time out to shop at Noosa Civic. Conveniently located 10 minutes from Hastings Street with free parking, Noosa Civic is the ideal shopping oasis. There’s even an indoor playground to keep the kids entertained! GPS search: 28 Eenie Creek Road, Noosaville, Queensland See map on back inside cover. Big W • Woolworths • 100 specialty stores 28 Eenie Creek Rd (Cnr Walter Hay Drive) Noosaville Ph 5440 7900


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

NOOSA FOOD & WINE 2016

APRIL

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STORYTIME BALLET The Australian Ballet brings its first ever ballet for children, The Sleeping Beauty, to Caloundra this April. One of the best-loved of all ballets, expect a visually stunning production designed especially for kids complete with a narrator and engaging preshow activities. Designed for ages 3 and up. when April 5 where The Events Centre, Caloundra cost from $19 theeventscentre.com.au THE AUSSIES This year the Sunshine Coast is proud to host the national Surf Life Saving Championships – billed as the largest event of its kind in the world. Members from 311 Australian Surf Clubs will merge on the coast to compete in more than 400 beach and ocean events and while most of us won’t be competing it makes for a great spectator sport as well. when April 16 to 24 where various locations cost free for spectators sls.com.au 24

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TIME FOR NATURAL This is an exhibition of ‘slow fashion’ by three local Noosa artisans using pure and natural fibres such as locally farmed alpaca and silk, sustainable cotton and Australian wool. Time is taken to spin, knit and crochet, weaving an ethical and moral approach into hand-made fashion (see what we did there?). when April 23 to May 24 where Old Pomona Railway Station Gallery, 10 Station Street, Pomona cost see website for details pomonartgallery.com THE MALENY WOOD EXPO Started by local forester Ashley Sewell in 1996 to promote sustainable use of native timbers, the Maleny Wood Expo is celebrating its 20th year. Enjoy three days of family fun in the beautiful Sunshine Coast hinterland and discover the magic of lovingly crafted timber. when April 30 to May 2 where Maleny Showground, 13 Maleny-Stanley River Road, Maleny cost $15 – under 16 free malenywoodexpo.com

MAY

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VA’A WORLD SPRINTS See the International Va’a Federation elite and club world sprint titles take place in our own Sunny Coast backyard. This is outrigger canoe racing at its most spectacular with 35 countries and 3000 participants competing in the fastest outrigger canoe event in Australia. when May 5 to 15 where Lake Kawana, Kawana cost free for spectators worldsprints.com COOROORA WOOD AND CRAFT SHOW The Cooroora Woodworkers Club showcases competition entries from regional clubs at this annual event. There are also woodworking demonstrations, timber milling and timber sales for the wannabe wood turner in all of us. when May 6 to 7 where Cooroy Memorial Hall, Maple Street, Cooroy cost $2 cooroorawoodworkersclub.com

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MICHELLE BROWN DUO Mix Michelle’s big bluesy voice with John’s Maier’s piano skills? Now that’s what we call a dynamic duo! when May 8 where The Yacht Club, Parkyn Parade, Mooloolaba cost free theyachtclubmooloolaba.com.au MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL COMEDY FESTIVAL ROADSHOW It’s silly, it’s satirical, it’s sidesplitting. It’s Australia’s ultimate comedy roadtrip! For nearly 20 years the Melbourne International Comedy Festival Roadshow has home delivered the best of the Festival to towns and cities across Australia and now it’s our turn! when May 12 where The Events Centre, 20 Minchinton Street, Caloundra cost $42 18+ only event theeventscentre.com.au


STORYTIM E BALLET

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NOOSA FOOD & WINE 2016 Join food and wine enthusiasts from all over the nation as they descend on Noosa for Noosa Food & Wine 2016. Event-goers can look forward to discovering new flavours alongside great Australian wines, artisan foods and culinary talent with some of Australia’s leading chefs, producers and finest Queensland produce in one of the country’s leading food destinations, Noosa. Discover an exciting program of activities including beachfront events, celebrity lunches and dinners, a food trail and lifestyle events. when May 20 to 22 where Noosa Heads cost see website for details noosafoodwinefestival.com.au

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BIG PINEAPPLE MUSIC FESTIVAL Our favourite Sunny Coast music festival returns with a line-up you won’t want to miss. Rüfüs, You Am I, Hermitude and The Veronicas headline the fourth instalment of this annual festival, and with tickets selling out in previous years, you had better get in quickly! when May 28 where Big Pineapple, Woombye cost see website for details bigpineapplemusicfestival.com

DREAM

DISCOVER

EXPLORE

The street fair is a must-do experience offering live music, locally-made art and craft, home wares, gourmet street food, delicious sweets, fresh produce, fashion and entertainment for children. See you there!

JUNE GARDENING ON THE EDGE The Maleny Garden Club’s annual garden trail and garden market. Foundation member Olga Webster, 92, recalls how the club started after a severe hailstorm ruined a lot of dahlias in the 1950s. Rather than waste their beauty, it was decided to stage a floral carpet in the School of Arts, hence the Dahlia Show originated. “We danced around the carpet at night and proceeds went to the School of Arts. It was very successful and became an annual event. Later it became a flower show with the carpet the centrepiece.” when June 11 to 12 where various locations cost varies, with proceeds going to local charities malenygardenclub.org

NATIONAL SQUARE DANCE CONVENTION The countdown is on to five days of hoedown this June. Young and old are welcome to participate or cheer on competing dancers with special events including parades, theme night and a ticketed Fourth of July dance. when June 29 to July 3 where various locations cost see website for details squaredancenational2016.com

Bulcock St, Caloundra ` Caloundra Street Fair www.caloundrastreetfair.com.au


PURSUIT OF PASSION

EARTH MOTHER, ECO TEACHER WORDS JANE FYNES-CLINTON PHOTOS CLAIRE PLUSH

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HER ENERGY IS INFECTIOUS. Talking a mile a minute, with her bright blue eyes dancing, when Morag Gamble speaks of permaculture and sustainability, she visually lights up; an articulate, informed whirling dervish of unbridled passion. Morag is an ecological ambassador, a permaculture promoter, a living demonstration of what sustainable living looks like, sounds like, acts like. And she wants to pay it forward, setting up a learning organisation, the Ethos Foundation, to help others find positive ways to do it too. There is an educational eco-farm in the heart of Crystal Waters in the Sunshine Coast hinterland, where she lives. She takes interns, runs permaculture workshops, runs tours and facilitates arts and music in the garden events. She runs a Young Ethos Scholars program for gifted and talented kids, encouraging them to embrace ecological and social justice principles (earth and people care) in their decision-making. Of course, this means Morag, 46, has a full dance card, where her partners in grooving often overlap and one piece of music blends into the next. And the music keeps building: this year her son Hugh, 7, joins daughter Maia, 9, in being home schooled. Morag says both children elected to be schooled in the breeze of the home veranda rather than a classroom after each had been accelerated a year at school and were feeling unstimulated and stifled. First thing in the morning, the children attend to the animals and help with making their own breakfast. They do stretching and yoga before they start two hours of core learning. The rest of the day is spent on projects – and it can be heady stuff. >


Photo SEED International

“An example is that the other day they decided they wanted to build a tree house,” Morag says. “In order to do that, they had to consider structural elements, design elements, they had to think of the engineering, the measurements, the maths. Hugh decided the roof needed to be on an angle to catch the rainwater, so he realised he had to assess the drop from one side to the other and the width of the treehouse so that he could work out how big the piece of tin needed to be. “To do that, I pointed out that a formula was required, so we explored Pythagoras and angles and lengths.” The children also regularly attend programs at the University of the Sunshine Coast with other home-schooled students. Morag also has Monty, 2, to tend to, a garden to care for, a household to organise and the Ethos Foundation to run. But she says she likes it that way. “Home schooling is influencing my work. I am learning how to juggle things and weave things together,” she says. “I have tried for a long time to make my life my work and my work my life. It is built around what I am passionate about – and my family is central to that. I do not want to and can’t imagine leaving my family behind to go off to work and do something else.” Morag was raised in outer suburban Melbourne by environmentallyconscious parents who discussed ethics and permaculture in a home that had natural food, but no sugar, salt, meat or caffeine. Morag says she was always going to raise her own family that way, too, a notion that solidified as husband Evan Raymond – also an Ethos Foundation board member and permaculture teacher and designer – incrementally built their self-sufficient, off-the-grid home at the Crystal Waters ecovillage. “Everyone knows your children and kids play across properties. There are no fences. It is amazing, really, without the stress of anxiety of worry about your children,” Morag says. “It is a simple life and you can live well on less, so you work part time and the quality of life is accelerated.” Morag says as a peace and environmental activist as a teen, she might not have been so upbeat. “I felt deeply angry about the damage we were doing to the planet,” 28

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she says. “I probably browbeat people about what was wrong, but then I realised a lot of people were turning off and I had to come from a more positive perspective: if not that, then what? What does the world we are trying to create look like? What does it feel like? How do you communicate that to people? You can’t just tell them – you need to live it, show it, and invite them to experience it.” She studied landscape architecture and environmental planning at university, and at 21 she was in a time of transition when she came across writing that made her realise she was no island in her desire to build sustainable, nourishing communities. “I found this clarity of purpose that popped out. Something happened that gave me the chance to sit back and question what I was doing and why I was here and what made me feel energetic and valued, and then I decided to learn directly from the scholars who were at Schumacher College in England,” she says. Morag worked with physicist Fritjof Capra, a leading authority in systems theory; environmentalist Vandana Shiva and other ecological leaders including Helena Norberg-Hodge. One led to another and Morag says she felt her mind expanding. Morag worked in 20 different countries, and has worked on permaculture projects in places as diverse as the Himalayas and England. “Where I have seen happiness and a functional community, most of the time that has meant a simple life and connectedness – to other people, to the earth,” she says. “It is not about going backwards and wearing hair shirts and living a prehistoric life. It is about how I can live in a way that is meaningful, connected, that leaves the world improved rather than less damaged or even undamaged.” Morag says that after deeply exploring permaculture and ecologically-sound practices around the world, she chooses to live in the Sunshine Coast hinterland. “I feel connected to the place and the land – and I understand it,” she says. “I have a sense that I do not need to solve all the world’s problems, but I do what I can where I can in my local community, where I understand the place and the community and have a deep connection to it. Without doubt, that has a ripple effect.” For information about a nature kids school holiday program or permaculture courses, contact the Ethos Foundation on 5494 4833 or ethosfoundation.org


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FOR A CAUSE

BEAUTY AND THE BEACH WORDS LILJANA FREY PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

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EACH FORTNIGHT, two young men wake at dawn and head to the beach with a boot full of pick-sticks and oversized rubbish bags. They dip between grassy dunes and dart across wet sand, the rising sun reflected on the glossy shoreline beneath them. While many others sleep, Shae Jifkins and Matt Dennehy are plucking plastic, glass and other non-biodegradable garbage from our beaches. No, they’re not performing court-ordered community service and neither Shae, 23, nor Matt, 22, fit the stereotypical profile of an environmental conservationist. But during a walk along Cotton Tree’s sandy banks, they are stopped several times by beach-goers who presume the fluoro-clad duo are picking up trash to pay for their crimes. “Well, I guess we are performing a kind of community service,” says Shae. “We just haven’t been ordered to do it.” Shae and Matt have turned their passion for environmental conservation into Beach & Spirit Cleanse, and twice a month they are joined by a handful of volunteers at one of four coast beaches. Together, this small army – armed with gloves, pick-sticks and a syringe disposal unit – scour hundreds of metres of beachfront. After just a few hours, they emerge victorious with bags full of litter. Beach & Spirit Cleanse materialised suddenly last year after the destruction of Shae and Matt’s favourite beach spot at Alexandra Headland. “There was a recycled wooden platform secured in a tree overlooking the water,” says Shae. “It was the perfect place to relax, meditate and refresh the spirit.” One morning the friends discovered the pallet had been torn from the branches, ripped apart and used for firewood by revellers the night before. The area had also been extensively littered: overnight, the once-pristine spot was contaminated with shattered glass, empty cans and cigarette butts. They even found a used syringe among the rubbish. “Our first thought was we didn’t want anyone else to come along and find the beach like that,” says Shae. “So we cleaned it all up, then and there.” It was the first of many litter clean-ups for Beach & Spirit Cleanse. Both men share a deep connection with the ocean and marine life, and they were far from content after de-littering just one strip of sand. With a mother who worked in wildlife rehabilitation, Shae grew up witnessing the devastating impact litter can have on animals. In a walk along the beach, he stops and points at a discarded plastic bag, half-buried in the sand. >

DRASTIC PLASTIC • It is estimated there are more than 100 million tonnes of plastic in the world’s oceans • Cigarette butts, polystyrene pieces and lollipop sticks are the most common types of litter found on Sunshine Coast beaches • A University of Queensland study found about 30 per cent of sea turtles autopsied from the Sunshine Coast and Moreton Bay areas had ingested plastic • Plastic is non-biodegradable and requires exposure to sunlight to break down. This process, known as photodegradation, can take several hundred years

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TAKING OUT THE RUBBISH WHAT: coastline litter clean-up and free barbecue WHERE: Sunshine Coast beaches. Exact location is confirmed in advance on the group’s Facebook page. Head to facebook.com and search Beach Spirit Cleanse WHEN: fortnightly on either Saturday or Sunday morning WHY: help the environment, get to know people in the community and ultimately be active, productive and have fun at the same time

“If we don’t pick this up, it’ll end up down in the water,” he says. “Eventually an animal will try to eat it or get caught in it.”

up and dispose of any large bits of litter you see, as this prevents them from breaking up into many smaller pieces.”

Matt shares Shae’s passion for coastal conservation, but says his connection with the beach is a spiritual one. For him, Beach & Spirit Cleanse is about giving back to the natural healing body from which humans gain so much.

Shae and Matthew agree that locals can play an important part in conserving the coast’s beaches, and they hope to inspire others – especially families – to volunteer with Beach & Spirit Cleanse.

“The beach is a healing place, both spiritually and physically,” says Matt. “Salt water can help to naturally heal the body, so it’s important we help maintain the health of the beach in return.” Studies show Sunshine Coast beaches really do need help. Coolum and North Shore Coast Care volunteer Susan Richards coordinates monthly marine debris beach surveys across the Sunshine Coast and in November and December last year, her team collected a staggering 313 pieces of rubbish from just 122 metres of beachfront at Coolum’s First Bay. While Susan advocates for big-picture solutions to the problem, such as banning the use of microbeads in cleansing products, she says regular beach-goers can help restore the health of the coastline. “Try to buy food and drinks that are not packaged in plastic, and try not to use single use plastic items like straws,” she says. “Pick 32

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“Kids aren’t really aware of the impact their rubbish has on the beach and marine life,” says Shae. “So part of our aim is to educate the younger generations. That’s why we have the barbecue afterwards, to encourage volunteers to bring their families along.” Along with the local businesses that validate Beach & Spirit Cleanse’s work through sponsorship, the group is often approached and thanked by locals who spot them cleaning up the beach. But it’s the volunteers who show up – regardless of how bad the weather or how big the swell – who make the early morning starts worthwhile for Shae and Matt. “Our volunteers are spiritually-inclined locals,” says Matt. “Cleaning up the beach with like-minded people is a very grounding experience. It’s as much about connecting with the community as it is about conserving the coastline.”


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LOOK AT ME

RAINBOW WOMAN

WORDS MARINE HACQUIN PHOTO ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

SARAH SPENT THE FIRST morning of 2016 watching the sunrise, sitting atop a hill at the Woodford Folk Festival. Gazing into the distance, she enjoyed this moment of pure serenity, watching the dark sky turning into a multi-coloured painting. The moment was magical and she felt at ease with dozens of other Woodfordians. But this has not always been the case. 34

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Looking for something different? “I always felt different from a really young age,” Sarah says, sitting on her terrace, bathed in sunshine. “I first knew that there was something different about me around the age of nine. I always wanted to be called Sarah because I love that name, but I was too scared to tell anyone.” Sarah was born a boy called Chris on January 31, 1979 on the Gold Coast. Despite having cerebral palsy, which confines her to a wheelchair, Sarah says she was not treated any differently to her sister, although she can’t speak and has to use a laser fixed to her glasses to communicate. But there was an emptiness, an undefinable feeling that something was not right within. As a child, she would steal her sister’s clothes when she was out and wear them with the help of her carer. She would hurry to change back into boys’ clothes when she could hear the car coming up the street. Once, her sister asked her: “Are you sure you are not gay?” “The song by Lady Gaga ‘Born This Way’ has a special meaning to me because deep down I always felt that I was born into the wrong body, and I am happy that I can now express my true self as a woman with the support of my friends and family,” Sarah says. Four years ago, she decided to make her dream come true, and it changed her life. First, she changed her name, then she began to take hormones and dress like a woman. And like a chain reaction, her body relaxed more and she started to be able to eat without the need for injections. Sarah also joined a transgender group for support and she says the members were surprised by how quickly happiness came as she transformed. She closes her eyes for a bit, as if picturing the distance covered since those days before she came out. Then she shakes her wild hair, illuminated by the morning sun. The memory is gone, and she is now looking towards a promising future. Despite physical circumstances, Sarah says she does not consider herself as a disabled person. She is independent and manages her life as she wishes. She lives in a cosy house in Maroochydore and employs several lifestyle assistants to help her in her everyday life. From early morning to bedtime, the carers get to know Sarah’s unique personality, day after day. “I have had English, German, Swedish and American lifestyle assistants and I love it. They do have a totally different outlook on life to Australians and they are more open to the world,” Sarah says. “I have had some awesome lifestyle assistants from all around the world who I am still friends with to this day.” This open spirit is one that Sarah also finds in Byron Bay, which she visits every few months. And every time she gets out of the car, a positive and strong feeling rekindles the light of freedom inside her. In Byron Bay, Sarah feels free to be herself, accepted in her entirety. “People there are like me, they have the same values,” she says. Adopting the hippy culture last year, Sarah sees more than a simple trend in this youth movement born in the United States in the early 1960s: she strongly believes in the fundamental ethos of the culture, such as being in harmony with nature and living within a community. When asked what makes her feel like a hippie, her answer is both thoughtful and mischievous. “I’m a flag with a thousand colours flying in the sky and I want people to know my story. The rainbow colours represent my personality – bright and bubbly,” she says. While she talks, she raises her gaze to the end of the terrace. A multi-coloured flag, proudly hung on the top of her garden gate, is waving in the breeze. Her story is a lesson of self-acceptance; it is about the journey travelled to become the person she really wants to be despite the obstacles. And the flag is there to remind her every day how far she has come.

