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Three-way


Three-way Subjects Portraits/Answers / Tim Clark 1/17 Campbell 2/17 Topher Campbell 3/18 David Drew 4/18 Bill Evans 5/19 Angus Hamilton 6/19 Diana Hardcastle 7/20 Christine Kennedy 8/20 Funke & Tomi Oyebanjo 9/21 Gemma Petch 10/22 Freda Sack 11/23 Ron Sidell 12/24 Phyl Kigell 13/24 Neil Sheppard 14/25 Sue Walters 15/26 Sally Bamber 16/26 Robert Taylor 17/27

Painter Sally Bamber and Photographer Robert Taylor welcome you to Three-way. Sally, Robert and sixteen people agreed to be the subject of a painted and a photographic portrait - created completely independently - and were then asked to compare and contrast the two media, describing their experiences of the two different processes and feelings about the results. The exhibition features the portraits and extracts from their written responses. Robert & Sally asked their subjects: 1. Before the start of the project, what were their feelings about being painted and photographed? 2. After their sessions, what were their feelings about sitting for Sally and being photographed by Robert? 3. What were their feelings about the results? 4. How they described themselves and whether their experiences of participating in the project changed that sense of self. 5. We also asked them if they themselves wanted to comment on any aspect of the project.


Exposure Many exhibitions of art, however extravagantly conceptual or challenging in purpose, are nonetheless thoroughly safe exercises. This one is not. This exhibition involves risk and exposure for both of the artists and their subjects. This exhibition allows you the quite probably undeserved privilege of making judgements. And it does not do this in a quiet or oblique way. This is a noisy, brutal exercise of contrast and comparison, in which a photographer and a painter don’t just sit and talk airily about their respective art. They share a subject and without any knowledge of the other’s work, set out to create a portrait which they know will then be viewed in context of the other’s piece. Robert says the pieces were created ‘in anticipation of each other’, but that doesn’t seem to ease the tension or potential for conflict - rather it heightens it. And so, here before us are the results. And ‘results’ they are because this must be an examination of two people, two talents and two fundamentally distinct ways of making a portrait.

So where do you start? Is it quite wrong to be asking yourself which one is better? Which one is a more accurate representation of the subject or the moment or the state of the artist’s mind? You may not want to ask them but the questions won’t go away and so you seek to answer them, knowing this to be an unfairly harsh business. It’s what happens next which is so strange. Because as you move from one pair of portraits to another, the rhythm of the exhibition starts to emerge and - rather than this being the battle you thought it must inevitably become, it starts to become a duet - and a strangely soothing one. Robert and Sally are very different people and what they get from a subject is in some cases extraordinarily different. But all the while the rhythm develops and after a very few pairs of portraits you find that you have stopped comparing them with the mood of an exam invigilator. Instead you are becoming engrossed in the process of trying to understand the subject better, through the very deliberate clues and tricks that each artist seems to have employed. In wondering why a mouth is cast a certain way in one image, you immediately turn to the other for a clue. It isn’t about technique or tricks employed

- it very soon becomes an all-consuming hunt for the truths of personality upon which all portraiture is grounded. You consume the images together - because they are best consumed together. Sally’s process sustains a long moment of many hours. Robert’s creates the moment or attends it. That rhythm stays and builds - to the point where you now need to see the images together in order to feel satisfied. And so the inevitable collision and smash-up never happens. Nothing is broken and nothing is damaged. But that is not something they could have known. The risk was always there.

Rahil Sheikh ARTIST


Tim Clark 1/17 EDITOR


Campbell 2/17 FILM MAKER


Topher Campbell 3/18 FILM MAKER


David Drew 4/18 DANCER


Bill Evans 5/19 ENTREPRENEUR


Angus Hamilton 6/19 JUDGE


Diana Hardcastle 7/20 ACTRESS


Christine Kennedy 8/20 EDITOR


Funke & Tomi Oyebanjo 9/21 WRITER & DAUGHTER


Gemma Petch 10/22 DESIGNER


Freda Sack 11/23 TYPOGRAPHER


Ron Sidell 12/24 ARCHITECT


Phyl Kigell 13/24 ARTIST


Neil Sheppard 14/25 PHYSICS PhD STUDENT


Sue Walters 15/26 RESEARCHER


Sally Bamber 16/26 PAINTER

Robert Taylor 16/27 PHOTOGRAPHER


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Robert and Sally asked their subjects five questions. Here are their answers.

Tim Clark EDITOR 1 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted

None. It’s not something I imagined would ever happen. I would never have chosen to make it happen. b - having your photograph taken?

Well, ditto really. 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

It was very pleasant and very easy. Not difficult or awkward or self conscious. It was very easy to be looked at. b - being photographed by Robert?

The session was a revelation, even when considered separately from the results, which I think flatter me yet show truthful things. I have never felt that cameras much like me - at best, they sometimes tolerated my presence in a composition but never celebrated it; at worst, accurate reflections quickly disabuse me of the fancy that on such a day, in such a place, maybe I could aspire to jolie laid. Vanity without good materials to play with makes for unhappy results. With this in mind, a spotlight turning my way will freeze a rictus smile and embarrassed muscles pull strange faces. But not this once. I don’t know why. Maybe being constantly stoned on painkillers means that selfconsciousness forgets to kick in. Certainly I could feel a spell being woven around me while the questions asked rolled around in my head. 3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you

My first feelings were that I liked it. And then later it kind of settled in and gave me a jolt. It looks a bit scary, a bit skeletal. It’s a bit true. There’s no denying that she has

painted what she sees and it feels true. But I don’t like it. I’m sure there are beautiful paintings of Hiroshima, but you wouldn’t hang them over the fireplace would you?

painter so was apprehensive. Then, because I was flat out, I completely missed the appointment and felt really like I was a flaky person!

b - the photograph of you?

b - having your photograph taken?

First sight of the photographs make the task of answering those questions much easier than I expected. I can say, “Yes, that’s how I see myself,” yet feel no shame in recognition.

I have known Robert for years and he has taken some beautiful photos of me before. I also trust where he is coming from completely as a photographer. We admired each others work over the years. I realise, though I like making images of other people, I don't much like to be in images myself and struggle with how photos and films kind of fix one's identity and image for the viewer. Also that photos somehow are seen as being 'true' and paintings 'interpretative'.

