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2012 Annual Annual Meeting Meeting 2012

Sheraton Chicago Chicago Hotel Hotel & & Towers Towers May May9-12 9-12

Jointly sponsored sponsored by the University Jointly University of of Cincinnati Cincinnati


Cocktails & Dreams Wednesday, May 9, 2012 Superior A&B from 4:30pm - 6:30pm Enjoy FREE wine/beer and hors d’ oeuvres while viewing the premier of the Foundation Awareness video, participating in random trivia, competing for prizes, music and much more! You won’t want to miss thee event to kick off the 2012 Annual Meeting. Say you are joining us at the event on facebook and receive an extra ticket for our door prizes.

Resident Winner:

The SAEM Foundation Development Committee would also like to congratulate Elisabeth Lessenich, MD on winning the free trip to this years Annual Meeting. We hope you enjoy your time at the meeting and are able to see some of Chicago while you are here.


Table of Contents General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 5 SAEM Business Meeting and Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 AEM Consensus Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Grant Writing Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Daily Schedules and Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-21 Resident Leadership Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Medical Student Symposium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Junior Faculty Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Didactic Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Residency Fair & Fellowship Fair Participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Abstract Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Innovations in Emergency Medicine Education (IEME) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 European Society of Emergency Medicine (EuSEM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Late Breaker Abstracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Photo Exhibit and Visual Diagnosis Contest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Call for Abstract and Didactic Proposals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79-81 Exhibitor Announcements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88-89 CME Disclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85-87 Sheraton Chicago Towers and Hotel Floor Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90-91

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General Information Welcome to the 2012 Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Annual Meeting. It is my distinct pleasure to be your guide on what will undoubtedly be an enjoyable, educational, and enlightening 4 day extravaganza. I have now used more words starting with the letter E than Ernest Vincent Wright; and thus feel so undignified. The planning for the 2012 Annual Meeting began in earnest (here we go again) in early spring of 2011. It is a true testament to the staff members at the home office in SAEM (I am particularly indebted to Maryanne Greketis, Sandy Rummel, Holly Gouin, and Jason Smith) that despite all the moving pieces and steps in the process, many of us will walk through the meeting and marvel at the day’s events. As you attend the meeting, hopefully you will notice the many significant innovations we have implemented for 2012. This was based upon extensive surveying of the general membership and in collaboration with the various committees/task forces/academies within SAEM. Please allow me to introduce them to you: 1. The Resident Leadership Forum Every year, SAEM hosts the Chief Resident Forum to much fanfare. However, many residents have often asked why they couldn’t attend the forum as well considering the forum was ultimately designed to cultivate the future generation of emergency medicine. Of course, opening the chief resident forum to all residents would then change the meaning behind it. Hence, the creation of the Resident Leadership Forum. This is all day event for the chief residents (just as before but with new lecture content), and an open afternoon for any resident of any year. The afternoon session is applicable to chief and resident alike as it focuses on growth potential. 2. The Junior Faculty Forum Similar in theme (and as an all day event) to the resident leadership forum with regards to future EM leadership foundation building, the junior faculty forum is designed specifically for those attendings in the first few years of their career. It focuses on advancement in education, research, and administration— as told through the eyes of faculty who have only recently passed through these formative years. 3. Academy Spotlight Sessions The academies started from the humblest of beginnings—often as interest groups that boomed with need and popularity. To honor their service to SAEM, spread throughout the Annual Meeting are individual two hour academy sessions with content specifically designed by the Academies. This is an addition to their various business meetings and other didactic/research initiatives. 4. Program Director Track Sessions In response to the ever fluctuating ACGME requirements, and in understanding the special needs that a PD or APD or burgeoning educator has, SAEM has pulled together some of the finest educators in the country (and not just from EM) to discuss the present and future state of resident education. These sessions will be held for one hour per day starting on Thursday. 5. Guided Oral Presentations Two years ago, SAEM introduced the lightning oral. This year, we aim to move abstract presentations in another direction once again. In these guided sessions each individual abstract presentation will be followed by teaching points organized by the moderator. As a result, medical students, residents, and faculty alike will not just hear the latest research but also learn about how it may impact their practice. One session per day will be held in this format. 6. IEME Innovations in emergency medicine education can take many forms, and often they involve similar disciplines. The Program Committee introduces three themed IEME sessions: US, simulation, and faculty-resident collaborations. In these sessions, you will learn about state of the art educational tools as it pertains to a specific topic. In addition, IEME will also host three general sessions. 7. Networking events At 11 am on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, SAEM will host a themed coffee-donuts mingling hour. Leaders in research, technology, and education will be on hand to answer your questions and share in your ideas.

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8. Technology Use your iphone or droid to download the free SAEM Annual Meeting or use your smartphone to go directly to the annual meeting SAEM website (am2012.saem.org). Here you will find up to the minute schedules, descriptions of sessions, and handouts. Also bring a poster with you as SAEM is proud to introduce e-posters. Assuming the presenter uploaded their poster to the OASIS e-poster site, you can view/zoom/and read a poster while sitting in the lobby or in your room. No SAEM Annual Meeting is complete without the Medical Student Symposium and all our star studded didactic and abstract sessions. 2012 has this and more as the Program Committee was able to expand content and time by re-designing our traditional schedule grid. Enjoy! Michael Hochberg, MD Chairman, Program Committee, SAEM Associate Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine Chairman, Department of Emergency Medicine, Saint Peters University Hospital

Registration For the cost of the basic registration fee attendees may attend all paper, poster, and didactic sessions, except those sessions that have limited enrollment, require pre-registration, or require an additional registration fee. Some of the limited enrollment sessions may be sold out prior to the Annual Meeting. Therefore, be sure to register early. For those that have pre-registered to attend sessions that require pre-registration, be sure to arrive a few minutes early.

Continuing Medical Education Target Audience: This conference has been created for Emergency Medicine physicians who want to expand and update their knowledge of quality instruction in emergency medicine training programs and improve the quality of emergency medical care. Overall Program Objectives: • Apply research findings to your emergency medicine practice. • Apply key statistical indicators in analyzing research results. • Utilize acceptable research methods and study design in the development of research projects. • Realize the details of the framework for EBM so that the intended practice improvements are vetted through this prism. Joint Accreditation Statement: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of the University of Cincinnati and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. The University of Cincinnati is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Cincinnati designates this live activity for a maximum of 30.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

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Faculty Disclosure Declaration: According to the disclosure policy of the University Of Cincinnati College Of Medicine, all faculty, planning committee members, and other individuals who are in a position to control content are required to disclose any relevant relationships with any commercial interest related to this activity. The existence of these interests or relationships is not viewed as implying bias or decreasing the value of the presentation, and any conflict of interest is resolved prior to the activity. All educational materials are reviewed for fair balance, scientific objectivity and levels of evidence. Disclosure will be made at the time of the activity. Learner Assurance Statement: The University of Cincinnati is committed to resolving all conflicts of interest issues that could arise as a result of prospective faculty members’ significant relationships with drug or device manufacturer(s). The University of Cincinnati is committed to retaining only those speakers with financial interests that can be reconciled with the goals and educational integrity of the CME activity.

Annual Business Meeting The Annual Business Meeting will be held on Friday, May 11, 2012 from 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm, in Sheraton Ballroom 4&5. The election results will be announced. In addition, the Young Investigator Award Recipients; the recipients of the Research Training, Institutional Training, EMS Research Fellowship Grants; and the recipients of the 2011 Annual Meeting Best Presentation Awards will be presented to the membership. Debra E. Houry, MD, MPH, will present her Presidential summary address to the membership. Incoming President Cherri D. Hobgood, MD, will also be introduced and address the membership with her preview of the coming year.

CPC Competition The 2012 Semi-Final CPC Competition will be held on Wednesday, May 9, 2012, 8:00 am-5:00 pm in the following rooms: Ohio, Colorado, Mississippi, Missouri, Arkansas and Mayfair. Annual Meeting attendees are encouraged to attend the competition and support the various residency program participants. There is no registration fee to attend the competition, which showcases EM residency programs. The CPC consists of the presentation and discussion of the best 72 cases submitted. The Competition finalists from each of the tracks will be announced during a reception held from 5:30 pm-8:00 pm on Wednesday Sheraton Promenade East-level 4. The CPC Final Competition, consisting of presentations by the six semi-finalist teams, will be held during the ACEP Scientific Assembly, which will be held in Denver, Colorado, Oct. 8-10, 2012. The CPC Competition is sponsored by ACEP, CORD, EMRA, and SAEM.

Academy Meeting dates and times • A AAEM: Thursday, May10, 2012 @ 8:00 am-12:00 pm (Michigan Room A Level 2) • AEUS: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 @ 8:00 am-12:00 pm (Superior Rooms A-B Level 2) • AGEM: Thursday, May10, 2012 @ 8:00 am-12:00 pm (Superior Rooms A-B Level 2) • AWAEM: Friday, May 11, 2012 @ 8:00 am-12:00 pm (Mississippi Room Level 2) 4

• CDEM: Thursday, May10, 2012 @ 8:00 am-12:00 pm (Superior Rooms A-B Level 2) • GEMA: Saturday, May 12, 2012 @11:00 am-3:00 pm (Superior Rooms A-B Level 2) • Simulation Academy: Friday, May 11, 2012 @ 8:00 am-12:00 pm (Missouri Level 2)

NIH Roundtable

Friday, May 11, 2012 · 1:00 pm-2:00 pm, Chicago Ballroom 9 - Level 4 An hour-long open discussion with Dr. Walter Koroshetz, NIH Deputy Director of National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) regarding opportunities for the funding of EM research.

Social Events

Opening Reception Join us on Thursday, May 10, 2012 for the opening reception from 6:00 pm-8:00 pm. This is a great opportunity to socialize and network with other SAEM members. It will be located on the Sheraton East/Chicago Promenade-level 4.

Networking Breakfast Networking Breakfast is scheduled for Friday, May 11, 2012 from 7:00 am-8:00 am in our exhibitor area, Chicago Ballroom 6 level 4. A great opportunity to network with colleagues and make new acquaintances.

AWAEM Luncheon The 3rd Annual AWAEM Luncheon will be held Friday, May 11, 2012 from 12:30 pm-2:00 pm in the Mayfair Room Level 2. Pre-registration is required and seating is limited. All conference attendees are invited to attend.

Cocktails and Dreams Wednesday, May 9, 2012 from 4:30 pm-6:00 pm in Superior rooms A&B combined-level 2. Enjoy FREE wine/beer and hors d’ oeuvres while viewing the premier of the Foundation Awareness video, participating in random trivia, competing for prizes, music and much more!

Networking break Thursday, May 10, 2012, 11 am – 12 noon - Technology: how to use it and love it in emergency medicine. Join Michelle Lin, Nicholas Genes, Jason Nomura and many more to discuss how you use technology, and how you can use medical blogging, informatics, Evernote, Dropbox, Google docs and the newest apps in your everyday work flow Friday, May 11, 2012, 11 am – 12 noon - Meet SAEM: how to get involved and stay involved. Join the leaders of SAEM interest groups and academies to learn what they are doing, and how you can get involved. This is one stop shopping to explore the breadth and depth of expertise in emergency medicine and SAEM. Don’t miss this unique opportunity. Saturday, May 12, 2012, 11 am -12 noon - Research: moving from junior investigator to seasoned researcher. If you have an interest in research but aren’t sure how to get started or have developed a niche and would like to discuss how to advance collaborative efforts, this is the networking session for you. Join top researchers in emergency medicine to discuss ways to advance research in our specialty


SAEM Annual Business Meeting Friday, May 11, 2012 3:00 – 4:30 pm Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers Sheraton 4 & 5, Level 4 All SAEM members are urged to attend

SAEM Awards- Debra E. Houry, MD, MPH and Cherri D. Hobgood, MD Hal Jayne Excellence in Education Award - Edward A. Panacek, MD, MPH Excellence in Research Award - John G. Younger, MD, MS Leadership Award – Donald M. Yealy, MD, FACEP Young Investigator Awards Brendan G. Carr, MD, MA, MS; Adit Ginde, MD, MPH; Jeremiah D. Schuur, MD Advancement of Women - Jean T. Abbott, MD Special Recognition - Jane Scott, ScD, MSN, FAHA - NHLBI Grant Presentations SAEM/Physio-Control EMS Research Fellowship Grant Michael T. Hilton, MD Spadafora Toxicology Scholarship Ashleigh M. Fay, MD SAEM/ECCC Emergency Care Sabbatical Grant Marc A. Gautreau, MD Education Fellowship Grant Jo Anna Leuck, MD Institutional Research Training Grant Manish N. Shah, MD, MPH Institutional Research Fellowship Program 2012 Recipients SAEM Academy Awards AEUS AWAEM CDEM 2011 Annual Meeting Awards Best Faculty Presentation – Ellen J. Weber, MD, University of California, San Francisco Best Young Investigator Presentation – Anthony M. Napoli, MD, Brown University School of Medicine Best Basic Science Presentation – Vikhyat S. Bebarta, MD, Wilford Hall Medical Center Best Resident Presentation – Arjun K. Venkatesh, MD, Harvard Medical School Best Fellow Presentation – Michael Puskarich, MD, Carolinas Medical Center Best Medical Student Presentation – Carl T. Berdahl, Yale School of Medicine Best IEME Presentation- Laura Nolting, MD, Palmetto Richland Best IEME Moderated Poster – Esther K. Choo, MD, Rhode Island Hospital Resident Visual Diagnosis Contest Winner – Matt Steimle, MD, Detroit Receiving Hospital Medical Student Visual Diagnosis Contest Winner – Rocky Samuel, Harvard Medical School, Northeastern Emergency Medicine Recognition of the 2011-12 Outgoing Committee & Task Force Chairs SAEM Annual Business Meeting Treasurer’s Report AEM Report Election Results Recognition of Board of Director members whose terms are expiring Remarks of Outgoing President – Debra E. Houry, MD, MPH Introduction of 2012-13 President - Cherri D. Hobgood, MD Other New Business Adjournment Note: Award and grant recipients, newly elected members of the Board and Nominating and Constitution and Bylaws Committees are asked to remain after the Annual Business Meeting to participate in the brief photo session. Photos will be published in upcoming issues of the SAEM Newsletter.

2012 Annual Meeting Program Committe Harrison J. Alter, MD Alameda County Medical Center Chris Barton, MD University of California (San Francisco)/San Francisco General Hospital Steven B. Bird, MD University of Massachusetts Medical School Andra L. Blomkalns, MD (BOD Liaison) University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Roberto Lopez-Freeman, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine John P. Marshall, MD Maimonides Medical Center Henderson D. McGinnis, MD Wake Forest University School of Medicine Angela M. Mills, MD University of Pennsylvania David P. Milzman, MD Georgetown University School of Medicine

Jennifer Carey, MD Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital

James E. Olson, PhD Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine

Moira Davenport, MD Allegheny General Hospital

Ali S. Raja, MD, MBA, MPH Brigham & Womens Hospital/ Harvard Medical School

Kevin L. Ferguson, MD University of Florida, Gainesville Susan Fuchs, MD Children’s Memorial Hospital Chris A. Ghaemmaghami, MD University of Virginia School of Medicine Autumn C. Graham, MD Georgetown/Washington Hospital Center Erin Grise, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Eric A. Gross, MD Hennepin County Medical Center Todd A. Guth, MD Denver Health Medical Center Michael L. Hochberg, MD Saint Peters University Hospital/ Drexel University College of Medicine Robert J. Hoffman, MD, MS Albert Einstein College of Medicine Carolyn K. Holland, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Jason Hoppe, DO University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine William A. Knight, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Terry Kowalenko, MD University of Michigan Hollynn Larrabee, MD West Virginia University School of MedicineRuby Memorial Hospital Jo Anna Leuck, MD Carolinas Medical Center

Megan Ranney, MD, MPH Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital Mitesh Rao, MD, MHS Yale-New Haven Medical Center Linda A. Regan, MD Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Kevin G. Rodgers, MD Indiana Clinic Emergency Medicine Sarah E. Ronan-Bentle, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Christopher Ross, MD Cook County Hospital Michael S. Runyon, MD Carolinas Medical Center Lorraine G. Thibodeau, MD Albany Medical College R. Jason Thurman, MD Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Jody A. Vogel, MD Denver Health Medical Center Taher T. Vohra, MD Henry Ford Hospital Joshua Wallenstein, MD Emory University School of Medicine Robert H. Woolard, MD Texas Tech University, El Paso Christopher Zammit, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Barbara Forney University of Cincinnati Sandra Rummel SAEM Maryanne F. Greketis

SAEM

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2012 AEM Consensus Conference Education Research in Emergency Medicine Wednesday, May 9, 2012 ~ Room: Chicago 9-10 7:30 am-8:00 am

Registration

8:00 am-8:15 am

Welcome, Opening Remarks

8:15 am-9:15 am

Overview of the State of Education Research in Medical Education

9:15 am-9:30 am

Consensus Process Principles

9:30 am-9:45 am

Networking Break/Audience division into tracks

Nicole DeIorio, MD, Joseph LaMantia, MD, Lalena Yarris, MD, MCR Stan Hamstra, PhD

9:45 am-12:00 pm Concurrent Breakout Session I Track Topic

Track 1: Best Evidence for Teaching Methods

Track 2: Best Evidence for Learner Assessment

Track 3: Education Researcher Training and Faculty Development

Track 4: Funding and Infrastructure Development for Education Research

Breakout

Evidence-based performance improvement

Assessing learner performance (includes assessing achievement of core competencies across the spectrum of medical education)

Defining a core curriculum for education research fellowships

An agenda for increasing grant-funded education research in EM

Group Chair(s)

S Khandelwal, J Riddle, KA Ericsson

C Kessler, W McGaghie, J Lockyear, K Leone

W Coates, M Lin, L Yarris

E Choo, E Hayden, L Gruppen

12:00 pm–1:30 pm Lunchtime Keynote Panel Discussion Obstacles and Solutions in the Education Research Paradigm: Translating Educational Ideas into Improved Performance Outcomes Larry Gruppen, PhD ~ Stan Hamstra, PhD ~ K Anders Ericsson, PhD

1:30 pm-1:45 pm

Audience division into tracks

1:45 pm-3:45 pm

Concurrent Breakout Session II: Working Groups Continue

Track Topic

Track 1: Best Evidence for Teaching Methods

Track 2: Best Evidence for Learner Assessment

Track 3: Education Researcher Training and Faculty Development

Track 4: Funding and Infrastructure Development for Education Research

Breakout

Evaluating curricula (all modalities, including asynchronous)

Assessing diagnostic reasoning strategies in learners

An agenda for promoting ongoing education research training in EM educators

An agenda for establishing an Emergency Medicine Education Research Consortium

Group Chair(s)

N Deiorio, S Stahmer

J Ilgen, B Humbert, G Norman

J LaMantia, N Searle, J Love

C Newgard, M Beeson

3:45 pm-4:00 pm

Afternoon Break

4:00 pm-4:45 pm

Workshop Feedback and Large Group Consensus Building

4:45 pm-5:00 pm

Wrap-up, Closing Remarks Nicole DeIorio, MD ~ Joseph LaMantia, MD ~ Lalena Yarris, MD, MCR

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2012 SAEM Award recipients Society for Academic Emergency Medicine 2012 Young Investigator Award Presented to Brendan G. Carr, MD, MA, MS

2012 SAEM Grant Writing Workshop 2012 Wednesday, May 9, 2012 Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers - Ontario Room AGENDA 7:30 am 8:00 am

University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine

9:00 am

Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

9:30 am

2012 Young Investigator Award Presented to Adit Ginde, MD, MPH University of Colorado, School of Medicine

Society for Academic Emergency Medicine 2012 Young Investigator Award Presented to Jeremiah D. Schuur, MD Brigham and Women’s Hospital

2012 Leadership Award Presented to Donald M. Yealy, MD, FACEP University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine

2012 Hal Jayne Excellence in Education Award Presented to Edward A. Panacek, MD, MPH University of California, Davis

2012 Excellence in Research Award

Presented to John G. Younger, MD, MS University of Michigan

2012 Advancement of Women in Academic Emergency Medicine Presented to Jean T. Abbott, MD

Continental Breakfast Developing Your Funded EM Research Program

Dr. Lori Post

The Anatomy of Science

Dr. Mark Angelos

Writing the Specific Aims Section of the Grant

Dr. Jeff Kline

10:00 am Responding to Reviews and Resubmitting

Dr. Alan Jones

10:30 am Small Group Session

Workshop faculty*

12:00 pm Networking Lunch

1:00 pm

1:30 pm

with course faculty

Career Development Awards

Dr. Manish Shah

FAQ Session

Dr. Brendan Carr, Dr. Mark Courtney, other course faculty

2:00 pm Wrap up and transition to Optional Break-Out Session Dr. Prasanthi Govindarajan, Dr. Brendan Carr, Dr. Mark Courtney, Dr. Reena Duseja**

2:30 pm

Optional Break-Out Session

4:30 pm

Close

* Small Group Session: Participants will rotate through three 30-minute skill-building stations which will each focus on a specific aspect of successful grant writing. Stations will include: specific aims section, revising and resubmitting grants, and other aspects of the grant application (i.e. budget, letter of recommendation for career development awards). ** Optional Break-Out Session (2 hours max): Workshop attendees are invited to submit grant applications that are being prepared for submission or resubmission before the event in order to gain valuable feedback from our experts. During this optional session, participants that have submitted a grant for feedback will have the opportunity to speak one-on-one with a reviewer to discuss how they can improve their application. Grant applications for this session must be submitted by April 1, 2012. Only a limited number of grants will be selected for this session. Preference will be given to federal grant applications and applications that are complete or nearly-complete. For questions and submission instructions, please contact Melissa McMillian at mmcmillian@saem.org or 847-813-9823.

University of Colorado, Denver

2012 Special Recognition Award Presented to Jane Scott, ScD, MSN, FAHA NHLBI

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Wednesday, May 9, 2012 Ontario Room

Michigan Room A

Chicago 9‐10

Sheraton 4

8a

9a

Pre‐registration  required/fee

Clinical  Pathologic  Case  Conference

Pre‐registration  required/fee

10a SAEM Intensive  Grant Writing  Workshop

11a

AEM Consensus  Conference ‐  Education Research in  Emergency Medicine:  Opportunities,  Challenges and  Strategies for Success

12p

1p

2p

3p

4p

Breakout  Rooms

.

  Community  VOICES 3  Investigator  Meeting

Ohio

 

Colorado

 

Arkansas

 

Huron

Mississippi

 

Michigan Room B  

Missouri Mayfair

Breakout Rooms

(D‐RE) Defining the Emergency  Care Health Services and Policy  Research Agenda in the Era of  National Health Reform

(D‐CD) The Nadir of Clinical  Operations Innovation:   Implications for Future Growth

5p Rethinking Triage and Boarding  Lightning Oral Abstracts  #40‐45

6p Sheraton Promenade East‐level 4  7p CPC Reception 8p

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Wednesday, May 9, 2012 Sheraton 5 

Chicago 6 

Chicago 7 

Chicago 8

Superior  A/B

8a

AEUS ‐  9a Academy of  Emergency  Ultrasound  Business  Meeting 10a

11a

(D‐SA) Ethics in Disasters:   Responsible Resource  Stewardship in Times of Crisis

Modern Perspectives on  Wound Care  Guided Oral  (D‐SA) Advances in the  Abstracts  #6 ‐ 9 Evaluation and Treatment of  (D‐CD) Academic Integrity in  Acetaminophen Poisoning Emergency Medicine‐Case  Studies (D‐RE) Spatial Information,  GIS, and Geo‐Spatial Methods  Metabolic Acidosis and  in Public Health and  Shock Syndromes   Emergency Care Research Lightning Oral Abstracts  The ED Rule‐Out MI:  Are  #10‐18 We Getting Better?    Lightning Oral Abstracts #19‐ 27

 (D‐SA) Jelly on the Belly:  Cutting Edge Pediatric  Ultrasound Applications

(D‐RE) Engineering Innovation:   Forming Collaborations to Bring  Operations, Design, and  Engineering into your  Department

(D‐CD) The Future Role of  Emergency Physicians in  Trauma: A New Category of  Trauma Specialists?

ED Cardiopulmonary  Imaging  Lightning Oral  Abstracts #28‐33

(D‐SA) Is Hypothermia the First  Broad Spectrum Therapy for  the Syndrome if Ischemia‐ Reperfusion Injury?

12p

1p

2p

3p (D‐ED) Training the  Trainers Who Train: A  Workshop for Those Who  Teach Emergency  Medicine Elsewhere in the  World

Teaching and Training in  (D‐RE) Real World Evidence‐ the International Setting   Based Diagnostics: The Good,  Lightning Oral Abstracts  The Bad, & The Ugly #34 ‐ 39

4p

5p

6p 7p 8p

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tuesday, may 8, 2012 & Wednesday, May 9, 2012 The following Committees/Task Forces/Interest Groups will not be meeting at the SAEM Annual Meeting: • • • •

Airway Interest Group Quality Medical Management Interest Group Triage Interest Group Uniformed Services Interest Group

SAEM and AEM Committee/Task Force/IG/Board Meetings/Academies Tuesday, May 8, 2012 3:00p-5:00p New Comm./TF/IG/Academy Chairs Orientation Missouri Room-level 2 5:00p-6:00p New Comm./TF/IG/Academy Chairs Social Presidential Suite 5:30p-6:30p SAEM PC Sub-committee Chairs Meeting Ohio Room-level 2 SAEM and AEM Committee/Task Force/IG/Board Meetings/Academies Wednesday, May 9, 2012 7:00a-8:00a SAEM Western Regional Planning Comm. Meeting Parlor B-level 3 8:00a-12:00p AEUS Academy Business Meeting Superior Rooms A&B-level 2 SAEM PC Meeting Erie Room-level 2 10:00a-11:00a 1:00p-2:00p Southeastern SAEM Planning Committee Parlor G-level 3 1:00p-2:30p SAEM Research Directors IG Parlor B-level 3 1:00p-4:00p SAEM Finance Committee Parlor F-level 3 Parlor C-level 3 2:00p-3:00p SAEM Trauma IG 6:00p-6:30p SAEM Ischemia-Reperfusion CPR IG Parlor E-level 3 Affiliated Meetings Wednesday, May 9, 2012 7:00a-3:00p EMRA BOD Meeting Parlor A-level 3 9:00a-10:00a The Emergency Medicine Resident Curriculum (EMREC) Parlor G-level 3 2:00p-3:00p ABEM Orientation Meeting Parlor G-level 3 3:00p-4:00p EMRA Regional Representative Committee Parlor A-level 3 3:00p-4:00p EMRA Committee Chair/Vice Chair Orientation Parlor B-level 3 4:00p-6:00p EMRA Health Policy Committee Parlor B-level 3 4:00p-6:00p EMRA Research Committee Parlor C-level 3 4:00p-6:00p EMRA Critical Care Committee Parlor D-level 3 4:00p-6:00p EMRA International Committee Parlor E-level 3 4:00p-5:00p ABEM/CORD officers Meeting Erie Room-level 2 EMRA Technology Committee Parlor F-level 3 4:00p-6:00p 4:00p-6:00p EMRA Education Committee Parlor G-level 3 EMF Board of Trustees Meeting Parlor A-level 3 5:00p-6:30p

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Wednesday 09 May    AEUS Business Meeting  Room: Superior A&B  8:00  – 12:00    

     

 

Bedside Ultrasound Research: 2011‐  A Year in Review  Panel of experts on manuscripts: how  to prepare, edit, publish  Narrated lecture series highlights  Pediatric EM ultrasound policy  Awards and 2012‐2013 BOD  introductions  Other AEUS 2011‐2012 highlights 

AEUS Didactic Session  Room: Sheraton 5  15:00  – 16:00  

Jelly on the belly­ Cutting edge pediatric  applications. Three of the leading pediatric  ultrasonographers in the country will discuss  ultrasound applications that will change your  clinical practice.   

Activities 2012 

Friday 11 May    SonoGames2012  Room: Sheraton 4  8:00 – 12:00  

 

Join us for the inaugural SonoGames2012  and  watch  resident  teams  compete  to  be  the nation’s top sonologists.    All aspects of ultrasound competence will  be  assessed,  including  image  acquisition,  image  interpretation,  and  incorporation  into clinical practice.    Thirty teams, three rounds, four hours of  non‐stop excitement! 

   

Thursday 10 May  

AEUS small group meetings  Room: Parlor F  

 

9:00 ­9:45  Medical student education  10:00 – 10:45  IIT (imaging informatics)  11:00 – 11:45   eusfellowships.com BOD  12:00 – 12:45  AEUS BOD  13:00 – 13:45  Membership committee  14:00– 14:45  Grants committee   15:00 – 15:45  CORD‐AEUS committee  16:00 – 16:45  REASON trial 

 

 

www.saem.org/academy‐emergency‐ultrasound  11


ThuRsday, May 10, 2012 Sheraton 4

7a

Sheraton 5

Chica go 6

Chicago 7

Chicago 8

Chicago 9 &  10 

Ontario Room

Coffee Break Sheraton East/Chicago Promenade‐level 4 

8a

Getting to know the Annual Meeting: A  Primer for residents and medical students on  what SAEM can do for you.             (target:  residents and med. Students)

9a (D‐CD) Floodlighting the  Hidden Threat of  (D‐ED) Social Media  Unconscious Bias and the Academic  Physician

10a

12p 12‐1p LUNCH

1p

12‐1p LUNCH

(D‐ED) Educating and  Assessing "In‐Training"  Physicians in the Finer Skills  Critical Care and  of Communication:  Handoffs  Resuscitations Oral  and Consultations 

Abstracts #166‐173

2p (D‐ED) Bringing the Science 

(D‐CD) Educational  Scholarship: Creating  and Publishing Academic  Products from your  Teaching

Exhibitors

(D‐ED) Getting the  Story: How to Teach  Residents and Medical  Students Essential  Narrative Tools (D‐ED) Beyond Evidence  Based Medicine:   11a (D‐SA) Surviving  Educational Strategies to  Sepsis Campaign  Promote Knowledge  2012: An Update on  Translation in GME Recommendations for  Emergency Medicine

(D‐SA) 2012 Updates in  Gender‐Specific  Emergency Care (D‐SA) Making Research  Matter to our Patients:   Implementation Science,  The Next Frontier

 

Change is in the Air:   The New Paradigm of  Continuous  Accreditation

(D‐SA) Integrated  Emergency Care  Systems in Health  Security and Research

Resident Forum‐  breakout

(D‐ED) Mastering  Milestones ‐ Achieving  Outcomes in    Education  

4p

VISIT EXHIBITS Sheraton 4 & 5  (4:30 ‐ 6:00 pm)

5p

Plenary Session Abstracts #1 ‐ 5

6p Sheraton East/Chicago Promenade (level 4)  6:00 ‐ 8:00 pm 7p 8p

12

12‐1p LUNCH

12‐1p LUNCH

of Education and Evidence to  QI and Patient Safety:  An  Academic Approach to  Regulatory Requirements

3p

Resident  Forum (Chiefs)

Opening Reception

Resident  Leadership  Forum

(D‐SA) Geriatric  Emergency  Departments:   Challenges and  Opportunities for  Clinicians and  Researchers Update on NIH Funding  Opportunities for EM  Researchers

Caught in the Safety  Net of the Access to  Care Debate Oral  Abstracts #249‐252


ThuRsday, May 10, 2012 Michigan A 

Michigan B 

Superior   A&B 

Mayfair

Missouri Room

Colorado

Arkansas

River Hall B

7a 8a

Volume and  Productivity Lightning  Oral Abstracts #46‐50

IEME Moderated  Posters #1 ‐ 6

11a

12p 12‐1p LUNCH

12‐1p LUNCH

Poster  Abstracts  #70 ‐ 134 Ethics in EM  Research  Moderated  Poster Abstracts  #143‐147

Future Stars of EM:   A Salute to Medical  Student Research  Guided Oral  Abstracts #135‐138

Preventing and  Predicting Poor  Cardiac Outcomes  Guided Oral Abstracts  #139‐142

Redefining Treatment  Rethinking EMS Drug  CDEM  Practices for Common  Delivery Lightning  Academy  Pediatric Emergencies  Oral Abstracts #154‐ Business  Lightning Oral Abstracts   159 Meeting  #148‐153

(D‐RE) Out of the  The Patient  Wild:  How to Conduct  Experience  and Publish  Moderated  Wilderness Medicine  Poster Abstracts  #160‐165 Research

Is This ED Visit  Training with  "Appropriate"?   Simulation Lightning  Lightning Oral Abstracts  Oral Abstracts #180‐ #174‐179 185

(D‐ED) Establishing Med  Stud/Resident  Wilderness Med  Electives in Academic  EM Education

Alcohol, Violence, and  IEME Simulation  STDs  Oral Abstracts   Spotlight Oral Session   #257‐260 #7‐10

10a

From Sedation to  Mitigating  Intubation:  A  Violence  Sampling of Airway  Moderated  Interventions  Poster Abstracts  Lightning Oral  #65‐69 Abstracts #59‐64

Sheraton East/Chicago  Promenade

Talk is Cheap:   Communication,  Errors and Clinical  Ops Oral Abstracts  #51‐58

9a

Geriatrics  Academy  Business  Meeting 

Networking Event 

AAAEM ‐ Academy of  Administrators in  Academic Emergency  Medicine Business  Meeting

12‐1p LUNCH

12‐1p LUNCH

1p

2p Poster  Abstracts  #186‐248

3p

(D‐RE)  Prehospital Trauma  Introduction to  Management Oral  Statistics Abstracts #253‐256

VISIT EXHIBITS

4p

Sheraton 4 & 5 (4:30 ‐ 6:00 pm) Plenary Session Abstracts #1 ‐ 5 Sheraton East/Chicago Promenade (level 4) 6:00 ‐ 8:00 pm

Opening Reception

5p 6p 7p 8p

13


Thursday, may 10, 2012 SAEM and AEM Committee/Task Force/IG/Board Meetings/Academies Thursday, May 10, 2012 7:00a-8:00a SAEM PC Meeting Mayfair Room-level 2 7:00a-8:00a SAEM Awards Committee Parlor B-level 3 8:00a-9:00a SAEM Faculty Development Committee Columbus Room B-level 3 8:00a-12:00p AAAEM Academy Business Meeting Michigan Room A-level 2 8:00a-5:00p SAEM AEUS Academy sub-committee meetings Parlor F-level 3 9:00a-10:00a SAEM Ethics Committee Parlor B-level 3 9:00a-10:30a SAEM Observational Medicine IG Ontario Room-level 2 Parlor E-level 3 9:00a-10:30a SAEM EBM IG 9:00a-10:00a SAEM Health Services Outcome IG Columbus Room B- level 3 9:30a-11:00a SAEM-ABEM Executive Leadership Meeting Presidential Suite 10:00a-11:00a SAEM Disaster Medicine IG Parlor B-level 3 Mayfair Room-level 2 10:00a-12:00p SAEM Resident & Student Advisory Committee 10:00a-12:00p SAEM Community Task Force Columbus Room B- level 3 11:00a-12:00p SAEM Crowding Interest Group Parlor B-level 3 Parlor E-level 3 11:00a-12:30p SAEM Diversity IG SAEM Patient Safety Parlor B-level 3 12:00p-1:00p 12:00p-4:00p CDEM Academy Business Meeting Superior Rooms A&B-level 2 SAEM Academic Informatics Parlor E-level 3 1:00p-2:00p 1:00p-2:30p SAEM Grants Committee Erie Room-level 2 1:30p-3:00p SAEM Membership Committee Columbus Room B- level 3 2:00p-3:30p SAEM Neurologic Emergencies IG Huron Room- level 2 2:30p-4:30p SAEM GME Committee Parlor D-level 3 3:00p-3:30p SAEM Fellowship Certification Task Force Columbus Room B- level 3 3:30p-4:30p SAEM Wilderness Medicine IG Huron Room- level 2

Affiliated Meetings Thursday, May 10, 2012 7:00a-8:00a ACEP -SAEM Research Work Group Parlor C-level 3 7:00a-10:00a EMCREG-International Steering Committee Meeting Huron Room Parlor A-level 3 8:00a-12:00p EMRA BOD Meeting & Committee Update 9:00a-11:00a ACEP -Research Committee Parlor C-level 3 9:00a-4:00p CORD meetings All day Parlor G-level 3 9:00a-2:00p CORD BOD meeting Parlor D-level 3 11:30a-12:00p ACEP-Scientific Review Sub-committee Parlor C-level 3 1:00p-3:00p ABEM/ACEP Officers Meeting Parlor B-level 3 1:00p-5:00p EMRA Medical Student Governing Council Parlor A-level 3 2:00p-4:00p EMRA Editorial Advisory Committee Mississippi Room-level 2 4:30p-5:30p EMRA National EM Jeopardy Contest Erie Room-level 2

14


15


FRIday, May 11, 2012 Sheraton 4

7a

Sheraton 5

Networking Breakfast

Chicag o 6 Chicago 7

Chicago 8

Chicago 9

Chicago 10

Ontario Room

Michigan  A&B

Sheraton East/Chicago Promenade‐level 4  8a

Ultrasound  SONO Games

10a

BEST of CDEM

11a

(D‐ED) Peer to Peer  Feedback:  Making it  Meaningful and  Delivering it with Grace

12p 12‐1p LUNCH

12‐1p LUNCH

Medical Student Symposium

(D‐CD) Leadership  Across Generations

Exhibitors

9a

(D‐ED) Principles of  Medical Photography  and the Use of Clinical  Images in Medical  Education

The Future Stars of  (D‐RE) Update on NIH  EM:  A Salute to  Emergency Care  Research Roundtables:   Resident Research  Lessons Learned and  Oral Abstracts #261‐ Future Goals 264

Care of the Elderly  Patient Lightning Oral  Abstracts #270‐274

Reducing the  Pediatric Trauma and  Mortality of Critically  (D‐SA) Prescription  Pain Management  Ill Patients Lightning  Drug Misuse:  The  Lightning Oral  Oral Abstracts #294‐ Scope of the Problem  Abstracts #288‐293 299 and the State of the  Research Soft Tissue and Other  Curriculum Under  Advances in Pediatric  Infections Lightning  Construction:  EM Lightning Oral  Building Systems‐ Oral Abstracts #328‐ Abstracts #322‐327 Based Practice 333 (D‐CD) NHLBI K12  Research Career  Development Programs  (D‐ED) Pediatric Care  Slamming Sepsis  in Emergency Medicine  in EM: Knowledge in  Lightning Oral  Research Translation Abstracts #346‐351

12‐1p LUNCH

12‐1p LUNCH

12‐1p LUNCH

NIH Roundtable

(D‐CD) More than just  a Hobby:  Building an  Academic Career in  Global Emergency  Medicine

12‐1p LUNCH

1p

BEST of CORD

2p

Novel Flow Initiatives  Lightning Oral  Abstracts #366‐371

3p

Sheraton 4 & 5 SAEM Business Meeting 

4p

5p

6p

7p

16

SAEM Business Meeting 

SIM WARS


FRIday, May 11, 2012 Huron Room

Erie Room

Mississippi  Room

Missouri

Colorado Room

Arkansas Room

River Hall A

River Hall B

7a

AWAEM  Academy   Business  Meeting 

Simulation  Academy Business  Meeting 

Teaching Emergency  Medicine Moderated  Poster Abstracts #281‐ 287

IEME Moderated  Posters #11‐16

9a

Competency:  An  Elusive Truth in  Resident/Medical  Student Education  Moderated Poster  Abstracts #314‐321

New Tech and New  Tools for Old Problems  Lightning Oral Abstracts  #334‐339 Interfacing Technology   IEME Faculty‐Resident  and Teaching Lightning  Spotlight Oral Session  Oral Abstracts #352‐ #17‐20 357

10a

Blunt Trauma  Evaluation Moderated  Poster Abstracts #340‐ 345

Sheraton East/Chicago  Promenade

The Changing Face of  the ED Patient  Clinical Operations  Lightning Oral Abstracts  Lightning Oral Abstracts  #300‐305 #306‐313

8a

Networking Event 

Cardiac Arrest  Risk Stratifying  Morbidity and  Cardiovascular Disease  Mortality Lightning  Lightning Oral Abstracts  Oral Abstracts #265‐ #275‐280 269

11a

12p 12‐1p LUNCH

12‐1p LUNCH AWAEM  Luncheon    Risk Stratifying GI Tract  Disease Processes Oral  Abstracts #362‐365 Improving the  EM Residency  Appropriateness of  Selection and Beyond  Imaging Utilization  Lightning Oral Abstracts  Lightning Oral Abstracts  #372‐377 #383‐387

Location:   Mayfair Rm

12‐1p LUNCH

1p

The Changing  Philosophy of CPR  Moderated Poster  Abstracts #358‐361

(D‐SA)  Opportunities to  Broaden the Role  of EMS

(D‐RE) Adaptive  Designs For  Clinical Trials

12‐1p LUNCH

2p

The Pre‐hospital  Perspective  Moderated Poster  Abstracts #378‐382

3p

Sheraton 4 & 5 SAEM Business Meeting 

4p

Residency/

Wine and  Cheese Poster  Session  Fellowship Abstracts  #388‐ 512, IEMEs #21‐ Fair 27

5p

6p

7p

17


FRIday, May 11, 2012 SAEM and AEM Committee/Task Force/IG/Board Meetings/Academies Friday, May 11, 2012 7:00a-8:00a SAEM PC Meeting Mayfair Room-level 2 7:00a-8:00a SAEM Past President’s Breakfast Columbus Room B- level 3 7:00a-9:00a AEM Editorial Board Meeting Superior Rooms A&B-level 2 8:00a-9:00a SAEM Research Committee Parlor A-level 3 8:00a-12:00p AWAEM Academy Business Meeting Mississippi Room-level 3 8:00a-12:00p SIM Academy Business Meeting Missouri Room-level 3 9:00a-10:30a SAEM External Collaboration Committee Parlor B-level 3 10:00a-11:00a SAEM Development Committee Lincoln Board Room-level 3 10:00a-11:00a SAEM Palliative Care End of Life IG Columbus Room B- level 3 SAEM 2013 PC meeting Parlor F-level 3 10:00a-12:00p 10:30a-12:00p SAEM Medical Toxicology IG Parlor A-level 3 11:00a-12:00p SAEM Consultation Services Parlor B-level 3 12:00p-1:00p SAEM Foundation Board Luncheon Lincoln Board Room-level 3 12:00p-1:00p SAEM Social Media Committee Columbus Room B- level 3 Parlor B-level 3 12:00p-1:00p SAEM EMS Interest Group 12:00p-1:00p SAEM Sports Medicine IG Parlor A-level 3 12:00p-1:30p AEM Reviewer Workshop Superior Rooms A&B-level 2 1:00p-2:00p SAEM Pediatric Interest Group Parlor B-level 3 2:00p-3:00p SAEM Clinical Directors IG Parlor B-level 3 2:00p-3:00p PeRLS Editorial Board Meeting Parlor A-level 3 3:00p-4:00p SAEM Public Health IG Mississippi Room-level 3 4:30p-6:00p SAEM International Relations Task Force Parlor F-level 3 5:00p-6:30p SAEM Past President/AACEM EC/ABEM officers/ACEP Officers Social Presidential Suite 6:00p-8:00p CMC Dept. of EM Reception (Invitation Only) Missouri Room-level 3

Affiliated Meetings Friday, May 11, 2012 7:00a-8:00a ACEP-Academic Leaders Breakfast Parlor C-level 3 8:00a-5:00p AAEM/RSA Board of Directors Meeting Parlor E-level 3 9:00a-6:00p CORD meetings All day Parlor G-level 3 8:30a-10:00a ACEP-Academic Affairs Committee Parlor C-level 3 11:30a-1:00p ACEP-Research Forum Sub-committee Parlor C-level 3 12:00p-5:00p EMRA/SAEM Simulation Academy SIM WARS Michigan Rooms A&B-level 2 1:00p-3:00p EMRA Awards Committee Parlor F-level 3 2:30p-3:00P EMRA Conference Committee Orientation Superior Rooms A&B-level 2 3:00p-4:00p EMRA Reference Committee Public Hearing Superior Rooms A&B -level 2 4:00p-5:00p EMRA Reference Committee Work Meeting Superior Rooms A&B-level 2 4:30p-5:30p EDSAFE in Person Meeting Parlor B-level 3 5:30p-6:30p EMRA Spring Awards Reception Chicago 8-level 4 5:30p-7:00p ACEP-Teaching Fellowship And EMBRS Alumni Parlor C-level 3 18


SAEM and MedEdPORTAL Announce a Call for Submissions and Reviewers in Emergency Medicine

The SAEM Board of Directors is pleased to announce that we will be entering a partnership with MedEdPORTAL. This will allow us to have our own webpage on the AAMC MedEdPortal site, feature SAEM member publications, provide author metrics including downloads which will be helpful for promotion and tenure, and give our members access to the iCollaborative and Continuing Education sections of the website. We aim to go live this July!

