__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

CASTLE HILLS • HILL COUNTRY VILLAGE • HOLLYWOOD PARK • SHAVANO PARK • NORTH SA

LOCAL COMMUNITY NEWS LOCA LCOMMU NI TYNE WS.CO M | VO L . 9, I SSUE 3 | SE PT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

TREAT YOURSELF

OFFICIALS REPORT ANIMAL FOSTERS, ADOPTIONS ARE ON THE RISE DURING COVID-19 HOME LOCKDOWNS

PG. 16 | EAT LOCAL

BLACK RIFLE COFFEE

Java worth a salute

by MIRANDA KOERNER

WHILE THE PANDEMIC may seem like a bad story to housebound humans, many shelter animals are getting fairy-tale endings with placements on the rise.

Even critters with health conditions are finding love, as people under quarantine or working from home add four-legged friends to the family for companionship and affection during the COVID-19 crisis. In fact, at the Animal Defense League of Texas on the Northeast Side, 27 large-breed dogs — many “longtimers” — are now with new owners or “fosters,” said Jamie Gibson, SHELTERS continues on pg. 10

PG. 18 | EAT LOCAL

BREW MONKEY BEER

Go bananas over suds

PG. 03 PG. 06

COMPLETE CALENDAR LIST TO PLAN AHEAD

HAPPENING LOCAL

LOCAL LOWDOWN

NEWS BRIEFS AND BUSINESS OPENINGS

PG. 08 | ROADWAYS

RAMPING UP

New access for 281/1604


One Body One Life

Restore Refresh Renew

2 STAFF SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

PUBLISHER Jaselle Luna EDITORIAL Editor

News Staff

Thomas Edwards

Edmond Ortiz

Contributing Writers

Olivier J. Bourgoin, Miranda Koerner. Noi Mahoney, Arthur Schechter and Susan Yerkes ART Designer

E. Fisher Contributing Artist

Jeremiah Teutsch Contributing Photographers

Alfonso Rios and RB Ornelas ADVERTISING Senior Media Representative

Dawn Radick and Joanne Torres Multimedia Account Representative

Michael Valdelamar Controller

Gracie Cortinez READER SERVICE Mailing Address

4204 Gardendale St., Ste. 107, San Antonio, TX 78229 Phone: (210) 338-8842 Fax: (210) 465-9455

10 years

GIVE US 3 MONTHS MONTHS,, WE’LL GIVE YOU

Call to Schedule a complementary consultation with our Medical Director Bill Murphy MD. Start your journey toward renewal.

(210) 253-3313 turquoisesprings.com

14800 San Pedro Ave, Ste 202, San Antonio, TX 78232

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Advertising@localcommunitynews.com STORY IDEAS: tips@localcommunitynews.com OUR OTHER PUBLICATIONS North Central SA: 78204, 78205, 78209, 78210, 78212, 78215 Metrocom: 78109, 78148, 78233, 78239, 78108, 78132, 78154, 78266 South San Antonio: 78204, 78205, 78210, 78214, 78223, 78235 Reproduction in whole or in part without our permission is prohibited, 2020 Local Community News LLC, all rights reserved.

ON THE COVER – As a result of work-at-home orders, remote learning and lockdowns due to COVID-19, area shelters say they are experiencing a rise in animal adoptions and placements in foster residences. This happy pooch outside San Antonio’s Animal Care Services is on his way to see a ‘fur-ever’ family. See story on page 01. Photo by Alfonso Rios The LOCAL Community News editorial board includes Jaselle Luna and Thomas Edwards.

TALK LOCAL

Mask up Quit fussing, and wear a mask.

There’s no question protective face coverings limit the spread of maladies, including COVID-19. There’s historic precedent for putting on a mask. Doctors and nurses have worn them for decades. People donned face coverings during the great pandemic of 1918. If masks save lives, yours and other’s, no doubt they should be utilized. It’s wearisome in the 21st century to hear debates over whether government orders to employ protective face coverings violate civil liberties. The answer is no. Wearing a mask is common sense. So what if the government tells you to do it? Each time you get in your car, you’re following official mandates — clicking a seat belt, carrying a driver’s license, making sure your inspection and registration are up to date and, hopefully, possessing valid insurance. By and large, no one objects to these directives. So, why all the howling about mask-wearing if it keeps you and your neighbors safe? People can shelve them after a vaccine is developed or restrictions are relaxed. Until then, show some consideration and put one on. EDITOR THOMAS EDWARDS tedwards@localcommunitynews.com


SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

SEPTEMBER

PLAN YOUR MONTH WITH OUR CALENDAR OF UPCOMING EVENTS IN THE COMMUNITY.

HAPPENING

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S

Next City Council/ School District Meetings

3

SEPT. 8 & OCT. 13

SEPT. 9

Stone Oak neighborhood representatives meet at 7 p.m. in The Club at Sonterra, 901 E. Sonterra Blvd. For updates or cancellations, visit http://www.stoneoakpoa.com.

Drive

A sewing club meets from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Encino Park Community Center, 1923 Encino Rio St. Bring a power strip or extension cord. For updates, contact Sylvia Jolet at sjolet@earthlink.net or call 210497-3383.

Aspen Lane

SEPT. 9

Hollywood Park: 6 p.m. Sept. 15; 2 Mecca Hill Country Village: 5 p.m. Sept. 17; 116

Shavano Park: 6:30 p.m. Sept. 21; 900 Saddletree Court Castle Hills: 6:30 p.m. Sept. 8 & Oct. 13; 209 Lemonwood Drive Northside ISD: 7 p.m. Sept. 22; 5900 Evers Road North East ISD: 5:30 p.m. Oct. 12; 8961 Tesoro Drive

LOCALCOMMUNITYNEWS.COM

SEWING GROUP

BUDGET TALK The District 9 City Council office holds a town-hall meeting about the city budget from 7-8:30 p.m. at Methodist Stone Oak Hospital, 1139 E. Sonterra Blvd. For updates, call 210-2070955.

STONE OAK GATHERING

SEPT. 10

BEXAR COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS The board of the Bexar County Master Gardeners meets from 3-5 p.m. at The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Office, 3355 Cherry Ridge Drive, Suite 208. Free and open to members. For updates or cancellations, email President@ bexarmg.org. HAPPENING continues on pg. 05


OPINION

4

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

A good reason to cover up by SUSAN YERKES

TO MASK OR NOT TO MASK? Why is that even a question?

There are many strange, disturbing and unexpected things about life with “the Rona.” Six months ago, you only saw face masks worn at Halloween, bank robberies and on raccoons. Way back then, no one imagined donning personal protective equipment to go to H-E-B. Who could have predicted the loss of jobs, mobility, gatherings, birthday parties, and going to restaurants and cinemas, or the quarantining of older relatives behind locked doors and Plexiglas? Even now, after the enormity of this world-changing pandemic has hit home, the fallout seems surreal. Just as surreal is the fact that when we should all be working together to defeat a common enemy — the sneaky,

spiky novel coronavirus — many have politicized the malady, defying public closures, having “COVID parties” and angrily protesting directives to wear face coverings in public. I mean, really? Come on, people.