4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

I would not like to try to describe myself. I would only say that I feel, even this late in life, that I have just begun to become the person I wish I had time to develop into. Given time and work, I would have learned to like myself. I think I’m transparently flawed, which at least makes it quite easy for people to see what’s right and what’s wrong and to decide whether to ignore my faults, or to ignore me. The ways of looking at me have changed. I have learnt to be more open to truths in images of myself. That I should not always be looking for a make-over, but rather that an artist’s eye looks for the other, the revelation, the hard stuff and that you can look at yourself in that way as well. There is truth and beauty in ugliness, whatever that word means.

2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

When I met Sally she picked me up in her car and kissed me in such a light and spontaneous non-Anglo way that her warmth just melted all my nerves. Plus she got me a vegan lunch without knowing I was vegan which is a rare and beautiful thing. She stared at me a lot to get my face I suppose and how the light played on it. I am used to doing the looking. So I went into filmmaker mode and asked HER lots of questions. But she was completely charming and disarming. Also she is someone who is surrounded by love and that was evident in her manner and the way she dealt with me. It was uncomfortable sitting still. I am a fidgety person so that was hard. She also worked while listening to music which I do too, so it helped relax me.

No. I don’t think so.

b - being photographed by Robert

Tim died peacefully 9th November 2006.

Campbell FILM MAKER 2 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted

I have never had my portrait painted so I didn't know what to expect. I thought it would take a long time and was worried because at the time I was working on a film production and other freelance projects and thinking maybe I had said ‘yes’ too quickly. I also did not know the

Robert is a long time friend and I felt relaxed to do what he wanted. Also at one point he looked at me in such a gentle, intimate, loving, open way that I let my guard down completely. He understands my dandy stud personality and respects it totally. He does not try to make me pose in a way that makes me feel strange or alien in my body. And also understands how as people of African descent we have a complex relationship to our bodies. Sometimes invisible sometimes hyper-visible. He let me choose the music from his Mac, which was brave as music in your computers is so personal and revealing. We had fun moving to the beat together.

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3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you

I thought the painting made me look like a Maroon warrior. I saw my ancestors in that face and was pleasantly surprised that Sally saw through me and beyond. I hadn't mentioned my guerilla ancestors to her in our conversations. I loved looking at me through her eyes. It was very textural and craft-like and from her head and hands and I am always humbled by people who can draw. I use technology - film and video - to create images usually through a Director of Photography, so one feels like a bit of a cheat. b - the photograph of you? When I saw the photo I thought OMG that look is the look I have in photos of myself aged 7. Then I thought I hope no one can see my chest under the jacket. I was concerned about that when we were shooting because I was not wearing a shirt, an idea suggested by Robert. On reflection I like the calmness of the shot. My gaze is steady and straight on but not combative. My fingers on my chin look beautiful, almost delicate even though I have quite large hands and the texture of the suit looks amazing. 4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

I am not an easy sitter. Maybe because I am second guessing the photographer/painter because I am used to creating images myself. 5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

It was absolutely fabulous to meet Sally. I would never come into contact with her as our worlds would not normally collide. So that was a surprise and delightful. It was great to pose for Robert again. He is a wonderful and creative and sensitive man.

Topher Campbell FILM MAKER 3 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted

I didn’t really think much about it. I was curious to know who Sally was and as this is a project done with Robert I simply hoped that she was a good painter. At one point it occurred to me that she might be an abstract artist. Whatever the outcome I decided that I would simply go with the flow and see what happened. b - having your photograph taken? Not much thought here either. Robert and I had talked about photographing me on and off for sometime, years actually, but it never seemed to happen so I didn’t expect it to happen anytime soon, if at all. However I do remember thinking one day when looking in the mirror it would be cool. Somehow Robert was gonna “immortalize my shit”. I liked that. 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

On meeting Sally I sort of guessed what I might get. She is very at ease with what she does and seems to be as much interested in meeting the people she paints as painting them. I warned her that I was rubbish at sitting still. Or as it turned out lying still, which I was. The painting isn’t flattering, but it’s truthful especially in the eyes. They look lived in, deep and experienced. Very different from my eyes in photographs of a younger me. It was great to have half a day of chillin’ out with a stranger, lying about and then to get to see what the painting was at the end. No down-side here. b - being photographed by Robert? Robert is imposing and challenging with a seductive energy and great laugh. He looks at you with very penetrating eyes when he clicks away. I found this more interesting than anything else. I wasn’t as comfortable as I thought I might be being photographed. It sort of undressed me. In the past I have hid behind a shell such as ‘Director’ or ‘model’. Robert kept saying he was interested in me and asked me to be “myself”. This made me want to say f**k off, so I guess I became uncomfortable with my mild aggression and exposure.

3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you

The painting is kind of brutal, but honest. It has a real truth in the eyes. It is not flattering and I like that. It is really interesting to see oneself in the eyes of a total stranger. Skin tone and contrast is very clear here. It’s shocking really to see such reality. b - the photograph of you? I like this photo. I look handsome and slightly imperial. This is me inside sometimes. Protecting myself before anything happens. When I first saw the picture I was surprised by its very upfront quality, its pride, its self assurance. The eyes speak volumes. They are defiant, challenging even, but not aggressive. Just ready. The colours are stunning too. They reflect a vibrancy. This guy looks very alive. 4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

This is the hardest question to answer, especially at 4am in an LA hotel room. I suppose the first thing I would say about myself now is that I am very masculine, a man. I wouldn’t have said that a few years ago. In both pictures there is a kind of vulnerability. The kind fashioned from experience. A sensitivity. The pictures have confirmed this and I am comfortable with it. However I still see myself as having a long way to go. There is still room for growth. It’s all in the eyes. They communicate so much more than I knew. 5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

It was cool and I look forward to it happening again sometime maybe.

David Drew DANCER 4 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted

At nearly 70 this was my first bona fide portrait. Physically, warts and all is fine; slightly more worrying was what might be revealed beneath the surface. So I was curious but not apprehensive.

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b - having your photograph taken?

I have had many professional photographs taken, but usually in character roles - being somebody else. One reason I became a dancer was to hide behind a different persona. This time it would be me. 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

Sally and I have known each other for thirty years, ever since she drew me extensively for a book of instruction on Ballet partnering techniques. From that experience I knew that she was already a fine draughts-woman, with an accurate and honest eye and I respect and trust her totally. Also, she works very quickly. b - being photographed by Robert?