About MedEdPORTAL

Provided by the Association of American Medical Colleges, MedEdPORTAL (www.mededportal.org) is a free online, peer-reviewed publication service that now features approximately 2,000 peer-reviewed educational resources that span the continuum of healthcare education. MedEdPORTAL maintains a rigorous peer review process based on standards used in the scholarly publishing community. Each submission is scrutinized by editorial staff and independent reviewers using a standardized review instrument grounded in the tenants of scholarship. Published authors receive a formal citation for their accepted publication.

• consist of stand-alone educational resources/teaching modules that would be of interest to other medical school faculty • include learning objectives and an instructor’s guide (per MedEdPORTAL Submission Instructions) Make sure to mention SAEM in your abstract or cover letter. For information regarding MedEdPORTAL submissions please visit: https://www.mededportal.org/submitresources/

Call for Emergency Medicine Reviewers

Impartial assessment is an essential component of scholarly review. Peer review is the attentive, unbiased assessment of materials submitted to publication outlets by reviewers and is the very foundation of academic publication. MedEdPORTAL is accepting reviewer nominations for emergency medicine submissions. If interested, please email peerreview@aamc.org MedEdPORTAL® is a program of the Association of American Medical Colleges

Call for Emergency Medicine Submissions MedEdPORTAL invites educator submissions of teaching materials that are relevant to emergency medicine. Submissions should:

19


saturday, May 12, 2012 7a

Sheraton 4 

Sheraton 5

Chicago 6 

Chicago 7

Chicago 8 

Chicago 9

Mitigating Traumatic  Brain Injury Oral  Abstracts #517‐520

Outcomes in Out‐of‐ Hospital Cardiac Arrest  Lightning Oral Abstracts  #513‐516

Coffee Break Sheraton East/Chicago Promenade‐level 4 

8a

(D‐SA) Emergency Care  Research Opportunities  with the Center for  Medicare and Medicaid  Innovation

9a

(D‐ED) Not Another  Boring Lecture: Small  Group and Active  Lecturing Techniques

(D‐CD) Academic Roles  Outside of Emergency  Medicine

Alcohol, Snakes, and  Treating the Acutely Ill  Pesticides ‐ What's Not  Psychiatric Patient  Lightning Oral Abstracts  to Like? Lightning Oral  Abstracts #521‐526 #527‐532

10a

11a

(D‐ED) Making Education  (D‐RE) Update on Public  Health Research in  Matter:  Focus on  Emergency Medicine:  Supporting Faculty (D‐ED) Death Warmed  Follow‐Up to the 2009  Over:  Bringing Clinical  AEM Consensus  Reasoning and Decision‐ Conference (D‐ED) Improve your  Teaching:  Evidence‐based  Making Sciences to  Morbidity and Mortality  Teaching Workshop using  Articles that will Change  Conference your Teaching Practice

11a‐12p LUNCH

12p

1p

2p

(D‐CD) The Next Match‐  (D‐RE) Dissemination  What Academic  and Translation of  (D‐RE) Research  Departments Want to See  Research Results for Lay  Fellowships: Picking the  When They Hire Audiences and Policy  Right One Makers (D‐ED) Conflict Prevention  & Resolution 101 ‐  Developing Skills for  (D‐SA) Generation X to Z  Trainees and Faculty and EM Research:  Using  Computer‐based  (D‐ED) Using Formal  Technology for  Reflective Exercises to  Recruitment, Consent,  Improve Medical  Intervention and Follow‐ Education up

Junior Faculty Forum

(D‐CD) Is a Career in  Academic Emergency  Medicine for Me?

Pain and the Drug  Seeker:  Are We Doing a  Disservice? Lightning  Oral Abstracts #605‐610

(D‐RE) Funding Your  Research

11a‐12p LUNCH

11a‐12p LUNCH

Simulate One, Do One,  Teach One Lightning Oral  Abstracts #622‐627

(D‐SA) Simulation and  your Certification, what  the Future Brings

Educational Assessment  and Evaluation  Techniques Lightning  Oral Abstracts #702‐713

Simulation:  Simply  Surviving Beyond the ED  Sublime Lightning Oral  Lightning Oral Abstracts  #723‐728 Abstracts #729‐734

3p Must be out of rooms by 3:30p

SAEM and AEM Committee/Task Force/IG/Board Meetings/Academies Saturday, May 12, 2012 7:00a-8:00a AEM CC 2013 Planning Parlor B - level 3 7:30a-3:00p SAEM BOD Meeting Mayfair Room-level 2 9:00a-10:00a SAEM Research Fellowship Committee Parlor C-level 3 11:00a-1:00p SAEM PC Meeting Parlor C-level 3 11:00a-3:00p GEMA Academy Business Meeting Superior Rooms A&B-level 2 20


saturday, May 12, 2012 Chicago 10 

Erie Room 

Superior A&B

Colorado

Arkansas

River Hall B

7a

8a EuSEM (European  Society of  Emergency  Medicine)/GEMA  (Global Emergency  Medicine Academy)  Session

9a EMS:  Saving Lives  Moderated Poster  Abstracts #533‐538

11a‐12p LUNCH

11a‐12p LUNCH Global EM Academy  Business Meeting

11a‐12p LUNCH

11a‐12p LUNCH

11a

12p

Intubation and Opiates:   A Match Made in  Heaven Moderated  Poster Abstracts #632‐ 635

Poster   Abstracts  #636‐ 701 Headaches, Seizures,  and Bleeding Brains  Moderated Poster  Abstracts #719‐722

Dollars and Sense: GME  Ultrasound  Lightning  Budget Workshop Oral Abstracts #714‐718

EMS:  It's Not Just About  (D‐ED) Violence Against  Life Saving Interventions  Emergency Department  Lightning Oral Abstracts  Workers #735‐740

10a

Cardiac Interventions:   Risk and Reward  Moderated Poster  Abstracts #611‐615

International EM  Lightning Oral Abstracts  #616‐621

The Future Stars of EM:   A Salute to Resident   IEME Ultrasound  Research Guided Oral  Spotlight Oral Session  Abstracts #628‐631 #34‐37

Poster   Abstracts  #539‐ 604

Sheraton East/Chicago  Promenade

(D‐SA) Where is the  Evidence II: Evidence‐ Based Approach to  Pediatric Abdominal  Complaints

IEME Moderated  Posters  #28‐33

Networking Event 

(D‐ED) Perfecting  Procedural Skills:   Applications of Learning  Theory for Educators

Poisoning and  Overdose Moderated  Poster Abstracts #741‐ 746

Affiliated Meetings

1p

2p

3p

Saturday, May 12, 2012 7:00a-9:00a National HIV Testing Consortium meeting Parlor A-level 3 8:00a-8:30a EMRA Rep. Council Welcome Breakfast Mich. Rooms A&B-level 2 8:30a-12:00p EMRA Representative Council Meeting/Town Hall Mich. Rooms A&B-level 2 12:00p-1:00p EMRA BOD Meeting Parlor B-level 3 1:30p-2:30p EMRA/SAEM SIM Academy SIM WARS Meeting Parlor A-level 3 21


Resident Leadership Forum - Thursday, May 10, 2012 The 2012 Annual Meeting will mark the initiation of the SAEM Annual Resident Leadership Forum, formerly the Chief Resident Forum. We’ve taken all the traditional and timehonored sessions of the Chief Resident Forum and enhanced them with fresh new didactics on strategies for success during residency and beyond. For Chief Residents, the Resident Leadership Forum is an all-day event (just like the previous Chief Resident Forum). For residents of any year, the afternoon session is open for you to attend, and is geared for chief residents and residents alike who are interested in leadership and advancement in EM. This one of a kind forum for residents will provide opportunities to interact with and learn from the leaders in our specialty. The morning session (chief residents only) is from 9 am to 12:00 pm, and will provide the tools necessary to make a successful transition to the role of chief resident, and includes the following sessions: • Being a Role Model and Making a Difference • The Art of Middle Management – Managing Up and Managing Down • Dealing with Difficult Resident Concerns • Chief Resident Pearls and Perspectives The afternoon session (chief residents and non chief residents of any year) is from 1 pm til 4 pm, and will focus on the key themes of development of leadership skills, and includes the following sessions: • Communication Skills for Success in Academia • Enhancing Your Leadership Skills • Successful Negotiation for an Academic EM Position • Negotiating Interdepartmental Politics and Intergenerational Work Styles • National Involvement, Advancement, and Leadership Opportunities

Resident Leadership Forum Agenda 9:00 am - 9:30 am

Leadership as a Chief Resident: Being a Role Model and Making a Difference

Stephen Wolf, MD; Denver Health Medical Center

9:30 am - 10:00 am

The Art of Middle Management: Managing Up and Managing Down

Jen Walthall, MD, Indiana University

10:00 am -11:30 am Dealing with Difficult Resident Concerns Mary Jo Wagner, Synergy Medical Education Alliance/Michigan State University, MD; Philip Shayne, MD, Emory University

11:30 am - 12:00 pm Chief Pearls and Perspectives

12:00 pm - 12:50 pm Networking Lunch with Program Directors and ACGME/RRC Non-Negotiables 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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Communication Skills for Success in Academia

James Adams, MD, Northwestern Memorial Hospital

1:30 pm - 2:15 pm

Enhancing Your Leadership Skills Presenters: Andra Blomkalns, MD, University of Cincinnati-College of Medicine, Brian Zink, MD, Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital Discussion Facilitators: James Adams, MD, Northwestern Memorial Hospital; Jill Baren MD, Penn Medicine-Department Of Emergency Medicine; Deb Diercks, MD, MSc, University of California Davis School of Medicine; Kate Heilpern, MD, Emory University; Cherri Hobgood, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine; Bob Hockberger, MD, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center; Judd Hollander, MD, Penn Medicine-Department Of Emergency Medicine; Deb Houry, MD, MPH, Emory University; Alan Jones, MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center; Jeff Kline, MD, Carolinas Medical Center

Objectives 1. Apply effective interpersonal and communication skills with colleagues, faculty, residency program leadership and interdisciplinary team to practice as an emergency medicine physician 2. Employ effective leadership skills to advance leadership within the specialty of emergency medicine 3. Employ negotiation and conflict resolution skills required for successful problem solving and management 4. Effectively delegate tasks, manage committees, and facilitate meetings 5. Understand RRC and ACGME requirements for residency training programs 6. Understand and manage in a professional manner the medicolegal and ethical concerns that may present in a residency training program 7. Understand the process of negotiating a contract and position as an emergency physician

Chief Resident Panel Discussion

2:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Navigating Interdepartmental Academic Politics & Intergenerational Work Styles

Tracy Sanson, MD, University of South Florida

2:45 pm - 3:30 pm

National Involvement & Advancement Michael Hochberg, MD, Saint Peters University Hospital; Deb Houry, MD, MPH, Emory University

3:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Evaluating your Job Options in Academic Emergency Medicine

Kirsten Rounds, Alpert Medical School, Brown University


Medical Student Symposium - Friday, May 11, 2012 7:30 am – 7:45 am Welcome

Joshua Wallenstein, MD, Emory University

7:45 am - 8:15 am

Is EM Right for Me?

Jason Liebzeit, MD, Emory University

8:15 am - 8:45 am

Oh the places you’ll go: Career paths in EM Herbert Hern, MD, Alameda County Medical Center

8:4 5am - 9:15 am

Q&A with Drs. Liebzeit & Hern

9:15 am - 9:30 am

Break

9:30am – 10:00am

How to Shine and Get the Most out of your EM Clerkship

Gus Garmel, MD, Stanford University/Kaiser Permanente

10:00am – 10:30am

Finding the match made in heaven: How to Select the Right Residency

James Colletti, MD, Mayo Clinic, Rochester

10:30am - 11:00am

Top 10 Mistakes EM Students and Applicants Make

Rob Rogers, MD, University of Maryland

11:00am – 11:30am

Q&A with Drs. Garmel, Colletti & Rogers

11:30am – 1:00pm

Lunch with Program Directors

1:00pm – 1:30pm

The written word: SLORs, MSPE, & the personal statement

Bernard Lopez, MD, Jefferson Medical College

1:30pm – 2:00pm

The interview: selling yourself without shooting yourself

Michael Gisondi, MD, Northwestern University

2:00pm – 2:15pm

Q&A with Drs. Lopez and Gisondi

2:15pm – 3:00pm

Small Group Breakout Sessions Osteopathic Students - Marc Squillante, DO, OSF St. Francis Medical Center Women in EM - Tracy Sanson, MD, University of South Florida International medicals students – Christain Jacobus, MD, Synergy Medical Education Alliance Strategic planning for M1&M2 students – Jeffrey Barrett, MD, Temple University Optimizing your fourth-year schedule - Jennifer Avegno, MD, Louisiana State University

3:00-3:15 Break 3:15-4:30

EMRA Resident Panel

4:30 – 6:30

Residency Fair

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Junior Faculty Forum - Saturday, May 12, 2012 New this year Junior Faculty Forum! The name may not be snazzy, but surely the concept is clear: supporting the growth of our junior faculty, in particular those early in their careers who are looking for the tools to become success stories in the world of emergency medicine. Expect A) talks from leaders in administration, research, and education, focusing on those next steps needed to climb these proverbial ladders; B) a networking lunch with senior faculty mentors; C) an interactive session on finances and productivity.

At the end of this course, participants will be able to: • Describe the financial environment of an academic department of Emergency Medicine. • Compare and contrast the academic career opportunities for junior faculty within the major areas of Administration, Education, and Research. • Describe the characteristics of successful EM faculty who have transitioned from junior level to mid-career faculty. • Define the characteristics of the mentor and mentee in a successful mentoring relationship in Academic Emergency Medicine. • Create individualized short term and long term career goals for success as a junior academic faculty member.

Scheduled Agenda & Speakers: 8:00a-8:45a

Finances of Academic Emergency Medicine Linda Davis-Moon, MSN, CRNP, APN-BC, Thomas Jefferson University, Jim Schuelen, MBA, Johns Hopkins University, Kenneth Marx, MA MBA, CMPE, University of Florida

9:00a-9:45a

Success in ED Administration Michael Hochberg, MD, Saint Peters University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine

10:00a-10:45a

Success in ED Education Fiona Gallahue, MD, University of Washington

11:00a-11:45a

Success in ED Research Jason Haukoos, MD, MSc, Denver Health Medical Center

12:00p-12:45p

Networking Lunch

1:00p-2:30p ED Leadership Panel Discussion-How to be successful Junior Faculty Glenn Hamilton, MD, Boonshoft School of Medicine, Robert Hockberger, MD, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Sandra Schneider, MD, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Sarah Stahmer, MD *presenters are subject to change

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SAEM 2012 ANNUAL MEETING DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS May 9 – 12, Chicago, IL WEDNESDAY, MAY 9th Academic Integrity in Emergency Medicine - Case Studies DS143 • Chicago 7 Session Time: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

This case-based panel session will discuss the meaning of “academic integrity,” review examples of issues in EM surrounding academic integrity, and provide resources to manage these issues. Specific topics to be covered include: research funding and data integrity, academic integrity in teaching and administration, plagiarism, falsification/fabrication of data (per NIH guidelines), conflict of interest, conflict of commitment and issues regarding authorship. The tools utilized and discussed include: self-assessment of ethical conflicts, use of audits, national guidelines for academic integrity, extramural disclosures and authorship criteria and guidelines. An expert panel forum will utilize case studies to review the concepts of academic integrity. Cases will be presented anonymously but will be real-life cases gathered from the general SAEM membership. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to 1)  Identify situations containing potential issues of academic integrity in Emergency Medicine 2) Utilize new navigational tools to manage these issues. Gerald Maloney, DO – submitter CWRU/MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, OH Shellie Asher, MD – moderator Albany Medical Center, Albany, NY James Adams, MD – presenter Northwestern University, Chicago, IL Jill Baren, MD – presenter University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Michelle Biros, MD – presenter Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN

Advances in the Evaluation and Treatment of Acetaminophen Poisoning

DS172 • Chicago 6 Session Time: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Over the past several years, emergency medicine researchers have made several advances that have are changing the evaluation and treatment of acetaminophen-poisoned patients. Historically, patients are risk stratified by plotting a timed serum acetaminophen concentration on the Rumack-Matthew Nomogram. This approach is limited as the time of ingestion is often unknown. Two new time-independent approaches have recently been described. One uses standard laboratory methods (the serum acetaminophen concentration and serum ALT) and the other uses a novel biomarker (acetaminophenprotein adducts). Drs. Sivilotti and Heard are leading researchers who have developed these methods. They will describe the applications and limitations of these methods for the evaluation of acetaminophen-poisoned patients. The other main advancement in the treatment of acetaminophen poisoning has been modification of the duration of treatment. While classic treatment is time-based, recent work suggests that a patient-tailored approach may allow truncation in therapy for many patients, while providing additional protection to high-risk patients. Dr. Hoppe, a co-investigator in a recent multi-center trial describing the treatment of more than 400 acetaminophen poisoned patients, will review the literature and describe the application and limitations of the shortened course of treatment. The session will include a brief introduction three clinical presentations and end with a wrap up with audience questions and the panel will address what additional research is required and how these exciting advances can be incorporated into clinical practice. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Risk stratify acetaminophen poisoned patients using these new methods. 2)  Describe how novel biomarkers may be used for the evaluation of acetaminophen poisoning. 3) Apply the latest studies describing acetylcysteine treatment protocols to acetaminophen poisoned patients.

Kennon Heard, MD –submitter and presenter Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center, Denver, CO Jason Hoppe, DO -presenter University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, CO Marco Sivilotti, MD, MSc - presenter Queens University, Kingston, ON, CANADA

Spatial Information, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and Geo-Spatial Methods in Public Health and Emergency Care Research

DS193 • Chicago 6 Session Time: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Incorporating spatial information, GIS and geo-spatial methods into research and application is becoming increasingly popular among medical and public health researchers. Long used by urban planners, geographers, and industries such as shipping and transportation, such methods only recently started to be applied to problems of infectious disease spread, environmental carcinogenic exposures, and emergency medical care access and delivery. This session will first describe how macro-level concerns such as the availability of specialty care and the development of care systems can make use of spatial information, GIS, and geo-spatial methods to fully describe problems and help to identify solutions. Subsequent speakers will briefly present real-life examples of how spatial information, GIS, and geo-spatial methods have been used in research and practice and have been an asset to more traditional analyses by broadening scope and potential efficacy. Participants will be exposed to a new and exciting perspective on data that you know and love by considering its place in space and its location in geography in order to approach research and system development in a new light. There will be an overview of how spatial information, GIS, and geo-spatial methods can complement and enhance traditional analyses, and show the immense range of potential applications. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Explain fundamental analysis considerations of spatial information, GIS, and geo-spatial methods and how they differ from traditional analysis.

2) Describe the concept of population planning and how it relates to spatial information in designing and measuring systems of care. 3) Validate spatial information, GIS, and geo-spatial methods that have been used in research and real-life systems development. Brendan G. Carr, MD, MS –submitter and presenter University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Robert Lipton, PhD - presenter, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Comilla Sasson, MD, MS – presenter University of Colorado, Denver, CO Bjorn Westgard, MD, MA - presenter University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

Ethics in Disasters: Responsible Resource Stewardship in Times of Crisis

DS163 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Recent events have brought the issue of responsible resource stewardship to the forefront. Specific shortages, such as a lack of ventilators during a pandemic influenza outbreak, or general shortages, such as those seen after the Haitian earthquake, are predicted to occur during future disasters. Policy makers and providers alike must prepare to make tough moral choices when resources are scarce. After a brief introduction to the topic, audience members will be presented with a series of cases involving difficult resource allocation decisions. They will be polled to determine which patients they would choose to receive a resource, and what factors influenced their decisions. This exercise will serve as a springboard to discussing two key questions: who should make allocation decisions and what ethical principles or frameworks should guide the process? Controversy exists over who should be in charge of resource

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allocation decisions. Ideally, providers should not serve dual roles as caregivers and resource stewards, yet providers must be morally prepared for times when by necessity, they must do both. Controversy also exists over what ethical frameworks should be used to guide policy and practice. Utilitarian plans strive to achieve the greatest good for the greatest number, but they vary greatly in their implementation. Egalitarian plans focus on fairness, and are more consistent with the ethical principles that guide our daily clinical practice. The question of whether a new framework for “disaster-ethics” is needed, will be discussed. The session will conclude with the generation of an educational and research agenda. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Critically analyze factors that may influence their resource allocation decisions 2) Determine who (ideally) should make resource allocation decisions 3)  Understand different ethical frameworks for resource allocation during disasters. Michelle M. Daniel, MD – submitter and presenter Brown University, Providence, RI James Holliman, MD - presenter Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD Gabor D. Kelen, MD - presenter Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

Defining the Emergency Care Health Services and Policy Research Agenda in the Era of National Health Reform

DS122 • Sheraton 4 Session Time: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Emergency medicine sits at the cross roads of the outpatient and inpatient arenas of the US health care system. The contemporary emergency department has seen huge growth in patient visit volumes, rising concerns with crowding compounded by the practice of boarding, and mounting pressure to contain costs and deliver quality care even as large numbers of EDs have closed. New quality measures and national health policy initiatives are increasingly involving emergency care, setting the stage for the exploration of never previously considered investigations. Emergency care health services research is therefore at the forefront of policy relevant solutions for US health care. Despite this reality, well publicized health policy initiatives from readmissions reduction efforts to the development of accountable care organizations and health insurance expansion—each with unique relevance to emergency care—have largely been explored from non-emergency frameworks in national discussions. Policy makers and the public also continue to view the role of emergency care from perspectives that are often inconsistent with the evidence. For these reasons health services research in emergency medicine is due for investment and expansion. The objective of this didactic is to: 1. Explore the agenda for emergency medicine health services research with a focus on policy relevant questions, 2. inspire the next set of research questions and a new generation of emergency medicine investigators, and 3. Suggest the skills and capabilities necessary to acquire and develop in order to become a successful investigator. Objectives: At the completion of the session, participants should be able to understand issues in health services and policy relevant research in emergency medicine, specifically: 1) Describe current trends in emergency medicine that lend itself to policy relevant research

2) Define health services research in emergency medicine 3) Consolidate the skills necessary to become successful in health services research 4) Describe how to effectively disseminate research findings to have a policy impact. Keith E. Kocher, MD, MPH, MPhil – submitter and presenter, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Brent R. Asplin, MD - presenter Fairview Medical Group, St. Paul, MN Rod Hayward, MD - presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Zachary F. Meisel, MD, MPH – moderator University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA Jesse M. Pines, MD, MBA – presenter George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC

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Engineering Innovation: Forming Collaborations to Bring Operations, Design, and Engineering in to your Department

DS160 • Chicago 7 Session Time: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Research in engineering is distinct from other approaches to research in that it is goal driven rather than hypothesis driven and is characterized by the use of technical and mathematical techniques. From architectural design to optimization of staffing and even development of novel devices, most emergency departments are “doing” engineering research as a part of dayto-day operations. Many of these problems have a significant technical underpinning in other fields. Solving these problems is necessary to our practice. Identifying problems that would benefit from a more sophisticated approach, identifying appropriate technical collaborators, and finding routes to academic productivity are essential to improving our solutions to these diverse problems. This panel discussion will feature presenters who work in several of technical fields who will share their experiences. A framework for the scope of potential collaborations based on experiences working with academic faculty will be presented. Collaborations with engineers will be discussed highlighting development of educational simulation devices. Other collaborations leading to commercialization of novel devices will also be discussed. The complex relationship between care processes, design of the built environment, and patient safety will also be considered. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Identify current problems within their own emergency department that might be amenable to engineering approaches

2) Develop models for operationalizing engineering opportunities 3) Recognize potential funding and publication opportunities. Jeremy Ackerman, MD, PhD – submitter and presenter Emory University, Atlanta, GA Suzanne Dooley-Hash, MD - presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Eric Goldlust, MD - presenter Brown University, Providence, RI Selim Suner, MD, MS - presenter Brown University, Providence, RI

Jelly on the Belly: Cutting Edge Pediatric Ultrasound Applications

DS135 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

While the average academic clinician is aware of the positive impact of bedside ultrasound on the care of adult emergency patients, many might not be familiar with its potential to facilitate care in the pediatric population. Over the last decade, a number of studies have been published describing various pediatric emergency bedside ultrasound applications. Many of them can be easily learned by the physician sonographer with basic ultrasound skills. This session is designed to familiarize the participants with these state-of-the-art applications. Specifically, the speakers will discuss how to acquire the ultrasound images, explain typical image findings, and discuss how to incorporate such knowledge into emergency department practice. Limitations, gaps and voids in the current literature will also be discussed to encourage further investigations by aspiring researchers. Time will be available after each lecture for brief questions from the audience. This session will consist of three separate presentations on pediatric bedside ultrasound applications in the emergency department. 1. Evaluation for abdominal emergencies: appendicitis, intussusception, and pyloric stenosis, 2. Procedural applications: localization of abscess, peripheral IV insertion, ultrasound-assisted lumbar puncture, 3. Musculoskeletal applications: evaluation for fracture and hip effusion. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Recognize the typical appearance of pediatric appendicitis, intussusception, and pyloric stenosis on ultrasound Describe the steps to perform ultrasound assisted abscess localization, 2)  peripheral IV insertion and lumbar puncture 3)  Evaluate for suspected pathology like fracture and hip effusion in the pediatric population 4) Cite the current literature on all of the above pediatric bedside ultrasound applications in the emergency department setting, and identify areas in need of further research.


Resa E. Lewiss, MD, RDMS - submitter St. Luke’s/Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York City, NY Stephanie J. Doniger, MD, RDMS - presenter Children’s Hospital and Research Center Oakland, Oakland, CA H. F. Samuel Lam, MD - presenter Advocate Christ Medical Center, Oak Lawn, IL Jennifer Marin, MD - presenter Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA

Training the Trainers Who Train: A Workshop for Those Who Teach Emergency Medicine Elsewhere in the World

DS120 • Chicago 8 Session Time: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

There are now over 30 International / Global Emergency Medicine (EM) fellowship programs in the United States alone, and many EM faculty and residents are involved in international collaborations. Many times, these collaborations lead emergency physicians (EPs) to travel to other countries in order to train the physicians working there. One common model used is to “Train the Trainers”. In this model, experienced EPs from countries with a more mature system for emergency care teach physician and nurse leaders in countries with “underdeveloped” and “developing” systems of national EM development to then become the “trainers” of other clinicians who provide emergent / urgent care in their home country. Although the traveling physicians are usually experienced in both the practice of EM, many of them have not been trained how to teach. Furthermore, the skills needed to teach physicians in one’s home country are different from the skills needed to train physicians in a different system. In this session, nationally-recognized expert teachers in EM will dialog with experts in International / Global EM to facilitate a session instructive for anyone teaching EM in the United States or abroad. Objectives: At the completion of this session the participant should be able to: 1) Devise a successful “Train-the-Trainers” program; 2) Formulate effective teaching methodologies/strategies; 3) Recommend effective tools/methods for feedback; and 4) Discuss strategies for applying objectives # 1-3 in varying cultural and resource settings. Scott Weiner, MD, MPH – submitter Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA Diane Birnbaumer, MD – presenter University of California, Los Angeles, CA Katherine Douglass, MD – presenter George Washington University, Washington, DC Ian B.K. Martin, MD – presenter University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC Susan Promes, MD – presenter University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA

The Nadir of Clinical Operations Innovation: Implications for Future Growth

DS123 • Sheraton 4 Session Time: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

The first time a physician or mid-level provider was placed in triage, it was ground-breaking. The first time we used clinical practice guidelines and created order sets, it seemed amazing. The first time we created a rapid-treat area in our emergency department, we smiled at our success. Different versions of these techniques have been applied at various emergency departments throughout the country, be they academic or community sites. Every day it seems as if there is something else on the horizon even though the reality is much starker. Eventually, short of new technology and treatment modalities, there will be nothing else left to employ. But what happens when there are no more ideas, no more room for improvement, no more opportunities to advance the cause of the patient experience from a throughput perspective without sacrificing quality and safety? Are we there now? From an innovation standpoint, have we reached our process flow peak? A panel of four emergency medicine leaders in clinical operations will explore the possibility that at least in the near term there is no more change forthcoming. They will briefly analyze the current state of process flow, including the latest modalities, and then debate the future of throughput innovation. This session is not meant to be one focusing on actual processes, but rather one of a philosophical nature, talking to our core as physicians who continually seek the latest development. A short question

and answer period will follow at the end of the panel presentation to allow for audience participation. Objectives: At the completion of this session, the participants should be able to: 1) Identify the inherent problems that arise when the emergency department is expected to constantly transform itself to meet certain key metrics.  escribe the conflict between “change for change” sake and true revolution 2) D in operational process improvements. 3) Analyze the possibility that ED leadership has reached an end-point as it pertains to the evolution of clinical operations innovation. Michael L. Hochberg, MD – submitter and presenter Drexel University College of Medicine, New Brunswick, NJ Leon L. Haley, Jr., MD, MHSA - presenter Emory University, Atlanta, GA Robert Lowe, MD - presenter Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR Peter S. Pang, MD - presenter Northwestern University, Chicago, IL Jesse Pines, MD, MBA, MSCE - presenter George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC

The Future Role of Emergency Physicians in Trauma: A New Category of Trauma Specialists?

DS205• Sheraton 5 Session Time: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Emergency physicians are integral to the treatment of, research around, and teaching about patients requiring advanced trauma care. As the treatment of these patients becomes more technology driven and less operative (and in light of the limited availability of specialized trauma surgeons) the specialty of Emergency Medicine is uniquely positioned to develop physicians who can oversee both the ED and inpatient care of trauma patients. The discussions will include: The overview of current needs in trauma surgery with the rational and motivation to train EPs alongside surgeons, how graduates have fared in critical care and trauma services with focus on the future plans for fellowships to train EP in trauma critical care, and the clinical, political and logistical challenges of crossing departments and combining disciplines. Objectives: At the conclusion of this course, attendees should be able to: 1) Analyze the current state of trauma surgery work force shortage 2) Be familiarized with the current EM fellowship opportunities relating to trauma surgery and what unique options are currently being practiced at several sites 3) Appraise the knowledge of political, clinical and logistical challenges of EPs involvement in trauma past the emergency department as well as future educational and research opportunities to explore their benefits. Eric Legome, MD - submitter Kings County Hospital Center, Brooklyn, NY Julie Mayglothling, MD - presenter Virginia Commonwealth, Richmond, VA Thomas Scalea, MD - presenter University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD

Real World Evidence-Based Diagnostics: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly

DS118 • Chicago 7 Session Time: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

This lecture will use real examples from the emergency medicine literature. We will review multiple studies of diagnostic tests and show how the research data can be (but often are not) presented to maximize the information to be gained from the test. We will also discuss various common but underrecognized biases and how they affect results. We will discuss both reading and preparing systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy. After this course, you will understand (1) the principles of diagnostic test assessment, including the calculation and use of interval likelihood ratios and the relationship between these likelihood ratios and the ROC curve (2) how to go beyond the area under the curve to get the most out of published ROC curves (3) recognize underappreciated flaws, biases, and limitations in studies of diagnostic tests (4) how to find, use, and author emergency medicine relevant systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy, including SROC curves. The session will also discuss the Academic Emergency Medicine “Evidence-Based Diagnostics” paper on

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diagnosing septic arthritis, and possibly the papers on diagnosing serious closed head injury, and gonorrhea. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should: 1) Understand the calculation and use of likelihood ratios, both for dichotomous and multi-level tests. 2) Critically read a paper on diagnosis, identifying errors in the calculation or use of likelihood ratios and potential biases in their estimation. 3) Recognize errors in the studies of others to avoid these errors in their own studies. 4) Discuss with other experienced clinicians the application of study results to real-world diagnostic problems. 5) Evaluate and, to some extent, perform systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy. Christopher Carpenter, MD, MS – submitter and presenter Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO Michael Kohn, MD, MPP -presenter University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA

Is Hypothermia the First Broad Spectrum Therapy for the Syndrome if Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury?

DS152 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Wednesday, May 09, 2012 - 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

After restoration of perfusion in the post-arrest patient, effective treatment of the inflammatory, apoptotic, and disordered remodeling that results from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) may become the most important component of acute care medicine in disease states such as stroke, myocardial infarction, and cardiac arrest. IRI is protean in its components, likely including free radical and reactive oxygen species, disordered vasculature, inflammatory injury, programmed cell death, and pathologic remodeling among others. IRI is not limited to the thromboembolic events of classic organ infarction, and is likely a part of all acute organ threatening processes. The cascade nature of IRI has defeated the single molecular target pharmacologic model, and failed therapies for entities such as cardiac arrest and stroke have been numerous. The last few years has seen a broad amount of literature reporting laboratory and empirical efficacy for hypothermia applied at, or shortly after, reperfusion. If it is found to be effective, it may be secondary to the fortuitous circumstance that the sum of the positive effects is greater than the toxicities. This lecture will review the molecular biology and pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion, including the known effects of hypothermia on those pathways and the pre-clinical and clinical evidence of efficacy. Specific clinical applications of hypothermia’s molecular and cellular sciences will be reviewed. The lecture will complete with a discussion of future research directions. Specific clinical management and techniques, in particular the management of hypothermia after cardiac arrest, will not be discussed. Objectives: At the completion of this session, the participant should be able to: 1) Review the systems biology of IRI, including oxygen free radicals, energy failure, mitochondrial injury, membrane injury, pro-inflammatory, apoptosis, and disordered remodeling. 2) Illustrate the mechanisms of hypothermia’s potential efficacy in IRI. 3) Discuss the concept of therapeutic Plausibility 4) Apply molecular and cellular biology to specific entities, including cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, stroke, spinal cord injury, and sepsis. 5) Outline future research directions. Norman Paradis, MD – submitter and presenter University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Clifton W. Callaway, MD -presenter University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA Terry L. Vanden Hoek, MD - presenter University of Illinois, Chicago, IL

THURSDAY, MAY 10th _________________________ Floodlighting the Hidden Threat of Unconscious Bias

DS170• Chicago 8 Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 9:00 am - 10:00 am

As its names implies, unconscious bias (UB) flies under the radar and, if not understood and openly addressed, can adversely impair the decision making of individuals, regardless of their gender or background, involved in evaluating, hiring, and advancing faculty. This session will focus on the role of

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UB in the work place. Important literature will be reviewed on how UB impacts: writing letters of recommendation; curriculum vitae evaluation; hiring and promotion; and selection for committees and other leadership roles. Finally, this session will provide effective strategies to identify and successfully address UB so that institutions can move their best talent forward. The session will be focused on UB and gender but many of the concepts discussed will be readily transferable to other areas impacting diversity such as age, race, economic class and sexual orientation. Objectives: Upon completion of the session, participants should be able to: 1) Describe the research exposing the impact of UB in hiring and advancing faculty, 2) Identify impediments to achieving gender diversity in academic emergency medicine, 3) Utilize effective techniques to address and reduce UB. Jeannette Wolfe, MD – submitter and presenter Baystate Hospital Western Campus Tufts University, Springfield, MA Leon L. Haley, Jr., MD, MHSA – presenter Emory University, Atlanta, GA Sandra M. Schneider, MD - presenter University of Rochester, Rochester, NY Brian J. Zink, MD - presenter Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI

Getting the Story: How to Teach Residents and Medical Students Essential Narrative Tools

DS134 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 10:00 am - 11:00 am

The crux of emergency medicine (EM) practice depends on listening to stories – the narrative - from emergency department (ED) patients. Medical students and resident physicians are not only expected to get the story right, but must develop the skills to respond efficiently, accurately, and compassionately. Often in the ED, a “pressured listener” tries to understand a “pressured storyteller.” This chaotic environment can be considered a narrative disaster zone. Academic emergency physicians learn to some extent through experience how to best guide the narrative and “get the story” from patients, but do not necessarily know how to impart these skills to more novice providers. Tools from literature and creative writing can be very useful in becoming a more skilled, curious and astute pressured listener. In this session, experts in narrative, will dissect stories and demonstrate how literary elements like character, desire and conflict, language and dialogue, voice and point of view, narrative arcs, metaphor, mystery and meaning operate in our daily EM practice, and how a deeper understanding of these elements promotes more attuned clinical and emotional responses to an increasingly diverse patient population with complex needs. Often, patients are labeled as “difficult” when the truth is that only their stories are difficult. Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to: 1) Describe key elements of stories, and how to teach these elements to trainees. 2) Implement narrative tools that foster communication, facilitate sensitivity, and help resolve moral dilemmas. 3)  Classify barriers to narrative understanding in EM and develop flexible strategies for improvement. 4)  Develop novel modes for educating residents, medical students and attending physicians. Brian J. Zink, MD - submitter, Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI Jay Baruch, MD - presenter, Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI Kathryn Montgomery, PhD -presenter, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL

Social Media and the Academic Physician

DS115 • Chicago 7 Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 9:00 am - 10:30 am

The internet has become a ubiquitous presence in the lives of academic physicians, and patients. Recently there has been an explosion in usergenerated content and information in the form of Social Media. As utilization grows, physician groups and organizations have moved to create guidelines for online professionalism, in an effort to help doctors and students protect their “digital footprint.” Tools for Web 2.0 Social Media endeavors range from well known such as Facebook and Twitter, to lesser known and newer apps. In the field of academic Emergency Medicine, these tools can be used to add


value to education, research, and collaboration. This didactic will review online professionalism guidelines and protecting your digital footprint. Social Media tools and their use will be reviewed, with examples of research publications that make use of these tools. Finally the discussion will focus on recommendations for online engagement and collaboration. In keeping with the theme of the didactic information and important points and questions from attendees will be broadcast via Twitter with the hashtag #SAEM12 and displayed with the presentation. Objectives: At the completion of this session, the participants should be able to: 1) Define and understand online professionalism guidelines. 2) Describe Social Media tools and their basic use. 3) Choose recommendations for online engagement with users. 4) Synthesize current research in Social Media and prepare for future directions. Jason Nomura, MD, RDMS – submitter and presenter Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE Robert Cooney, MD - presenter Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center, Johnstown, PA Nicholas Genes, MD, PhD - presenter Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY James Miner, MD - presenter Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN

2012 Updates in Gender-Specific Emergency Care

DS112 • Chicago 8 Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 10:00 am - 11:00 am

Current research indicates there are significant physiologic differences between men and women that may have important clinical implications in the emergency care of patients. However, a gap persists between the research demonstrating gender differences in disease presentations, responses to treatment, and clinical outcomes and the knowledge and clinical practice of physicians. This State of the Art Presentation will review 8 clinical topics, covering 7 organ systems, applying the “gender lens” as it relates to the practice of emergency medicine. Topics will include Cardiovascular, Pulmonary, Gastrointestinal, Neurology, Pharmacology, Critical Care, Injury and Trauma, Orthopedics, and an updated look at Obstetrics and Gynecology. We will provide this overview using the “Pecha-Kucha” style of presentation, in which speakers are limited to brief (5 or 6 minute) talks that are concise and well-rehearsed. Pecha-Kucha, or “chitchats” have become a world-wide phenomenon for their ability to maintain listener engagement through dynamic, fast-paced presentations. A series of “lightning” teaching rounds, Pecha-Kucha will enable us to represent the broad range of topics for which consideration of gender is key to good emergency medicine in a relatively short amount of time, taking advantage of the average learner’s brief attention span. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Describe concrete examples of physiologic gender differences with significant implications for the clinical practice of Emergency Medicine, and 2) Describe examples of a gender-specific approach to several common disease entities. Alyson McGregor, MD – submitter and presenter Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University, Providence, RI Esther Choo, MD, MPH - presenter Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI Moira Davenport, MD - presenter Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA Marna Greenberg, DO - presenter Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network, Allentown, PA Stacey Poznanski, DO - presenter Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dayton, OHBasmah Safdar, MD - presenter Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT Roxanne Vrees, MD - presenter Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University, Providence, RI

Educational Scholarship: Creating and Publishing Academic Products from your Teaching

DS126 • Chicago 7 Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 10:30 am - 11:30 am

Many academic emergency physicians in SAEM have significant professional

involvement in teaching activities, curriculum development, production of educational resources, and other academic endeavors. The recognition that scholarship encompasses a much wider range of academic activities than the traditional research paradigm has increased opportunities for faculty to be recognized by local promotion and tenure committees for their work as educators. This session will teach participants about Boyer’s Model of Scholarship, with a focus on the scholarship of teaching. The process of peer review, public dissemination, and the creation of a platform for further development will be discussed as important components for faculty to focus on when creating academic products. Areas where opportunities exist for scholarship will be highlighted, with an emphasis on the creation of scholarship from teaching activities that faculty are already doing. Locations for the peer review and dissemination of educational materials will be presented, including traditional print journals such as Academic Emergency Medicine, various open-access publications, and electronic publication repositories. The process for submission, peer-review, and publication of educational materials to electronic repositories, including the AAMC MedEdPORTAL, will be described. Course attendees will participate in a brainstorming workshop activity where faculty will collaborate and share ideas for creating scholarly materials based on current teaching activities. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Identify scholarly products that can be produced from teaching activities. 2) Categorize the four different types of scholarship as presented in Boyer’s model. 3)  Examine the resources available for peer review and publication of educational materials. 4) Produce a written series of steps to accomplish the publication of an academic product based on current teaching activities. 5) Review emergency medicine educational resources that have been peerreviewed and published in publicly available electronic repositories. Michael T. Fitch, MD, PhD – submitter and presenter Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC Nichole DeIorio, MD -presenter Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR

Beyond Evidence Based Medicine: Educational Strategies to Promote Knowledge Translation in Graduate Medical Education

DS121 • Sheraton 4 Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 10:30 am - 12:00 am

While evidence-based medicine skills are usually the focus of journal club and didactic teaching within graduate medical education, there is a pressing need to develop new competencies that focus on the integration of knowledge from clinical research and implementation science into practice at both the individual and system level. Using a brief didactic presentation followed by a facilitated round table discussion, this session will provide attendees with accessible and replicable educational strategies to enhance residents’ incorporation of evidence-based principles and knowledge translation (i.e. the scientifically sound and systematic incorporation of evidence into clinical practice) at the learner, department, and systems level. We will review three examples of emergency medicine specific knowledge translation curricula that have been employed for several years resulting in numerous teaching awards and peerreviewed publications. We will also discuss common barriers to initiating and sustaining knowledge translation programs within graduate medical education programs while offering actionable solutions to these obstacles. Each participant will be provided with an array of resources to facilitate successful uptake of these curricula within their institutions. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Outline complementary approaches for teaching implementation science to residents at the individual learner, department, and systems level 2) Identify common resident and faculty barriers to these curricula along with previously successful solutions to these obstacles. Christopher R. Carpenter, MD, MS – submitter and presenter Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO Eddy S. Lang, MD - presenter University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Rawle A. Seupaul, MD - presenter Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN Stewart W. Wright, MD, MEd - presenter University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH

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Making Research Matter to our Patients: Implementation Science, the Next Frontier

DS145 • Ontario Room Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 10:30 am - 12:00 p m

This session will build on key concepts from the well received 2011 Didactic: Role of Research in Practice Change. This didactic will continue the discussion of the interplay between research and the external forces that influence practice change, focusing on the evolving field of implementation science. Implementation science seeks to understand how to best translate research findings into clinical practice, primarily working in the late stage of the translational continuum; focus is critical evaluation of facilitators and barriers associated with translating proven intervention into practice while retaining interventional fidelity. Topics to be covered include critical analysis of the principles and optimal evaluative methods for implementation science research using 2 cases studies as example; understanding training requirements and opportunities in implementation research; and developing a competitive portfolio and research plan. Attention will also be paid to federally funded, versus industry funded research and challenges associated with transitioning implementation from academic to nonacademic settings. Following a brief focused introduction (overview of the conceptual evolution of this field and range of research opportunities), Speakers will give examples of EM researchers (one clinical one public health) that have conducted research in this arena and have competed for NIH and/or industry funding in order to provide insights into the methods and process of designing and conducting implementation research. There will also be a NIH and industry panel discussing opportunities and challenges (to include program officers from NIH - e.g. NCATS, NIMH, NHLBI) and industry. Objectives: At the end of this session, the participant should be able to: 1) U nderstand differences between demonstration projects, operational research, and implementation research. 2) U nderstand study design, as well as facilitators and barriers to implementation research. 3) Understand role of regulation in practice change and implementation research. 4) U nderstand local and national training opportunities for implementation research. 5) Identify mechanisms (NIH institutes and industry) that support implementation science in emergency medicine. Presenters and panelists Christopher Lindsell, PhD - presenter University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati Ohio Benjamin Abella, MD - presenter University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Michael S. Lyons, MD - presenter University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH Mary Ellen Michel, PhD - panelist National Institute on Drug Abuse, Deputy Director, Center for the Clinical Trials Network Ryan Mutter, PhD - panelist Agency for Health Research and Qualit, Senior Economist and Coordinator for Emergency Department Research Activities Catherine M. Stoney, PhD panelist National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Program Director, Prevention and Population Sciences Program Gabor D. Kelen, MD - panelist Professor and Chairman, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore MD Richard E. Rothman, MD, PhD - moderator The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Zach Meisel, MD - co-moderator University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, MA

Surviving Sepsis Campaign 2012: An Update on Recommendations for Emergency Medicine

DS114 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) consensus guidelines for the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock are widely regarded as the most pertinent recommendations for the emergent management of sepsis. First published in 2004, the most recent revision to be released in 2012 contains revised recommendations, many of which are important for emergency physicians to completely understand. This session will be moderated by the SAEM representative to the SSC 2012 writing group who will present an overview of the process of SSC recommendation process followed by a summary of the new recommendations pertinent to emergency medicine. The course faculty will then provide an in-depth exploration of the pertinent literature supporting the new recommendations.