VISTA DERMATOLOGY MEDICAL • SURGICAL • COSMETIC

DR. KARLA MUÑOZ IS ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

27511 IH-10 W Bldg 2, Boerne, TX 78006

P: (210) 698-0500 | F: (210) 698-0600 www.vistadermsa.com

My anti-mask friends are quick to point out government officials “flip-flopped” on mask-wearing early on. That was before they fully understood how infectious and dangerous this virus is. It was before people realized you can be infected and not know it, but still spread the disease. An infected person may be most contagious even before symptoms appear. Now, we understand the contagion largely travels through the air by coughing, talking or even breathing, so health officials strongly recommend wearing masks in public, especially indoors or near others. They also encourage physical distancing and frequent handwashing. How well does all this work? The numbers clearly indicate it slows the spread. Fewer hospitalizations. Fewer deaths. You don’t do those things just to keep yourself safe. You do them to keep others safe, too. If you are infected and don’t know it, you could kill your friend. Something we do know about COVID-19, or any highly contagious, airborne bug: The more people have it, the more people will get it. The less folks are in a position to infect others, the less it will be able to spread. That’s the in-school or homeschool dilemma, fraught with difficult choices. But, where individual adults are

concerned, it seems to me that if requiring a leash and tags for your pets doesn’t violate your rights, I can’t see how mask mandates do. On the lighter side, face coverings can save women a ton on makeup. It’s also harder to pick your teeth in public. A friend’s 90-year-old mom, suffering from potentially embarrassing denture problems, was delighted to be able to take walks and visit her doctor without having to explain herself. On the serious side, we all need to stop bickering and blaming. Dr. Ruth Berggren, director of the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics at UT Health San Antonio, knows more than most about infectious disease. I love the way she puts it: “In this war, we need to fight the virus itself, not each other. ... Until we get better drugs and vaccines, our best weapons in this war are masking, handwashing and 6-foot distancing. These are weapons. They are not infringements on our liberty.” We’re all on the same side in the battle against the pandemic. Let’s stop fighting each other. Stay well, y’all. syerkes@localcommunitynews. com

One of the most well-respected and award-winning journalists in South Texas, Susan Yerkes pens a column each month for LOCAL Community News. A veteran of newspapers, television, radio and online, she calls San Antonio home.


SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S

HAPPENING continues from pg. 03

SEPT. 12 & OCT. 10 SUPPORT GROUP

Myasthenia gravis sufferers meet on the second Saturday of each month (excerpt July and August) from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Baptist HealthLink, 288 W. Bitters Road. For updates or cancellations, visit www.mgsouthtexas. org.

SEPT. 12

HOLLYWOOD PARK GAME NIGHT Hollywood Park residents only are invited to gather at 8 p.m. at Voigt Park, 700 El Portal Drive, for a Disney trivia contest and entertainment from DJ Troutwine. Social distancing

will be enforced. Spread out on blankets and lawn chairs. For updates or cancellations, visit https:// hollywoodpark-tx.gov/.

SEPT. 12-14 ROLL’ EM

Watch a film festival from the comfort of your home at 8 p.m. The Barshop Jewish Community Center presents a series of movies. Cost is $15. To register, plus updates, cancellations and titles, visit https://www.jccsanantonio.org/index.php?src=events&srctype=detail&category=Arts%20and%20 Culture&refno=5330.

SEPT. 15

TEACHING TOLERANCE The San Antonio Chapter of Hadassah

HAPPENING

5

invites the community at 5:30 p.m. to a free Zoom video-conferencing program about eliminating bullying among youths. It’s led by Lisa Van Horn Barry. To RSVP, plus for updates, send name and email address to hlb@texas.net before Sept. 10.

Center’s Holzman Auditorium. Free popcorn. Walk-ins are welcome. The JCC is on the Campus of the San Antonio Jewish Community, 12500 N.W. Military Highway. For updates or cancellations, call 210-302-6860.

SEPT. 16

FALL CLEANUP

STONE OAK POA A meeting is at 3:30 p.m. in the Property Owners Association offices, 19210 Huebner Road, Suite 100. For updates or cancellations, visit http:// www.stoneoakpoa.com.

SEPT. 17 & OCT. 1

SEPT. 19-27 Dumpsters will be on-site at Hollywood Park City Hall, 116 Aspen Lane, to receive unwanted materials. For updates or cancellations, visit www.hcv.org.

SEPT. 23

DISTRICT 9 NEIGHBORHOOD ALLIANCE The alliance gathers at 7 p.m. in Stone Oak Methodist Hospital, 1139

SILVER CINEMA

Enjoy a free, 1 p.m. movie for seniors at the Barshop Jewish Community

HAPPENING continues on pg. 07

LOCALCOMMUNITYNEWS.COM

Director of Admissions Lisa Rosenfeld

www.antonian.org | 6245 West Avenue, San Antonio, Texas 78213 | 210.344.9265

lrosenfeld@antonian.org

ACADEMICS 100% graduation rate 98% college acceptance rate $19,541,392 in college scholarships (Class of 2020)

TECHNOLOGY 1:1 Chromebook use New classroom technology Upgraded internet infrastructure

ANTONIAN STRONG Call Us Today!

With education and safety as our top priorities, the overall well-being of our students is our focus. We are dedicated to providing the highest quality education. At Antonian, we understand that it is in times like these, one major benefit of Catholic education is needed most -- community. We invite you to learn more and become part of our family.

EXTRACURRICULAR Grade-level retreats 25+ clubs and organizations Volunteer opportunities Dynamic athletic program

Get Social With Us At: Lisa @antoniancollegeprep @antoniancollegepreparatoryhs


6

LOWDOWN

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

Open and Opening Soon TAKE A QUICK LOOK AT WHAT’S NEW IN THE COMMUNITY FROM OPENINGS AND CLOSINGS TO NEWS TIDBITS.

BLACK RIFLE COFFEE CO., 180 W. Bitters Road, is a premium small-batch coffee-roasting enterprise offering different custom-roasted beans and coffee blends. The company, started by service members, is dedicated to hiring and promoting veterans and first responders. The Salt Lake City, Utah-based concern has been undergoing expansion in Texas, having opened a site in Boerne. Besides java, Black Rifle serves pastries for breakfast, plus sandwiches and other items for lunch. Hours are 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and 5 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. For more, visit www.blackriflecoffee.com/pages/bitters-retail. (See story on page 16)

BREW MONKEY BEER CO., 11935 Starcrest Drive near Blossom Athletic Center, is the brainchild of Jim

Hansen, a seasoned brewer who strove four years to get it off the ground, according to an online post. Offerings include West Coast India pale ale, Steam beer, Bavarian Hefeweizen, Irish stout, and honey blonde ale. Also available is house-made, nonalcoholic ginger beer and root beer. Hansen said patrons visiting the taproom can play games, bring four-legged friends, grab grub from a food truck and “learn about good beer.” Hours are 4-10 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, and noon to 10 p.m. weekends. For more, call 210-474-0234 or visit brewmonkeybeerco.com/. (See story on page 18)

IN OTHER NEWS:

CONGREGATION AGUDAS ACHIM RECENTLY WELCOMED Senior Rabbi

Five-star Medicare plan. Five-star quality and service. Take advantage of a top-rated Medicare Advantage plan — only from UnitedHealthcare.® UnitedHealthcare is proud to receive 5 out of 5 stars+ in 2020 which means you can enroll in this plan at any time throughout the year. AARP® Medicare Advantage SecureHorizons® (HMO) plan may include: $0 copay for primary care visits

Dental, vision and hearing coverage

$0 monthly premium

Free rides to or from the doctor

Go ahead, take advantage. You can switch to a five-star Medicare Advantage plan anytime. Call me to find out more.