Robert came highly recommended by Sally and I felt a rapport as soon as we met. The implied intimacy of the sitting meant we cut all the chatter and got straight to subjects which interested us both. 3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you

It has helped me to understand myself better. It captures brilliantly both the surface and the spirit. It manages somehow to be of me, but about him, so I can view it without ego getting in the way. b - the photograph of you?

Kind. Although Robert has too much integrity for that to have been his intention. 4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

A mess of contradictions. Between them, portrait and photograph capture many opposing elements. I feel a bit easier in my skin as the youngsters say. A little more tolerant of this too, too solid flesh. 5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

In its totality, fascinating, imaginative and revealing. Sally and Robert have many qualities in common. Both are highly professional, charming company, relaxed, intelligent and humourous; which made it more of a stimulating conversation than a sitting. They must do it again.

Bill Evans ENTREPRENEUR 5 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted

I’ve always wanted my portrait painted, not because of ego, I think a painting is special and forever and I like the idea of my great, great grandchildren having my portrait on a wall. My wife and three children have been painted by Sally so I was really looking forward to it. b - having your photograph taken?

I don’t like having my photo taken because I never look good and I’ve never had my photo taken professionally. I hate posed, studio portraits. I knew this wouldn’t be one of those, but I was still a bit apprehensive. 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

It was hard to look Sally in the eyes without laughing (which we did plenty of) and it was weird and intense having someone study you for 5 hours, but it was a special experience. b - being photographed by Robert?

Robert was so professional and a lovely guy. We talked, listened to music, laughed and before I knew it, he’d taken 50 shots. Done. 3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you

I really like it, creases, lines and bags. It’s me, it’s a moment in time captured forever. Sally managed to capture how I felt more than than how I look. b - the photograph of you?

It’s a nice, friendly middle aged bloke you would trust with your savings, but I don’t think it’s me. It’s obviously the way I behaved for the camera and I should have been more expressive and silly. 4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

I’d describe myself as expressive and silly even though those characteristics don’t really come across. It’s fascinating seeing how different someone else’s interpretation of you can be.

5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

Thank you for the opportunity to be one of your subjects and part of your inspired project.

Angus Hamilton JUDGE 6 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted b - having your photograph taken?

In both cases a mixture of trepidation and excitement. Enthusiastic about being involved in the project. Anxious about whether I was a worthy subject and about being the best, most cooperative model. A little less so in the case of the photograph as I had both met and been photographed by Robert before. 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

Sally - I was fascinated by the creative process - especially the selection and mixing of the oils on the palette - it seemed nigh on impossible that the 'odd' mixing of colours would produce something recognisable. I thought (worried?) that Sally might be going for something entirely abstract until I saw the work in progress at the end of the first sitting. It was also, frankly, bloody uncomfortable keeping pretty still for 4-5 hours albeit in two sessions. I also remember being uncertain about how to engage with Sally in part because I didn't know her, but also because I fretted that small talk would be distracting. b - being photographed by Robert?

In Robert's case the photography session was easier both in the sense that it was shorter and much less uncomfortable as Robert positively invited me to move around (both all of me and bits of me). I was also more familiar with the whole process of taking a portrait photograph - including all the little mouth exercises. It was also easier to engage and chat as you only had to 'shut up' really on the click of the shutter. It was a bit frustrating not being able to see anything that Robert took that evening. Oh, and finally, I remember that I had been sick and off work for a few days and 'natural vanity' made me wonder what impact that would have on the end result.

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3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you

I thought it was very interesting that independently Robert and Sally chose exactly the same location and positioning within my apartment for the photograph and painting although with very different end results. I really like Sally's portrait. It makes me look rather more steely-eyed and noble than I think I deserve. I also like the combination of darkness and warmth in the colours used - it’s evocative of firelight on a cold Winter's night (which I suppose it was - almost - though there was no fire) or some other single light source lighting the subject. Without meaning to sound vain - I would be happy to have the painting hanging on a wall in my home. I knew when it was finished I wanted to spend longer looking at it. b - the photograph of you?

In Robert's photograph, although it was taken at roughly the same time as Sally painted me and in the same place, the predominant colours are greys and blues and the overall effect is rather cold. I think that I look rather stiff and uncomfortable (which is odd given that the painting experience was far more uncomfortable in reality). I also look rather emotionless - like I'm trying not to give anything away. This may all be the by-product of being unwell! I think fundamentally, although I acknowledge the skill behind the photograph, I do not actually 'like' it. I want to look away from it rather than to study it. 4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

Oh blimey what an awful question (at least the first part). I have no idea how to describe myself - especially when this might be read by people who do not know me at all. I think I should leave the descriptions to others - much easier. I don't think either the portrait or the photo make me feel differently about myself. Sally's portrait makes me LOOK rather more attractive than I feel and Robert's photograph a little less so, but I don't think either alter my fundamental feelings.

5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

Yes - your subjects need much more time to consider these questions and phrase their replies!!!

3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you

Isn’t she lovely. I look quite sad - and I might have my hair bleeched paroxide blond! I’d love Tom to see it. b - the photograph of you?

Oh, it’s sweet! If that’s the photo that he’s chosen, I’m perfectly happy with it. Diana Hardcastle ACTRESS 7 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted

I haven’t had my portrait done before and my friends said ‘what’s so special about you that you’re having yours done!’. If I had thought to have my portrait done it would have been to hang it in my house so others could see and that’s such an embarrassing thought! b - having your photograph taken?

I have had loads of photographs done, professional things done for papers and contacts so people can see what you look like, or it’s done for telly or part of a theatre production, it’s quite normal - but that doesn’t mean I like having my photo taken. It’s ok when it’s part of a production and I’m not really aware of it happening, but when the concentration is just on me, it’s, quite frankly, terrifying. 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

That was fine. I was absolutely intrigued about what it was going to be like. I thought we might talk, but we couldn’t because you were concentrating on what you were doing. There were sudden bursts of conversations, but there were moments when I was lost in my own thoughts. One doesn’t give oneself four hours normally to just sit and be contemplative. It was very peaceful. b - being photographed by Robert?

It was terrific and very good fun and very quick. Interestingly he directs you, the burden of responsibility is removed. I really did enjoy it. I think he has so much positive energy. Instead of feeling shy or self conscious, it felt really as if I was just the model and he was getting from me what he wanted. Which maybe means that I’m very lazy. I didn’t feel it really had anything to do with me, it was collaborative, but only by me simply being there.

