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YEAR IN REVIEW 2018 – 2019


Cover Credit: Four-circle Hevajra Mandala, Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Paul Bernat Fund Painted for the Sakya Order; probably from the Ngor Monastery, Tsang, Tibet

This mandala has at its center the seated Buddha Sakyamuni, his hands arranged in the dharmacakra-mudra, or wheel-turning gesture, indicating that he is preaching his first sermon. The male figure in the embracing couple at the center of each of the four circular mandalas is a form of Hevajra, the presiding deity

of the esoteric Vajrayana Buddhist ritual described in the Hevajratantra, indicating that this mandala is dedicated to Hejavra. He is locked in sexual embrace with his female partner, known as Nairatmya, or No-Soul. Below the couple’s feet are supine beings symbolizing evil spirits, who are being trampled and destroyed.

Set against a pattern of undulating waves, each Hevajra-Nairatmya couple appears in a stylized lotus blossom centered within the confines of the deities’ square palace; a small deity guards each corner of the palace as well as each of its four gates. Virtuous monks surrounded by a variety of deities appear between the

mandala circles, although fierce deities appear immediately below the lower set of circles. Along the top and bottom is an arcaded register, each with fourteen

arches. Seated monks occupy twelve of the arches along the top, seated deities the other two; deities occupy twelve of the arches along the bottom, a seated priest and a tantric altar the remaining two. In fact, the monk seated in the lower right corner is presiding over the Hevajratantra, the ritual in which this mandala is traditionally used; a variety of ritual objects rest on the altar.


TABLE OF CONTENTS AY 2018-19 Highlights

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Faculty Projects and Programs

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The 1947 Partition of British India

Crossroads Emerging Leaders Program

Arts at the Mittal Institute

Talent and Meritocracy in China and India Mental Health and Technology Program

Providing Platforms for South Asian Scholars

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Mittal Institute Fellowships

Mittal Institute Events and Seminars

Furthering Research among Harvard Students

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Student Grants

Other Student-Related Initiatives

Seed for Change (SFC) Student Competition

In-Region Projects and Programs

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Annual India Symposium

Building Bharat-Boston Biosciences (B4) Program

Program for Scientifically Inspired Leadership (PSIL) Nepal Studies Program

Multidisciplinary Approach to Social Enterprises in India In-Region Seminars

Mittal Institute Budget

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OUR MISSION The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University (The Mittal Institute) engages in interdisciplinary research to advance and deepen the understanding of critical issues in South Asia and its relationships with the world.


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OUR SCIENCE PROGRAMMING HAS BECOME EVEN MORE ROBUST, SUPPORTING RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE, HEALTHCARE, AND SOFT ROBOTICS AND CRAFTING IN-REGION SEMINARS TO PROMOTE SCIENTIFIC COMMUNITY-BUILDING AND ADVANCEMENT. — TARUN KHANNA

FROM THE DIRECTOR It’s been another whirlwind of a year at the Mittal Institute as we continue to reinforce the multi-disciplinary approach to our work, partnering with new and familiar faculty, students, and organizations to develop research and find ways to understand its impact on South Asia.

to engage students in new research and technological advancements. This year, the program has expanded to bring twice the number of young scientists to work with our faculty and students in labs across Harvard and Boston University. Each young scientist will spend 18 months with our community.

This year, we’ve been pleased to welcome some impressive speakers to Harvard’s campus, from musicians and authors to activists and political leaders, engaging our community in South Asian arts, science, business, and culture. Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, Chairman of the Pakistan Peoples Party, visited the Mittal Institute for a crowded lecture to discuss education reform and the geopolitics of Pakistan. A screening and discussion of a new film directed by Nandita Das, famed Indian actress and director, was supported by the Mittal Institute, and Ali Sethi, Pakistani musician and author, performed a musical demonstration for a rapt audience.

Our science programming has become even more robust over the past year, supporting research in agricultural science, healthcare, and soft robotics and crafting in-region seminars to promote scientific community-building and advancement. In fact, our inaugural Annual India Symposium in April focused on “Science and Society,” and brought scientists from India and the US together with other academic, government, and industry representatives to help nurture a culture of science literacy.

Our research project on the 1947 Partition of British India advances to the final stage of preparation toward an edited volume. Once complete, it will be the first collection of essays from scholars across disciplines who reside in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan, partnering with colleagues in the US to shine a light on the complex consequences of this epochal event. The program on life sciences, funded by the Government of India, was renewed, continuing to inspire young Indian scientists through collaborative fellowships, multiweek workshops, and seminars in India

The Mittal Institute continues to support Harvard’s students whose work centers around South Asia, providing funding to pursue relevant internships, research, and arts studies through numerous grants and travel funds. From the creation of a South Asian art installation in the Davis Museum at Wellesley College and the development of a passive cooling panel that addresses the extreme heat and air pollution of New Delhi to the formation of a weeklong scientific curriculum built by a Harvard team and delivered to students in northeast India, the Mittal Institute has helped further student entrepreneurship and scholarship on South Asia across multiple schools at Harvard. Throughout South Asia, there are thousands of museums and cultural sites that not only

need to be protected, but preserved. With the contributions of our Arts Council, the Mittal Institute connects faculty members with leading institutions to share knowledge that will help heritage professionals across South Asia have a lasting, positive impact on the understanding of South Asian art. Our involvement spans the conservation of centuries-old Indian manuscripts to our arts fellows’ curation of contemporary art installations at Harvard and in the local community. We continue our work with Harvard Art Museums, bringing together experts to use cutting-edge scientific technology in South Asian art preservation. On firm footing and with a myriad of resources available to our faculty and students keen to expand their research in South Asia, our office established in the heart of New Delhi in early 2018 is already a center of vibrant intellectual life that helps us form partnerships with leading academic, public, and private institutions across the region. Combined with our longstanding presence in Lahore, Pakistan and elsewhere, we remain well-positioned to continue building academic bridges across the region. In the year to come, the Mittal Institute will continue its “One Harvard” approach to develop intellectual capital around the complex issues South Asia faces every day. TARUN KHANNA Director, The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute; Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School

2018-19 Year in Review

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FALL 2018

AY 2018-19 HIGHLIGHTS

SPRING 2019

AUGUST 2018 Narayan Khandekar and Jinah Kim led a two-part lecture in Mumbai in partnership with CSMVS to explore the Forbes Pigment Collection and the scientific analysis of pigments in paintings.

JANUARY 2019 A Harvard team traveled to Manipur, India to deliver an educational outreach program, the Program for Scientifically Inspired Leadership, teaching critical thinking and problemsolving skills to local high schoolers.

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JANUARY 2019 As part of the Building BharatBoston Biosciences (B4) program, a panel of scientists discussed the changing landscape of life sciences and its impact on young Indian scientists at a seminar in New Delhi. JANUARY 2019 Michael Witzel led a conference in Lalitpur, Nepal on Hinduism in Nepal through history, focusing on the prominence of fire rituals in Hindu societies from the Vedas to modern times.

The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

SEPTEMBER 2018 Ashok Gadgil, University of California, Berkeley, and his team obtained materials to collect and transmit data from new cookstoves developed to alleviate indoor air pollution in India, as part of the Multidisciplinary Approach to Social Enterprises in India program funded by The Mittal Institute.

FEBRUARY 2019 Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, Chairman of the Pakistan Peoples Party, visited Cambridge to discuss the need for good governance, education reform, and opportunities for youth in Pakistan.


NOVEMBER 2018 Two of the most prominent antiSection 377 campaigners and key architects of the legal challenge in India visited Cambridge for a discussion about the importance and impact of the decision.

NOVEMBER 2018 The Talent and Meritocracy in India and China Workshop was held in New Delhi to shed light on the relationship between merit and the organization of talent in China and India.

NOVEMBER 2018 Pakistani musician and author Ali Sethi gave a demonstration and lecture about Sufi poetry, his own artistic journey, and life as a perpetual student of the arts.

MARCH 2019 Jinah Kim and Katherine Eremin, Harvard Art Museums, traveled to New York to present on the conservation of centuriesold Indian paintings at Asia Week 2019 in partnership with Christie’s.

DECEMBER 2018 Sixteen scholars gathered at the TRACE Symposium to share their research into South Asian art and architecture from 500 to 1500 CE.

APRIL 2019 The Delhi office held its first Annual Symposium to build awareness of the Mittal Institute’s presence in the region as a platform for connecting scholars from the US and South Asia. APRIL 2019 The winners of the Seed for Change competition were announced at the Annual Symposium.

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Professor Rahul Mehrotra with the Partition project research team

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Professors Jerold Kayden, Homi Bhabha, Ajantha Subramaniam, and Jinah Kim at a Mittal Institute Steering Committee meeting

Professor Vikram Patel interacts with guests at a Mittal Institute seminar

Professor Jennifer Leaning discusses the Partition research

Faculty at a brainstorming workshop on the Mental Health project

FACULTY PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS The Mittal Institute supports faculty-led multidisciplinary research projects and programs in the disciplines of arts and humanities, social sciences, and sciences.

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THE 1947 PARTITION OF BRITISH INDIA A research project that seeks to develop a rich and empirically grounded understanding of the 1947 Partition of British India by exploring its demographic and humanitarian consequences.

Under the direction of Jennifer Leaning, Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, the 1947 Partition of British India research project examines questions surrounding the demographic and humanitarian consequences of the Partition that have yet to be addressed. To this day, there are still missing pieces in the global understanding of the years leading up to the Partition, the migration and violence that occurred during the Partition itself, and the subsequent period of resettlement into new states. EXAMINING THE PARTITION’S EFFECTS This project began with Professor Leaning’s collection of archival materials in Europe, the United States, India, and Pakistan found in both scholarship and personal reflections, and has expanded with the support of the Mittal Institute. It has since grown to include Professors Tarun Khanna and Karim Lakhani of Harvard Business School, who have crowdsourced oral narratives from Partition survivors, in particular focusing on populations that have been overlooked in existing documentation.

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PROJECT TEAM JENNIFER LEANING François-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health PRASHANT BHARADWAJ Associate Professor, Department of Economics, University of California, San Diego TARUN KHANNA Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, The Mittal Institute, Harvard University ASIM KHWAJA Sumitomo-FASID Professor of International Finance and Development, Harvard Kennedy School KARIM LAKHANI Charles E. Wilson Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School RAHUL MEHROTRA Professor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design SHUBHANGI BHADADA Mittal Institute Fellow


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THE PARTITION OF BRITISH INDIA REMAINS THE LARGEST INSTANCE OF FORCED MIGRATION IN RECORDED HUMAN HISTORY. FOR THOSE ON THE SUBCONTINENT, THE PARTITION IS A SUSTAINED PROCESS OF REFLECTION THAT CONTINUES TO AFFECT THE LIVES OF MILLIONS OF PEOPLE EVEN TODAY. — JENNIFER LEANING Professor Jennifer Leaning discusses the research being undertaken on the Partition at an event in New Delhi

In addition, Professor Rahul Mehrotra of the Harvard Graduate School of Design is researching post-Partition urban growth and development in South Asia, which shifted drastically due to the mass movement of refugees in 1947.

Kennedy School are employing machine learning to dissect political rhetoric and understand how it can impact the economic behavior of a region.

Professors Prashant Bharadwaj of UC San Diego and Asim Khwaja of Harvard

The goal of the project is to cultivate a deeper understanding of the displacement

NEW INSIGHTS

that occurred during the Partition in 1947 to better inform and direct cross-border displacement and migration today. Together, the five faculty members across the United States and 14 regional scholars in South Asia, England, and Germany will produce a book composed of a collection of essays from various disciplines that will provide new insights into our understanding of this historic event. This book is currently in the drafting stage, with the essays going through various iterations to finalize and compile for final manuscript. INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERSHIPS • • • •

Laboratory for Innovation Science, Harvard University Independent University, Bangladesh Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS) The Citizens Archive of Pakistan

The Partition project research team

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ARTS AT THE MITTAL INSTITUTE Partnering with arts fellows, faculty, and inregion institutions, the Mittal Institute supports artistic commentary on South Asia’s issues, while working to preserve the region’s art and cultural sites.