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Objectives: At the conclusion of this session participants should be able to: 1) Analyze and then utilize the SSC guideline recommendation process; 2) Apply the new SSC recommendations pertinent to emergency medicine; 3) Appraise the literature supporting the new SSC recommendations pertinent to emergency medicine. Alan E. Jones, MD – submitter and presenter University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS Stephen Trzeciak, MD - presenter Emergency Medicine, Cooper Hospital/University Medical Center, Camden, NJ

Educating and Assessing “In-Training” Physicians in the Finer Skills of Communication: Handoffs and Consultations

DS149 • Sheraton 4 Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

As reported in 2005 by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, communication was the leading root cause of sentinel events in all categories! This session will focus on education and assessment techniques for resident and medical student communication skills, with particular attention to hand-offs and consultations. Presenters will discuss why hand-offs and consults are becoming more important patient-safety related issues each year with new work-hour requirements and ACGME mandated directives. Specifically, an interactive discussion about various handoff tools will occur to take a more in-depth look at a curricular tool developed by and for Emergency Physicians. There will be a discussion of the critical aspects of the consultation and handoff process. Following, there will be a review of educational strategies, based in adult learning theory, to engage residents and students in the process such as didactic teaching, audio and video files, the use of standardized consultants/ physicians and other simulated scenarios. The principles of how to motivate learners, make these tools “stick,” and have residents/students incorporate these communication tools into every day practice will also occur. The session will conclude with a “how to” guide for core competency assessments using existing consultation and handoff tools. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1.  Understand the impact of ineffective and inefficient handoffs and consultations in the Emergency Department, 2.  Critique frameworks for handoffs and consultations within Emergency Medicine, 3. Identify a framework for teaching medical students and residents handoff and communication skills, 4. Appraise and utilize a handoff and consultation taxonomy within Emergency Medicine. Chad Kessler, MD, MHPE – submitter and presenter University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, IL Hans House, MD - presenter University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Out of the Wild: How to Conduct and Publish Wilderness Medicine Research

DS150 • Missouri Room Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 1:00:00 PM - 2:00:00 PM

This session will provide a brief history of the roots of Wilderness Medicine (WM) research, then move quickly to introduce the wide range of topics academic WM physicians are currently researching, from high altitude, hyperbaric/ dive medicine, toxicology, international medicine, the role of climate change in global health, hypothermia, hyperthermia. Topics will include generating research ideas, study design, successful funding practices, source of grant funding, collaborative relations with other specialties, and practical advice on doing medical research in resource limited environments under austere conditions. Each of the speakers is an internationally recognized investigator with more at total of 6 decades of combined WM research experience. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1)Define and understand critical steps in conducting a successful wilderness medicine research project and career 2) Develop the important facets of an wilderness medicine research project including: generating research ideas, study design, successful funding practices, source of grant funding, collaborative relations with other specialties, and practical advice on doing medical research in resource limited environments under austere conditions. N. Stuart Harris, MD, MFA – submitter and presenter Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA


Edward J. Otten, MD - presenter University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH

Evolving Role of Integrated Emergency Care Systems in Health Security and Research

DS197 • Chicago 7 Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

This session will highlight the evolving role and research potential of emergency care systems (emergency medical services (EMS), emergency department (ED), poison center) in bio-preparedness, syndromic surveillance, situational awareness and emergency management. The panel will provide expert input on the development, design and function of a near real-time integrated statewide emergency care information system from the EMS, ED and poison center perspectives. The EMS perspective will be given by Dr. Greg Mears, recent Medical Director of the NC Office of EMS and a key developer of the National EMS Information System (NEMSIS); the ED perspective from Dr. Charles Cairns, PI of the National Collaborative on Bio-preparedness (NCB-Prepared) and CoDirector of the NIH US Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group; and the poison center perspective from Dr. Marsha Ford, Director of the Carolinas Poison Center and President-elect of the American Association of Poison Control Centers. Dr. Alexander Garza, Assistant Secretary for Health Affairs, Department of Homeland Security has been invited to be the moderator. The moderator will lead a discussion on how the real-time integration of emergency care information systems could not only allow for the rapid detection of emerging health threats, but also for new insights into the regionalization of emergency care clinical systems and health services research. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: identify the potential role of emergency care information systems in populationbased bio-surveillance, bio-preparedness, emergency management and health services research. Charles B. Cairns, MD – submitter and presenter University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC Marsha D. Ford, MD - presenter Carolinas Poison Control Center, Charlotte, NC Alexander Garza, MD - moderator Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC Gregory D. Mears, MD - presenter EMS Performance Improvement Center, Chapel Hill, NC

Geriatric Emergency Departments: Challenges and Opportunities for Clinicians and Researchers DS195 Ontario Room Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Over the past 5 years, geriatric emergency departments (EDs) have emerged as a means to address the unique needs of older ED patients. Characteristics of these geriatric EDs are varied but include additional room space to accommodate family members and care providers, additional access to personnel such as social workers and pharmacists, and specific infrastructure to facilitate movement and prevent falls. The objectives of these interventions include: 1) providing an optimal environment for the assessment and treatment of older ED patients; 2) improving patient safety; 3) increasing patient and family satisfaction with the ED visit; 4) reducing return visits and re-admissions; and 5) minimizing ED length of stay. Unfortunately, little is known about how the various components or combinations of components of care currently being implemented in geriatric EDs impact these outcomes. This session will discuss: 1) Characteristics of existing geriatric EDs and efforts to date to study these EDs; 2) Strategies for integrating research into a geriatric care environment; and 3) Some of the challenges of conducting this researching including selecting comparison populations, defining the intervention, and selecting outcomes. Objectives: By the close of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Characterize current geriatric EDs, 2) Describe the components of successful programmatic research, 3) Discuss the challenges of implementing programmatic research to study the impact of geriatric EDs. Timothy Platts-Mills, MD –submitter and moderator University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC William Dale, MD, PhD – presenter University of Chicago, Chicago, IL Marc Rosenberg, DO - presenter St. Joseph’s Regional Medical Center, New Jersey, NJ

Scott T. Wilber, MD, MPH -presenter Emergency Medicine, Summa Akron City Hospital, Akron, OH

Update on NIH Funding Opportunities for EM Researchers Ontario Room Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 2:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Dr. Basil Eldadah is a program officer in the Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology of the National Institute on Aging. Dr. Eldadah will provide a 30 minute update on funding opportunities from the NIA specific to emergency medicine researchers including funding mechanisms for junior investigators, emerging funding priorities, and the impact of budgetary challenges on current and future funding Basil Eldadah, MD, PhD - presenter National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD

Bringing the Science of Education and Evidence to QI and Patient Safety: An Academic Approach to Regulatory Requirements

DS137 • Sheraton 4 Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

The new Web Add requirements and the evolving ABEM Assessment of Practice Performance requirements mandate a focus on patient safety (PS) and quality of care metrics. Academic physicians, well skilled in education and research, are generally not well versed in Emergency Department (ED) operations and Quality Improvement (QI). Administrators, often not well versed in teaching and research as well, often set metrics, which are not evidence based or clinically effective. In this pro-active panel discussion, one discussant will present the current ACGME oversight guidelines and two discussants will present the expert consensus on creating goals and developing curriculum and research parameters to evaluate QI benchmarks with a specific focus on applying evidence and the science of education to ED clinical operations. The last portion of the session will be devoted to small group think tanks on the three aspects of QI/PS curriculum: creating, teaching, and evaluating. Objectives: At the completion of the session, participants will be able to: 1) Describe the importance of QI/PS in today’s healthcare environment; 2) Review the new ACGME oversight guidelines (Web Adds, PBL/I PIF Questions, Chapter 11-15, ACMGE 2011 Duty Hour Standards); 3) Utilize tools to create a QI/PS educational and research curriculum. Lisa Moreno-Walton, MD, MS, MSCR - submitter and presenter Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans Janis Tupesis, MD - presenter University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison Mary Jo Wagner, MD - presenter Synergy Medical Education Alliance/Michigan State University, Saginaw, MI

Establishing Medical Student and Resident Wilderness Medicine Electives in Academic Emergency Medicine Education

DS164 • Missouri Room Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

This session will address the rationale and blueprint for establishing a formal medical student or resident wilderness medicine elective within your medical school or emergency department. The didactic will cover negotiation tactics with the medical school dean and department chairs, liability coverage, addressing participant safety concerns, intra and extra institutional collaboration, obtaining educational credit, and faculty recruitment and reimbursement. Additionally, the session will offer medical student elective curriculum, elective structure, and elective locations. Further, the learning theory behind and practice tactics of the established teaching and learning modalities of scenario-based education, small group problem solving, and in situ simulations with “standardized patients” will be offered. Wilderness medicine curriculum and WM cases in high fidelity simulations will be discussed as they relate to overall EM education. The role of the resident in WM student education will also be discussed. Lastly, the differences between medical student and resident electives curriculum will be described. The unique educational needs, leadership mentoring, and teaching instruction of residents in relation to their curriculum will be described. The course will also cover methods of evaluation for a Wilderness Medicine rotation, including objective and subjective evaluation tools for all aspects of a WM rotation. Differences in student vs. resident evaluation techniques will be addressed. The course will also discuss overall course/elective evaluations. A roadmap for EM educators

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will be developed to mature a program, and how such a strategy can create educational and professional opportunities for students, residents, faculty, and the department as a whole. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Understand the relevance of wilderness medicine training within a medical university or emergency department, 2) Devise a framework necessary to establish an elective within an institution or medical school, 3) Develop WM curriculae, teaching modalities, and evaluation methods in WM education, 4) Evaluate the specific needs of residents within an elective, and 5) Summarize the academic and continuing professional opportunities that WM electives may provide. Sanjey Gupta, MD – submitter and presenter New York Hospital Queens/Weill Cornell Medical College, Flushing, NY Elisabeth Edelstein, MD - presenter Thomas Jefferson University Hospital/Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA Jay Lemery, MD - presenter New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY Henderson McGinnis, MD -presenter Wake Forest University/Wake Forest Baptist Medical, Winston-Salem, NC

tests, p values, confidence intervals, and sample size and power calculations will be discussed. An overview of subgroup analysis, interim data analysis, and intention to treat will also be provided. Through discussion of these concepts at this session, attendees will increase their understanding of statistical concepts and will be able to apply this knowledge to their research and practice. Objectives: At the completion of this session, the participant should be able to: 1) Describe types of data, common statistical tests, p values, and confidence intervals, 2) Understand sample size and power calculations, 3) Utilize subgroup analysis, interim data analysis, and intention to treat. Jody Vogel, MD - submitter Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO Roger J. Lewis, MD, PhD - presenter Los Angeles County-Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA

Mastering Milestones - Achieving Outcomes in Education

The 2009 NIH Roundtables on Emergency Research identified strategic goals for enhancing the national EM research infrastructure and improving collaboration between EM researchers and the NIH. Major priorities in these discussions included the establishment of EM clinical research networks and research training programs; expansion of EM-specific initiatives within existing NIH institutes; and the integration of emergency investigators into federal grant review and research advisory roles. Three years after the roundtables, this didactic will be an update on our progress: What have we accomplished? Which groups of investigators have been particularly successful in advancing their research agenda? What lessons can we learn from them, and which other emergency research domains can benefit most from those lessons? Our moderator and panelists, all of whom served on the original roundtables, will provide insight into these questions and participate in an interactive discussion with audience members on how to promote greater faculty engagement in our federal research agenda. Two products will be produced from this program: Web content will be developed for faculty with specific instructions on applying for federal research advisory positions, and a manuscript reviewing the successes and future direction of the roundtables will be submitted to Academic Emergency Medicine. Objectives: At the completion of the session, participants should be able to: 1) Evaluate progress in advancing the science of emergency care since the 2009 NIH Emergency Care Research Roundtables. 2) Identify components of the national EM research agenda needing further development, including faculty participation in federal research advisory roles. 3) Evaluate roles in federal research agencies that would allow research for emergency physicians, such as NIH grant review, study section participation, and institute advisory councils. Brandon Maughan, MD, MHS – submitter Brown University, Providence, RI Charles Cairns, MD - presenter University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC Gail D’Onofrio, MD, MS - presenter Yale University, New Haven, CT Amy Kaji, MD, PhD - presenter Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA Roger J. Lewis, MD, PhD - presenter Los Angeles County-Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA

DS184 • Chicago 7 Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Increasingly educators are asked for goals and outcomes measurements to assure that education in a specific area or task has been adequate. Whether it is procedural competency, medical knowledge, transitions of care, communication, or professionalism we need to be able to prove that our learners have achieved the goals set before them. These “milestone measurements” offer educators the opportunity to target strengths and weaknesses of learners and develop individualized improvement plans. In addition, it allows the educator to assess the effectiveness of education at a systems level. However, developing this system can be an intimidating task. This session will describe how to develop a process that will work for your group of learners including development of goals, measureable endpoints or milestones and an expected timeframe during which reaching a milestone is reasonable and achievable. Regardless of whom your target learners are this session will develop real-world skills in outcomes assessment and management. Objectives: At the end of the session the learner should be able to: 1) Develop goals for educational activities (both short term and longitudinal) that are realistic and achievable. 2) Understand how to develop timeframes for these milestones are well as develop a hierarchy for natural progression of the learner. 3) Develop rubrics to assess educational milestones that are straight-forward, reproducible, financially sound and time efficient. 4) Implement a new outcomes based curriculum 5) Develop remediation steps for learners who are not meeting outcomes in the timeframe set forth 6) Utilize multiple educational modalities for both education and assessment including simulation, web-based training modules, video and audio tools and portfolio building. Hollynn Larrabee, MD –submitter and presenter West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Felix K. Ankel, MD - presenter Regions Hospital, University of Minnesota Medical School, St. Paul, MN Patrick H. Brunett, MD -presenter Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine, Portland, OR

Introduction to Statistics

DS165 • Mayfair Room Session Time: Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

To succeed in research and academia, a fundamental knowledge of important statistical concepts is a necessity. This knowledge will allow investigators to plan a sound research study, develop testable hypotheses, choose appropriate analytical methods, work effectively with statistical consultants, and determine the feasibility of performing a study in a given population and setting. In this session, Introductory statistical topics such as types of data, common statistical

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FRIDAY, MAY 11th ____________________________ Update on NIH Emergency Care Research Roundtables: Lessons Learned and Future Goals

DS117 • Chicago 9 Session Time: Friday, May 11, 2012 - 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Principles of Medical Photography and the Use of Clinical Images in Medical Education

DS132 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Friday, May 11, 2012 - 8:00 am - 9:30 am

Medical photography is a powerful tool that can establish permanence of clinical teaching opportunities. In order to maximize the sharing experience and learning from clinical photographs, the educator must obtain the highest possible quality medical images. This session consists of a series of short lectures addressing a) the essential equipment needed to produce excellent clinical images, b) the


fundamentals of medical photography including explanations of exposure, lighting, establishment of view, reproduction ratios, management of distortion, c) the use of clinical images to augment teaching, and d) clinical applications of medical photography. Following the lecture segment, the faculty will teach a hands-on workshop so that participants can practice newly learned techniques. During the workshop, the faculty will use digital SLR cameras and projection equipment to demonstrate how proper technique generates high quality images as well as how improper technique may result in poorer quality images. Participants are encouraged to bring their own personal digital SLR cameras, but cameras will be provided during the workshop for the use of the audience. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Describe the fundamentals of medical photography including appropriate equipment, proper photographic techniques for maximum image quality, the use of medical imaging in teaching and clinical applications, 2) Utilize these newly learned photographic techniques, with hands-on practice. R. Jason Thurman, MD – submitter and presenter Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN Suzanne Dooley-Hash, MD - presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Kevin J. Knoop, MD - presenter Naval Medical Hospital, Portsmouth, VA Larry Stack, MD - presenter Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Prescription Drug Misuse: The Scope of the Problem and the State of the Research

DS203 • Chicago 9 Session Time: Friday, May 11, 2012 - 9:00 am - 10:30 am

Pharmaceutical misuse, now reaching epidemic proportions, has become a public health crisis in the United States. The Emergency Department (ED) plays a central role in this epidemic: not only is the ED a source of drugs that may be diverted to illicit use, it is also a site where consequences from prescription drug misuse are often treated. The ED is, therefore, an excellent venue for studying prescription drug misuse, but future directions for research investigations may not be clear to emergency physicians who do not engage in toxicology or injury prevention research. This course will describe the epidemiology of prescription drug misuse, assess the relationship between prescribing patterns and mortality, and describe poorly-understood phenomena such as opioid-induced hyperalgesia and delayed respiratory depression. Furthermore, we will examine the impact of departmental and individual prescribing habits on patient/ provider satisfaction as well as patient morbidity and mortality. Lastly, our speakers will discuss the landscape and priorities for funding of pharmaceutical misuse research through NIDA and the NIH over the next 5-10 years. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Appreciate the extent and impact of prescription drug misuse in the United States and 2) Appreciate new research questions and the funding potential and priorities of NIDA and the NIH. Robert Cloutier, MD - submitter Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR Edward W. Boyer, MD, PhD - presenter University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA Robert Hendrickson, MD - presenter Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine, Portland, OR Mary Ellen Michel, PhD Center for the Clinical Trials Network, NIDA, Rockville, MD

Leadership Across Generations

DS199 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Friday, May 11, 2012 - 9:30 am - 11:00 am

Generational differences in leaders and mentees may cause potential misunderstanding and conflict in the workplace. The Baby Boomers, Generation X, and the Millenials identify with varied views on work/life balance, work environment, independence, effort/reward, and structure. This session aims to outline these differences and how these differences can be optimized to make for a successful workplace. After a brief introduction, Drs. Clyne and Blomkalns

will introduce several well-known EM leaders in a Q&A panel. The leaders of this didactic assure an extremely interesting discussion utilizing the participation of these qualified leaders during a roundtable session. Education, research, and administrative topics will be represented. This format is a continuation of the successful 2010 session. Objectives: By the close of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Review differences in professional personalities of Boomer, Gen X, Y, and the Millennials. 2) Utilize practical tools of leadership which attendees can start exercising immediately. 3)  Identify techniques to manage leadership positions across generational groups. Andra L. Blomkalns, MD – submitter and presenter University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH Brian Clyne, MD - presenter Brown University, Providence, RI Deborah B. Diercks, MD, MSc -presenter University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA Cherri D. Hobgood, MD -presenter Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN Debra E. Houry, MD, MPH - presenter Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA Alan E. Jones, MD – presenter University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS Brent R. King, MD - presenter University of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX Arthur M. Pancioli, MD - presenter University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH Brian J. Zink, MD - presenter Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI

NHLBI K12 Research Career Development Programs in Emergency Medicine Research

DS110 • Chicago 9 Session Time: Friday, May 11, 2012 - 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

In July 2011 the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) funded six institutional research career development (K12) awards to promote multidisciplinary clinical research training programs in emergency medicine. These programs are designed to prepare clinician-scientists for independent research careers and academic leadership roles in Emergency Medicine. This five year, $21 million award represents a major opportunity for junior emergency medicine researchers to obtain NIH funded, mentored research career training. The panel will include a moderator, the NHLBI K12 program officer, and a member from each of the six K12 award programs. The NHLBI program officer will discuss the development of the NHLBI EM K12 program as well as the overall design of the program including candidate eligibility criteria and the goals for the program/program graduates. Following the K12 program officer’s presentation, members from each program will provide a brief description of their respective programs. These presentations will highlight the strengths and unique attributes of each individual program, the types of candidates they are targeting, and the application process. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to 1) Describe the goals of the NHLBI K12 program, 2) State K12 candidate eligibility, 3) Outline the strengths of the six K12 programs, and 4) Describe the application process. James Holmes, MD, MPH - submitter UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA Roger J. Lewis, MD, PhD - presenter Los Angeles County-Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA Jane Scott, ScD, MSN - presenter National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

Peer to Peer Feedback: Making it Meaningful and Delivering it with Grace

DS175 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Friday, May 11, 2012 - 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

It is unarguable that feedback is crucial to building expertise and reaching

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maximum performance in the workplace. While educators view providing feedback as a crucial step towards improving learner performance, less is understood about how to provide effective feedback to peers. Peer-to-peer feedback (at both a faculty-faculty and resident-resident level) is important in forming a 360-degree evaluation. Building on last year’s workshop focused on teacher-learner interaction, this year’s workshop looks at the advanced skill of providing feedback to peers, including the special circumstance of when the peer also functions as a supervisor. We will draw upon seminal articles in the feedback literature to both enable the participant to understand feedback from the receiver’s perspective, and empower participants to employ practical strategies to improve real-time feedback. Objectives: At the end of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Develop a plan to incorporate evidence from the feedback literature into their clinical teaching practice, 2)  Outline steps required to provide effective feedback given the new conceptual framework, 3) Apply principles of feedback specific to peer and supervisor feedback. Sorabh Khandelwal, MD – submitter and presenter The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH Marcia Perry, MD - presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Sally A. Santen, MD, PhD - presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Lalena M. Yarris, MD – presenter Oregon Health and Science University School of Medicine, Portland, OR

Pediatric Care in Emergency Medicine: Knowledge in Translation

DS154 • Chicago 10 Session Time: Friday, May 11, 2012 - 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Emergency medicine (EM) residents continue to express discomfort over care for pediatric patients, both during training, and after entering the workforce, despite focused pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) education. The challenges of educating EM residents during training are many, including the lack of exposure to critically ill children, the limited exposure and volume, and the seasonal variability of pediatric illness. Equally challenging is the continued incorporation of current evidence into the general emergency medicine community, after completion of training. Although advances in PEM care have been made in recent years, implementation of this evidence has remained a challenge. Consequently, evidence-based medicine (EBM) and knowledge translation (KT) efforts have gained increased attention in the field of PEM. In this session, the participants will describe two techniques of knowledge translation, including programmatic methods focused on resident trainees, and specific methods of implementation of evidence-based practice aimed towards general EM practitioners. In addition, descriptions of existing and proposed KT programs, using community based in-person education modules and real-time clinical decision support tools will be included. Audience participation will be solicited along with an open-discussion among presenters and participants following the session. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Recognize the potential for EBM and KT techniques to enhance dissemination of evidence-based practice to the general ED community, and 2) Analyze current and future methods of KT. Rakesh Mistry, MD – submitter and presenter University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Jeffrey Hom, MD – presenter Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY

Opportunities to Broaden the Role of EMS

DS157 • Missouri Room Session Time: Friday, May 11, 2012 - 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems predominantly offer a one size fits all approach of providing ambulance responses and subsequent transports to an emergency room for all 9-1-1 calls. There are many instances when this approach may neither be the best solution for the patient, nor for our high cost, fragmented health system. The EMS community has been interested for a long time in breaking this mold and becoming a more flexible, patient centered, clinically integrated health service working with partners in the inpatient and

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outpatient world. This could provide better care and reduce redundancies and inefficiencies in the healthcare system. However, few innovations have been put into general practice largely because of legal constraints and financial incentives that favor the status quo. Under health reform, and more generally within the trends in healthcare policy toward greater coordination of care and efforts at cost-containment, there may be new opportunities available for EMS/ Prehospital Care systems to expand their role beyond emergency care delivery into the areas of public health and care management to improve the underlying health of the populations they serve. This session will feature two leaders in the EMS community who will update us on the latest innovations in the expanded practice of EMS systems and providers, describe the grander visions for prehospital care and describe the opportunities available under health reform that might help us realize these visions. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Describe the limits of the existing prevailing EMS model and the missed opportunities therein. 2) Outline the financial and legal obstacles to changing that model. 3) Understand the term “community paramedicine.” 4) Critique the grand vision of EMS described by the panelists. 5) Describe the opportunities under health reform for realizing that vision. Kevin G. Munjal, MD – submitter and presenter Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY Thomas Judge, CCTP LifeFlight of Maine, Bangor, ME Gregory Margolis, PhD, NREMT-P - presenter US Dept of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC

More than Just a Hobby: Building an Academic Career in Global Emergency Medicine

DS101 • Chicago 10 Session Time: Friday, May 11, 2012 - 1:00 pm- 2:30 pm

As the specialty of Emergency Medicine continues to spread around the world, a growing number of academic emergency physicians have begun to involve themselves in the realms of global emergency medicine development, research, and teaching. While academic departments have always found this work laudable, they have only recently begun to accept global emergency medicine as a rigorous academic pursuit in its own right. This didactic will cover the various ways in which emergency physicians can translate their global health work into “academic currency.” The first portion of the session will be split into two successive blocks, the first intended for academic emergency physicians pursuing a “teaching” track and the second intended for those pursuing a “research” track within their departments. For each track, we will discuss the challenges involved in pursuing a career in global emergency medicine and how to overcome those challenges. Specific skills will include a discussion of how to “sell” the importance and relevance of one’s international work to the chair and the department, how to fund one’s time and effort abroad, and how to successfully integrate global health work with the many other responsibilities of an academic emergency physician. This didactic session will conclude with a panel discussion on the types of training available to help launch a career in global emergency medicine, including the relevance of an international emergency medicine fellowship and tips on what to look for in a fellowship program. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Discuss the career pathways and training opportunities available in global emergency medicine. 2) Create a roadmap for developing an academic career in global emergency medicine that fits their particular interests and needs. 3) Describe specific examples of “academic currency.” 4) Cite specific challenges they are likely to face in building a career in global emergency medicine and ways to overcome them. Adam Levine, MD – submitter and presenter Brown University Medical School, Providence, RI Mark Hauswald, MD - presenter University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM Stephanie Kayden, MD, MPH - presenter Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA Ian B.K. Martin, MD - presenter University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC


Adaptive Designs for Clinical Trials

DS190 • Missouri Room Session Time: Friday, May 11, 2012 - 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Our discussion of adaptive clinical trials will focus on a very specific class of flexible designs. Our use of the term adaptive refers to trials which make use of accumulating information from enrolled subjects to make changes in the conduct of the ongoing trial. Importantly, all of these changes are prospectively planned using extensive numerical simulation and sensitivity analyses. These designs can help the trial investigators concurrently accomplish important scientific and medical goals. Recent advances in simulation techniques via advances in modern computing power have made these designs increasingly feasible. In this session we will identify situations where specific types of adaptive clinical trial designs could be useful. In addition, we will identify situations in which adaptive designs may not be as useful or may even be less efficient. Adaptive trials offer potential benefits in improving trial efficiency (smaller trials which are more likely to be successful) that must be balanced against the additional complexities (extensive up-front simulation work and the need to rapidly incorporate accumulating data from participants within the on-going trial). We will provide an overview of the key characteristics of highquality adaptive clinical trial designs. Then, the panel discussion will focus on lessons learned from the trial design process and the attendee will learn about potential methods to enhance the efficiency of trial design. We use “adaptive clinical trials” to refer to trials which make use of accumulating information from enrolled subjects to make changes in the conduct of an ongoing trial. These designs are valuable because they do not require investigators to make as many assumptions ahead of time and can provide more flexibility than traditional designs while still protecting against bias and statistical error. Importantly, this flexibility must be prospectively planned using extensive numerical simulation and sensitivity analyses. Recent advances in simulation techniques and the widespread availability of increased computing power have made these designs increasingly feasible and accessible. Objectives: At the completion of this session, the participant should be able to: 1) describe the taxonomy of adaptive clinical trial designs and areas where such designs may be useful, 2) understand the advantages of using numerical simulation in clinical trial design and will be motivated to use these methods, and 3) anticipate potential process issues within trial or research design and use best practices to maximize the efficiency of the process William J. Meurer, MD – submitter and presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI William G. Barsan, MD - presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Clifton W. Callaway, MD - presenter University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA Roger J. Lewis, MD, PhD - presenter Los Angeles County-Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA Robert Silbergleit, MD - presenter Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

SATURDAY, MAY 12th _________________________ Emergency Care Research Opportunities with the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation

DS192 • Sheraton 4 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 8:00 am - 9:00 am

In the aftermath of health care reform, emergency medicine and emergency department visits have received a great deal of scrutiny. As federal and state governments work to implement the health care reform, a variety of changes to the health care delivery system loom. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) with a $10 billion appropriation will be responsible for testing a variety of health care delivery models over the coming years. It will be important to understand opportunities for emergency medicine to influence the discourse through research. This session will review past and current initiatives coming from CMMI and their implications for emergency medicine. In addition, we will discuss opportunities for the emergency medicine community to engage with our federal partners and influence future work. Both of the speakers have spent time working with CMMI and will share their experiences and perspectives. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1)  Define the role and mission of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid

Innovation (CMMI), 2) Identify current CMMI projects which will influence emergency care, 3) Describe opportunities for emergency medicine research in-line with CMMI activities. Anand Shah, MD – submitter and presenter University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia VA Medical Center, PA Jesse Pines, MD, MBA, MSCE - presenter George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC

Perfecting Procedural Skills: Applications of Learning Theory for Educators

DS169 • Chicago 10 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 8:00 am - 9:30 am

Procedural skills involve a complex combination of cognitive decisionmaking and technical skills that need sufficient time for learning and practice in order for the learner to attain mastery. Increasing restrictions on resident work hours and decreasing resident exposure to opportunities for learning important procedural skills make it imperative that educators provide a learning environment that best fosters development of these skills in trainees. An introductory lecture will introduce concepts of learning theory as it applies to the development of procedural or psychomotor skills. These concepts include 1) general adult learning theory, 2) the stages of learning psychomotor skills, 3) conditions of practice, such as massed vs. distributed practice, 4) deliberate practice (Ericsson, 1993), and 5) components of effective feedback. Next, a standardized four-step method of teaching procedural skills (Walker and Peyton, 1998) will be demonstrated for a procedural skill essential to the practice of emergency medicine. Different methods available for teaching procedures and the evidence for each will be discussed. Specific alternatives to bedside teaching, such as simulation, task trainers, cadaver and animal labs will be discussed. A discussion will show how procedural education can be incorporated into a residency or clerkship curriculum. Participants will then be divided into small groups. Each group will participate in interactive activities that involve a variety of simple, procedural skills. Both clinical and non-clinical procedures will be included to ensure unfamiliarity of some tasks for the learners. Groups will apply principles learned in the lecture above to develop a strategy for teaching these skills and then reconvene as a large group to teach each other the skills. Feedback will be provided from panelists and solicited from attendees. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Discuss learning theory as it applies to teaching and learning procedural skills to adult learners. 2) Identify essential components for attaining skill mastery. 3) Develop a plan to incorporate relevant learning theory into their teaching of procedural skills in both the clinical and laboratory settings. Suzanne Dooley-Hash, MD – submitter and presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Douglas Ander, MD - presenter Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA Laura Hopson, MD - presenter University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI Ernest Wang, MD - presenter University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Evanston, IL

Not another Boring Lecture: Small Group and Active Lecturing Techniques

DS174 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 8:00 am - 9:30 am

This interactive workshop will introduce models of how adults learn and current cognitive theory as a basis for the introduction to alternative and innovative methods of teaching. During the session, participants will share in handson experiences and demonstrations using alternative methods of teaching including readiness assessment testing, modified team-based and problembased learning, jig-saw small groups, think-pair-share, 1 minute paper, using stimuli, role plays, facilitated discussion and “Jeopardy” based assessment. At the completion of the session, participants will be able to select and employ new tools specific to their teaching environment as well as gain an understanding of some of the foundations of cognitive learning theory. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Develop an understanding of some of the foundations of cognitive learning theory.

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2) Categorize existing and develop new and effective tools for their teaching environment. Eve Losman, MD – submitter and presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Sally Santen, MD, PhD - presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Emily Senecal, MD - presenter Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Mary Jo Wagner, MD - presenter Synergy Medical Education Alliance/Michigan State University, Saginaw, MI Esther Choo, MD – moderator Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI Robin R. Hemphill, MD, MPH - moderator National Center for Patient Safety, VA Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI Philip H. Shayne, MD – moderator Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA

Academic Roles Outside of Emergency Medicine

DS206 • Chicago 6 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 8:00 am - 9:30 am

This session will discuss academic career opportunities outside of clinical emergency medicine. The first portion of this session will include several speakers that discuss the following potential career paths: academic center positions (Dean, Chancellor, Provost, Chief Medical Officer, research center directorships, and hospital leadership positions in quality/patient safety, medical informatics, utilization), affiliated institutional positions (AAMC/ACGME/AMA/ Joint Commission posts), government-based positions (CDC/NIH positions, public health leadership positions, military opportunities, leadership/administrative roles in Homeland Security/NHTSA), and other academic opportunities (research & development roles at pharmaceutical or device companies, editorial roles for journals and publishing companies, consultant work, international leadership posts). The second portion of this session will include questions and answers from the audience. The speakers will offer their insights, advice, and strategies to anyone interested in pursuing an academic career outside of emergency medicine. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Understand opportunities for academic growth in local institutions as well as national organizations within medicine, 2)  Develop awareness of necessary skill sets in business and government leadership positions, 3) Appraise opportunities for emergency physicians in consulting and physician leadership coaching. Todd Crocco, MD - submitter West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Brooks Bock, MD, CEO - presenter Colorado Mountain Medical, P.C., Vail, CO Ann Chinnis, MD, MHSA, CSC - presenter Matrix Executive Coaching, Virginia Beach, VA F. Brian Clare, MD – presenter Virginia Chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians (VACEP), Williamsburg, VA Richard Hunt, MD – presenter National Center For Injury Prevention & Control, Atlanta, GA Chris M. Thomson, MD, MS - presenter Centra Medical Group, Lynchburg, VA Vincent P. Verdile, MD – presenter Albany Medical College, Albany, NY

Is a Career in Academic Emergency Medicine for Me?

DS158 • Sheraton 4 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 9:00 am - 10:00 am

“Is academia for me?” is a commonly asked question by medical students, residents, and junior faculty. This session is designed to provide a general overview of academic emergency medicine. It will begin with an introductory lecture session followed by an interactive panel discussion by academicians from various practice settings. The typical career path of an academician will be described along with the workload and expectations associated with a career in academia. The concepts of promotion and tenure will be reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of an academic career will be described. Ways to identify and secure a position in academia will be discussed, along with tips for a successful application. Finally, the popular question, “Has fellowship become required to

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secure an academic position?” will be discussed by those who are intimately familiar with the current hiring practices at academic institutions. Objectives: By the close of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Describe the advantages and disadvantages of a career in academia; 2) Assemble a timeline for and various ways to pursue an academic position. Jody Vogel, MD - submitter Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO Katherine L. Heilpern, MD - presenter Emory University, Atlanta, GA Robert S. Hockberger, MD - presenter Los Angeles County-Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA John Marx, MD - presenter Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC

Making Education Matter: Focus on Supporting Faculty

DS189 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 9:30:00 AM - 10:30:00 AM

With so many different priorities in Emergency Medicine, education is often lost in the process. The purpose of this session will be to lead a discussion on how to bring education into the spotlight of priorities. The session will be lead by Department Vice-Chairs and Leaders in Emergency Medicine. The session will start with brainstorming about how to prioritize education. Then there will be a panel discussion of 4 model programs: 1) design and implementation of educational RVUs (eRVUs), 2) use of a scholarship pipeline to encourage faculty to turn education into scholarship, 3) educational criteria for “citizenship” and incentive, 4) faculty development programs Following the panel discussion, the participants will break in to smaller groups to discuss each of the models. These sessions will help guide participants in taking these models back to their institutions to improve the focus on education. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Design and implement a comprehensive faculty work plan in education. This may include an educational RVU process, matching individual faculty effort to department deliverables, developing an incentive plan for educational productivity and incorporating individual requirements for faculty development. 2) Facilitate faculty members turning educational activities into scholarship using reflection, peer review and diverse means for the dissemination of educational products. 3)  Develop specific educational outcomes that can contribute to faculty incentives. 4) Describe two approaches to faculty development in education: may include elements such as self study, institutional training, national courses and mentorship programs. Sally A. Santen, MD, PhD – submitter and presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Terry Kowalenko, MD - presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Steven A. McLaughlin, MD - presenter University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM Philip Shayne, MD - presenter Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA

Update on Public Health Research in Emergency Medicine: Follow-Up to the 2009 AEM Consensus Conference

DS155• Chicago 6 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 9:30 am- 11:00 am

The 2009 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, Public Health in the ED: Surveillance, Screening, and Interventions, brought together over 160 researchers, policymakers, funders, and others to craft a research agenda for academicians in this broad, fast-changing area. The conference proceedings, published in the November, 2009 issue of AEM, contained 31 papers outlining the broad themes of this agenda. Content areas included substance use, injury prevention, sexual behavior, and mental health. In the two years since, many EM researchers have moved this agenda forward, by securing federal grants in these areas, joining NIH study sections, and publishing papers in high-impact journals. This session will feature presentations and an interactive discussion between the audience and the organizers of the Consensus Conference. Steven L. Bernstein, MD, will survey the grants and projects that have been funded since the 2009 meeting. Gail D’Onofrio, MD, MS, will review the federal agencies, foundations, and state and local public health agencies that support public


health research in the ED. Rebecca Cunningham, MD, will review advances in designing and testing brief interventions for risky health behaviors, particularly substance abuse. Lastly, the panelists will engage in a conversation with the audience about future directions in public health research in the ED, with a focus on preparing residents, fellows, and junior faculty with a “roadmap” to build a career in this area. This will include discussion of training and networking opportunities, existing research networks, and offline mentoring advice. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Identify federal funding sources that support public health-relevant research in the ED, 2) Identify foundations and state and local public health agencies that may support public health research, 3) Categorize public health research projects funded since the 2009 Consensus Conference, 4) Analyze recent progress, trends and future possibilities for ED research to improve the health of the public. Steven Bernstein, MD – submitter and presenter Yale University, New Haven, CT Rebecca Cunningham, MD - presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Gail D’Onofrio, MD, MS - presenter Yale University, New Haven, CT

Where is the Evidence II: Evidence-Based Approach to Pediatric Abdominal Complaints

DS130 • Chicago 10 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 9:30:00 AM - 11:00:00 AM

Abdominal pain is among the most commonly encountered complaints in emergency medicine, accounting for thousands of ED visits per year. Although a frequently evaluated condition that can be indicative of pathologies with significant morbidity and mortality, the majority of children with abdominal pain do not have severe disease. Therefore, emergency physicians often have great anxiety regarding evaluation these patients, and difficulty remains in identifying appropriate children for diagnostic work-ups. In many cases, these challenges result in excess diagnostic testing, radiation exposure, and unnecessary hospitalization or interfaculty transfers for these children. For this didactic session, the diagnostic approach to three common abdominal emergencies: 1) intussusception, 2) acute appendicitis, and 3) blunt abdominal trauma, will be discussed. Recent investigations have focused on the approach to each of these conditions, specifically with respect to physical examination, serum testing, and appropriate radiologic imaging. Influential studies on each of these conditions have recently been completed, including multi-center investigations through the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Collaborative Research Committee (PEM CRC) and PECARN. Using these recent studies, the presenters will synthesize the evidence and recommend evidenced-based best practices that emergency physicians can readily implement into their everyday practice. Following the formal didactic presentation, audience participation, queries, and discussion, will be welcomed. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Apply state-of-the-art PEM research to diagnosis and evaluation of abdominal emergencies, and 2) Use current research to form sound evidence-based approaches to commonly encountered abdominal emergencies that can readily be incorporated into practice. Rakesh Mistry, MD – submitter and presenter Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia/University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Anupam Kharbanda, MD, MS - presenter University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Nathan Kuppermann, MD - presenter University of California-Davis, Davis, CA

Funding Your Research

DS167 • Chicago 9 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 10:00:00 AM - 11:00:00 AM

Emergency medicine physicians often consider pursuing funding to support their investigative efforts. This session is designed to describe the types of grants and the funding mechanisms available to support research. The session will begin with an introductory lecture followed by a panel discussion with individuals who have successfully secured funding to support emergency medicine research. Different types of grants appropriate for investigators at all stages of their career, from novice researcher to seasoned investigator will be discussed.