Ph: 5477 7192 Monday to Friday 7:30am – 4:30pm


BOOKS & BLOGS

FRESH

INSPIRATION WORDS CLAIRE PLUSH

Autumn has arrived, and with it, a fresh pile of new releases, perfect for lining the shelves and coffee tables before the cold (or should we say, less warm) weather hits. Happy reading!

PATISSERIE Melanie Dupuis | Hardie Grant | $60 This is not your average cookbook, but a musthave kitchen bible for anyone wanting to master the art of French patisserie. A whopping 100 recipes, photographs and illustrations jump from the pages of Patisserie, inspiring Francophiles and pastry-chef wannabes to create iconic boulangerie sweets without leaving the house – think croissants, eclairs and macarons. Tres bien! HUMANS OF NEW YORK: STORIES

TO WIN A COPY OF PERFECT IMPERFECT GO TO THE WIN PAGE AT SALTMAGAZINE.COM.AU

Brandon Stanton | Macmillan Australia | $39.99 It’s not as fresh from the printers as the others, but this hardcover gem is worthy of a front and centre position on the coffee table. From blog to best-selling book, and now a second book, photographer Brandon Stanton shares an intimate side of strangers through his natural portraits and the accompanying tales he discovers while interviewing them. It’ll make you see people in a completely new light.

FALLINGWATER Lynda S. Waggoner | Hardie Grant | $79.95 Architecture aficionados will know instantly what Fallingwater is about without another word from us. But for everyone else, this book is an exquisite exploration into the renowned masterpiece of arguably one the world’s most influential architects, Frank Lloyd Wright. Built over a waterfall in Pennsylvania, Fallingwater is an incredibly elegant residence, completely deserving of its own book.

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PERFECT IMPERFECT Karen McCartney, Sharyn Cairns and Glen Proebstel | Murdoch Books | $60 Karen McCartney can do no wrong, and Perfect Imperfect is proof that there’s always room for another feather in her cap. Based on the Japanese philosophy of wabi-sabi, this pageturner is packed with #interiorporn and advocates for the beauty of the imperfect and the authentic. Add to that, thoughtful prose and stunning images by two of the country’s best photographers, Sharyn Cairns and Glen Proebstel, and it’s clear this one is a winner!

BLOG ROLL — THINGS WE LOVE BLOGS TO BOOKMARK HEY MAMA One for the mamas searching for style, career and parenting inspiration. heymama.co INTERIOR ADDICT An Australian mainstay on the interiors’ blog scene. theinteriorsaddict.com LET’S GO SOMEWHERE Our fave new Australian travel blog, brimming with weekend getaway ideas. letsgosomewhere.com.au CAPTAIN AND THE GYPSY KID A real-life definition of the elusive term “bohemian luxe”. captainandthegypsykid.com The books were recommended by Rosetta Books, 30 Maple Street, Maleny, 5435 2134. The blogs were selected by salt HQ.

TINY HOUSES IN THE CITY Mimi Zeiger | Hardie Grant | $59.95 We might not live in a city, but that doesn’t mean we can’t soak up the inspiration found in this contemporary hardcover. Bursting with ingenious ideas and impressive workings of space, if building a small residence or holiday house is on the agenda, you’d best check out these prime examples of compact living done oh-so-right.


A DOSE OF SALT

BETWIXT AND BETWEEN WORDS JANE FYNES-CLINTON ILLUSTRATION AMY BORRELL

ANCIENT WISDOM IS BACK. Have you noticed that? Despite, and perhaps because of, our lives zooming at the speed of a supersonic newish millennium, we seek wisdom from another time, hanker after what we seem to think was a more respectful space. From the dust and debris of ancient Rome and China come breakthrough knowing and actions. And we feel all groovy and fresh when we embrace these old treasures. It is as if we are not reinventing the wheel, but are noticing the seamless way it turns for the first time. The difficult simplicity of mindfulness that finds its roots in meditation practices of the primeval East has become de rigeur. We are learning to slow down, to hasten slowly, to be because we have forgotten how – even though it was as natural to our predecessors as breathing. 38

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BUT AS SOME RAGAMUFFIN NOTED, IT CAN ALSO BE HELL IN THE HALLWAY.

In the same vein, ancient grains such as quinoa are all the rage for the healthy and the cool, even though those colourfully dressed cool cats in Inca times were chowing down on it. There is cacao, which was perfectly complete for at least 2000 years until humans’ hopeless addiction to sugar got involved and got the world hooked on cacao’s evil cousin, chocolate. Now, it is back in a big way. We can wash it down with Kombucha, a Chinese fermented drink as old as Confucius, which is also the latest natural cancer fighter and preventative. Everything old is new again. And so it is with ancient words. Hipsters look to Sanskrit and that glorious-sounding and wise-meaning extinct language Latin for profundity and deeper purpose with which to ink their flesh. “Fortunam iuuare” means fortune favours the brave; “alls grave nil” is nothing is heavy to those with wings and my favourite “dum spiro spero” in modern English means while I breathe, I hope. Those in Ancient Rome would be surprised at these phrases’ fresh flush of popularity on human hide. Latin was a deep and romantic language, with the Latin words of philosophers, political leaders and scholars such as Cicero, Constantine the Great and Marcus Aurelius echoing across the dusty passages of time. A word that I came across that gave me a hook to hold onto in a recent challenging time in my life was “limens”. It is Latin for “threshold” and I think it is used most beautifully in the phrase “liminal space”.

The liminal space is the in between. It is the doorway, the stoop a person steps over to move from one place to another. It is the space where you are no longer what you were, but not yet what you will become. It is an inalienable truth that when one door closes, another one opens. But as some ragamuffin noted, it can also be hell in the hallway. And that hallway is where liminality lives. But even though it is hard to see it in the middle of a transition, particularly a big one, the hallway itself can sometimes be an interesting place to be. There are decorative items there. Works of art adorn walls. Occasional tables feature knick-knacks and mementoes. There is rarely one exit point from any hallway. While there is always relief when we reach a new destination, when we can finally exhale and feel comfortable with newness and appreciate how far we have come, the journey there can be wonderful too. The author of Peter Pan, J.M. Barrie, touched on liminal spaces when his mischievous, spirited fairy Tinkerbell says: “You know that place between sleep and awake, that place where you still remember dreaming? That’s where I’ll always love you, Peter Pan. That’s where I’ll be waiting.” Old notions, ancient words and historical practices can harbour aching, nourishing beauty. And in modern, uncertain times, we should always help ourselves to several helpings of that soul food. To see more illustrations by Amy Borrell visit amyborrell.com

Modern Australian Share Plates

Craft Beers Boutique Wines Cocktails

Open 7 days 12noon till 9pm and beyond

/FluxLounge /FluxRestaurantLounge

3/255 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville

Bookings P 07 5455 6540

www.fluxlounge.com.au saltmagazine . com . au

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TABLE TALK

THE PLAYFUL CHEF WORDS LUCY EMLYN-JONES PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

Smoked granite belt venison with celeriac puree, carrot spheres, potato fondant, grilled asparagus with merlot jus and truffle smoke 40

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SOME SPOTS IN the world have a heartbeat. From the red scrub soils of the vineyard slopes to the grassy grazing pastures, at Flame Hill you can feel the strong and steady da dum, da dum. Life ticks along this morning like every other: a chicken warbles in the distance, guinea fowl mosey through the vines and the estate’s watchdog ‘Wild Bill’ pokes his head around the corner, making sure all is in order. Head chef Adam Lugg overlooks rows of ripening reds, his heart having settled into the relaxed rhythm of the Montville vineyard and restaurant. Lunch service is not long away, but you would not know it. There are no orders being barked, pots clanging or anxious waits for supplies. The estate is at ease. “Working here, it’s almost peaceful,” Adam says. “I’ve had jobs where you start at 8-9 in the morning and it is go, go, go straight away and all day. Now I come to work and tend to the chickens, check the grapes and water the garden – we’ve got loganberries, silverbeet, golden zucchinis, beans, capsicums, eggplant. We’re working on making it even bigger with more variety. A lot will be second generation, using seeds kept and replanting them. You see, I’m in touch with the food.” Owner Tony Thompson’s passion for the land and all it has to offer is tangible, felt in the ground in which the Flame Hill wines grow and the breeze that blows through the restaurant, carrying a hint of the coast. Several years have been spent creating a considered and ecologically conscious site with 20 hectares boasting a working vineyard, cattle station, orchid, market garden and even accommodation for those who wish to linger. “Tony’s hands on with everything,” Adam says. “He was out there picking grapes the other day and once a year, at the end of harvest, hosts Stomp – a big festival where we put out these receptacles filled with grapes and people go in barefoot and stomp on them, like they used to.” Together, owner and head chef forge a path that leads to Sunshine Coast sustainability at its finest with everything in reach to inspire a homegrown, handpicked menu with a touch of European pizzazz. “As a chef you work with what you have,” Adam says. “I love being able to cook everything fresh, straight from the farm. I use the wine for little touches that help pair it with the meal. We’ve got a moscato called Wild Child and I use it to make a granita for one of the desserts. >

AS UNIQUE

as you are. Released from the rough, carefully shaped, and polished to perfection.It's rare, it's precious and utterly unique. There will never be another one like it. We know that what we do is something very special because there is nothing quite like the moment when an opal captures your heart.

See the full collection in-store or online . 11 Ballantyne Ct, Glenview QLD 4553 (07) 5494 5400

opalsdownunder.com.au

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Cherry ripe, warm chocolate tart injected with cherry puree, freeze dried cherries, chocolate popping candy, glace cherries and coconut snow

IT’S PLAYING, STARTING WITH A KEY OR CORE INGREDIENT AND BUILDING AROUND IT TO CREATE COMPLEMENTING FLAVOURS AND DIFFERENT TEXTURES.

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the head chef. It was in his best interest to show me as much as possible, and it was all made from scratch – breads, sauces, everything.” Underpinning every element on the Flame Hill menu is the same heartfelt, hands-on approach that helped the bright-eyed apprentice find his footing in the culinary world. Adam relishes the abundance of local produce available to complement those that have been picked, butchered or baked in-house. They include cheese from Woombye, spanner crab caught on the Fraser Coast, mushrooms from the grounds of Palmwoods and chorizo crafted in Noosa. The restaurant serves up a Sunshine Coast smorgasbord. “When I had my own restaurant in London, I would get invoices from the fruit and veg supplier that would have to tell you which country the produce came from,” he says. “But the Sunshine Coast has some amazing produce, and there is not a lot you can’t get from the area. “We have a dish called Taste of the Sea which features year round. It is little pieces of pan-seared Harvey Bay scallops, Fraser Coast spanner crab and tempura Mooloolaba prawns. The first two or three bites of something you eat are the best and then after that your palate gets used to it and it gets a bit boring. I think food should be an experience. Life’s too short to eat bad food.” And life is certainly too short to eat alone, with the act of cooking for loved ones and sharing a meal a simple pleasure in life, and one you might think loses its shine for one who works in the kitchen as his bread and butter. But for Adam, the desire to hear butter sizzle in a pan, smell pork belly slowly cooking or adding the final flourish to a dish is not something that switches off the moment he hangs the apron up for the night. “It’s playing, starting with a key or core ingredient and building around it to create complementing flavours and different textures.” As an eight-year-old kneading dough with his mother to make scones and a 13-year-old elbow deep in dirty dish water, it would seem Adam has been playing with his food, so to speak, all his life. “I never wanted to be anything but a chef,” he says. “I grew up in the south coast of New South Wales in a small town called Ulladulla. I got a job as a kitchen hand and would ride my bike to work after school. “They could see I was keen and threw me straight in. By the time I was 14 I was making entrees and desserts. It was a small kitchen, and when I was doing my apprenticeship it was just myself and

“One of my friends had a party recently and I went and gave them a four-course meal,” he says. “I cook at home on my days off. The kids are almost two and four and I will get the oldest one to help season the lamb; he loves using the salt and pepper. We’ve made things like sausage rolls and he just loves getting his hands in there and getting dirty.” It is a family trait, it would seem. “I just love food,” Adam says. “It is quite a unique job in that it’s physically and mentally draining, but I can’t see myself doing anything else.” 249 Western Avenue, Montville. 5478 5920 or flamehill.com.au

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NOSH NEWS

Vanilla Food specialises in providing a 100 per cent organic breakfast, lunch and take-away menu featuring healthy meals, many of which include raw options. Also featuring Nilla Tomkins’ raw cakes, VANILLA FOOD is also available for catering, bulk take-away and wholesale. Belmondos Organic Market, 59 Rene Street, Noosaville. 5474 4404 or belmondos.com.au

nosh news

Dining has never played a bigger part in our lives, so here salt shares news, information and products that enhance our passionate consumption.

Visit France every month with THE LOOSE GOOSE and French expert Mimie Pichenot. A culinary Tour de France, this is less French cooking class and more a region-inspired dinner to be shared. Learn the cultures, historical and food highlights from a local’s point of view. $65 per person for three courses, including presentation and a booklet about the region to take home. Mangez bien! 3/175 Ocean Drive, Twin Waters. 5457 0887 or theloosegoose.com.au 44

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Spoil yourself with ELEMENTS AT MONTVILLE’S vintage high tea: decadent treats from buttermilk scones to meltin-your-mouth finger sandwiches and petits fours to die for, everything is fresh, homemade and exquisitely presented. Or indulge with a High Tea & Beauty Package, including blissful 45-minute beauty treatment and sumptuous high tea with filter coffee or loose-leaf tea. Gluten-free options available. Bookings essential. Open Wednesday to Monday. 38 Kondalilla Falls Road, Montville. 5478 6212 or elementsmontville.com.au


French-trained chef Daniel Jarrett returns to SPICERS TAMARIND as executive chef, bringing with him the experience of a career spanning more than 18 years. His passion for food combined with outstanding ability has seen him receive a number of awards, including two Chef Hats in 2014/2015. The modern Asian and Thai-inspired Tamarind restaurant reflects Daniel’s creative passion in each dish along with the relaxed style of luxury Spicers is renowned for. 88 Obi Lane South, Maleny. 1300 311 429 or spicersretreats.com

SIROCCO NOOSA’S lunch special has returned Tuesday to Saturday with a choice of two courses including a glass of white, red or sparkling wine, soft drink or juice at just $28 per person. Available Tuesday to Saturday from noon – 2.30pm, the lunch special is a great excuse to enjoy a beautiful meal overlooking the Noosa River. 2/257 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville. 5455 6688 or sirocconoosa.com.au

Interested in becoming a professional barista or perhaps just learning how to make first-class coffee with your machine at home? Noosa coffee roastery CLANDESTINO ROASTERS’ artisan baristas can share their craft with you. Master the art of making a great coffee, learn the techniques of a great espresso and get creative with latte art in training exclusively on Hastings Street, in one of the street’s busiest cafes Cafe Le Monde. clandestino.com.au

Snacking on healthy raw and activated grain-free crackers and biscuits has got a lot easier thanks to Noosa producer NIC’S BICS. Nic makes 100 per cent organic grain-free biscuits in both sweet and savoury flavours. We are loving the cashew, carrot and kale biscuits and the kale and chia crispies. And if you’re after something sweet there is nothing better than the vanilla almond incredibles! Available at Bio Shop Noosa in Belmondos Organic Market. bioshopnoosa.com

DINE IN & TAKE AWAY

07 5494 4411 2/466 MALENY-KENILWORTH RD, WITTA Q 4552 WWW.MAUDYS.COM.AU

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CULINARY CREATIONS

TIP

CULINARY CREATIONS

A STORE-BOUGHT CURRY PASTE WILL SUFFICE, BUT THE PURISTS CAN FIND A GREAT RED CURRY RECIPE IN THE BEST OF SPIRIT HOUSE COOKBOOK.