The Mittal Institute continues its dedication to the scholarship and preservation of South Asian art, sculpture, and architecture through a visiting artist fellowship, conservation and collections management, an arts fund program, and events. VISITING ARTIST FELLOWSHIP Under faculty director Jinah Kim, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture at Harvard University, selected artists from South Asia visit Cambridge to deepen their artistic 2018-19 VISITING ARTIST FELLOWS SAMSUL ALAM Dhaka, Bangladesh AMAN KALEEM Delhi, India MAHBOOB JOKHIO Lahore, Pakistan KRUPA MAKHIJA Ahmedabad, India

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explorations of South Asia through the use of Harvard’s museums, libraries, and archives. These fellows are connected with faculty and students, using their time here to build on the Harvard community's understanding of South Asian social, political, cultural, and economic issues through the lens of art and design. In Fall 2018, Visiting Artist Fellows Samsul Alam and Aman Kaleem joined the Mittal Institute. Alam, a photographer from Bangladesh, explored the identities and desires of individuals from minority backgrounds in his work. Kaleem, a filmmaker from India, began developing an online repository of protest movements in South Asia with the goal to create an immersive platform for viewers. FACULTY DIRECTOR JINAH KIM Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art and Architecture, Department of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University


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DURING OUR OPENING OF THE SHOW AT HARVARD ED PORTAL, I MET ANNETTE EZEKIEL. SHE WAS BORN IN KARACHI TO A JEWISH FAMILY. MEETING HER A SECOND TIME OVER DINNER AT HER PLACE, ANNETTE'S AMAZING ORAL MEMOIRS AND HER PHOTOGRAPHS CHANNELED MY RESEARCH INTERESTS TOWARD A DIRECTION THAT I NEVER HAD THOUGHT OF. — MAHBOOB JOKHIO THE MOST IMPORTANT AND EXCITING THING ABOUT WORKING AND RESEARCHING AT HARVARD IS THE WAY I CAN GET IN TOUCH WITH SOME IMPORTANT PROFESSORS THROUGH CLASSES … NOW THEY ARE GUIDING ME NOT ONLY FOR MY PROJECTS AT HARVARD, BUT ALSO FOR MY ART PRACTICE. — KRUPA MAKHIJA

Guests at the opening reception for the “Partition Perspectives” art exhibition at the Harvard Ed Portal

Two Spring 2019 Visiting Artist Fellows — Krupa Makhija from India and Mahboob Jokhio from Pakistan — arrived in March to begin their work and research in Cambridge. Makhija’s art comments on cultural destruction following the Partition of British India using a wide range of mediums, including items collected from Indian migrants. Jokhio will work on a visual project

exploring the oral stories of the Partition and the subsequent religious dislocations that occurred. CONSERVATION AND COLLECTIONS MANAGEMENT Continuing its commitment to nurturing South Asian art, the Mittal Institute has

Meena Hewett with Visiting Artist Fellows Krupa Makhija and Mahboob Jokhio at a panel discussion at the Harvard Ed Portal

partnered with the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS) museum in Mumbai, the Harvard Art Museums’ Straus Conservation Center, and Harvard’s Graduate School of Design to support scholarly pursuits in art and site collection and conservation management. The first activity under this partnership was the Conservation Initiative workshop, held in August 2018. “The Mittal Institute has been working with the CSMVS in Mumbai to identify and address the areas for improvement in the field of conservation in South Asia. With the commitment of the Mittal Institute Arts Program, we can make certain interventions at the level of training. For example, we can help revise and reform the training curriculum and provide platforms to improve the support system that helps conservatories and conservation scientists be on the top of their fields,” said Professor Kim. The Mittal Institute’s Executive Director, Meena Hewett, also visited the Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage's (INTACH) conservation laboratory in Lucknow, India to study the state of

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Ancient manuscripts at INTACH; photos taken by Meena Hewett during a trip to study art conservation practices in India

conservation science in India for a variety of heritage objects — from manuscripts to animal skins — building an understanding of the current conservation services available to art collectors. In December 2018, the Mittal Institute, the Department of History of Art and Architecture, and the Harvard Art Museums organized the TRACE Symposium, bringing together scholars of South Asian art, history,

and culture to share knowledge on art history’s material turn in South Asian art and architecture between 500 and 1,500 CE. At this year’s Asia Week New York, Professor Jinah Kim and Dr. Katherine Eremin, Patricia Cornwell Senior Conservation Scientist at the Harvard Art Museums, teamed up with Christie’s to give a talk that explored their work with color and pigments used in Indian paintings and the high-tech

Professor Jinah Kim and Dr. Katherine Eremin discuss their work at Asia Week New York

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THERE’S NO SHORTAGE OF HERITAGE IN SOUTH ASIA — ANCIENT AND MODERN — AND HOW TO PRESERVE IT WELL IS A CONCERN FOR MANY PARTIES. — JINAH KIM

Ali Sethi at a lecture and demonstration of his work at the Barker Center

science behind conservation and restoration of centuries-old paintings. BUILDING SCHOLARSHIP ON SOUTH ASIAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE Each year, the Mittal Institute provides funding for Harvard students to study South Asian art and sculpture and to travel to various countries to further their work. This year, Sonali Dhingra curated an installation

Rachel Parikh during a trip to conduct research for her book on South Asian arms and armor

of South Asian art at the Davis Museum of Wellesley College, which displays paintings and sculptures from across India. Rachel Parikh traveled to Kuwait and Qatar to conduct research for her book on South Asian arms and armor. There, she visited the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha and the Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah in Kuwait, which contain two of the largest collections of South Asian arms and armor in the world. Parikh was able to assess the makeup of the materials, how the objects were made, and how they were meant to be used. Louis Copplestone visited the ninthcentury Buddhist monastic site of Somapura Mahavihara in northern Bangladesh, researching its place within the transregional, trans-sectarian South Asian system of architectural practices. “As a second-year graduate student, I had spent days hunched over site plans, maps, and photographs of the ninth-century complex. But only upon walking through the gateway of the vast monastery, exploring its 177 monastic cells, and coming face-to-face with its towering central structure did the

relationship between these parts start to make sense as a whole,” he said. As part of the Mittal Institute’s dedication to celebrating South Asia’s art and culture, several artists from the region visited Harvard’s campus for performances, and lectures, and screenings, including Mallika Sarabhai, renowned Indian choreographer, dancer, and activist; Ali Sethi, famed Pakistani musician and writer; and Amar Kanwar, prominent Indian filmmaker.

INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERSHIPS • • • • •

Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS) Museum Harvard Art Museums Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, Harvard Art Museums Christie's, New York Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage (INTACH)

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CROSSROADS EMERGING LEADERS PROGRAM A unique, fully-funded career development opportunity for ambitious youth who have overcome significant barriers to higher education.

In the heart of Dubai, 80 low-income, firstgeneration college students from across the Middle East, Africa, and South and Central Asia met in September 2018 to learn from four Harvard professors in the second year of the Crossroads Emerging Leaders Program. Spearheaded by Professors Tarun Khanna, the Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at Harvard Business School and Director of The Mittal Institute, and Karim Lakhani, the Charles E. Wilson Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School, the pro bono program lasted five days and taught a multidisciplinary curriculum to the attending students. A NEW CULTURAL EXPERIENCE Through this program, student participants travelled to Dubai on a fully-funded trip, where they were introduced to a Harvard classroom environment. They took part in mentor discussions, traveled to Dubai’s landmarks, and considered their future education and career possibilities. For many students, this trip to Dubai was the first time they had left their hometowns — opening their eyes to new cultures, experiences, and connections with other youth from across

18 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

multiple continents. “The places we visited opened our minds to new possibilities for the future. They filled us with inspiration and opportunities to master our new skills,” said one student. Within the cohort, 35 percent of participants were from South Asia, 25 percent from the Middle East, and 20 percent each from Africa and Central Asia. “The diversity in the program made me learn valuable information about other cultures and how they solved different issues, which made the experience very informative at both the personal and career levels,” a student remarked. FACULTY DIRECTORS TARUN KHANNA Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University KARIM LAKHANI Charles E. Wilson Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School


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THE CROSSROADS SUMMER PROGRAM GAVE ME THE MOTIVATION AND INSPIRATION TO THINK BIG, WORK HARD, AND STAY FOCUSED. — CROSSROADS PROGRAM STUDENT [THE PROGRAM] HELPED ME UNDERSTAND WHAT IT IS LIKE TO STUDY IN THE HARVARD CLASSROOM. EACH SESSION HELPED ME BROADEN MY PERSPECTIVE OF THE WORLD AROUND US. — CROSSROADS PROGRAM STUDENT Professor Kristin Fabbe and Goulam Amarsy with Crossroads participants

THE CASE-STUDY METHOD The program continues to grow, with 30 additional participants in 2018. Throughout the week, students engaged with one another and faculty through Harvard Business School’s case-study method of teaching and learning. They were exposed to reallife business scenarios and an even greater

variety of disciplines than presented in the first iteration of the program. Topics this year included science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM), as well as business and entrepreneurship. “[The program] helped me understand what it is like to study in the Harvard classroom. Each session helped me broaden my

perspective of the world around us,” said one student after the program’s conclusion. “The Harvard Crossroads Summer Program gave me the motivation and inspiration to think big, work hard, and stay focused,” said another. “Cultural diversity was one of the things that worked best in this program. There were representatives from different countries, and the interaction of the students with each other has really helped us change our perspective about others.”

INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERSHIPS • • •

Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard University Center for African Studies, Harvard University HBS Club of The Gulf Cooperation Council

Crossroads participants with Faculty Lead Professor Karim Lakhani

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TALENT AND MERITOCRACY IN CHINA AND INDIA An investigation into talent allocation in Indian and Chinese societies, uncovering how meritocracy is conceptualized and has changed over time.

Beginning in 2015, the Meritocracy Project has worked to build a better understanding of merit and talent systems in China and India, and the role of power and influence in these two nations. The goal of the project is to produce a volume of essays written by scholars from China, India, and the United States, both from Harvard University and additional peer universities. KNOWING THE LIMITATIONS Co-directed by Tarun Khanna, the Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at Harvard Business School and Director of the Mittal Institute, and Michael Szonyi, Director of the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, this project has taken an in-depth look at the approaches of both China and India in recognizing, nurturing, and allocating talent in-country. Project participants seek a better understanding of the limitations individuals in these nations face when restricted by historical class systems that leave many without effective education and opportunities for promotion. “The impetus behind the project was the sense of the dual meanings of meritocracy

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as a social, educational, and occupational system in which all people have the opportunity to develop themselves to their full potential — in terms of both their education and professional development — and as a political system. Leaders are selected on the basis of their capacity to rule, and their performance is assessed by some form of the systematic evaluation system,” said Professor Szonyi. “There are fundamental issues which affect not just India, China, or the United States, but the whole world. There is tremendous experience in thinking FACULTY DIRECTORS TARUN KHANNA Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University MICHAEL SZONYI Frank Wen-Hsiung Wu Memorial Professor of Chinese History, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations; Director, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University


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THE IMPETUS BEHIND THE PROJECT WAS THE SENSE OF THE DUAL MEANINGS OF MERITOCRACY AS A SOCIAL, EDUCATIONAL, AND OCCUPATIONAL

SYSTEM IN WHICH ALL PEOPLE HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO DEVELOP THEMSELVES TO THEIR FULL POTENTIAL .... — MICHAEL SZONYI A roundtable discussion with project collaborators

about meritocracy in India and China, experience in operationalizing and figuring out how to actualise meritocratic systems and deal with the problems of those systems in the two societies,” he continued. CONCEPTUALIZING MERITOCRACY In November 2018, the Mittal Institute and

the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies organized the workshop entitled Talent and Meritocracy in India and China workshop. It explored the relationship between merit and the organization of talent in China and India, while uncovering the role of power and influence in these nations. Through workshops and research, parties in this project aim to change how people in China

and India think about talent, identify new avenues for finding talent, and influence the overall public policy debate surrounding meritocracy. COLLABORATORS • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Professors Michael Szonyi and Tarun Khanna discuss their work under the Meritocracy project at an event in New Delhi

Varun Aggarwal, Aspiring Minds Daniel Bell, Shandong University Cameron Campbell, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Liang Chen, Nanjing University Ashwini Deshpande, Delhi University Sumit Guha, University of Texas, Austin Bill Kirby, Harvard University James Lee, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Pratap Bhanu Mehta, Ashoka University Michael Puett, Harvard University Sudev Sheth, Harvard University Ajantha Subramaniam, Harvard University Ashutosh Varshney, Brown University Bernard Yeung, National University of Singapore Meng Zhang, Loyola Marymount University

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MENTAL HEALTH AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM A multi-year research project centered around the use of technology to positively impact mental health in South Asia.