4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

I don’t know what to say about that. One person has so many different faces, I don’t think I can really answer the question as I’m sure that I will be different things to different people. I could say I’m a mother, I’m an actress, I’m quite bright and good at my job - but is that ME? It’s incredibly easy to say non-positive things about myself, like; I’m quick to anger, impatient, I worry pointlessly about things. On the positive side, I laugh a lot, I’m affectionate, I’m loving. That’s enough. It hasn’t changed my sense of self. 5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

I’m really intrigued to see the finished work, not just my stuff, but all these portraits with the photographs, I’m just really interested. And if Sally makes me look like a dog, that’s the end of the friendship!

Christine Kennedy DESIGNER 8 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted

I was curious about having my portrait painted. I used to enjoy painting portraits and figures in art classes at school and evening classes and it’s a pastime I would like to take up again. Although I always took my turn at posing that kind of level meant any kind of character was usually bereft in the works created. I was really interested to see what a professional would make of me. I anticipated it being an intense process - all that scrutiny! I felt challenged by the proposition because I don’t believe there are many people who really look at another person

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more than fleetingly or quite casually, unless they love them, so I thought that taking part in this project would be a special opportunity. b - having your photograph taken?

I was more apprehensive about having my photo taken because I’ve seldomly liked any which have been taken of me and snapshots work more by luck than judgement. I’ve come to realise photos reflect your mood a lot more than you think - that I’m usually so tense and that my unease comes across quite blatantly. But I have worked with Robert on a few occasions so I was familiar with his MO and I was less anxious than I might have been. 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

I surprised myself at how relaxed I was when meeting Sally. I must have been because I asked if she had any nettle tea when we arrived at her house (she had some!) I doubt I would have asked if the day hadn’t been about Sally and me. As I travelled on the Tube to her place it had felt strange that I was going off to do something that was nothing to do with work or family or errands. No tasks, nothing to remember to do or say. I was weirdly emboldened by that. I had concerns that an artist might be overly interrogative and attempt to subsume another layer of intelligence into the work. I was wrong. Sally is very likeable and kind and it was easy to sit for her. b - being photographed by Robert?

It was a beautiful, sunny day when I caught the train to Robert’s. I had my first holiday in ages coming up and at home we had finally re-started our redecoration plans so again I was feeling positive and I felt that sense of freedom once more. I’m enchanted by Robert - I know he sees every nuance in his subjects’ features and movements. I didn’t know what he was hoping for in choosing me, but I knew he was certain he was going to obtain it. The process didn’t take as long as I thought it would. Robert seemed more peaceful than when I’ve previously been in his company. I guess it was because he was at home, but it also made me feel much less stressed.

On both occasions I was so pleased not to be working I was very happy to sit still and be quiet - it got uncomfortable at times, but never as bad as the pain of sitting at a desk all day.

agelessness. I don’t fit any stereotype which I believe is great, but it also alarms people. It’s a responsibility I had not grasped until recently. I’m reassured by the portraits though. I don’t appear as freaky-looking as I imagined.

3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you

5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

I was startled by the painting of me because it was a lot more alive than I had expected. I thought I would look quite dour, but Sally captured a mirth that I have which I think is hard to achieve, particularly with a brush and paints and a few hours. It was unnerving looking at an image of me that wasn’t a mirror reflecting back or an image which wasn’t a split-second snapshot and it was strange to see some heritage in there that I hadn’t counted on. It’s also strange that something so personal to you doesn’t belong to you; I have no control over it. I was pleased with it however and felt relieved about it. Afterwards I wondered if it was too much of a caricature, but I changed my mind. b - the photograph of you?

I like the photograph. I was eager to see which shot Robert would select. It endows me with a worldly quality I didn’t know I could exhibit and I’m pleased about that. It makes me look happy and relaxed and even though I was at the time, it’s such a rare occurrence it feels quite fraudulent! Beforehand and during Robert talked about my hair and I couldn’t truly understand why, but I can see now why the geometry of it intrigues him. 4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

I think I’m currently emerging from a long-standing dark patch in my life. I generally have low self-esteem, I’m nervy and I lack confidence. During the period from being asked to take part and until the appointments were made I was trying to think of how I could get out of it or hoping another subject would be found to replace me. However, the arrangements coincided with a metamorphosis of sorts and I think this comes across in both portraits in that I look far more at ease with myself. I’ve learnt over the years that visually I’m indeterminate. Strangers are foxed by my ethnicity and

It will be interesting to see the painting and the photograph side by side. They are more similar than I thought they would be.

Funke & Tomi Oyebanjo WRITER & DAUGHTER 9 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted b - having your photograph taken?

Tomi: I felt quite privileged and quite special because I have never done this before and not many people in my age group do this sort of thing. Funke: I loved the idea!!! A portrait is such a special thing and equally so a photograph. Having worked with Robert last year I had a pretty good idea of what was involved so to be asked to do it for love was a very special thing. Thanks. 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

Tomi: I felt very excited on my way to Sally’s home, but during the sitting I felt quite restricted, but it was still nice though. Funke: I was slightly apprehensive as I’d never met Sally nor understood the process involved in a portrait painting. The sitting still was interesting. It’s quite daunting particularly for a lengthy amount of time, let alone sitting still in front of a very observant artist!!!! However, it gave me a good opportunity to get to know Sally by talking to her on a range of subjects that we wouldn’t have touched. b - being photographed by Robert?

Tomi: I felt very different to sitting with Sally because I always thought that photographs and paintings were quite similar, but I realise the process that you go through and the way that they looked were actually quite different. Funke: I’ve been photographed by Robert before and I

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found the experience exhilarating. So when he asked me again, I didn’t hesitate I said yes straight away. But of course, this time I was being photographed with my daughter which threw in a different dynamic. The experience was more relational than about being or looking fabulous. 3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you

Tomi: I feel that the painting is very good, but I think photographs capture everything, and paintings do, but in a strange way. Funke: The interesting things about portraits are that they capture things the subject projects without his or her awareness. I had no idea I had a quiet defiance sort of pervading my surface. I found it surprising initially, but I’ve come round to embracing it. I like it now. It’s me. b - the photograph of you?