Patty De La Garza Licensed Sales Representative

210-488-6826, TTY 711 AARPMedicarePlans.com Sí, hablo su idioma.

Every year, Medicare evaluates plans based on a 5-star rating system. +CMS Star Rating applies to H4590-010-000, which includes AARP® Medicare Advantage SecureHorizons® (HMO) in the state of Texas. This plan is rated 5 out of 5 stars for 2020. You may enroll only once during the Special Enrollment Period (SEP), December 8 – November 30. Benefits, features and/or devices vary by plan/ area. Limitations and exclusions apply. Plans are insured through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or one of its affiliated companies, a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in the plan depends on the plan’s contract renewal with Medicare. UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company pays royalty fees to AARP for the use of its intellectual property. These fees are used for the general purposes of AARP. AARP and its affiliates are not insurers. You do not need to be an AARP member to enroll. AARP encourages you to consider your needs when selecting products and does not make specific product recommendations for individuals AARP does not employ or endorse agents, producers or brokers. ©2019 United HealthCare Services, Inc. All rights reserved. H4590_191029_113532_M SPRJ51855 00238C75

Sharon Cohen. Newly relocated from Lexington, Kentucky, she brings more than 20 years of rabbinic experience to town. “With

LOWDOWN SPOTLIGHT

gratitude and excitement, I accept the honor of joining the Agudas Achim family as the new senior rabbi,” Cohen said.

REAGAN HIGH SCHOOL SOPHOMORE MAYA CASTAÑEDA spent five weeks this summer sewing 100 clearview masks and donating them to North East Independent School District. Castañeda is just one of many NEISD students and staff helping during the ongoing pandemic, according to a district statement. “I think right now, it’s really important to give back and help,” she said. More than 60 volunteers are working to meet the district’s need for coverings. “Our goal is to have around 1,500 to 2,000 masks,” said Jan Greer DeHaven, NEISD’s director of special education. “So, this is a huge help.” LOWDOWN continues on pg. 19

BLACK RIFLE COFFEE CO.


SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S

HAPPENING continues from pg. 05

E. Sonterra Blvd., classrooms No. 1 and No. 2. For updates or cancellations, call President Art Downey at 210-497-8873.

SEPT. 24

military members and guests are invited to an 8-10 a.m. meal at Lupe Tortilla, 21103 U.S. 281 North. For more, contact www.post10.weebly.com.

OCT. 3

SHRED DAY

This cancer support group for adult survivors ages 20-40 and their loved ones meets from 6:30-8 p.m. at La Madeleine, 722 N.W. Loop 410, Suite 201, at Park North. For updates or cancellations, email Chelsea.hart@lls. org or call 210-998-5127.

Shavano Park holds a Shred Day from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at City Hall, 900 Saddletree Court. Officials recommended destroying documents such as credit card offers, old IRS tax forms, bank checks and household bills. For more, including updates or cancellations, call 210-493-3478 or visit https://www.shavanopark.org/.

OCT. 3

OCT. 3

On the first Saturday of each month, all

“3 Miles for Texas Smiles Family Fun

IT’S A ‘C’ THING

AMERICAN LEGION BREAKFAST

READY, SET, GO!

HAPPENING

5K Run” is 9 a.m. at Walker Ranch Park, 12603 West Ave. Proceeds benefit local dental-clinic programs. For costs, updates or cancellations, visit https://www. athleteguild.com/running/sanantonio-tx/2020-3-miles-for-texassmiles-family-fun-5k-run.

OCT. 4

OFF AND RUNNING The 19th annual “Army-Dillo 10/20 Miler” is 7:30 a.m. at Valero Park’s Leon Creek Greenway, behind the Drury Inn & Suites at 15806 Interstate 10 West. For registration, updates or cancellations, visit https://www. purnellracing.com/UpcomingRaces.html.

LOCALCOMMUNITYNEWS.COM

CO MMUNI -CA RE -H E A LTH C E NTE RS

7

OCT. 6

NATIONAL NIGHT OUT Castle Hills, Hollywood Park, San Antonio and Shavano Park are celebrating National Night Out, with attendees promoting community unity and safety. Meet your neighbors and local first responders. Also, Hollywood Park will have small block parties. For times, updates or cancellations, visit each of the individual city’s websites or https://natw.org/registration.

OCT. 24

FALL FEST The Hidden Forest Homeowners Association’s Fall Festival is 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The HOA needs volunteers to HAPPENING continues on pg. 17


8

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S

ROADWAYS

SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

North Side freeway project ‘ramps up’ TXDOT DEBUTS FLYOVERS AT 281, 1604 by EDMOND ORTIZ

MID-AUGUST marked a milestone on the North Side when the highway department opened connections from U.S. 281 North to Loop 1604 designed to reduce delays.

The Texas Department of Transportation debuted flyover ramps from the southbound main lanes of 281 to eastbound and westbound main lanes of 1604. The ramps are the latest addition to an ongoing expansion project designed to improve traffic flow and reduce congestion on one of Texas’ busiest roadways. “We are excited to share this milestone with the community as we move forward with our initiative to reduce travel delays on the most-congested corridor in the San Antonio area,” TxDOT District Engineer Mario Jorge said in a news release. TxDOT is overseeing the installation of

two more ramps at 281 and 1604 by the end of 2021. One will guide motorists on westbound 1604 to northbound 281; the other will lead drivers on eastbound 1604 to northbound 281. Overall upgrades, estimated at $532

million, are meant to provide a range of improvements between 1604 and Borgfeld Drive, including two nontolled general-purpose lanes and one for highoccupancy vehicles utilizing ride-sharing in each direction, including buses operated by VIA Metropolitan Transit. “The expansion project will bring much-needed relief to the 91,000 drivers that travel on the corridor each day,” Jorge said in the release. “Once complete, this project will reduce motorist delays by 660,000 hours every year.” According to TxDOT, nearly four years of work on the first segment of betterments between 1604 and Stone Oak Parkway is on track for completion in 2021. The second, started in 2019 from the parkway to Borgfeld, is slated to end in late 2023. Roadwork on the latter portion will result in new highway lanes from Borgfeld to Evans Road, frontage roads

Southbound U.S. 281 North flyover ramps at Loop 1604 went operational in mid-August. Courtesy photo/Texas Department of Transportation

accompanied by bicycle and pedestrian paths, and HOV lanes linked directly to and from VIA’s Stone Oak Park & Ride facility. Also, expect several auxiliary upgrades, such as sidewalks, driveways, traffic signals and pavement markings to enhance safety along the corridor. The COVID-19 crisis has affected some aspects of the constructionindustry pipeline, but TxDOT says the outbreak hasn’t stymied the 281 expansion project. “We work closely with contractors to identify opportunities to advance work on corridors with lighter traffic due to the pandemic,” said Jennifer Serold, a spokeswoman for TxDOT’s San Antonio District office. “On a case-bycase basis, several projects have been able to extend lane closures and close additional lanes where traffic volumes are low. This increased flexibility has allowed contractors to increase work

PROJECT UPDATES

Here's a status report on current North Side infrastructure projects powered by San Antonio’s voter-approved 2017 bond:

• Evans Road from U.S. 281 to Caliza Drive — design phase, behind schedule. • Auldine and Burr Oak drives drainage — design phase, on time. • Vance Jackson Road lowwater crossings — design phase, on time. • De Zavala Road from Interstate 10 to LockhillSelma Road — construction phase, on time.


SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S

ROADWAYS

hours and expedite work.” Serold added, “TxDOT continues to monitor traffic volumes and work with contractors to make adjustments as necessary.” Funding for the undertaking comes from TxDOT, San Antonio, Bexar County, VIA, the Advanced Transportation District, plus state and federal dollars administered by the Alamo Area Metropolitan Planning Organization. The approval of Proposition 7, a previous state initiative, and the Texas Clear Lanes program both provide further financing for major nontolled roadway enhancements such as those around 281. Find this story and more at www. localcommunitynews.com.

9

Looking west at the new southbound U.S. 281 North flyover ramps at Loop 1604. Courtesy photo/ Texas Department of Transportation

LOCALCOMMUNITYNEWS.COM

TELEMEDICINE F O R A D U LT C A R E , P E D I AT R I C S , & B E H AV I O R A L H E A LT H !

B O O K O N L I N E TO D AY !

COMMUNICARESA.ORG


10

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S

PETS

SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

SHELTERS continues from pg. 01

director of lifesaving initiatives at ADL. Fostering an animal means providing temporary care until a “forever” home is found. “When the stay-at-home orders were released here in San Antonio, my applications increased by three times, which is the best problem I’ve ever had,” Gibson said. “It gave us a chance to take care of our distemperoutbreak dogs, because they can recover, but still be shedding the virus so they can’t be around other dogs.” She added, “(With extra fosters), they didn’t have to recover in our isolation unit, but got to go be with

families and be a normal dog. We had a huge outpouring of support from our community and the surrounding areas. The best silver lining I could ask for.” Rescue groups citywide put out foster calls and locals answered. Donna Legendre-Hofmann, a San Antonio Humane Society foster for four years, said she found new meaning housing animals amid the outbreak. The retired West Avenue Elementary School educator even permanently adopted two, including a cat named Blossom. The feline originally arrived at the shelter with road rash and half an ear missing, which led to skin-graft surgery. “(Fostering) became particularly important to me during the pandemic because I started getting depressed about all of life’s changes,” Legendre-

Hofmann said. “I desperately needed to busy myself. As a retired specialeducation teacher, I was used to being busy and didn’t do well with a lot of free time. I have fostered dozens of kittens, but my favorite foster situation is fostering pregnant cats. I believe my current foster is (my sixth).” Legendre-Hofmann’s current “cat mama” Skittles, and kittens Perry, Mason, Hamilton, Drake and Della, have provided her with a way to nurture others in a time of seclusion, particularly for people unaccustomed to being housebound. “Honestly, Skittles and her litter saved me,” she said. “The distraction was so needed. I think for folks who are forced to stay at home, the time

for fostering couldn’t be better. The bonds are very important to me. No matter how busy I am, I make time for them. Socialization is paramount for my fosters and my personal pets.” Animal Care Services, which runs the city’s animal shelter on the West Side, is delighted oncecrowded kennels are becoming sparse these days. From April to June, 438 pets got fostered; 93% found full-time domiciles. The next month, 94% of the shelter’s animals found outside lodgings. “There’s a lot of pets finding homes here, especially in July,” said Alfonso Rios, an ACS

Fostering cats and kittens during the pandemic lockdown ‘saved me,’ said Donna LegendreHofman, a retired North East Independent School District teacher. She is shown with Della at the San Antonio Humane Society. Photo by RB Ornelas


SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

spokesman. “We definitely have seen more people wanting to step up during COVID because a lot of people are at home and have more time. They’re more willing to foster a pet in these times.” ACS received $20,000 from the Petco Foundation, which matched fundraising efforts with relief grants to rescue organizations nationwide. The nonprofit donated $1.8 million to 80

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S

SA ANIMAL CARE SERVICES

438 PETS got fostered

93 PERCENT

FOUND

FULL-TIME DOMICILES APRIL-JUNE 2020

94 PERCENT of

THE SHELTER'S

ANIMALS FOUND OUTSIDE LODGINGS JULY 2020

$1.8 MILLION

from Petco Foundation to

80 DIFFERENT

GROUPS

TO OFFSET FINANCIAL DIFFULTIES CAUSED BY THE CORONAVIRUS

different groups to offset financial difficulties caused by the coronavirus. By itself, ACS raised more than $25,000. When combined with the Petco support, the figure totaled $48,649. Funding will better the lives of sheltered animals and create virtual activities in lieu of the Shelter Paws program, where families take a dog for the day. “We want to improve their quality of life and engagement with the community and provide more events, such as lower-cost adoptions,” Rios said. “With the Petco Foundation money, we can provide more and it’ll help us with our volunteer program and our veterinary care as well.” “We distribute these grants to empower organizations to use these funds for the biggest lifesaving impact in their community, whether that be for adoption programs, medical care, spay/ neuter services or to help pet owners in financial need,” echoed Jennifer Perez, a Petco Foundation spokeswoman.

LOCALCOMMUNITYNEWS.COM

PETS

11

“It’s such a challenging time for animal-welfare organizations (and) we’re happy these matching grants provided support during COVID-19, brought more awareness of these hardworking groups, and sparked additional community support,” she added. Still, for every furry adoption, another is waiting, said those involved in animal rescues. “Every foster is literally saving lives,” Gibson said. “Every animal they save not only is a part of that animal’s happy-ending story, but it starts a happy-ending story for another animal.” Find this story and more at www. localcommunitynews.com.

THE TIME FOR FOSTERING COULDN'T BE BETTER” DONNA LEGENDRE-HOFMANN, RETIRED EDUCATOR

STERILIZE YOUR HOME, OFFICE, AND CLASSROOM. 99.9%

Sterilization

Rate

-

Portable

-

Less

Than

an

Hour

REDHAWK UV STERILIZATION (210)842-1261

-

(866)4REDHAWK

RedHawkMedicalProducts.com


12

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S

CREATIVE

SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

Art in a time of pandemic ARTISTS, GALLERIES, MUSEUMS TURN INNOVATIVE DURING COVID-19 by EDMOND ORTIZ

MANY NORTH SIDE ARTISANS, museums and galleries struggling during the ongoing pandemic have found creative ways to stay connected with their audience.