In September 2018, the Mittal Institute helped arrange a brainstorming meeting to build an agenda for a multi-year research project on mental health in South Asia. Led by Professor Vikram Patel, Pershing Square Professor of Mental Health at the Harvard Medical School, the project will center around technology’s role in addressing and positively impacting mental health. Key areas of focus in mental health will include alcohol use and relevant policy, child development and abuse, brain health and capability, and the wellbeing of young people. SHIFTING GEARS “The conversations on mental health are too fragmented, and benefit when there is a shift away from purely biomedical modes of conceptualizing and engaging with mental illness,” Professor Patel explained. “The big issues in India that impact mental health and apply across the region are violence, displacement and marginalization, ill health, and poverty and inequality.” In November 2018, the Mittal Institute helped assemble a group of professors and

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experts for a roundtable meeting to discuss the rationale, feasibility, and scope of a digital platform in a developing country to train and build the mental health workforce. BREAKING SOCIAL STIGMAS As part of the India Seminar Series, the Mittal Institute also teamed up with Sangath and It’s Okay to Talk for a panel conversation about mental health between Professor Patel, Ishita Mehra, and Ishita Chaudhry called “Unspoken Story.” Mehra, an artist and mental health advocate, and Chaudhry, a fellow of Ashoka and INK and founder of the YP Foundation, both shared stories about their journeys to address their own mental health needs. They advocated the importance of talking about mental health

FACULTY DIRECTOR VIKRAM PATEL The Pershing Square Professor of Global Health, Harvard Medical School


A brainstorming workshop on the Mental Health project

and breaking the negative social stigma that surrounds it. “Sangath, for example, works across the life course — young people with autism, all the way through to older adults,” Professor Patel said. “It has developed a program where it uses community resources for delivery of mental health interventions. Mental health

care on the frontlines can be delivered by non-specialized care workers, however, how does this get implemented in the real world?” The Mittal Institute will continue to help building a deeper understanding of mental health and how to educate society members to identify and speak up about it. With

further research, we can equip institutions to better address mental health in India and South Asia.

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THE CONVERSATIONS ON MENTAL HEALTH ARE TOO FRAGMENTED, AND BENEFIT WHEN THERE IS A SHIFT AWAY FROM PURELY BIOMEDICAL MODES OF CONCEPTUALIZING AND ENGAGING WITH MENTAL ILLNESS. THE BIG ISSUES IN INDIA THAT IMPACT MENTAL HEALTH AND APPLY ACROSS THE REGION ARE VIOLENCE, DISPLACEMENT AND MARGINALIZATION, ILL HEALTH, AND POVERTY AND INEQUALITY. — VIKRAM PATEL

INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERSHIPS • • • •

Sangath, India It's Okay to Talk, India American Center, India U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS)

Ishita Mehra, Ishita Chaudhury, and Professor Vikram Patel discuss Mental Health in South Asia at an event in New Delhi

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Mahboob Jokhio and Krupa Makh art exhibition

The gallery entrance for the “Partition Perspectives� art exhibition at the Harvard Ed Portal

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Participants at the Pre-Texts trainin


hija discuss their work with visitors at the “Partition Perspectives”

ng program

Roluahpuia, the Mittal Institute’s Raghunathan Family Fellow 2018-19, in his office

Rajyashri Goody, the Mittal Institute’s 2018-18 Visiting Artist Fellow

PROVIDING PLATFORMS FOR SOUTH ASIAN SCHOLARS The Mittal Institute serves as an active platform for connecting faculty and students from across Harvard and other U.S. academic institutions with scholars, public and private organizations, and governments in South Asia.

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RAGHUNATHAN FAMILY FELLOWSHIP The Raghunathan Family Fellowship supports recent PhDs in the humanities and social sciences with their research on historical or contemporary South Asia.

ROLUAHPUIA

RAGHUNATHAN FAMILY FELLOW 2018-19 Faculty Mentor: Professor Sugata Bose

Roluahpuia, the Mittal Institute’s Raghunathan Family Fellow, is a native of Manipur in northeast India and the first in his family to attend university. He admits it was challenging to convince his parents that an academic career is a worthwhile option for a young man, rather than earning a living straight away.

100 million people — and they are largely at an economic and social disadvantage. But tribal issues, he says, are at the fringes of academia in India. “My interest is in tribes, although there’s no such thing as ‘tribal studies,’” he says. “I think about questions of identity, of development and of nationalism, and also of territory and conflict.”

“In a sense, I was disobedient,” he says. “I wouldn’t say my family was unsupportive, but the reality is that it takes many years to complete a PhD, and there is financial pressure. But this was my passion, and I needed to make this bold decision.”

“In India, the academic focus on tribes has been relatively scant,” he continues. “There may be plenty of historical and anthropological works, but we are still rather uninformed about contemporary tribal politics.”

Roluahpuia achieved a PhD in 2017 from the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS) in India. He is interested in identity, nationalism, development, and borderland studies. His PhD thesis is an in-depth ethnographic account of the Mizo national movement in northeast India. Now, having worked as an assistant professor for a year at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies (CSDS), New Delhi, he is the latest Indian scholar to be awarded the Raghunathan Family Fellowship.

In the US for the first time, Roluahpuia has kept an open mind, allowing himself the space to benefit from the many opportunities that will come his way. “It’s a big leap for me, personally and professionally, and the fellowship was unexpected,” he says. “The issues that I touch upon in my own work are very much global in nature. There is a lot to learn from other parts of the world. Here, I can listen, share my ideas, and fully participate in the academic exchange.”

Roluahpuia is from a tribal background. In India, indigenous tribes account for around one-tenth of the total population — more than

26 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University


BABAR ALI FELLOWSHIP The Babar Ali Fellowship supports advanced degree-holders and recent PhDs in their continued research in areas related to Pakistan.

Mariam Chughtai initially came to the Mittal Institute as a graduate student in search of support for the creation of a universitywide student organization centered around Pakistan. Years later, she became the first member of the Mittal Institute’s presence on the ground in Pakistan, helping expand its in-region work. Today, as the Mittal Institute’s Babar Ali fellow, she is writing a book that explores the tension between the politics and culture of Pakistan to rewrite the narrative that has been erroneously assigned to the nation.

MARIAM CHUGHTAI

BABAR ALI FELLOW 2018-19 Faculty Mentor: Professor Kristin Fabbe

Chughtai’s book builds on an idea she developed in her doctoral dissertation. “The education system in Pakistan is used to make and break identity in Pakistan,” she explains. “It’s a larger commentary on Pakistan and its trajectory in the last 70 years. It’s looking at the politics of identity, religion, and terrorism. Embedded within that is the conversation about what the role of education has been in making society [the way it is].” Her research stands to challenge the staunch Western notion that instances of violence in Pakistan can be generalized across an entire population as a violent nature. In 2015, Chughtai moved back to Pakistan and teamed up with Dr. Tahir Andrabi,

Stedman-Sumner Professor of Economics at Pomona College, to carry out a project assigned by Syed Babar Ali, the inaugural donor from Pakistan to the Mittal Institute and funder of the Institute’s Syed Babar Ali Fellowship. Their mission was to establish a first-of-its-kind School of Education at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS SOE). Just two years later, they launched the Syed Ahsan Ali and Syed Maratib Ali School of Education. “The main ethos of the school is to operate at the nexus of research policy and practice to enable our students to consume leading research and bring it into practice,” Chughtai explains. Partnered with the Department of Youth Affairs through LUMS, Chughtai has built a massive, $4 million project in the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa to explore entrepreneurship, youth, and identity in the country. Today, she serves as the initiative’s project director. “We have the mandate to select youth from across the province with a special focus in rural youth and on women,” Chughtai explains. Currently, over 350 youth entrepreneurs have received training. Through her book and field experience, Chughtai intends to demonstrate that the perceived narrative about Pakistan is not necessarily the correct narrative.

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VISITING ARTIST FELLOWSHIPS Artists of diverse backgrounds visit Harvard’s campus to expand their work, using various mediums to comment on social, economic, and political issues in South Asia.

AMAN KALEEM

VISITING ARTIST FELLOW 2018-19 Faculty Mentor: Professor Jinah Kim Aman Kaleem is the founder and CEO of Kahaani Wale, a social impact communication organization. Currently, she is creating an online repository of protest movements across South Asia. At Harvard, she worked on a project to create a platform for immersive spatial experiences, bringing the viewer on the same stage as the protagonist. Her latest documentary for the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, "Shaadi, Sex Aur Parivaar," premiered at the International Film Festival in Madrid and is currently being screened in festivals across the world.

A still from Aman Kaleem’s documentary, “Shaadi, Sex, Aur Parivaar”

28 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

She is a Hubert Humphrey Fulbright Fellowship India nominee, a Young India Fellow, and has been recognized by the Government of India and The United Nations as a "Make a Difference Leader" for her work in the region.


SAMSUL ALAM

VISITING ARTIST FELLOW 2018-19 Faculty Mentor: Professor Jinah Kim Samsul Alam is a photographer based in Dhaka, Bangladesh. He completed his training in photography from Pathshala South Asian Media Institute. His recent work, "Love Studio," depicts the portraits of a working-class community where an old studio in Dhaka transforms into a neighborhood venue to represent the dreams, hopes, and desires of the factory workers, their families, and unemployed neighbors. In another portrait series on Hijra (transgender community), the camera hones in on the unfolding drama, nothing short of razzmatazz, that reads like a narrative and exotic hieroglyphic as the protagonists dance and sing for an absent audience. Alam loves to make fiction to question the reality. His aim is to transcend the socio-cultural and political issues, which are primary interests. He explores identity, dreams, and longings, and plays with the psychological realm of these issues to understand the deeper marks they create.

A piece from Samsul Alam’s series, “Runaway Lovers”

2018-19 Year in Review

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MAHBOOB JOKHIO

VISITING ARTIST FELLOW 2018-19 Faculty Mentor: Professor Jinah Kim Mahboob Jokhio was born in Mahrabpur, Pakistan. Graduating with Distinction from Beaconhouse National University in visual arts as an UMISSA scholar, Jokhio currently teaches at his alma mater in Lahore. Jokhio’s work considers the nature of images; their claims to objectivity and ability to manipulate meaning and perception. Working in various mediums, he questions image production and reception through subjects ranging from history and religion to love and violence. These investigations often incorporate irony, dark humor, and self-referential critiques that locate and decode the image’s capacity to mediate reality.

A day in the museum of wasted loves, by Mahboob Jokhio

30 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

Jokhio worked for BBC Urdu at Lahore in 2006. He has had his work displayed in a number of local exhibitions in Sindh, Alhamra Lahore, IVS Gallery, TAG Lahore, including the upcoming Karachi Biennale; a group show at the Canvas Gallery, "ExtraOrdinary, 37 Ideas for Free," curated by Rashid Rana; in "Everything is Embedded in History" at LLF; a two-person show called “A Thousand Times to Moon and Back Home” at IVS Gallery Karachi; “Premises of Promise,” curated by Quddus Mirza at Canvas Gallery; commissioned project in Karachi Biennale; “Multiple Narratives” at Grosvenor Gallery, London; and “Epiphany” at Piazza Sant’Andrea, Palermo, Italy. After his first solo show, “In the City of Lost Times,” at The Tetley, Leeds, UK, in 2018, he was awarded the Gasworks Residency at London, an IFTCF Emerging Artist Award, and residency at Villa Poggio in Verde, Italy.