Tomi: I look stunning. Funke: I’m getting old! My profile again has a quiet strength which I think I’m good at hiding. I like it. I suppose I like the fact that the woman with the quiet strength is looking up to a child that’s exuberant and full of life. It’s great. 4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

Tomi: I would describe myself as beautiful eyed and mouthed girl. Small ears, bushy eyebrows, lovely shaped nose and gorgeous dark brown frizzy hair. And I look the same. Funke: I would describe myself as youthful, easy on the eye 40 year old. Yes, I suppose the project has changed that description somewhat. Now I think I look like a woman who has an inner strength which makes her comfortable in her skin. I have to accept that from now on I must use the term youthful sparingly. 5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

Tomi: I appreciate that you asked my mother and I to be a part of this project. I am truly thankful. Funke: Yes, it was a great experience and I’m happy I was asked. Thank you very much Sally and Robert.

Gemma Petch DESIGNER 10 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted

Before I saw Sally’s previous paintings I was much less daunted by being painted. My view was that a painting is more of the artist’s interpretation and less of a reality and as she knew me she wouldn’t be too harsh or paint anything too unflattering - I hoped. After such a hectic few weeks I looked forward to sitting still for a long time, in the calm with just my own thoughts. b - having your photograph taken?

I was more worried about the photograph as I figured that the ‘camera doesn’t lie’ and I might not like what was captured. I don’t feel that I am very photogenic and I’m very fickle when it comes to photos of myself. As I didn’t know Robert, I worried the end result would not necessarily be as I see myself - rather the honest truth! I was prepared to just be myself and made a conscious decision not to change after work or redo my makeup so that the picture reflected the true me, just home from a long day, minimum sleep and maximum spontaneity. I liked the idea of having a record of this period of my life. Whether I like it now or not, I still recognise that in years to come it will be something I look back on and appreciate with more objectivity. 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

I had only just got back from New York and had worked so hard all week with a long commute every day. It was the eve of my birthday so everything was happening and I was exhausted. We had dinner, a glass of red wine and then sat down to do the painting and almost instantly I was fighting to keep my eyes open. With regular sugar breaks I managed to stay awake, but I was worried that Sally’s interpretation might be of a party girl, juggling an unmanageable social/work life and only just keeping her head above water - rather than the determined career minded sociable designer I put out to be! b - being photographed by Robert?

Robert really brought that out in me. He was very flattering and helped me to relax a little in front of the camera. I was

nervous about ‘performing’ as I didn’t expect to enjoy having so much focus on me, but after a while I started to enjoy the feeling - it felt very self indulgent! 3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you

I love the painting of me. It captures that drive and determination I have had to find in myself over the past year or so, but also manages to hint at a playful, humourous side in the smile, maybe someone who doesn’t take things too seriously. The shadows and high contrast light Sally used creates a dramatic, intense effect which is very powerful. I think the word ‘fierce’ was used to describe the painting and this word sums up the feeling perfectly - coincidentally it was a word we’d coined in New York the previous week to describe ourselves - a ‘pack’ of 6 girls spending more money than we had ever imagined on martinis and Louboutins! b - the photograph of you?

I love the photograph too. I find it interesting that Robert has captured a much more feminine side of me. At one point he asked me to pose in a very similar way to the way Sally had me sit for the painting and I tried hard not to influence him either way, although he seemed to be leaning towards a ‘sultry stare’ type of look as Sally had. So I am pleased that the photograph he felt best expressed me at that moment is so different from the pose Sally chose of me. I think it shows more of the playful, light hearted side of me. 4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

I realised that, however much I claim I don’t, I really do like being the centre of attention in one way or another. Whether that’s through being the ‘organiser’ or the person who brings people together or does things for others, I seem to think it important to be in the middle of the action and at the front of people’s minds. Maybe that’s a way of me seeking acceptance. That’s something I have to think a bit more about myself. 5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

Thank you both.

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Freda Sack TYPOGRAPHER 11 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted

Being painted/drawn intrigued me, a totally new experience; somehow having one’s portrait painted seemed to be more self-indulgent than being photographed. I was curious about the process, I was nervous about the outcome, whether I would like the interpretation. Ultimately I was flattered to be asked, particularly as I love Sally’s work, having seen her drawings to begin with, and then her portraits at various exhibitions. Although I have known Sally for a long time, and we have worked together on design projects, I was looking forward to getting to know ‘the artist’. I realised it would be quite a bonding situation. b - having your photograph taken?

I admit to not enjoying having my photograph taken in any situation - although I have had a couple of serious photo sessions professionally. I am more at ease behind my own amateur camera than in front of one. I am intrigued by the ‘magic’ of capturing images, moments. I was apprehensive about the ‘honesty’ of the camera. I hadn’t met Robert before and I felt I needed to know more about him and his work before being photographed by him - the start of building ‘the necessary relationship’. Having looked at Robert’s work on his web site and gaining an incite into the man behind the camera, I had a feeling the experience would be a good one. A comfortable intimacy. 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

It was much more intense than I expected. I can and do sit still for long periods, but usually in a symmetric position for Yoga! It’s surprising how much energy is needed to maintain an asymmetric position. Being observed so intently was unnerving to begin with; it’s not often that we gaze into another’s eyes in that way, looking at her looking at me. I got over this by becoming an observer as well. Watching Sally paint was fascinating, the precise actions, the deliberations, the eyes rapidly alternating from me and back to the canvas to imprint the memory of the image there.

There was the certainty of the moment when she declared that she had me on the canvas and I wished I could see how she had reached that point. I draw but I can’t imagine how I would start on a blank canvas with a brush, it’s a terrifying thought. After a welcome break for lunch, we carried on. I say we, although Sally was the one working, it felt like a partnership. As I expected she spent a long time on my eyes. An overcast late autumn day, the daylight disappeared early and the portrait was miraculously completed at that natural deadline. I didn’t think it would be possible to accomplish a final portrait in that time, less than 4 hours. Then the telling moment when I confronted myself: unexpectedly I loved it - I don’t know who was the more relieved of the two of us. b - being photographed by Robert?