A stepwise approach to funding in support of a logical progression of scientific investigation will be presented. An overview of grant funding sources, including federal and foundation grants will be discussed, as well as opportunities for industry sponsored research. The introductory lecture session will be followed by a panel discussion led by individuals who have received funding to support research from a variety of sources, including federal grants, foundation grants, and industry. The panelists will discuss the (1) typical application process for each type of funding; (2) advantages and disadvantages of each funding category; and (3) tips for application success. Session attendees will subsequently have the opportunity to ask questions of the speaker and panelists. Objectives: At the completion of this session, the participant should be able to: 1) Describe the available funding types and mechanisms, 2) Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of the various funding types, 3) Diagram and utilize the application process for grant funding to various funding sources. Jody Vogel, MD - submitter Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO Deborah B. Diercks, MD, MSc - presenter University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA Craig D. Newgard, MD - presenter Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine, Portland, OR Karin Rhodes, MD, MS - presenter University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA

Death Warmed Over:Bringing Clinical Reasoning and DecisionMaking Sciences to Morbidity and Mortality Conference

DS140 • Sheraton 4 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 10:00 am - 11:30 am

Morbidity and mortality conference (M&M) is a common forum for discussing clinical cases with undesirable events or outcomes for the purpose of improving medical practice. EM residents frequently are responsible for leading M&M conferences but often receive little training on how to facilitate sessions that are educationally effective and engage the audience. EM faculty who supervise M&M discussions often have little formal training as well. Central to the purpose of the M&M conference is deciphering why a medical error occurred and what measures can be taken to prevent reoccurrence. Case analysis too often focuses on blame rather than identifying cognitive errors or faulty systems that could easily happen again. It is paramount that presenters of M&M cases be trained to analyze and critique clinical reasoning and involve the audience as active learners in the process. This session will be particularly useful for EM residents and those who mentor them, faculty involved in quality assurance and safety programs, and faculty who coordinate M&M conferences. The presenters will demonstrate how cognitive theory can be used to analyze diagnostic errors in the Emergency Department. Cognitive biases that are often at the root of the “bad outcome” will be presented along with common ED systems issues that are often contributing factors. Finally, the presenters will discuss cognitive forcing strategies and other tools that can be used to promote safe and effective decision-making in the ED. Objectives: At the end of the session the participant should be able to: 1) Describe cognitive factors that physicians use in medical decision-making and common cognitive errors present in emergency medicine. 2) Discuss ways cognitive and systems issues interact to either lead to or protect against errors in ED decision-making. 3) Apply a structured approach to analyzing clinical reasoning and error in morbidity and mortality cases. 4)  Facilitate morbidity and mortality presentations that accomplish the educational goal of promoting patient safety through active learning and audience engagement. Joshua Wallenstein, MD – submitter and presenter Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA David Gordon, MD - presenter Duke University, Durham, NC Jeremiah Schuur, MD, MHS - presenter Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

Improve your Teaching: Evidence-based Teaching Workshop using Articles that will Change your Teaching Practice

DS127 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 10:30 am- 11:30 am

Rationale: In teaching, medical educators, like in clinical practice, should use the

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evidence from the education literature and incorporate it into their teaching practice. This session will help participants translate the evidence from some landmark education articles to develop strategies to improve their teaching. The major concepts include the evidence on: 1) how to improve memory and retention 2) optimizing instructional slides through cognitive theory of multimedia media 3) diagnostic error and clinical reasoning 4) divergence between self-assessment and self-monitoring. The evidence will be briefly presented, then, in small groups the participants will plan learning or assessment exercises from their own setting. The session will be highly interactive, requiring participants to use both the evidence and apply it to their teaching, learning and assessment practices. This forum will incorporate exercises to understand the concepts and develop ways to improve each participants’ teaching skills. Intended outcomes: The participants will understand the evidence in these areas for effective teaching and assessment, take home strategies for improving their teaching using and develop a plan for how they will incorporate the evidence into their teaching practice Objectives: By the close of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Identify new thinking about traditional teaching, 2) Describe the evidence from the teaching and learning literature, 3) Apply the evidence to develop strategies to change and improve your teaching practice. Sally A. Santen, MD, PhD - submitter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Robin R. Hemphill, MD, MPH - presenter National Center for Patient Safety, VA Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI Susan E. Farrell, MD EdM - presenter Harvard School of Medicine, Cambridge, MA Michelle Lin, MD - presenter University of California (San Francisco)/San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, CA

The Next Match What Academic Departments Want to See When They Hire

DS196 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Matching the talents of EM residents and faculty applicants with the needs of academic departments results in greater productivity and professional gratification for both groups. Combining the experiences of long time program directors and chairs, the moderator and panelists will discuss real and perceived needs of academic departments, trends in hiring, desired cover letter and CV features, and how the right individuals are found to fulfill the marketed (and actual)positions. Continually evolving departments will benefit from techniques used in selection, interviewing and landing new faculty, while residents will glean insight into the next world of academics they hope to inhabit in a contributing, sustainable way. Objectives: By the close of this session, participants should be able to: 1)  Describe major factors considered in interviewing faculty applicants including desired features of cover letters and CVs. 2) Discuss long-term and recent trends in hiring. 3) Evaluate the actual selection process of the persons comprising academic departments today and in the future. Andra L. Blomkalns, MD – submitter and presenter University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH William J. Frohna, MD - presenter Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC Robert S. Hockberger, MD - presenter Los Angeles County-Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA

Dissemination and Translation of Research Results for Lay Audiences and Policy Makers DS191 Chicago 6 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Research, no matter how well designed and executed, has little impact if the results cannot be easily translated and widely disseminated for patients, providers, and policy makers. Emergency care is likely to be both blessed and cursed by the fact that it is among the health care settings that is often most in the public eye: while myths and anecdotes create barriers to effective dissemination of emergency-care science, the same factors create an opportunity for researchers to explain scientific results. The federal government has made substantial investments in the domain of dissemination and translation of health care evidence—particularly for comparative effectiveness research. The overall objective of this didactic is to introduce methods which will provide

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didactic participants and SAEM membership at large with the ability to “explain the science” to a diverse groups of stakeholders using novel and effective translational methods. Areas of focus will be 1) writing for lay audiences from an evidence based perspective, 2) providing testimonials and scientifically focused messages to policy makers, 3) using narratives to make results “sticky” with real-life human impact, 4) crafting press releases and more modern means of disseminating research results including social media and blogging. Panelists will each describe their approach to communicating, translating, and disseminating research results, practice guidelines and/or evidence-based principles to key stakeholders in all areas of health care including hospital and medical school leadership, local and national policy makers, the press, and the public at large. Objectives: At the completion of the session, participants should have an improved understanding of the landscape, including gaps and opportunities, for the dissemination and translation of research results: 1. Identify ten common mistakes researchers make when communicating to lay persons (e.g. using jargonized terms such as relative risk without context or explanation, conflating statistical significance with clinical significance, failing to explain the difference between effectiveness and efficacy, etc.) 2. Illustrate novel and effective approaches to engaging non-academic audiences about the investigational aspects of emergency care (including best practices for engaging the press, use of social media, and using narratives to translate nuanced research and statistical concepts). 3. Acquire techniques to overcome the linguistic and cultural barriers that exist between scientific inquiry and the public interest and attention. Zachary F. Meisel, MD, MPH – submitter and presenter University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Holly Auer, MBE - presenter University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Phil B. Fontanarosa, MD - presenter Northwestern University, Chicago, IL David H. Newman, MD - presenter Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY Patti Wolter - presenter Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL

Research Fellowships: Picking the Right One

DS113 • Sheraton 4 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

The program will begin by describing the essential components of a research fellowship in detail including mentorship (within and outside of emergency medicine), research skills training, a terminal research degree, an institutional training track record, and grant writing education and support, and a perspective from the NIH about their expectations for research training. This portion of the program is designed for residents and junior faculty who are exploring fellowships and for more established faculty who may be considering establishing a formal fellowship program. It will then discuss, “Why should I do a research fellowship?” and describe the many granting mechanisms that support fellows and junior faculty available through the NIH (T32, F32, K12, IRTG, K08, etc) and foundations (RWJ, AHA, etc.) Following the overview of the essential components of a research fellowship, a number of historic pathways will be highlighted using case examples. These will include entering into an established research training program not housed within emergency medicine, entering an existing fellowship within emergency medicine, and developing a research fellowship that builds upon components within and outside of emergency medicine. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to: 1) Identify the existing funding mechanisms for research training in emergency medicine, 2) Identify the essential components of a research fellowship in emergency medicine, and 3) Understand the many pathways to achieve research training in emergency medicine. Brendan G. Carr, MD, MS – submitter and presenter University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Judd E. Hollander, MD - presenter University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Renee Y. Hsia, MD - presenter University of California (San Francisco)/San Francisco General Hospital, San


Francisco, CA Jeffrey A. Kline, MD - presenter Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC Jane Scott, ScD, MSN - presenter National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health,

and faculty at home institutions. Javier A. Gonzalez del Rey, MD, MEd – submitter and presenter Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati, OH Richard M. Ruddy, MD - presenter University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH

Washington, DC

Simulation and your Certification, what the Future Brings

Conflict Prevention & Resolution 101 Developing Skills for Trainees and Faculty

DS181 • Chicago 8 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

DS103 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Conflict is a source of challenge in the medical workplace - requiring professionalism and good listening skills. Working towards highly skilled trainees requires active engagement and the use of tools to help understand high-risk situations, to prevent escalation and when it occurs safely and politically to find solutions that lead to adequate resolution of the problem. Our current educational process has limited training in this area, leaving trainees and faculty in uncomfortable positions when exposed to these situations. This workshop is intended to give the participants the skill set to both learn some techniques in conflict prevention / resolution as well as some of the tools to facilitate and teach these skills in their home departments. Using case based learning with role playing and active audience participation, attendees will be introduced to communication techniques such as “PEACE” and “LEAPS”, as well as other tools used in the management of situations which are polarities. Audience will also be able to use these learning and teaching techniques to develop their conflict resolution curriculum for their own institutions. Objectives: By the close of this session, participants should be able to: 1)  Understand different types of conflict commonly encountered in your professional life, 2) Formulate specific techniques to prevent, reduce and resolve conflict, 3) Create case based scenarios that can be used for the education of trainees

Generation X to Z and Emergency Medicine Research: Using Computer-based Technology for Recruitment, Consent, Intervention and Follow-Up

Residency Program Director The University of Kentucky Department of Emergency Medicine is seeking to interview exceptional candidates for the position of Residency Program Director. Ideal applicants will have demonstrated successful leadership roles in academic emergency medicine. The University of Kentucky College of Medicine established the Department of Emergency Medicine in 1982. The UK Department of Emergency Medicine continues to benefit from outstanding institutional support including the recent completion of a new 40,000 square foot Emergency Department in the summer of 2010. Competitive salary and benefits are offered with this position. Please send CV to: Roger L. Humphries, MD Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine UK College of Medicine, room M-53 Williard Medical Sciences Building 800 Rose Street Lexington, KY 40536-0298 rlhump0@uky.edu

The University of Kentucky is an equal opportunity employer and encourages applications from minorities and women.

UK 1-6 3.5x4.75 SAEM.indd 1

The American Board of Medical Specialties approved a Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program to “ensure that the highest standards of patient care are established and maintained and that certified physicians are being assessed by reliable and valid measures to continually improve patient care.” This session will present an approach to MOC utilizing the unique properties of a simulationbased education program in which simulated patient care scenarios provide practitioners the opportunity to refresh currently existing skills while adding newer techniques to their professional toolbox. Other specialty boards are currently piloting such efforts. It is the vision of experts in emergency medicine (EM) simulation that the requisite expertise and infrastructure exists within EM departments and could be mobilized to provide expert simulation-based programs for physicians seeking experiential learning-based MOC. This didactic session will (1) update attendees on advances in simulation-based training and assessment at the level of the practicing physician, (2) describe a network structure that could implement simulation as a mechanism for maintenance of certification, (3) provide a sample curriculum for an MOC simulation session, and (4) discuss potential barriers and challenges to advancing CME-based simulation in a more structured manner. Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to 1) Identify current barriers and opportunities inherent in the current MOC processes, 2) Evaluate how present emergency medicine-based simulation activities can be leveraged for future MOC, 3) Identify potential challenges and barriers to developing and implementing a simulation-based MOC program, and 4) Propose possible solutions to the challenges and barriers discussed. John A. Vozenilek, MD – submitter and presenter Northwestern University, Chicago, IL Rosemarie Fernandez, MD - presenter University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA James A. Gordon, MD, MPA - presenter Harvard University, Boston, MA

1/6/12 10:34 AM

DS141 • Sheraton 4 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 1:30 pm- 3:00 pm

Continually incorporating technology into emergency medicine research is an essential process. Newer technologies are increasingly part of the infrastructure of medicine, and our patient population is increasingly familiar with receiving information and communicating through technology-based modalities. Further, technology provides potential solutions to perennial barriers to ED research, such as time constraints, accessing difficult-to-reach populations, systematically identifying potentially eligible patients for research, conducting outcome assessment and obtaining follow-up after an index visit or enrollment. The objective of this didactic is to discuss selected technologies (interactive computer programs, text messaging, social media) and how their use can improve the efficiency, efficacy and fidelity with which researchers are able to perform core research functions. We will address approaches to major concerns over using technologies for EM research, including ethical, privacy, and safety issues. Objectives: At the completion of the session, participants should have an improved understanding of using selected technologies for research, specifically: 1) Applications of selected technologies for subject recruitment, education, consent, interventions and follow-up assessments; 2) Analyzing the technical expertise, infrastructure, and costs involved in using selected technologies for EM research; 3) Evaluating privacy/confidentiality issues that arise when using technologies to gather and store subject information.

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Esther Choo, MD, MPH –submitter Rhode Island Hospital/Brown University, Providence, RI Edward Boyer, MD, PhD - presenter University of Massachussetts, Worcester, MA Rebecca Cunningham, MD - presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Raina Merchant, MS, MD - presenter University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Megan L. Ranney, MD, MPH – moderator Rhode Island Hospital/Brown University, Providence, RI Karin Rhodes, MD, MS - presenter University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA

Using Formal Reflective Exercises to Improve Medical Education

DS124 • Sheraton 5 Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Reflection is a metacognitive process that creates greater understanding of self and situations to inform future actions. When done correctly, reflection leads to growth of individuals – morally, personally, psychologically, emotionally, and cognitively. Ultimately, appropriate reflection may lead to improvement in patient care. There is an inherent desire to reflect upon work experiences. We reach out to colleagues to discuss cases, we vent frustration with loved ones, and we refer ourselves to morbidity and mortality for peer review. Our desire to reflect can lead to inappropriate actions as well such as Facebook postings and Tweets about our feelings related to patient care. Educators should formalize the reflection process and provide guidance to learners at all levels as they progress through training. Teaching learners to reflect in an appropriate manner will help them develop professionally during training and to continuously grow over a long career. This session will define reflection and explain the role of reflection in modern learning theories. The session will also discuss how reflection can help achieve LCME and ACGME competencies. Concrete examples on how to formalize the reflective process during medical student and resident training will be demonstrated. The session will inform educators of best practices regarding guiding learners through formalized reflective exercises. Objectives: At the completion of this session, should be able to: 1) Define reflection, 2) Integrate reflection into personal and professional development, 3) List and show how to implement ACGME competencies that can be taught through reflection, 4) List formats and modalities that can be used for structured reflection, 5) Evaluate the problems and pitfalls with unstructured or informal reflection. Aaron Bernard, MD - submitter The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH Esther H. Chen, MD - presenter University of California (San Francisco)/San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, CA Sorabh Khandelwal, MD - presenter The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

Violence against Emergency Department Workers

DS138 • Erie Room Session Time: Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Violence directed against emergency department workers affects everyone involved in emergency care. This often-hostile environment can be a difficult place to deliver appropriate clinical care. The many prongs of violence can affect overall emergency department operations at several levels from personnel morale to regulation at a state and federal level. This session will be a moderated panel discussion discussing issues pertaining to violence against health workers in the emergency department. Both of the speakers are funded NIH and CDC researchers on the subject with multiple publications in the field. They will discuss the current state of violence against healthcare workers, regulatory issues, potential prevention measures, state laws, and ongoing research pertaining to violence prevention. Objectives: By the close of this session, participants will be able to: 1) Describe the extent of the problem of violence in the emergency department. 2) Analyze the reasons why emergency department staff are at risk and discuss ways to prevent violence. 3) Identify ongoing research and areas of future research opportunities.

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Terri Kowalenko, MD – submitter and presenter University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Thomas Balga, PA-C – presenter, ACEP State Legislature/Regulatory Committee, North Haven, CT Donna Gates, RN, EdD College of Nursing at University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH


Mid-Level Tenure Track Faculty Position Clinical and Translational Research Cardiovascular Medicine The Department of Emergency Medicine and the Department of Clinical and Translational Science (DCaTS) at Wayne State University are seeking applicants for a mid-level tenure track faculty position in clinical and translational research. Individuals with a track record of established, federally funded research that is translational in nature and focused on cardiovascular medicine (hypertension, acute coronary syndrome, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, and cerebrovascular disease), resuscitation, or cardiac arrest are encouraged to apply. Applicants with a solid history of implementation and dissemination of clinical trial protocols, particularly those with a bench to bedside component will be given highest priority. The emphasis of DCaTS is to apply discoveries generated through research in the laboratory and in preclinical studies to the development of trials and studies in humans. DCaTs will be housed in the new integrative Biomedical Research Building that is designed to encourage the development of novel methods and approaches to clinical and translational research, enhance informatics and technology resources, and improve training and mentoring. DCaTS provides a highly interactive environment with multiple opportunities for multidisciplinary basic and translational research. Anticipated rank for the selected applicant will be at the Associate Professor level with a joint appointment in the Department of Emergency Medicine and DCaTS. Compensation and benefits are highly competitive. Protected time and research support are commensurate with such projections. Interested applicants should electronically submit a letter of interest, along with a curriculum vitae and brief statement regarding their research interests, as a single PDF, to: Phillip D. Levy, MD, MPH Associate Director of Clinical Research Wayne State University School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine 4201 St. Antoine, UHC-6G, Detroit, MI 48201; plevy@med.wayne.edu Wayne State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

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www.cardeneiv.com

Š2011 EKR Therapeutics, Inc. Bedminster, NJ 07921

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02/11 All rights reserved.


SATELLITE SYMPOSIUM AT THE 2012 SAEM ANNUAL MEETING

Maximizing ED Settings’ Potential to Test and Link HIV-Positive Patients to Care Friday, May 11, 2012 • 5:30 pM - 7:30 pM Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers • Chicago Ballroom 7

fACULTY Yvette Calderon, MD, MS Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY

Christopher M. Gordon, PhD National Institute of Mental Health Rockville, MD

Richard Rothman, MD, PhD Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD

This satellite symposium is co-sponsored by the International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care (IAPAC), in parternship with the National ED HIV Testing Consortium, and is made possible through an educational grant from OraSure Technologies.

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May 10, 2012 8:00am - 12:00pm 8:00am

Executive Committee Meeting

10:00am

Series of presentations and a panel discussion of topics that include Emergency Medicine hot topics: * Planning for an Urgent Care Center Jill Zaheer * Emergency Department Design Jim Scheulen * New 2013 flow metrics Linda Davis-Moon * Benchmarks Jim Scheulen * EMRs Ken Marx * Use of Simulation Richard McAdam

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SIMULATION

ACADEMY

OF THE SOCIETY FOR ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE

Your Simulation Academy is comprised of emergency medicine physicians who are committed to enhancing education, research, and patient safety through the use of simulation. You will recognize our members as they bring you some of the most exciting developments in experiential education and translational research.

SOME HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE:

SimWars

is an EMRA-sponsored educational program and an inter-disciplinary simulation competition between healthcare providers. SimWars has been held at national meetings including the International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare, American College of Emergency Medicine Scientific Assembly, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Annual Meeting.

Training with Simulation, Simulate One, Do One, Teach One, and Simulation: Simply Sublime, the Lightning

Oral abstract sessions, are being held on Thursday, May 10th from 2:00 - 3:00 pm and on May 12th from 12:00 to 1:00 and from 2:00 to 3:00 pm

IEME Spotlight Session - Simulation May 10th from 3:00 to 4:00pm

Didactic Presentations,

Engineering Innovation: Forming Collaborations

to Bring Operations, Design, and Engineering Into Your Department will will feature presenters who work in several of technical fields who will share their experiences, May 9 from, 3:00pm to 4:00pm

Simulation and your Certification, what the Future Brings,

will present a conceptual model for the future use of simulation for maintenance of certification, May 12 from 1-2 pm

Perfecting Procedural Skills:

Applications of Learning Theory for Educators, a standardized four-step method of teaching procedural skills will be demonstrated for a procedural skill essential to the practice of emergency medicine May 12 from 8-9:30 am

search “SIMULATION� in your online guide for more!

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The Global Emergency Medicine Academy invites you to share in an international experience during the 2012 Annual Meeting - Chicago!

Saturday, May 12, 2012

All SAEM members are encouraged to join GEMA and to participate in the Academy’s events during the Annual Meeting. Global Emergency Medicine Academy is a discipline focused on the improvement of emergency care in other parts of the world through clinical care, research and educational programs. It is one of the fastest growing subspecialties of Emergency Medicine as evidenced by the ever increasing number of Emergency Medicine faculty, trainees, and medical students pursuing international opportunities. 8:00am - 10:00am

EuSEM - GEMA Abstract Collaboration Superior Rooms A&B - Level 2

10:00am - 11:00am

Global Emergency Medicine Lightning Abstracts Erie Room - Level 2

10:45am - 12:15pm

GEMA Business Meeting Superior Rooms A&B - Level 2

12:15pm - 12:45pm

Refreshments/Meet & Greet Networking Superior Rooms A&B - Level 2

12:45pm - 1:45pm

Global Emergency Medicine Fellowship Showcase Superior Rooms A&B - Level 2

1:45pm - 2:00pm

BREAK

2:00pm - 3:00pm

Global Emergency Medicine Research Panel

Attention Residents: REMEMBER....you are able to join GEMA for free. Login to your profile and join today! www.saem.org

Additional International Sessions Wednesday, May 9, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm

Training the Trainers Who Train Chicago 8 - Level 4

Friday, May 11, 2012 1:00pm - 2:30pm

Building Academic Careers in Global Emergency Medicine Chicago 8 - Level 4

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Redmond Medic One increased their hands-on time by almost

25% with the help of the Physio-Control System of Care.

Learn more at www.physio-control.com/systemofcare Š2012 Physio-Control, Inc.

Š2012. Paid for by the United States Army. All rights reserved. Information subject to change.

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AWAEM at SAEM

What’s in store for you!

Discovery is said to be an accident meeting a prepared mind..... Research is to see what everybody else has seen, and to think what nobody else has thought. - Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

Dear AWAEM colleagues & all interested SAEM members: We have planned some fantastic sessions at SAEM this year.  We will be tackling some of the important issues that face women in academic emergency medicine.  We hope you will join us – we need your perspective, your wisdom, and your voice to build our strong community. See you in Chicago! Stephanie Abbuhl MD, AWAEM President 2011-12 May 10, 2012 - SAEM Didactic Sessions 9:00-10:00 am - Floodlighting the Hidden Threat of Unconscious Bias (moderated by J. Wolfe) Discuss with expert panel Sandra Schneider, Brian Zink, Leon Haley: • Effective strategies that address unconscious bias • Use of those strategies to promote hiring, mentorship and promotion practices that are free of gender biases

10:00-11:00 am - 2012 Updates in Gender-Specific Emergency Care - A Pecha Kucha Style Presentation (A. McGregor; E. Choo, B. Safdar, M. Greenberg, S. Poznanski, R. Vrees)  • Learn how to acknowledge the emerging science of sex differences in acute clinical care and translate this new data into lifesaving outcomes.   • This presentation will sprint through 8 organ systems using "PechaKucha", the fascinating lecture style from Tokoyo that has become a world-wide phenomenon for its ability to maintain listener engagement. Bring your seatbelt!

May 11, 2012 - Academy Block 8:00-8:30 am - AWAEM Business Meeting (S. Abbuhl, G. Kuhn) • Learn about AWAEM’s activities and how to get involved 8:30-9:00 am - The Status of EM Gender Research (A. McGregor, E. Choo, B. Safdar, M. Greenberg) • Gain insight into current and future strategies on the inclusion of Sexand Gender- Specific Medicine into EM Research

9:00-10:00 am - Career Development Tailored for Women - Programs for Success ( J. Welch, S. Abbuhl) • Learn how career development programs can help you build a community of peer mentors and succeed in all spheres of your life • Learn about great programs that exist to help you build the skills needed to flourish

May 11, 2012 - 3rd Annual Networking Lunch Proven to be an extremely popular event, our primary goal is for women in academics to meet and discuss items of mutual interest that we feel merit the comments and opinions of all of you...our members! 12:30-2:00 pm - Lunch Events • Networking with members from around the country • Recognition of Academy Award Winners • Facilitated Table Discussions - This year’s list of important topics will be facilitated by a fabulous panel... • Gender Bias (J. Wolfe, A. McGregor) Problems, experiences, and solutions • Gender Research (M. Greenberg, B. Safdar) Gaps, topics needing research, impact of lack of research • Negotiating (K. Clem, G. D’Onofrio) Handling rejection, negotiation for protected time, a new position, or scheduling requests • Leadership (R. Vrees) Tricks of the trade to enhance leadership skills in any situation

These topics deliberately mirror our didactic topics to give members an opportunity to discuss what our speakers have taught and give us a chance to determine how to use what we have learned in our careers and lives. The results of these discussions are then printed in our bimonthly AWAEM eNewsletter so that all members can share in the wisdom and recommendations made during this invaluable gathering.

10:00-11:00 am - XX, XY and the Art of Asking What, when and how to negotiate (moderated by J. Wolfe) • A short review of the literature on gender differences in negotiation followed by a panel discussion of EM experts. • Chairs Kathleeen Clem, Kate Heilpern & Brent King will share their proven secrets to make you more confident and successful at the bargaining table.

11:00 am-12:00 pm - Poster Session/Networking (moderated by A. McGregor & select AWAEM members) • Mix and mingle with women in academic emergency medicine • Learn what others are doing to promote their careers, research and keys to personal fulfillment.

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What  makes  Elite   Elite  Medical  Scribes   the  premier   premier  scribe  company?   We  asked  our  clients  why  they  prefer  working  with  Elite  Medical  Scribes.    These  are   the  reasons  why  they  con>nue  to  choose  Elite  over  all  other  scribe  companies:   1.  HIGHEST  QUALITY  SCRIBE  SERVICES   •  Four-­‐&er  training  system   •  Comprehensive  Quality  Assurance   •  Mixed  learning  modali&es   •  Industry-­‐leading  innova&ons   2.  GREATEST  RETURN  ON  INVESTMENT   •  No  start-­‐up  costs   •  Improved  pa&ent  throughput   •  Increased  physician  efficiency   •  Op&mized  chart  reimbursement   3.  BEST  CUSTOMER  SERVICE   •  24/7,  responsive  personnel   •  Leading  consumer-­‐sa&sfac&on   •  Physician  contact  for  providers  

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Enhance the Quality of Patient Care

Centered in Care. Powered by PRIDE. Academic Emergency Medicine Opportunities with Tarrant County’s Only Level I Trauma Center

Director of Emergency Medicine Ultrasound

Academic Staff EM Physician – Two positions available

Qualifications: • Emergency Medicine Ultrasound Fellowship Trained • Board Certified/Eligible in Emergency Medicine • Board Certified/Eligible in Emergency Ultrasonography • Minimum 2+ years experience as EM US Director or Associate in an academic setting Primary Duties: • Participate as EM Core Faculty in accordance with RRC-EM guidelines • Establish and maintain EM Resident US curriculum • Develop a US Fellowship Program • Audit EM Faculty US Quality Assurance

Qualifications: • EM Residency Trained • EM Board Certified/Eligible • Experience in an Academic Setting Primary Duties: • Clinical Teaching at the Bedside • Participation in Weekly Resident Conferences • Participation in Resident Evaluations

For more information contact: Tina Wells, Physician Recruiter at (817) 702-8696 or E-mail bsnarr@jpshealth.org.

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advancing my career. Nesreen Kaufman, MD, Medical Director, with her husband

“Starting with a lower volume ED gave me the opportunity to excel without being overwhelmed. TeamHealth recognizes and develops individual potential. Within six months, I was promoted to medical director and took advantage of the leadership development resources and classes they offer.�

888.861.4093 www.MYEMCAREER.com physicianjobs@teamhealth.com

Visit us in booth #10 at the SAEM Annual Meeting in Chicago!

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Are you ready to own your practice? As the largest truly democratic emergency physicians’ partnership in the U.S., CEP America not only believes in the principles of shared ownership, financial transparency, and mutual respect for our Partners—we put these beliefs into practice every day. At CEP America, you are an owner and work for yourself on Day 1 —not for a corporate owner or Wall Street. If you’re ready to own your practice, visit info.cep.com/Ownership or call 800-842-2619.

AVA I L A B L E O P P O R T U N I T I E S

EMA PHYSICIANS ENJOY

Explore opportunities with one of the country’s most respected, democratic emergency medicine groups.

3 A Culture Committed to Life-Work Balance 3 Superior Compensation & Comprehensive Benefits 3 An Equal Voice in Everything We Do 3 An Equal Share in Everything We Own

New York

New Jersey

North Carolina

Rhode Island

E N T E R T O W I N AT 2 0 1 2 S A E M A N N U A L M E E T I N G Please visit Booth #23 in Chicago at the SAEM Annual Meeting to enter our drawing to win a pair of Bose Noise Cancelling Headphones. Contact Us Today Follow us:

www.EMA.net jobs@ema.net (877) 692-4665 ext. 1048 51


Revolutionizing Ultrasound Training Visit us at the SonoSim booth for a hands-on training demonstration

sonosim.com info@sonosim.com • 3030 Nebraska Ave, Suite 301B Santa Monica, CA 90404 • (310) 315-2828

Q

starting Emergency medicine careers out on the right foot

Questcare Partners is a physician-owned and -operated Emergency Medicine organization. We are a truly democratic group with an entrepreneurial vision and dedication to career growth and development. Questcare delivers state-of-the-art emergency care in nineteen ultramodern facilities located throughout Dallas/Fort Worth, El Paso, and San Antonio.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

SHARON HIRST - 214.431.3952 SHIRST@QUESTCARE.COM

Visit us in the SAEM Exhibit Hall 52

Ownership Opportunity Democratic Group Process Leadership Development Program LLSA education Journal Club Committee involvement Documentation and Efficiency Academy Mentoring and development Strong Financial Security


SAEM Residency & Fellowship Fair - Friday, May 11, 2012 - 4:30-6:30pm Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers, River Exhibition Hall A • A dvocate Christ Medical Center Residency Program

• Johns Hopkins University Residency Program

• Summa Akron City Hospital Fellowship Program

• University of Massachusetts Medical School Fellowship Program

• Akron General Medical Center Residency Program

• Lehigh Valley Health Network Residency Program

• Summa Akron City Hospital Residency Program

• University of Massachusetts Medical School Residency Program

• Baylor College of Medicine Residency Program

• Loma Linda University Medical Center Residency & Fellowship Programs

• SUNY/Downstate/Kings County Hospital Residency & Fellowship Programs

• University of Michigan Fellowship Program

• Los Angeles County & USC Medical Center Fellowship Program

• Texas A&M/Scott and White Healthcare Residency Program

• Los Angeles County & USC Medical Center Residency Program

• Texas Tech University HSC Residency Program

• Louisiana State University, New Orleans Residency Program

• The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Residency Program

• Baystate Medical Center Residency Program • Beaumont Health System Residency Program • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Affiliated Residency Program

• University of Michigan/St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Residency Program • University of Nebraska Medical Center Residency & Fellowship Programs • University of Nevada Residency Program • University of North Carolina Residency Program

• Beth Israel Medical Center Residency Program

• Maimonides Medical Center Residency & Fellowship Programs

• Brown University Residency Program

• Maine Medical Center Residency Program

• Christiana Care Health System Fellowship Program

• Massachusetts General Hospital Fellowship Program

• Christiana Care Health System Residency Program

• Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education Residency Program

• UCSF Fellowship Program • UCSF-SFGH Residency Program

• University of Puerto Rico Residency Program

• Christus Spohn Residency Program

• Medical College of Wisconsin Residency Program

• University of Alabama at Birmingham Residency Program

• University of Rochester Residency & Fellowship Programs

• New York Hospital Queens Residency & Fellowship Program

• University of Arizona College of Medicine at South Campus Residency Program

• University of South Florida Residency & Fellowship Programs

• Cooper Medical School of Rowan University/Cooper University Hospital Residency Program • Denver Health Residency Program • Duke Residency & Fellowship Programs • Emory University Residency & Fellowship Programs • Geisinger Health System Residency & Fellowship Programs • Georgetown University Hospital/ Washington Hosp. Center Residency Program • Hennepin County Medical Center Residency Program • Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit Fellowship Program • Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit Residency Program • Indiana University Fellowship Program • Indiana University Residency Program • Iowa Residency Program • Jacobi/Einstein/Montefiore Residency Program • Johns Hopkins University Fellowship Program

• North Shore LIJ Health System Residency & Fellowship Programs

• The University of Arizona Residency Program • The Wexner Medical Center at the Ohio State University Residency & Fellowship Programs

• University of Califorina, Davis Residency & Fellowship Programs

• University of Ottawa Fellowship Program • University of Pittsburgh Residency Program

• University of Texas, Houston Residency Program

• University of California, Irvine Residency Program

• University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas Residency Program

• Orlando Regional Medical Center Residency & Fellowship Programs

• University of California, Irvine Fellowship Program

• University of Utah Residency Program

• OSHU Fellowship & Residency Programs

• University of Chicago Residency Program

• University of Virginia Residency & Fellowship Programs

• Penn State University/Milton S. Hershey Medical Center Residency Program

• University of Cincinnati Fellowship Program

• University of Wisconsin Residency & Fellowship Programs

• University of Cincinnati Residency Program

• UMDNJ – RWJMS Fellowship Program

• University of Connecticut Residency Program

• UMDNJ – RWJMS Residency Program

• University of Florida, College of Medicine, Jacksonville Residency Program

• VCU Medical Center Residency & Fellowship Programs

• Northwestern McGaw Center for Graduate Medical Educators Residency Program

• Regions Hospital Fellowship Program • Regions Hospital Residency Program • Resurrection Medical Center Residency & Fellowship Programs • Saint Louis University Residency Program • St. Luke’s Hospital Residency Program • Stanford/Kaiser Residency Program • Staten Island University Hospital Residency Program

• University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria Residency Program

• Yale New Haven Medical Center Residency Program • York Hospital Residency & Fellowship Programs

• University of Kentucky Residency Program • University of Maryland Medical Residency & Fellowship Programs 53


SAEM 2012 ANNUAL MEETING abstract PRESENTATIONS May 9 – 12, Chicago, IL Listed below are the title, presenter name, and presenter institution for the 746 abstracts that have been selected for presentation at the 2012 SAEM Annual Meeting from the 1,172 abstract submissions. Please note the abstracts are listed in presentation order. These numbers do not correspond to the original abstract numbers given at time of submission.

PLENARY SESSION THURSDAY, May 10th • 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm in Sheraton 4-5

Moderators: David C. Cone, MD, Yale University School of Medicine Debra E. Houry, MD, MPH, Emory University School of Medicine 1. Policy-driven Improvements In Crowding: System-level Changes Introduced By A Provincial Health Authority and Its Impact On Emergency Department Operations In 15 Centers Grant Innes, MD, University of Calgary 2. Prevalence of Non-convulsive Seizure and Other Electroencephalographic Abnormalities In Emergency Department Patients With Altered Mental Status Shahriar Zehtabchi, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center 3. RNA Transcriptional Profiling for Diagnosis of Serious Bacterial Infections (SBIs) in Young Febrile Infants Prashant Mahajan, MD, Children’s Hospital of Michigan 4. Saving Maternal, Newborn, and Child Lives in Developing Countries: Evaluation of a Novel Training Package Among Frontline Health Workers in South Sudan Brett Nelson, MD, MPH, DTM&H, Massachusetts General Hospital 5. Whole Blood Lactate Kinetics in Patients Undergoing Quantitative Resuscitation for Septic Shock Alan Jones, MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center

WEDNESDAY, May 9th, 2012 Modern Perspectives on Wound Care - Guided Oral Presentation WEDNESDAY, May 9th • 11:30 am – 1:00 pm in Chicago 8 Moderator: Brigitte M. Baumann, MD, MSCE, Cooper Hospital/University Medical Center 6. A Comparison of Cosmetic Outcomes of Lacerations of the Trunk and Extremity Repaired Using Absorbable Versus Nonabsorbable Sutures. Cena Tejani, MD, Newark Beth Israel Hospital 7. Minimally Invasive Burn Care: A Report of Six Clinical Studies Of Rapid And Selective Debridement Using A Bromelain Based Debriding Gel Dressing Lior Rosenberg, MD, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev 8. The Golden Period of Laceration Repair Has Disappeared James Quinn, MD MS, Stanford University 9. The Effects of a Novel TGF-beta Antagonist onScarring in a Vertical Progression Porcine Burn Model Adam Singer, MD, Stony Brook University

Metabolic Acidosis and Shock Syndromes – Lightning Oral Presentation WEDNESDAY, May 9th • 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm in Chicago 8

Moderator: Kevin G. Rodgers, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine 10. A Double-Blinded Comparison of Insulin Regimens in Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Does Bolus Insulin Make a Difference Joel Kravitz, MD, FACEP, FRCPSC, Community Medical Center, Toms River 11. Calibration Of APACHE II Score To Predict Mortality In Out-of-Hospital and In-hospital Cardiac Arrest Cristal Cristia, MD, BIDMC Center for Resuscitation Science 12. Hyperlactatemia Affects the Association of Hyperglycemia with Mortality in Non-Diabetic Septic Adults Jeffrey Green, MD, UC Davis Medical Center 13. The Effect of Near Infrared Spectroscopy Monitoring on Patients Undergoing Resuscitation for Shock James Miner, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center

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14. A Laboratory Study Assessing The Influence of Flow Rate and Insulation Upon Intravenous Fluid Infusion Temperature Jonathan Studnek, PhD, Carolinas Medical Center 15. Outcomes of Patients with Vasoplegic Versus Tissue Dysoxic Septic Shock Sarah Sterling, MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center 16. Assessment of Clinical Deterioration and Progressive Organ Failure in Moderate Severity EmergencyDepartment Sepsis Patients Lindsey Glaspey, BA, Cooper University Hospital 17. Lipopolysaccharide Detection in Patientswith Septic Shock in the ED Daren Beam, MD, MS, Carolinas Medical Center 18. Evaluation of the Efficacy of an Early Goal Directed Therapy (EGDT) Protocol When Using MEDS Score for Risk Stratification Ameer Ibrahim, MD, MS, Buffalo General Hospital

The ED Rule-Out MI: Are We Getting Better? – Lightning Oral Presentation WEDNESDAY, May 9th • 1:30 pm– 3:00 pm in Chicago 7

Moderator: Andra L. Blomkalns, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine 19. Validation of Using Fingerstick Blood Sample with i-Stat POC Device for Cardiac Troponin I Assay Devin Loewenstein, Loyola University Health System 20. Central versus Local Adjudication ofMyocardial Infarction in a Biomarker Trial Stephen Smith, Hennepin County Medical Center 21. Myeloperoxidase And C-Reactive Protein In Patients with Cocaine Associated Chest Pain Katie O’Conor, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania 22. A Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator, Bay 41-8543, Preserves Right Ventricular Function In ExperimentalPulmonary Embolism John Watts, PhD, Carolinas Medical Center 23. Prospective Evaluation of a Simplified Risk Stratification Tool for Chest Pain Patientsin an Emergency Department Observation Unit Matthew Fuller, University of Utah 24. Disease Progression in Patients Without Clinically Significant Stenosis on Coronary CT Angiography Performed for Evaluation of Potential Acute Coronary Syndrome Anna Marie Chang, MD, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania 25. Triple Rule Out CT Scan for Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Chest Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. David Ayaram, MD, Mayo Clinic 26. Impact of Coronary Computer Tomographic Angiography Findings on the Medical Treatment of CAD Anna Marie Chang, MD, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania 27. Validation of a Clinical Decision Rule for ED Patients with Potential Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS) Julie Pitts, University of Pennsylvania

ED Cardiopulmonary Imaging – Lightning Oral Presentation WEDNESDAY, May 9th • 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm in Chicago 7

Moderator: Christopher Kabrhel, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital 28. Utilization of an Electronic Clinical Decision Rule Does Not Change Emergency Physicians’ Pattern of Practice in Evaluating Patients with Possible Pulmonary Embolism Salam Lehrfeld, DO, UTSouthwestern Medical Center 29. Identification of Patients with Low-Risk Pulmonary Emboli Suitable for Discharge from the Emergency Department Mike Zimmer, MD, University of Michigan


30. Validation of a Clinical Prediction Rule for Chest Radiography in Emergency Department Patients with Chest Pain and Possible Acute Coronary Syndrome Joshua Guttman, MD CM, McGill University 31. The Detection Rate of Pulmonary Embolisms by Emergency Physicians Has Increased Scott Alter, MD, Morristown Medical Center 32. D-dimer Threshold Increase With Pretest Probability Unlikely for Pulmonary Embolism To Decrease Unnecessary Computerized Tomographic Pulmonary Angiography Jeffrey Kline, MD, Carolinas Medical Center 33. A Randomized Trial of N-Acetyl Cysteine and Saline Versus Normal Saline Alone to prevent Contrast Nephropathy in Emergency Department Patients Undergoing Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography Stephen Traub, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Teaching and Training in the International Setting – Lightning Oral Presentation WEDNESDAY, May 9th • 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm in Chicago 8

Moderator: Scott Weiner, MD, Tufts Medical Center 34. Patients Transferred from an Outpatient Clinic in Rural Haiti: An Evaluation of Reason for Transfer Benjamin Nicholson, Virginia Commonwealth University 35. Competency Based Measurement of EM Learner Performance in International Training Programs James Kwan, MD, Sydney Medical School 36. US model Emergency Medicine in Japan Seung Young Huh, MD, Aizawa Hospital 37. Occupational Upper Extremity Injuries Treated at a Teaching Hospital In Turkey Erkan Gunay, MD, Tepecik Research and Training Hospital, Ismir, Turkey 38. Mixed Methods Evaluation of Emergency Physician Training Program in India Erika Schroeder, MD, MPH, George Washington University 39. An Analysis of Proposed Core Curriculum Elements for International Emergency Medicine and Global Health Fellowships Gabrielle Jacquet, MD, Johns Hopkins University

Re-thinking Triage and Boarding – Lightning Oral Presentation WEDNESDAY, May 9th • 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm in Sheraton 4

Moderator: Jesse Pines, MD, MBA, George Washington University School of Medicine 40. Predicting ICU Admission and Mortality at Triage Using an Automated Computer Algorithm Joshua Joseph, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center / Harvard Medical School 41. Replacing Traditional Triage with a Rapid Evaluation Unit Decreases Left-Without-Being-Seen Rate at a Community Emergency Department Jeffrey Green, MD, UC Davis Medical Center 42. Failure to Validate Hospital Admission Prediction Models Adding Coded Chief Complaint to Demographic, Emergency Department Operational and Patient Acuity Data Available at ED Triage Neal Handly, MD, MSc, MS, Drexel University College of Medicine 43. A Decision Tree Algorithm to Assist Pre-ordering Diagnostics on Emergency Department Patients During Triage Gerald Maddalozzo, DO, St Michael’s Medical Center 44. Reducing ED Length Of Stay For Dischargeable Patients: Advanced Triage and Now Advanced Disposition Jeff Dubin, MD, MBA, MedStar Washington Hospital Center 45. ED Boarding is Associated with Increased Risk of Developing Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers Candace McNaughton, MD, Vanderbilt University

THURSDAY, May 10th, 2012 Volume and Productivity – Lightning Oral Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 9:00 am – 10:00 am in Missouri Room

Moderator: Robert A. Lowe, MD, MPH, Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine 46. Nursing Attitudes Regarding Boarding of Admitted ED Patients Bryce Pulliam, MD, UC Davis Medical Center 47. Randomized Controlled Trial of Volume-based Staffing Brian Rowe, MD, MSc, University of Alberta 48. Provider And Hospital-Level Variation In Admission Rates and 72-Hour Return-Admission Rates Jameel Abualenain, MD, The George Washington University 49. Emergency Medicine Resident Physician Attitudes About the Introduction of a Scribe Program at an Academic EM Training Site Mia Tanaka, DO, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria 50. The Effect of Introduction of an Electronic Medical Record on Resident Productivity in an Academic Emergency Department Christopher Sala, MD, University of Connecticut School of Medicine

Talk is Cheap: Communication, Errors, and Clinical Ops – Oral Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 9:00 am – 11:00 am in Michigan B

Moderator: Jeremiah Schuur, MD, MHS, Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School 51. Physician Feedback Reduces Resource Use in the Emergency Department Shabnam Jain, MD, Emory University 52. Publicly Posted Emergency Department Wait Times: How Accurate Are They? Erin Simon, DO, Akron General Medical Center 53. Reduction of Pre-analytic Laboratory Errors in the Emergency Department Using an Incentive Based System Benjamin Katz, MD, Albany Medical Center 54. Comparison of Emergency Department OperationMetrics by Annual Volume Over 7 Years Daniel Handel, MD, MPH, Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine 55. Does the Addition of a Hands Free Communication Device Improve ED Interruption times? Amy Ernst, MD, University of New Mexico 56. “Talk-time” In The Emergency Department: The Duration of Patientprovider Interactions During An ED Visit Danielle McCarthy, MD, Northwestern University 57. Degradation of Emergency Department Operational Data Quality During Electronic Health Record Implementation Michael Ward, MD, University of Cincinnati 58. Factors Associated With Excessive Emergency Department Length Of Stay For Treated & Released Patients in an Urban Academic Medical Center Jeremy Sperling, MD, Weill Cornell Medical College / NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

From Sedation to Intubation: A Sampling of Airway Interventions – Lightning Oral Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 10:00 am – 11:00 am in Missouri Room

Moderator: TBD 59. Ketamine-Propofol Combination (Ketofol) versus Propofol Alone for Emergency Department Procedural Sedation and Analgesia: A Prospective Randomized Trial Ali S. Raja, MD, MPH, Brigham & Womens Hospital/Harvard Medical School 60. The Effect of CMS Guideline on Deep Sedation with Propofo Lindsay Harmon, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine 61. The Use of End Tidal CO2 Monitoring in Patients Undergoing Observation for Sedative Overdose in the Emergency Department James Miner, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center

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62. How Reliable Are Healthcare Providers in Reporting Changes in ETCO2 Waveform Anas Sawas, MPH, MS, University of Utah 63. Effectiveness and Safety in Rapid Sequence Intubation Versus Non-Rapid Sequence intubation In Emergency Department: Multi-center Prospective Observational Study In Japan Masashi Okubo, MD, Okinawa Chubu Hospital 64. How Can Technology Help Us Further Interpret ETCO2 Changes? Anas Sawas, MPH, MS, University of Utah

Mitigating Violence – Moderated Poster Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 10:00 am – 11:00 am in Colorado Room

Moderator: Megan Ranney, MD, MPH, Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital 65. One-Year Peer Violence Outcomes Following a Brief Motivational Interviewing Intervention for Violence and Alcohol among Teens Rebecca Cunningham, MD, University of Michigan 66. Violence Against ED Healthcare Workers - A 9 Month Experience Terry Kowalenko, MD, University of Michigan 67. A Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial of Vacant Lot Greening to Reduce Crime and Increase Perceptions of Safety Eugenia Garvin, MD, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania 68. Screening for Violence Identifies Young Adults at Risk for Return ED Visits for Injury Abigail Hankin-Wei, MD, Emory University 69. Firearm Possession among Adolescents and Young Adults presenting to an Urban Emergency Department for Assault Patrick Carter, MD, University of Michigan, School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine; University of Michigan Injury Center