KRUPA MAKHIJA

VISITING ARTIST FELLOW 2018-19 Faculty Mentor: Professor Jinah Kim Krupa Makhija was born in Patan, North Gujarat, India. She has a BFA (2005) and MFA (2007) in painting from the Faculty of Fine Arts, M.S. University at the University of Baroda. Her works are representations of her experiences about culture, language, and identity, a practice she describes as "Cultural Amnesia." Makhija was initially trained as a painter, but her practice also includes sculpture and installations. She has been part of several important international residencies, including the Fukuoka Asian Art Museum's residency program in 2017, Glenfiddich’s international artists residency in Scotland, UK in 2015, and the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MMCA) in South Korea in 2012. Her works have been part of many significant exhibitions, including the 2018 "Art in Fukuoka Castle" exhibition curated by Fukuoka Asian Art Museum and Fukuoka Art Museum, and "Yet and Yet Again" at Gallery OED, as part of a collateral project at the 2017 Kochi-Muziris Biennale. Her first solo show, "An Amnesiac’s Memory," was organized and sponsored by Glenfiddich at Gallery Art District XIII in New Delhi in 2016. Makhija has won many prestigious awards including a national award by the Government of India in 2009. Her works are part of many important public, private and museum collections.

Sindh-hind, by Krupa Makhija

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BUILDING BHARAT-BOSTON BIOSCIENCES (B4) FELLOWSHIPS For eighteen months, Science and Technology Fellows visit Harvard and other Boston institutions to deepen their research in the biosciences and learn from faculty and mentors.

KRITIKA GUPTA

MADHUMATHI KALIDOSS

Home Institution: Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore

Home Institution: Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Madras

Field of Specialization: Molecular Genetics and Protein Biophysics

Field of Specialization: Biomaterials

B4 FELLOW 2018-19

Research: Comprehensive analyses of extensive datasets for mutational sensitivities of a globular and intrinsically disordered protein through saturation mutagenesis. Boston Faculty Mentor: Professor Philippe Cluzel, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Harvard University

"

I HOPE TO APPLY MY PAST KNOWLEDGE AND GAIN FRUITFUL EXPOSURE TO THE WORLD OF SCIENCE. IN THIS RESPECT, BOSTON HAS A VAST ACADEMIC CULTURE THAT WILL ALLOW SHARING OF SCIENTIFIC EXPERIENCES AND WILL STRENGTHEN MY RESEARCH CAPABILITIES THROUGH AN EXPOSURE TO CHALLENGING TASKS.

32 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

B4 FELLOW 2018-19

Research: Developing local drug delivery systems for the treatment of periodontal infections using calcium phosphate bioceramic nanoparticles. Boston Faculty Mentor: Professor Muhammad Zaman, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University

"

I AM MOST EXCITED ABOUT WORKING IN A TOP US RESEARCH UNIVERSITY. I HOPE THIS FELLOWSHIP WILL HELP ME BROADEN MY RESEARCH AREA AND EQUIP ME WITH NEW SKILL SETS.


PREMANANDA KARIDAS

AJAY SHANKAR LABADE

SUDIPTA TUNG

Home Institution: Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore

Home Institution: Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune

Home Institution: Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune

Field of Specialization: Genome Biology

Field of Specialization: Experimental Evolution and Population Dynamics

Research: The functional importance of Nucleoporin Nup93 – subcomplex in regulating HOXA gene cluster expression.

Research: Different control methods for stabilizing extinction-prone populations and dispersal evolution's correlated changes in life-history, behavior, and metabolism.

B4 FELLOW 2018-19

Field of Specialization: Plant Developmental Biology Research: The development of biological surfaces, like plant leaves and insect wings at the organ, cellular, and molecular levels using the Arabidopsis plant.

B4 FELLOW 2018-19

Boston Faculty Mentor: Professor Elena Kramer, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

Boston Faculty Mentor: Professor Jason Buenrostro, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Harvard University

I AM EXCITED TO LEARN, DISCUSS, AND DEFINE NOVEL RESEARCH QUESTIONS – AND ANSWER THEM – AT A PIONEER LAB THAT STUDIES AQUILEGIA, AN UPCOMING MODEL ORGANISM FOR EVOLUTIONARY AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY STUDIES.

I AM MOST EXCITED TO CONDUCT RESEARCH IN THE WORLD'S TOP UNIVERSITY IN THE FIELD OF MY INTEREST.

"

"

B4 FELLOW 2018-19

Boston Faculty Mentor: Professor Michael Desai, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology (OEB) and the Department of Physics, Harvard University

"

I LOOK FORWARD TO EXPERIENCING THE VIBRANT INTELLECTUAL ATMOSPHERE OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY, LEARNING NEW RESEARCH TECHNIQUES TO EXPAND MY ACADEMIC PORTFOLIO, PRESENTING MY WORK, AND FINDING NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR COLLABORATIVE, INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH PROJECTS ON THE GLOBAL PLATFORM.

2018-19 Year in Review

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RESEARCH AFFILIATES Our research affiliates contribute to Harvard’s scholarship on South Asia through their wealth of expertise on the region, from urban infrastructure to public health.

RONAK D. DESAI

MICHAEL LINDENMAYER

Vice-Chair, India Practice, Steptoe & Johnson LLP

Co-Lead of Smart Sanitation and Digital Health, Toilet Board Coalition

Desai’s research and scholarship over the past few years has focused primarily on US-India ties (strategic, energy, and technology transfer and collaboration), diaspora politics, and corruption and governance issues in the subcontinent. He has also done considerable work advising companies on how to ensure compliance with foreign anti-corruption laws in South Asia and other high-risk jurisdictions.

Lindenmayer’s areas of technical expertise include smart sanitation, digital health, human-centered design, and social impact. At Harvard, he will be on the Advisory Committee for a studio course at the Graduate School of Design (GSD). He will assist in generating new knowledge, enhancing GSD students' in-field expertise in India, and advancing Harvard GSD as a continued thought-leader in systems-level design.

HASNA JASIMUDDIN MOUDUD

SUJATA SAUNIK

Chairperson, Bangladesh National Committee of IUCN Members

Indian Civil Service; 2017-19 Takemi Fellow, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health

Moudud studies the Silk Road to uncover the lost links between Mongolia and India via Bangladesh. She is also studying the life and work of Atisha Dipankara Srigana, the great Buddhist scholar who was born in Bangladesh.

At Harvard, Saunik is working on a comprehensive study of the recent Kerala Floods to critically examine the successes and failures of the response in order to learn lessons for future rebuilding projects. She is also studying internal migration in Jalna, Maharashtra, and its impact on health and education services for women and children.

34 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University


SALIL SHETTY

VERONICA VARGAS

Shetty has been a long-term activist on issues of poverty and justice and has served as Amnesty International’s eighth SecretaryGeneral. He now works with the Carr Center, researching accountability and equity in governance in India across sectors. He seeks to understand strategies for more inclusive and accountable governance in India.

Vargas is an economist focusing on health and public policy. She is currently exploring potential collaboration between South Asia and Latin America on R&D of new vaccines and therapeutics. Her research addresses how Harvard can build on existing strengths and comparative advantages between these two regions and further catalyze research and development capabilities and collaborations for much-needed, lower-priced vaccines and therapeutics.

Senior Fellow, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

FATIMA T. ZAHRA

Research Associate, Alberto Hurtado University

MUHAMMAD H. ZAMAN

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor of Biomedical Engineering and International Health, Boston University

Zahra devises public policies to enhance employment and educational opportunities for women, refugees, and other marginalized groups in South Asia. She is currently working with the local community at the Rohingya refugee camps to improve mental and fiscal well-being of refugees. She is also working on interventions to enhance education and health outcomes of women and children leveraging mobile technologies in these camps.

Zaman’s work focuses on the regulatory framework, quality of pharmaceuticals, and access to medicines and diagnostics in South Asia. His work examines how generic pharmaceutical companies in South Asia (particularly Cipla) address the issue of quality. In particular, the research aims to understand the equilibrium between growing demand for affordable pharmaceuticals and the costs to create and maintain quality of the product.

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EVENTS AND SEMINAR SERIES The Mittal Institute strengthens South Asiarelated research in a variety of disciples through our symposiums, seminars, and workshops.

ANNUAL CAMBRIDGE SYMPOSIUM Each year, the Annual Cambridge Symposium highlights the ongoing research and programs that the Mittal Institute has both developed and supported. This year, economist Devaki Jain delivered the 10th Annual Mahindra Lecture at the Symposium, weaving her own story into the story of India and exploring the value of revisiting and learning from the population’s experience in the period following independence and the Partition of British India in 1947. During the second day of the Symposium, four panel sessions were held to underscore the Mittal Institute’s involvement in science, health, arts, and education in South Asia. The science and technology session focused on the relevance of life sciences, big data, healthcare, and STEM education, while the session on health centered around the 1947 Partition of British India to learn more about how its legacy of lasting violence affected the population. The arts session elaborated on the importance of preserving South Asia’s art and historical sites and the use of cutting-edge scientific technology to protect and reconstruct these relics, and the final session concentrated on the role that

36 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

higher education institutions play in building academic infrastructure in South Asia. ANNUAL INDIA SYMPOSIUM The first Annual India Symposium was held in April 2019, welcoming scholars, industry leaders, and government representatives for a day of learning and discussion. Entitled “Science & Society,” the Symposium took an in-depth exploration into the role that science and technology play in India’s societal development, and examined the need for scientific advancement and new partnerships between science and industry. The Symposium provides a platform for industry experts to connect, share knowledge, and push their research and practices forward. Through this event, the Mittal Institute strengthens its partnerships with institutions in South Asia, and continues its in-region work to bring together likeminded individuals who can have a positive impact on the region’s societies. SEMINAR SERIES Each academic year, the Mittal Institute hosts a myriad of events that cover topics


Ali Sethi speaks to a packed room at the Barker Center

ranging from the arts, humanities, and sciences to education, business, and the social sciences (see pages 38-45 for a list of events held at Harvard during AY 201819). Partnering with relevant organizations, student groups, universities, and more, the Institute organizes events to provide platforms for faculty, scholars, industry leaders, and government representatives, allowing them to present their research, discuss developing issues and concerns, and look toward the future to deepen our understanding of the critical issues that South Asia faces every day. Our Seminar Series attracts worldrenowned speakers from South Asia. High profile speakers in 2018-19 included Bilawal Bhutto Zardari (Chairman, Pakistan Peoples Party), Amar Kanwar (Filmmaker), Devaki Jain (Economist and Padma Bhushan recipient), and K. VijayRaghavan (Principal Scientific Adviser to the Government of India). Co-sponsors for some of these events include the various Harvard Schools and Departments, the Alwaleed Islamic Studies Program, Asia Center, FXB Center for Human Rights, Carpenter Center,

Mahindra Center, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard Ed Portal, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Brown University, and the Harvard Global Institute. CONFERENCES/WORKSHOPS Urban Conference: In November 2018, the Mittal Institute cohosted a two-day international conference to explore various economic, political, and social measures that can bolster resilience against disasters and climate change occurring throughout the Asia-Pacific region. TRACE Symposium: In December 2018, the TRACE Symposium on artisanal intelligence, material agency, and ritual technology in South Asian art brought together scholars whose research embraces methodological interventions and theoretical implications of art history’s material turn in the field of South Asian art and architecture between 500 and 1500 CE. Pakistan Education Roundtable: In April 2019, The Mittal Institute hosted a roundtable to discuss issues facing education in Pakistan.

Nepal Conferences: In January and May 2019, Professor Michael Witzel led two conferences that analyzed the role of fire rituals in Hindu societies, particularly in Nepal, from the Vedas to modern times. CSMVS Workshop: The Mittal Institute partnered with CSMVS in Mumbai to host a two-day event around art and heritage conservation in India. OTHER OUTREACH EVENTS Asia Week New York: Each year, Asia Week New York gathers the world’s best auction houses, museums, and Asian art specialists for a weeklong event celebrating the importance of Asian art. In March 2019, Professor Jinah Kim and Dr. Katherine Eremin partnered with Christie’s through the Mittal Institute’s Arts Program to give a talk about artistic and scientific conservation of centuries-old Indian manuscripts. The discussion was moderated by Dipti Mathur, Chair, The Mittal Institute Arts Council.

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These seminars fall under several event series, including the India Seminar Series, South Asia Without Borders, Muslim Societies in South Asia, and the Joint Seminar Series on South Asian Politics.