While Olmos Park Terrace artists originally hoped to spend a November weekend welcoming visitors to their neighborhood as part of the 20th annual Uptown Art Stroll, the tour now may be online only. “In the spirit of community safety and care for our neighbors, the decision

was made to abstain from a face-toface event and leave the door open for a virtual event, and possibly a date in

BELOW: The McNay Art Museum has safety protocols in place for visitors and staff alike. RIGHT: North Central artist Augusta Brook Rosser believes the pandemic has spurred innovation, while galleries such as Artpace provide free Wi-Fi in the parking lot (inset). Courtesy photos


SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S

the spring,” a press release from event organizers stated. Planners hope to instead post photos of artists working in their studios and images of the art they have been creating during the pandemic. The public may follow along at www. uptownartstroll.org or www.facebook. com/UptownArtStroll. Indeed, public-art spaces have resorted to lessening capacity or taking only appointments to permit visitors. Many galleries are using their websites and social media to livestream workshops, tours and other programming. Monthly activities such as First Fridays in Southtown are on hiatus. This year’s editions of Fiesta and Luminaria and their art-vendor opportunities are canceled. Overall, there are some relief efforts, including a Facebook page encouraging support for local artists: https://www. facebook.com/groups/supportartistsinsanantonio/. Businesses such as Artpace are giving back to the community with free public Wi-Fi in its parking lot at 513 N. Flores St. San Antonio has authorized $2.6 million in federal relief funds for local, nonprofit arts organizations and individual craftsmen. Roberto Treviño, the District 1 councilman, proposes creating an Art WORKS program, suggesting San Antonio boost its public-art investment by collaborating with builders to accommodate public art at new developments. “Whether in the form of murals, sculpture or functional art, (art’s) existence in public places adds vibrancy to cities and strengthens community bonds,” Treviño said. “Public art also provides jobs.” According to the COVID-19 Impact

Survey for Artists and Creative Workers, more than 60% of these individuals nationwide have become unemployed, and nearly 100% lost income. Artist and resident Celine Casillas Thomasson said many need exhibits like Art Stroll and live shows “to make a go of it financially.” “It’s really devastating. All those opportunities to make money are just gone,” she added. However, local artists such as Thomasson and Augusta Brook Rosser believe COVID-19 has spurred innovation. Rosser, a North Central resident, paints from home, promotes through social media and has sold works at AnArte Gallery. “I think that being forced to be home not only opened up additional time to create paintings, but also inspired me to use social media to share my creative process in a way that I hoped would inspire others to create while also at home,” she said. “Some videos simply show me painting while others demonstrate how to use tinfoil to create a heart or paint flowers on a grocery bag,” she added. Because more people are housebound, they want to buy art to hang on the walls, Rosser suggested. “I’m happy to provide a colorful and happy image for people’s homes. Even when things aren’t going so well, I try and focus on the positive in my art,” she added. Thomasson said she barely worked at her craft during the outbreak’s first two months. “You need to focus on this loss, and then claw your way back to a place where you think, ‘Now, I have room in my heart and my head, and I have energy to do this,” she said. Thomasson and her colleagues said some creative people may struggle if

LOCALCOMMUNITYNEWS.COM

CREATIVE

13

However, we are seeing visitation slowly build week after week,” said Rachel Trevino, the museum’s communications and marketing head. “We have received feedback that visitors are enjoying ‘having the museum to themselves’ and being able to take in the art and the scenery of our grounds in a spacious and open environment.” Other art organizations are going virtual to continue tradition. Blue Star Contemporary’s Red Dot Art Sale, set for Sept. 23, will feature a virtual augmented reality experience in which the viewer walks around the room to get a “feel” for being inside the Southtown art space. The regular Red Dot exhibit can be viewed in person or online Sept. 23-Oct. 4. Find this story and more at www. localcommunitynews.com.

they cannot afford web service at home, are not digitally savvy or don’t have a built-in audience. Museums, too, have adjusted to a “new normal.” Area institutions such as the Witte Museum, McNay Art Museum, San Antonio Museum of Art, and Briscoe Western Art Museum all installed safety and cleaning protocols to accommodate reduced guests. Still, special events and regular public activities at these sites are postponed or canceled. The Briscoe also experienced layoffs. Meanwhile, the McNay is proceeding with its long-range landscaping master plan, having added three outdoor sculptures. “We have experienced lower-thanaverage attendance, as expected.

THREE CONVENIENT CAMPUSES SERVING SAN ANTONIO I

NORTH CENTRAL: 12222 Huebner Rd STONE OAK : 20615 Huebner Rd. DOMINION : 6185 Camp Bullis Rd.

G FRUITFUL CHILDREN GROWIN

www.

GRO

Contact 2


14

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S

SPORTS

SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

Soto off and running as Johnson’s new coach SAFETY KEY FOR PLAYERS DURING PANDEMIC by EDMOND ORTIZ

MARK SOTO has known plenty of wins on the gridiron during his high school playing and coaching careers.

He now seeks to continue a victorious tradition at Johnson High School, where he’s beginning his first year as athletic coordinator and head football coach. In addition, Soto wants to ensure pupils, parents, school employees and community members are kept fully informed about

campus happenings during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. “Our No. 1 goal is the safety of

STAY SAFE STAY HEALTHY SHOP LOCAL

\Here Today. Here Tomorrow. Always LOCAL. We’re moving forward together.

Contact us to learn more about our timely and affordable marketing options to reach your engaged neighbors.

210-338-8842 LOCALCOMMUNITYNEWS.COM/CONTACT

everybody. The only way to earn the trust of parents is to be transparent in everything we do,” he said. Soto attended Judson High School, playing for the legendary D.W. Rutledge and the perennial powerhouse Rockets’ program. He lettered three years and was a starter for two. He would later serve as an assistant coach there. Soto also served with Phil Danaher and David Sanchez, among the winningest coaches in Texas high school football history. Soto spent much of the last decade as head coach of San Marcos High School, leading the Rattlers to the playoffs three times, including a District 14-6A title in 2017. At Johnson, he succeeds Ron Rittimann, who left for the same positions at Alamo Heights High School. Rittimann, the Jaguars’ first coach/ athletic coordinator, compiled a 74-59 record and eight postseason appearances in 12 seasons. “These past 12 years have been a blessing to me and my family. I want to thank all athletes, coaches, parents and supporters who have been a big part of growing a successful athletic program at Johnson High School,” Rittiman said in a statement. Soto initially thought about a career in coaching as a junior high school student, and became the first in his family to go to college. He earned a bachelor’s degree in physical education from Missouri Valley College, where he played football, lettering four years and starting his last three. “My parents were the ones to show me there was a better way of doing things,” Soto said. Early on, he found himself “enamored by coaches, the air they had, the way they commanded a

room.” Attending Judson, Soto found a system built upon consistent leadership and positive character traits, which coaches shared with players. “It was definitely a process that worked there,” he added. Soto wants to convey similar lessons he’s learned over time, as both player and coach, to Johnson’s student-athletes. There are four portions, or “pillars,” in Soto’s system. The first is a passion to build one’s integrity by teaching teenagers to set goals, make good decisions and hold themselves accountable. A second part regards effort — to strive for the best in everything. No. 3 is healthy competition breeds success. “I’m not going to rest until the people next to me, and the people who come after me, are better people,” he added. And, finally, have a positive attitude, regardless of the situation. “Every time you wake up, you’re going to be an optimist, not a pessimist,” Soto said. “What we put in is what we put out.” During the pandemic, Soto suggested parents and neighbors help students develop proactive behavior, and be consistent with them when it comes to wearing masks, social distancing, refraining from large gatherings, plus whatever else is required to stay safe and limit exposure. “It’s going to take a village to build those habits,” he added. Find this story and more at www.localcommunitynews.com.


SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S

NISD alum returns to lead Clark High ZIMMERMAN STRIVES TO KEEP FAMILIES INFORMED DURING ONGOING PANDEMIC by EDMOND ORTIZ

CLARK HIGH SCHOOL’S new principal has come full circle in the Northside Independent School District.

Growing up a military brat, Steve Zimmerman and his family moved around a bit – including being stationed in San Antonio. When his father retired from the Army, the Zimmermans settled in the Alamo City. From there, Zimmerman built a career in education, which led to his new job as the top educator at Clark. Zimmerman succeeds Jerry Woods, who was promoted to NISD assistant superintendent for high school instruction. “I have always wanted to be around kids and work with them,” Zimmerman said. NISD administrators said Zimmerman is a good fit for the school. “Northside ISD welcomes Steve Zimmerman to our district and to the Clark High School community,” said Ray Galindo, deputy superintendent of administration. “He is following in the footsteps of some great campus leaders and we are very confident that he will continue the work they started in fostering success and excellence.” After attending NISD’s Marshall High School, Zimmerman earned a bachelor’s degree from St. Mary’s University, and a master’s in education from Schreiner University. Zimmerman recalled his father taking up teaching and coaching in the Somerset Independent School District after leaving the service, and he was inspired to follow in his dad’s footsteps. Prior to starting the 2020-2021

academic year as the Cougars' new principal, Zimmerman spent the past three years as principal of Madison High School in the North East Independent School District. He previously worked at three other NEISD campuses — Churchill (where he coached the 2003 boys’ soccer state champs) and Johnson high schools, plus Driscoll Middle School. He also had jobs at Judson and New Braunfels Canyon high schools. Zimmerman said becoming principal at Clark fulfills a longtime dream. “Being a product of Northside (ISD), the reputation of success and high achievement at Clark was well known to me,” Zimmerman said. He added the feedback from the Clark community has been great. “I have felt very welcomed by parents, students and staff. I have been impressed to find that a large portion of the Clark staff have been a part of the Clark family for well over 15 and even 20 years.” NISD began the new academic year Aug. 24 with all students participating in remote learning due to the LOCALCOMMUNITYNEWS.COM

EDUCATION

COVID-19 pandemic. District campuses were to remain closed to in-person classes until at least Sept. 8, following Labor Day. Zimmerman said he and his staff will work hard to keep everyone as informed as possible, especially with novel coronavirus restrictions. “This applies to all aspects of Clark life —athletics, fine arts, clubs and organizations, and instruction. I believe in being completely transparent with information,” he said.

I HAVE FELT VERY WELCOMED.” STEVE ZIMMERMAN, CLARK HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL

15

He added: “This time of uncertainty can lead to undue anxiety and a child’s school should not be a source of adding to that anxiety. Although information from the state (Texas Education Agency) and (San Antonio) sometimes makes our job difficult, we must remember that we are all part of the NISD family and that we will get through this together and be stronger for it on the other side.” Find this story and more at www. localcommunitynews.com.

Rich in tradition, Devoted to care, Together in community.

Faith Based INDEPENDENT LIVING • ASSISTED LIVING MEMORY CARE • EXTENDED NURSING CARE • In-Home Care provided by Sisters Care at The Village • Mass offered twice a day • Multiple floor plans • Learning opportunities at UIW

• All faiths welcome • Two locations for dining • Social & recreational activities • Transportation available six days a week

TheVillageIW.org Call Us Today! 210-610-8457 License

#’s 000777 (AL-A) 101505 (AL-B), 100473 (ALZ), 011872 (HCSSA)


16 EAT

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

Why should you move your loved one into a senior living community during a pandemic? Socialization Activities help residents stay engaged and boost morale.

LEARN ABOUT THE NEWEST NEIGHBORHOOD PLACES FOR BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER.

HOURS ARE CURRENT AS OF PRESS TIME, BUT CHECK WITH THE BUSINESS FOR UPDATES.

Safe Environment

Most outlets of the Salt Lake City, Utah, enterprises are either franchises or independently owned, a spokeswoman said. “It’s (West Bitters) the first, nationwide, that’s company owned,” said Miranda Riddle. The 3,000-square-foot space, once home to a Taco Cabana and more recently the short-lived Market Barbecue, will employ about 40 people. Army veterans Evan Hafer of Utah and Mat Best of El Paso — a Green Beret and a Ranger, respectively — are partners in the company, formed in 2014 and known for its pro-USA and pro-guns outlook, videos and ads. The business is dedicated to hiring and promoting veterans and first responders. Shane Baker, a San Antonio resident who served 24 years in the Army, including in a tank division, is director of retail. Black Rifle Coffee travels far and wide to find the best coffee beans, he said. “Mr. Hafer goes all over the place to source beans from small, family-owned independent

We monitor everyone daily for symptoms and limit visitors. Access to Medical Care Therapy services, doctor visits, pharmacy delivery and more are offered in-house. Do you need more reasons that NOW is the time to make a move? Shavano Park Senior Living is here to help.

growers,” he said. The brand name is a nod to the armed forces, and its slogan is “Premium, fresh coffee. By Veterans, for Patriots.” The coffeehouse is a premium, small-batch coffee-roasting enterprise offering numerous beans and blends, and committed to martial themes reflected by names such as Silencer Smooth, Gunship Coffee Roast and AK-47. Hours are 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and 5 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Find this EAT Local at www. localcommunitynews.com.

More than 50% of staffers at Black Rifle Coffee Co. stores are veterans. A new outlet opened at 180 W. Bitters Road, serving java ‘for patriots,’ according to the company. Photo by Olivier J. Bourgoin

BLACK RIFLE COFFEE CO.

Call us today! 210.492.4040

by OLIVIER J. BOURGOIN

NEWLY OPENED BLACK RIFLE COFFEE CO. is taking aim at bad java with its first company-owned outpost at 180 W. Bitters Road.

Three Meals a Day No grocery store trips, no expensive delivery services – we bring it to your door!

Veteran-owned coffee shop digging in

180 W. Bitters Road For more, visit www. blackriflecoffee. com/pages/ bitters-retail


SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S

HAPPENING continues from pg. 07

FRIDAYS

LOCAL PRODUCE help with planning and activities. For more, email Amanda Conine at amandaconine@gmail.com.

MONDAYS

SO, YOU THINK YOU CAN SING San Antonio Chordsmen, a barbershop chorus, rehearses at 7 p.m. in The Backdoor youth center behind Colonial Hills United Methodist Church, 5247 Vance Jackson Road. Auditions open to newcomers. For updates or cancellations, visit sachordsmen.org. Meanwhile, The Friends in Harmony Chorus also exercise vocal cords at 6:45 p.m. in University United Methodist Church, 5084 De Zavala Road. For updates or cancellations, contact Wendell Peters at wendellpeters@ sbcglobal.net.