Although I didn’t expect to, I enjoyed the process of being photographed. Robert very quickly established a rapport, made me feel at ease, made me laugh, and being on my own territory of course helped. Easy to talk to, setting up his equipment with a familiar professionalism it was clear the enjoyment was mutual. I was impressed that ‘a temporary photographic studio’ could be set up so rapidly. Robert gave good direction, timed his shots between my eye blinks gave me tips on how to stop the face muscles ‘freezing’, suggested sitting and standing positions that were comfortable and informal - eventually I forgot the camera was there; it became a friendly conversation about anything and everything, with Richie Havens playing in the background. He made me feel part of the process, rather than just the subject of the camera. He said it would take just over an hour, this was so and I regretted that it couldn’t go on just a bit longer. 3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you

I half expected not to like it. I purposely didn’t look at the picture until it was finished - it didn’t seem the right thing to do somehow, although I would have been interested to see how the painting built up. In one break I did catch sight of it through the window from a distance and was surprised that is seemed quite powerful. I didn’t know what my reaction would be, but it was the strangest

feeling to be looking at myself, because I really was. It wasn’t the same as looking in the mirror, because you know what your feelings are at that point and overlay them on what you see. What was looking back at me from the canvas was me. Like gazing into my own soul. b - the photograph of you?

Although I really enjoyed the photo session, again I still had no clue what to expect, except I thought the result might be more unconventional. Studying images of myself is not usually a happy encounter, but this photograph is more flattering than I could have hoped for. I am impressed Robert managed to take a picture of me with a natural smile and eyes wide open. It is softer and more feminine than I usually imagine myself as being. Robert has captured my humourous and my optimistic side. Even for me it is an engaging portrait, I know it is me, but I wonder what she is thinking at that moment. It is the eyes that hold me - as with Sally’s painting. 4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

I think it is fair to say that I prefer the unconventional. I’m self-centred and I can be very solitary, although I love being with my friends, and like orchestrating ‘typographic happenings’. I’m tough on myself and therefore so on other people. I sometimes set myself seemingly impossible challenges, but often accomplish what I set out to do, which always surprises me. I feel I’m lucky that I enjoy my work and I’m good at it. And whilst writing these responses I realise, these days I’m more content than not, but definitely not complacent. I was less apprehensive about being painted than about being photographed. Perhaps this is because it was an ‘unknown’, and that appealed from the ‘new challenge’ point of view. Both sessions involved a two-way partnership, but for the sitter it is still rather a solitary, self-centred experience, being the sole object of attention. The process of being involved with this project has given the rare opportunity to have one-to-one sessions with two creative people.

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Reviewing the experience of the two media has been rather like personal therapy, confronting yourself, and your reactions. 5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

My initial thoughts in both cases: I have to be honest with myself the vanity/ego side takes over and I have reservations about how another sees, or interprets what they see - being at that vulnerable stage in life where the albeit inevitable aging process begins to be visible. This is not of any great importance until it is 'set in stone' photographed, or painted, and I wonder whether I want to be 'recorded' in that way. However I feel immensely privileged to be invited to take part. What an extravagance of experience to be paid the attention of being painted and photographed at such a level. Sally’s work I know, and I both envy and admire her artistic ability in capturing the person on different levels in the one portrait. Robert I didn’t know, but the calibre of his creative work in image and words was immediately obvious from his web site. The psychology and relationship of trust and empathy between sitter and 'subject' were all important for both sessions. As I finalise my thoughts on paper and the words partnership and two-way seem prominent, it only now occurs to me to be reminded the project is called ‘Three-way’. The richness of experiencing being a sitter for both media has come about because it has a purpose other than just being photographed or painted. The tripartite aspect gives the valid dimension.

b - having your photograph taken?

Robert's angle, however, was more of an unknown quantity. On seeing a previous publication of his photographs, which seemed either striking, beautiful or whacky I had to ask myself how I would fit in. 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted

On being asked to participate I was surprised, curious, and yes, flattered. Already familiar with Sally's work, but curious nevertheless, about the actual sitting process which would be a first for me.

1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted

I didn’t give it huge thought because I thought, let it be, because I’ve done paintings but I haven’t ever been painted, so I had a terrifically open mind.

Sitting for Sally was a pleasure. I had maybe wondered about her concentrated scrutiny after what, to date, had been purely a friendship. Would she discover another side to me? I came away, and remain, at ease with the experience, an outcome I had expected and hoped for.

b - having your photograph taken?

b - being photographed by Robert?

Oh, I tell you what was fun, what my feelings were. I just sat there in that chair, there, quite happy and when she moved of course I was drawing her in my head and I was thinking so that’s the way her hair grows, rather nice, and so on, and at the same time she was drawing me. I was looking at her as an artist - so that’s how I would draw her.

On the photography side I had only ever experienced the dreaded passport photograph syndrome. How would I fare? Would Robert catch on film the me that I knew? He made it easy - glasses or no glasses, smiling or serious - a couple of hours of facial gymnastics. I really enjoyed the session and would love to see the other shots to understand why this one was Robert's choice. 3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you b - the photograph of you?

The painting and photograph? Perhaps they showed differing traits of the same individual... ...were either of them me? 4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

My character? Animated I'm told. But probably, in fact, multi-faceted. A public persona, with behind, another me. Did it change me? No, not really. 5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

Ron Sidell ARCHITECT 12

Phyl Kigell ARTIST 13

An aspect that has always appealed to me about this type of study is the juxtaposition of the snapshot moment in time, and the slowly evolving study of character on canvas.

Oh, that was fun, because you can’t lie, but with paintings you can. That was a technical skill. Painting’s completely different. 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

b - being photographed by Robert?

Oh, great fun, because it was a photograph, which is a completely different thing, that’s a, what do you call it, it’s a machine, it’s done whether you like it or not, whereas painting is so different because it’s you doing it, I mean with the painter doing it you can make a proper balls up of it, and simply change that and have another go. 3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you

Well I rather thought I don’t look like that! So there we are. Interesting, but I hope, on a limb of it’s own. I’m not too keen on the portrait painting. But I say to myself that I don’t think I really look like that, thank heavens. b - the photograph of you? Oh you see I like that, I like that because it makes me look quite nice. That’s the truth, it’s the truth. Well I tell you what, it looks like what I think I look like, so I’m frightfully flattered. I’m really pleased. Usually when you see photographs of yourself you have an image of what you’d like to be like, but you’re not, in the usual photographs. But I am in yours, of course I flatter my self in my image, and they are jolly nice - that's the truth.

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4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

Oh, a very interesting question. What I always wanted to be, really quite simply was really frightfully good looking. And say when I saw myself walking towards a shop window I think, ‘Oh my God’, that sort of thing you know, terrific vanity, which I think the shop window puts right, if you know what I mean. 5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

Oh, I tell you what, I rather enjoyed the whole idea because it’s very unusual, I think. And, also you don’t have to be, because of its, unusualness, one can be, one can be and say things like 'I’m flattered' or 'I’m knocked out', you know you can muck about I think.