FALL 2018

FRANCESCA R. JENSENIUS Constructing a Majority: A MicroLevel Study of Voting Patterns in Indian Elections SEPTEMBER 2018 FEBRUARY 2019

SPRING 2019

SEMINARS ON SOUTH ASIAN HISTORY AND POLITICS

BILAL A. BALOCH Crisis and Credibility: The Politics of Ideas in India and Developing Democracies

BILAWAL BHUTTO ZARDARI Pakistan’s Youth and the Welfare State

38 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

ROLUAHPUIA Dreams of Independence: Vernacular Nationalism among the Mizos of Northeast India


RAMACHANDRA GUHA Book Talk: ‘Gandhi: The Years That Changed the World, 1914–1948’

CHINMAY TUMBE The Great Indian Migration Wave

SUGATA BOSE ROHIT DE SREENIVASAN JAIN AYESHA JALAL Panel Discussion: Democracy in Distress in South Asia

MOEED YUSUF India-Pakistan Crises: Risks, Opportunities, and Options for US Crisis Management

MENAKA GURUSWAMY ARUNDHATI KATJU Decoding the Supreme Court Verdict that Decriminalized Homosexuality in India

VIJAYENDRA RAO Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics: Deliberative Inequality: A Text-As-Data Study of Tamil Nadu’s Village Assemblies

ALYSSA AYRES India on the U.S. Foreign Policy Agenda

OCTOBER 2018

NOVEMBER 2018

DECEMBER 2018

MARCH 2019

APRIL 2019

MAY 2019

ASHUTOSH VARSHNEY RONAK DESAI HASIT SHAH India's Upcoming Elections: What's at Stake?

DEVAKI JAIN 2019 Annual Mahindra Lecture Engaging with India: Engaging with Feminism and the Passion of “The Before Midnight’s Children” 2018-19 Year in Review

39


Supported by the Arts Advisory Council and the Dean of the Division of Social Science’s Donald T. Regan Lecture Fund, these seminars celebrate South Asian art, sculpture, and architecture.

40 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

FALL 2018

SEPTEMBER 2018 FEBRUARY 2019

SPRING 2019

SEMINARS ON THE ARTS

SONNY MEHTA The Riyaaz Qawwali Ensemble: A Journey of Cultures and Faiths through Qawwali


SUGATA BOSE SARVANI GOOPTU SUNIL AMRITH Beyond the Nation and the Novel: The Drama and Music of Dwijendralal Roy

SAMSUL ALAM AMAN KALEEM Shaping the Ordinary through Love and Dreams: South Asian Perspectives - Visiting Artist Fellowship Art Exhibition Opening Reception and Panel Discussion

AJAY SINHA Transcultural Attractions: American Photographs of an Indian Dancer

AMAN KALEEM Screening and Discussion of Documentary film 'Shaadi, Sex aur Parivaar' AASTHA GOSWAMI Autumn Moon: An Evening of Hindustani Music

ALI SETHI From Lahore with Love - Lecture and Demonstration

OCTOBER 2018

NOVEMBER 2018

DECEMBER 2018

MARCH 2019

APRIL 2019

MAY 2019

MAHBOOB JOKHIO KRUPA MAKHIJA Culture, Language, and Identity: Perspectives through South Asian Art: Visiting Artist Fellowship Art Exhibition Opening Reception

CATHERINE BECKER Buddhist Sites in Andhra Pradesh, India and Sri Lanka NANDITA DAS Screening of "Manto"

MALLIKA SARABHAI Dance to Change the World: Lecture and Demonstration

ALI SETHI ALI ASANI The Art of the Ghazal 23rd ANNUAL INDIA POETRY READING

AMAR KANWAR Carpenter Center Artist Talk and Screening of "Such a Morning"

2018-19 Year in Review

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We host numerous seminars that advance scholarship on South Asian cities, ecology, and business.

FALL 2018

SEPTEMBER 2018 FEBRUARY 2019

SPRING 2019

SEMINARS ON URBANIZATION AND ENVIRONMENT; ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND MARKETS

PARAG KHANNA Book Talk: The Future Is Asian

ANOORADHA IYER SIDDIQI “Whenever in Need, They Would Go To Each Other”: Sri Lankan Narrations and Architectural Schemes by Minnette De Silva

42 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University


NADEEM HUSSAIN The Emerging Markets Technological Revolution: Financial Inclusion & Development Through Digitization

TARUN KHANNA Book Talk: "Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries" ADITI MUKHERJI The Water-Energy-Food Nexus in India: Indirect Management of Groundwater Through Electricity Sector Reforms

MRINALINI RAJAGOPALAN Delhi Modern: Five Short Stories of a City

RAHUL MEHROTRA SOURAV BISWAS Becoming Urban: Emerging Patterns of Urbanization in India

OCTOBER 2018

NOVEMBER 2018

DECEMBER 2018

MARCH 2019

APRIL 2019

MAY 2019

SRIPAD MOTIRAM VAMSI VAKULABHARANAM Production of City Space in India: Class, Caste, and Grayness

2018-19 Year in Review

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Our seminars on health and gender span topics from public health needs and solutions in South Asia to the education and rights of women and girls.

44 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

FALL 2018

SEPTEMBER 2018 FEBRUARY 2019

SPRING 2019

SEMINARS ON HEALTH AND GENDER

JACQUELINE BHABHA ELIZABETH DONGER Prevention Science in Child Protection: An Indian Case Study


SONALDE DESAI Does Rising Education Lead Changing Gender Norms in India?

INDRANI CHATTERJEE Missing Matrons in a History of Wealth

PARVEEN PARMAR JEN LEIGH Rohingya Persecution in Myanmar: Evidence and Accountability OCTOBER 2018

NOVEMBER 2018

DECEMBER 2018

MARCH 2019

APRIL 2019

MAY 2019

SARAH KHAN De Facto Suffrage: A Field Experiment to Improve Women’s Turnout in Pakistan’s General Elections

SHENILA KHOJA-MOOLJI Book Talk: "Forging the Ideal Educated Girl: The Production of Desirable Subjects in Muslim South Asia" 2018-19 Year in Review

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A Chai and Chat session at the Mittal Institute

46 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University


Neeti Nayak and Sheliza Jamal, curators of the Student Research Art Exhibition

A panel discussion at the 2018 Harvard India Conference

A student examining an art exhibit

A student group discussion in progress

FURTHERING RESEARCH AMONG HARVARD STUDENTS

The Mittal Institute supports Harvard undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students in their South Asia-related research and internships, entrepreneurial projects, and on-campus student group activities.

2018-19 Year in Review

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STUDENT GRANTS Each year, the Mittal Institute funds students in their pursuit of research, language studies, or internships focused on South Asia during the winter and summer recesses.

The Mittal Institute awards summer and winter session grants to Harvard students focused on deepening their academic engagement with issues facing South Asia. Research grants support field research on specific topics that could contribute to a thesis or dissertation. Language grants support students who choose to pursue an intensive study of a South Asian language. Internship grants are awarded to students who choose to work with organizations in South Asia. RESEARCH GRANTS

THOMAS BRANDON EVANS PhD Candidate in Film and Visual Studies Listening to the (in)finite: The Ends of Sound in Sikh Audiovisual Media Winter 2018 MORGAN CURTIS PhD Candidate in Philosophy The Cilappatikram and Its Reception History Summer 2019

48 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

JULIA FINE '19 Cooking Up British India: Foodways and Intimate Imperial Exchanges, 1796-1901 Winter 2018 BRONWEN S. GULKIS PhD Candidate in History of Art and Architecture Indian and Persian Albums in St. Petersburg Collections: Use and Reuse Winter 2018 SHIREEN HAMZA PhD Candidate in Philosophy Making ibb: Medical Exchanges in the Indian Ocean World, 1200-1550 CE Summer 2019 LAURA SKY HERMAN '20 Pigments: Then and Now Winter 2018

KARAN SAHARYA, MDes '20 The Many Lives of the Qutub Minar: Conservation and Conflict in Post-Colonial India Summer 2019


Mittal Institute grant recipient Angela Thurston, MDiv ’16, at the Aasha Foundation

EDUARDO PELAEZ, MDes '19 Learning from Slumscapes: Wet grounds, Flooding, and Community-Based Initiatives in Mumbai Winter 2018 NIVEDITA SAKSENA RAJ, MPH ‘20 A Data Protection Framework for Health in India Winter 2018 ALEXANDRA SANYAL, MDes '20 Religious Residue: A Study of Preservation and Colonial Heritage on Sacred Sites in Kolkata Summer 2019 THOMAS SCHAPERKOTTER, MArch '20 Voices of the Rohingya Summer 2019 SANDHIRA WIJAYARATNE Candidate for Doctor of Medicine The Role of Social Media as Propaganda in Sri Lanka's Post-War Religious Violence Summer 2019

IRIS YELLUM PhD Candidate in South Asian Studies The Value of Viability: Seeds, Indian Agriculture, and Agrarian Livelihoods Winter 2018 LANGUAGE STUDY GRANTS

NARIMAN AAVANI PhD Candidate in Philosophy Intensive Sanskrit Program Summer 2019

INTERNSHIP GRANTS

RUI SU, MUP '20 Internship at the Janaagraha Centre for Citizenship & Democracy, India Summer 2019 ADITI CHITKARA ‘21 Research Internship at PrecisionAg, India Summer 2019

MOHIT MANDAL PhD Candidate in Philosophy Malayalam Summer Language Program Summer 2019 PRANATI PARIKH '21 AIIS Summer Sanskrit Program Summer 2019

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SEED FOR CHANGE STUDENT COMPETITION 2019 An annual student competition to develop new entrepreneurial projects for India and Pakistan that aim to positively impact social, economic, and environmental issues.

Through the Seed for Change (SFC) Program, the Mittal Institute fosters and supports the development of a healthy, vibrant ecosystem for innovation and entrepreneurship in both India and Pakistan. Each year, the Mittal Institute holds this competition to identify and reward interdisciplinary student projects that positively impact social, economic, and environmental issues in India and Pakistan.

2019 SFC COMPETITION JUROR PANEL KP BALARAJ Co-Chair, Advisory Council, The Mittal Institute MEERA GANDHI Founding Member, Advisory Council, The Mittal Institute NADIA SAMDANI Founding Member, Arts Council, The Mittal Institute OSMAN KHALID WAHEED Founding Member, Arts Council, The Mittal Institute

50 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

To bring new, substantive ventures and ideas to the region, the program prioritizes projects that are in the early stages of development, rather than start-ups that have already received substantial financial support. Through this program, numerous entrepreneurial ventures have sprouted in Pakistan and India and continue to positively impact the lives of those who live there.

2019 FINALISTS CHADDHAL Rameen Rana ‘20 Aishah Ahmed ‘20 Rifat Atun (Advisor), Professor of Global Health Systems, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Chaddhal is a non-profit business aiming to bring insecticide-treated clothing technology to populations who require it the most and to empower textile workers and communities in India.


Rameen Rana ‘20 and Aishah Ahmed ‘20 present their proposal at the 2019 SFC semi-finals

GRAMHAL

MEET

RISKBOARD

Vikas Birhma, MPP ‘19 Pankaj Mahalle, Tata Institute of Social Science, Mumbai Julie Battilana (Advisor), Alan L. Gleitsman Professor of Social Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School; Joseph C. Wilson Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Vish Srivastava, MDE ‘19, Ankit Chugh, Medha Jock Herron (Advisor), Design Critic in Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Pradeepan Parthiban, ALM ‘19 Arjun Bisen, MPP ‘19 Ryan Jiang ‘20 Luka Caratsch, University of St. Gallen Satchit Balsari (Advisor), Assistant Professor in the Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Gramhal is a social enterprise that aims to redesign India’s agriculture market to build smallholder farmers’ agency and improve their livelihoods.

Meet is an employment app that connects verified employers and job-seekers, providing both with trusted information such as reviews, job openings, and profiles to support better matching.

RiskBoard provides a digital dashboard tool for corporations, investors, and NGOs that want to monitor human rights abuses and political risks as they occur. The tool aggregates news, social media data, and political and economic indices to give the user a live understanding of disruptions and reputational risks in their complex supply chains and investments.

The juror panel at the 2019 SFC Semi-Finals: Scott Overdyke, Tarun Khanna, and Mariam Chughtai

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The 2018 winners of the Seed for Change competition created products that address environmental and healthcare issues in India and Pakistan.