TUESDAYS

WEIGHT-LOSS SUPPORT GROUP T.O.P.S., or Take Off Pounds Sensibly, meets at 10 a.m. (weigh-in 9-9:45 a.m.) inside House of Prayer Lutheran Church, 10226 Ironside Drive. For updates or cancellations, call Carolyn at 210-415-0937.

TUESDAYS AND SATURDAYS OLMOS BASIN FARMERS MARKET

San Antonio Farmer’s Market Association offers area growers’ farm-fresh produce from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 100 Jackson Keller Road. For updates or cancellations, visit sanantoniofarmersmarket.org.

THURSDAYS

STONE OAK ROTARY CLUB Guest speakers visit the group from noon to 1 p.m. at The Club at Sonterra, 901 E. Sonterra Blvd. For a schedule, lecturers, updates or cancellations, visit www.stoneoaksarotary.org.

Drop by St. Matthew Sports Complex & Recreational Area, 11121 Wurzbach Road, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and support local growers as the San Antonio Farmer’s Market Association presents farm-fresh products. For updates or cancellations, visit sanantoniofarmersmarket.org.

SATURDAYS

FARMERS’ MARKETS Come to 16607 Huebner Road from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for local and organic produce, plus baked goods and handcrafted products. For updates or cancellations, visit hillcountryfarmersmarket.org. Also, Four Seasons Market, 11602 Huebner Road in Huebner Oaks shopping center, sells wares from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. For updates or cancellations, call 972-884-0680.

ONGOING

NEVER TOO OLD TO LEARN North East Independent School District Community Education and Northside Adult & Community Education offer programs with courses for all ages. For the former, most classes are taught in NEISD facilities or the district’s Community Learning Center, 8750 Tesoro Drive. For updates or cancellations, visit https://communityed.neisd.net or call 210-407-0140. For the latter, to get information on course registration, schedules, venues, costs, updates or cancellations, visit www.nisd.net/ace.

ONGOING

HAPPENING

17

2020-2021 academic year. For more including program participants, visit https://www.nisd.net/news/ thousands-northside-students-eatfree-school-year.

ELSEWHERE IN SAN ANTONIO

SEPT. 10 & OCT. 8

ALTRUSA INTERNATIONAL At work in San Antonio since 1928, the international nonprofit — striving to make communities better through leadership, partnership, service and charity — holds 6:30 p.m. meetings at Mimi’s Cafe, 17315 Interstate 10 West. For updates or cancellations, visit https://districtnine.altrusa.org/sanantonio/.

SEPT. 12-13

CHORAL AUDITIONS The San Antonio Choral Society holds online auditions by appointment only. Fall activities include Zoom vocal and music-reading lessons and other COVID-19 safe options. For updates, cancellations, and schedule placement, email director@ sachoralsociety.org.

SEPT. 16

CANCER SUPPORT GROUP UT Health San Antonio offers a group setting for women with gynecologic cancers. Meetings are 6-8 p.m. at the Medical Arts & Research Center, 8300 Floyd Curl Drive (first-floor conference room B). Free parking. For updates or cancellations, visit uthealthcare.org/ purple or call 210-450-9500.

COMBATTING STUDENT HUNGER

SUBMITTING EVENTS: Email all the

Forty-nine Northside Independent School District campuses serve free breakfasts and lunches during the

details along with your contact information two months in advance to tips@localcommunitynews.com.

LOCALCOMMUNITYNEWS.COM

HORMONE IMBALANCE ISSUES FOR WOMEN OPTIONS FOR DEALING WITH YOUR EMOTIONAL ROLLER COASTER Author: Mike Anderson, RPh Don’t let anyone tell you, “It’s all in your head”! When the ovaries begin to sputter, proper hormone balance begins to sputter also, causing erratic cycles which often relate to highs and lows in estrogen, progesterone and other sex hormones. Thereby creating “an emotional roller coaster”. In the years leading up to menopause (perimenopause), bleeding during your period may be heavier or lighter than usual. Forgetfulness, foggy thinking, mental confusion, thinning hair, depression, breast tenderness, and mood swings are symptoms experienced by many women. These are in addition to the more common hot flashes, night sweats, tearfulness, difficulty sleeping, weight gain, thyroid issues, and declining interest in sex. Not all women experience these symptoms. As individuals we each have our very own biochemistry and metabolism. But it is very common to experience one or more of the above listed symptoms at some point. The degree, to which you experience discomfort, is likely to be associated with the degree to which your hormones are out of balance. The amount of each hormone individually is not as important as their ratios to each other. A disturbance in the ratio of estrogen to progesterone may result in many of the symptoms of perimenopause and menopause, which may increase the risk for serious hormone related complications. So, what can you do? Test yourself. A simple hormone saliva test is available at the pharmacy to accurately measure your sex hormone levels. For a limited time our pharmacist is offering a free consult to interpret your results (a $150 value), just mention this article. Find out vital information about your health NOW!

14369 Blanco Road San Antonio, TX 78216 P: 210-226-1112 • F: 210-226-1119 pharmacist@mixingpharmacy.com Find us on facebook @ themixpharmacy


18 EAT

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

LEARN ABOUT THE NEWEST NEIGHBORHOOD PLACES FOR BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER.

HOURS ARE CURRENT AS OF PRESS TIME, BUT CHECK WITH THE BUSINESS FOR UPDATES.

Go ape over beer at new Brew Monkey by EDMOND ORTIZ

OPENING A BRICK-AND-MORTAR business during a pandemic, much less a microbrewery, might seem a risky venture.

But don’t tell that to Jim Hansen. In late August, the San Francisco native and veteran brewer debuted his own place, Brew Monkey Beer Co. The watering hole is located at 11935 Starcrest Drive, inside Blossom Business Park, a short jaunt from McAllister Park’s dog park and soccer fields.

Local artists’ work can be found inside Brew Monkey Beer Co.’s taproom. Courtesy photo

15 Months - Pre-Kinder Afterschool Care 1st through 5th grades Summer Camp 5 through 10 year olds Located on Six Wooded Acres - With a Pool! 824

(210) 696-0213 www.suburbanschool.com

Join

LOCAL as a

Multi-Media Sales Representative

We’re looking for dedicated individuals who want to be a part of a great team! Responsibilities include servicing and growing accounts within an assigned geographic territory within San Antonio. • Paid Holidays • Base Salary • Paid Vacation

• Commission • Bonuses

Interested? Email your resume and cover letter to: Careers@localcommunitynews.com Localcommunitynews.com

Brew Monkey’s taproom has limited capacity and other coronavirus safety measures. Patrons’ options include five core beers: a West Coast India pale ale, honey blonde ale, Bavarian Hefeweizen, Irish stout and a lager. Hansen and brewer Lou Gonzalez, a fellow ex-Californian, use reverse osmosis at Brew Monkey, producing different regional water profiles. “We’re traditional with our techniques, but we’ll also be innovative,” Hansen said. Brew Monkey will rotate other styles of beer, plus offer nonalcoholic ginger beer and root beer, both made in-house.