POSTER Presentations THURSDAY, May 10th • 10:00 – 11:30 am am in River Hall B Clinical Decision Guidelines

70. Does Cellulitis Belong in an Observation Unit? Louisa Canham, MD, BIDMC 71. Comparison of a Novel Clinical Prediction Rule, MEDS, SIRS, and CURB-65 in the Prediction of Hospital Mortality for Septic Patients Visited the Emergency Department Kuan-Fu Chen, MD PhD, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital 72. Overuse of CT for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Christopher Szlezak, MD, Yale School of Medicine 73. Doctor Knows Best: Published Guidelines vs. ED Physicians Predictions Of ACS Amisha Parekh, MD, New York Methodist Hospital 74. Compartative Accuracy of the Wells Score and AMUSE Score for the Detection of Acute Lower Limb Deep Vein Thrombosis Gabriel Blecher, MBBS(Hons), PDM, FACEM, University of Ottawa 75. Facial Action Coding to Enhance The Science of Pretest Probability Assessment (the FACES initiative) Jeffrey Kline, MD, Carolinas Medical Center 76. Presenting on May 12th, 9 – 10:30 am - Acute Stroke Research and Treatment Consent: The Accuracy of Surrogate Decision Makers Jessica Bryant, University of Michigan Medical School 77. Validation of Mid-Arm Circumference for a Rapid Estimate of Emergency Patient Weight Christopher Belcher, BS, University of Kentucky 78. Hospice and Palliative Care in the Emergency Department Afzal Beemath, MD, Detroit Medical Center and Seasons Hospice and Palliative Care 79. Prospective Validation of a Prediction Instrument for Endocarditis in Febrile Injection Drug Users Hangyul Chung-Esaki, MD, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine 80. Early Predictors of Post-Concussive Syndrome in Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries Presenting to the ED Brian O’Neil, MD, Detroit Medical Center

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81. Clinical Characteristics Associated with Moderate to Severe Carotid Stenosis or Dissection in Transient Ischemic Attack Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department Heather Heipel, BSc, University of Ottawa 82. Boarding Costs-- ED Care Is More Expensive Richard Martin, MD, Temple University

Computer Technology

83. Improving Identification of Frequent Emergency Department Users Using a Regional Health Information Exchange William Fleischman, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine 84. Indocyanine Green Dye Angiography Effective at Early Prediction of Second Degree Burn Outcome Mitchell Fourman, M.Phil, Stony Brook University Medical Center 85. The Sepsis Alert: Real Time Electronic Health Record Surveillance in the Emergency Department and Sepsis Outcomes Thomas Yeich, MD, York Hospital 86. Emergency Department Physician Experience With a Real-time, Electronic Pneumonia Decision Support Tool Caroline Vines, MD, University of Utah 87. Improving Identification of Hospital Readmission Using a Regional Health Information Exchange William Fleischman, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine 598. Effectiveness of Geographic Isolation in Preventing EP Migratory Contamination in a Cluster Randomized Trial to Increase ED tPA Use in Stroke (The INSTINCT Trial) Victoria Weston, BS, University of Michigan

Critical Care/Resuscitation

88. A Comparison Of Outcomes In Post-cardiac Arrest Patients With and Without Significant Intracranial Pathology On Head CT Sean Doran, The University of Western Ontario 89. Bandemia Does Not Predict Mortality, Positive Cultures, or Source Location In Septic Patients Presenting To The ED Scott Teanu Mataoa, MD, Yale New Haven Hospital 90. Impact of ED Volumes on Sepsis Resuscitation Bundle Compliance at an Urban Level I Trauma Center Hima Rao, MD, Henry Ford Hospital 91. An Experimental Comparison of Endotracheal Intubation Using a Blind Supraglottic Airway Device During Ongoing CPR with Manual Compression Versus Automated Compression Bob Cambridge, DO, OSF St. Francis Medical Center 92. Comparison of Baseline Aortic Velocity Profiles and Response to Weight-Based Volume Loading in Fasting Subjects: A Randomized, Prospective Double-Blinded Trial Anthony Weekes, MD, Carolinas Medical Center 93. Identification of Critical Areas for Improvement in ED Severe Sepsis Resuscitation Utilizing In Situ Simulation Emilie Powell, MD, MS, MBA, Northwestern University 94. The Presenting Signs and Symptoms of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Meta-analysis of the Literature Utpal Inamdar, MD, JD, Yale New Haven Hospital Department of Emergency Medicine 95. Normal Initial Blood Sugar Level and History of Diabetes Might Reduce in-hospital Mortality of Septic Patients Visited the Emergency Department Hsiao-Yun Chao, MD, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital 96. Sedation and Paralytic Use During Hypothermia After Cardiac Arrest William Knight, MD, University of Cincinnati 97. The Implementation of Therapeutic Hypothermia in the Emergency Department: A Multi-Institution Case Review Sara Johnson, MD, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California 98. Serum Lactate as a Screening Tool and Predictor of Outcome in Pediatric Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Suspected Infection Loren Reed, Southern Illinois university 99. Failure To Document The Presence Of Sepsis Decreases Adherence To Process Of Care Measures In Emergency Department Patients Stephanie Dreher, BA, The Ohio State University


Diagnostic Technologies/Radiology

100. Sonogram Measured Inferior Vena Cava Diameter Response to Intravenous Fluid Bolus. Christopher Vogt, University of Pikeville Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine 101. Ultrasound Guided Vascular Access On A Phantom: A Training Model For Medical Student Education Lydia Sahlani, MD, The Ohio State University Medical Center 102. The Tongue Blade Test: Still Useful As A Screening Tool for Mandibular Fractures? Nicholas Caputo, MD, MSc, Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center 103. Bedside Ultrasound Evaluation Of Lung Infiltrates Stephanie Cohen, MD, Emory University Medical School 104. Inter-rater Reliability of Emergency Physician Ultrasonography For Diagnosing Lower Extremity Deep Venous and Great Saphenous Vein Thromboses Compared To Ultrasonographic Studies Performed By Radiology Mary Mulcare, MD, New York Presbyterian Hospital 105. A Prospective Evaluation of Emergency Department Bedside Ultrasonography for the Detection of Acute Pediatric Appendicitis David McLario, DO, MS, Denver Health Medical Center 106. Sonographic Measurement of Glenoid to Humeral Head Distance in Normal and Dislocated Shoulders in the Emergency Department Alan Chiem, MD, UC Irvine 107. Confirmation Of Intraosseous Needle Placement With Color Doppler Ultrasound In An Adult Fresh Cadaver Model Kenton Anderson, MD, San Antonio Military Medical Center 108. Introducing Bedside Limited Compression Ultrasound by Emergency Physicians into the Diagnostic Algorithm for Patients with Suspected DVT: a prospective cohort trial Marco Sivilotti, MD, MSc, FRCPC, FACEP, FACMT, Queen’s University 109. Point of Care Focused Cardiac Ultrasound for Pulmonary Embolism Short-Term Adverse Outcomes Jennifer Davis, MD, Yale University School of Medicine 110. Indocyanine Green Dye Angiogaphy Accurately Predicts Jackson Zone Survival in a Horizontal Burn Comb Model Mitchell Fourman, M.Phil, Stony Brook University Medical Center 111. Ultrasound Experts Rapidly And Accurately Interpret Ultrasound Images Obtained Using Cellphone Video Cameras Transmitted By Cellular Networks Jillian Davison, MD, Orlando Regional Medical Center 112. Renal Colic: Does Urine Dip and/or Serum WBC Predict the Need For CT To Identify Kidney Stone Mimics? Raashee Kedia, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Disaster Medicine

113. “Child in Hand” - A Prospective Cohort Study To Assess the Health Status And Psychosocial Distress of Haitian Children One Year After 2010 Earthquake Srihari Cattamanchi, MD, Harvard Medical School / Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 114. Systematic Review of Interventions to Mitigate the Impact of Emergency Department Crowding in the Event of a Respiratory Disease Outbreak Melinda Morton, MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine 115. Communication Practices and Planning in US Hospitals Caring for Children During the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic Marie Lozon, MD, University of Michigan

Disease/Injury Prevention

116. An Investigation of the Association between Extended Shift Lengths, Sleepiness, and Occupational Injury and Illness Among Nationally Certified EMS Professionals Antonio Fernandez, PhD, NREMT-P, EMS Performance Improvement Center University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill 117. Does An Intimate Partner Violence Kiosk Intervention in the ED Impact Subsequent Safety Behaviors? Justin Schrager, MPH, Emory University School of Medicine 118. Prime Time Television Programing Fails to Lead Safely By Example: No Seat Belts No Helmets David Milzman, MD, Georgetown University School of Medicine

119. The Effect of Young Unlicensed Drivers on Passenger Safety Restraint Use in U.S. Fatal Crash: Concern for Risk Spillover Effect? Jonathan Fu, BS Biology, Yale University School of Medicine 120. Emerging Conducted Electrical Weapon Technology: Is it Effective at Stopping Further Violence? Jeffrey Ho, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center 121. Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening as Preventive Health Measure among Adult Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department. Nidhi Garg, MD, New York Hospital Queens 122. Impact of Rising Gasoline Prices on Bicycle Injuries in the United States, 1997-2009 Mark Sochor, MD, MS, FACEP, University of Virginia 123. Obesity and Seatbelt Use: A Fatal Relationship Dietrich Jehle, MD, SUNY@Buffalo 124. Days Out of Work Do Not Correlate with Emergency Department Pain Scores for Patients with Musculoskeletal Back Pain Barnet Eskin, MD, PhD, Morristown Memorial Hospital 125. Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Among a Population of Volunteer Firefighters David Jaslow, MD, MPH, EMT-P, Albert Einstein Medical Center 126. Prevalence Rates Of Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration Among Male Emergency Department Patients Daniel Bell, BA, Emory University 127. Human Physiologic Effects of a New Generation Conducted Electrical Weapon Jeffrey Ho, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center 128. Use of Urinary Catheters in U.S. EDs 1995-2009: A Potentially Modifiable Cause of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection? Jennifer Gibson Chambers, MS, University of New England 129. Child Passenger Restraint Misuse in Rural vs. Urban Children: A Multisite Case-Control Study Stephanie Kok, MD, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria 130. A National Estimate of Injuries to Elders from Falls in the Home that Presented to U.S. Emergency Departments in 2009 Alejandro Gonzalez, MD, University of Arizona 131. Prevalence of Bicycle Helmet Use By Users of Public Bicycle Sharing Programs Christopher Fischer, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School 132. Keeping Infant Safe and Secure for Schools (KISS): A School-Based Abusive Head Trauma Prevention Program Faisal Mawri, MD, University of Michigan Health System

Ethics

133. Will Patients Exaggerate Their Symptoms to Increase the Likelihood Of A Cash Settlement? Thomas Gilmore, MD, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital 134. Expert Consensus Meeting Recommendations on Community Consultation for Emergency Research Conducted with an Exception from Informed Consent Lynne Richardson, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Future Stars of Emergency Medicine: A Salute to Medical Student Research – Guided Oral Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 11:00 am – 12:30 pm in Missouri Room

Moderator: Lorraine Thibodeau, MD, Albany Medical College 135. Is A History Of Psychiatric Disease Or Substance Abuse Associated With an Increased Incidence of Syncope of Unknown Etiology? Zev Wiener, Harvard Medical School 136. Scope of Practice and Autonomy of Physician Assistants in Rural vs. Urban Emergency Departments Brandon Sawyer, BS, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine 137. Video Education Intervention in the Emergency Department Nancy Steven, Medical College of Wisconsin 138. Secondary Shockable Rhythms: Prognosis in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests with Initial Asystole or Pulseless Electrical Activity and Subsequent Shockable Rhythms Andrew Thomas, MPH, NREMT-P, Oregon Health & Science University

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Preventing and Predicting Poor Cardiac Outcomes – Guided Oral Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 11:00 am – 12:30 pm in Michigan B

Moderator: Richard L. Summers, MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center 139. Racial Disparities in Stress Test Utilization in a Chest Pain Unit Anthony Napoli, MD, FACEP, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University 140. The Usefulness of the 3-Minute Walk Test in Predicting Adverse Outcomes in ED Patients with Heart Failure and COPD Ian Stiell, MD, University of Ottawa 141. The Effect of Prone Maximal Restraint (PMR, aka “Hog-Tie”) Position on Cardiac Output and Other Hemodynamic Measurements Davut Savaser, MD, MPH, UCSD 142. The Associations Between Numeracy and Health Literacy and 30Day Recidivism in Adult Emergency Department Patients Suspected of Having Acute Heart Failure Candace McNaughton, MD, Vanderbilt University

Ethics in EM Research – Moderated Poster Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 11:00 am – 12:00 pm in Arkansas Room

Moderator: Harrison Alter, MD, Alameda County Medical Center 143. The Influence of Clinical Context on Patients’ Code Status Preferences John E. Jesus, MD, Christiana Care Health Systems 144. End of Life Decision-Making for Patients Admitted Through the ED: Patient Demographics, Hospital Attributes, and Changes Over Time Derek Richardson, MD, Oregon Health & Science University 145. Disparities in the Successful Enrollment of Study Subjects Involving Informed Consent in the Emergency Department. Lea Becker, MT, University of Virginia Health System 146. Informed Consent for Computerized Tomography via Video Educational Module in the Emergency Department Lisa Merck, MD MPH, Emory University 147. Does Pain Intensity Reduce Willingness to Participate in Emergency Medicine Research? Alexander Limkakeng, MD, Duke University

Redefining Treatment Practices for Common Pediatric Emergencies – Lightning Oral Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm in Michigan A

Moderator: Nathan Kuppermann, MD, MPH, University of California, Davis, School of Medicine 148. A Multicenter Study To Predict Continuous Positive Airway Pressure And Intubation For Children Hospitalized With Bronchiolitis Patricio De Hoyos, Massachusetts General Hospital 149. Prevalence of Abusive Injuries in Siblings and Contacts of Abused Children Daniel Lindberg, MD, Brigham & Women’s Hospital 150. Validity of the Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale for Children. A Multi-centre, Database Study Jocelyn Gravel, MD, MSc, Sainte-Justine UHC, Université de Montréal 151. Diagnosing Intussusception by Bedside Ultrasonography in the Pediatric Emergency Department Jessica Zerzan, MD, Maimonides Medical Center 152. Accuracy of Point-of-Care Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Elbow Fractures in Children Joni Rabiner, MD, Children’s Hospital at Montefiore 153. Persistent Failure to Understand Key Elements of Medication Safety after Pediatric Emergency Department Visi Margaret Samuels-Kalow, MD, MPhil, BWH/MGH Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency

Rethinking EMS Drug Delivery – Lightning Oral Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm in Michigan B Moderator: Theodore R. Delbridge, MD, MPH, The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University

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154. Use of Oral Disintegrating Ondansetron to Treat Nausea In Prehospital Patients Steven Weiss, MD, University of New Mexico 155. Does the Addition of the Mucosal Atomizer Device Increase Fentanyl Administration in Prehospital Pediatric Patients? Daniel O’Donnell, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine 156. EMS Provider Self-efficacy Retention After Pediatric Pain Protocol Implementation April Jaeger, MD, Sacred Heart Medical Center 157. Hemodynamic Changes In Patients Receiving Ketamine Sedation By Emergency Medical Services Mark Escott, MD, Baylor College of Medicine 158. Do Paramedics Give EpinephrineWhen Indicated For Anaphylaxis? Herbert Hern, MD, Alameda County - Highland 159. Weight Based Pediatric Dosing Errors Are Common Among EMS Providers Herbert Hern, MD, ACMC- Highland

The Patient Experience – Moderated Poster Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm in Colorado Room

Moderator: Emilie S. Powell, MD, Northwestern University 160. Drivers of Satisfaction. What Components of Patient Care Experience Have the Greatest Influence On the Overall Perceptions Of Care? Eddy Lang, MD, University of Calgary 161. Street Outreach Rapid Response Team for the Homeless Lindsay Harmon, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine 162. Communicating with Patients With Limited English Proficiency: Analysis of Interpreter Use and Comfort with a Second Language David Chiu, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 163. Why did you go to the Emergency Department? Findings from the Health Quality Council of Alberta Urban and Regional Emergency Department Patient Experience Report Eddy Lang, MD, University of Calgary 164. Variation of Patient Preferences for Written and Cell Phone Instructional Modality of Discharge Instructions by Patient Health Literacy Level Travis Olives, MD MPH MEd, Hennepin County Medical Center 165. All Health Care is Not Local: An Evaluation of the Distribution of Emergency Department Care Delivered in Indiana John Finnell, MD, MSc, Indiana University

Critical Care and Resuscitations – Oral Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm in Sheraton 5

Moderator: Robert M. Rodriguez, MD, University of California (San Francisco)/ San Francisco General Hospital 166. Cumulative SAPS II Score Fails To Predict Mortality In Out-ofHospital Cardiac Arrest Cristal Cristia, MD, BIDMC Center for Resuscitation Science 167. Restoring Coronary Perfusion Pressure Before Defibrillation After Chest Compression Interruptions Ryan Coute, BS, Baystate Medical Center 168. Rescue Shock Timing And Outcomes Following 12 Minutes Of Untreated Ventricular Fibrillation Ryan Coute, BS, Baystate Medical Center 169. Effect of Time of Day on Prehospital Care During Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Sarah Wallace, AB, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania 170. Lung Protective Ventilation is Uncommon Among ED Patients Brian Fuller, MD, Washington University School of Medicine 171. Life-Threatening Etiologies of Altered Mental Status in Children Antonio Muniz, MD, Dallas Regional Medical Center 172. The Impact of Early DNR Orders on Patient Care and Outcomes Following Resuscitation from Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Derek Richardson, MD, Oregon Health & Science University 173. Does a Simulation Module Educational Intervention Improve Physician Compliance and Reduce Patient Mortality in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock? Michelle Sergel, Cook County (Stroger)


Is This ED Visit “Appropriate”? – Lightning Oral Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm in Michigan A

Moderator: Michelle H. Biros, MD, MS, Hennepin County Medical Center 174. Direct Linkage of Low Acuity Emergency Department Patients with Primary Care: A Quasi-Experimental Trial Kelly Doran, MD, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, Yale University School of Medicine and U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs 175. Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions and the Likelihood of 30 Day Hospital Readmissions Through the ED Joseph Tyndall, MD, MPH, University of Florida 176. Visit Urgency Between Frequent Emergency Department Users In A Large Metropolitan Region Network Theodore C. Chan, MD, University of California, San Diego 177. Return Visits to the Emergency Department and Costs: A Multi-State Analysis Reena Duseja, MD, UCSF 178. Can Patients Accuately Assess Their Own Acuity? Findings From A Large Scale Emergency Department Patient Experience Survey Eddy Lang, MD, University of Calgary 179. Intervention to Integrate Health and Social Services for Frequent ED Users with Alcohol Use Disorders Ryan McCormack, MD, NYU School of Medicine/Bellevue Hospital

Training with Simulation – Lightning Oral Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm in Michigan B

Moderator: William F. Bond, MD, Lehigh Valley Hospital Network/Pennsylvania State University Hospital 180. A Comparison Of Hand-On-Syringe Versus Hand-On-Needle Technique For Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Blocks Brian Johnson, MD, MPH, Alameda County Medical Center 181. Does Level of Training Matter When EM Residents Provide Patient Care While Distracted? Daniel Miller, MD, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics 182. Developing a Perfused Cadaver Training Model for Invasive Lifesaving Procedures: Uncontrolled Hemorrhage Robert De Lorenzo, MD, FACEP, Brooke Army Medical Center 183. Development of a Simulation (SIM) - Enhanced Multidisciplinary Teamwork Training (TT) Program in a Pediatric Emergency Department Susan Duffy, MD, MPH, Brown University 184. ACLS Training: Does High Fidelity Simulation Matter? Lauren Weinberger, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania 185. Using Heart Rate Variability as a Physiologic Marker of Stress During the Performance of Complex Tasks Douglas Gallo, MD, Pitt County Memorial Hospital

POSTER Presentations THURSDAY, May 10th • 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm in River Hall B Cardiovascular – Basic Sciences and Cardiovascular Clinical Research

186. An Experimental Comparison of Endotracheal Intubation During Ongoing CPR with Manual Compression Versus Automated Compression Bob Cambridge, DO, OSF St. Francis Medical Center 187. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Affects Vascular Remodeling After Acute Myocardial Infarction Thomas Belanger, MD, Washington University in St. Louis 188. The Diagnosis of Aortic Dissections by ED Physicians Is Rare Scott Alter, MD, Morristown Medical Center 189. Prevalence and ECG Findings for Patients with False-positive Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory Activation among Patients with Suspected ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Audra Robinson, MD, Virginia Commonwealth University 190. An Evaluation of an Atrial Fibrillation Clinic for the Follow-up of Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Newly Diagnosed or Symptomatic Arrhythmia Brandon Hone, HBSc, University of Alberta

191. Repolarization Abnormalities in Previous Electrocardiograms of Adult Victims of Non-Traumatic Sudden Cardiac Death Michael Plewa, MD, Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center 192. The Association of Health Literacy, Self Care Behaviors, and Knowledge with Emergency Department Readmission Rates for Heart Failure Carolyn Overman, MD, Emory University School of Medicine 193. Comparison of Door to Balloon Times in Patients Presenting Directly or Transferred to a Regional Heart Center with STEMI Jennifer Ehlers, MD, Stony Brook University 194. A Comparison of the Management of ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction Between Patients Who Are English and Non-English Speaking Scott Weiner, MD, MPH, Tufts Medical Center 195. A Four-year Population Based Analysis of Emergency Department Syncope: Predictors Of Admission/Readmission, and Regional Variations In Practice Patterns Xin Feng, University of Calgary 196. Correlation Between Change in Dyspnea Severity and Clinical Outcome in Patients with Acute Heart Failure Howard Smithline, MD, Baystate Medical Center 197. Ability of a Triage Decision Rule for Rapid Electrocardiogram (ECG) to Identify Patients with Suspected ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) Anwar Osborne, Emory University 198. Healthcare Resource Utilization Among Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Managed by Two University Affiliated Emergency Department Observation Units, 2007-2011 Justin Schrager, MPH, Emory University School of Medicine

Clinical Operations – Personnel and Clinical Operations - Processes

199. Emergency Department Case Volume and Short-term Outcomes in Patients with Acute Heart Failure Chu-Lin Tsai, MD, ScD, Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, The University of Texas School of Public Health 200. Emergency Department Disposition and Charges for Heart Failure: Regional Variability Alan B. Storrow, MD, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine 201. Hospital Based Shootings in the United States: 2000-2010 Gabor Kelen, MD, Johns Hopkins University 202. Impact of Emergency Physician Board Certificationon Patient Perceptions of ED Care Quality Albert Sledge, IV, MD, Maine Medical Center 203. Electronic, Verbal Discussion-Optional Signout for Admitted Patients: Effects on Patient Safety and ED Throughput Christopher Fischer, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School 204. Does the Nature of Chief Complaint, Gender or Age Affect Time to Be Seen in the Emergency Department? Ayesha Sattar, Stanford University School of Medicine 205. The Impact of a Neurology Consult in Patients Placed in Observation for Syncope or Near Syncope Simon Katrib, MD, St. John Hospital and Medical Center 206. Time Burden of Emergency Department Hand Hygiene with Glove Use Joseph Reardon, Harvard Medical School 207. Door-to-Balloon Times for Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: How Do Freestanding Emergency Departments Perform? Erin Simon, DO, Akron General Medical Center 208. Emergency Department Holding Orders Reduce ED Length Of Stay By Decreasing Time To Bed Order Samir Haydar, DO, MPH, Maine Medical Center 209. Emergency Department Interruptions in the Age of Electronic Health Records Matthew Albrecht, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine 210. Physician Documentation of Critical Care Time While Working in the Emergency Department Jonathan Heidt, MD, Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis

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211. Attitudes Toward Healthcare Robot Assistants In The Ed: A Survey Of Ed Patients And Visitors Karen Miller, RN, MPA, Vanderbilt University Medical Center 212. The Effectiveness Of A Nurse Telephone Triage Protocol For Emergency Department Disposition During the H1N1 Epidemic Of 2009 Christopher Verdick, BS, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria 213. Ed Impact of Rh Factor Testing in Patients with First Trimester Vaginal Bleeding Nicholas Genes, MD, PhD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine 214. Are We Punishing Hospitals for Progressive Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation? Nicole Piela, MD, Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center 215. A Comparison of Two Hospital Electronic Medical Record Systems and Their Effects on the Relationship Between Physician Charting and Patient Contact John Shabosky, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine 216. Emergency Department Rectal Temperatures Are Frequently Discordant from Initial Triage Temperatures Daniel Runde, MD, St. Luke’s Roosevelt 217. Direct Bedding, Bedside Registration and Patient Pooling to Improve Pediatric Emergency Department Length of Stay Niel Miele, MD, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey 218. Are Emergency Physicians More Cost-Effective in Running an Observation Unit? Margarita Peng, St. John Hospital and Medical Center 219. A Long Term Analysis of Physician Screening in the Emergency Department Jonathan Rogg, Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency 220. Professional Translation Does Not Result In Decreased Length of Stay For Spanish Speaking Patients With Abdominal Pain Otar Taktakishville, MD, Stony Brook University 221. Emergency Department Patients on Warfarin - How Often Is the Visit Due to the Medication? Jim Killeen, MD, UCSD Medical Center 222. Ultrasound in Triage in Patients at Risk for Ectopic Pregnancy Decreases Emergency Department Length of Stay Kenneth Cody, MD, University of Pennsylvania 223. Boarding and Press Ganey Patient Satisfaction Scores Among Discharged Patients - Quantifying the Relationship Paris Lovett, MD, MBA, Thomas Jefferson University 224. Effect of Day of Week on Number of Patients Transferred to a Tertiary Care Emergency Departmen Wendy Woolley, Albany Medical Center 225. The Impact Of Increased Output Capacity Interventions On Emergency Department Length Of Stay and Patient Flow Hallam Gugelmann, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Obstetrics/Gynecology

226. The Epidemiology of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease in a Pediatric Emergency Department Fran Balamuth, MD, PhD, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 227. Impact Of Maternal Ultrasound Implementation In Rural Clinics In Mali Melody Eckardt, MD, MPH, Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Global Health and Human Rights, Massachusetts General Hospital 228. Predicting Return Visits for Patients Evaluated in the Emergency Department with Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy Brian Sharp, MD, University of Michigan Hospital 229. Prevalence of Human Trafficking in Adult Sexual Assault Victims David Slattery, MD, University of Nevada School of Medicine 230. Should Empiric Treatment of Gonorrhea and Chlamydia Be Used in the Emergency Department? Scarlet Reichenbach, MD, BIDMC

Neurology

231. Impact of Airline Travel on Outcome in NHL and NFL Players Immediately Post mTBI: Increased Recovery Times David Milzman, MD, Georgetown University School of Medicine

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232. Regional Differences in Emergency Medical Services Use For Patients with Acute Stroke (Findings from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Emergency Department Data file) Kristin Kuzma, MD, UCSF Medical Center 233. Effect of Race and Ethnicity on the Presentation of Stroke Among Adults Presenting to the Emergency Department Bradley Li, MD, New York Hospital Queens 234. Non-febrile Seizures In The Pediatric Emergency Department: To Draw Labs And CT Scan Or Not? Vikramjit Gill, MD, and Ashley Strobel, MD, University of Maryland Medical Center Emergency Medicine Pediatrics Combined Residency Program 235. Thrombolytics in Acute Ischemic Stroke Assessment and Decision-Making: EM vs. Neurology Margaret Vo, Paul L. Foster School of Medicine 236. Lumbar Puncture or CT Angiography Following a NegativeCT Scan for Suspected Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Decision Analysis? Foster Goss, DO, Tufts Medical Center 237. Abnormalities on CT Perfusion in Patients Presenting with Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) Sharon Poisson, MD, University of California San Francisco 238. Withdrawn 239. Economic Benefit of an Educational Intervention to Improve tPA Use as Treatment For Acute Ischemic Stroke in Community Hospitals: Secondary Analysis of the INSTINCT Trial Cemal Sozener, MD, MEng, University of Michigan 240. Anti-hypertensive Treatment Prolongs tPA Door-to-treatment Time: Secondary Analysis of the Increasing Stroke Treatment Through Interventional Behavior Change Tactics (INSTINCT) Trial William Meurer, MD, University of Michigan 241. Protocol Deviations During and After IV Thrombolysis in Community Hospitals William Meurer, MD, University of Michigan 242. CT Is Sensitive for the Detection of Advanced Leukoaraiosis in Patients with Transient Ischemic Attack Matthew Siket, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital

Professional Development

243. Compassion Fatigue: Emotional Exhaustion After Burnout M. Fernanda Bellolio, MD, MS, Mayo Clinic 244. Effective Methods To Improve Emergency Department Documentation In A Teaching Hospital To Enhance Education, Billing, And Medical Liability Anurag Gupta, MD, MBA, Beth Israel Medical Center 245. Identifying Mentoring “Best- Practices” for Medical School Faculty Julie Welch, Indiana University 246. A Pilot Study to Survey Academic Emergency Medicine Department Chairs on Hiring New Attendings Ryan Aycock, MD, Staten Island University Hospital 247. Reliability of the Revised Professional Practice Environment Scale when Used with Emergency Physicians Tania Strout, PhD, RN, MS, Maine Medical Center 248. Gender Diversity in Emergency Medicine: Measuring System’s Change Lori Post, PhD, Yale University School of Medicine

Caught in the Safety Net of the Access to Care Debate – Oral Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th, 2012 • 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm in Ontario

Moderator: Katherine Heilpern, MD, Emory University School of Medicine 249. Quantifying the Safety Net Role of the Academic Emergency Department Benjamin Heavrin, MD, MBA, Vanderbilt University 250. Impact of Health Care Reform in Massachusetts on Emergency Department and Hospital Utilization Peter Smulowitz, MD, MPH, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 251. Access to Appointments Following a Policy Change to Improve Medicaid Reimbursement in Washington DC Rachelle Pierre Mathieu, George Washington 252. Access to Urgent Pediatric Primary Care Appointments in the District of Columbia Rachelle Pierre Mathieu, George Washington


Prehospital Trauma Management – Oral Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th, 2012 • 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm in Missouri Room

Moderator: Ali S. Raja, MD, MPH, Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School 253. Comparison Of Three Prehospital Cervical Spine Protocols With Respect To Immobilization Requirements And Missed Injuries Rick Hong, MD, Cooper University Hospital 254. The Cost-Effectiveness of Improvements in Prehospital Trauma Triage In The U.S. M. Kit Delgado, MD, MS, Stanford University School of Medicine 255. Emergency Medical Services Compliance with Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) Cervical Spine Immobilization Guidelines Rick Hong, MD, Cooper University Hospital 256. The Association Between Prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale and Trauma Center Outcomes in Victims of Moderate and Severe TBI: At Statewide Trauma System Analysis Daniel Spaite, MD, University of Arizona

Alcohol, Violence, and STDs – Oral Presentation THURSDAY, May 10th • 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm in Michigan A

Moderator: Megan Ranney, MD, MPH, Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital 257. A Computer-Assisted Self-Interview Focused on Sexually Transmitted Infections in the Pediatric Emergency Department Is Easy-To-Use and Well-Accepted Fahd Ahmad, MD, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine 258. Dating Violence: Outcomes Following a Brief Motivational Interviewing Intervention Among At-Risk Adolescents in an Urban ED Lauren Whiteside, MD, University of Michigan and Hurley Medical Center 259. Relationship of Intimate Partner Violence to Health Status and Preventative Screening Behaviors Among Emergency Department Patients Anitha Mathew, MD, Emory University 260. The 21-Only Ordinance Reduced Alcohol-Related Adverse Consequences among College-Aged Adults Michael Takacs, MD MS, University of Iowa

FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 The Future Stars of Emergency Medicine: A Salute to Resident Research – Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 8:00 am – 9:00 am in Chicago 10

Moderator: Sarah Stahmer, MD 261. Factors Affecting Success of Prehospital Intubation in an Air and Land Critical Care Transport Service: Results of a Multivariate Analysis Anna MacDonald, MD, University of Toronto 262. Incidence and Predictors of Psychological Distress After Motor Vehicle Collision Gemma Lewis, MD, University of North Carolina 263. Derivation of a Simplified Pulmonary Embolism Triage Score (PETS) to Predict the Mortality in Patients with Confirmed Pulmonary Embolism from the Emergency Medicine Pulmonary Embolism in the Real World Registry (EMPEROR) Beau Briese, MD, Stanford/Kaiser Emergency Medicine Residency Program 264. Denver Trauma Organ Failure Score Outperforms Traditional Methods of Risk Stratification in Trauma Nicole Seleno, MD, Denver Health Medical Center

Cardiac Arrest Morbidity and Mortality – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 8:00 am – 9:00 am in Huron

Moderator: Joseph P. Ornato, MD, Medical College of Virginia School of Medicine 265. The Relationship Between Early Blood Pressure Goals and Outcomes in Post-Cardiac Arrest Syndrome Patients Treated with Therapeutic Hypothermia David Gaieski, MD, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

266. Initial Lactate Level Not Associated With Mortality in Post-Arrest Patients Treated with Therapeutic Hypothermia David Gaieski, MD, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 267. Pre-hospital Initiation of Therapeutic Hypothermia in Adult Patients After Cardiac Arrest Does Not Improve Time to Target Temperature Eric Schenfeld, MD, Carolinas Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine 268. Assessment of Building Type and Provision of Bystander CPR and AED Use in Public Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Events Kenneth Jones, BSc, University of Colorado 269. Ethnic Disparities In The Utilization Of EMS Resources and the Impact On Door-to-PCI Times In Stemi Patients Nick Testa, MD, Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center

Care of the Elderly ED Patient – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 8:00 am – 9:00 am in Ontario

Moderator: Christopher R. Carpenter, MD, MS, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine 270. Identification of Delirium in Elderly Emergency Department Patients Maura Kennedy, MD, MPH, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 271. Hospitalization Rates and Resource Utilization of Delirious ED Patients Maura Kennedy, MD, MPH, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 272. Physician and Prehospital Provider Unstructured Assessment of Delirium in the Elderly Adam Frisch, MD, UPMC 273. Mode of Arrival: The Effect of Age on EMS Use for Transportation to an Emergency Department Courtney Marie Cora Jones, MPH, University of Rochester Medical Center 274. Impact of a New Senior Emergency Department on ED Recidivism, Rate of Hospital Admission, and Hospital Length of Stay Daniel Keyes, MD, MPH, St Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor/ University of Michigan EM Residency

Risk Stratifying Cardiovascular Disease – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 8:00 am – 9:00 am in Erie

Moderator: Deborah Diercks, MD, MSc, University of California, Davis, School of Medicine 275. Prospective Validation and Refinement of a Clinical Decision Rule for Chest Radiography in ED Patients with Chest Pain and Possible Acute Coronary Syndrome Joseph Poku, Medical Student, Mayo Clinic 276. Cholesteryl Esters Associated with Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-2 Predict Coronary Artery Stenosis in Patients with Symptoms of Acute Coronary Syndrome Chadwick Miller, MD, MS, Wake Forest Health Sciences 277. The Role of Bedside Carotid Ultrasonography in the Emergency Department to Risk Stratify Patients With Chest Pain Anita Datta, MD, RDMS, New York Hospital Queens 278. Are Echocardiography, Telemetry, Ambulatory Electrocardiography Monitoring and Cardiac Enzymes in Emergency Department Patients Presenting with Syncope Useful Tests? Shamai Grossman, MD, MS, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 279. Needles In A Needlestack: “Prodromal” Symptoms of Unusual Fatigue and Insomnia Are Too Prevalent Among Adult Women Visiting the ED to be Useful in Diagnosing ACS Acutely Paris Lovett, MD, MBA, Thomas Jefferson University 280. Length of Stay for Observation Unit Chest Pain Patients Tested with Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Compared to Stress Testing Depends on Time of Emergency Department Presentation Simon Mahler, MD, Wake Forest University Medical School

Teaching Emergency Medicine – Moderated Poster Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 8:00 am – 9:30 am in Colorado Room

Moderator: Linda A. Regan, MD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 281. Correlation of Student OSCE Scores with Other Performance Metrics in an EM Clerkship: A Three Year Review Joshua Wallenstein, MD, Emory University

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282. Rating The Emergency Medicine Core Competencies: Hawks, Doves, And The ACGME Jason Nomura, MD, Christiana Care Health System 283. Emergency Medicine Resident Self-Assessment of Competency During Training and Beyond Jeremy Voros, MD, Denver Health Emergency Medicine Residency 284. Screening Medical Student Rotators From Outside Institutions Improves Overall Rotation Performance Shaneen Doctor, MD, University of Utah 285. Creation of a National Emergency Medicine Fourth-year Medical Student Examination Emily Senecal, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital - Harvard Medical School 286. A Novel Approach To “See One Do One”: Video Instruction For Suturing Workshops Amita Sudhir, MD, University of Virginia 287. Educational Technology Can Improve ECG Diagnosis of ST Elevation MI Among Medical Students Ali Pourmand, MD, MPH, George Washington University

Pediatric Trauma and Pain Management – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 9:00 am – 10:00 am in Chicago 10

Moderator: Michelle M. Nypaver, MD, University of Michigan 288. Better Than Expected: External Validation of the PECARN Head Injury Criteria in a Community Hospital Setting Aveh Bastani, MD, Troy Beaumont Hospital 289. Prevalence of Non-traumatic Incidental Findings Found on Pediatric Cranial CT scans Alexander Rogers, University of Michigan 290. Evidence of Axonal Injury for Children with Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries Lynn Babcock, MD, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center 291. Knowledge Assessment of Sport-related Concussion among Parents of Children Aged 5-15 years Enrolled in Recreational Tackle Football Carol Mannings, MD, University of Florida 292. Young Children Have Difficulty Using the Wong Baker Pain Faces Scale in an ED Setting Gregory Garra, DO, Stony Brook University 293. Timeliness and Effectiveness of Intranasal Fentanyl Administration for Children Ryan Scheper, Medical College of Wisconsin

Reducing the Mortality of Critically Ill Patients – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 9:00 am – 10:00 am in Ontario

Moderator: Jordan B. Bonomo, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine 294. National Study of Emergency Department-Associated Deaths Elaine Reno, MD, University of Colorado 295. Post-intubation Care In Mechanically Ventilated Patients Boarding In The Emergency Department Rahul Bhat, MD, Georgetown University Hospital/Washington Hospital Center 296. Assessing Vitamin D Status In Sepsis and Association With Systemic Inflammation Justin Salciccioli, BIDMC Center for Resuscitation Science 297. Antipyretic Use Does Not Increase Mortality in Emergency Department Patients with Severe Sepsis Nicholas Mohr, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine 298. Risk Factors for Unplanned Transfer to Intensive Care Within 24 Hours of Admission from the Emergency Department in an Integrated Healthcare System M. Kit Delgado, MD, MS, Stanford University School of Medicine 299. Effect of Weight-Based Volume Loading on the Inferior Vena Cava in Fasting Subjects: A Randomized, Prospective Double-Blinded Trial Margaret Lewis, MD, Carolinas Medical Center

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The Changing Face of the ED Patient – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 9:00 am – 10:00 am in Erie

Moderator: Lynne D. Richardson, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine 300. An Early Look at Performance Variation on Emergency Care Measures included in Medicare’s Hospital Inpatient Value-Based Purchasing Program Megan McHugh, PhD, Northwestern University 301. Do Improvements In Emergency Department Operations Influence the Patient Experience? Impacts of Large Scale Implementation of Overcapacity Protocols On Perceptions of Crowding and Overall Ratings of Care Eddy Lang, MD, University of Calgary 302. Cost-savings Associated with Use of Observation Units as Compared to 1-day Inpatient Admission in Massachusetts Leah Honigman, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School 303. National Study of Non-Urgent Emergency Department Visits Leah Honigman, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School 304. If My ER Doesn’t Close, But Someone Else’s Does, Am I At Higher Risk Of Dying?’ An Analysis Of Cardiac Patients And Access To Care Renee Hsia, MD, University of California San Francisco 305. Emergency Department Visit Rates after Common Inpatient Procedures for Medicare Beneficiaries Keith Kocher, MD, MPH, University of Michigan

Clinical Operations – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 9:00 am – 10:30 am in Huron

Moderator: Rahul K. Khare, MD, Northwestern University 306. Does Pharmacist Review of Medication Orders Delay Medication Administration in the Emergency Department? James Killeen, MD, University of California, San Diego 307. Empiric Antibiotic Prescribing Practices After the Introduction of a Computerized Order Entry System in an Adult Emergency Department Sheeja Thomas, Yale University School of Medicine 308. Factors Associated with Left Before Treatment Complete Rates Differ Depending on ED Patient Volume Daniel Handel, MD, MPH, Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine 309. Environmental Contamination in the Emergency Department - A Non-toxic Alternative to Surface Cleaning Stephanie Benjamin, University of Cincinnati 310. Emergency Department Extended Waiting Room Times Remain a Barrier to the Opportunity for High Patient Satisfaction Scores Scott Krall, MD, Christus Spohn Memorial Hospital 311. Pain Management Practices Vary Significantly at Three Emergency Departments In A Single Health Care System Melissa McCarthy, ScD, George Washington University 312. Decreases in Provider Productivity After Implementation of Computer Physician Order Entry Neil Roy, MD, Christiana Care Health Systems 313. Computer Order Entry Systems in the Emergency Department Significantly Reduces the Time to Medication Delivery for High Acuity Patients Eddy Lang, MD, University of Calgary

Competency: An Elusive Truth in Resident/Medical Student Education – Moderated Poster Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 9:30 am – 11:00 am in Arkansas Room Moderator: Philip H. Shayne, MD, Emory University School of Medicine 314. Emergency Medicine Procedures: Examination of Trends in Procedures Performed by Emergency Medicine Residents Kristin Swor Wolf, MD, University of Michigan 315. A Brief Educational Intervention Effectively Trains Senior Medical Students to Perform Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Access in the Simulation Setting Daniel Wood, Emory University School of Medicine


316. Factors Predicting EM Resident Ultrasound Competency: Number of Scans or Post-Graduate Year? Angela Cirilli, MD, North Shore-LIJ Health System 317. Comparison of Resident Self, Peer and Faculty Evaluations in a Simulation-based Curriculum Dylan Cooper, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine 318. Do Evaluations Of Residents Change When the Evaluator Becomes Known? Jonathan Jones, MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center 319. Testing to Improve Knowledge Retention from Traditional Didactic Presentations: A Pilot Study David Saloum, MD, Maimonides Medical Center 320. Pediatric Emergency Medicine Core Education Modules (PEMCEM) Utility in Asynchronous Learning Michael Preis, DO, Carolinas Medical Center 321. Asynchronous Vs Didactic Education: It’s Too Early To Throw In The Towel On Tradition Jaime Jordan, MD, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center

Advances in Pediatric EM – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 10:00 am – 11:00 am in Chicago 10

Moderator: Nathan W. Mick, MD, Maine Medical Center 322. Access To Pediatric Equipment And Medications In Critical Access Hospitals: Is A Lack Of Resources A Valid Concern? Jessica Katznelson, MD, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine 323. Pews Program In The Pediatric Emergency Department Halves Unanticipated In-hospital Transfers To A Higher Level Of Care For Patients With Respiratory Complaints Truman Milling, MD, University Medical Center at Brackenridge 324. Children’s Emergency Department Recidivism in Infancy and Early Whitney Cabey, MD, University of Michigan 325. Prevalence of Urinary Tract Infections inFebrile Infants < 90 daysold with RSV Antonio Muniz, MD, Dallas Regional Medical Center 326. Impact of an English-Based Pediatric Software on Physician Decision Making: A Multicenter Study in Vietnam Michelle Lin, MD, University of California, San Francisco 327. Ability of Acutely Ill Children with Asthma to Perform Acceptable Forced Expiratory Maneuvers in the Emergency Department Christopher Hollweg, MD, MPH, NSLIJ Emergency Department, Long Island Jewish Medical Ctr

Soft Tissue and Other Infections – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 10:00 am – 11:00 am in Ontario