GREEN SCREEN INDIA Team Gina Ciancone, MUP '19, Project Lead David Costanza, Rice University School of Architecture Dan Cusworth, PhD '18 (Atmospheric Chemistry) Ramya Pinnamaneni, MPH '18 Rahul Mehrotra (Advisor), Professor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design Gina Ciancone on Green Screen and its genesis:

farmers – further contributing to air pollution. In fact, over 27 million tons of agricultural waste are burned annually, exposing nearly 22 million people to the worst air quality in the world. Such intense air pollution also traps heat within the city of New Delhi and leads to deadly heat waves. Our solution incentivizes an alternative use to excess agricultural waste and transforms “waste” into a product used to cool those most at risk due to extreme heat. Green Screen developed through multiple phases of design-thinking: data analysis of heat and pollution in Delhi, as well as a needs assessment of slum communities. This

Alongside global health practitioners from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and another designer from the Harvard Graduate School of Design, I developed Green Screen as a solution to simultaneously address the interconnected problems of air pollution and extreme heat. Green Screen is a zero-electricity air-cooling panel made entirely of agricultural waste, which would have otherwise been burned by The Green Screen panel

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The Green Screen panel installed at a home in Delhi

led to a fast design charrette of possible solutions, which were combined and edited to create a breakthrough idea. As a designer trained in both architecture and urban planning, I am accustomed to working at different scales, which is reflected in the product’s design and projected scalability from a passive cooling screen to a passively cooled building.

Members of the Gazipur community in Delhi with the Green Screen panel

My interdisciplinary background and the diversity of the current team, which is composed of a materials scientist, an atmospheric chemist, and a physician, allowed for the development of an entirely new product. Ultimately, Green Screen is the result of creative problem solving – it utilizes elements from a designer’s toolkit to integrate experimentation, technological

possibility, and business success to arrive at an innovative solution.

UMBULIZER PAKISTAN Team Shaheer Ahmed Piracha, Project Lead and Engineer Hamza Ali Khan, MBA '19 Sanchay Gupta, MD '21 Faye Evans (Advisor), Instructor in Anaesthesia and Department of Global Health and Social Medicine Affiliate, Harvard Medical School In developing countries like Pakistan, there is a shortage of mechanical ventilators. Umbulizer is developing a reliable, lowcost, and portable device that can provide continuous ventilation to patients in resource-limited healthcare settings.

Green Screen’s agricultural and cooling production lifecycles

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OTHER STUDENT-RELATED INITIATIVES The Mittal Institute supports the work of undergraduate and graduate students at Harvard, from grants for student organizations to the creation of new curriculum.

STUDENT ORGANIZATION GRANTS The Mittal Institute offers grants to undergraduate and graduate student organizations for projects relating to either individual countries or spanning the region of South Asia. Mittal Institute grants also support student events that have an academic focus and Harvard faculty involvement, as well as social events, such as concerts, mixers, and holiday celebrations. Select student organizations and events funded in 2018-19 Harvard Pakistan Student Group South Asia ConnectED at the Harvard Graduate School of Education Human Rights Professional Interest Council at the Harvard Kennedy School Harvard College Deepam South Asia Engagement Forum at the Harvard Kennedy School

54 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

India Conference 2019 organized by the Harvard Kennedy School and the Harvard Business School South Asia Symposium 2019 organized by the Harvard Kennedy School Film Screenings of India’s Daughter at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and Haider at the Department of History at Harvard University Gross National Happiness Conference 2019 organized by the Harvard Divinity School FALL COURSE ON CONTEMPORARY DEVELOPING COUNTRIES SW47 Entrepreneurial Solutions to Intractable Social and Economic Problems, partly sponsored by The Mittal Institute, provides a framework (and multiple lenses) through which to consider the salient economic and social problems of the five billion people living in the developing world. During this course, students work in a team setting to


Kale mache marda sashi; photo taken by Mittal Institute grant recipient Stephanie Spray, PhD ‘16

identify entrepreneurial solutions to such problems. Case study discussions cover challenges and solutions in fields as diverse as health, education, technology, urban planning, and arts and the humanities. All students participate in the development of a business plan or a grant proposal to tackle their chosen problem in a specific developing country or region.

SW47 is co-taught by: Tarun Khanna, Harvard Business School Satchit Balsari, Harvard Medical School and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public He alth Krzysztof Gajos, Harvard John A. Paulson School Of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Rahul Mehrotra, Harvard Graduate School of Design Doris Summer, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

STUDENT AMBASSADOR PROGRAM The Mittal Institute's student ambassadors at each Harvard school help build relationships with various stakeholders. Through them, we connect with Harvard students, spread the word about our events, and use their unique knowledge of their own school to brainstorm potential new or partnered events for us to host. The Student Ambassador Program is currently in its inaugural year. Our 2018-19 student ambassadors are: RUI SU, MUP '20 Harvard Graduate School of Design AMANAT BOPARAI, MPP '20 Harvard Kennedy School DIPAL NAGDA, MD '22 Harvard Medical School

Professor Jinah Kim with students at an art exhibition

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A site visit under the Fuel-Efficient Cookstoves project

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The official opening of the Mittal Institute’s New Delhi office

A team meeting at the Mittal Institute’s New Delhi office

The PSIL team at the Don Bosco school in Manipur

Participants at a Rapid Scenario Planning Exercise undertaken as part of the Nepal Studies program in Kathmandu

IN-REGION PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS Through its office in Delhi, the Mittal Institute provides a venue for faculty, students, and institutions to build regional partnerships, and form new connections that advance the scholarship of South Asia.

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ANNUAL INDIA SYMPOSIUM "SCIENCE AND SOCIETY" The Mittal Institute held its first Annual India Symposium, bringing together academics, industry leaders, and government representatives to discuss science and technology in India.

BRAINSTORMING SESSION In the build-up to our Annual India Symposium on April 4, 2019 in New Delhi, the Mittal Institute, with support from the Tata Trusts, organized four brainstorming sessions to bring together academics and industry leaders to discuss some of the scientific and technological issues India faces, and the potential solutions to

these problems. Topics covered included agricultural advancement, the life sciences, STEM education, and digital health. This group of scientists and industry leaders were also joined by the US Ambassador to India, Kenneth I. Juster, as well as Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw, the Chairperson and Managing Director of Biocon, and Professor K. VijayRaghavan, the Principal Scientific Adviser to the Government of India.

A brainstorming session on the status of scientific and technological advancements in India

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A panel discussion at the Annual India Symposium

INDIA SYMPOSIUM In April 2019, the Mittal Institute held its inaugural annual India Symposium in Delhi, convening scholars, practitioners, researchers, and more for a full-day event composed of sessions centered around science and technology. This Symposium mirrors the same event hosted by the Cambridge office and brings visibility to

cutting edge research on critical issues relevant to South Asia. It creates a platform that connects scholars from the United States and South Asia, bringing them together to share knowledge and push their research, teaching, and practices forward. The Symposium also provides the opportunity for the Mittal Institute to build and strengthen its partnerships with government, private, and public institutions across the region.

Science and technology play a central role in societal development, and it is critical to understand why and how. Applying cuttingedge scientific advances to meet real-world needs requires a knowledge of the latest technology, domain expertise, and the contextual intelligence needed to operate in emerging markets. India’s first Symposium, entitled “Science & Society,” brought together academics and government and industry leaders to illustrate the possibilities for scientific advancement, with sessions given by prominent panelists in topics ranging from India’s agricultural advancements to its digital health ecosystem and STEM education in schools. This symposium was organized in collaboration with the NITI Aayog and the Office of the Principal Scientific Advisor to the Government of India.

A message from Mr. Lakshmi Mittal that was displayed for participants of the Annual India Symposium

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PROGRAM FOR SCIENTIFICALLY INSPIRED LEADERSHIP (PSIL) A Harvard team traveled from Cambridge to Manipur, India to deliver a curriculum centered around critical thinking and problem-solving to local high school students.

Dominic Mao, a Lecturer in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, is originally from Manipur, Imphal — a state in northeast India. Recently, he set out to create a program in Manipur that would engage local high school students and college-level teaching assistants in a Western-style educational format. ENVISIONING MANIPUR’S CLASSROOMS “Most initiatives happen in the western part of India, and I wanted to set up an education outreach program in a part of India that people don’t tend to go to. Imphal is one of the poorest states in India, and the region has been under political conflict for many years,” Dr. Mao explained. “As a result of conflict, the education system gets hit the hardest.” With funding from the Mittal Institute, the Science Education Department at FAS, the Asia Center, and local in-region parties, the Program for Scientifically Inspired Leadership (PSIL) was created. Dr. Mao teamed up with Christopher Li, a researcher at the Belfer Center, and three Harvard

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undergraduate students, Sam Kessler, Allison Pao, and Ellen Zhang, to build a curriculum for Manipur’s high schoolers centered around the scientific method. Dr. Mao’s vision led the team to Don Bosco school in Manipur for one week in January 2019 to deliver their curriculum to about 60 local high school students. “We had core lectures, labs, ‘TED Talks,’ a talent show, a career session — where they got to talk to university faculty, an entrepreneur, a news anchor, a retired IAS officer, and a trainer — an open Q&A session with the Harvard students, and a presentation of their group project,” Dr. Mao said.

FACULTY DIRECTORS VENKATESH MURTHY Professor of Molecular & Cellular Biology, Harvard University DOMINIC MAO Director; Lecturer, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University


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[A STUDENT] SAID THAT THE PROGRAM GAVE HER A BROADER SENSE OF THE WORLD AND OPPORTUNITIES. FOR ME, THIS PROGRAM GAVE ME NEW PERSPECTIVES AND EXPERIENCES THAT HAVE AND WILL CONTINUE TO SHAPE THE WAY I VIEW OPPORTUNITIES, EDUCATION, AND MENTORSHIP AS I GO FORWARD. — ELLEN ZHANG IT WAS REALLY EMPOWERING TO KNOW THAT WE WERE DOING THIS FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER. THAT WAS A LITTLE BIT DAUNTING AT TIMES, BUT I THINK THAT WAS WHAT MADE THE EXPERIENCE SO REWARDING: KNOWING THAT WE BUILT SOMETHING FROM NOTHING. — ALLISON PAO The Harvard team, teaching assistants, high school students, and additional team members stand outside of the Don Bosco school in Manipur

Throughout the week, the students took what they learned and applied it to Manipur’s social problems to develop potential solutions. “The students were so passionate about all of the problems that their state, Manipur, was facing, from crimes against women to frequent strikes in the state,” Pao said.

LEAVING A LASTING LEGACY The program opened the high schoolers’ eyes to the potential pathways they could take in life, and the impact of the program is already taking root. “Some high school students were asked by their schools to share what they had learned with students in lower grades,” Dr. Mao said. In the week

following the program, Pao and Dr. Mao learned that one of the students even started a feminism group at their school. Now, the high schoolers “are better equipped with information on how to pursue higher education and various career tracks,” Dr. Mao explained.

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I REALLY LOVED THE EDUCATIONAL COMPONENT OF IT… THE ONLY WAY TO REALLY LEARN ABOUT A PLACE IS TO EXPERIENCE IT AND TO MEET PEOPLE THERE, AND TO DO WHAT YOU CAN TO GO IN THERE WITH OPEN EYES. — SAM KESSLER

INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERSHIPS • • • • • • Allison Pao, third from left, with five of the student participants

FAS Division of Science, Science Education, Harvard University Don Bosco School, Manipur Lamjingba Group of Companies Gopen Moses Asia Center, Harvard University Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University

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BUILDING BHARAT-BOSTON BIOSCIENCES (B4) PROGRAM In its second phase, the B4 Program educates and inspires young Indian scientists through fellowships, workshops, and seminars as they pursue careers in the biosciences.

The Building Bharat-Boston Biosciences (B4) Program is the second iteration of the earlier Boston-Bangalore Biosciences Beginnings Program. Funded by the Department of Biotechnology within the Government of India, the Mittal Institute collaborates with IBAB, Bengaluru and IISER, Pune to connect institutions in India

2019-20 B4 FELLOWS KRITIKA GUPTA Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore MADHUMATHI KALIDOSS Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Madras PREMANANDA KARIDAS Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore AJAY SHANKAR LABADE Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune SUDIPTA TUNG Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune

62 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

and Boston and create a platform for them to promote research and build new knowledge in the biosciences. BUILDING KNOWLEDGE IN BANGALORE Under the leadership of faculty director Venkatesh Murthy, Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard University, the program is composed of three parts: up to eight Science and Technology Fellowships at Harvard and other Boston institutions are awarded for 18 months in fields related to biosciences; two “Young Scientist” workshops each year on topics related to biosciences to promote interdisciplinary learning for young scientists in India; and two in-country seminars each year are held in a city in India to highlight the work of visiting scientists.