CHEF TOM SWAPP PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS RESTAURANT SPIRIT HOUSE RESTAURANT

Ingredients: BARBECUED MORETON BAY BUGS WITH RED CURRY BUTTER AND PINEAPPLE AND CUCUMBER SALAD Serves 4 Preparation 30 mins Cook 10 mins

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Moreton Bay bugs 4 green Moreton Bay bugs, halved and deveined 60g butter, room temperature 2 tbsp red curry paste (see hot tip) 2 tbsp finely chopped coriander leaves 1/ 2 tbsp light palm sugar 1/ 2 tbsp fish sauce Zest of 1/2 a lime 

Pineapple and cucumber salad 1/ 2 small pineapple, peeled, cored, sliced 1/ 2 continental cucumber, peeled and sliced 1 small knob of ginger, peeled and finely sliced 1 stick of lemongrass 4 kaffir lime leaves, finely sliced 1/ 2 cup of Thai basil leaves 3 green onions, thinly sliced 1 long green chilli, deseeded, sliced

Dressing 2 tbsp lime juice 2 tbsp sugar 1 tbsp fish sauce


Met hod

Preheat a barbecue or char-grill to high. In a small bowl, mix red curry paste, butter, palm sugar, fish sauce, coriander and lime zest until smooth. Mix dressing ingredients together in a separate bowl. In a salad bowl, assemble the salad ingredients, but don’t add your dressing until ready to serve. Brush bugs with butter mixture and barbecue for 3-5 mins on each side or until golden and fragrant. Serve bugs with salad and extra lime cheeks.  PHILOSOPHY To provide a positive work environment, to showcase modern Thai cuisine using local produce wherever possible, and to help put the Sunshine Coast on the map as a major food destination. WINE TO MATCH Castagna grower’s selection Harlequin 2013. Serve at 1012°C to release all its aromas. Available at Spirit House Restaurant and Cooking School, 20 Ninderry Road, Yandina. 5446 8977 or spirithouse.com.au FOR EXTRA SALT visit saltmagazine.com.au for a sea salt and pistachio chocolate fudge recipe.


PRODUCE PEOPLE

RAW, LIVE,

delicious WORDS JANE FYNES-CLINTON PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN

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THE LACK OF tooth-aching, saliva-inducing sweetness is surprising. Sugar is derived from it, certainly, but sugarcane’s reputation has been unfairly besmirched in a case of the processed, corrupted creation destroying the reputation of the pure creator. It would be like people thinking bananas must be unhealthy because they saw the kilojoule count of a banana cream pie. As it turns out, sugarcane juice is a sublime combination of being wonderfully refreshing in a warm climate and extraordinarily healthgiving. Those in the know say its health properties are on a par with wheatgrass shots and that raw sugarcane juice heals, restores and prevents a broad range of conditions. Cane was a familiar sight in the Sunshine Coast landscape for generations when the sugar mill was in full flight more than 10 years ago, but even then few people considered cane as anything other than sugar dressed up in a bamboo disguise. It took a grand adventure far from the Sunny Coast for locals and visitors here to be exposed to the wondrous, health-giving, tasty drink that sits hiding within the woody stalks. That adventure was taken hand-in-hand, as chefs Pete and Claire Harvison, from Cootharaba, left their kitchens, looped around the world and ended up in colourful, lively market stalls on the Sunshine Coast. The business venture evolved from a vision shared after the couple had a couple of years cheffing in Edinburgh and London, and then traversing more than 25 nations. It was somewhere along the dusty, textured way that they noted the sugarcane juice being sold from roadside stands – as it is in tropical climates like those in Egypt, Columbia, Thailand, Cuba and Brazil – and realised Sunshine Coasters were being robbed of something that was good as well as delicious, even though it was sitting right in their agricultural lap. The chefs, now 35, who have worked in kitchens as esteemed as the Sheraton and Berardos, then started bringing it to the Sunshine

Coast, juggling conventional jobs with weekend markets until the business grew so big after six years – 18 months ago – that it commanded all of their attention. They now sell their luscious juice, made to order, at three of the coast’s biggest markets, including the iconic Original Eumundi Markets on Saturdays and Wednesdays. Sugarcane juice contains only about nine per cent total sugar content, all of which is raw and unrefined. It has less sugar than orange juice and is not as sweet as strawberries. The rest of the juice >

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GROWING EVIDENCE • Sugarcane juice has no simple sugars. Diabetics can enjoy it too • It lowers body cholesterol – both LDL and triglycerides • In Asian nations, it is used as a salve for acne because it is a good source of alpha hydroxy acids like glycolic acid, which helps to increase cell turnover • It’s good for the digestive system, helping ease constipation because of its high potassium content • An Australian study also showed that it stabilises blood sugar levels and promoted weight loss in obese rats • Sugarcane juice is extremely high in a mix of compounds called polyphenols, which slow the absorption of sugars into the blood but are lost in the process of making refined sugar

is water loaded with vitamins and minerals. The list is extensive: calcium, chromium, cobalt, copper, magnesium, manganese, phosphorous, potassium, zinc, iron and vitamins A, C, B1, B2, B3, B5 and B6. “It also is an isotonic, and we get a lot of cyclists and triathletes who use it pre and post-workout,” Pete says. “The juice is fresh and local, nothing is artificial, so in that way it is really good on the conscience.” Claire says key to the couple’s business success has been a Yandina cane farmer and supplier, who cuts their cane by hand and to their order. “Our providers are divine. They always accommodate us, always go out of their way to make sure we have enough,” she says. “And that commitment is matched by regulars who use our juice as part of their diet and routine. Having said that, we get people who find us at the markets every time they come up on holidays – even if that is once a year.” 50

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The couple is proud of their unique crushing, juicing device – a contraption made at a Cambodian munitions factory. Their dream of delivering sugarcane juice to a thirsty, needy Sunshine Coast was almost crushed before it began, when the first machine they ordered online never arrived, costing them time and $5000. But they persevered, including trying a Brazilian-made hand press, and have now sourced custom-built stainless steel machines that are efficient and reliable for their needs. The raw cane is collected and cleaned the day before market days. The pieces are cut to length with a cane knife as the drinks are ordered and cold pressed in front of the customer. The most popular of the juice combinations is sugarcane juice with lime and ginger. Pete and Claire also sell a grantita – made fresh in the pre-dawn each market day – that includes passionfruit, lemon and mint, or strawberry, lemon and mint. “People are so much more aware of superfoods, whole foods, and the importance of eating live foods,” Pete says. “It feels good to


be able to offer people something they can’t make themselves – crushing cane is a tough ask without special equipment – but that is so good for them and tastes so good.” The way the elements within the juice are ordered means that the juice is alkaline-forming food, and science has shown that cancer cannot live in an alkaline environment. The antioxidants in sugarcane juice also fight viral and bacterial infections, boost the immune system, and also protect against diseases of the liver. Sugarcane juice also improves kidney function by clearing

the urinary flow and is believed in ancient cultures to be a good treatment for fevers, as it boosts the body’s protein levels. For something linked so intrinsically with sweetness, healthy has never tasted so good. Noosa Cane Juice is available at local markets including Eumundi Markets on Wednesdays and Saturdays or contact Noosa Cane Juice on Facebook (Noosa-Cane-Juice) and Instagram (@noosa_cane_juice)

Hands up if you love the freshest local seafood & modern Australian cuisine. Enjoy modern Australian cuisine in a unique waterfront venue with a fantastic atmosphere and magnificent water views.

SEE RESTAURANT

See Restaurant is located at the famous Mooloolaba Wharf, and is perfect for special occasions, group dinners, romantic dinners or wedding receptions. Enjoy great food, exceptional wine, a world class marina atmosphere and fantastic staff and service.

123 Parkyn Parade “The Wharf” Mooloolaba

www.seerestaurant.com.au

Open Tuesday to Saturday from 10:00am till late and Sunday Lunch only

Call us today on (07) 5444 5044 to confirm your booking. GMA_SR250515

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RELAXED RECIPES

NO COOKING REQUIRED WORDS SALLY TRUDE PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

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Take a break from the oven and the stove. So simple, so quick and easy, these treats are sure-fire pleasers.

CHILLED CUCUMBER, BASIL AND MINT SOUP Serves: 4 Prep time: 30 min

Ingredients:

Met hod

1 cup sour cream 1/ 2 cup basil 1/ 2 cup mint 1/ 4 cup sliced shallots 1 cup water 1 continental cucumber, chopped 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice 1/ 2 tsp Tabasco sauce

Puree sour cream, basil, mint, shallots and water in a blender. Add cucumber. Pulse until just combined but still slightly chunky. Stir in lemon juice and Tabasco sauce, and season with salt. Chill soup at least 3 hours. Top each serving with thin cucumber slices. >

BIOSHOP NOOSA

YOUR EVERY DAY ORGANIC GROCER Fresh fruit and veggies to dairy products and every day grocery lines, Bioshop Noosa is your every day organic grocer providing the freshest quality prices wholesale and direct to the public.

59 RENE STREET, NOOSAVILLE (Located inside Belmondos)

BioShopNoosa

WWW.BIOSHOPNOOSA.COM 0400 424 928

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WHITE CHEDDAR-CHIVE PIMIENTO CHEESE Serves: 4 Prep time: 30 min

Ingredients:

Met hod

340g sharp cheddar cheese 1/ 3 cup plus 2 tbsp mayonnaise 113g diced pimiento, drained and rinsed 1/ 3 cup thinly sliced fresh chives 1 tbsp Dijon mustard 1/ 2 tsp Worcestershire sauce 1/ 2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Grate half of the cheese using the large holes of a box grater. Grate remaining half of cheese using the small holes of the box grater. Stir together mayonnaise and remaining ingredients. Stir in cheddar cheese until well blended. Let stand for 15 minutes. Serve immediately with crackers or cover and chill up to three days.

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APRICOT-BASIL CHICKEN SALAD Serves: 4 Prep time: 30 min

Ingredients:

Met hod

cup mayonnaise cup low-fat Greek yoghurt 1 garlic clove, minced 1/ 2 tsp paprika 5 tsp white wine vinegar 3 cups shredded cooked chicken 1/ 4 cup blanched slivered almonds, toasted 1/ 2 medium white onion, minced (1/2 cup) 1 large celery stalk, diced small (1/2 cup), plus leaves 1/ 3 cup dried apricots, diced small 1/ 3 cup packed fresh basil leaves, torn Salt and pepper

In a large bowl, whisk together mayonnaise, yoghurt, garlic, paprika and vinegar. Stir in chicken, almonds, onion, celery, apricots, and basil.

1/ 3 1/ 2

Season with salt and pepper.

>

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TURKEY WRAPS Serves: 4 Prep time: 20 min

Ingredients:

Met hod

cup sour cream 2-3 chopped pickled chillies 2 tbsp fresh lime juice Salt and ground pepper 4 sandwich wraps 3 cups baby spinach 3 cups shredded turkey 1 tin drained and rinsed black beans 1 large tomato, thinly sliced 1 small red onion 1 avocado, thinly sliced

In a bowl whisk together the sour cream, chillies and lime juice, season with salt and pepper.

3/ 4

Spread the sandwich wraps with sour cream sauce, leaving a 5cm border. In centre of wraps, layer equal amounts of baby spinach, shredded turkey, black beans, tomato, onion and avocado. For each wrap fold two sides of wrap over filling, then roll tightly, ending seam side down.

FOR EXTRA SALT visit saltmagazine.com.au for our creamy chocolate mousse recipe. 56

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For tickets and full program, visit the website

noosafoodwinefestival.com.au

­ ŧ

noosafoodandwine

¬ noosafood_wine


PADDOCK TO PLATE

CARVING OUT A NICHE WORDS AARON WYNNE PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

Coal roasted duck, smoked yoghurt, cranberry hibiscus, wattle seed 58

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Christine and Chris

LIKE SO MANY REAL and wholesome things in life, the relationship started organically. A chat at a market, a visit to a farm – and the results are as plain as the beautiful cuisine placed elegantly on a pristine plate.

“Cameron came along one morning and said ‘ah everyone is telling me that I should come and see you’ so we just started having a chat,” Christine says. “The next week he came out to the farm with his sous chef at the time, Chris Hagan, and they just wandered around and they picked and they ate and that’s where it all started.”

Synergy and a common purpose drew the Spicers Clovelly Estate’s restaurant The Long Apron in Montville and The Falls Farm in Mapleton together. For both parties, it had to be organic, seasonal and, more often than not, a little hard to find.

Christine says it’s important that both parties benefit from a paddock to plate relationship like this and it takes time to build an understanding and to know exactly what everyone needs to make the farmer/chef relationship work.

The Falls Farm manager Christine Ballinger says their relationship with The Long Apron and executive chef Cameron Matthews began somewhat serendipitously at the Montville Markets.

“I always say to them ‘we are learning’ and they need to give us feedback and we need to give them feedback as we go,” Christine says. >

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Chris Hagan

THESE SMALL, HARD-TO-FIND INGREDIENTS MAKE FOR SPECIAL DISHES THAT CAN’T BE REPLICATED AT HOME.

Cameron says the only way he can give his guests the unique experience he is aiming for is by working directly with growers like The Falls Farm. “It’s important for us at The Long Apron to work with boutique growers because we want to provide our guests with a ‘boutique’ experience,” Cameron says. “These small, hard-to-find ingredients make for special dishes that can’t be replicated at home. It’s important to us to create that unique dining experience.” It’s this growing demand for more unique and obscure produce that led The Falls Farm to experiment with growing Cranberry Hibiscus, which has already become a firm favourite in The Long Apron kitchen. “We had a chef come out to the farm and say that they had had this Cranberry Hibiscus leaf at a dinner in Sydney and basically asked us 60

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if we could grow it,” Christine says. “From there I tracked it down online, found a plant and that’s when it all started.” Christine says when you are working with produce for the very first time there is a lot of experimenting that needs to happen. But she and her team rise to a challenge and the results have made their efforts worthwhile. “It’s interesting because in the hibiscus family there are a lot of varieties that are edible,” Christine says. “For example okra and rosella are both a hibiscus, so you can start to look at other members of the family and see if there is potential in that. That really interests me.” While Cameron and his team, including second-in-charge chef Chris Hagan, don’t have the challenge of growing, they do have the difficult task of designing a menu that showcases ever-changing


seasonal and sometimes very obscure produce – some of which diners are tasting for the very first time. “It certainly can be difficult using seasonal produce at times, but when we write our menus we try to make it so we can swap ingredients in and out as seasons come and go,” Cameron says. “We see a lot of applications that we can use the cranberry hibiscus in with everything from savoury to sweet.” Christine says what chefs like Cameron are doing with ingredients like the cranberry hibiscus and other obscure produce is something the region should be very proud of. “The sort of produce these chefs are using and how they are using it is incredibly creative,” Christine says. “As a grower, I love that creative side of using really high quality produce to enable them to create a really beautiful plate.” As both farmers and chefs continue to play a more hands-on role in shaping the paddock to plate journey, diners are encouraged to ask where their food comes from and how it is produced. “Guests are very interested in where their food is sourced,” Cameron says. “They generally love the fact that they can know the name of who grew what they are eating and to us as chefs that’s important because the producers are the real heroes of the restaurant.” Christine says education plays a major role in re-forming the link between paddock and plate and restaurants like The Long Apron are playing a major role in that.

really critical to the health of what is on your plate, which then directly impacts your own health.”

“We are so estranged from what is on our plate and where it comes from,” Christine says. “The health of the growing environment is

38-68 Balmoral Road, Montville. 1300 252 380 or spicersretreats.com/spicers-clovelly-estate


SALT CELLAR

racyriesling WORDS TYSON STELZER

THE GREAT WHITE GRAPE of Germany may not share the popularity of sauvignon blanc or chardonnay, but riesling is performing better than ever in the heights of South Australia’s Clare and Eden Valleys. If you thought the zesty white wines from the riesling grape were sweet and old fashioned, it’s time to rediscover Australian riesling. The dry rieslings of the Eden and Clare Valleys are unique in the wine world, where riesling typically carries some sweetness. Cooler regions like Tasmania, France’s Alsace or Germany’s Mosel have more to benefit from sweetness in tempering their austerity. “Dry riesling is the Clare’s contribution to the world of riesling,” says guru riesling maker Jeffrey Grosset. Riesling rejoices in cool nights to sustain its signature vivacity, infusing an acid line that charges fresh vitality in its youth and enduring longevity in the cellar. Both the Clare and Eden Valleys are thrust into the heavens by the Mount Lofty Ranges, and its altitudes of up to 600m above sea level that explain why zesty rieslings can hail from as far north as the Clare, and from Eden, the neighbour of the warm Barossa Valley. The Clare is just a 45 minute drive north-east of Eden. The days are slightly warmer in the Clare, which is a little more sheltered from the moderating influence of the ocean. This explains the slightly more extroverted personality of Clare’s floral aromas and lemon and lime flavours, becoming tropical fruits in warmer seasons. As climate change tightens its grip on south-eastern Australia, the advantage of altitude in these regions is becoming ever more pronounced. In 2015, the Barossa harvested its earliest vintage in living memory. In the Clare, Grosset harvested his 35th vintage in 2015 and picked his riesling 35 days earlier than usual. Such early harvest dates mean that riesling is ripening in summer rather than autumn, exacerbating the importance of cool, high sites for creating elegant and long-lived wines. This also heightens the pressure for winemakers. “For growers who didn’t get on to picking in haste, the wines are broad and ripe,” suggests Grosset. 2015 certainly exemplifies the full sweep of diversity of ripeness across the Clare and Eden Valleys. Riesling was once the most planted white variety in the country, and its leading brand a decade ago was Jacob’s Creek, selling 3.2 million bottles a year. Now it sells less than 1.9 million. “It’s fair to say that it’s always had a bit of a struggle for identity with mass consumers, compared to some of the other sexy grape varieties that come along, like chardonnay and, more recently, sauvignon blanc, and now pinot grigio,” says former Jacob’s Creek Chief Winemaker Bernard Hickin. But even this is turning around and Jacob’s Creek Riesling 2015 was released early in response to strong demand. The more I speak with riesling makers and retailers, the more encouraged I am about the popularity of this noble white grape, particularly at the premium end of the market, where the Clare Valley leads the market, with the Eden Valley in a distant second position. “People laugh about the supposed ’90s riesling revival that never happened,” says Dan Murphy’s wine panel coordinator Tony Titheridge. “And I disagree with them, and I say, ‘Instead of this two-year revival you 62

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1 BEST OF THE BUNCH

1 ORLANDO ST HELGA EDEN VALLEY RIESLING 2015, $20 A beautifully precise and pure Eden Valley riesling, and a standout for value and longevity in this vintage. Exact lemon blossom, lime and green apple fruit of impeccable definition is gorgeous now and has the stamina to age.