Moderator: Daniel J. Pallin, MD, MPH, Brigham And Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School 328. Antibiotics For The Treatment Of Abscesses: A Meta-analysis Jahan Fahimi, MD, MPH, Alameda County Medical Center - Highland Hospital; University of California, San Francisco 329. Primary Versus Secondary Closure of Cutaneous Abscesses in the Emergency Department: A RCT Adam Singer, MD, Stony Brook University 330. Low Incidence of MRSA Colonization Among House Officers Rachel Semmons, Orlando Regional Medical Center 331. Do Physical Exam Findings Correlate with the Presence of Fever in Patients with Skin and Soft Tissue Infections? Jillian Mongelluzo, MD, University of California San Francisco 332. Preliminary Clinical Feasibility of an Improved Blood Culture Time To Detection Using a Novel Viability Protein Linked PCR Assay Enabling Universal Detection of Viable BSI Hematopathogens 3-fold Earlier Than The Gold standard John Morrison, MD, St. Luke’s Hospital and Health Network 333. Operating Characteristics of History, Physical, and Urinalysis for the Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infections in Adult Women Presenting to the Emergency Dept: An Evidence-Based Review Lisa Meister, SUNY Downstate

New Tech and New Tools for Old Problems – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 10:00 am – 11:00 am in Erie

Moderator: Peter D. Panagos, MD, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine 334. Comparison of 64 and 320 Slice Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Adam Singer, MD, Stony Brook University 335. Use of a Novel Ambulatory Cardiac Monitor to Detect Arrhythmias in Discharged ED Patients Ayesha Sattar, Stanford University School of Medicine 336. Inferior Vena Cava To Aorta Ratio Has Limited Value For Assessing Dehydration In Young Pediatric Emergency Department Patients Molly Theissen, MD, Denver Health Medical Center 337. Multicenter Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial of Cardiac CT vs Alternative Triage Strategies in Acute Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department: Results from the ROMICAT II Trial Udo Hoffmann, MD, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital 338. Meta-analysis Of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Diagnosis of Appendicitis Michael Repplinger, MD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health 339. Physician Variability In Positive Diagnostic Yield of Advanced Radiography to Diagnose Pulmonary Embolus In Four Hospitals: 2006-2009 Dana Kindermann, MD, MPH, Georgetown University Hospital / Washington Hospital Center

Blunt Trauma Evaluation – Moderated Poster Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 11:00 am – Noon in Colorado Room

Moderator: Julie Mayglothling, MD, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine 340. Association Between the “Seat Belt Sign” and Intra-abdominal Injury in Children with Blunt Torso Trauma in Motor Vehicle Collisions” Dominic Borgialli, DO, MPH, University of Michigan School of Medicine and Hurley Medical Center 341. Pelvic CT Imaging In Adult Blunt Trauma: Does It Add Clinically Useful Information? Omayra Marrero, MD, MHA, Carolinas Medical Center 342. The Clinical Significance of Chest CT When the CXR is Normal in Blunt Trauma Patients Bory Kea, MD, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine; San Francisco General Hospital 343. Occult Pneumothoraces Visualized in Children with Blunt Torso Trauma Lois Lee, MD, MPH, Children’s Hospital Boston 344. Use and Impact of the FAST Exam in Children with Blunt Abdominal Trauma James Holmes, MD, MPH, UC Davis School of Medicine 345. History Of Anticoagulation And Head Trauma In Elderly Patients: Is There Really An Increased Risk Of Bleeding? Laura Melville, New York Methodist Hospital

Slamming Sepsis – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 11:00 am – Noon in Ontario

Moderator: Nathan I. Shapiro, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/ Harvard Medical School 346. The Value of microRNA for the Diagnosis and Prognosis of Emergency Department Patients with Sepsis Michael Puskarich, MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center 347. Prognostic Value of Significantly Elevated Serum Lactate Measurements in Emergency Department Patients with Suspected Infection Michael Puskarich, MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center 348. Does Documented Physician Consideration of Sepsis Lead to More Aggressive Treatment? Aaron Stutz, University of Arizona 349. Elevated Inter-alpha Trypsin Inhibitor (ITI) :Levels in Emergency Department Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Anthony Napoli, MD, FACEP, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

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350. The Microcirculation Is Preserved in Sepsis Patients without Organ Dysfunction or Shock Michael Filbin, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital 351. Benchmarking The Incidence And Mortality Of Severe Sepsis In The United States David Gaieski, MD, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Interfacing Technology and Teaching – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 11:00 am – Noon in Erie

Moderator: John T. Finnell, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine 352. Emergency Medical Services Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma and Cardiac Ultrasound in Cardiac Arrest: The Training Phase Donald Byars, MD RDMS RDCS, Eastern Virginia Medical School 353. Videolaryngoscopy as an Educational Tool for the Novice Pediatric Intubator: A Comparative Study Jendi Haug, MD, University of Texas Southwestern 354. CT Imaging In The ED: Perception Of Radiation Risks By Provider Richard Bounds, MD, Christiana Care Health System 355. A Mobile Lighty-embalmed Cadaver Lab As A Possible Model For Training Rural Providers Wesley Zeger, DO, UNMC 356. Creation Of A Valid And Reliable Competency Assessment For Advanced Airway Management James Takayesu, MD, MSc, Massachusetts General Hospital 357. Implementing and Measuring Efficacy of a Capnography Simulation Training Program for Prehospital Healthcare Providers Jared Roeckner, MS4 University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

The Changing Philosophy of CPR – Moderated Poster Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm in Arkansas Room Moderator: Brendan G. Carr, MD, University of Pennsylvania 358. Current Knowledge of and Willingness to Perform Hands Only CPR in Laypersons Jennifer Urban, BS, Stony Brook University 359. Use of Automated External Defibrillators for Pediatric Out-ofHospital Cardiac Arrests: A Comparison to Adult Patients Austin Johnson, MD, PhD, Denver Health Medical Center 360. Does Implementation of a Therapeutic Hypothermia Protocol Improve Survival and Neurologic Outcomes in all Comatose Survivors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest? Ken Will, MD, Cook County (Stroger) 361. Protocolized Use of Sedation and Paralysis with Therapeutic Hypothermia Following Cardiac Arrest Timothy Ellender, MD, Indiana University Department of Emergency Medicine

Risk-Stratifying GI Tract Disease Processes – Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm in Erie

Moderator: Scott W. Melanson, MD, St. Luke’s-Bethlehem PA 362. Physician Clinical Impression (PCI) Compared to a Novel Clinical Decision Rule (CDR) for Use in Sparing Pediatric Patients with Signs and Symptoms of Acute Appendicitis (AA) Exposure to Computed Tomography (CT) Michael Brown, MD, Michigan State University 363. Negative Predictive Value of a Low Modified Alvarado Score For Adult ED Patients with Suspected Appendicitis Andrew Meltzer, MD, George Washington University 364. A Novel BioMarker Panel to Rule Out Acute Appendicitis in Pediatric Patients with Abdominal Pain Roger Lewis, MD, PhD, UCLA Harbor 365. Video Capsule Endoscopy (VCE) in the Emergency Department: A Novel Approach to Diagnosing Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage (AUGIH) Andrew Meltzer, MD, George Washington University

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Novel Flow Initiatives – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm in Chicago 9

Moderator: Michael L. Hochberg, MD, Saint Peters University Hospital/ Drexel University College Of Medicine 366. A Novel Way to Track Patterns of ED Patient Dispersal to Nearby Hospitals When a Major ED Closes Thomas Nguyen, MD, Beth Israel Medical Center 367. Upstream Relief: Benefits On EMS Offload Delay Of A Provincial ED Overcapacity Protocol Aimed At Reducing ED Boarding Andrew McRae, MD, PhD, FRCPC, University of Calgary 368. What is the Impact of a Rapid Assessment Zone on Wait Times to Care for the Acute Care Unit of the Emergency Department? Alex Guttman, MD, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University 369. Factors Influencing Completion of a Follow-Up Telephone Interview of Emergency Department Patients 1-Week After ED Visit Sara Bessman, MS, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 370. Effect of the Implementation of an Electronic Clinical Decision Support Tool on Adherence to Joint Commission Pneumonia Core Measures in an Academic Emergency Department Michael Gibbs, MD, Carolinas Medical Center 371. Continued Rise In The Use Of Midlevel Providers In Us Emergency Departments, 1993 To 2009 David Brown, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital

EM Residency Selection and Beyond – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 2:00 pm– 3:00 pm in Mayfair

Moderator: David A. Caro, MD, University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville 372. Should Osteopathic Student Applying to Emergency Medicine Take the USMLE Exam? Abbas Husain, MD, Staten Island University Hospital 373. Emergency Medicine Residents’ Association (EMRA) Emergency Medicine Qualifying and Certification Exam Preparation Survey Todd Guth, MD, University of Colorado 374. Use Of The Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) For Emergency Medicine Resident Selection: Acceptability To Participants And Comparison With Application Data Laura Hopson, MD, University of Michigan 375. Novel Comprehensive Emergency Medicine In-Training Exam Course can Improve Residency-Wide Scores Jeremy D. Sperling, MD, Weill Cornell Medical College / NewYorkPresbyterian Hospital 376. Difference in Rates of Medical Board Disciplinary Action Between Emergency Medicine Trained and Non-Emergency Medicine Trained Physicians in the Emergency Department David Kammer, MD, Carolinas Medical Center 377. Does the Residency Selection Cycle Impact What Information is Accessed on the Web? Jim Killeen, MD, UCSD Medical Center

The Pre-hospital Perspective – Moderated Poster Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm in Colorado Room

Moderator: Jason T. McMullan, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine 378. A Focused Educational Intervention Increases Paramedic Documentation of Patient Pain Complaints Herbert Hern, MD, Alameda County - Highland 379. Emergency Medical Service Providers Perspectives on Management Of The Morbidly Obese Graham Ingalsbe, University of Miami 380. Anaphylaxis Knowledge Among Paramedics: Results of a National Survey Ryan Jacobsen, MD, EMT-P, Truman Medical Center 381. Thermal Medication Stress in Air Ambulances: The Mercy Saint Vincent Life Flight Experience Richard Tavernetti, MSVMC 382. Opportunities for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Care of Syncope Brit Long, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine


Improving the Appropriateness of Imaging Utilization – Lightning Oral Presentation FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm in Erie

Moderator: Ian G. Stiell, MD, MSc, University of Ottawa 383. Electronic Accountability Tools Reduce CT Overutilization in ED Patients with Abdominal Pain Angela Mills, MD, University of Pennsylvania 384. Identification Of Patients Less Likely To Have Significant Alternate Diagnoses On CT For Renal Colic Chris Moore, MD, Yale University School of Medicine 385. Delayed Outcomes For Patients With Suspected Renal Colic After Discharge From The Emergency Department Justin Yan, The University of Western Ontario 386. The Effect on CT utilization in Patients who Have Undergone Appendectomy After Emergency Ultrasound of the Appendix was Introduced to an Emergency Department Andrew Laudenbach, MD, New York Methodist Hospital 387. Patient Perceptions of Medical Imaging from the Emergency Department Michael Repplinger, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

POSTER Presentations FRIDAY, May 11th, 2012 • 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm in River Hall B Health Policy Research

388. A Comparison of Clinician Impression vs. Objective Data in the Diagnosis of Drug-Seeking Behavior Scott Weiner, MD, MPH, Tufts Medical Center 389. Homeless Frequent Flyers: The Impact of Homelessness on Frequent Use Of The Emergency Department Michael Bouton, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess 390. Hospital Readmission Rates: Related to Ed Volume, Population and Economic Variables Ronald Low, MD, MS, NYC HHC/NYU 391. Are ED Visitors Willing to Engage In Political Advocacy to Support Poison Control Centers? David Lee, MD, North Shore-LIJ Health System 392. Many Patients Who Present to the Emergency Department Don’t Believe Their Weight Poses Health Risks: a Disconnect Between Weight, Health and Patient Provider Communication Matthew Ryan, University of Florida 393. Patient Attitudes and Expectations Towards HIV Testing Apoorva Chandar, MBBS, Case Western Reserve University 394. Patient Centered Medical Home and Emergency Department Utilization Yunfeng Shi, Pennsylvania State University 395. Comparison of Mystery Caller Methodology to Direct Calls to Evaluate Access to Care After an Emergency Department Visit Rachelle Pierre Mathieu, George Washington 396. The Geography of Cardiac Arrest: Defining the Cardiac Arrest Belt Catherine Wolff, BA, EMT-B, University of Pennsylvania

Health Services Research

397. Diagnostic Accuracy of Various Health Literacy Screening Tools in the Emergency Department Margaret Lin, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 398. Is Performance on Emergency Care Measures Related to Performance on Other Measures? Megan McHugh, PhD, Northwestern University 399. The Correlation between Health Literacy and Numeracy in the Emergency Department Margaret Lin, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 400. National Study of Frequent Users of the Emergency Department: Characteristics and Opportunities for Intervention Deborah Vinton, Denver Health Medical Center 401. Connecticut Emergency Department Use of Point-of-care Ultrasound Meghan Herbst, MD, Hartford Hospital 402. Determinants of Healthcare Access and Use in an ED Population Donna Carden, MD, University of Florida

403. “Patients Who Can’t Get An Appointment Go To The ER”: Strategies For Getting Publicly-insured Children Into Specialty Care Karin Rhodes, MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania 404. Effect of a Pharmacist on Post-Intubation Sedative and Analgesic Use in Trauma Patients Albert Amini, MD, University of Arizona 405. Association of Insurance Status and Access to Primary Care with Emergency Department Revisits Joshua Moskovitz, MD, MPH, North Shore LIJ School of Medicine 406. Trends in the Rates of Computed Tomography Use for Patients with Symptoms of Potential Pulmonary Embolism in U.S. Emergency Departments Lisa Feng, MPH, George Washington University 407. A Time Flow Study to Establish Determinants ofthe EMS Offload Interval: Implications For Evaluation of EMS Operational Efficiency Andrew McRae, MD, PhD, FRCPC, University of Calgary 408. Beneficial Effects Of A “Front Loading” Intervention In An Overcrowded ED Drew Richardson, MBBS, FACEM, Australian National University 409. Randomized Controlled Trial Of Three Instructional Modalities For Patients Prescribed Outpatient Antibiotics From The ED: The Potential Of Cell Phone Technology To Reach Limited Health Literacy Patients Travis Olives, MD, MPH, MEd, Hennepin County Medical Center 410. Utility of the Care Transition Measures-3 in the Emergency Department Population Anna Marie Chang, MD, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania 411. Evaluation of 30-day Readmissions: ED Patients Who Are Rehospitalized for Less than 24 Hours Rahul Khare, MD, MS, Northwestern University 412. Boarding Is Associated With Higher Rates Of Medication Delays and Adverse Events But Fewer Laboratory Related Delays Shan Liu, MD, SD, Massachusetts General Hospital 413. Transfers from US Emergency Departments, 2002-2009: Implications for Regionalization and Patient Safety Marlow Macht, MD, MPH, University of Colorado School of Medicine 414. The Role of the Emergency Department as a Source of Hospitalizations in the United States Keith Kocher, MD, MPH, University of Michigan 415. The Role of Racial Disparities in ED Cardiac Evaluation Amisha Parekh, MD, New York Methodist Hospital 416. Enhanced Targeted HIV Screening using the Denver HIV Risk Score Outperforms Nontargeted Screening in the Emergency Department Jason Haukoos, MD, MSc, Denver Health Medical Center 417. Hospitalizations Through the Emergency Department for Congestive Heart Failure and Pneumonia 2003-2009 Scott Dresden, MD, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine 418. Comparison of Charges Incurred for Emergently vs. Electively Admitted Inpatients-United States, 2009 Mahshid Abir, MD, MSc, George Washington University 419. Variability and Efficiency of Intensive Care Unit Utilization in Adult Patients with Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage Daniel Nishijima, MD, University of California, Davis 420. When Coverage Expands: What Happens to Utilization of Health Care Services? SCHIP as a Natural Experiment Adrianne Haggins, MD, University of Michigan 421. Emergency Department Utilization by Adult Cancer Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study Michael Prystajecky, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Calgary 422. Non-Value-Added Activities Reduce Emergency Physician Job Satisfaction Risa Cyr, MD, University of Massachussetts 572. A Collaborative Opt-Out, Non-Rapid HIV Testing Model between an Emergency Department and Infectious Disease Clinic Ian Martin, MD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Airway/Anesthesia/Analgesia

423. Comparison Of Rocuronium And Succinylcholine On Postintubation Sedative Dosing In The Emergency Department Justin Korinek, MD, University of Arizona

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424. What is the Impact of the Implementation of an Evidence Based Procedural Sedation Protocol in the Emergency Department? Nisreen Maghraby, MBBS, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University 425. The Association Of Pain, Stress, And Anxiety Measures With Receiving Opioid Medications For The Treatment Of Painful Conditions in the ED James Miner, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center 426. Comparison of GlideScope Videolaryngoscopy to Miller Direct Laryngoscopy for Intubation of a Pediatric Simulator by Novice Physicians Joni Rabiner, Children’s Hospital at Montefiore 427. Analgesic Use For The Management Of Suspected Acute Renal Colic In The Emergency Department Justin Yan, The University of Western Ontario 428. Randomized Controlled Trial of Endotracheal Intubation Using the C-MAC Videolaryngoscope versus Standard laryngoscopy in Patients Undergoing Emergent Endotracheal Intubation in the Emergency Departmen James Miner, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center 429. The Association Of The Occurrence Of Aspiration Pneumonia With The Intubating Device Used, The Number Of Attempts, The Time To Intubation, And The Occurrence Of Hypoxia During The Intubation Among Patients Intubated In The Emergency Department James Miner, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center 430. Emergency Airway Management for Very Elderly Patients in Japan: an Analysis of a Multi-center Prospective Observational Study Taichi Imamura, M.D., Shonan Kamakura General Hospital 431. The Effect of Sonographer Experience on the Ability to Determine Endotracheal Tube Location Using Transtracheal Ultrasound Robert Stuntz, MD, York Hospital 432. The Association of Pain Report with Changes in Vital Signs in Subjects Exposed to a Standard Painful Stimulus James Miner, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center 433. The CMAC Videolaryngoscope For Difficult Airway Management in the Emergency Department John Sakles, MD, University of Arizona 434. Failed Prehospital Endotracheal Intubation Patient Characteristics And Association With Difficult Emergency Department Endotracheal Intubation Joshua Ennis, MD, University of Arizona 435. Vital Signs Cannot Estimate Intensity Of Pain In The Emergency Department Raoul Daoust, MD, Médecine d’Urgence, Hôpital Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Université de Montréal

Trauma

436. Signs And Symptoms Associated With Abnormal Brain CT Findings After Acute Traumatic Brain Injury Heather Applewhite, BA, University of Florida 437. Determination of the Spectrum of Hemodynamic Profiles in Trauma Patients with Neurogenic Shock Stephen Baker, University of Mississippi Medical Center 438. Utilization Of Computed Tomography In Blunt Trauma: When Is Thoracic And Lumbar Imaging Warranted? Aalap Mehta, St. Louis University 439. The Impact of a Massive Blood Transfusion Protocol on Blood Product Delivery and Patient Outcomes Timothy Ellender, MD, Indiana University Department of Emergency Medicine 440. Epidemiology of Pediatric Motocross Injuries Presenting to an Urban Emergency Department Vivienne Ng, MD, MPH, University of California, Davis Health System 441. Disparities in Trauma Care: Demographics and Trauma Transfer Rates Mitesh Rao, MD, MHS, Yale-New Haven Medical Center 442. Frontal vs Side Impact Car Crashes on Head Injury Outcomes Stephanie Eucker, MD, PhD, University of Virginia 443. Can We Get A CT Or MRI In The Obese Trauma Patient? Diana Yandell, MD, Synergy Medical Education Alliance

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444. The Effects of Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Injury Progression in a Rat Comb Burn Model Daniel Singer, BA, Stony Brook University 445. Effect Of Road Surface On Injury Severity In Pedal Cyclists Injured In Accidents Involving Motor Vehicles Nicola Baker, MD, University Of Arizona 446. Risk Factors Of Significant Painful Syndrome 90 Days After A Minor Thoracic Injury Raoul Daoust, MD, Médecine d’Urgence, Hôpital Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Université de Montréal 447. The Use of Ultrasound to Evaluate Traumatic Optic Neuropathy Lisa Montgomery, TTUHSC - Paul L Foster School of Medicine 448. Catechol O-Methyltransferase Haplotype Predicts Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity Six Weeks after Sexual Assault Samuel McLean, MD, MPH, The University of North Carolina 449. End Tidal CO2 In The Trauma Bay: A Non-invasive Marker For Shock Nicholas Caputo, MD, MSc, Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center 450. The Accuracy Of The Olfactory Sense In Detecting Alcohol Intoxication In Trauma Patients Shweta Malhotra, MD, Suny Downstate and Kings County Medical Center

Education

451. The Utility of a Novel Simulation Assessment Method for Emergency and Critical Care Cardiac Ultrasound Training Hal Minnigan, MD, Ph.D, Indiana University 452. Integration of Ultrasound into MS4 Clerkship in Emergency Medicine Mark Favot, MD, Henry Ford Hospital 453. Mentor Relationships and Medical Students’ Specialty Choice An Emergency Medicine Focused Study Sara Aberle, B.S., Mayo Clinic 454. Emergency Medicine Resident Applicant Views on Pre-Interview Events during the Residency Interview Process Britney Anderson, MD, University of Colorado 455. Employment Search Education and Preparedness by Emergency Medicine Residency Programs David Chiu, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 456. Carbohydrate Knowledge in Diabetic Emergency Department Patients Preeti Dalawari, MD, MSPH, Saint Louis University Hospital 457. The Participation in a Vertigo Day Resulted in Better Resident Comfort with Discharging Patients Without Receiving a CT Scan in Patients with Vestibular Neuritis. Rodney Omron, Johns Hopkins 458. Does Resident Productivity Increase When A Nearby ED Closes? Gregg Husk, MD, Beth Israel Medical Center 459. Use of a Wireless Remote Programmed Stethoscope as an Adjunct to High-Fidelity Mannequin Simulation Steven Warrington, MD, Akron General Medical Center 460. Are EM Program Directors Willing to Accept Applicants with Prior Non-EM Residency Training that Currently Practice EM in a Rural Setting? Mary Jo Wagner, MD, Synergy Medical Education Alliance 461. A Qualitative Assessment of Emergency Medicine Self-Reported Strengths Todd Guth, MD, University of Colorado 462. Approaches to the Patient Follow-Up Requirement in Emergency Medicine Residencies David Salzman, MD, Northwestern University 463. Emergency Medicine Resident’s Appraisal of a Simulator Versus Cadaveric Model for Competency Assessment of Ultrasound Guided Central Venous Catheterization Amish Aghera, MD, FACEP, Maimonides Medical Center 464. Short-Term Impact of an Introductory Emergency Medicine Clinical Skills Course for Medical Students at Middle East and US Medical School Campuses Hina Z. Ghory, MD, Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar/Weill Cornell Medical College, New York


465. Comparison Between A Global Rating Score And A Traditional OSCE Evaluation Tool For Rating Medical Students’ Performance During A Simulated Patient Encounter Takashi Shiga, MD, MPH, Tokyo Bay Medical Center 466. Lay Preferences and Knowledge Concerning Wound Closure Devices in the ED Kristen Aliano, BS, Stony Brook University 467. Medical Wilderness Adventure Race (MedWAR): A Novel and Effective Teaching Platform for Wilderness Medicine Knowledge and Skills Hillary Irons, MD,PhD, Michigan State University 468. Palliative Care Provision In The Emergency Department: Barriers Reported By Emergency Physicians Sangeeta Lamba, MD, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey 469. Short Of Breath: Review of EM Resident and Student Pediatric Rapid Sequence Intubation Practice Reveals Deficiencies in Procedural Knowledge Ian May, University of Michigan 470. Reading A Brief Information Document Improves Patients’ Understanding Of The Function Of The Emergency Department Jacob Gessin, MD, UC Davis Medical Center 471. Incorporation of Focused Ultrasonography into a Critical Care Training Fellowship: Validation of an Educational Mode Eric Adkins, MD, MSc, The Ohio State University Medical Center 472. Attending in Triage: Impact on Resident Experience Paris Lovett, MD, MBA, Thomas Jefferson University 473. Training in Transvaginal Ultrasound Using Pelvic Ultrasound Simulators versus Live Models James Moak, MD, University of Virginia 474. Importance of the Emergency Medicine Application Components: The Medical Student Perception Scott McCann, MD, Christiana Care Health Systems 475. Impact of Simulation Training on Emergency Medicine Residents’ Crisis Resource Management Skills in Emergency Department Resuscitations Sudhir Baliga, MD, Henry Ford Health System 476. The Safe Haven Law: A Deficiency In Residency Training? Nicholas Caputo, MD, MSc, Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center 477. Assessing Knowledge based on the Geriatric Competencies for Emergency Medicine Residents Bhakti Hansoti, MD, University of Chicago 478. An Assessment of the Experiential Background of Entering PGY-1 Emergency Medicine Residents Dylan Cooper, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine

EMS/Out-of-Hospital - Cardiac Arrest

479. Initial Rhythm, Therapeutic Hypothermia And Patient Outcomes In Cardiac Arrest Patients Sameer Syed, The University of Western Ontario 480. Racial Differences in Prehospital Care of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Sarah Wallace, AB, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania 481. Effect Of High Flow Oxygen On Mortality In Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients In Prehospital Setting: Randomized Controlled Trial Michael Austin, MBBS, Menzies Research Institute of Tasmania and The Ottawa Hospital/University of Ottawa 482. Measurement and Characterization of Hazardous Aerosolized Particulate Matter Associated with Ambulance Exhaust in an Emergency Department Environment Bryan Choi, MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University 483. An EMS “Pit Crew” Model Improves EKG And STEMI Recognition Times In Simulated Pre-hospital Chest Pain Patients Sara Baker, MD, Orlando Regional Medical Center 484. All Cardiac Arrests Are Not Created Equal: How Neighborhoods Impact the Likelihood of Having an Automated External Defibrillator Used Comilla Sasson, MD, University of Colorado

485. The Impact of an Educational Intervention on the Pre-Shock Pause Interval among Patients Experiencing an Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Jonathan Studnek, PhD, Carolians Medical Center 486. An Electronic Tool To Improve Emergent Pediatric Medication Dosing In An Era of Obesity Peter Di Rocco, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin 487. Diagnosis of Cardiac Arrest by 911 Call Takers Improved After Education and Raised Bystander CPR Rates Dina Gozman, MD, University of Cincinnati 488. Capnography Is A Reliable Method Of Determining Endotracheal Tube Location In An Out-Of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Population Confirmed By Autopsy Salvatore Silvestri, MD, Orlando Regional Medical Center 489. Lactate Clearance is Associated with Survival in Post-Cardiac Arrest Syndrome Patients Treated with Bundled Post-Arrest Care Including Therapeutic Hypothermia David Gaieski, MD, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 490. A Nationwide Survey of Emergency Medical Services Standards of Care for Cardiac Arrest - Variability Amongst America’s Largest Urban Systems Jeffrey Goodloe, MD, University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine 491. Out Of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Management Evaluation In The Northeast Region Of Puerto Rico Nannette Lugo-Amador, Emergency Medicine Department, University of Puerto Rico 492. Rate of ROSC in Non-traumatic Prehospital Patients Undergoing CPR Who Received Either an Endotracheal Inubation or King LT Airway Placement Charles Vu, MD, UC Davis Medical Center 493. Evaluation Of Ventilatory Rates And The Benefits Of An Immediate Feedback Device With And Without Supplementary Instruction On Out Of Hospital Resuscitations Josh Handbury, MD, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth 494. Effectiveness of CPR: A Comparison of Three Groups by Status of Certification Paul Ko, MD, FACEP, SUNY Upstate Medical University 495. How Well Does AED Location Match Cardiac Arrest Location? Raina Merchant, MD, MSHP, University of Pennsylvania 496. Potential Negative Effects of Epinephrine on Carotid Blood Flow and ETC02 during Active Compression-Decompression CPR utilizing an Impedance Threshold Device Aaron Burnett, MD, Regions Hospital EMS 497. Hypoxia But Not Hyperoxia Associated With Mortality In A Cohort Of Post-arrest Patients David Gaieski, MD, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 498. End Tidal CO2 vs. Cerebral Oximetry for Monitoring CPR Quality Brian O’Neil, MD, FACEP, Wayne State School of Medicine Dept. of Emergency Medicine

EMS/Out-of-Hospital – Non-Cardiac Arrest

499. An Assessment Of The Transfer Of Patient Care By Emergency Medical Services Personnel To Emergency Department Physicians And Nurses Irina Svirsky, MD, University of Arizona Medical Center, South Campus 500. Evaluation of Paramedic Knowledge of Psychiatric Emergencies Swati Singh, MD, University of California, San Francisco 501. Paramedic Airway Management: How Can We Maintain Competency? Timothy Fallon, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital 502. How well do EMS 911 Protocols Predict ED Utilization for Pediatric Patients? Stephanie Fessler, MD, Emory University 503. The Association between Patients Perception of their Overall Quality of Care and their Satisfaction with Provided Pain Management in the Prehospital Setting Jonathan Studnek, PhD, Carolinas Medical Center 504. Retention of Cricothyrotomy Skills by Paramedics Using a WireGuided Technique Juan March, MD, East Carolina University

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505. Helicopter Emergency Medical Services in South Africa: The Role of Physicians and the Impact on Scene Times. Zina Semenovskaya, MD, SUNY Downstate/ King’s County 506. The Dissemination and Adoption of a Standardized Emergency Medical Services for Children Off-line Pain Treatment Protocol in the State of Utah Brent Kaziny, MD, University of Utah, School of Medicine 507. Effectiveness of Intranasal Naloxone by Basic Life Support Providers David Schoenfeld, MD, Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 508. Assessment and Treatment of Pain in Adult Prehospital Patients after Pediatric Focused Pain Management Education and Pain Protocol Implementation Kari Haley, BS, Medical College of Wisconsin 509. Does Ambulance Response Time Influence Patient Condition Among Patients With Medical Illnesses And Trauma? Scott Oglesbee, BA, NREMT-P, Albuquerque Ambulance 510. Adverse Effects Following Prehospital Use Of Ketamine By Paramedics Eric Ardeel, MD, Baylor College of Medicine 511. An EMS Agency-Public Health-University Partnership Model for the Human Subjects Approach to Evaluating the Implementation of Prehospital Evidence-Based Guidelines Daniel Spaite, MD, University of Arizona 512. Understanding Under-Triage in Trauma: The Roles of Age and Patient Preference in EMS Transport Patterns Craig Newgard, MD, MPH, Oregon Health & Science University

SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest – Lightning Oral Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 8:00 am – 9:00 am in Chicago 9

Moderator: Edward J. Otten, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine 521. Effect on Acetaminophen Metabolism by Liquid Formulations: Do Excipients in Liquid Formulation Prevent Production of Toxic Metabolites? Michael Ganetsky, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 522. Long Term Efficacy of Pressure Immobilization Bandages in a Porcine Model of Coral Snake Envenomation. Mary Smyrnioudis, MD, East Carolina University 523. Dichlorvos Exposure To The Kölliker-fuse Nuclei Is Sufficient But Not Necessary For Op Induced Apnea Romolo Gaspari, MS, MD, PhD, University of Massachusetts Medical School 524. Crotaline Fab Antivenom Reverses Platelet Dysfunction Induced By C. scutulatus Venom: An in vitro Study Shaun Carstairs, MD, Naval Medical Center San Diego 525. Does An Alcohol-based Hand Sanitizer Impact Breathalyzer Levels? Michael Wilson, MD, PhD, University of California San Diego 526. Intravenous Lipid Emulsion Alters the Hemodynamic Response to Epinephrine in a Rat Mode Stephanie Carreiro, MD, The Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Department of Emergency Medicine

Treating the Acutely Ill Psychiatric Patient Lightning Oral Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 9:00 am – 10:00 am in Chicago 8

Moderator: Robert Swor, DO, William Beaumont Hospital 513. Using Geographic Information Systems and Cluster Analysis to identify Neighborhoods with High Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Incidence and Low Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Prevalence in Denver, Colorado Comilla Sasson, MD, University of Colorado 514. Does GIS-Derived Transport Time Prediction Reflect Actual Transport Times In Out Of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients? Michael Cudnik, MD, MPH, The Ohio State University Medical Center 515. Emergency Department Factors Associated with Survival After Outof-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Nicholas Johnson, MD, University of Pennsylvania 516. Variability by Hospital in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest 30-Day Survival Sarah Wallace, AB, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania

Moderator: Leslie S. Zun, MD, Mount Sinai Hospital 527. Rasch Analysis of the Agitation Severity Scale when Used with Emergency Department Acute Psychiatry Patients Tania Strout, PhD, RN, MS, Maine Medical Center 528. Trends In U.S. Emergency Department Visits For Attempted Suicide And Self-inflicted Injury, 1993-2008 Sarah Ting, PhD, Massachusetts General Hospital 529. Frequent Emergency Department Visits As A Risk Factor For A Current Major Depressive Episode Benjamin Bregman, MD, George Washington University 530. Access to Psychiatric Care Among Patients with Depression Presenting to the Emergency Department Benjamin Bregman, MD, George Washington University 531. Evaluation of a 2-Question Screening Tool (PHQ-2) for Detecting Depression in Emergency Department Patients Jeffrey Smith, MD, MPH, George Washington University 532. Prevalence And Predictors Of Screening For Intentional Self-harm Among Emergency Department Patients: A Multicenter Study Jeffrey Caterino, MD, MPH, The Ohio State University

Mitigating Traumatic Brain Injury – Oral Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 8:00 am – 9:00 am in Chicago 8

EMS: Saving Lives – Moderated Poster Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 9:00 am – 10:00 am in Colorado

Moderator: Opeolu M. Adeoye, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine 517. Prehospital and Emergency Department Intubation is Associated with Increased Mortality in Patients with Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Jody Vogel, MD, Denver Health Medical Center 518. Serum Levels Of Spectrin Breakdown Product 150 (SBDP150) Distinguish Mild Traumatic Brain Injury From Trauma and Uninjured Controls And Predict Intracranial Injuries on CT and Neurosurgical Intervention Linda Papa, MD, MSc, Orlando Regional Medical Center 519. Utility of Platelet Transfusion in Adult Patients with Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage and Pre-Injury Anti-Platelet Use Shahriar Zehtabchi, MD, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center 520. Abnormal Levels of End- Tidal Carbon Dioxide (ETCO2) are Associated with Severity of Injury in Mild and Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury (MMTBI) Linda Papa, MD, MSc, Orlando Regional Medical Center

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Alcohol, Snakes, and Pesticides: What’s Not to Like? – Lightning Oral Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 9:00 am - 10:00 am in Chicago 9

Moderator: Thomas W. Trimarco, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine 533. The 6th Vital Sign: Out-of-hospital End-tidal Carbon Dioxide is More Predictive of Mortality Than Systolic Blood Pressure, Pulse, Respiratory Rate and Oxygen Saturation Christopher Hunter, MD, Ph.D, Office of the Medical Director, Orange County EMS 534. Effect Of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) On Mortality In The Treatment Of Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema (ACPE) In The Pre-hospital Setting: Randomized Controlled Trial Michael Austin, MBBS, The Ottawa Hospital/University of Ottawa and Menzies Research Institute of Tasmania, Australia 535. Can Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS) Ability To Predict Low Acuity Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Patients Be Improved By Addition Of Physiologic Data? Fanglong Dong, PhD, University of Kansas 536. Factors Limiting The Success Of An Alternate Ambulance Destination Program C. Nee-Kofi Mould-Millman, MD, Emory University


537. The Effect of a Standardized Offline Pain Treatment Protocol in the Prehospital Setting on Pediatric Pain Treatment Brent Kaziny, MD, University of Utah, School of Medicine 538. Prospective Validation of Clinical Decision Rule for Helicopter Transport of Injured Patients Michael Cudnik, MD, MPH, The Ohio State University Medical Center

POSTER Presentations SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 9:00 am – 10:30 am in River Hall B Abdominal/Gastrointestinal/Genitourinary

539. A Novel ED Based Observation Protocol For Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Patients. Mark Moseley, MD, MHA, The Ohio State University Medical Center 540. CT Imaging In Pyelonephritis Presentations To The Emergency Department: Is It Necessary? Warren Perry, BS, Yale School of Medicine 541. Curative Versus Palliative Therapy for Patients with Colorectal Cancer Presenting to the Emergency Department Andy Barnett, MD, Oregon Health & Science University 542. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis: Relevance to Emergency Medicine Giuseppe Perrotta, MD, Henry Ford Hospital 543. Safety And Efficacy Of Milk And Molasses Enemas In The ED Gary Vilke, MD, UCSD Medical Center

AEM Consensus Conference – Education Research in Emergency Medicine: Opportunities, Challenges and Strategies for Success

544. Expectations Of Clinical And Communication Skills For New Interns: A Survey Of Program Directors Lee Wilbur, MD, Indiana University

Geriatrics

545. Relationship Of Advanced Age And Vital Signs With Admission From An Emergency Department Observation Unit. Emily Hoover, The Ohio State University 546. Older Adult Fallers in the Emergency Department Luna Ragsdale, MD, MPH, Duke University 547. Does Starting Position of Fall Predict Significant Head or Neck Injury in the Elderly Patient? Darin Agresti, DO,St. Luke’s Hospital and Health Network 548. Do Prognostic Screening Instruments Predict Adverse Short-Term Outcomes Among Geriatric Emergency Department Patients with Dementia or Low Health Literacy? Christopher Carpenter, MD, MS, Washington University in St. Louis 549. Impact of a Caregiver on Satisfaction, Disposition and Outpatient Followup in the Emergency Department Kalpana Narayan, University of Pennsylvania 550. Shared Decision Making in the Selection of Outpatient Analgesics for Older Emergency Department Patients Timothy Platts-Mills, MD, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill 551. Inflammatory Markers, Vitamin D, Muscle Strength, and MobilityRelated Activities of Daily Living in Older ED Patients Scott Wilber, MD, MPH, Summa Akron City Hospital, Northeast Ohio Medical University 552. A Qualitative Evaluation of Patient, Provider and Caregiver Comfort and Satisfaction with Telemedicine-Enhanced Acute Care for Older Adults Dylan Morris, University of Rochester Medical Center 553. Barriers To Osteoporosis Screening Test As Preventive Health Measure Among Elderly Female Patients Presenting To The Emergency Department. Nidhi Garg, MD, New York Hospital Queens 554. Does Cognitive Dysfunction Affect Quality of Life Assessment in Emergency Department Geriatric Patients? Christopher Carpenter, MD, MS, Washington University in St. Louis 555. Does Age Predict Adverse Outcome In Syncope? Shamai Grossman, MD, MS, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 556. Antibiotics And Supratherapeutic Inr In The Elderly Nicole Schneiderman, MD, Resurrection Medical Center

557. Does Adequacy Of Nursing Home Paperwork Influence Ed Length Of Stay Or Admission Decisions? Rebecca Jeanmonod, MD, St. Luke’s Hospital and Health Network

Infectious Diseases

558. Novel Approach to Streamlining HIV Testing in the Emergency Department - Touch-Screen Kiosk Systems for Offering HIV Test and Risk Assessment Richard Rothman, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins University 559. Missed Opportunities For Targeted HIV Screening And Diagnosis Among Emergency Department Patients Tested For Sexually Transmitted Infections Douglas White, MD, Alameda County Medical Center - Highland Hospital 560. Influence Of An Emergency Department Laboratory Order Set On Rates Of HIV And Syphilis Screening Among Patients Tested For Gonorrhea And Chlamydia Douglas White, MD, Alameda County Medical Center 561. Awareness Of HIV Screening Guidelines Is Low In Swiss Emergency Departments Olivier Hugli, MD, MPH, Lausanne University Hospital 562. A Qualitative Assessment of Emergency Department Patient’s Knowledge, Beliefs, Attitudes and Acceptability towards Revised HIV Testing Strategies Ethan Cowan, MD, MS, Jacobi Medical Center 563. Feasibility and Safety of a Collaborative Multidisciplinary Implementation of a Pharmacy-Based Influenza Immunization Program in an Urban Academic Emergency Department Victor Cohen, PharmD, Maimonides Medical Center 564. Repeat Testing Offers Can Often be Successful When Initial Offers of HIV Testing are Not Possible in the ED Meagan Hunt, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine 565. HIV Screening Acceptance in an Ethnically Diverse Urban Emergency Department Hillary Cohen, MD, Maimonides Medical Center 566. Emergency Department (ED) Utilization by HIV-Infected ED Patients in the United States in 2009 - A National Estimation Yu-Hsiang Hsieh, PhD, Johns Hopkins University 567. The Impact of Wound Age on the Infection Rate of Simple Lacerations Repaired in the Emergency Department Shahriar Zehtabchi, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center 568. Fever and Bacteremia in the Critical Adult Sepsis Patient Karl Ambroz, MD, Resurrection Medical Center 569. Blood Cultures in the ED: Can We Do Better? James Svenson, MD, MS, University of Wisconsin 570. Emergency Department Visit Rates For Abscess vs. Other Skin Infections During the Emergence Of Ca-MRSA, 1997-2007 Munirih Qualls, MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital 571. Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns in Urine Cultures Sent from the Emergency Department Robert Rifenburg, DO, Resurrection Medical Center 572. *Presenting on May 11th, 4:30 – 6:30 pm A Collaborative Opt-Out, Non-Rapid HIV Testing Model between an Emergency Department and Infectious Disease Clinic Ian Martin, MD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 573. Improved Interpretation of Coagulase Negative Staphylococcal Blood Culture Results Using Limited Genomic Resequencing Ashley Satorius, MS, University of Michigan 574. Prioritization of Interventions to Mitigate the Impact of Emergency Department Crowding in the Event of a Respiratory Disease Outbreak Melinda Morton, MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine 575. Using Acoustic Analysis Of Coughs To Identify Respiratory Infections In The Emergency Department Suzanne Smith, MD, MPH, MPA, STAR Analytical Services 576. Failure Of The BinaxNow Rapid Antigen Test To Detect Influenza In Emergency Department Patients Wesley Self, MD, MPH, Vanderbilt University

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577. Infection Prevention Practices in U.S. Emergency Departments, 2011 Jeremiah Schuur, MD, MHS, Brigham & Womens Hospital/Harvard Medical School 578. Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics of Staphylococcal Community-acquired Pneumonia in Middle Tennessee: Preliminary Findings from the CDC Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) Study Wesley Self, MD, MPH, Vanderbilt University

International Emergency Medicine

579. Estimating the Weight of Children in Kenya: Do the Broselow Tape and Age-Based Formulas Measure Up? Darlene House, MD, Indiana University 580. The Use Of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling In The Assessment Of Health and Water/Sanitation Services In A Complex Humanitarian Emergency Kiemanh Pham, MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins University 581. Emergency Care Training Needs in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Pilot Study from Rural Uganda Usha Periyanayagam, MD, Northwestern University 582. Assessment of Point-of-care Ultrasound in Tanzania Devjani Das, MD, New York Hospital Queens 583. Pre-hospital Care in Suburban China: Frequency of Performance of Critical Actions Y. Veronica Pei, MD, MEd, MPH, Department of Emergency Medicine, University Of Maryland School of Medicine

Pulmonary

584. Trends In The Utilization And Management Of Non-invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation In The Emergency Department Marie-Carmelle Elie-Turenne, MD, University of Florida 585. Obesity Is Not A Risk Factor For Repeat Epinephrine Use In The Treatment Of Anaphylaxis Brian Geyer, MD, PhD, MPH, Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency 586. Comparative Effectiveness of Noninvasive Ventilation versus Invasive Mechanical Ventilation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure Chu-Lin Tsai, MD, ScD, Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, The University of Texas School of Public Health 587. Capnographic Waveforms May Be Useful For Assessment Of The Emergency Department Dyspneic Patient Ashlee Edgell, BA, University of Cincinnati 588. Asthma and COPD Patients’ Care Gaps at Emergency Department Discharge Cristina Villa-Roel, MD, MSc, University of Alberta 589. Non-Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation to Treat Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Study of Utilization and Adherence to Evidence-Based Standards and Proposed Quality Improvement Metrics Dave Tran, MPH, University of Calgary 590. ST2 in Emergency Department Patients with Non-cardiac Dyspnea Justin Benoit, MD, University of Cincinnati 591. Dyspnea Scores May Be A Better Predictor Of Hospital Admissions Than FEV1 For Patients With Acute Asthma Exacerbations John Schneider, Washington University in St. Louis 592. Increased Serum Albuterol Concentrations May Be Associated With Elevations Of Serum Lactate In Subjects With Acute Asthma Exacerbations Kristen Aubuchon, Washington University in St. Louis 593. Trends in Emergency Department Visits for Asthma from 1996 to 2010 Brian Rapp, Morristown Medical Center