Neil Sheppard PHYSICS PhD STUDENT 14 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having your portrait painted

This was going to be an all new experience for me. I wondered how I would feel to have a portrait artist who I wouldn’t meet until the day, staring at me intently for a prolonged period. I knew that Sally would not have seen any pictures of me and so would have no pre-formed impressions of her subject until this first meeting. I felt both exited about having the new experience of being involved in an artistic venture and nervous about whether I would be able to sit still and not feel too shy. b - having your photograph taken?

Having met Robert a couple of times before having any photographs taken, I looked forward to the experience to work with him. I was reassured about what might happen during the session and that Robert would like to capture my character by allowing me opportunities to express myself. Again, it would be a novel feeling for me to be the focus of an artist’s work.

2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally

b - the photograph of you?

Sally was welcoming and hospitable so I was quickly put at ease. At first I found it an odd feeling to be studied so intently, especially with so much direct eye contact. I think all the eye contact quickly led to a feeling of greater empathy between us as if we’d known each other for some time. It was a real pleasure to observe an artist at work, mixing her oils to perfect the colours and concentrating piece by piece on different areas of my face. We sat and Sally worked for about five hours, so it was a little tiring trying to keep still, but the time that went by just increased the anticipation of seeing the product.

The photograph catches me at a contemplative moment. There are two images not just physically, but in an emotive sense. To me, the real image communicates an inner calm and hints at resolve, determination and perhaps quiet confidence. The reflection meanwhile appears more humble and intimates a degree of uncertainty or sadness. I can recognise my character in both images, but it is incredible to see them both here cheek by jowl in one photograph.

b - being photographed by Robert?

Being photographed by Robert was an amazing experience. The photography took place in and around his new studio which had just come into use. Taking place after dark, the session had an energy of its own, fuelled by Robert’s creativity, the novelty of the new studio, and my having fun expressing myself in front of the camera. At first it was a little uncomfortable to know that there was a large telephoto lens pointed right at me snapping away. I decided I should approach the experience in a very honest way without shying away from certain shots or angles. Soon I found myself thoroughly enjoying the experience and laughing between shots or smiling unstoppably. 3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of you

There is something about the amount of time invested in painting a portrait that allows it to command a lot of attention. It is an unnerving experience at first to be faced with your own portrait. It is something of an object of fascination for me. I seem to find new aspects each time I study it. After 5 hours of painting, every stroke still stands out to me. I love the use of colours, especially the light and shadows created as the weather outside turned from sunny afternoon to blackened squall and back again. The portrait shows my uncertainty at the process of being studied so intently for so long and not being in control. I was also curious to see what was taking shape on the canvas and I think this comes across too.

4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

I am a young professional striving to make something of myself and to enjoy life as much as possible along the way. As a young gay man I feel I have relatively few role models and don’t fit in with many societal norms or expectations. I feel quite strongly that I must find my own path. Participating in this project has provoked me to look at myself how others might perceive me. Being a scientist, I could never have guessed just days before the project started that I would be involved in an artistic venture like this. I like to challenge myself to take on opportunities like participating in this project when they arise. New experiences such as these are certainly food for the soul and help me evolve as a person. I think that being involved in this project has made me more confident to express myself. 5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

I think that when the pictures and paintings of all the subjects are aligned it might be possible to challenge the viewer to determine which of the artists chose each subject. The prior knowledge of the subject by one artist may lead to a difference in their representation that extends beyond the differences associated with painting versus photography.

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Sue Walters RESEARCHER 15 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having my portrait painted

I had already had the upper part of my face painted and while it very much looked like me, the painter captured the mental anguish and loneliness that having Multiple Sclerosis can promote. That portrait was derived from a series of casual photographs - I never sat for it. Hence I was excited and curious about how the “real life” version would go. b - having my photograph taken

I was excited by this as well. I’ve seen very few good (in my terms!) photos of me, but I thought that having more time with a “proper” photographer would be interesting, if not challenging! 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally:

I’d seen the painter’s portraits before (from her “Souls” collection) so I was confident about her as an artist. I was also intrigued what she would see and I was more than happy to sit still for a few hours (with a break in the middle!). b - being photographed by Robert

I’d also seen examples of the photographer’s work - a lot of which looked really exciting. I looked forward to this session as well, because we had never met before and, as he came to my home, I was doubly intrigued about what he would make of it all - including me. The session was good fun, although all the way through I had to keep reminding myself that someone REALLY did want to photograph me, REPEATEDLY. 3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of me

I love the painting of me, especially since the look of “pain” has gone. Half way through the session, when I looked at the painting “she” looked younger than me, and although logically I knew it was me, emotionally I wondered who “she” was. When it was finished, I couldn’t take my eyes off “her”. Her eyes were particularly fascinating - I found it hard to persuade myself that “she” was NOT actively looking at me. This was far more disconcerting than looking in the mirror.

The finished portrait does look like me - the age was about right in the end and although I think the cheeks might be a bit too puffy, she looks a really interesting and approachable character. I feel very flattered. I would like to think I am “her”. b - the photograph of me

Can’t wait to see Robert’s photos of me - hope they don’t shatter my illusions! Don’t believe they will. 4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

I would describe myself as an intelligent, fun loving woman. I feel I’ve achieved a lot - my son and daughter come top of the list, which also includes creating, running and selling three businesses, writing a book and keeping a sense of pride and independence despite this horrid disease called MS. I think the project has consolidated my pride and confidence that maybe I don’t look so bad after all. 5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

Woke up this morning thinking that both processes of painting (definitely) and photography (maybe) seem to capture the thoughts of the sitter as exhibited on the facial appearance of the sitter. I say this because I was thinking particularly nice things very consciously during my recent sitting with you and I think they came out in the portrait. The key, I think, is time. How often do people get the chance to sit still and think UNINTERRUPTED across four hours or so? It’s incredibly self-indulgent. The same happened for me when Robert was here - maybe his photos have captured my frame of mind too? I’ve seen Robert’s photos of me now and I’m absolutely knocked out - I love them. They are the best I’ve ever seen of me. They have done me “a power of good”. I show them to people whenever I get the opportunity.