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2 HEGGIES EDEN VALLEY RIESLING 2015, $24 A delightfully fragrant and pure vintage for Heggies, upholding kaffir lime spice, granny smith apple, pepper and lime blossom perfume, presenting excellent fruit concentration, an exacting expression of an outstanding season. 3 PEWSEY VALE EDEN VALLEY RIESLING 2015, $25 An enticingly fragrant and pure Pewsey Vale that captures an exceptional vintage in delightful lemon blossom perfume and signature lime and granny smith apple flavour. A vintage of precise fruit expression and concentration framed in enduring acidity.

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4 PETER LEHMANN WIGAN EDEN VALLEY RIESLING 2010, $32 Radiating an incredibly vibrant straw green for its age, this mature release confidently upholds a finely balanced tension between presence and structure. A core of electric lemon and lime fruit is slowly morphing into the toast, butter and wild honey of middle age. 5 HENSCHKE JULIUS EDEN VALLEY RIESLING 2015, $33 With a pale straw green hue, this is a style of focused lime and red apple fruit of excellent definition, built around fruit concentration and well-defined structure. It finishes with enduring acid line and outstanding persistence. 6 WINES BY KT PEGLIDIS WATERVALE RIESLING 2015, $35 These 1973 vines capture the body and volume of the 2015 season and do so with exacting, refined precision, finishing very long and honed. A riesling of precision and refinement, it’s incisive, focused and driven by impeccable acid line.

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7 MOUNT HORROCKS CORDON CUT CLARE VALLEY RIESLING 2015, $37 2015 will go down among the greatest and longest-lived Cordon Cuts, a benchmark that achieves complexity and concentration while upholding an exceptional, enduring acid line rarely seen in Australian dessert wines. 8 LEO BURING LEONAY

DW W17 2015, $40 Leonay upholds precision in its spectrum of lemon blossom, lime and granny smith apple fruit that few achieve in Eden in 2015. Classic Eden acid drive keeps it on the rails with exceptional focus and drive, invigorated by slatey mineral mouth feel.

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9 PIKES THE MERLE RIESLING

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Multi-award winning restaurant renowned for its delicious flavours, friendly service and magnificent uninterrupted views of the Noosa River. Open for breakfast, lunch, dinner, tapas, with free WiFi, fully licensed and BYO wine. 257 Gympie Terrace Noosaville • p 5455 6688 • www.sirocconoosa.com.au

2015, $45 Pristine length and line define one of the greatest rieslings that I have ever tasted from Pikes. From a single block of the Pike’s Polish Hill River vineyard, this is a compellingly closed, calm and tightly coiled expression of the 2015 season.

10 GROSSET POLISH HILL

RIESLING 2015, $55 Delicacy, grace and understated character define an exceptionally pure and pristine Polish Hill, whose greatness is declared as much by what it is not as what it is. Green apple, lemon blossom, lime and talc are here, but only if you look for them. Length is undeterred, laser-aligned; sheer stamina and poise – breathtaking.

wanted, it has happened, but it’s happened over 15 years’.” He points out that the popularity of riesling today is such that many Clare and Eden Valley rieslings that are released in the winter or spring of vintage have sold out before the following year’s wine is available, a trend that was not the case in the 1990s. In the ever-ascending calibre of Clare and Eden Valley rieslings, perhaps their most refreshing hallmark of all remains their affordability, long the unsung bargains of Australian wine. This may not always be the case. I recently witnessed a six pack of Jacob’s Creek Steingarten Riesling sell for $900 at an auction in the Barossa. “Riesling is coming back!” cheered Hickin. Stock up now. Tyson Stelzer was named International Wine & Spirit Communicator of the Year 2015 and Australian Wine Communicator of the Year 2015.

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64 KEEPING IT REAL Klarissa and Brenton Campbell happily shared their wedding day with a beautiful little starlet. 70 FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE Jim and Jean Duncan have been together for almost all their lives – and love is the centrepiece. 72 TO HAVE AND TO HOLD Fashionable, must-have products for the loved up. 74 MAGIC MAKER A beautiful vehicle with a remarkable history is a Sunshine Coast celebrity.

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A WEDDING FEATURE WITH

AUTUMN ’16

IMAGE COURTESY OF NATALIJA BRUNOVS, IHEARTWEDDINGS.COM.AU

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KEEPING IT REAL

Shining couple, tiny Star WORDS LINDA READ

Klarissa Onoprienko & Brenton Campbell May 9, 2015

IMAGES COURTESY KATE POWELL KATEYSCAPTURES.COM

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IT’S NOT USUALLY the done thing to upstage a bride on her wedding day. But when little Riley-Rose stole the show at Klarissa and Brenton Campbell’s wedding, the bride could not have been happier. RileyRose is Klarissa and Brenton’s now one-year-old daughter, and at their wedding last May at Noosa Springs Golf and Spa Resort, she was one of the star attractions. “It was a delight to have her there at the wedding,” Klarissa says. “Being six months old at the time, she melted hearts of all the guests, dressed in a yellow and white tutu. She absolutely loved being in all the family photos. She just loved the camera.” Having their gorgeous daughter with them to celebrate their marriage was a special bonus for Klarissa, a pharmacy assistant, and Brenton, a plumber, whose wedding day was everything they had dreamed of and more. Although the couple live in the Wide Bay-Burnett town of Childers, they chose Noosa as their wedding destination after falling in love with the town a couple of years earlier, on their first-ever visit there. With a scrapbook full of ideas, they planned to visit an array of places in the region that might be suitable. But when they saw the serene tropical splendour of Noosa Springs, they looked no further. “Noosa Springs was the first place on my list of venues, and as we were going down the entrance, we said ‘yes, this is definitely the place’. We got goose bumps as soon as we arrived. It was perfect,” Klarissa says. “We couldn’t have chosen a better venue for our wedding day.” Klarissa describes the theme of the wedding as “fresh, vibrant, modern, yellow”. “Yellow’s my favourite colour and I thought it would pop out against the green of the golf course,” she says. “I wanted something bright – and you don’t see yellow too often.” >

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WEDDING DAY ROLL CALL RECEPTION & CATERING Noosa Springs Resort, Links Drive, Noosa Heads. 5440 3355 or noosasprings.com.au DRESS Odyssey odysseyformalwear.com.au FLORIST First Class Functions firstclassfunctions.com.au CAKE The Gifted Spatula facebook.com/thegiftedspatula. childers HAIR MD Brides mdbrides.com.au CELEBRANT The Sunny Celebrant – Natalie Skye thesunnycelebrant.com.au EVENT STYLIST First Class Functions firstclassfunctions.com.au

PLAYLISTS FIRST DANCE I Won’t Give Up – Jason Mraz RECEPTION Moove It Djs 68

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WEDDINGS I HENS I BUCKS Ceremony I Reception I Accommodation Golf I Spa

.....All in the one location For more information contact Events Manager P: 07 5440 3333 E: weddings@noosasprings.com.au

The idyllic setting is a fitting backdrop for this couple’s storybook tale of love that began at their local high school in their home town of Childers. But it was when they joined the local touch football team that love really blossomed. “We share similar interests, family values and common life goals,” says Klarissa. “And we love laughing and spending time together.” In keeping with all things picture-perfect, Brenton planned a proposal that Klarissa simply couldn’t refuse. And because he >

w w w. n o o s a s p r i n g s . c o m . a u Links Drive, Noosa Heads, QLD 4567 P: (07) 5440 3333 I E: info@noosasprings.com.au


ABOUT THE VENUE Bordering the iconic Noosa National Park and Lake Weyba, Noosa Springs Golf and Spa Resort is set on 103 hectares of natural beauty. The resort offers a complete wedding destination at the one location, with award-winning dining, accommodation, and spa facilities. Spectacular photographic locations are plentiful on the immaculately maintained golf course, with golf carts provided for the bridal party’s on-course photos. There is a range of indoor and outdoor venues to choose from at the resort, catering for small, boutique weddings or large multi-venue celebrations. Spa hens parties and golfing bucks parties are available. A personal wedding consultant is provided for every wedding, and the resort guarantees that there will only be one wedding hosted per day. noosasprings.com.au

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has always made a habit of being extremely romantic, Klarissa wasn’t the least bit suspicious. “Everyone was expecting it but me,” Klarissa says. “He had taken me to South Bank in Brisbane as a birthday weekend away, and surprised me with a hot air balloon ride followed by breakfast and champagne at O’Reilly’s Vineyard, Canungra Valley. I thought ‘this is just the usual weekend away’, so I didn’t think anything of it. But he didn’t propose during the hot air balloon ride or the breakfast. He carried the ring all day in his pocket, and waited until we got back to our hotel and then he proposed.” For these two high school sweethearts, it seems as though romance is a favourite theme in their relationship and will continue to be so, with Brenton often spiriting Klarissa away to a surprise destination. “He’s always spoiling me,” says Klarissa. “He’s always taking me away somewhere. “I can’t complain that he doesn’t do anything nice for me.” Klarissa says that together, they are a “dynamic duo” with an indefinable bond. “I believe we complement each other beautifully,” she says. “We can finish each other’s sentences and know what the other is thinking.”


FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

LOVE AT EVERY AGE AND STAGE WORDS LUCY EMLYN-JONES PHOTO ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

FOR THE SCEPTICS, the heartbroken, the hopeless romantics – this one is for you. In a world where a relationship can be over as quickly as a status update and marriage is not always ’til death do us part, there is Jim and Jean Duncan. Their story is the kind you tell your daughter when she has her first crush, when consoling a girlfriend going through a breakup or when lying awake at night wondering why you haven’t yet met “the one”. True love exists, and they are it. Sixty-five years together, four children, 13 grandchildren, nine greatgrandchildren – if that doesn’t make your heart swell, then truly you are a lost cause. But milestones aside, what is really remarkable is how they look at one another after all these years, as though time hasn’t really passed. “It was our first date and I was 14,” Jean says. “It was very strict back then, you couldn’t do much together but we were allowed to go to an agricultural and produce show, which is a very big thing in New Zealand – the highlight of the year. 72

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Montville - Sunshine Coast Hinterland “I still have the little glass-blown swan that I watched be made – it was the first thing he ever got me. From there on it just blossomed.” And at 84 and 86 years young, there have been many dates since. Their history goes back as far as their memories, to the tiny coastal city of Gisborne in New Zealand where their mothers struck a friendship and working relationship that would see their lives intertwined. “His mother was the most beautiful dressmaker and my mother was the cook. We grew up together and I know as much about his family as I do my own,” Jean says. “As a kid Jim was pretty awful to his sister and me; he’d tease the life out of us.” “When I was little I pushed her in a puddle of water,” says Jim. “I was nine months old,” Jean says. “We were sitting on the verandah dressed up for church and he decided to wash me with his dirty water. My mother was not happy, as you can imagine.” By the time the teenage years hit, Jim no longer felt the boyish desire to push Jean into puddles, preferring conversations over the school fence and walking her home in the afternoon instead. And married life meant the freedom to share their love of the great outdoors together.

Vintage High Tea

$29.95

“We biked for miles, joined a tennis club, had bonfires on the beach – we had a great life,” says Jean. Their lives have always kissed the coast, a gatekeeper of cherished family memories. School holidays were spent enjoying packed picnics on the beach, exploring the rocks and cray fishing. “We drew our first house on the beach in the sand,” says Jean. “It started off as a two bedroom and we were able to add to it as the family got bigger. I just loved our home. We had a full quarter acre and the kids were always playing. The boys would decide to put a goat cart track down the back or they’d put curtains up in the carport and have concerts. “Our children were our life.” When the family home eventually emptied and Jim retired, the shores from across the ditch called. The Sunshine Coast became their home, and has been for the past 20 years. “When we came over here the children were dead against it,” Jim says. “Our eldest one said ‘they’ll be back in six months’. We got here and within three weeks we’d bought a car and a house.” It turned out their move was a magnet for their children and about two years later all except one had followed. And as they have always done, on a bright day Jim and Jean prefer to head out side-by-side, hand-in-hand. “I don’t think there is anything we don’t do together,” says Jean. “Even now on a nice day we fill our thermos with tea, pack lunch and go down the waterfront or the dam at Montville – that’s one of our favourite spots. “We still hold hands and someone will say ‘isn’t that romantic’ and I’ll say ‘it’s past the romantic stage; it’s a necessity now, otherwise I’d probably fall over’.”

y • Classic beauty therapy • Bridal make-up • Wedding packages • Girls day out • Autumn specials online

5478 6212

www.elementsmontville.com.au www.facebook.com/alittlebeauty 38 Kondalilla Falls Rd Montville


TO HAVE AND TO HOLD

E V A H O T AND TO HOLD

Greek Goddess

Paris may be the city of love, but there’s another European city that’s stolen our heart. From the picturesque seaside of Greece comes Christos Costarellos, the Greek god of sophisticated yet beachy bridal wear guaranteed to make any Aussie bride a goddess. And judging by his latest collection of bohemian goodness, we’re almost certain the designer will have you falling in love all over again. Don’t worry future grooms, we are talking about the gowns. So while you marry the man you love, say ‘I do’ to a gown you love too. Christos subtly combines ancient Greek style with a bohemian aura, like in this dreamy number. Contrasting trendy lace with seamless silk, the romantic style is both chic and fresh. Dresses start from $3400. costarellos.gr

WORDS LAYNE WHITBURN

Here’s our pick of fashionable, must-have products for that loved up occasion.

B-B-BEAUTIFUL

Photo Daisy & The Duke

ballerinas

RAISE THE BAR Planning a wedding is tough. All the stress over dresses, themes, photographers, venues, music and even nit-picky invitations can get a tad overwhelming. But if you really want to raise the bar, the number one most important element to your wedding is … the bar. So take things to the next level with Gathering Events Boutique Caravan Bar. It really will be the life of the celebration (apart from the best man’s dance moves). This vintage caravan is too cute, and that’s without beer goggles! The qualified (and charming) bartenders will keep your guests refreshed and entertained under a BYO smooth operation. You supply the booze, and they’ll take care of the rest. Cheers to that! gatheringevents.com.au 74

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Ballerinas, brides and Barbie. The three ‘B’ words most little girls base their childhood on. So while the grown ups play bride, at least let the little ones play ballerinas. Tutu Du Monde Bespoke have the cutest customised tutus for pretty little helpers. With a choice of eight silhouettes and a variety of gorgeous embroidery, beading and embellishments, personalise the flower girl’s dress to blend exquisitely with the bridal party. Tutu Du Monde Bespoke meticulously handcrafts every garment. There’s just one ‘B’ word not allowed near these gorgeous tutus: boys. No boys allowed. tutudumonde.com


FIT FOR A PRINCESS Just like every prince charming needs a shiny sword, every princess needs a little shiny charm too. No, we’re not talking tiaras (they are so 1800s). Today’s princess needs a different kind of sparkle, like this gorgeous princess cut diamond ring from Underwood’s Fine Jewellers Kawana. Custom made and designed by owner Stuart Maclean, this 18ct rose gold band topped with a stunning 1.60 carat princess cut diamond will make any evil stepsister jealous. Sold exclusively at Kawana Shopping World, this dreamy ring is the perfect fit for a fairy tale wedding. underwoodsfinejewellerskawana.com.au

Happy glamper Spunky trunks So you’ve bagged a hunky groom. Score. Now bag a chunky, well, bag. Inspired by vintage bridal trunks, Trousseau & Co. wedding bags are the spunkiest bags out. Lined in rich velvet, they feature a spacious treasure chest for everything a modern bride needs and more – more style that is. These chic carry-all trousseaus not only are super handy, they make the perfect memento for your special day. Score! trousseauandco.com

Nothing says “hen’s weekend” like a stretch limo full of giggly girls sipping on X-rated drinking straws, but if that isn’t your style, swap the high heels for ugg boots, strobe lights for starry nights and pack the girls up for a camping weekend! If camping makes you cringe, don’t worry: Glamping Days Hire Co. keep things female approved. In fact, they’re so good, even the blokes will be trading in their swags. These luxurious teepee-style tents are perfect for the Australian climate, keeping things cool in summer and cosy in winter. And there is no need to pack your skinny camping mat or sleeping bags. Get a quality night’s sleep on the designer queen airbeds complete with mattress toppers and luxury linen and pillows. Even better, the Glamping Days Hire Co. team do all the setting up and packing down for you! Now that’ll make you a happy camper. Oops, we mean glam-per. glampingdayshireco.com.au

SHARPEN

You have the wedding shoes, jewellery and hairpiece. There are just one or two accessories you may be forgetting. His. Yes, the other half needs some accessorising too. So while you may have looked past his finishing touches, judging by Sarah and Sebastian’s range of men’s goodies, you won’t be looking any further. The Australian jewellery label has a reputation for modern simplicity. And their newly released range of men’s accessories captures just that. Conventional shapes meet clean lines and sharp edges, creating timeless, modern pieces for the stylish groom. sarahandsebastian.com

UP

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MAGIC MAKER

IF THESE

WHEELS

COULD TALK WORDS AARON WYNNE PROFILE PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

ONE OF THE GREATEST benefits of getting to your later years has to be the long list of amazing experiences and stories you have collected. One of Noosa’s most iconic residents is 70 this year and boy, there are stories it could tell … the only problem is, words are not possible. The famous Hastings Street Woody, which has become synonymous with Noosa Longboards, is now the prized possession of Tim and Kym Crabtree, from Noosa Woody Hire. Much like the Woody itself, Tim and Kym travelled the world before settling in Noosa and are now determined to let as many people enjoy this amazing car as possible. > 76

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exquisite handcrafted jewellery & wares from outstanding artists

A n n e GENTRY - SMITH

OPEN 7 DAYS 10—5 07 5442 9598 www.opalcutter.com.au Shop 4 ‘The Pottery’ 171-183 Main St Montville


Photo Studio Impressions Photo Jack Eden, 1996

SURFERS LOVED THEM BECAUSE THEY WERE BIG AND THEY COULD THROW ALL THEIR BOARDS AND JUNK IN THE BACK.