Research Design/Methodology/Statistics

594. Use Of An Electronic Medical Record “Dotphrase” To Electronically Collect Prospective Study Data During An Emergency Medicine Study Of Head Injury Steven Offerman, MD, The Permanente Medical Group

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595. Randomization, Allocation Concealment and Blinding in Published Studies of Animal Research in the Last Decade of Emergency Medicine Literature Michael Plewa, MD, Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center 596. Validating The Use Of ICD9 Codes To Generate Injury Severity Score: The ICDPIC Mapping Procedure Ross Fleischman, MD, MCR, Oregon Health and Science University 597. Probabilistic Matching of Computerized Emergency Medical Services (EMS) records and Emergency Department and Patient Discharge Data: a Novel Approach to Evaluation of Prehospital Stroke Care Prasanthi Govindarajan, MD, MAS, UCSF Medical Center 598. *Presenting on Thursday, May 10th, 10 – 11:30 am Effectiveness of Geographic Isolation in Preventing EP Migratory Contamination in a Cluster Randomized Trial to Increase ED tPA Use in Stroke (The INSTINCT Trial) Victoria Weston, BS, University of Michigan 599. Diagnostic Test Assessment And The Average Absolute Likelihood Ratio: Application To Diagnosing Wide QRS Complex Tachycardia Keith Marill, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital 600. Patient, Family, and Diagnostic Barriers Exist to Enrolling Emergency Department (ED) Patients with Advanced Illness in Clinical Trials Brandon Kandarian, Mount Sinai School of Medicine 601. The Feasibility of Enrolling and Randomizing ED Patients with Metastatic Solid Tumors to ED-Initiated Palliative Care Consultation versus Care as Usual Corita Grudzen, MD, MSHS, Mount Sinai School of Medicine 76. Acute Stroke Research and Treatment Consent: The Accuracy of Surrogate Decision Makers Jessica Bryant, University of Michigan Medical School

Simulation

602. Can Interprofessional Simulation Improve Physician - Nurse Communication and Error Reporting Confidence? Dylan Cooper, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine 603. Knowledge in Palliative Care Topics in Medical Trainees Laura Walker, MD, Yale-New Haven Hospital 604. How is Simulation Being Used to Teach Emergency Medicine? Nicholas Nacca, MD, SUNY Upstate Medical University

Pain and the Drug Seeker: Are We Doing a Disservice? – Lightning Oral Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 10:00 am – 11:00 am in Chicago 8

Moderator: Frank LoVecchio, DO, District Medical Group 605. Characteristics and Correlates of Past Year Prescription Drug Misuse among Adolescents and Young Adults Seeking Care in the Emergency Department Lauren Whiteside, MD, University of Michigan 606. Prospective 10-Year Evaluation of the Impact of Patient Ethnicity on Pain Management Practices in the Emergency Department Philip Craven, MD, University of Utah 607. Risk of depression in High Emergency Department Utilizers with Non-Specific Abdominal Pain Benjamin Bregman, MD, George Washington University 608. Emergency Department Visits for Chronic Pain as a Risk Factor for a Current Major Depressive Episode Benjamin Bregman, MD, George Washington University 609. Multiple Hospital Emergency Department Visits Among “Frequent Flyer” Patients With A Pain Associated-discharge Diagnosis Gary Vilke, MD, University of California, San Diego 610. Use of a Single Dose of Intramuscular (IM) Methadone for Acute Opioid Withdrawal Fiona Garlich, MD, Bellevue Hospital Center

Cardiac Interventions: Risk and Reward – Moderated Poster Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 10:00 am – 11:00 am in Arkansas

Moderator: Jonathan S. Olshaker, MD, Boston University School of Medicine


611. Age as a Predictor of Mortality in Post-Cardiac Arrest Brandon Giberson, MD, BIDMC Center for Resuscitation Science 612. Quantitative B-type Natriuretic Peptide Values for Stratifying Risk of Poor Outcomes in ED Patients with Heart Failure Ian Stiell, MD, University of Ottawa 613. Coexisting COPD and Acute Coronary Syndrome: Implications for Biomarkers and Patient Outcomes Chu-Lin Tsai, MD, ScD, University of Texas School of Public Health 614. What is the Quality of Our Documentation for Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Acute Aortic Dissection? David Slattery, MD, University of Nevada School of Medicine 615. Systems-Wide Cardiac Arrest Interventions Improve Neurologic Survival after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Jody Vogel, MD, Denver Health Medical Center

International EM – Lightning Oral Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 10:00 am – 11:00 am) in Superior A Moderator: Stephanie Kayden, MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital/ Harvard Medical School 616. A Uniform Database and Application Process for International Emergency Medicine and Global Health Fellowships Gabrielle Jacquet, MD, Johns Hopkins University 617. Feasibility of Emergency Care in Rural Uganda: A Pilot Study Usha Periyanayagam, MD, Northwestern University 618. Development And Validation Of A Standardized Tool To Evaluate Communication Between Italian Pre-hospital And Hospital Emergency Physicians. Francesco Dojmi di Delupis, MD, Careggi Hospital Inter-institutional Integrated Department 619. Impact Of US University-Private Hospital Partnerships On The Implementation Of Graduate Medical Education In Emergency Medicine In India Kate Douglass, MD, George Washington University 620. Health Care Access and Needs after a Disaster: Impact of the 2010 Pakistan Floods Thomas Kirsch, MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins University 621. The Nepal Village Ultrasound Project (VUP): A Successful Education Program of Nurses in Bedside Trans-Abdominal Ultrasound in Pregnancy Davut Savaser, MD MPH, UCSD

Simulate One, Do One, Teach One – Lightning Oral Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • Noon – 1:00 pm in Chicago 8

Moderator: Rosemarie Fernandez, MD, Harborview Medical Center/University of Washington 622. Improving CPR Quality in Novice and Experienced Providers through Training with an Internal Chest Compression Monitoring Device Joshua Glick, Penn State Hershey Medical Center 623. Computerized Decision Simulation as an Educational Primer for High Fidelity Simulation Nathan Olson, MD, Northwestern University 624. Creation and Validation of a Tool to Measure Performance during Simulated Pediatric Resuscitation Scenarios Jessica Katznelson, MD, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine 625. Percutaneous Transtracheal Ventilation: Benefits of Simulation Training in the Difficult Pediatric Airway Elizabeth Whitman, MD, MedStar Washington Hospital Center/ Georgetown University Hospital 626. Validation of a Torso Simulator for Assessment of Ultrasound Guided Central Line Placement Amish Aghera, MD, FACEP, Maimonides Medical Center 627. The Effect of Noise Distraction on Emergency Medicine Resident Performance During Intubation of a High-Fidelity Patient Simulator Leila Getto, MD, Christiana Care Health Systems

The Future Stars of Emergency Medicine: A Salute to Resident Research – Guided Oral Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 11:30 am – 1:30 pm in Chicago 10 Moderator: Benjamin Honigman, MD, University of Colorado Denver

628. Implementation of an Emergency Department Sign-Out Checklist Improves Patient Handoffs at Change of Shift Nicole Dubosh, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 629. The Growing Role Of The Emergency Department In Hospital Admissions: U.S. 1993-2006 Arjun Venkatesh, MD, MBA, Brigham and Women’s HospitalMassachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency 630. Comparing Emergency Department Operational Metrics by Visits per Square Foot and Visits per Treatment Space Saad Amin, MD, Christiana Care Health System 631. Predictors Of Failure Of Empiric Outpatient Antibiotic Therapy In Emergency Department Patients With Uncomplicated Cellulitis. Danny Peterson, The University of Western Ontario

Intubation and Opiates: A Match Made in Heaven – Moderated Poster Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • Noon – 1:00 pm in Colorado Room

Moderator: Jennifer Avegno, MD, Louisana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans 632. Use of an Intubating Wrist Splint to Improve Endotracheal Intubation Technique (WriST Trial) Joshua Zavitz, DO, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria 633. Prehospital Intubation by Air Medical Providers is not Associated with Increased Mortality Michael Cudnik, MD, MPH, The Ohio State University Medical Center 634. Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing 2 mg IV hydromorphone to Usual Care Jason Lupow, MD, Montefiore Medical Center 635. Need for Additional Analgesia Following a Standard Dose of 0.1 mg/ kg IV Morphine Polly Bijur, PhD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

POSTER Presentations SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • Noon – 1:30 pm in River Hall B Pediatrics - General

636. Impact of an Asthma Pathway on Time to Corticosteroid Administration Marie-Pier Desjardins, MD, CHU Sainte-Justine 637. Reasons for Unscheduled Return Visits to a Pediatric Emergency Department: A Parental Perspective Charles Eldridge, MD, St. Louis Children’s Hospital 638. Pediatric Training and Comfort levels among Critical Access Hospital Emergency Department Staff C Forsythe, BA, University of North Carolina School of Medicine 639. Pre-arrival Anti-pyretics Shorten Emergency Department Course John Stanton, MD, East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine 640. The Impact of Childhood Weight on Emergency Department Visits in a National Cohort James Dziura, PhD, Yale School of Medicine 641. National Trends in Pelvic Inflammatory Disease among Adolescents in the Emergency Department Monika Goyal, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 642. Ultrasound Findings of the Elbow Posterior Fat Pad in Children with Radial Head Subluxation Joni Rabiner, MD, Children’s Hospital at Montefiore 643. The Effect of Opening a Dedicated Pediatric ED on Patient Satisfaction Adam Singer, MD, Stony Brook University 644. The Impact Of Limited English Proficiency On Asthma Action Plan Use Antonio Riera, MD, Yale University School of Medicine 645. Disparities Among Pediatric ED Visits For Unintentional Injury in the United States Jessica Schwartz, University of Maryland School of Medicine 646. Cardiac Arrests in Schools: Assessing Use of Automated External Defibrillators (AED) on School Campuses Robert Swor, DO, William Beaumont Hospital

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647. Physician And Caretaker Perceptions Of Clinical Improvement In A Multicenter Study Of Children Hospitalized With Bronchiolitis Natalie Mazur, Massachusetts General Hospital 648. Using the VeinViewer Vision to Increase the Identification of Peripheral Veins for Intravenous Catheter Placement in Children in a Pediatric Emergency Department Bruce Becker, MD, PhD, Brown University 649. An Interdisciplinary Intervention to Decrease Abdominal CT Use in Children Scott Weiner, MD, Tufts Medical Center 650. Do Abdominal CT Utilization Rates Vary Between Academic and Private Practice Pediatric Emergency Departments (PED) for Suspected Appendicitis? Margaret Menoch, Emory University - Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta 651. Variations in Transfer Patterns in Northern California Pediatric Trauma Centers Jessica Pierog, DO, MS, Stanford University 652. Impact on Triage-Based Guideline with Intranasal Analgeia in a Pediatric Emergency Department Kristin Anderson, MD, University of Utah 653. Pulmonary Embolism in the Pediatric Emergency Department Beesan Shalabi Agha, DO, Emory University 654. A Controlled Trial Evaluating the Outcomes Associated with a Discharge Action Plan Employing Single Dose Home Use Of Ondansetron In Patients With Acute Gastroenteritis Reed Caldwell, MD, New York Methodist Hospital 655. Repeatability Coefficient Of A 100 mm Visual Analog Scale In Children Benoit Bailey, MD MSc, CHU Sainte-Justine 656. Diagnostic Accuracy Of Two- Versus Four-film X-ray Series In The Diagnosis Of Skull Fractures In Children With Head Trauma Jocelyn Gravel, MD, MSc, CHU Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal 657. The Utility of an Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Respiratory Variation Index to Assess Dehydration in Pediatric Patients Isabel Barata, MD, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System 658. Pediatric Emergency Airway Management in Japanese Emergency Department: Multi-Center Prospective Observational Study in Japan Masashi Okubo, MD, Okinawa Chubu Hospital 659. Needs Assessment For Pediatric Respiratory Emergencies Among Residents And Medical Students Using A Web 2.0 Tool Including Preliminary Evidence Of Validity Anna Cedar, OHSU 660. Emergency Ultrasound Training In Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship Programs Jennifer Marin, MD, MSc, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh 661. Can The Pediatric Asthma Control And Communication Instrument (PACCI) Be Used In The ED To Improve Clinicians’ Assessment Of Asthma Control? Elizabeth Goldberg, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University 662. United States Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Death Rate Associated Strongly With Mean State Altitude Barry Brenner, MD, PhD, University Hospitals Case Medical Center 663. Evaluation of the Bedside Pediatric Early Warning System score for Pediatric Placement after Inter-facility Transports Jill Keyes, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin 664. Trauma Center Designation and Emergency Physician Awareness of Local Child Passenger Safety Resources Michelle Macy, MD, University of Michigan 665. Find My Patients a Pediatric Subspecialist: Benefits of a Statewide Pediatric Telemedicine Program Harold Simon, MD, MBA, Emory U. Depts of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine/ Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta 666. Disparities in Pregnancy Testing Rates Among Adolescent Emergency Department Patients Monika Goyal, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Pediatrics – Infectious Diseases 72

667. Evaluation of a Novel Pediatric Appendicitis Pathway Using High and Low Risk Scoring Systems Miranda K Devine, BS, Oregon Health and Science University 668. Computer-Assisted Self-Interviews Improve Testing for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea in the Pediatric Emergency Department Fahd Ahmad, MD, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine

Psychiatry/Social Issues

669. Lack Of Timely In-person Psychiatry Consultation In The Emergency Department Dinah Chen, Massachusetts General Hospital 670. Computer-delivered Alcohol And Driver Safety Behavior Screening And Intervention Program Initiated During An Emergency Department Visit Mary Murphy, PhD, Yale University 671. Prevalence of Depression Among Emergency Department Visitors with Chronic Illness Benjamin Bregman, MD, George Washington University 672. Initial Blood Alcohol Level Aids CIWA in Predicting Admission for Alcohol Withdrawal Craig Hullett, University of Arizona 673. Patient Perspectives On The Role Of Emergency Department Visitors And The Effect Of Visitors On Patient Outcome Measures Vicken Totten, MD, MS, University Hospitals Case Medical Center 674. Change in Ethanol Related Visits and Alcohol Withdrawal Visits to the Emergency Department Following a Law to Allow Expansion of Alcohol Sales Benjamin Hatten, MD, Oregon Health and Science University 675. In Combination With Benzodiazepines And Alcohol Intoxication, Intramuscular But Not Oral Olanzapine Is Associated With Decreased Oxygen Saturations Michael Wilson, PhD, MD, University of California San Diego 676. A Comparison of Frequent and Infrequent Emergency Department Users Among Patients with a Psychiatric Diagnosis Rasha Buhumaid, George Washington University 677. Presenting Symptoms Among Somali Patients Presenting with Myocardial Infarction: A Comparison of Clinical Characteristics, Presenting Complaint and Time to EKG Among Somali and Agematched White ED Patients Travis Olives, MD, MPH, MEd, Hennepin County Medical Center 678. A National Comparison Between Emergency Department Versus Outpatient Visits in Patients Who Are Depressed and Suicidal Shannon Toohey, MD, University of California, Irvine 679. ED Throughput For Patients With Psychiatric Complaints: The Role of a Physician in Triage Candace McNaughton, MD, Vanderbilt University 680. Ethnic Differences Influence Initial Alcohol Withdrawal Assessment Douglas Rappaport, University of Arizona 681. Comparison of Triage Systems: Is the Australian Triage System a Better Indicator of Psychiatric Patients Needs for Invention than the ENA Emergency Severity Index Triage System? Trena Burke, MPA, Chicago Medical School, Mount Sinai Hospital 682. Variations in the ED Workup For Psychiatric Patients Presenting to a Delaware ED: Does Final Disposition Influence the Evaluation? Danielle Minett, MD, Christiana Care Health Systems

Trauma

683. Evaluating Age in the Field Triage of Injured Persons Yoko Nakamura, MD, Oregon Health & Science University 684. Fluid Resuscitation Of Uncontrolled Hemorrhage Using A Hemoglobin-based Oxygen Carrier: Effect Of Traumatic Brain Injury Nathan White, MD, University of Washington 685. Post-traumatic Intracranial Bleeding With Normal INR: Does A Safety Threshold Exist? Amélie Coderre, Hopital du Sacre-Coeur de Montreal 686. Acute Outcomes After Emergency Department Presentation For Traumatic Brain Injury Tammy Ju, BA, University of Florida


687. Platelet Rich Plasma for Acute Ankle Sprains in the Emergency Department Adam Rowden, Einstein Medical Center 688. Nitroglycerine Modulates Survival Time In a Porcine Polytrauma Model When Co-infused with a Hemoglobin-based Oxygen Carrier. Nathan White, MD, University of Washington 689. Epidemiological Factors Predictive of Penetrating Trauma in an Urban Population Lisa Moreno-Walton, MD, MS, MSCR, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans 690. Falling on an Outstretched Hand (FOOSH) Radius Fractures of Emergency Department Patients Ian Storch, Jefferson Medical College 691. Validation of Rules to Predict Emergent Intervention in Pediatric Trauma Patients Dowin Boatright, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Denver Health Medical Center

Toxicology/Environmental

692. Droperidol for Sedation of Acute Behavioural Disturbance Leonie Calver, MD, Calvary Mater Newcastle and University of Newcastle 693. Glomerular Filtration Rate as an Indicator For Risk Of ContrastInduced Nephropathy for ED Patients Receiving Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography Rachel Weiselberg, MD, North Shore University Hospital 694. A Rat Model of Carbon Monoxide Induced Neurotoxicity Heather Ellsworth, Regions Hospital 695. A Prospective Cohort Study of Acute Kidney Injury in Multi-Day Ultramarathon Runners Anil Menon, MD, Stanford University School of Medicine 696. Prescription Opioid Misuse Among Geriatric Patients Kavita Babu, MD, the Alpert Medical School of Brown University 697. Summertime Heat-Related Illness in US Emergency Departments: Analysis of a Nationally Representative Sample Jeremy Hess, MD, MPH, Emory University 698. S-100β And Neuron-specific Enolase Levels In Carbonmonoxide Poisoning Murat Durusu, GATA School of Medicine Department of Emergency Medicine 699. Neurons In The Dorsomedial And Paraventricular Hypothalamus Mediate Locomotor And Neuroendocrine Responses To MDMA In Conscious Rats. Daniel Rusyniak, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine 700. Safety of Droperidol for sedation of Acute Behavioural Disturbance Leonie Calver, MD, Calvary Mater Newcastle and University of Newcastle 701. Blood Lead Level Elevation Following Explosive Charge Exposure in Breachers Christopher Holstege, MD, University of Virginia School of Medicine

Educational Assessment and Evaluation Techniques – Lightning Oral Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 12:00 noon – 2:00 pm) in Chicago 9

Moderator: David C. Gordon, MD, Duke University School of Medicine 702. Direct Observation of the Student-Patient Encounter in Emergency Medicine Clerkships Shreni Zinzuwadia, MD, NJMS and MMC 703. Does Standardized Training of EM and IM Residents Improve Information Transmitted During the Admission Handover? Miriam Fischer, MD, Emory University 704. Trainee-Preceptor Decision Concordance in the Pediatric Emergency Department Lindsey Tilt, New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s HospitalColumbia Univeristy 705. Student Perceptions on Basic and Advanced Cardiac Life Support Training During Medical School: Results of an Emergency Cardiac Care Training Initiative Survey Malford Pillow, MD, M.Ed, Baylor College of Medicine 706. Patient Perception Of Medical Professionalism: A Comparison In Different Clinical Settings Jared Strote, MD, University of Washington

707. Emergency Medicine Faculty Knowledge of and Confidence in Giving Feedback on the ACGME Core Competencies Todd Guth, MD, University of Colorado 708. Assessment Of Emergency Medicine Residents’ Competency in the Use Of Bedside Emergency Ultrasound Anita Datta, MD, RDMS, New York Hospital Queens 709. What ECG Diagnoses And/or Findings Do Residents In Emergency Medicine Need To Know? Catherine Patocka, MD, McGill Emergency Medicine Residency Program, McGill University 710. “Rolling Refreshers”: The Feasibility of Bedside Training to Reinforce CPR Psychomotor Performance Sarah Perman, MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania 711. Teaching Emergency Medicine Skills: Is A Self-directed, Independent, Online Curriculum The Way Of The Future? Tighe Crombie, MD, University of Ottawa 712. What The Applicant Sees: An Internet Based Evaluation of Residency Curricula In 3 Year Em Programs Using Websites and the SAEM Residency Directory. Daniel Runde, MD, St. Luke’s Roosevelt 713. Successful Use of Web-Based Learning Instruction for a Complex Communication Skill Travis Ganje, MD, University of Michigan

Ultrasound – Lightning Oral Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm)in Erie

Moderator: Michael B. Stone, MD, Alameda County Medical Center 714. Emergency Department (ED) Pelvic Ultrasound Reduces ED Length Of Stay (ED LOS) Compared To Radiology (RD) Pelvic Ultrasound Alan Chiem, MD, UC Irvine 715. Does Left Lateral Tilt Position Improve Inferior Vena Cava Filling In Third Trimester Pregnant Patients? Katherine Catallo, MD, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital 716. Derivation of Standard Observed Structured Competency Evaluations (OSCE) for FAST, Cardiac, Aortic and Pelvic Ultrasound Training In Emergency Medicine Stephen Leech, MD, Orlando Regional Medical Center 717. A Comparison of Longitudinal Versus Transverse Approach to Ultrasound Guided Axillary Vein Cannulation Michael Witting, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine 718. Preventing the Collapse of a Peripheral Vein During Cannulation: An Evaluation of Various Tourniquet Techniques on Vein Compressibility Amy Kule, MD, Oakland University / William Beaumont School of Medicine

Headaches, Seizures, and Bleeding Brains – Moderated Poster Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 1:00 – 2:00 pm in Arkansas Room

Moderator: Edward P. Sloan, MD, MPH, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago 719. Diagnostic Accuracy of a novel Emergency Electroencephalography Device (microEEG) in Identifying Non-convulsive Seizures and other EEG Abnormalities in the Emergency Department Patients with Altered Mental Status Shahriar Zehtabchi, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center 720. A Randomized Controlled Trial Of A Comprehensive Migraine Intervention Prior To Discharge From An ED Jennifer Norton, DO, Albert Einstein College of Medicine 721. Non-traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Diagnosed by Lumbar Puncture following Non-diagnostic Head CT: A Retrospective CaseControl Study and Decision Analysis Dustin Mark, MD, Kaiser Permanente 722. Does Pre-existing Antiplatelet Treatment Influence Postthrombolysis ICH In Community Treated Ischemic Stroke Patients? William Meurer, MD, University of Michigan

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Surviving Beyond the ED – Lightning Oral Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 2:00 – 3:00 pm) in Chicago 9

Moderator: Brian Zink, MD, Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital 723. Post-Cardiac Arrest Therapeutic Hypothermia Protects Cerebellar Purkinje Cells Robert Neumar, MD, PhD, Center for Resuscitation Science, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania 724. The Effect of Compressor-Administered Defibrillation on Peri-Shock Pauses in a Simulated Cardiac Arrest Scenario Joshua Glick, Penn State Hershey Medical Center 725. Prognostic Value of Peripheral Venous Oxygen Tension to Predict an Abnormal Initial Central Venous Oxygen Saturation in Emergency Department Patients Undergoing Quantitative Resuscitation for Septic Shock Jaclyn Davis, Carolinas Medical Center 726. The Effect of Controlled Mild Hypothermia on Survival in a Resuscitated Rat Model of Large Scald Burns Nhi Tan, BS, Stony Brook University 727. Serum Levels of Mitochondrial DNA in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Sepsis Michael Puskarich, MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center 728. Predictors Of Severe Systemic Anaphylactic Reactions In Emergency Department Patients Sangil Lee, Mayo Clinic

Simulation: Simply Sublime – Lightning Oral Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm in Chicago 8

Moderator: Ernest E. Wang, MD, NorthShore University HealthSystem 729. High Fidelity Simulation Improves Provider Confidence During Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) Resuscitation Scenarios Even Among Highly Experienced Staff, Jonathan McCoy, MD, RWJUH/RWJMS 730. Delays and Errors Among Pediatric Residents During Simulated Resuscitation Scenarios Using PALS Algorithms Arielle Levy, MD, MEd, Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Sainte Justine, Montreal, Canada 731. External Validation of Scoring Instruments to Evaluate Pediatric Resuscitations Arielle Levy, MD, MEd, Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Sainte Justine, Montreal, Canada 732. A Comparison of Traditional Lecture to Simulation Based Cases for Emergency Medicine Education Among Fourth Year Medical Students Alise Frallicciardi, MD, University of Connecticut Health Center/Hartford Hospital 733. Teaching an Emergency Medicine Approach to Altered Mental Status: Simulation Session More Effective Than Traditional Curriculum Jeremy Sperling, MD, Weill Cornell Medical College / NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital 734. Simulation Training Improves Patient Empathy In Medical Trainees Grace Lee, MD, Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine

EMS: It’s Not Just About Life Saving Interventions – Lightning Oral Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm in Chicago 10

Moderator: Michael S. Runyon, MD, Carolinas Medical Center 735. Attitudes, Beliefs, and Trust in the EMS to ED Handoff: Overcoming Barriers to Improving the Prehospital Patient Care Transition Zachary Meisel, MD, MPH, University of Pennsylvania 736. Barriers To Primary Care In Persons Using EMS Kimberly Hart, MA, University of Cincinnati 737. Predictors of Stress Among Nationally Certified EMS Professionals Melissa Bentley, MS, NREMT-P, National Registry of EMTs 738. The Effect of Gender on Patient Satisfaction with Prehospital Care Kruti Joshi, MPH, BSc, New York Hospital Queens

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739. Novel Approach to Statewide Biosurveillance Using Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Information Charles Cairns, MD, University of North Carolina 740. Assessing Chronic Stress In The Emergency Medical Services Elizabeth Donnelly, PhD, MPH, LICSW, NREMT-B, University of Windsor

Poisoning and Overdose – Moderated Poster Presentation SATURDAY, May 12th, 2012 • 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm in Colorado Room

Moderator: Louise Kao, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine 741. Effect of Naltrexone on Delayed EncephalopathyAfter Acute Poisoning with the Sarin Analogue Diisoprophylfluorophosphate (DFP) Followed by Atropine and Pralidoxime Rescue Michelle Troendle, MD, East Carolina University 742. Utility Of Point-of-care Ultrasound to Identify Large Tablet Ingestions Arthur Au MD, Thomas Jefferson University 743. Intravenous Lipid Therapy Does Not Mitigate Hypotension for Tricyclic Antidepressant Overdose: Interim Data Analysis of a Randomized, Controlled Study in Swine Shawn Varney, MD, San Antonio Military Medical Center 744. Lipid Rescue 911: A Survey Of Poison Center Medical Directors Regarding Intravenous Fat Emulsion Therapy Michael Christian, MD, The Toxikon Consortium 745. Reliability Of Non-toxic Acetaminophen Concentrations Obtained Less Than 4 Hours After Ingestion Kerry King, MD, Naval Medical Center San Diego 746. Opioid Receptor Polymorphism Associated with Clinical Severity in a Drug Overdose Population Alex Manini, MD, MS, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine


2012 Innovations in Emergency Medicine Education (IEME) Do you want to see the cutting-edge of Emergency Medicine Education? Mark your calendars for this year’s IEME exhibits! Take your institution to new heights by taking part in the 2012 Innovations in Emergency Medicine Education (IEME) at the SAEM Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois. We have a new format that includes three moderated poster sessions, a tabletop exhibit demonstration session and, for the first time, three moderated oral spotlight sessions. The spotlight sessions showcase the best of educational innovations in the categories of simulation, ultrasound and faculty-resident projects. Exhibits will be showcased on Thursday (5/10) Friday (5/11) and Saturday (5/12) with multiple offerings each day.

THursday, May 10, 2012

Moderated IEME Poster Presentations, 9:00 am – 10:00 am in Arkansas Room

1) A  B C’s Of Team Leadership In Emergency Medicine: A Literature Review and Novel Curriculum Cullen Hegarty, Kelly Barringer, Jessie Nelson, Emily Binstadt, Sharmila Raghunandan. Regions Hospital, St. Paul, MN 2) Life After Residency Workshop: A Statewide Workforce Preparation Day for Emergency Medicine Residents and Pediatric Emergency Fellows Erin S. Berk, Kelly Gray-Eurom, Kendall Webb, Alexander S. Berk, Phyllis L. Hendry. University of Florida COM-Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL 3) Introduction Of Symptom-Based Point-Of-Care Ultrasound Lecture Curriculum Into An Emergency Medicine Residency: A Novel Approach Srikar Adhikari, Albert Fiorello. University of Arizona Medical Center, Tucson, AZ 4) A Human Cadaver Training Model For Ultrasound Diagnosis Of Pneumothorax Srikar Adhikari1, Wes Zeger2, Carol Lomneth2. 1University of Arizona Medical Center, Tucson, AZ; 2University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 5) An ECG Blog for Education in Electrocardiography Stephen W. Smith, Scott A. Joing. Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN 6) Pediatric Emergency Care Safety Initiative (PECSI): An E-Learning Educational Program for Just-In-Time Training and Continuing Education Phyllis L. Hendry, Colleen Kalynych, Robert Luten, Madeline Joseph, Steven A. Godwin. University of Florida COM-Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL

IEME Simulation Spotlight Oral Presentations, 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm in Michigan B

7) F  rom Passive Observers to Active Learners: Using New Technologies to Capture Observer Ratings David H. Salzman, Susan Eller, Paul Pribaz, Craig Adams, Lanty O’Connor, John A. Vozenilek. Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 8) Quick Case Simulation Curriculum: A Time Sensitive Approach To Emergency Medicine Education Utilizing Simulation Alise Frallicciardi, Thomas Nowicki, Christian Molstrom, Katherine Fellman, Ian Medoro. Hartford Hospital/University of Connecticut, Hartford, CT 9) Trauma Ambush - Statewide Trauma Education via Video Teleconference Trauma Simulation Jonathon Palmer. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 10) Transition in Critical Care from PGY1-2: Carolinas Healthcare System: Intern Simulation-Based Common Critical Care Curriculum Mark J. Bullard, Jo Anna Leuck, Lisa Howley. Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC

FRIDAY, May 11, 2012

Moderated IEME Poster Presentations, 8:00 am – 9:00 am in Arkansas Room

11) L ightening Rounds: A Resident Directed Short Format Didactic Innovation Nathan Allen, M. Tyson Pillow. Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 12) I mplementation of Small Group Reflection Rounds at an Emergency Medicine Residency Program Leana S. Wen1, Justin T. Baca1, Patricia O’Malley2, James Kimo Takayesu2. 1 Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA; 2Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 13) T  he Incorporation Of High-fidelity Simulation In The Evaluation Of Efficacy Of A Residency Remediation Plan Chris A. Ghaemmaghami, Amita Sudhir, William A. Woods. University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA 14) The “EBM Smartphrase”: A Novel Use of the Electronic Health Record, Smartphones and QR Codes to Teach Evidence Based Medicine at the Bedside Matthew A. Silver, William C. Krauss, Cameron M. McFarland. Kaiser Permanente, San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, CA 15) A Novel Approach Using Self-assessments To Improve Performance On The Oral Board Examination Richard Bounds1, Amish Aghera2, Colleen Bush3, Nestor Rodriguez4, Christopher McDowell5, Peter Shearer6, Barbara Davis1, Sally Santen7. 1 Christiana Care Health Systems, Newark, DE; 2Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY; 3Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; 4 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI; 5Southern Illinois University, Springfield, IL; 6Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY; 7University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI 16) Development Of A Tablet Based Application For Self-guided Training On Emergency Orthopedic Care Steven J. Warrington, Michael Beeson. Akron General Medical Center, Akron, OH

IEME Faculty/Resident Spotlight Oral Presentations, 11:00 am – Noon in Huron Room

17) A  Blog-format Educational Media Collective Daniel J. Lakoff, Reuben J. Strayer. Mount Sinai, Manhattan, NY 18) EM Lyceum--A Novel Method to Encourage Academic Debate and Teaching Amongst Faculty and Residents Whitney K. Bryant1, Anand Swaminathan2, Audrey Wagner2, Salil Bandhari2. 1University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH; 2New York University/Bellevue Hospital Center, New York, NY 19) Academic and Clinical Integration: A Novel Residency Curriculum Translating Evidence Into Action Joel Moll. Emory University, Atlanta, GA 20) Use Of An Innovative Web-based Mentoring Tool To guide Residents and Faculty In Design Of Original Clinical Research Kyle Warren, Daniel Keyes. St Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor/ University of Michigan EM Residency, Ann Arbor, MI

IEME Exhibit Presentations, 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm in River Hall B

21) E  mergency Department Thoracotomy: A Novel Simulation Teaching Model for Residency Training Erinn Hama1, Kevin Reed1, Sangeeta Desai1, Jesse Jamieson2, Christine Trankiem3. 1Georgetown University and Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC; 2Sitel Clinical Simulation Center, Washington, DC; 3MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC 22) Umbilical Vascular Access Task Trainer-An Inexpensive & Biohazardly Safe DIY (Do It Yourself) Model Jacqueline Nemer, Jillian Mongelluzzo. University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 23) S  imulation in Education: A Fracture Reduction Model Spencer Adoff, Kevin King, Joseph Spinell. Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA 24) A Novel Technique for Teaching Deliveries: A Low Fidelity Model Danielle Hart. HCMC, Minneapolis, MN

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25) Cadaveric Porcine “Beating Heart” Model for Training Emergency Cardiorrhaphy Michael C. Plewa, Kristina K. Burgard. Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center, Toledo, OH 26) I ntegrating a Wireless Remote Programmed Stethoscope into Simulation Scenarios Steven J. Warrington, Michael Beeson, Frank Fire. Akron General Medical Center, Akron, OH 27) Educational Video Production Using BoinxTV Scott Joing, Robert Reardon, Stephen Smith, Joseph Clinton. Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN

Saturday, May 12th

Moderated IEME Poster Presentations, 8:00 – 9:00 am in Arkansas Room

28) R  edesigning Patient Follow-up Logs: Harnessing Technology to Promote Self Directed Learning and Create an Interactive, Collaborative, Emergency Medicine Patient Follow-up Blog David H. Salzman, Lanty O’Connor, John A. Vozenilek, Michael A. Gisondi. Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 29) An Emergency Medicine Research Course and Curriculum for Emergency Medicine Residents and Junior Faculty Edward P. Sloan, Wes Eilbert, Heather Prendergast. UIC College of Medicine, Chicago, IL 30) The Visual Odyssey Case of the Week Margarita E. Pena. St. John Hospital and Medical Center, Grosse Pointe Park, MI 31) P  roject Professionalism Julie A. Slick, Andrew Pizza, Lisa Moreno-Walton. Louisiana State

University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 32) T  eaching Clinical Reasoning In Emergency Medicine: A Curriculum For Third And Fourth Year Students Todd Guth1, Dave Matero1, Tien Vu2, Jacqueline Ward-Gaines1, Jacqueline Ward-Gaines1, Jason Hoppe1, Jeff Druck1. 1University of Colorado, Aurora, CO; 2 The Children’s Hospital of Denver, Aurora, CO 33) S  LICE: Simulation to Limit the Incidence of Cognitive Errors David Saloum, Brian Gillett, Karen Lind, Amish Aghera, Magdalena Filardo, Joshua Schiller. Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY

IEME Ultrasound Spotlight Oral Presentations, Noon – 1:00 pm in Erie Room

34) The Ultrasound Podcast Michael P. Mallin1, Matthew Dawson2. 1University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; 2 University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 35) Emergency Department Ultrasound Simulator Paul Kulyk, Paul A. Olszynski. University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada 36) 1-Minute Ultrasound iPhone App Matthew Dawson1, Michael Mallin2. 1University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY; 2 University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 37) Qpath A Web Based Image Archival System And Feed Back Loop. The Newest Innovation In Ultrasound Education At Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Chris Mendoza, Rajesh Geria, Grant Wei. UMDNJ- Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ

GEMA Welcomes the european society of emergency medicine Saturday, May 12th 8:00am - 10:00am Evolution of Research in Emergency Medicine in Europe Abdel Bellou, MD Evolution of Emergency Medicine Training in Europe Eric Revue, MD Use of Bayesian Nets in Emergency Medicine Nathalie Flacke, MD Overcrowding in Emergency Departments in Europe Eric Revue, MD Update on Anaphylaxis Management Abdel Bellou, MD *Content subject to change *Make sure to stop by the Global Emergency Medicine Academy session immediately following from 10:00am - 3:00pm in Superior A & B

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Late Breaker Abstracts #2) Presenting on Thursday, May 10th, 4:30 – 6:00 pm, Sheraton 4-5 Prevalence of Non-convulsive Seizure and Other Electroencephalographic Abnormalities In Emergency Department Patients With Altered Mental Status Shahriar Zehtabchi1, Arthur C. Grant2, Samah G. Abdel Baki3, Omurtag Ahmet3, Richard Sinert1, Geetha Chari2, Shweta Malhotra1, Jeremy Weedon4, Andre A. Fenton5. 1Department of Emergency Medicine, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY; 2 Department of Neurology, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY; 3Biosignal Group Inc., Brooklyn, NY; 4 Scientific Computing Center, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY; 5Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, NY

#337) Presenting on Friday, May 11th, 10:00 – 11:00 am in Erie Room Multicenter Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial of Cardiac CT vs Alternative Triage Strategies in Acute Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department: Results from the ROMICAT II Trial Udo Hoffmann1, Quynh A. Truong1, Hang Lee1, Eric T. Chou2, Shant Kalanjian2, Pamela Woodard3, John T. Nagurney1, James H. Pope4, Thomas Hauser5, Charles White6, Mike Mullens3, Nathan I. Shapiro5, Michael Bond6, Scott Weiner7, Pearl Zakroysky1, Douglas Hayden1, Stephen D. Wiviott8, Jerome Fleg9, David Schoenfeld1, James Udelson7. 1 Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA; 2Kaiser Permanente Fontana, Fontana, CA; 3Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; 4Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA; 5Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA; 6University of Maryland, Baltimore, Baltimore, MD; 7Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA; 8Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA; 9NHLBI, Bethesda, MD

Background: Two to ten percent of patients evaluated in emergency (ED) present with altered mental status LATE BREAKERdepartment ABSTRACTS (AMS). The prevalence of non-convulsive seizure (NCS) and other Background: While early cardiac computed tomographic angiography #2) Presenting on Thursday, May 10th, 4:30 – 6:00 pm, Sheraton electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities in this4-5population is (CCTA) could be more effective to manage Emergency Department This information needed to make recommendations not known. patients with acute chest pain and intermediate (>4%) risk of Prevalence of Non-convulsive Seizureisand Other Electroencephalographic Abnormalities In(ED) Emergency regarding routine of emergent EEG in AMS patients. Departmentthe Patients Withuse Altered Mental Status acute coronary syndrome (ACS) than current management strategies, it1 also could result in increased testing, cost, and radiation exposure. 3 Objectives: To 1 identify the2 prevalence of 3NCS and other EEG Shahriar Zehtabchi , Arthur C. Grant , Samah G. Abdel Baki , Omurtag Ahmet , Richard Sinert , Geetha

1 4 Chari2, Shweta Malhotra , Jeremy Weedon , Andre A. Fenton5. 1Department of Emergency Medicine, abnormalities in ED patients with AMS. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to determine whether State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY; 2Department of Neurology, State incorporation of CCTA early in the ED evaluation process leads to more 3 Methods: prospective observational study at two urban Biosignal Group Inc., Brooklyn, NY; University ofANew York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY; academic 4 efficient Scientific Computing Center, University New York, Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY; management and earlier discharge than SOC in patients with ED. Inclusion: patients ≥ State 13 years oldofwith AMS.Downstate Exclusion: An easily 5 acute chest pain at intermediate risk for ACS. Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, NY correctable cause of AMS (e.g. hypoglycemia, opioid overdose). A Randomized comparative effectiveness trial enrolling Methods: 30-minute with the standard electrodes was performed on present Background: EEG Two to ten percent of patients19 evaluated in emergency department (ED) with patients between 40-75 years of age without known CAD, presenting altered mental status (AMS). prevalence of non-convulsive (NCS)within and other each subject as soon as The possible after presentationseizure (usually 1 electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities in this population is noton known. This information needed toisthe ED with chest pain but without ischemic ECG changes or elevated hour). of EEG abnormalities based unblinded Outcome: prevalence to make recommendations regarding the routine use of emergent EEG in AMS patients. initial troponin and require further risk stratification for decision review of EEGs by a board-certified epileptologist. All EEGs were later making, at nine US sites. Patients are being randomized to either Objectives:by To identify the prevalence of NCS and EEG abnormalities in EDinterpatients with AMS. reviewed a second epileptologist in other a blinded fashion and CCTA as the first diagnostic test or to standard of care (SOC) which rater agreement (IRA) was calculated. Descriptive statistics are used Methods: A prospective observational study at two academic urban ED. Inclusion: patients ≥ 13 years could include no testing or functional testing such as exercise ECG, tooldreport EEGExclusion: findings. are reported as percentages with overdose). A 30with AMS. An Frequencies easily correctable cause of AMS (e.g. hypoglycemia, opioid stress SPECT, and stress echo following serial biomarkers. Test results minute EEG with the standard 19 electrodes was performed on each subject as soon as possible after 95% confidence intervals (CI), and IRA is summarized with kappa. were provided to MDs but management in neither arm was driven by presentation (usually within 1 hour). Outcome: prevalence of EEG abnormalities based on unblinded review of A EEGs by of a board-certified All from EEGs were reviewed by a second a study protocol. Data on time, diagnostic testing, and cost of index total 261 patientsepileptologist. were enrolled Aprillater 2011 to February Results: epileptologist a blinded inter-rater (IRA)EEG was calculated. statistics hospitalization and the following 28 days are being collected. The 2012 (medianin age: 59, fashion rangeand 13-100, 46%agreement male). The findings Descriptive are are used to report EEG findings. Frequencies are reported as percentages with 95% confidence intervals primary endpoint is length of hospital stay (LOS). The trial is powered presented in the table. Excluding uninterpretable reports, 204 EEG were (CI), and IRA is summarized with kappa. to allow for detection of a difference in LOS of 10.1 hours between abnormal (78%, 95% CI, 73-83%). The most common abnormality was Results: A totalslowing of 261 patients were enrolled from April 2011 to February 2012 (median age:competing 59, range strategies with 95% power assuming that 70% of projected background (see table) indicating underlying encephalopathy. 13-100, 46% male). The EEG findings are presented in the table. Excluding uninterpretable reports, 204 LOS values are true. Secondary endpoints are cumulative radiation NCS (including non-convulsive status epilepticus [NCSE]) was detected EEG were abnormal (78%, 95% CI, 73-83%). The most common abnormality was background slowing exposure, and cost of competing strategies. Tertiary endpoints are in(see 5%table) (95% CI, 3-10%) of patients. IRA forNCS EEG interpretations (N=227) indicating underlying encephalopathy. (including non-convulsive status epilepticus institutional, caregiver, and patient characteristics associated with [NCSE]) detected in 5% (95% CI,95%CI, 3-10%) of0.28-0.41). patients. IRA for EEG interpretations (N=227) was very was verywas modest (kappa: 0.35, modest (kappa: 0.35, 95%CI, 0.28-0.41). primary and secondary outcomes. Rate of missed ACS within 28 days Table: EEG interpretations in subjects ED patients with AMS (n=261). is the safety endpoint.

Table: EEG interpretations in subjects ED patients with AMS (n=261). EEG interpretation n Normal 51 Slowing only 157 NCS with NCSE 7 NCS without NCSE 4 Epileptiform * 36 Uninterpretable 6 *With or without slowing

% 20 60 3 2 14 2

95% CI 15,25 54,66 1,6 0,4 10,19 1,5

Conclusions: ED patients with AMS have a high prevalence of EEG abnormalities, including encephalopathy and NCS. ED physicians should have a high index of suspicion for such pathologies in AMS patients. EEG is necessary to make the diagnosis of NCS/NCSE, for which early treatment significantly reduces morbidity.