FACULTY DIRECTOR VENKATESH MURTHY Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University


Students gain hands-on experience in the lab during the B4 workshop

CUTTING-EDGE WORKSHOPS The Young Scientist workshops introduce talented Indian students to the latest fields within the life sciences. They comprise several lectures given by eminent experts and incorporate hands-on lessons to provide students with practical knowledge on how to apply these lessons to future endeavors.

“The most recent workshop in January 2019 was held in Bangalore and was on the topic of Synthetic Biology, led by faculty from Johns Hopkins,” said Professor Murthy. “In the future, I’m interested in exploring other topics for these workshops, including Artificial Intelligence, cybersecurity, or cryptography.”

In January 2019, an in-country seminar, “Preparing Young Indian Scientists for Life Sciences in the 21st Century,” was held at the National Institute of Plant Genome Research (NIPGR) in New Delhi to discuss the rapidly evolving landscape of life sciences and the increasingly competitive job environment surrounding the field of life sciences in India. A panel of distinguished life scientists and policymakers discussed some of the most pressing issues that young scientists in India face, helping them prepare for their future careers. INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERSHIPS • • •

Department of Biotechnology, Government of India Institute of Bioinformatics and Applied Biotechnology (IBAB) Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune

Faculty Lead Professor Venkatesh Murthy discusses the work being undertaken as part of the B4 program

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NEPAL STUDIES PROGRAM In its third year, the Nepal Studies Program journeyed to Nepal to take an in-depth look at the importance of fire rituals and Hinduism.

The Nepal Studies Program began in 2017 with generous support from Jeffrey M. Smith, and for the past three years, has focused on a different faculty-led topic of interest each year. EXPLORING HINDUISM IN NEPAL Currently in its third year, this year's Program Lead Michael Witzel, Wales Professor of Sanskrit, continued the program's work of engaging with scholars and practitioners in both Cambridge and Nepal. Witzel has journeyed into an exploration of the Hindu religion in Nepal and the important role of rituals, from the Vedic period to modern times.

"

NEPAL IS A FASCINATING COUNTRY SWIRLING WITH COMPATIBILITIES, CONTRADICTIONS, AND SOMETIMES CONFLICTS. BY BRINGING NEPAL INTO THE HARVARD ORBIT AND HARVARD INTO THE NEPAL ORBIT, WE CAN CREATE A NEW INTELLECTUAL TERRAIN FOR ALL OF US. — JEROLD S. KAYDEN

“Hinduism had always been the state religion of Nepal, but since the emergence of the secular Republic in 2008, this is no longer the case, despite some scattered demands to reinstate a Hindu country. Yet, state leaders … partake in certain rituals, especially those that the former kings attended. These [rituals] simply belong to the fabric of Nepal,” Professor Witzel said. “Nepal has been called a Museum of

64 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

Medieval India — many rituals, festivals, and forms of art that have long disappeared in India are still prominent,” Witzel continued. “The pattern of continuity and reform can easily be observed: even a casual walk through town … showed not only the daily Pūjā at Hindu and Buddhist temples, but also public performances that … underlined the community participation that is vividly present at the Agnishala.” RITUAL SHAPES SOCIETY In January 2019, Professor Witzel led a FACULTY DIRECTORS JEROLD S. KAYDEN Frank Backus Williams Professor of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design LEONARD VAN DER KUIJP Professor of Tibetan and Himalayan Studies, Harvard University MICHAEL WITZEL Wales Professor of Sanskrit, Harvard University


The “Hinduism in Nepal” conference team

conference in Nepal with support from the Nepal Leadership Academy and Himalayan Children’s Charities. The goal was to study the extensive documentation of Hindu ritual over the past few decades, and how it has shaped social customs. With a focus on fire rituals in Nepal, Professor Witzel and fellow speakers discussed Agnimatha rituals, related Buddhist rites, and more.

In May 2019, the Nepal Studies Program will hold a companion conference at Harvard University. The second leg of the 2019 conference will elucidate theoretical aspects of Hindu rituals in Nepal, and will also include further exchange of scholarship between foreign and local scholars and practitioners.

PAST FACULTY-LED PROJECTS In the first year of the program, Professor Jerold Kayden led a study on earthquake preparedness in Nepal. In its second year, Professor Leonard van der Kuijp explored the spread and development of Buddhism in the IndiaNepal corridor.

INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERSHIPS • • • • •

Nepal Leadership Academy Himalayan Children’s Charities School of Arts, Kathmandu University Harvard Alumni Association of Nepal South Asia Institute, Heidelberg University

Basantapur in Nepal; photo taken by Patrick Xu ‘16

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MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO INNOVATIVE SOCIAL ENTERPRISES PROGRAM A multi-year program supporting the development of social entrepreneurship projects that positively impact social, economic, and environmental issues in India.

The Multidisciplinary Approach to Innovative Social Enterprises program, funded by the Tata Trusts, identifies and supports creative social entrepreneurship projects that are grounded in rigorous academic research and seek to address issues in public health, education, science and technology, women’s safety, access to clean water, energy, and sanitation infrastructure. Currently, seven multidisciplinary projects — led by faculty from Harvard, MIT, and UC Berkeley — are underway to assist current government, civil society, academic, and corporate efforts working to improve the economic standing of the Indian masses. FACULTY DIRECTORS TARUN KHANNA Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, The Mittal Institute SATCHIT BALSARI Assistant Professor in Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant Professor, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health

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JACQUELINE BHABHA FXB Director of Research; Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health CHRIS DUGGAN Professor in the Departments of Nutrition and Global Health and Population, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health ASHOK GADGIL Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UC Berkeley; Faculty Senior Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory RAHUL MEHROTRA Professor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design PAWAN SINHA Professor of Vision and Computational Neuroscience, MIT CONOR WALSH Gordon McKay Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences


"

THE TOOLKIT IS A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE FOR INDIVIDUAL PROVIDERS OR SMALL PRACTICES IN INDIA TO PLUG INTO INDIA’S DIGITAL HEALTH GRID. WE ARE DEVELOPING A PROVIDER-DRIVEN, PATIENT-CENTRIC DESIGN PROCESS FOR DIGITIZING HEALTH DATA WHEREBY DOCTORS AND ADMINISTRATORS CAN QUICKLY DEPLOY EASY-TOUSE CUSTOMIZED SOLUTIONS THAT CAN SECURELY PORT DATA TO AND FROM OTHER SYSTEMS.

— SATCHIT BALSARI, INDIA DIGITAL HEALTH NETWORK: AN EHR-TOOLKIT FOR PRIMARY HEALTH CARE The Sanitation Infrastructure team meets with government officials and community members

This year, project efforts on the ground have scaled up through mass digital data collection and by building the capacity of in-region collaborators. The teams have engaged with government bodies about policy, performed community outreach and training, and identified potential industry partners.

INDIA DIGITAL HEALTH NETWORK: AN EHR-TOOLKIT FOR PRIMARY HEALTH CARE SATCHIT BALSARI The goal of the India Digital Health Network is to improve healthcare delivery in India.

Under the project, the team created a “light-footprint” prototype of a customizable electronic health record (EHR) called “EHRlite,” and an “EHR Implementation Toolkit” that identifies necessary documentation, personnel, and resources at the primary care level. “The Toolkit is a step-by-step guide for individual providers or small practices in India to plug into India’s digital health grid,” says faculty lead Professor Satchit Balsari. “We are developing a providerdriven, patient-centric design process for digitizing health data whereby doctors and administrators can quickly deploy easy-touse customized solutions that can securely port data to and from other systems.” Once the products are field-tested, they will transition to Social Alpha, the non-profit start-up incubator funded by Tata Trusts, to help scale. Partnerships: Computer scientists, medical informaticians, healthcare providers, data scientists, and policymakers from India and Harvard to provide technical and

The India Digital Health Network team works on the EHR Toolkit

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Participants at the two-week course in nutrition research methodology, a part of the BBNC Nutrition project

policy assistance. The India team is led by Professor Tony Raj, Dean of St. John’s Research Institute, Bengaluru. BANGALORE BOSTON NUTRITION COLLABORATIVE / MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH AND NUTRITION CHRIS DUGGAN India faces high levels of maternal and child mortality and morbidity due to undernutrition, micronutrient deficiencies, and infectious diseases. In this project, Professor Chris Duggan and his team identify and train professionals who have the necessary skills, knowledge, and interdisciplinary collaborative abilities to mitigate these issues. The Bangalore Boston Nutrition Collaborative (BBNC) conducts an annual two-week course in nutrition research methodology at St. John’s Research Institute, Bangalore, to train professionals and help influence policymaking at the national and global level. Nine courses have

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been conducted from 2010–2018 and over 350 participants have been trained. The BBNC nutrition project is in the process of digitizing a free, two-week course developed by scientists from St. John’s Research Institute, Harvard, and Tufts for public health workers in India and the US to build a global community of online students and improve nutrition education and training. SOFT ROBOTICS TOOLKIT CONOR WALSH The Soft Robotics Toolkit aims to lower the barrier of entry to STEM industries by developing a line of soft robotic devices for students. Each kit contains parts that students use to create their own soft robot. The first Toolkit contains pieces to create a gripper arm that can be used to pick up objects. Created to be adaptable for lesson plans, workshops, home, and school use, the kits excite students about STEM areas,


"

AS USERS, THE STUDENTS AND TEACHERS GAVE VALUABLE INSIGHTS INTO AREAS OF THE INSTRUCTIONS THAT NEED TO BE CLEARER FOR AN INDIAN CLASSROOM SETTING, WHAT AGE GROUP THEY FOUND THE TOOLKIT MOST SUITABLE FOR, AND ANY ADDITIONS TO THE TOOLKIT THAT WOULD MAKE IT EVEN MORE EXCITING. — ANKUR GOEL, SOFT ROBOTICS TOOLKIT Bauxite ore being used for fluoride removal under the Defluoridation project

while showing the possible applications of robotics: grasping objects (manufacturing), artificial muscles (prosthetics), and locomotion (biomimicry). The goal of this project is to create several different types of Toolkits. Faculty lead

Professor Conor Walsh and his team are currently in the R&D phase, planning which educational concepts the kits will teach and establishing design criteria. A team member experienced in STEM education will pilot the Toolkit in India in the educational space and inspire interest in STEM fields.

DEFLUORIDATION OF WATER ASHOK GADGIL This project examines scalable and affordable methods to remove fluoride from drinking water in rural India, which can cause skeletal and dental fluorosis and affects 66 million people throughout the country. The team has identified a costeffective method in fluoride removal through the use of bauxite ore, which can tremendously improve access to safe water in impoverished rural communities. On a recent visit to Mumbai and Ahmedabad, faculty lead Professor Ashok Gadgil of UC Berkeley discussed plans for Year 2 of the project with partners in India, including Sattva Consulting, INREM, and ICTMumbai. Andrew Haddad, post-doctoral fellow, collected fluoride-contaminated samples from Jhabua, Madhya Pradesh, which were transferred to INREM and ICTMumbai for fluoride absorption analysis.