“I feel like everybody needs to know the car’s story,” Tim says. “I think it’s probably our duty as owners to make sure it’s not left to be just another car, because it’s not just another car.”

While the exact dates aren’t known, it was somewhere in the ’50s or ’60s that the now Noosa Woody was shipped from America to Peru, where it worked as a taxi for many years.

The Woody was born in Detroit, Michigan in 1946 and embodies the transition from horse and cart-style coaches to the modern motorcars we know today.

“In 1994, a group of Aussie car collectors went to Peru to buy old cars and bring them back to Australia and sell them,” Tim says. “They would drive past the Woody every day and it was just abandoned on the side of the road and they said ‘if that’s still there on the last day and we have room in the container we will take it home’ and that’s exactly what they did.”

“After the war, steel was at such a premium that for the actual bodywork on the bigger cars they coach-built a lot of them,” Tim says. “Timber was still being used in a lot of delivery trucks and work trucks at the time, so there were these teams of guys who were really good at that style of work and the Woody was kind of the high-end version.”

A couple of restorations and 20-odd years later and the Noosa Woody is now synonymous with Noosa and Hastings Street.

As technologies advanced, Woodies were superseded by more modern cars and quickly became very cheap, hence the appeal to the surf community.

“We saw it and the reaction it was getting from people every day on the street and thought, ‘there’s definitely a business in that’,” Tim says. “It felt like it was a waste just having it sit there on the street.”

“Surfers loved them because they were big and they could throw all their boards and junk in the back,” Tim says. “You could literally live in them and they became known as the car of ‘daddy’s worst nightmare’ with all these surfers showing up to take their daughters out.”

Both Tim and Kym knew if they were going to go to the effort and expense of buying the car then there was no point doing things by halves. The pair set up Noosa Woody Hire, designed for everything from school formals and jaunts around town to highend weddings. The reaction has been overwhelming.

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“Originally we would get a lot of people saying ‘the guys and grooms must love it’,” Kym says. “But honestly, a lot of my calls are now coming from brides who are saying ‘I love the car’ and they just want it in the wedding.” Tim says the Woody works its own magic. “The great thing about the Woody – and I really think this is why it works so well for the weddings – is it covers such a broad spectrum and has such a broad appeal. We get everyone from five-year-old kids who just stand in awe of the car right through to 75-year-old men who remember having cars like this as their first cars. That really rings true for the weddings too, where we have done really high-end right through to relaxed coastal weddings.” Tim and Kym try to tailor the experience to suit the individual event with everything from props and picnics to even offering to remove the 1964 surfboard from the roof. “I have said to every single bride ‘we can take the board off the roof if you like’,” Kym says. “Every one of them has said: ‘Absolutely not. We want the car as it is’.” It’s ironic that Tim – who is originally from the south of England – and Kym – who is from Western Australia – and a Woody from Detroit, Michigan are each a part of something so embedded in Noosa’s culture. What’s more is that Tim and Kym make it accessible to everyone else. That’s the funny thing about the Sunshine Coast, many visit as ‘just passing through’ but not many leave … cars included. noosawoodyhire.com

L A M A I S O N D E L’A M O U R

the home of love

A F R E N C H - I N S P I R E D W E D D I N G AT S P I C E R S

Everyone knows that a wedding should be special, but at Spicers Clovelly Estate we also believe it should be unique. That’s why our romantic, French-inspired, 10 room property is aimed at providing you and your wedding guests with a wedding experience like no other. Our romantic Sunshine Coast Hinterland setting, beautiful reception venue, magnificent gardens, and memorable catering and service provide all the essential ingredients to make your special day perfect. For more information call us on 1300 252 380 or email events.clovelly@spicersretreats.com

Awarded 2014

68 Balmoral Rd, Montville | spicersretreats.com

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FASHION

DECENT

� e r u s o p x E FASHION EDITOR BRISEIS ONFRAY

AS THE SUNNY DAYS GET SHORTER, OUR FASHIONABLE SENSE IS TO OPT FOR EXTRA LAYERS AND LONGER LENGTHS, MAKING STYLING A NEW OUTFIT MUCH MORE FUN. AND IF IT IS WHAT IS ON THE INSIDE THAT COUNTS, THEN STARTING WITH BEAUTIFUL LINGERIE MAKES PERFECT SENSE.

80 THE MAD HATTER Add instant chutzpah with a great hat. 82 TANGLED UP IN BLUES Weave your own way in alluring blues. 84 SEASONAL STYLE Featuring OV Boutique. 85 DREAM CATCHERS For the days that feel a little ho-hum. 86 CHANCE ENCOUNTER The bold beauty of any fashionable collection. 88 SOUL SISTERS A soulful mix of natural fabrics, colours and prints. 90 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

Menswear is all laid-back intelligence. 91 LABELS & STOCKISTS.

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 91 80

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Love Stories


Elk

Willow & Zac

Underwoods Jewellers Kawana 18ct white gold diamond bangle (TDW 2.48 carats)

Travel near or far in style with OV Boutique Shop 4, The Dunes 27 Cotton Tree Parade

Ph: 5479 4505 www.ovboutique.com.au

Miz Mooz

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M.A. Dainty

Mesop

THE

MAD

HATTER

NY2K 18ct white gold white and yellow diamond ring

Autumn sees a toning down of brighter modes with warmer neutrals taking the lead. We can all take comfort in cosier knits and extra lengths this season. Just avoid going too “beige”. Donning a great hat will add instant chutzpah, and luxurious accessorising will hold this style together with ease.

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 91 82

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Akubra


Elm Clothing

The Redletter Club

Sperry

Mela Purdie

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Scotch & Soda Amsterdams Blauw

Elk

TangledUP IN

Blues

Steering away from the heat does tend to unveil more navy in the wardrobe. Weave your own way in alluring midnight, denim or indigo blues. They’re a smart substitute for black and are just as robust, mix-matching well with most fabrics, colours and skin tones. Navy stripes are still dynamite and rocking the bluest of gemstones commands style-sublime status. FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 91

Eb & Ive

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Underwoods Jewellers Kawana 18ct 1.86 yellow gold, tanzanite and diamond ring


Binny

ADFX_160079

Banana Blue

Lisa Brown, Jac+Jack, Binny, American Vintage, Free People, Paige Denim

Shop1 'Sandcastles' 3 River Esplanade Mooloolaba QLD 4557 (07) 5478 0885 info@unseenboutique.com.au www.unseenboutique.com.au Unseen-Boutique


SEASONAL STYLE

FEATURED STOCKIST OV BOUTIQUE BY SHELLEY KELLOW

TRAVEL NEAR OR FAR IN STYLE. THE MUST-HAVE MELA PURDIE PANT IS AVAILABLE IN SEVERAL COLOURS AND TEAMS PERFECTLY WITH MELA LIGHTWEIGHT TRENCH OR TOPS, HEELS OR TRÉS CHIC CASUAL WITH FLATS. FRINGING IS NOT GOING AWAY ANYTIME SOON – IT IS FASHIONABILITY WITH AN EDGE. STYLE YOUR WARDROBE THIS SEASON WITH TIMELESS PIECES WITH A TWIST THAT CAN TAKE YOU TO SEVERAL DIFFERENT OCCASIONS … NO IRONING REQUIRED!

1

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1 BAG Estilo Emporio 2 WATCH Triwa 3 SHOES Estilo Emporio

3

AVAILABLE AT:

OV Boutique, Shop 4, The Dunes, 27 Cotton Tree Parade, Cotton Tree, 5479 4505 or ovboutique.com.au

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 91 86

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Mela Purdie


Love Stories

Dream Catchers

Opals Down Under solid Coober Pedy crystal opalised fossilised shell (3.21ct) in 18k yellow gold pendant with diamonds.

The Hip Tee

Sashenka

For the days that feel a little hohum, throw a little metallic magic into the mix to inspire more sparkle. Stocking up on beautiful lingerie is totally acceptable to pamper self-loving attitudes. And remember that a day is never dull when wearing serious bling. FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 91

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chance encounter This staple colour will always be revered as the bold beauty of any fashionable collection: black ‌ beautiful black. The sophisticated base works wonders in any arrangement. Update the classic white shirt with ruffled charm. Black worn with faux fur, studded leather and elegant jewels will have heads turning for sure.

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Luxe Deluxe

NY2K 18ct two-tone free form Eyris Mabe pearl pendant. Handmade by Paul New.

Mesop

Cadelle Leather

Birkenstock | Crocs | FitFlops | Skechers | Teva | Aetrex | ECCO | Ahnu | Wonders of Spain Noosaville - 230 Gympie Tce 5447 1755

Mens Ladies

Caloundra - 82A Bulcock St 5492 7185 www.getsetfootwear.com.au

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Scotch & Soda

soul SISTERS There is no doubt that autumn trends toward an earthier side of fashionable styles too. There is a soulful mix of natural fabrics, colours and prints that inspire a calmer mood. These are the best fashion foundations to creatively up-style a unique look with more arty flair.

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 91

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Boom Shankar

THE LIFESTYLE BOUTIQUE IN CALOUNDRA

FA S H I O N ACCESSORIES HOME DÉCOR GIFTS

Status Anxiety

The Opalcutter Daniel Vior hand crafted necklace from Barcelona

Bernie Mev

Shop 1, 10 Ormuz Avenue Caloundra QLD 4551 07 5491 8890 www.villaverdeliving.com.au

! e l y t s r u o y Live


Scotch & Soda

A work week may require some formal codes but it’s easier to get away with more creative licence these days. Approach your style (work or weekends) with laid-back intelligence. Stick with quality fabrics and footwear. A V-neck tee under a suede or tweed-inspired jacket has an authoritative stamp of approval.

R.M. Williams

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO NEXT PAGE

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R.M. Williams


FASHION STOCKISTS

Scotch & Soda

LABELS AND STOCKISTS

AKUBRA Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 or threads4556.com BANANA BLUE OV Boutique, Shop 4, The Dunes, 27 Cotton Tree Parade, Cotton Tree, 5479 4505 or ovboutique.com.au BERNIE MEV Get Set Footwear, 82A Bulcock Street, Caloundra, 5492 7185 or 230 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville, 5447 1755 or getsetfootwear.com.au BINNY Unseen, Shop 1 Sandcastles, 3 River Esplanade, Mooloolaba, 5478 0885 or unseenboutique.com.au BOOM SHANKAR Villa Verde Living, Shop 1/10 Ormuz Avenue, Caloundra, 5491 8890 or villaverdeliving.com.au

CADELLE LEATHER OV Boutique, Shop 4, The Dunes, 27 Cotton Tree Parade, Cotton Tree, 5479 4505 or ovboutique.com.au EB & IVE Giddy and Grace, Shop 2, 1 Maple Street, Maleny, 5494 3636 or giddyandgrace.com ELK Evolve, 5/10 Grebe Street, Peregian Beach, 5448 2077 or evolvembh.com.au ELM CLOTHING Giddy and Grace, Shop 2, 1 Maple Street, Maleny, 5494 3636 or giddyandgrace.com LOVE STORIES Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 or threads4556.com LUXE DELUXE OV Boutique, Shop 4, The Dunes, 27 Cotton Tree Parade, Cotton Tree, 5479 4505 or ovboutique.com.au

M.A. DAINTY Unseen, Shop 1 Sandcastles, 3 River Esplanade, Mooloolaba, 5478 0885 or unseenboutique.com.au MELA PURDIE OV Boutique, Shop 4, The Dunes, 27 Cotton Tree Parade, Cotton Tree, 5479 4505 or ovboutique.com.au MESOP Evolve, 5/10 Grebe Street, Peregian Beach, 5448 2077 or evolvembh.com.au MIZ MOOZ Villa Verde Living, Shop 1/10 Ormuz Avenue, Caloundra, 5491 8890 or villaverdeliving.com.au MORRISON Unseen, Shop 1 Sandcastles, 3 River Esplanade, Mooloolaba, 5478 0885 or unseenboutique.com.au MOSS & SPY OV Boutique, Shop 4, The Dunes, 27 Cotton Tree Parade, Cotton Tree, 5479 4505 or ovboutique.com.au

NY2K Rovera Plaza, King Street, Cotton Tree, 5443 1955 or ny2k.com.au OPALS DOWN UNDER 11 Ballantyne Court, Palmview, 5494 5400 or opalsdownunder.com.au R.M. WILLIAMS Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 or threads4556.com SASHENKA Giddy and Grace, Shop 2, 1 Maple Street, Maleny, 5494 3636 or giddyandgrace.com; Unseen, Shop 1 Sandcastles, 3 River Esplanade, Mooloolaba, 5478 0885 or unseenboutique.com.au SCOTCH & SODA Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 or threads4556.com

SCOTCH & SODA AMSTERDAMS BLAUW Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 or threads4556.com SKECHERS Get Set Footwear, 82A Bulcock Street, Caloundra, 5492 7185 or 230 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville, 5447 1755 or getsetfootwear.com.au SPERRY Get Set Footwear, 82A Bulcock Street, Caloundra, 5492 7185 or 230 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville, 5447 1755 or getsetfootwear.com.au STATUS ANXIETY Villa Verde Living, Shop 1/10 Ormuz Avenue, Caloundra, 5491 8890 or villaverdeliving.com.au THE HIP TEE OV Boutique, Shop 4, The Dunes, 27 Cotton Tree Parade, Cotton Tree, 5479 4505 or ovboutique.com.au THE OPALCUTTER Shop 4, The Pottery, 171-183 Main Street, Montville, 5442 9598 or opalcutter.com.au THE REDLETTER CLUB Giddy and Grace, Shop 2, 1 Maple Street, Maleny, 5494 3636 or giddyandgrace.com UNDERWOODS JEWELLERS KAWANA Shop 505, Kawana Shopping World, Point Cartwright Drive, Buddina, 5452 6774 or underwoodsfinejewellerskawana. com.au WILLOW & ZAC OV Boutique, Shop 4, The Dunes, 27 Cotton Tree Parade, Cotton Tree, 5479 4505 or ovboutique.com.au saltmagazine . com . au

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BOLD VISIONARIES

FAR-AWAY TREASURES REBORN WORDS LAYNE WHITBURN PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

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TRAVEL MAY BE the only expense that truly makes one richer. For Renee Blackwell, the metaphor is true in more ways than one. With a blossoming jewellery business nestled beside her tranquil Conondale property, Renee expresses her life travels and experiences through art. Creating exquisite earrings, necklaces, rings and bracelets inside her Harmony House bush studio, Renee works in utter peace and harmony, surrounded by nature’s uplifting and nourishing inspiration. Pure bliss? Most definitely. Work? Not for most of the world. But what makes Renee Blackwell Designs so successful is the pure passion and love behind her creations. Each and every design, gemstone, bead, antique and carving means something to Renee. “My jewellery is a reflection of all I am and have become,” Renee says. And looking at her beautifully artistic and detailed designs, there’s no doubt she has lived a colourful life. Growing up in Washington State in the US, Renee’s childhood was a constant adventure. “I was travelling from day one,” she says. “My parents were always packing up and taking their three kids travelling around, so I always saw travel as easy.” And it was as simple as that: travel was in her blood. So by the time university came around, keeping Renee in the one spot was harder than finding a one-of-a-kind gemstone in the most remote location on earth. Just like discovering new gemstones or learning different cultures, Renee opened her mind to university and started a degree in media and marketing, but after years of on and off study separated by trips around the world, she was busier making memories than building towards a career. While she never finished her degree, Renee’s freehearted, creative soul discovered something far more beautiful than a college degree: she discovered her passion, purpose and value. She literally found herself – and a few rare gemstones along the way. Her first trip to eastern Africa in her early 20s was a “life changer”. “Besides the fact east Africa is a whole other planet – the people, animals, landscape and even the smells – the thing that really stood out for me was their fabric, beads and adornments,” she says. “What they wear in everyday life is amazing. When we dress up, we put on a costume, but they wore this colourful clothing every day – even the poor.” Taking in the stunning landscape, smelling the exotic air and listening to the people opened her eyes, ears and heart towards an exciting future and passion for adornment. She ran a few other businesses in America, but no matter how busy life got, Renee always made jewellery on the side. Unlike most hobbies, Renee’s free time bought her some extra cash. It wasn’t until a trade show in the US featuring her organic skin care business that she realised her side hobby had actually stolen the show when she glammed up the tables’ empty spaces with a few bracelets and earrings. And the result? More empty spaces. Everyone loved her designs so much, every piece of jewellery sold the first day. “Everyone kept telling me how different and unique they were,” she says. “And in the jewellery world, that was a big deal because there is so much competition.” It was in this moment Renee realised the direction her career was meant to go. And it took off, taking her all around the globe to some of the most remote places on earth. >

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THEY WORE THIS COLOURFUL CLOTHING EVERY DAY – EVEN THE POOR.