Sally Bamber PAINTER 16 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about having your photograph taken?

The last time there were lots of pictures taken of me was my wedding day and I loved it. This time I was edgy and had loads of time to think about it, but chose to park my thoughts until - the week before I thought about getting a facial, about washing my hair so that it behaved on the day and eating the right food. The night before I thought about what I would wear! 2. What are your feelings about being photographed by Robert?

Like a fashion shoot, Robert went into photographer mode, it made me smile, so when I looked into the lens I thought about Keith. During the day, Robert took photos whilst I painted and this felt more natural, much as it got in the way of my painting. We also did stage photos of the painting itself - that brings up a load of different issues - doing this was dissecting me too. I’m sorry we didn’t set up stage photos of Robert shooting me. It was an intense day. 3. What are your feelings about the photograph of you?

I think we have many faces, depending on light, hair, make-up, mood, angle, company and opinion - I am very content to have this portrait as the public face of Sally Bamber. It does for me what I try to achieve in my works; vulnerability, inquisitiveness, fun and an element of being wary. I am curious that this is black and white, but colour can often distract from the point of a photograph, so it may be another reason for being content with it. The second one - Robert changed his mind and this one I sort of want to put back in the box, whereas we look for evidence of the past in a photo of ourselves, somehow I can see my future in this one; thinning hair, a hardness of features, deteriorating skin, but with a smile that has hope in it. I wouldn't choose this picture to represent me, but Robert has.

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4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

I am my husband’s wife, my children’s mother, my parent’s daughter. I have had to be selfish and strong to paint, but the more I practice the better it gets in terms of acceptance, support and my learning. This project has allowed and focused on subjects of vanity (worth) and truth, a natural extension of selfishness and I am looking for the positives. Whereas I started off feeling good and excited about the project, loving doing the work, meeting Robert’s people and spending wonderful days with mine. By the time we put our work together I was terrified. Putting my work into an exhibition opens me up to judgement. Maybe the reason I have not seen photographers and painters put their work up together in this way is because of how different they are; slick juxtaposed with rough, naive and primitive in contrast to advanced technology. What control do I really have over what I am doing and does it matter? Being part of this project has increased the speed of my development, painting four portraits over five days was extreme. 5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

What do we expect from a portrait? Do we expect to recognise ourselves? How we appear to others or what we think we look like to ourselves is often quite different from how others see us. Our behaviour, our relationships and our appearance change and alter, in some more subtly, in others more dramatically. Three-way has explored this, and our subjects’ answers are evidence. I would like to keep doing Three-way with Robert, the collaboration has energy, it’s affirming and most importantly, fun.

Robert Taylor PHOTOGRAPHER 17 1. Before the painting and photography took place what were your feelings about: a - having my portrait painted

I was very apprehensive, as I always am about allowing anyone to create an image of me. It was all the more daunting because, although I really enjoy and respect Sally’s work and have had a real blast working with her on this project over the last year, she’s not given to flattery or crowd-pleasing when she paints people. I was (and am) far too vain to not hope that she’d make me look good (ie. intelligent, likable, handsome, etc). 2. What are your feelings about: a - sitting for Sally:

It was eventually a lovely experience. I always enjoy Sally’s company, I was just so apprehensive about sitting still and doing as instructed for several hours. During the initial sketches I was unnerved by her eyes darting from me to the paper and back again at great speed. It didn’t help that I didn’t really like how I looked in the sketch, but somehow I managed to let go at that point and enjoy watching Sally at work. From then on time flew by. I was struck by how beautiful she was, particularly when she moved in towards the canvass, focussing all her energy and attention on it. 3. What are your feelings about: a - the painting of me

I was very surprised and somewhat relieved that Sally’s undeniable ‘truths’ could coincide with my hopes for a flattering result. The man in her painting of me is both familiar and fascinatingly new to me. 4. How would you describe yourself, and have any of your experiences in participating in this project changed that description?

I’m a bundle of contradictions and paradoxes. I’m delighting in learning more and more how important it is to love, make the best of what is so, whilst being as outrageously creative as possible about generating good times for me and those around me. I’m rather good at giving myself a hard time and exaggerating the

consequences when I fail my own or other folks’ expectations. I am extraordinarily blessed with the people who choose to stick around despite my limitations. I like being me. My feelings about the project’s impact are still evolving. I don’t think I’ve been changed by the project, just more intensely aware of what I’ve been up to - for good or ill. Coming to it as a disciplined art project rather than a client commission liberated me from some of the usual requirements to please, but we’ll have to wait and see if my commercial practice has been affected, either in the content or quantity of work. 5. Is there anything else you want to say about any aspect of this project?

I have been thrilled, intimidated, frustrated, charmed and above all fascinated by this project. I am absolutely delighted to have had such a rich opportunity to explore what I have been up to, what a painter gets up to and to hear in so much detail what it has been like for our subjects. I first thought of approaching Sally to explore a collaboration purely on instinct. There was something about her as a person that convinced me it would be right, and great fun. There was a comical moment after we’d agreed in principle to go ahead when Sally not unreasonably pointed out that I had not seen any of her work yet. What if I hated it? I did not flinch. Someone who radiates such warm energy and curiosity about the sort of things that matter so much to me would be a great person for the subjects to work with. Without getting too pompous about it I was absolutely right. She is a joy to be with and her work is rich, powerful, challenging and a real contribution to people.

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Three-way Š Copyright photography: Robert Taylor Copyright paintings: Sally Bamber The right of Robert Taylor and Sally Bamber to be identified as the authors of this work has been asserted by them in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction, copy or transmission of this publication may be made without written permission. No paragraph of this publication (no word or picture) may be reproduced, copied or transmitted save with the written permission or in accordance with the provisions of the Copyright Act 1956 (as amended). First published in 2008 By Robert Taylor & Sally Bamber www.sallybamber.com www.taylor-photo.co.uk Catalogue Design: Sally Bamber Print: CTD

Exhibition open 7th-29th January 2008 Monday to Saturday, 10am-4pm (Please call the gallery before your visit to avoid clashing with closures for University events) The SaĂŻd Business School Gallery Park End Street, Oxford OX1 1HP Phone: 01865 288800 www.sbs.ox.ac.uk


Three way catalogue  

Painter Sally Bamber and Photographer Robert Taylor welcome you to Three-way. Sally, Robert and sixteen people agreed to be the subject of a...

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