Pints, flights, crowlers and merchandise are available on-site. The latter two can also be ordered online or curbside to take home. Providing a family- and dog-friendly environment, Brew Monkey also has games and TVs inside the taproom, with some outdoor seating. A food truck is parked there each day the taproom is open. Guests can also see local artwork displayed on interior brick walls. Hours are 4-10p.m. Wednesday through Friday, and noon to 10 p.m. weekends. Find EAT Local at www. localcommunitynews.com.

BREW MONKEY BEER CO.

11935 Starcrest Drive For more, call 210-474-0234 or visit www.brewmonkeybeerco.com or https://www.facebook.com/brewmonkeybeerco


SEPT. 8 - OCT. 13, 2020

L O CA L C O M M U N I T Y N E W S

LOWDOWN continues from pg. 06

NORTH EAST INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT TRUSTEES VOTED TO MAKE Nov. 3 (Election Day) a holiday. The declaration allows for more safety and security on campuses during the 2020 general election, as there are 46 voting sites, according to NEISD officials. “Giving students and staff this day off will help lower campus traffic and limit possible COVID-19 exposure to our NEISD community. It will also allow for more time to thoroughly clean and sanitize the areas open to voters,” trustees said in a release.

VIRTUAL CHOIR CLASSES ARE BEING HELD across the North East Independent School District as the academic year kicks off during the COVID-19 outbreak. Singers have online access to how-to guides and videos to help make sessions

LOWDOWN

as collaborative and engaging as possible, educators said. Virtual classrooms allow pupils and parents to navigate music-literacy tools through apps. Audrey De la Cruz, Bush Middle School choir director, said teachers have worked to make students’ experiences as traditional as possible. “We will still sing. We will still create. We will still provide an outlet for emotional expression and understanding. We will not sacrifice the content, or the connection, just because a screen separates us,” De la Cruz said.

CHURCHILL HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR ABBY DIAMOND has launched a website, COVID Survivors Group, where people recovering from coronavirus can share experiences and pool essential items for donations to help others struggling with the malady. Diamond’s father tested positive for COVID-19 last March, and

was put on a ventilator for weeks. He is recovering, Diamond said in a North East Independent School District release, although her dad is dealing with post-illness complications. The group’s members need water, Gatorade, protective masks, blankets, hand sanitizer, and reading materials. Visit https://www. covidsurvivorsgroup.com for details.

BOY SCOUT AND INCOMING REAGAN HIGH SCHOOL FRESHMAN Huston Allen performed an Eagle Scout service project at Vineyard Ranch Elementary School, one of his former campuses.

CHURCHILL HIGH SCHOOL’S Principal Todd Bloomer, and Nimitz Middle School Assistant Principal Chris Castro, were recently named the year’s best in their job title by the Texas Association of Secondary School Principals Region 20. The agency is one of 20 education-service

19

sectors in Texas, covering 56 school districts in 19 counties.

NORTH EAST INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT teachers attending a virtual convocation Aug. 10 learned the North East Educational Foundation was distributing $310,000 in innovative classroom grants to 41 educators this fall. Eight recipients were publicly announced including Cibolo Green Elementary School’s Melissa Perez with $4,000 for her campus’ social-emotional learning class; Hardy Oak Elementary School’s Laurie Darilek and Ashlee Lara applying $5,100 to make large-font books available to dyslexic students and struggling readers; and Churchill High School’s Alejandro Gomez receiving $3,400 for a computerscience drone project.  Find LOCAL Lowdown at www. localcommunitynews.com.

JOIN THE CONVERSATION VISIT US ONLINE TO FIND OUT MORE AND JOIN THE DISCUSSION ABOUT WHAT’S HAPPENING IN YOUR COMMUNITY. LOCALCOMMUNITYNEWS.COM

NOW OPEN FOR DINE IN 1

Three Wayys to Order

Order TO-GO

Alcohol Included! All Wine & Champagne Bottles

50% OFF

2

Curbside

Call In An Order & Pay Ahead! Let Us Know When You Arrive

3

Scuzzi’s Deliveers We Partner with h

Grub Hub – Postmates Uber Eats – Door Dash FAVOR

$5 Off Lunch $20 Purchase

VALID ONE PERSON PER TABLE VALID FOR DINE IN ENTREES ONLY. NOT VALID WITH HAPPY HOUR, TUESDAY HALF PRICE WINE BOTTLES, 2 COURSE MEAL, CHEF FEATURE OR ANY OTHER PROMOTION OR DISCOUNTS. EXPIRES OCTOBER 31, 2020. LOCAL NORTH CENTRAL

$10 Off Dinner $30 Purchase

Shavano Park 210-493-8884

4035 N Loop 1604 W, Unit #102 San Antonio, TX 78257

HOURS: Mon-Thu:11AM-10PM • Fri-Sat:11AM-11PM • Sun:11AM-9PM

scuzzisitalianrestaurant.com

VALID ONE PERSON PER TABLE VALID FOR DINE IN ENTREES ONLY. NOT VALID WITH HAPPY HOUR, TUESDAY HALF PRICE WINE BOTTLES, 2 COURSE MEAL, CHEF FEATURE OR ANY OTHER PROMOTION OR DISCOUNTS. EXPIRES OCTOBER 31, 2020. LOCAL NORTH CENTRAL


*****ECR WSS Postal Customer

Comprehensive Healthcare For Seniors

Prsrt Std US Postage Paid Permit 6450 San Antonio TX

EFFICIENCY MEETS EXHILERATION.Dr. Brown Dr. Valbuena G O NZ A BA-ME D I CA LG RO UP

THE ALL NEW 2018 BMW 530e.

It's All Here At Gonzaba

• In-House Contact Center

A

principleauto

Dealership

North Central Clinic 6487 Blanco Rd. Just Inside Loop 410

BMWofSanAntonio.com Gonzaba.com • (210) 515-4570 877-447-7443 | 8434 Airport Blvd.

4204 GARDENDALE STE. 201

BMW of San Antonio

4204 Gardendale Ste.TX107 SAN ANTONIO, 78229 San Antonio, TX 78229

• Urgent Care

C O M M COMMUNITY U N I T Y NNEWS EWS

NowBMW Offering In-Person Virtual 72 Appointments The all-new 530e iPerformance withand EPA estimated MPGe maximizes efficiency by affording you the ability to power your drive using all-gas, all-electric or an intelligent combination of both. Plus, with features like eBoost Primary • Physical Medicine the Instant Acceleration, and•the ability toCare upload directions and precondition • Specialty Care you Rehabilitation cabin climate remotely from your smartphone, can take charge of&the road, the office and beyond from behind the wheel. • Chiropractic Physical Therapy

Profile for San Antonio Local Community News

LOCAL - North San Antonio - September 2020  

San Antonio city officials are reporting a sharp increase in animal fosters and adoptions during COVID-19 home lockdowns.

LOCAL - North San Antonio - September 2020  

San Antonio city officials are reporting a sharp increase in animal fosters and adoptions during COVID-19 home lockdowns.

Profile for salocal
Advertisement