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CAFÉ open for breakfast, lunch, morning and afternoon tea Every trip was a new adventure: meeting new people, embracing different cultures and experiencing local fashion. And it shows in her work.

GIFTWARES • NURSERY THE GARDEN HAUS GALLERY

Renee often looks over the photos captured during her travels that show unique landscapes, colourful fabrics or unusual patinas from old door handles and chipped park benches. The colours, patterns and lines in her photos resonate in her jewellery whether she plans it or not. Every piece tells a story: whether it was an ancient button discovered in Morocco, shoe clips from Paris, ceramic beads from Greece or a reflection of an unusual patina she captured in Vietnam, every earring, necklace, bracelet and ring has a unique background. Some even date back to the 1800s. But the one thing they all have in common? Renee’s unique touch. While she draws this beautiful inspiration from ventures far and wide, Renee says some of the most breathtaking findings are from her own backyard.

THE NIGHT GARDEN events with new exhibition showing in the Garden Haus Gallery and many more events...

“When people think Australia, they immediately think opals, but we have so much more,” she says. “I have discovered some of the most spectacular stones in Australia; they are just phenomenal.” Connecting travel experiences through jewellery is Renee’s way of connecting her passion with other souls, and making fingers, necks, ears and wrists look beautiful along the way.

OPEN 7 DAYS

If travel truly does make one richer, Renee is the ringleader. Literally. Renee will bring three collections to the Sunshine Coast this autumn and launch her new book, Adornments From The Soul, exploring the relationship between jewellery and travels, comparing photos of inspiring patinas and weathered textures to the jewellery it reflects. Her work will be on show at Art Nuvo Buderim from April 30 to May 21. Art Nuvo Gallery, 25 Gloucester Road, Buderim. 5456 2445 or artnuvobuderim.com.au

Mon - Fri: 9.00am - 4.30pm Weekends 8.00am - 4.30pm 34 Mountain View Road, Maleny, Ph 07 5499 9928 info@thegardenmaleny.com.au thegardenmaleny.com.au

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INDULGENCE

SOWING SEEDS OF YOUTH WORDS CELESTE MITCHELL PHOTO ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

“POP UP HERE, SWEETS. I’m just going to numb you up,” Grace Kovac tells me after I meet her for my 2pm. “Excuse me, what?” I’ll admit it, I’m at an age where I want my skin to look better. I’m not about to duck off for a lunchtime injection, but regular facials are not necessarily cutting the mustard any more. I’ve booked in for a Dermapen treatment in a bid to promote natural collagen production and stop those crows’ feet stomping on my face. Still, I’m feeling a little nervous as a numbing cream is applied over my face. Within 20 minutes my top lip is feeling slack and I’m glad not too much chat is required on my part. 98

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“The results I’m getting with this I would put on par with many vicious laser treatments, but without the downtime and without the cost,” Grace seems to read my mind and validate that numbing my face is completely worth it. “Ninety per cent of premature ageing is because of the sun, so that’s why this treatment is bonza. I don’t need to worry about clients being tanned ... there’s virtually no risk of pigmentation whereas IPL and laser leave you with a huge risk. “It’ll feel a little bumpy up here on your forehead,” she warns as the machine starts up and I hear it buzz and rumble away as Grace rubs the Dermapen in small circles. I have visions of Grace standing behind a soil aerator, running it over the pits and troughs of my face, but instead of piercing hard earth and opening it up to receive rain and fertiliser, 12 microscopic needles on the end of a wand the size of a large pen


are slightly pricking my epidermis. Then serums made up of magic plumping ingredients are slathered on. WHERE IS IT? Professional Beauty Clinic, Noosa Life & Health Centre, 4/5 Gibson Rd, Noosaville. To make a booking call 5447 1172 or grace@gracekovac.com.au WHY IS IT SPECIAL? This treatment provides a collagen boost for your skin without being invasive. It’s quick, relatively painless, and there’s barely any downtime post-treatment. No Samantha in Sex and the City acid-peel shame, here! WHICH TREATMENT WAS ENJOYED? A Dermapen treatment, which runs for 90 minutes and costs $295 per session. Grace recommends a course of six, with a treatment each fortnight or three weeks, then maintenance every quarter after that. You can pre-purchase six treatments for the price of four ($180 each). FINAL TIPS? Avoid getting burnt and activities like hot yoga or swimming for 24 hours after treatment.

“This is a hyaluronic and collagen mask,” Grace explains as she arranges the cool white fabric over my face. “Since we’ve given you the Dermapen, your epidermis is open to receive any nutrients for 10 minutes, so we’re going to feed it as much goodness as we can to help with the plumpness.” In other words, we’ve aerated the soil and now the water can get right down deep. I might look like a mummy, but it feels amazing on my skin. Things turn space-age when Grace peels back the mask and pops protective glasses on. She holds an LED light wand close to my skin, moving it around in a slow-mo, lightsaber moment Darth Vader would be proud of. “This will give you a quantum leap into healing,” Grace says. “It’s great for taking out any redness, too. Most clients text me back the next morning and tell me they can’t see they’ve had anything done.” As I walk down the stairs to my car, The Weekend’s catchy tune plays on loop in my head – “I can’t feel my face when I’m with you...”. I’m feeling flushed. I blast the air con in my car and aim it directly on my face. That night – a particularly humid Sunshine Coast evening – I hold an ice pack to my face for a few minutes after dinner, but overall it’s not uncomfortable. I slather on some of Grace’s own, soon-to-be-released serum before bed and wake the next morning with a much calmer face looking back at me from the mirror. Three days later, while there’s a little dryness on my forehead and between my eyes, there’s no obvious peeling and I just moisturise as normal. Within a week my skin is feeling brand new – plumped up, smooth and fresh. I can’t tell if it’s helped me in the ageing stakes just yet, but knowing this non-invasive option is available and so easy to work in around sun exposure is comforting for the future. Lesson learned? If you look after the soil, it will give you good things for years to come.

3X AUS/NZ Colour Technician of the Year Nationally & Internationally Awarded Salon

Shop 4 /166-170 Alexandra Pde Alexandra Headland

(07) 5479 6661 assemblyhair.com.au We proudly use and recommend

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BEAUTY

cool refreshments

AUTUMN

SAYA ROSE + CUCUMBER FACIAL TONER $26, 200ml. Available at Saya Factory, Shop 6/41 Gateway Drive, Noosaville. 5473 0257 or sayaskin.com

GIVEAWAYS For your chance to WIN an Olaplex Treatment valued at $80, thanks to Strut Hair & Beauty or a Waterlily Calming Face Masque, head to saltmagazine.com.au

NUDE BY NATURE MATTER MINERAL BRONZER $39.95, 15g. Available at Priceline Pharmacy, Shop MM1, Noosa Civic, 28 Eenie Creek Road, Noosaville. 5440 7900 or noossacivicshopping.com.au THALGO CELLULAR REVIVING MARINE MIST WITH RED ALGAE $61, 150ml. Available at Aqua Day Spa, Sheraton Noosa Resort & Spa, 14-16 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads. 5449 4888 or sheratonnoosaresort.com/spa

Soul Soothers BEAUTY EDITOR BRISEIS ONFRAY

IT’S TIME TO SHED THE SCORCHER SEASON AND RECONDITION SUN-DRENCHED SOULS WITH SOOTHING REMEDIES THAT BOOST LACK-LUSTRE MOODS, HAIR AND COMPLEXIONS. TOP UP ON NOURISHING CLEANSERS, MISTS, CREAMS AND NUTRIENT-ENRICHED OILS. MAKE TIME WITH YOUR BEAUTY THERAPIST AND HAIR STYLIST, AND INVEST IN A TAILOR-RECOMMENDED HOMECARE REGIME. AUTUMN IS TONIC FOR THE SOUL.

Win

WATERLILY HONEY & CHAMOMILE CALMING FACE MASQUE $53, 50ml. Available at Spa Anise, Spicers Tamarind Retreat, 88 Obi Lane South, Maleny. 1300 252 380 or spicersgroup.com.au EMINENCE AGE CORRECTIVE STARTER SET $126. Available at The Spa, Noosa Springs Resort, Links Drive, Noosa Heads. 5440 3355 or noosasprings.com.au 100

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eye spy WHEATBAGS SILK COOLING EYE PILLOW $15. Available at Kansha Natural Therapies, 6 Mary Street, Noosaville. 5473 0724 or kansha.com.au GERMAINE DE CAPUCCINI ILLUMINATING EYE CREAM $88, 15ml. Available at Asante Day Spa, Shop 5/7-13 Beach Road, Coolum Beach. 5446 5229 or asantespa.com.au

smooth operators Win

LABEL.M REJUVENATING OIL MIST $53.50, 100ml. Available at Toni & Guy, 2/30 King Street, Maroochydore. 5451 0251 or toniandguy.com.au SHU UEMURA ESSENCE ABSOLUE PROTECTIVE OIL $67, 150ml. Available at The Assembly Hair, Shop 4, 166-170 Alexandra Parade, Alexandra Headland. 5479 6661 or assemblyhair.com.au OLAPLEX HAIR PERFECTOR NO.3 $49.95, 100ml. Available at Strut Hair & Beauty, 21 Beach Road, Maroochydore. 5443 5605 or struthair.com.au

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PAMPER AND PREEN

BEAUTY

FACE FIRST WORDS PENNY SHIPWAY PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

WHEN I REALISED I was about to enjoy a pamper treatment over water – and I mean literally, this Cape Cod-style spa has been built right over a private lagoon – the water baby in me squealed with delight. Similar to those hovering bungalows you see in the brochures for the Maldives, but with more of a Hamptons feel, I knew the stress load on my shoulders was about to dissolve as I walked up the steps to this exquisite day spa. With huge windows capturing all the glorious ripples of the lagoon below, this two-storey wooden villa is painted in modern light greys, but inside it’s all about white; exuding freshness and luxury, with high ceilings and the softest towels adorned with pretty fresh flowers. And oh, the magical scents of essential oils wafting through the rooms … heaven. We start with a relaxation and aromatherapy massage, which was just what this poor frazzled mum needed. I’ve lately been dealing with tension headaches from the everyday stresses of parenting – sound familiar? 102

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As I melted into my massage table, the delightful spa manager Anja Chytraeus put me under her spell as relaxation music began to float throughout the room and into my soul. When Anja started to show off her expertise, I was already dreaming of taking up permanent residency here. You know that feeling when you start wishing something will never end before it’s even begun? Anja explained that I was in the right place for my tension headaches as this massage was specifically designed to suit those dealing with emotional and stress-related conditions. Pure essential oils – which I’m a huge fan of because not only do they just smell divine, but they really do transport you straight to a Balinese ashram – made me feel a complete sense of release, as though the tightness in every single muscle was seeping out with every stroke. As my massage came to a devastating end, there was soon a beacon of hope when Anja began to prepare for my facial and I realised we weren’t over just yet. This brings me to a somewhat embarrassing admission: I have never had a facial. I know, my friends have raved for years about how incredible they are but life just sort of got in the way, so of course I was just a tiny bit excited to get my very first facial. And my poor face – which has hardly seen much attention at all over the years apart from a


COTTON TREE

WHERE IS IT? Lagoon Day Spa, Novotel Resort Twin Waters, Ocean Drive, Twin Waters. lagoondayspa@ gmail.com or 0406 447 679. WHY IS IT SPECIAL? This luxurious day spa is housed in a two-storey wooden villa sitting directly over the gentle waters of a pristine lagoon, where you can soothe your body, mind and spirit while taking in breathtaking water views with large windows throughout. WHICH TREATMENT WAS ENJOYED? I indulged in the spa’s three-treatment special where you can enjoy a choice of a body exfoliation, back, neck and shoulder massage, mini facial, mini manicure or mini pedicure – for $149. Note this special does not run during the school holiday period. FINAL TIPS? Take your partner, mum or friend as there’s a large couples’ massage room on the lower floor with fantastic water views. This would also be perfect for birthday treats, hens’ parties or bridal pampers. Then why not head over to the resort’s waterfront bar for a colourful cocktail?

WE AT TONI&GUY ARE COMMITTED TO THE EXCELLENCE IN THE ART OF HAIRDRESSING. WE ARE PASSIONATELY DEDICATED TO PROVIDING CLIENTS WITH THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF SKILLS, SERVICE AND PRODUCTS IN AN ENJOYABLE, FRIENDLY SALON ENVIRONMENT. “TO GROW THE BEST, MOST RESPECTED, CREATIVE HAIRDRESSING COMPANY ON THE PLANET, WHERE PEOPLE LOVE TO WORK AND CLIENTS LOVE TO BE.” TONI MASCOLO TONI&GUY COTTON TREE | SHOP 2, 30 KING ST | 07 5451 0251

cleanser, a rare exfoliation and moisturiser – was pleading for someone to give it a little tender loving care. It was divine. There were soft scrubs and cleanses, hot towels and intoxicating smells. Again, the aroma of those oils had me in faraway places you could only dream about (the white sands of the Caribbean, swimming with turtles in Hawaii and magic carpet rides over Marrakesh). The express facials are aimed as a quick pick-me-up and also incorporate a treatment mask, carefully selected to meet your skin’s needs, and an intensive moisturiser which is massaged into your skin. This time Anja used a refreshing peppermint scent which she says is used to help wake you from your blissful massage slumber. (Remember you can’t stay the night!) Next up, it was time to peel myself off the table and head upstairs for my mini manicure to give my fingers some desperate attention. Anja soaked, clipped, buffed and shaped my nails, finishing off with a delicious hand cream, while I explored myriad colours – choosing a splendid copper glow. The salon uses Vinylux polish which is somewhere between Shellac (a gel polish) and a varnish – and for those in the know it’s the best in the business. With my glamorous new nails, babysoft cheeks, ache-free shoulders, and a soothed soul, I strolled back to my car through the beautifully landscaped, tropical walkways of Novotel Resort Twin Waters with a spring in my step and a twinkle in my eye. But next time I’m taking my girlfriend. Oh, and we’re throwing in a shopping trip or cheeky champagne. Just because we can.

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HEALTH

THE WHOLE REVOLUTION WORDS BRISEIS ONFRAY PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

A healthy garden of herbs and vegies, as well as fruit trees are grown on the premises to provide the kitchen staff with the freshest of seasonal, organic ingredients every day. 104

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THE PART CAN never be well unless the whole is well. – Plato It is Sunday: a relaxing morning at home with the ocean calling nearby. The sky is blue and my mind is smiling. I am off for a seven-day detox at Living Valley Health Retreat – a wellness retreat nestled in the fairytale-like rolling hills of Kin Kin. A part of me is excited. The rest of me is anxious about leaving work, family and caffeine behind to face the true status of my health. Somewhere along the way, my world had become an unsettling rollercoaster of mixed emotions and energy levels. For more than 25 years Living Valley Health Retreat founders Gary and Debbie Martin have been on a mission to empower people to take charge of their health. “This vision came when I was about 30. I was working in Sydney in corporate finance and noticed many people claiming sickness insurance due to lifestyle-related diseases,” Gary says. “At the time, a 49-year-old client (smoker with bad lifestyle habits) was dying of lung cancer. He had worked hard to meet financial goals so he could retire at 50. With tears in his eyes, he asked me to share his story far and wide to help educate people on healthful living, so that others would not experience his similar fate. I was quite moved and took on the challenge.” Gary has since gained extensive knowledge and experience in the wellness arena, and this has brought remarkable results. Living Valley Health Retreat exists to “naturally” recondition body, mind and soul back to optimum wellness. There has been an alarming global increase of people diagnosed with chronic illness and Living Valley Health Retreat is constantly expanding and upgrading to cater for the demand. They have a world-class treatment program with an incredibly gifted team of experts to provide core knowledge, support, technique and secrets to achieving life-enhancing results for their guests. On arrival I fall in love with the setting. It’s a valley of spring-green waves with accommodation, treatment, beauty, fitness, dining and consultation rooms spaciously plotted around tall gum, palm and fruit trees. Mother Nature beckons me to surrender to this peaceful presence. So I do. >


SOME RECOMMENDED WELLNESS WISDOM BY LIVING VALLEY HEALTH RETREAT

This is by no means a holiday, but more a wellbeing workout. My Lifestyle Guide includes an intensive plan of naturopath consultations, detox and beauty treatments, workshops, fitness and education sessions, with a mindful eating and fasting program full of organic, nourishing goodness. Hats off to the kitchen staff too: every meal and juice served is gourmet perfection. With the added temptation of massage therapy and natural skincare and beauty treatments, daily steam baths, relaxation by the pool, early morning walks and early nights, there is not much time to spare. 106

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Photo Briseis Onfray

I am warmly greeted at reception and given the grand tour by Debbie. Everything is within lung-loving walking distance, but car access is an option for rainy days and hilly bits. My room is lovely and comes with air-conditioning, wifi, organic teas and beauty products, beautiful bird songs and canopy views.