Students working with the Soft Robotics Toolkit

Moving forward, the team will identify ways

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A Project Prakash team member with a patient

A cookstove developed under the Fuel-Efficient cookstove project

to obtain large amounts of bauxite from a consistent source. PROJECT PRAKASH PAWAN SINHA Since 2005, Project Prakash has connected citizens from hundreds of villages in India to the most sophisticated treatment available for preventable and treatable blindness in children. Led by Professor Pawan Sinha, MIT, the team’s work raises fundamental questions regarding brain plasticity and learning, creating a comprehensive picture of pediatric health across several sites in India. Through the use of a digitized application, field workers can track and follow-up with patients who suffer from eye conditions. The second phase of the project envisions the creation of several “Prakash Vision Centers” (PVCs) to serve basic optometric needs of Indian citizens in rural and semiurban areas. The PVCs will facilitate ongoing neuroscience research, providing

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data for epidemiological analyses, livelihood generation, and public health improvement, while acting as referral centers for children who suffer from surgically treatable congenital blindness. FUEL-EFFICIENT COOKSTOVES ASHOK GADGIL Most of India’s population cooks food indoors using open fires, stone hearths, or rudimentary stoves. This process releases toxic pollutants that cause an estimated 1.9 million premature deaths each year. Under the “Cool Mesh Berkeley India Stove (CMBIS)” project, headed by Professor Ashok Gadgil of UC Berkeley, new cookstoves have been designed to mitigate indoor air pollution by increasing time and fuel efficiency. A pilot project was carried out in 2018 in three villages of the Karjat district in the state of Maharashtra. In summer 2018, the team purchased 95 temperature monitors and dataloggers for long-term monitoring of CMBIS stoves.


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TIME HAS BEEN TAKEN TO LEARN THE IMPORTANT PRACTICES (COOKING, HOUSEHOLD CHORES, ETC.) OF THE HOUSEHOLDS IN THE VILLAGES TO UNDERSTAND HOW THE COOKSTOVES CAN SUPPORT THESE PRACTICES — ASHOK GADGIL, FUEL-EFFICIENT COOKSTOVES

The Sanitation Infrastructure team on a site visit in Mumbai

Thousands of data-points have been transmitted to UC Berkeley for analysis. By the end of the project, there will be enough data to understand the extent of the cookstove’s use. Currently, the project team is addressing some issues of the cookstove, including its user-friendliness and potential price-point.

PUBLIC SANITATION INFRASTRUCTURE IN MUMBAI RAHUL MEHROTRA This project examines the issue of public sanitation infrastructure in Mumbai, with a special focus on community

toilets in the city’s informal settlements. Led by Professor Rahul Mehrotra, the research maps the larger community toilet networks, exploring social, technical, and cultural concerns surrounding public toilets in Mumbai. In the final stage, the research will identify the potential means by which a prototype project can be implemented to address issues of sanitation. Professor Mehrotra recently conducted working sessions in Mumbai with the project’s on-the-ground partner, Urban Design and Research Institute (UDRI). Mapping of several same-community sites in Koli settlements has been completed. Data collected will be used to further explore sanitation policy. From the latter half of 2019 through 2020, the team will plan prototype development and implementation. Potential partnerships will be explored with government agencies to mobilize resources for prototype implementation and scale the project nationally in India.

A site visit under the Fuel-Efficient Cookstoves project

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8TH ANNUAL ONE HARVARD YOUNG HARVARD EVENT 2018

JINAH KIM Color and Pigments in Indian Painting NARAYAN KHANDEKAR Art and Science of the Forbes Pigment Collection

IN-REGION SEMINARS The Mittal Institute’s Delhi office hosts regular events as part of the India Seminar Series and engages in outreach events to build partnerships in the region.

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ROHIT CHANDRA The Past, Present, and Potential Future of Coal in India

VIKRAM PATEL ISHITA MEHRA ISHITA CHAUDHRY Unspoken Story In partnership with Sangath and It’s Ok To Talk

JULY 2018

AUGUST 2018

JANUARY 2019

FEBRUARY 2019

SANJEEV GALANDE RAJESH GOKHALE ALKA SHARMA PARVATHI SREEKUMAR SANDHYA KAUSHIKA Preparing Young Indian Scientists for Life Sciences in the 21st Century

MARK C. ELLIOTT Building a Leading Institution for Research and Education: Insights from Harvard University


MICHAEL SZONYI TARUN KHANNA Meritocracy: What Lessons Can India Learn from China?

ANDREW Z. HADDAD SRIKRISHNA SRIDHAR MURTHY SUNDERRAJAN KRISHNAN Tackling Fluorosis: Innovative Technology as a Solution to the Spreading Health Crisis

ANITA RAJ Gender, Violence, and Vulnerabilities of Adolescents in India

SEPTEMBER 2018

OCTOBER 2018

NOVEMBER 2018

DECEMBER 2018

MARCH 2019

APRIL 2019

MAY 2019

JUNE 2019

SURESH SUBRAMANI Harnessing Science to Serve Humanity: Vision of Tata Institute for Genetics and Society

KABI RAJ LAMA Trauma and Memory – Healing Through Art

ASHISH JHA KAYLA LASERSON PREETHA RAJARAMAN URVASHI PRASAD Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World

BRAINSTORMING SESSION ON THE STATUS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN INDIA

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IN MEMORIAM We remember Professor Roderick MacFarquhar and Mr. Eshwar S. Purandar Das for their generosity to The Mittal Institute and their commitment to the study of South Asia.

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL

The Mittal Family

KP Balaraj, MBA ’97 (India) and Sumir Chadha, MBA ’97 (USA), Chairs, Advisory Council

RODERICK MACFARQUHAR

ESHWAR S. PURANDAR DAS

1930 – 2019

1944 – 2018

ADVISORY COUNCIL

ARTS COUNCIL

Eminent Scholar of Chinese History

Chairs: KP Balaraj, MBA '97 (India) Sumir Chadha, MBA '97 (USA)

Dipti Mathur (USA), Chair, Arts Council

Syed Babar Ali, AMP '73 (Pakistan)

Family South Asia Institute

Purandar Das (USA)

Tarun Khanna, Director, The Lakshmi Mittal and

FRIENDS OF THE MITTAL INSTITUTE Gobind Akoi, GMP '10, The Imperial Hotel (India)

Kuntala Das and Bharat Das '08, s/o late Mark Fuller '75, MBA '78, JD '79, and Jo Froman (USA)

Mala Haarmann '91, MBA '96 (UK)

Anuradha and Anand Mahindra '77, MBA

Poonam Bhagat (India)

'81 (India)

Anurag Bhargava (India/USA) Radhika Chopra (India)

Anwarul Quadir Foundation (USA)

Arif Naqvi/ Aman Foundation (UAE)

Victor Menezes (USA)

Usha and Diaz Neesamoney (USA)

Chandrika and Dalip Pathak (UK)

(Malaysia)

Anonymous Donor

Arts Program Advisor: Shanay Jhaveri (USA) Archan Basu '93 and Madeline Jie Wang '97 (USA)

Jeffrey Smith (USA)

Mohamed R. Mohamed Haneef, LLM '97

Chair: Dipti Mathur (USA)

Vikram Gandhi, MBA '89, ExEd '00 (USA/India)

Resource Group

Mr. and Mrs. Papas (USA)

Faculty Director: Jinah Kim, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University

Meera Gandhi (USA)

Karen '82, and Sanjeev Mehra '82, MBA '86 (USA)

Nadeem Elahi, MBA '01 (Pakistan), The

Entrepreneur and Champion of Education in India

Chandni and Mukesh Prasad '93 (USA) Sribala Subramanian and Arvind Raghunathan (USA)

Rajiv and Anupa Sahney (India)

Parul and Gaurav Swarup, MBA '80 (India) Tom Varkey, MBA '97

Osman Khalid Waheed '93 (Pakistan) Arshad Zakaria '85, MBA ’87 (USA)

74 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

Aparajita and Gaurav Jain (India) Sunil Hirani (USA)

Chandrika Pathak (UK/India)

Pinky and Sanjay Reddy (India) Omar Saeed (Pakistan)

Sana Rezwan Sait (USA)

Nadia and Rajeeb Samdani (Bangladesh) Shilpa Sanger (USA)

Osman Khalid Waheed '93 (Pakistan)


ADMINISTRATION

CAMBRIDGE

Tarun Khanna, Director; Jorge Paulo

Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School Meena Sonea Hewett, Executive Director

Chelsea Ferrell, Assistant Director

Alex Gilliard, Communications Manager Selmon Rafey, Program Coordinator

Sneha Shrestha, Arts Programs Manager Megan Siwek, Staff Assistant

Alexandra Sanyal, MDes '20, Student Intern

Yashada Wagle, MDes '20, Student Intern The Partition Project

Shubhangi Bhadada, Mittal Institute Fellow Nabil Khan, Research Associate

Rasim Alam, Research Associate

Michael Minietti, Research Associate

Ruihan Wang, Research Associate

Diane Athaide, Research Associate

Diwakar Kishore, Research Associate

Tiara Bhattacharya, Intern Stephanie Mao, Intern

Aditi Chitkara '21, Student Intern IN-REGION India

Sanjay Kumar, India Country Director

Garima Aggarwal, Grant and Finance Manager Savitha Ananth, Program Manager, B4 Neha Sethi, Communications Manager

Saba Kohli Dave, Program Coordinator Farhana Siddiqui, Staff Assistant

Ankita Sukheja, Communications Consultant Mariam Chughtai, Pakistan Programs

STEERING COMMITTEE

Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director; The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University

Asim Khwaja, Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development (FASID) Professor of International Finance and Development, Harvard Kennedy School

Sunil Amrith, Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies and Professor of History; Chair, Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University

Jinah Kim, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art and Architecture, Department of Art and Architecture, Harvard University

Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University Homi Bhabha, Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of the Humanities, Department of English; Director, Mahindra Humanities Center, Harvard University Jacqueline Bhabha, FXB Director of Research, Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Lecturer in Law, Harvard Law School; Adjunct Lecturer, Harvard Kennedy School David Bloom, Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Martha Chen, Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School; Affiliated Professor, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Director

Emmerich Davies, Assistant Professor of Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education

FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATIVE TEAM (SHARED WITH OTHER ASIA-RELATED CENTERS)

Diana Eck, Professor of Comparative Religion and Indian Studies; Fredric Wertham Professor of Law and Psychiatry in Society, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences; Member, Faculty of Divinity, Harvard Divinity School; Professor, Harvard College

Pukar Malla, Nepal Programs Director

Sarah Gordon, Director of Finance and

Administration

Maryam Mirza Alivandi, Financial Associate

Karen Christopher, Financial Associate

Kathryn Maldonis, Senior Financial Associate

Sheila Jasanoff, Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies, Harvard Kennedy School Jerold S. Kayden, Frank Backus Williams Professor of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Karim R. Lakhani, Charles Edward Wilson Professor of Business Administration and Dorothy and Michael Hintze Fellow, Harvard Business School Jennifer Leaning, Franรงois-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health Rahul Mehrotra, Professor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design Venkatesh Murthy, Professor of Molecular & Cellular Biology, Harvard University Jukka-Pekka Onnela, Associate Professor of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health Parimal G. Patil, Professor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Committee on the Study of Religion, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences Fernando Reimers, Ford Foundation Professor of Practice in International Education; Faculty Director, International Education Policy, Harvard Graduate School of Education Kristen A. Stilt, Deputy Dean; Professor of Law; Faculty Director, Animal Law and Policy Program; Director, Islamic Legal Studies Program, Harvard Law School Ajantha Subramanian, Professor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University S V Subramanian, Professor of Population Health and Geography, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health Conor J. Walsh, Gordon McKay Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

2018-19 Year in Review

75


THE MITTAL INSTITUTE BUDGET INCOMES + SAVED BALANCES Current Use Endowment

FY19 $ 1,142, 963 $ 1,217,044

INCOMES + SAVED BALANCES Current Use Endowment

FY20 $ 1,086,954 $ 1,161,187

TOTAL

$ 2,360,007

TOTAL

$ 2,248,141

EXPENSES Faculty Students Fellows Operations In-Region Programs

FY19 $ 298,657 $ 210,040 $ 92,543 $ 620,535 $ 110,673

EXPENSES Faculty Students Fellows Operations In-Region Programs

FY20 $ 239,895 $ 208,075 $ 92,543 $ 847,946 $ 145,503

TOTAL

$ 1,332,448

TOTAL

$ 1,533,962

76 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University


NOTES

2018-19 Year in Review

77


NOTES

78 The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Harvard University


CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA 02138 https://mittalsouthasiainstitute.harvard.edu/

The Mittal Institute Year in Review 2018-2019  

Each year, the Mittal Institute publishes its Year in Review, detailing the latest work done on projects, programs, events, research, in-reg...

The Mittal Institute Year in Review 2018-2019  

Each year, the Mittal Institute publishes its Year in Review, detailing the latest work done on projects, programs, events, research, in-reg...

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