Eight laws of health Nutrition, exercise, water, sunlight, temperance, air, rest and recreation, trust in divine power Go organic, with everything But if it’s hard to find organic fruit/ veg, wash in water with organic apple cider vinegar Avoid stress It is one of the biggest causes of disease Eliminate processed foods and sugar ‘That Sugar Film’ is an absolute must-watch for the whole family. Sugar is now one of the biggest causes of chronic illness around the world. Know your fats Increase the good ones and cook with the right ones. Reduce or nil caffeine Switch coffee to an organic dandelion chino or rooibos tea Naturally treat a migraine By placing a grain of Himalayan salt crystal under the tongue. Download a healthy app ‘7 minute workout’ is perfect to do in the office.


WHERE IS IT? 15 Sheppersons Lane, Kin Kin (Noosa hinterland) WHAT PACKAGE WAS EXPERIENCED? The Seven-day Power Cleanse and Detox, (starting from $3700) HELPING THE CAUSE: Living Valley Health Retreat is a not-for-profit organisation. Donations of $2 and over are tax deductible. All profits are injected back into the future of Living Valley Health Retreat objectives

My consultation with the naturopath was amazing. Everything made penny-dropping sense. In less than 30 minutes I learnt more about why my health was out of whack and how to naturally restore it than I had in the past five years of medical check-ups, band-aid prescriptions and costly doctor appointments. Seriously.

Photo Briseis Onfray

Detox is the vital part of the Living Valley Health Retreat program with all eliminating organs considered. And there is nothing glamorous about a colonic, but collectively, wow! Instant results. The first two days featured caffeine withdrawals, thumping headache, nausea, low concentration and energy levels. Apparently I had arrived very dehydrated. One litre of water daily for me was not enough (I now drink two). By day three, the clouds lifted and from that point I continued to feel energised, bright, connected, calm and lighter in mood (and body weight). “The human body is so resilient that it responds quickly to our tailored cleansing program. It never ceases to amaze me how quickly people bounce back. Energy levels soar, skin shines, faces glow and eyes become very clear,� Gary says. By the last day I am armed with better health, wellness wisdom, a three-month meal plan, healthy recipes, new friends and have a Living Valley Health Retreat Diploma in Lifestyle Excellence under my belt. The group is buzzing and nobody wants to leave. Living Valley Health Retreat is so much more than I expected. A valuable life lesson. Wellness is everything. It is a very personal journey but the connections and courageous stories shared will remain in my mind for a long time. lvs.com.au

holistic dental care at noosa junction

At JD Dental, we believe that dental health is just a component of your all over well-being. We would like to help you find the answer to better health. By sharing our knowledge - from amalgam fillings (metal) and root canal treated teeth, to the perfect mix of a healthy diet and lifestyle tailored specifically for you. Find the balance and feel great! 16 Sunshine Beach Road, Noosa Junction (above surf-shop) P 07 5449 2460 E info@noosajunctiondental.com.au www.noosajunctiondental.com.au

Dr Alex Dietz - Dental Surgeon

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ARTIST

LIFE IN FINE DETAIL WORDS ALEX FYNES-CLINTON

THE CREATION OF truly special artwork requires an inimitable drive. Many are drawn to the easel by a question, message or curiosity. Others for the simple joys of creation. For artist Marcel Desbiens, the brief is pure. Photo Luke Parminter

“If there is a message, it’s about taking the time to see beauty and enjoy it,” Marcel says.

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“Beauty has always been my theme. The way I explain it to myself is that if I paint beauty and let people feel good, feel happy, then they discover the beauty inside themselves.” Marcel’s work is simply spectacular in its composition. Realised in stunning oils and reflecting the beauty of the natural environment, salt


LILLY IN THE NIGHT

each piece is seemingly endless in its depth of colour and detail, and a lifetime spent staring into one of his works could perhaps not uncover all of its hidden surprises and touches. Marcel says many of his paintings home in on the remarkable elements of nature often overlooked or ignored. “I think the path I took with my painting was more an aesthetic path, not so much of an intellectual path,” he says. “It’s always natural environment, but I twist it a lot. I put elements together that you may not necessarily find in nature together. In a way it’s light surrealism because of the combination. Everything is based around the shape, the lights and the colours. “It’s my way of participating socially in bringing a little bit of positivity and some respect for nature. When people look at my paintings they rediscover something, like a painting of flowers with a close up. I show the intimate part of the flower people normally don’t see.” Marcel’s approach to creation was shaped through curiosity. Raised in Quebec, Canada, he spent the first 10 years of his career in his home country before love brought him to Australia 26 years ago. As a young man, on one of his many trips to visit exhibitions in Quebec, a particularly fascinating show and a fistful of courage would spark his creative fire. “There was a major exhibition and I was so impressed that I made the decision I was going to go down that path,” he says. “It was a group of young artists in their late 20s who were using Renaissance-period technique with a modern twist – it was a little bit surreal. It was really well done, really well executed. “Following the exhibition, I knocked at the door of the artists I’d seen in the gallery. They were about 10 years older than me, but they were very welcoming to me. They welcomed me into the group and shared their philosophy and technique. “That way of working was very involved technically. You needed knowledge and it wasn’t knowledge you could find in an art school. It’s something you need to experiment with to discover how it works.” Marcel tackles each of his works in layers. Large pieces can take around 50 hours at the easel and each coat takes around two weeks >

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ROSE PETALS OVER THE SKY

TO STOP AND HAVE NOTHING ELSE … IT’S LIKE A MEDITATION. I HAVE COMPLETELY EMPTIED MY MIND OF ANYTHING ELSE. 110

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EARTH AIR AND FIRE WITH PETAL AND LEAF


to dry. Much of the time, the painting will remain black and white for the first or second coat before his trademark flourishes of colour are added. The majority of works require at least four different coats, which leaves a lot of time to ponder the next steps in the process. But while many would be overawed, Marcel is a master of multitasking. When preparing an exhibition he will have five or six paintings on the go, with each providing its own opportunity to express a different facet of his vision. “I enjoy painting very much. Life can be busy and it’s very hard to find time for yourself,” he says. “To stop and have nothing else – nobody talking to you, just you and the paint – it’s like a meditation. I have completely emptied my mind of anything else.

PUBLIC ART FOR ROBINA HOSPITAL GOLD COAST, OIL ON CANVAS

“When I paint, and I believe it is the same with other artists, we’re so focused that there is no way we can think about anything else. You don’t have time to think. If you start thinking, you can’t do what you need to do. You need to be completely focused – preparing the colours, choosing the right brush. At the end of the day I will feel really good. Tired, but really good.” While the saying goes that beauty is fleeting, Marcel has honed an ability to capture the splendour of the world around him with a unique sophistication. While some may only pause to consider the beauty of his artistry for a moment, his connection to each piece runs much deeper. With each deliberate brushstroke, he is creating work to enrich and inspire. “I think deeply about whether the painting I’m doing will bring anything to the world,” he says. “It’s a philosophical question. I wouldn’t be happy to paint something that would be just decoration. I believe a painting is a lot more. A lot of people don’t see it that way, but to me it’s like a book you’ve been reading that influenced your life. It’s not just a pile of papers bound together. I believe painting has the same effect.” Marcel Desbiens’s work will be exhibited in Lasting Impressions Gallery Kenilworth from May 8 to May 22. This exhibition introduces the master artist who captures the essence of beauty in his exquisite oil paintings. 6 Elizabeth Street, Kenilworth. 5446 0422 or lastingimpressionsgallery.net


ART DATES

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QUEENSCLIFF 1975 BY ROGER SCOTT, ANMM Collection courtesy the

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APRIL 1 NOOSA FESTIVAL OF SURFING JUBILEE: 25 YEARS OF PURE STOKE Surfing is synonymous with Noosa and in 2016 the Noosa Festival of Surfing celebrates its 25th jubilee year. Co-curated with the Noosa Regional Gallery, the exhibition celebrates local achievements and highlights the history of this ever-popular world renowned surfing event.

DATES

Take a moment to peruse some of the finest works from some of the best galleries on the coast. SEWING TAPA (1974) BY RAY CROOKE oil on canvas, 1000x750mm, $35000

2 WAVES AND WATER– AUSTRALIAN BEACH PHOTOGRAPHY Covering Australian beach culture from the 1930s to 2000, the exhibition includes 35 iconic photographs from seven leading Australian photographers including Max Dupain, Ray Leighton, Jeff Carter and Roger Scott.

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3 COLLECTORS’ CHOICE – THE ICONS OF AUSTRALIAN ART Enjoy the beauty and prestige of paintings by some of Australia’s most iconic and sought-after artists at an impressive exhibition offering collectable art by Blackman, Boyd, Crooke, Dickerson, Doyle, Hart, Juniper, Kilvington, Lindsay, Mora, Namatjira, Olsen, Perceval, Sawrey, Storrier and more. when now to mid June (closed every Sunday and Monday and Good Friday and Easter Monday) where Tiffany Jones Fine Art Gallery, 138 Burnett Street, corner Townsend Road, Buderim. 5450 1722 or tiffanyjonesfineart.com.au

when now to May 1 where Noosa Regional Gallery, Level 1, Riverside, 9 Pelican Street, Noosa. 5329 6145 or noosaregionalgallery.com.au

when now to May 1 where Noosa Regional Gallery, Level 1, Riverside, 9 Pelican Street, Noosa. 5329 6145 or noosaregionalgallery.com.au

photographer

4 AUTUMN EXHIBITION

Hearts and Minds Art continues to showcase a wide range of stunning works by artists, sculptors and furniture makers and will also be holding an exhibition at Graydons Gallery, New Farm from late May to June.

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when open daily throughout autumn where Hearts and Minds Art, Noosa Marina, Parkyn Court, Tewantin. 0418 108 299 or heartsandmindsart.com.au


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REFLECTION BY JEN ROBSON artwork on aluminium panel, 1500x1000mm, $1495

5 KAREN ATKINS Karen’s whimsical, surreal, dreamlike paintings inspired by everyday life transform the ordinary into the wonderful and infuse a sense of meaning into everyday places and objects.

Montville Art Gallery

when April 1 to 30 where Montville Art Gallery, 138 Main Street, Montville. 5442 9211 or montvilleartgallery.com.au

TRACERY BY KAREN ATKINS acrylic on stretched canvas, 910x610mm, $1500

6 FINESSE Finely crafted watercolours from husband and wife, Tony and Dawn Lewis.

7 ANIMAL FANFAIR: HUMANS – ANIMALS – ENVIRONMENT This exhibition challenges audiences to think about how we treat animals, both deliberately and inadvertently. It features works by ten high-calibre Australian artists who address the societal issues underpinning animal/human relationships.

8 ADORNMENTS FROM THE SOUL Renee Blackwell Jewellery Designs exhibits with the vibrant, energetic works from Buderim’s own Kendall. This fusion of wearable art for your body and original artwork for your home is a feast for the eyes.

when April 9 to 30 where Art on Cairncross, Cairncross Corner, Maleny. 5429 6404 or artoncairncross.com.au

when April 13 to May 22 where Caloundra Regional Gallery, 22 Omrah Avenue, Caloundra. 5420 8299 or gallery.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au

when April 30 to May 21 where Art Nuvo Gallery, 25 Gloucester Road, Buderim. 5456 2445 or artnuvobuderim.com.au

April, Karen Atkins

138 Main Street, Montville Opposite the ‘Village Green’

Our “Artists of the Month” for:

May, Olga Garner-Morris

June, Lorraine Burns

Phone: 5442 9211 montart@montart.com.au

Open daily 10 - 5 www.montvilleartgallery.com.au

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10 JOURNEY # 4 BY KEN GAILER oil and acrylic on canvas, 120x1200mm, $7500

POND II BY KERRY ARMSTRONG linen canvas or paper limited edition signed prints, from 610x710mm, from

MAY 9 OLGA GARNER-MORRIS

A talented, versatile artist who thrives on challenge and is best known for her traditional landscape paintings portraying the spectacular scenery of the many interesting places she has called home. when May 1 to 31 where Montville Art Gallery, 138 Main Street, Montville. 5442 9211 or montvilleartgallery.com.au

11 CHIRPY CHIRPY

SQUEAK SQUEAK Delightful ceramic and steel bird and animal sculptures by James L. Peterson raising smiles and also consciousness about reducing native habitats. when May 7 to 29 where Art on Cairncross, Cairncross Corner, Maleny. 5429 6404 or artoncairncross.com.au

12 MARCEL DESBIENS

Art Nuvo are proud to be working with Melbourne artist Kerry Armstrong. Kerry has many years’ experience working with interior decorator / designs and can custom size her print works to suit a range of wall sizes.

Renowned French-Canadian master artist Marcel Desbiens presents his exquisite oil paintings at Lasting Impressions Gallery. His work captures the true essence of beauty which he offers to us as a subtle reminder of our fundamental task, the search for happiness.

when May 1 onwards where Art Nuvo Gallery, 25 Gloucester Road, Buderim. 5456 2445 or artnuvobuderim.com.au

when May 8 to 22 where Lasting Impressions Gallery, 6 Elizabeth St, Kenilworth. 5446 0422 lastingimpressionsgallery.net

10 MONO

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$380

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IN THE LIGHT OF TRUTH (DETAIL), 2016 BY KIM SCHOENBERGER used tea bags, thread, ink and varnish, image by tony webdale


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 EGRETS, YELLOW WATER BY REX BACKHAUS-SMITH watercolour and gouache, 650x490mm, $3600

15 MUTUAL RESPECT – 13 PAPILLON

A sea of 2000 butterflies suspended from the roof of the gallery foyer creates a kinetic sculpture, counterpointed by a specimen wall where thousands of butterflies printed with abstract imagery have been pinned for closer observation. when May 25 to July 3 where Caloundra Regional Gallery, 22 Omrah Avenue, Caloundra. 5420 8299 or gallery.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au

JUNE 14 LORRAINE BURNS

A multi award winning artist renowned for her colourful, realistic still life paintings, Lorraine is also highly regarded for her ability to capture the naturalness of sun-smart youngsters playing innocently at the water’s edge. when June 1 to 30 where Montville Art Gallery, 138 Main Street, Montville. 5442 9211 or montvilleartgallery.com.au

REX BACKHAUS-SMITH, RICK EVERINGHAM, TOM MCAULAY AND MICHAEL NICHOLAS Four senior Queensland artists reunite, each of whom has been painting for more than 45 years with remarkable artworks and careers to their credit. This exhibition is born out of genuine mutual respect and is a coming together of a significant part of Queensland’s cultural history. when June 25 to July 10 where Art on Cairncross, Cairncross Corner, Maleny. 5429 6404 or artoncairncross.com.au

16 SOLO BY THE SEA

John Maitland returns to Art Nuvo for his 2016 solo exhibition, showcasing the expressive and contemporary works in figures and their relationship with the sea. when June 25 to July 16 where Art Nuvo Gallery, 25 Gloucester Road, Buderim. 5456 2445 or artnuvobuderim.com.au

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IN YOUR DREAMS

TURNED UP

LOUD WORDS JANE FYNES-CLINTON PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN

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IT IS LIKE BEING Alice and stepping through the looking glass. The red front gate is emblazoned with a wrought iron sign saying “knock knock” in slightly askew running writing, a hint at the quirky unexpectedness within the home that lies behind it – a visual feast of fun, a riot of colour and a series of spaces that ooze energy. And nothing, absolutely nothing, is ordinary or predictable. But then, neither is the woman who breathed life into this warm, beautiful home. Dui Cameron is well known on the Sunshine Coast as the creator of Boom Shankar, the clothing label with a big heart and an authentic, vintage style that has become a favourite in more than 150 shops and online. Just as her garments are distinct and stylish, so is she. But her modesty and humility reflexively bat such complimentary observations away. Dui, 42, loves colour. She says that to her, colour is life and love and it makes her happy. Her favourite is yellow, but she opens her arms to other hues and shades too. The brighter the colour is, the happier Dui feels and the more she hugs it, loves it and shows it off. Dui’s Peregian dwelling – she also lives part-time in India – was designed by renowned Queensland architect Gabriel Poole, who started producing home designs that minimised environmental impact and featured innovative use of materials a generation ago, before it was the done thing. The house is orientated the right way on the block to make best use of the sun and shade, >


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has high ceilings and the living spaces are divided in part with sliding partitions. There is no need for air-conditioning or heating and there are ceiling fans only in the bedrooms. But when Dui bought the house four years ago, it was an unpolished gem despite being more than 20 years old. The walls were bare cement sheets linked with black joiners; there was no landscaping nor true garden. So she let her mind run free. She and her sister Sally whitened the walls – she says they “painted hardcore” for a week – to provide a blank backdrop for Dui’s dynamic artworks. The industrial linoleum stayed, as did the industrial-style partial mezzanine with a metal grate floor that hovers above the lounge room. Her son Charlie, 12, who has a passion for making music and art, uses the space to make both on his own and with friends. The yard was brought to life with native gardens that now attract birds and wildlife. Dui is a self-proclaimed “mad gardener”, and she has added a swimming pool and a roomy timber deck to the

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vista in the front yard, perfect for Harry, her golden retriever/ poodle cross who she rescued 18 months ago. The inside living space is packed with knick-knacks, art and sculpture. There are bird ornaments of vibrant colours, seashells organised in careful patterns in one place, but randomly scattered in another, baby dolls sitting amid seaside scenes in wall-hung dioramas. It is fun, it is wild and it is certainly unique. And everywhere there is space, air and glass. An ornament depicting Frida Kahlo with a plant growing out of her beautiful head is one of several Perspex items in the lounge room made by Lovestar, a Brisbane brand by designer Helen Bayley whose hallmarks are creations that combine strange bedfellows, acrylic neon and nature. Dui’s home is stuffed with curios and collectables, oddities and ornaments. “For years, my nickname was ‘trinket queen’,” Dui says. “I would buy things off the street if they appealed to me; I have >

• building design • residential interiors • commercial interiors • furniture consultancy & design • investment property refurbishments p. 07 54473255 f. 07 54473299 e. carole@ct-design.com.au shop 8b arcadia walk po box 613 noosa heads qld 4567

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The Country Collection SHOP ONLINE www.giddyandgrace.com never had one style or colour – but I know when I see something that I must have it. When I get something new, my son is most likely to say ‘not another cushion!’ My home is certainly busy, but then my life is busy too, so that seems OK to me.”

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Charlie is a collector too. His bright and light room has an impressive collection of snow globes, Lego, toy cars and Star Wars memorabilia. The artworks on Dui’s walls are as various as her curios. There is a stunning piece by indigenous artist Minnie Pwearl and an equally striking but vastly different piece by internationally-acclaimed Brisbane street artist Anthony Lister. Eclectic is not an expansive enough word for Dui’s taste. The acclaimed designer also has a penchant for mid-century and vintage furniture. She says she is very grateful to midmodoz at Peregian Beach for sourcing a gorgeous fully restored 1960s’ turquoise Danish-style Parker lounge and rare 1950s’ teak daybed/chaise with rattan back. The adjacent oval-shaped mid-century dining table by Berryman is teamed seamlessly with a set of genuine, fully restored late 1950s’ teak chairs by Parker and English G-Plan sleigh-leg sideboard. Dui recently finished renovating the main bathroom to incorporate a black-and-white chequerboard floor and an enormous free-standing bath with free-standing tap. Now she has plans for the kitchen. “I know what I want – and for a start it is not to be cooking in the corner,” she says. “I want to be in the middle of the room. I love cooking and I make a mess, and I want to be in the middle of whatever is going on in this room.”

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One thing is certain – in Dui’s kitchen, colour will feature.

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“Bright colour is not just about art or clothing, it is in everything, and we feel best when it is everywhere. I mean in our food, in our garden – everywhere we look and taste and be. I like the world to be turned up loud. Colours just make me happy.”

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HOMEWARES

THE

STYLING

ARRANGEMENT LIFESTYLE EDITOR BRISEIS ONFRAY

OUT WITH THE JADED OR SUN-FADED AND IN WITH A REFRESHING ARRANGEMENT OF COLOURS, TEXTURES AND STYLES. RE-STYLE THE LIVING ROOM WITH A NEW COFFEE TABLE, RUG OR ECLECTIC SUITE OF PRINT-POPPING CUSHIONS. UP-CYCLE RETRO FURNITURE. INTRODUCE ANOTHER COLOUR TO THE KITCHEN. AUTUMN-CLEANSE INTERIOR SPACES WITH SOME FUNKY LOVING. OOH, YEAH!

Milly and Eugene tea lights. $35 set of 3. Things of Metal and Wood, 45 Wises Rd, Maroochydore. 0407 011 772 or thingsofmetalandwood.com.au

Armadillo&Co Rugs hand-crafted and fair trade rugs in various colours and patterns for indoor and outdoor use. POA. Available at Larissa Ella Design, showroom opening soon in Cooroy. 0439 764 668.

Sunnylife Avalon natural bamboo cutting board in contrasting colours. $39.95. Dare Gallery, Maroochydore Homemaker Centre, 11-55 Maroochy Boulevard, Maroochydore. 5453 6929 or daregallery.com.au 122

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‘SC55’ TV chair by Fred Lowen for FLER. Iconic mid-century Australian chair made in 1955 with ‘surfboard’ arms. Fully restored and reupholstered in peacock blue in the cargo commercial fabric range from Warwick Fabrics. $745. midmodoz, Shop 3, 2 Kingfisher Drive, Peregian Beach. 5448 2314 or info@midmodoz.com.au


Cristina Re teacups and saucers with 24k gold trim and gift box in a range of colours. $37.50. Hearts and Minds Art, 1 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads. 0418 108 299 or heartsandmindsart.com.au

design studio and retail space rugs, fabric and colour samples Interiors advice and consultation

Eclipse coffee table featuring recycled timber from the Hornibrook Bridge, Redcliffe, demolished in 2011. $1199. Available at Recliner House, Maroochydore Homemaker Centre, 11-55 Maroochy Boulevard, Maroochydore. 5443 6800 or reclinerhouse.com.au

The space reflects the collaboration of custom and selective products, fabric sampling and design advice Practical in-store quoting available

Larissa Ella Design 16B Maple Street, Cooroy QLD

Élitis scatter cushions and linen. From $200. Carole Tretheway Design, Shop 8b, Arcadia Walk, Noosa Heads. 5447 3255 or ct-design.com.au

M 0439 764 668 P 5447 7584 | W larissaelladesign.com.au

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MEET THE DESIGNER

PASSION MORE THAN SKIN DEEP WORDS PENNY SHIPWAY PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

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WHEN YOU THINK of a tattoo artist words like ‘sophistication’ and ‘exclusive’ don’t usually come to mind – let alone the thought of being picked up by boat for your appointment. But Noosa tattooist Sam Clark works his own way when it comes to his craft of inking skin, adding an air of tastefulness and tranquillity to the process (yes, you read that correctly). Sam and his wife Polly can often be seen escorting clients across Noosa River in their little boat and taking them to their hidden, creative retreat, the location kept private and known only to paying guests, friends and family. Sam says they do this so they can keep their studio as harmonious as possible, unlike the hustle and bustle of a regular tattoo shop, where people are coming and going, and often interrupting the session. Here the award-winning tattooist wants his clients to have his utmost attention and to feel completely relaxed and comfortable. “I burn incense and essential oils before and during the creation process,” he says. “It helps relax my clients as well as me, and creates a peaceful, comfortable space. Listening to music is what really gets my brain working. I think it helps my brain to relax and then the ideas start coming to me.” Transporting his clients over water is all part of the thrill and adventure. “A lot of people don’t realise that we can pick them up by boat and get super excited,” he says. “It really gives the clients a nice start to the experience. We’re lucky to live in such a beautiful part of the world, so to be able to share it with people from other countries and other parts of Australia is something special.” Originally from Sydney, Sam and Polly had always dreamed of moving to Noosa and took a punt in moving five years ago. “I was so busy tattooing in Sydney, and we had this thought of giving people a completely different tattoo experience where they could relax, maybe even have a couple of days’ holiday, and collect a piece of art on their body in a comfortable and peaceful environment,” Sam says. “We’ve both been visiting Noosa since we were kids and really enjoyed the warm weather, waves and slower pace of life compared to the busyness of city life. Everyone seems friendlier and more relaxed up here. Polly and I will be here forever hopefully. We’ve made some great friends and love the lifestyle we have at the moment.” Before becoming the internationally-regarded tattooist he is today, Sam was working two jobs as a landscaper and packaging surfboards at a factory. And it was at the surfboard factory where his creative spark truly ignited. “I was amazed at the airbrush artistry on the surfboards and decided to start painting my mates’ surfboards. After a couple of months mucking around I started doing portraits and landscapes, and all sorts of commission work on canvas,” he says. “A friend came around to pick up their artwork and said, ‘why don’t you become a tattoo artist?’ and I just laughed in his face and kept doing what I was doing.” But his mate had planted a seed and just a week later Sam was knocking on the door of every tattoo shop he could find, pleading for an apprenticeship. The knockbacks made him >

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I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS A NATURAL GIFT OR MAYBE I WAS ALWAYS STRIVING TO IMPROVE.

angry and hungry. Sam bought every book he could find on tattooing and read them all in a week. “I practised on fruit, fake synthetic skin and then later on my friends,” he says. After almost six months of intense self-coaching, Sam perfected a portfolio he was proud of and took it down to a new tattoo shop in Sydney’s Dee Why, hoping this time someone would take a chance on him. And they did. “The guy working called the owner to come down and I was freaking out. I thought he was going to break my fingers and tell me to stop tattooing, but he looked at my work and asked me to start the next day. I was in shock.” Breaking into Sydney’s tattoo scene is near impossible if you aren’t a part of the community’s tight-knit clique, Sam says, where contacts are everything. “So it was a huge surprise that I got the job,” he says. “I was over the moon.” 126

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Art had always been in Sam’s life and is in his veins. From an early age he was drawn to creating.

and also sculptor Bernini. But his biggest life heroes are his dad and Polly.

“My mum was an artist and gave me paintbrushes and pencils to distract me, and I would draw for hours,” he says. “I don’t know if it was a natural gift or maybe I was always striving to improve from my last squiggle with each new creation, but art always seemed easy for me through school.”

“My dad has been so supportive of me throughout my career and he’s 69 and still working like a horse,” he says. “His drive to succeed in whatever he does really stands out to me. And Polly has been through some tough times in her life and her determination and perseverance really motivates me to push through whenever things get a little hard.”

After a stint in graphic design, which he felt was “too rigid”, Sam tried some landscaping to be in the outdoors, and where there was still an element of designing and creating. But he says it’s his tattoo artistry which has him skipping out of bed each morning, with clients travelling from South Africa, Sweden, Norway, UK, Europe, Canada, USA, New Zealand, and across Australia, to utilise his craftsmanship. He was even commissioned to do a T-shirt design for multi-national US surf label Hurley. Sam says some of his biggest influences have been classical painters Rembrandt, Da Vinci, Monet, Caravaggio and Mucha,

Sam says he knew Polly was special the moment she walked through his Sydney studio doorway. “When she came in I jumped at the opportunity to tattoo her. It was like a beautiful ray of light walked into the shop and I fell in love with her straight away.” And yes, Sam has given her a few tattoos since, including her leg, ribs and even her armpit. “She has an incredible pain tolerance,” he says. samclarktattoos.com

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Dear salt-y readers, We hope you enjoyed your autumn dose of salt. Follow us @saltmag and share your Sunny Coast moments via #saltmag for your chance to WIN a year’s subscription to salt magazine. The team at salt. xx MAROOCHYDORE

@SALTMAG #autumngiveaway

TOURIST INFORMATION

CLIMATE No wonder it’s called the Sunshine Coast, with an average of seven hours of sunshine daily (one of the highest amounts in the world). Autumn (March to May) days are always popular with visitors with an average temperature between 13°C to 25°C and an ocean temperature of 24°C. Temperatures in the hinterland can be several degrees cooler. SCHOOL HOLIDAYS March 25, 2016 to April 10, 2016. MARKETS Blackall Range Growers Market, 316 Witta Road, Maleny, third Saturday of the month (except January), 7am to noon. Caloundra Country Markets, 17 Buderim Street, Currimundi, every Sunday. Caloundra Markets, Bulcock Street, Caloundra, every Sunday, 8am to 1pm. Cotton Tree Street Market, King Street, Cotton Tree, every Sunday, 7am to noon. Eumundi Courtyard Village Market, 76 Memorial Drive, Eumundi, every Saturday, 8am to 2pm, Wednesday 8.30am to 1pm. Fishermans Road Sunday Markets, Fishermans Road, Maroochydore, every Sunday, 6am to noon. Kawana Waters Farmers’ Market, Stern Street, (Sportsman Parade end), every Saturday, 7am to noon. Maleny Market, Maple Street, every Sunday, 8am to 2pm. Nights On Ocean, Ocean Street, Maroochydore, second Friday of the month from 5pm. Noosa Farmers’ Market, AFL Grounds, Weyba Road, Noosaville, every Sunday, 7am to noon. 128

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EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS Ambulance, Fire Brigade, Police, Coastguard, Rescue......................000 Poisons Information Centre...............131 126 Ambulance Transport........................131 233 TRAVELLING DISTANCES Brisbane to Caloundra........................ 100km Brisbane to Mooloolaba...................... 105km Brisbane to Nambour......................... 110km Brisbane to Noosa ............................. 148km Noosa to Montville............................. 56 km Mooloolaba to Maleny........................ 41km Caloundra to Kenilworth..................... 77km SURF SAFETY PATROLS (Times vary between 7am – 5pm) Year round 7 days/week Noosa Heads, Sunshine Beach, Peregian Beach, Coolum Beach, Twin Waters Resort, Maroochydore, Alexandra Headland, Mooloolaba, Dicky Beach, Kings Beach. TO STAY SAFE AT THE BEACH REMEMBER: Too much exposure to the sun can cause serious damage to your skin. Make sure whenever you are going in the sun that you take adequate precautions. SLIP, SLOP, SLAP, SEEK AND SLIDE Slip on a shirt (preferably a long-sleeved shirt). Slop on the sunscreen (+30 reapply as needed). Slap on a hat. Seek some shade. Slide on wrap around UV protective sunglasses. It’s also a good idea to avoid direct exposure to the sun during the hottest part of the day – between the hours of 10am and 3pm – and try to take advantage of shade when possible.


DIRECTORY

USEFUL INFORMATION

WHEN VISITING THE SUNSHINE COAST MEDICAL

SKIN

General Practice and Skin Check Clinic Open 7am - 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am - 5pm Saturday and Sunday. Coolum Village Shopping Centre 8-26 Birtwill Street, Coolum Beach. 5471 6333 lookingafteryourhealth.com.au

Early skin cancer detection. Scan QR code with smartphone for details

Children under 16, pension concession and DVA card holders. Bulk bill.

Surgical and non-surgical treatments. Suite 1, Kawana Private Hospital, 5 Innovation Parkway, Birtinya. 5438 8889 skinsurveillance.com

*

Peregian Springs Doctors Open 8am to 5pm Monday to Friday Coles Peregian Springs Shopping Centre, 1 Ridgeview Drive, Peregian Springs, 1st floor above Amcal Pharmacy. 5471 2600 lookingafteryourhealth.com.au Children under 16, pension concession and DVA card holders. Bulk bill. *

Would you like to advertise in our directory? Contact salt magazine 0412 210 281

ADVERTISE WITH SALT FOR FREE* Each edition salt gives away a third page advertisement worth $1100 to a worthy non-profit organisation that tugs on our salt strings. This edition we’re proud to donate a third page advertisement to the Leukaemia Foundation Queensland. If you know or are a part of a non-profit organisation that needs to spread the word, please let us know. To find out more visit saltmagazine.com.au and click on the free ad link.

Each year hundreds of people on the Sunny Coast are told they have a blood cancer. Â

You can help them. leukaemiaqld.org.au

saltmagazine . com . au

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SHOPPING CENTRES: SF state forest

MAP

NP national park SF state forest SF state forest NP national park

NP 1 national park highway major road

1

KEY: highway state forest SFMAP

golf 1 courses highway

state park forest major road NPSF national

1 major airport highway road

minor roadnational park 1 NP highway

road golfmajor courses minor road

major golf roadcourses

minor road N airport

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minor airport road

minor road

ON THE COVER: Pincushion Island

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Map Disclaimer: This map was not created to any scale, and no claim is made to its accuracy. Most natural features are eliminated, as are changes in elevation. This map does provide a starting point for finding your way around. Map depicted is subject to change.

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AP UC AR T TM IO EN N TS

D I S C O V E R F I R S T C L A S S I N M O O L O O L A B A A collection of private and contemporary beach apartments designed for modern-day living with quality finishes. Exclusive common area with sun-deck and stunning swimming pool. Private fitness area and barbecue facilities for entertaining. Experience the first class Mooloolaba lifestyle you have always dreamed of. • 67 BOUTIQUE APARTMENTS • 100M TO BEACH • WITHIN MOOLOOLABA’S BEACHSIDE SHOPPING, CAFÉ AND DINING PRECINCT

2 BEDROO M, 2 B AT HROOM F ROM

$

439,000

Average price $520,000 on level 11

F O R M OR E I NF O R M ATION co nt a c t N i ck Cri ss on 0403 001 992 w w w. f i rst l i ght m ool ool aba.c o m.au

2 5 - 2 7 F I R S T AV E N U E Whilst every effort has been made to accurately describe the details as outlined herein, the agent nor the vendor accepts responsibility for the accuracy of any information contained herein or for any action taken in reliance thereon by the purchasers. Purchasers should make their own enquiries to satisfy themselves as to all aspects of the development. All model, marketing materials, artist’s impressions and plans in relation to the development are conceptual and illustrative only. All plans, concepts and materials to be used in the development are subject to approval from all relevant authorities. Changes may be made without notice to the whole or any part of the development.

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IS BORN OF THE PUREST PARENTS, THE SUN AND THE SEA” PYTHAGORAS

Profile for salt magazine

salt magazine - autumn 16  

s a l t magazine is a quarterly tourism and lifestyle publication based on the Sunshine Coast of Australia.

salt magazine - autumn 16  

s a l t magazine is a quarterly tourism and lifestyle publication based on the Sunshine Coast of Australia.

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