Results: As of November 21st, 2011, 880 of 1000 patients have been enrolled (mean age: 54±8, 46.5% female, ACS rate 7.55%). The anticipated completion of the last patient visit is 02/28/12 and the database will be locked in early March 2012. We will present the results of the primary, secondary, and some tertiary endpoints for the entire cohort. Conclusion: ROMICAT II will provide rigorous data on whether incorporation of CCTA early in the ED evaluation process leads to more efficient management and triage than SOC in patients with acute chest pain at intermediate risk for ACS.

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Late Breaker Abstracts #349) Presenting on Friday, May 11th, 11:00 am – 12:00 noon Inter-alpha Trypsin Inhibitor (ITI) levels in Emergency Department Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Anthony M. Napoli, Ling Zhang, Fenwick Gardiner, Patrick Salome. Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI Background: Inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor (ITI) is a protein in a family of plasma protease inhibitors that are thought to be protective in sepsis by inhibiting serine proteases that play a role in inflammation. Prolonged negative feedback of the inflammatory cascade is thought to exhaust the body’s reserves of ITI leading to dysregulation of cellular immunity and inflammation seen in sepsis. Low levels of ITI have been associated with severe sepsis in ICU patients when compared to healthy controls. Objective: To determine if ITI levels in ED patients are significantly lower in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. To determine if ITI levels correlate with the APACHE score. Methods: Prospective observational cohort of controls(C), acutely ill inflammatory non-septic illnesses (AINS) patients with SIRS criteria but no clinical or pathologic evidence of infection, and patients with severe sepsis or septic shock (SS) (lactate >4, SBP<90 after 2L normal saline). Exclusion criteria include neutropenia, active treatment for cancer, pregnancy, incarceration, hypothermia (environmentally induced, < 95 F), hyperthermia (environmentally induced, >104 F), or any attending suspicion of coexisting traumatic, cardiogenic, or neurogenic shock. A competitive ELISA assay using murine 69.26 antibody was used to measure ITI levels. Based on prior results from inpatients with sepsis, a sample size of 100 patients would be necessary (2 tail, p<0.05,β=0.8), assuming a standard error of difference of 140. Results: 103 patients were enrolled, 8 excluded secondary to protocol violations, leaving a total of 95 patients. Mean age was 57±21. In SS patients, mean shock index was 1.1±0.3, lactate 2.1±1.3, ScVO2 63±21, and APACHE 15±6. ITI levels are lower in patients with SS (252 95%CI 234-269) vs. AINS 262 (95% CI 237-289) or C (292 95%CI 260-325), p=0.05. ITI levels are weakly positively associated with APACHE score in severe sepsis patients (r=0.36, p=0.01). However, ITI significantly varied as a function of age within each cohort. Conclusion: ITI levels in ED patients presenting with severe sepsis are higher than control and AINS patients. However, the degree of variability in ITI levels within each cohort as well as the differences in ITI as a function of age between cohorts limits the utility of these results without further research exploring whether age itself or disease specific factors may account for these variations. #592) Presenting on Saturday, May 12th, 9:00 – 10:30 am Increased Serum Albuterol Concentrations May Be Associated With Elevations Of Serum Lactate In Subjects With Acute Asthma Exacerbations Kristen Aubuchon1, Kazuko Matsuda2, Stacey L. House1, Ian Ferguson1, John Schneider1, Lawrence Lewis1. 1Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO; 2Medicinova, Inc., San Diego, CA Background: We have previously described increased serum lactate concentrations in subjects with acute asthma exacerbation. It is not

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clear if this is due to increased work of breathing or possibly a side effect of treatment. Objectives: 1) Determine if there is a significant correlation between increased treatment lactate or ∆ lactate and serum albuterol concentrations during treatment of an acute asthma exacerbation after adjusting for dyspnea score. 2) Determine if elevated treatment lactate concentrations or ∆ lactate concentrations are associated with increased hospital admissions. Methods: This is an interim, subgroup analysis of a prospective, interventional, double-blind study performed in an academic urban ED. Subjects that were consented for this trial presented with acute asthma exacerbations with FEV1 < 50% predicted within 30 minutes following initiation of “standard care” (includes a minimum of 2.5 mg nebulized albuterol; 0.5 mg nebulized ipratropium; and 50 mg of a corticosteroid). ED physicians who were unaware of the study objectives administered all treatments. Subjects were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either placebo or investigational intravenous beta agonist arms. Blood was obtained at 1 and 1.25 hours after the start of the hour long infusion for determination of albuterol and lactate concentrations, and a Modified Borg Dyspnea Score (DS) was obtained for all patients. The treatment lactate and ∆ lactate were correlated with 1 hr serum albuterol concentrations and hospital admission using partial Pearson correlations to adjust for DS. Results: 42 subjects were enrolled to date, 20 with complete data. The mean baseline serum lactate level was 19.3 mg/dL (SD ±9.5). This increased to 32.6 mg/dL (SD ±15.8) at 1.25 hrs. The mean 1 hr DS was 3.85+ 2.0. The correlation between treatment lactate, ∆ lactate, 1 hr serum albuterol concentrations (R, S and total) and admission to hospital are shown (Table 1). Both treatment and ∆ lactate were highly correlated with total serum albuterol, R albuterol, and S albuterol. There was no correlation between treatment lactate or ∆ lactate and hospital admission. There was also no significant difference in the mean lactate levels in admitted vs. non-admitted patients (32.8 mg/ dL vs. 32.1 mg/dL, p=0.9). While not statistically significant, there was a trend in twenty-four hour dyspnea scores in patients with markedly elevated lactate (≥ 30 mg/dL) compared to those with lactate < 30 mg/ dL (3.19 vs. 1.88, p=0.08) Conclusions: Lactate and ∆ lactate concentrations correlate with albuterol concentrations in patients presenting with acute asthma exacerbations after adjusting for dyspnea score, but do not correlate with hospital admission.

Treatment Lactate

Delta Lactata

R Alb

S Alb

Total Alb

Admit

Correlation Coefficient

0.505

0.497

0.674

-0.018

Significance (2 tailed)

0.028

0.030

0.002

0.910

Correlation Coefficient

0.519

0.525

0.605

-0.075

Significance (2 tailed)

0.023

0.021

0.006

0.643


Call for Didactic Proposals- 2013 SAEM Annual Meeting May 15th-18th Atlanta, Georgia

The Program Committee is inviting proposals for didactic sessions for the 2013 Annual Meeting. Didactic proposals may be aimed at medical students, residents, junior faculty, and/or senior faculty. The format may be a lecture, panel discussion, or workshop. The Program Committee will also consider proposals for pre- or post-day workshops or multiple sessions during the Annual Meeting aimed at in-depth instruction in a specific discipline. Didactic proposals must support the mission of SAEM (to improve patient care by advancing research and education in research and emergency medicine) and should fall into one of the following categories: Career Development Education (educational research or teaching methodology, improving the quality of education, enhancing teaching skills) Research (research methodology, improving the quality of research) State-of-the-Art (presentation of cutting edge-basic science or clinical research topics that have important implications for further investigation or the future practice of emergency medicine: note the State-of-the-Art sessions are not a review of the literature or summary of clinical practice) Only online submissions will be accepted. To submit a proposal, complete the online Didactic Submission form at www.saem.org. For additional questions or information, contact SAEM at saem@saem.org or call 847-813-9823.

Didactic Co-Chairs: Sarah Ronan-Bentle, MD - email ronanse@ucmail.uc.edu Megan Ranney, MD - email megan_ranney@brown.edu

Best of CORD

Session #1

Friday May 11, 2012 1:00p-3:00p Chicago Ballroom 8-level 4

1:00 pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2:00 pm Critical Conversations Stephen Hayden, MD; University of California, San Diego

Come see the best presentations of the CORD Annual Academic Assembly Meeting held this past April 2012 in Atlanta!

Leaving a residency, suspicion of alcohol or other drug abuse, a resident in legal trouble. These are just a few examples of articularly difficult scenarios that can occur in residency. Effective communication is crucial during these critical conversations with residents. After this session, participants will be able to: 1. Identify high-stakes resident scenarios requiring further conversations with program leadership. 2. Choose the ideal setting to have the critical conversations. 3. Practice techniques of effective communication with residents. 4. Discuss follow-up methods and strategies for critical conversations.

Session #2 2:00 pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:00 pm Fostering Resilience Edward Callahan, MD; Medical College of Wisconsin Development of a competent Emergency Physician is a stressful and arduous process. The ability to maintain strength, perseverance and hope during adversity is key to resident success. This session is designed to help faculty identify and foster the traits and behaviors that create a resilient resident. After this session, participants will be able to: 1. Define resilience and the factors that predict success in residency and beyond. 2. Identify the potentially fragile resident before it is too late. 3. Provide tools for faculty to help residents become more resilient in both their personal and professional lives. 79


Photography Exhibit & Visual Diagnosis Contest Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers, River Exhibit Hall B There were 78 cases and photos submitted to the Program Committee for consideration of presentation at the Annual Meeting. Selected photos and cases will displayed in two formats. Medical students and residents will be invited to participate in the Visual Diagnosis Contest. Winners in both medical students and resident categories will be awarded a one-year membership in SAEM, including subscription to Academic Emergency Medicine Journal (AEM), a free registration to attend the 2013 SAEM Annual Meeting in Atlanta, a major Emergency Medicine textbook, and a subscription to the SAEM Newsletter. Recipients will be announced in the July/August issue of the SAEM Newsletter. “Clinical Pearls” photos will be displayed for the benefit of all attendees. These photos will include a case history, as well as the diagnosis and “take home” points. SAEM is proud to display original photos of educational value and gratefully acknowledges the efforts of the individuals who contributed to this years Clinical Pearls and Visual Diagnosis Contest entries.

Photography Exhibit & Visual Diagnosis Participants Kellen T. Galster, MSIV Albany Medical College Lisa Mills, MD Albany Medical College Silva Fernando, MD Albany Medical College Peter Lofaso, DO Aria Health Annahieta Kalantari, DO Aria Health Thomas Nguyen, MD Beth Israel Medical Center, NY Syeda Hasan, MD Beth Israel Medical Center, NY Beena Mathaikutty, MD Beth Israel Medical Center, NY Christian H. Jacobus, MD Central Michigan University College of Medicine Robert Cooney, MD Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center Kara Jane Sexton, MD Cooper University Hospital Rachel Haroz, MD Cooper University Hospital

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Jessica Mitchell, MD Cooper University Hospital

Nichole S. Lupei, DO Resurrection Medical Center

Janet Alteveer, MD Cooper University Hospital

Ryan Paterson, MD St. Joseph’s Medical Center, Denver

Jeff Weiner, MD Cooper University Hospital

Ryan Murphy, St. Joseph’s Medical Center, Denver

Lauren Py, MD Florida Hospital Emergency Medicine

Jesson Yeh, MD St. Luke’s Roosevelt Hospital

Mark Silverberg, MD Kings County Hospital/SUNY Downstate, Brooklyn

Diana Herrera, MD St. Luke’s Roosevelt Hospital

Daniela Morato, MD LAC + USC Medical Center

Turandot Saul, MD St. Luke’s Roosevelt Hospital

Jordana Haber, MD Lincoln Hospital South Bronx

Elizabeth Brothers, MD SUNY Downstate/Kings County Hospital Center

Mary Ryan, MD Lincoln Hospital South Bronx

Mark Silverberg, MD SUNY Downstate/Kings County Hospital Center

Mary T. Ryan, MD Lincoln Hospital South Bronx

Cray Ross, MD Texas Tech HSC, El Paso, TX

Camille Doan, MD Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Susan Watts, PhD Texas Tech HSC, El Paso

Eric McVey, MD Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Robert F. Stump, MD, PhD Texas Tech HSC, El Paso

Heather Murphy-Lavoie, MD Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Shook-Ming Taylor, DO Texas Tech HSC, El Paso

Lisa Moreno-Walton, MD Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Joseph Portale, MD Thomas Jefferson University Hospital

Ryan Chamberlin, MD LSU Interim Public Hospital

Michael Estreicher, MD Thomas Jefferson University Hospital

Jedidiah Leaf, MD LSUHSC - New Orleans

Vicken Totten, MD University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Jeffery St. Clair, MD LSUHSC - New Orleans

Edward Michelson, MD University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Sean Hardy, MD LSUHSC - New Orleans

Kelly Tenbrink, MD University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Christie Butts, MD LSUHSC - New Orleans

Brandon Allen, MD University of Florida, Gainesville

George L. Higgins, III, MD Maine Medical Center

Richard F. Petrik, MD University of Florida, Gainesville

Nathaniel J. Ward, MS4 Maine Medical Center

Nick Kluesner, MD University of Iowa

James H. Little, MD Maine Medical Center

Hans House, MD University of Iowa

Erik Angles, MD Maine Medical Center

Nirav Shastri, MD University of Missouri, Kansas City

Sara W. Nelson, MD Maine Medical Center

Tamara Peterson, DO University of Missouri, Kansas City

Akira L. Dunn, DO Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center

Milton Fowler, MD University of Missouri, Kansas City

Michael J. McCrea, MD Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center

Derek Knotts, MSIV University of Oklahoma

Mark Su, MD North Shore University Hospital

Scott Rogers, MD University of Oklahoma

Kristin M. Schwab, DO North Shore University Hospital

Joshua Gentges, MD University of Oklahoma

Steve C. Kristos, DO Resurrection Medical Center

Stephen Thomas, MD University of Oklahoma


Call for Abstracts - 2013 SAEM Annual Meeting May 15-18, 2013 Atlanta, Georgia The Program Committee will be accepting abstracts for review for presentation at the 2013 SAEM Annual Meeting in the fall. Authors are invited to submit original emergency medicine research in the following categories:

Abdominal/Gastrointestinal/Genitourinary AEM Consensus Conference - Global Health and Emergency Care: A Research Agenda Airway/Anesthesia/Analgesia Cardiovascular – Basic Sciences Cardiovascular – Clinical Research Clinical Decision Guidelines Clinical Operations – Personnel Clinical Operations – Processes Computer Technology Critical Care/Resuscitation Diagnostic Technologies/Radiology Disaster Medicine Disease/Injury Prevention Education EMS/Out-of-Hospital – Cardiac Arrest EMS/Out-of-Hospital – Non-Cardiac Arrest Ethics Geriatrics

Health Policy Research Health Services Research Infectious Diseases International Emergency Medicine Neurology Obstetrics/Gynecology Orthopedics Pediatrics – Infectious Diseases Pediatrics - General Professional Development Psychiatry/Social Issues Pulmonary Research Design/Methodology/Statistics Simulation Toxicology/Environmental Trauma Other

The abstract submission site and instructions will be available on the SAEM website at www.saem.org in October, 2012. For further information or questions, contact SAEM at saem@ saem.org or 847-813-9823. As the reach of emergency medicine expands, SAEM recognizes that many abstracts traditionally submitted to the Annual Meeting are also pertinent to other national societies, and may be presented at their respective scientific assemblies. In an effort to provide a forum for SAEM Annual Meeting attendees to hear and experience the vast breadth of emergency medicine research, abstracts submitted to or presented at other, non-emergency medicine, national meetings within the past calendar year (June 2012 to May 2013) will be considered for presentation at the SAEM Annual Meeting. Original abstracts presented at SAEM 2012-2013 Regional Meetings or the 2013 CORD Academic Assembly will be considered. Only reports of original research may be submitted. The data must not be published in a manuscript or e-publication prior to the first day of the Annual Meeting except in abstract form when associated with a presentation at a non-emergency medicine national conference. Abstracts accepted for publication at the Annual Meeting will be published in the Academic Emergency Medicine online supplement. SAEM strongly encourages authors to submit their manuscripts to AEM. AEM will notify authors of a decision regarding publication within 60 days of receipt of a manuscript. Proposals for Innovations in Emergency Medicine Education (IEME) will be solicited with a deadline in January, 2013. Submission information will appear online on the SAEM Annual Meeting webpage www.saem.org in November, 2012. Abstract Co-Chairs:

Steven Bird, MD - email steven.bird@umassmemorial.org Ali Raja MD - email aliraja@gmail.com

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Moderators for 2012 Meeting Opeolu M. Adeoye, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Debra E. Houry, MD, MPH Emory University School of Medicine

Megan Ranney, MD, MPH Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital

Harrison J. Alter, MD, MS Alameda County Medical Center

Christopher Kabrhel, MD Massachusetts General Hospital

Linda A. Regan, MD Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Jennifer Avegno, MD Louisana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans

Louise Kao, MD Indiana University School of Medicine

Lynne D. Richardson, MD Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Brigitte M. Baumann, MD, MSCE Cooper Hospital/University Medical Center

Stephanie Kayden, MD, MPH Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Kevin G. Rodgers, MD Indiana University School of Medicine

Michelle H. Biros, MD, MS Hennepin County Medical Center

Rahul K. Khare, MD Northwestern University

Robert M. Rodriguez, MD University of California (San Francisco)/San Francisco General Hospital

Andra L. Blomkalns, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Nathan Kuppermann, MD, MPH University of California, Davis School of Medicine

Michael S. Runyon, MD Carolinas Medical Center

William F. Bond, MD Lehigh Valley Hospital Network/Pennsylvania State University Hospital

Frank LoVecchio, DO District Medical Group

Jeremiah Schuur, MD, MHS Brigham & Womens Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Jordan B. Bonomo, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Robert A. Lowe, MD, MPH Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine

David A. Caro, MD University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville

Julie Mayglothing, MD Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine

Christopher R. Carpenter, MD, MS Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine

Jason T. McMullan, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Brendan G. Carr, MD University of Pennsylvania David C. Cone, MD Yale University School of Medicine Theodore R. Delbridge, MD, MPH The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Deborah B. Diercks, MD, MSc University of California, Davis, School of Medicine Rosemarie Fernandez, MD Harborview Medical Center/University of Washington John T. Finnell, MD Indiana University School of Medicine David C. Gordon, MD Duke University School of Medicine Katherine L. Heilpern, MD Emory University School of Medicine Michael L. Hochberg, MD Saint Peters University Hospital/ Drexel University College Of Medicine Benjamin Honigman, MD University Of Colorado Denver-Emergency Medicine

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Scott W. Melanson, MD St Luke’s-Bethlehem PA

Nathan I. Shapiro, MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School Philip H. Shayne, MD Emory University School of Medicine Edward P. Sloan, MD, MPH University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago Sarah A. Stahmer, MD

Nathan W. Mick, MD Maine Medical Center

Ian G. Stiell, MD, MSc University of Ottawa

Michelle Nypaver, MD University of Michigan

Michael B. Stone, MD Alameda County Medical Center

Jonathan S. Olshaker, MD Boston University School of Medicine

Richard L. Summers, MD University of Mississippi Medical Center

Joseph P. Ornato, MD Medical College of Virginia School of Medicine

Robert A. Swor, DO William Beaumont Hospital

Edward Otten, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Lorraine G. Thibodeau, MD Albany Medical College

Daniel J. Pallin, MD, MPH Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Thomas W. Trimarco, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Peter D. Panagos, MD Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine Jessie Pines, MD, MBA George Washington University School of Medicine Emilie S. Powell, MD Northwestern University Ali S. Raja, MD, MPH, Brigham & Womens Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Ernest E. Wang, MD NorthShore University HealthSystem Scott Weiner, MD Tufts Medical Center Brian J. Zink, MD Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital Leslie S. Zun, MD Mount Sinai Hospita


Abstract Submission Reviewers Jean T. Abbott, MD University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine

Michelle Blanda, MD Summa Health System/ NEOUCOM

Gregory P. Conners, MD, MPH, MBA Children’s Mercy Hospital

Leigh Evans, MD Yale University School of Medicine

Srikar R. Adhikari, MD University of Nebraska Medical Center

Andra L. Blomkalns, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Francis L. Counselman, MD Eastern Virginia Medical School

Jay L. Falk, MD Orlando Regional Medical Center

Harrison J. Alter, MD Alameda County Medical Center

Michael Breyer, MD Christiana Care Health Services

Michael Cudnik, MD, MPH The Ohio State University Medical Center

Kevin L. Ferguson, MD University of Florida, Gainesville

Chandra Aubin, MD Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine

Robert Cambridge, DO, MPH OSF St Francis Medical Center

Nicholas Daniel, MD University of Nebraska College of Medicine

John T. Finnell, MD Indiana Clinic Emergency Medicine

Thomas P. Aufderheide, MD Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals

Jennifer Carey, MD Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital

Moira Davenport, MD Allegheny General Hospital

Susan Fuchs, MD Children’s Memorial Hospital

Erin Grise, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Brendan G. Carr, MD University of Pennsylvania

Nicole M. DeIorio, MD Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine

E. John Gallagher, MD Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Jacobi/Montefiore)

Eric A. Gross, MD Hennepin County Medical Center

Wallace A. Carter, MD New York Presbyterian Hospital

Leisa Deutsch, MD William Beaumont Hospital

Romolo J. Gaspari, MD University of Massachusetts Medical School

Todd A. Guth, MD Denver Health Medical Center

Theodore C. Bania, MD St. Luke’s-Roosevelt/Columbia University Chris Barton, MD University of California (San Francisco)/San Francisco General Hospital Darren Beam, MD Carolinas Medical Center Gillian Beauchamp, MD University Of Cincinnati College Of Medicine

Andrew K. Chang, MD Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center Carey D. Chisholm, MD Indiana Clinic Emergency Medicine

David Berger, MD William Beaumont Hospital

Hangyul Chung-Esaki, MD University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine

Steven L. Bernstein, MD Yale University School of Medicine

Sean P. Collins, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Steven B. Bird, MD University of Massachusetts Medical School

David C. Cone, MD Yale University School of Medicine

Zachary Dezman, MD University of Maryland School of Medicine Katherine A. Douglass, MD George Washington University Marie-Carmelle Elie, MD University of Florida, Gainesville Eric Ernest, MD University of Nebraska College of Medicine Amy A. Ernst, MD University of New Mexico Brian Euerle, MD University of Maryland School of Medicine

**Applications for consideration to be an abstract reviewer are posted in the SAEM newsletter and in Academic Emergency Medicine summer issues.

Autumn C. Graham, MD Georgetown/Washington Hospital Center Richard T. Griffey, MD, MPH Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine

Leon L. Haley, Jr., MD, MHSA Emory University School of Medicine

Paul R. Gennis, MD Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Jacobi/Montefiore)

Daniel A. Handel, MD, MPH Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine

Chris A. Ghaemmaghami, MD University of Virginia School of Medicine

Kent Harkey, MD Penn State University/Milton S Hershey Medical Center

Maria F. Glenn, MD Carolinas Medical Center Steven A. Godwin, MD University Of Florida College Of Medicine, Jacksonville

Significant time, effort, and resources are devoted to reviewing and moderating the many excellent abstracts submitted to SAEM every year. We thank all the reviewers and moderators for their valuable time and labors in making our Annual Meeting what it is today. The continued success of these important academic achievements depends on their unrelenting enthusiasm to support the SAEM mission with their highest standards.

Michael L. Hochberg, MD on behalf of Program Committee SAEM Annual Meeting 2012

Monika Goyal, MD Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Marianne Gausche-Hill, MD Los Angeles County-HarborUCLA Medical Center

acknowledgements for Abstracts & Moderators

Gratefully,

Joshua Goldstein, MD, PhD Harvard Medical School

N. Stuart Harris, MD Massachusetts General Hospital Margaret Hauck, MD Carolinas Medical Center Jason S. Haukoos, MD, MSc Denver Health Medical Center

Future SAEM Annual Meetings May 15-18, 2013 The Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel Atlanta GA May 14-17, 2014 Sheraton Dallas Hotel Dallas TX May 13-16, 2015 Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina San Diego CA

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Abstract Submission Reviewers Kennon Heard, MD University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine

William A. Knight, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Danielle Minett, MD Christiana Care Health Services

Jonathan W. Heidt, MD Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine

Terry Kowalenko, MD University of Michigan

Chris Moore, MD, RDMS Yale University School of Medicine

Michael L. Hochberg, MD Saint Peters University Hospital

Hollynn Larrabee, MD West Virginia University School of Medicine-Ruby Memorial Hospital

Robert S. Hockberger, MD Los Angeles County-HarborUCLA Medical Center

E. Brooke Lerner, PhD Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals

Robert J. Hoffman, MD, MS Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Jo Anna Leuck, MD Carolinas Medical Center

Carolyn K. Holland, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Jeffrey Hom, MD, MPH Stony Brook University School Of Medicine Benjamin Honigman, MD University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine Jason Hoppe, DO University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine Alexander P. Isakov, MD, MPH Emory University School of Medicine Janetta Iwanicki, MD Denver Health Medical Center David M. Jaffe, MD Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine Neil B. Jasani, MD Christiana Care Health Services John Jesus, MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School Russell Johanson, MD University of Massachusetts Medical School Jeffrey S. Jones, MD Grand Rapids Medical Education and Research Center/Michigan State University

Daniel C. Morris, MD Henry Ford Hospital Michael E. Mullins, MD Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine Brittany Murray, MD Carolinas Medical Center

Philip N. Salen, MD St Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem, PA

Susan Thompson, DO Christiana Care Health Services

Arthur B. Sanders, MD University of Arizona College of Medicine

R. Jason Thurman, MD Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

Kori Sauser, MD Northwestern University

Veronica Tucci, MD, JD University of South Florida College of Medicine

Terri Schmidt, MD Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine Sandra M. Schneider, MD University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Joel M. Schofer, MD, RDMS Naval Medical Center Portsmouth

Mark B. Mycyk, MD Boston University School of Medicine

Michael M. Liao, MD Denver Health Medical Center

James E. Olson, PhD Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine

David C. Seaberg, MD University of Tennessee College of Medicine at Chattanooga

John P. Marshall, MD Maimonides Medical Center

Arthur M. Pancioli, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Rawle A. Seupaul, MD Indiana Clinic Emergency Medicine

John W. Martel, MD University of Michigan

Peter S. Pang, MD Northwestern University

Dan Mayer, MD Albany Medical College

Usha Periyanayagam, MD Northwestern University

Suzanne M. Shepherd, MD University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Henderson D. McGinnis, MD Wake Forest University School of Medicine

Michael A. Puskarich, MD Carolinas Medical Center

Salvatore Silvestri, MD Orlando Regional Medical Center

Ali S. Raja, MD, MBA, MPH Brigham & Womens Hospital/ Harvard Medical School

Richard Sinert, DO SUNY Health Science Center at Brooklyn

Megan Ranney, MD, MPH Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital

Adam J. Singer, MD SUNY at Stony Brook

Bernard L. Lopez, MD, MS Thomas Jefferson University

Jason T. McMullan, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Garth Meckler, MD Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine William J. Meggs, MD, PhD The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Zachary F. Meisel, MD, MPH University of Pennsylvania Michael J. Mello, MD, MPH Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital

Mitesh Rao, MD, MHS Yale-New Haven Medical Center Charles L. Reese, MD Christiana Care Health Services Linda A. Regan, MD Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Lawrence A. Melniker, MD, MS New York Methodist Hospital

David J. Karras, MD Temple University School of Medicine

Chadwick Miller, MD Wake Forest University School of Medicine

Kevin G. Rodgers, MD Indiana Clinic Emergency Medicine

Gabor D. Kelen, MD FRCP(C) Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Angela M. Mills, MD University of Pennsylvania

Sarah E. Ronan-Bentle, MD

Jeffrey A. Kline, MD Carolinas Medical Center

Lorraine G. Thibodeau, MD Albany Medical College

Jennifer L. Levy, MD Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Justin Reif, MD The Brooklyn Hospital Center/ Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Stephen M. Keller, MD Carolinas Medical Center

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Michael Levine, MD Banner Good Sameritan Medical Center

Lisa Moreno-Walton, MD Louisana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans

Michael S. Runyon, MD Carolinas Medical Center

David P. Milzman, MD Georgetown University School of Medicine James R. Miner, MD Hennepin County Medical Center

University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Marc S. Rosenthal, PhD, DO Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center Christopher Ross, MD Cook County Hospital

David P. Sklar, MD University of New Mexico School of Medicine

Arvind Venkat, MD Allegheny General Hospital Jody A. Vogel, MD Denver Health Medical Center Taher T. Vohra, MD Henry Ford Hospital Joshua Wallenstein, MD Emory University School of Medicine Christopher S. Weaver, MD Indiana Clinic Emergency Medicine Eric K. Wei, MD University of Michigan Scott Weiner, MD Tufts Medical Center Steven J. Weiss, MD University of New Mexico Ted “TJ” Welniak, MD University of Nebraska College of Medicine Scott T. Wilber, MD, MPH Akron City Hospital / Summa Health System / NEOUCOM Matthew Wong, MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School

Joseph S. Stapczynski, MD District Medical Group

Robert H. Woolard, MD Texas Tech University, El Paso

Latha Ganti Stead, MD, MS University of Florida, Gainesville

Donald M. Yealy, MD University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Dale Steele, MD Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital

Kelly D. Young, MD Los Angeles County-HarborUCLA Medical Center

Sarah Sterling, MD University of Mississippi Medical Center

Christopher Zammit, MD University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Susan A. Stern, MD Harborview Medical Center/ University of Washington Michelle D. Stevenson, MD, MS University of Louisville Benjamin C. Sun, MD Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine Robert A. Swor, DO William Beaumont Hospital


program committee Disclosures

Kevin Ferguson ,MD Advisory Board Med Challenger - Medical Education Chris Ghaemmaghami, MD Officer or Board Member: Society of Chest Pain Centers/ Chest Pain center accreditation/education Eric Gross, MD Advisory Board: Lundbeck Pharmaceuticals-Hematin Acute Intermittent Porphyria Jason Hoppe, MD Consultant: Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug CenterPoison call center. Toxicology fellowship. Consultant: Up to Date: Wrote chapter on PCP-Toxicology. Grant Recipient: Dana White HIV grant for early intervention in HIV -Funding for linking to primary care- HIV follow up. William A. Knight IV, MD Speakers Bureau: Genentech, Inc Activase (rt-PA) Stroke Terry Kowalenko, MD Spouse Genentech employee: Ritaxan- Rheumatoid Arthritis, Wegener’s Granulomatosis, Microscopic Polyangiitis. Shareholder: Amgen, Biogen-Idec, Roche Angela Mills, MD Consultant: Becker & Associates Consulting- Glucose monitoring. Grant Recipient: AspenBio Pharma, Inc. Siemens Health Care Diagnostics Allere, Inc. Research funding- Appendicitis DVT/PE BhCG testing. EM Reports EM Clinics of North America/ Chapter Author Guest Editor- Abd pain GI emergencies Ali Raja, MD Employee: Diagnotion, LLC- Clinical Decision Support Software-all emergency diagnoses. Intellectual Property/Patents: Diagnotion, LLC- Clinical Decision Support Software- all emergency diagnoses. Michael Runyon, MD Consultant: Abbott Fund Tanzania- Global Emergency Medicine Development.

Jr. Faculty Forum Disclosures Jason Haukoos, MD, MSc

Denver Health Medical Center • Employee: Denver Health and Hospital Authority- Denver Health and Hospital Authority •G rant Recipient: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality- Research funding

The following abstract authors have disclosures: Gary Andolfatto, Lion’s Gate Hospital, Astra Zeneca Propofol – Off label Lynn Babcock, MD, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati Center for Clinical and Translational Science – Grant Recipient Joseph Barger, MD, Contra Costa County EMS Agency, County EMS Medical Director – Employee Andra L. Blomkalns, MD, University of Cincinnati – Board Member, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, sBioMed – Steriplex – Off label Leonia A. Calver, MD, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Phebra Pty Ltd, Droperidol – Off label Michael R. Christian, MD, The Toxikon Consortium, Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Intralipid – Off label Ethan Cowan, MD, Jacobi Medical Center, NIAID – Grant Recipient Adam N. Frisch, MD, UPMC, SAEM EMS Fellowship Grant Recipient Jeffrey M. Goodloe, MD, University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine, EnPro Consultant Corita R. Grudzen, MD, MSHS, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, American Cancer Society Grant Recipient John W. Hafner, MD, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Intubating Wrist Splint in development – Off label Adrienne Haggins, MD, University of Michigan, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Clinical Scholar Grant Recipient Herbert G. Hern, MD, Alameda County – Highland, American Medical Response Medical Director, Consultant Jeffrey Ho, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center, TASER International, Inc. , Medical Director and Shareholder Judd Hollander, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Allere, Brahms, Siemens Diagnostics, NIH, ACR Imaging Network Grant Recipient

Brandon Hone, HBSc, University of Alberta, Boehringer Ingelheim Grant Recipient Sara W. Johnson, MD, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California - Zoll Medical Corporation, CoolGuard – Off Label Jeffery Kline, MD, Carolinas Medical Center, CP Diagnostics LLC Shareholder, AHRQ, NIH, Genentech Grant Recipient, Carolinas Healthcare Inventor – Intellectual Property/Patents Barry Knapp, MD RDMS, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Sonosite Grant Recipient William A. Knight, MD, University of Cincinnati, Genentech, Inc. Speaker’s Bureau Keith E. Kocher, MD, University of Michigan, Magellan Health Services, Inc. Consultant Joel Kravitz, MD, Community Medical Center, Toms River, Albert Einstein Society, Albert Einstein Medical Center Grant Recipient Alexander Limkakeng, MD, Duke University, Roche Grant Recipient Marlow Macht, MD, MPH, University of Colorado School of Medicine, GE Focus group participant Michelle Macy, MD, University of Michigan, Michigan Center for Advancing Safe Transportation Throughout the Lifespan Grant Recipient Juan March, MD, East Carolina University, Officer - CECBEMS (Continuing Education Coordinating Board for EMS); Editorial Board - NAEMSP (National Association of EMS Physicians); Prehospital Emergency Care, Education Committee Chair; Officer, NACECBEMS (Continuing Education Coordinating Board for EMS Zachary Meisel, MD, MPH, University of Pennsylvania, ZaBeCor Pharmaceticals Advisory Board, Time Magazine, Employee Edward Melnick, MD, Yale School of Medicine, ACEP Clinical Policies Committee Member

Andrew Meltzer, MD, George Washington University, Given Imaging, LTD Consultant Raina M. Merchant, MD, MPH, University of Pennsylvania, Research Grants:NIH, NHLBI K23 Merchant: Grant 109083-01; Cardiac Science, Philips, Zoll Medical, Physio-Control Lisa H. Merck, MD MPH, Emory University, Department of Defense; National Institutes of Health; Atlanta Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Grant Recipient Chadwick D. Miller, MD, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Society of Chest Pain Centers Committee Member, Siemens, American Heart Association Grant Recipient, Provisional patent application – Intellectual Property/Patents James Miner, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center, Hutchinson Technology Grant Recipient Nicholas E. Nacca, MD, SUNY Upstate Medical University, ACEP Academic Affairs Committee member and NYACEP Research Committee Member Anwar D. Osborne, Emory University, Philips Contractor Linda Papa, MD, MSc, Orlando Regional Medical Center, Banyan Biomarkers Inc. Consultant Emilie Powell, MD, Northwestern University, AHRQ, EMF Grant Recipient Michael S. Radeos, MD, New York Hospital Queens, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Grant Recipient Lior Rosenberg, MD, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, MediWound Ltd. Intellectual Property/ Patent Richard E. Rothman, Johns Hopkins University, Gilead Foundation Grant Recipient

Brian Rowe, MD, University Of Alberta, MedImmune Advisory Board, GSK Grant Recipient, AstraZeneca Speaker’s Bureau Jeremiah Schuur, MD, MHS, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, United Healthcare Advisory Board Wesley Self, MD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, CareFusion, BioMerieux Grant Recipient Nathan Shapiro, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Cumberland Pharma Grant Recipient Adam A. Singer, MD, Stony Brook University, Auxagen Inc. Grant Recipient Stephen W. Smith, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center, Alere, Biosite Consultant Suzanne M. Smith, MD, MPH, MPA, STAR Analytical Services - Employee Nick Testa, MD, Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Grant Recipient Stephen Traub, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Cumberland Pharma Grant Recipient Arjun Venkatesh, MD, MBA, Brigham and Women’s Hospital-Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency, AHRQ Consultant Michael Wandell, MD, AspenBio Pharma, Inc. Consultant Scott Weiner, MD, Tufts Medical Center, Board member, Massachusetts College of Emergency Physicians, NIH/NHLBI Grant Recipient Nathan White, MD, University of Washington, Biopure Corp, HBOC-201 Off label Shahriar Zehtabchi, MD, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Biosignal Group Inc. collaboration on NIH-funded project

Adam Rowden, MD, Einstein Medical Center, Artieocyte Medical Systems, Albert Einstein Society Grant Recipient

Disclosures as of 4/15/12 - 2012 AEM Consensus Conference

No Disclosures as of 4/12 - 2012 Grant Writing Workshop

Teresa Chan, Grant Recipient - NON COMMERCIAL (Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada) - Studies for Medical Education Grant

Mark Angelos, MD, The Ohio State University

Aloysius (Butch) Humbert, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine, Spouse, Michelle Humbert - Shareholder - Pfizer, Inc.

Brendan Carr, MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania

Nathan Kuppermann, MD, MPH, University of California, Davis, Intellectual Property/Patents - Patent holders – InsuCalc

Esther Choo, MD, MPH, Brown University D. Mark Courtney, MD, MS, Northwestern University

No Disclosures as of 4/12 - 2012 AEM Consensus Conference aadia Akhtar, MD, Beth Israel Medical Center Felix Ankel, MD, University of Minnesota Michael Beeson, MD, Akron General Medical Center Jill Castaneda, North Shore University Hospital Bernard Charlin, MD, PhD, Université de Montréal Esther Choo, MD, MPH, Brown University Wendy Coates, MD, FACEP, Harbor UCLA Nicole DeIorio, MD, Oregon Health & Science University Suzanne Dooley-Hash, MD, University of Michigan Kevin Eva, PhD, University of British Columbia Michael Fitch, MD, PhD, Wake Forest Fiona Gallahue, MD, FACEP, University of Washington Michael Gisondi, MD, Northwestern University Sharon Griswold-Theodorson, MD, MPH, Drexel University College of Medicine Larry Gruppen, PhD, University of Michigan

Matthew Hansen, MD, Oregon Health & Science University Benjamin Hatten, MD, Oregon Health & Science University Emily Hayden, MD, MHPE, Harvard Medical School Jonathan Ilgen, MD, MCR, University of Washington Julianna Jung, MD, Johns Hopkins University Chad Kessler, MD, MHPE, University of Illinois-Chicago Sorabh Khandelwal, MD, The Ohio State University Gloria Kuhn, DO, PhD, Wayne State University Joe LaMantia, MD, MCR, North Shore University Hospital/NYU Katrina Leone, MD, Oregon Health & Science University Michelle Lin, MD, University of California, San Francisco Judith Linden, MD, Boston University School of Medicine Craig Newgard, MD, MPH, Oregon Health & Science University Susan Promes, MD, University of California, San Francisco Elliot Rodriguez, MD, FACEP, SUNY Upstate Medical University David Salzman, MD, Northwestern University

Prasanthi Govindarajan, MD, MBBS, MAS, University of California, San Francisco Alan Jones, MD, University of Mississippi Lori Post, PhD, Yale University

Reena Duseja, MD, University of California, San Francisco

Sally Santen, MD, PhD, University of Michigan Nancy Searle, Ed.D., Baylor College of Medicine Jonathan Sherbino, MD, MEd, FRCPC, FAcadMEd, McMaster University Jeffrey Siegelman, MD, Emory University Michael D. Smith, MD, FACEP, Metro Health Medical Center Aparijita Sohoni, MD, Alameda County Medical Center Thomas K. Swoboda, MD, MS, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Demian Szyld, MD, EdM, New York University James Kimo Takayesu, MD, Massachusetts General Lorraine Thibodeau, MD, Albany Medical Center Stephen Wolf, MD, Denver Health Wendy Woolley, DO, FACEP, Albany Medical Center Lalena Yarris, MD, MCR, Oregon Health & Science University

Disclosures as of 4/12 - 2012 Grant Writing Workshop Jeffrey Kline, MD, Carolinas Health Care, Shareholder - CP Diagnostics LLC; Grant recipient - AHRQ, NIH, Genentech; Speaker’s Bureau - Carolinas Healthcare Michael Puskarich, MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Grant Recipient - American Heart Association Kabir Yadav, MDCM, MS, George Washington University, Shareholder - General Electric

Best of CDEM presenters with no disclosures: Michael Beeson, MD, Akron General Medical Center

Jonathan Fisher, MD, MPH, Beth Israel Deaconess Med Center

Aaron Bernard, MD, Ohio State

Jason Haukoos, MD, MSc, Denver Health Med Center

Agata P. Butler, PhD, National Board of Medical Examiners

William McGaghie, PhD, Northwestern University

Best of CDEM presenters with disclosures: Emily Senecal, MD, Massachusetts General, Co-author “Emergency Management of the Coding Patient”

Abstracts - Authors with no disclosures Sara Aberle BS Mayo Clinic Mahshid Abir MD, MSc George Washington University Allison L Abplanalp Brooke Army Medical Center Jameel Abualenain MD The George Washington University Eric J Adkins MD, MSc The Ohio State University Medical Center Amish Aghera MD, FACEP Maimonides Medical Center Darin Agresti DO St. Luke’s Hospital and Health Network Fahd A Ahmad MD Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine Matthew Albrecht Southern Illinois University School of Medicine Kristen R Aliano BS Stony Brook University Scott M Alter MD Morristown Medical Center Karl Ambroz MD Resurrection Medical Center Saad Amin MD Christiana Care Health System Albert Amini MD University of Arizona Douglas Ander MD Emory University School of Medicine Kenton L Anderson MD San Antonio Military Medical Center Britney B Anderson MD University of Colorado Kristin Anderson MD University of Utah Heather Applewhite BA University of Florida Eric Ardeel MD Baylor College of Medicine Arthur Au MD Thomas Jefferson University Kristen Aubuchon Washington University in St. Louis Michael A Austin MBB The Ottawa Hospital/ University of Ottawa and Menzies Research Institute of Tasmania, Australia David Ayaram MD Mayo Clinic Ryan D Aycock MD Staten Island University Hospital Kavita M Babu MD the Alpert Medical School of Brown University Benoit Bailey MD, MSc CHU Sainte-Justine Kathryn T Bailey North Shore University Hospital John Bailitz MD Cook County (Stroger) Stephen Baker MD University of Mississippi Medical Center Nicola Baker MD University Of Arizona

Sara Y Baker MD Orlando Regional Medical Center Fran Balamuth MD, PhD Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Sudhir B. Baliga MD Henry Ford Health System Isabel Barata MD North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System Andy S Barnett MD Oregon Health & Science University Aveh Bastani MD Troy Beaumont Hospital Brigitte M Baumann MD, MSCE Cooper University Hospital Daren M Beam MD, MS Carolinas Medical Center Lea H Becker MT University of Virginia Health System Bruce M Becker MD, PhD Brown University Afzal Beemath MD Detroit Medical Center and Seasons Hospice and Palliative Care Thomas Belanger MD Washington University in St. Louis Christopher Belcher BS University of Kentucky Daniel S Bell BA Emory University M. Fernanda Bellolio MD. MS Mayo Clinic Stephanie Benjamin University of Cincinnati Justin L Benoit MD University of Cincinnati Melissa A. Bentley MS, NREMT-P National Registry of EMTs Sara C Bessman MS Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Rahul Bhat MD Georgetown University Hospital/ Washington Hospital Center Polly E Bijur PhD Albert Einstein College of Medicine Adrienne Birnbaum MD, MS Albert Einstein College of Medicine Janice Blanchard MD George Washington Gabriel E Blecher MBBS (Hons), PDM, FACEM University of Ottawa Dowin Boatright MD Department of Emergency Medicine, Denver Health Medical Center Dominic Borgialli DO, MPH University of Michigan School of Medicine and Hurley Medical Center Richard Bounds MD Christiana Care Health System Michael Bouton MD Beth Israel Deaconess Sabina A Braithwaite MD, MPH University of Kansas

Benjamin L Bregman MD George Washington University Barry E Brenner MD, PhD University Hospitals Case Medical Center Beau Briese MD Stanford/Kaiser Emergency Medicine Residency Program Michael Brown MD Michigan State University David F.M Brown MD Massachusetts General Hospital Jessica Bryant University of Michigan Medical School Rasha Buhumaid George Washington University Trena M Burke MPA Chicago Medical School, Mount Sinai Hospital Aaron M Burnett MD Regions Hospital EMS Donald Byars MD Eastern Virginia Medical School Whitney V Cabey MD University of Michigan Charles Cairns MD University of North Carolina Reed Caldwell MD New York Methodist Hospital Bob Cambridge DO OSF St. Francis Medical Center Louisa Canham MD BIDMC Nicholas D Caputo MD, M.Sc. Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center Donna L Carden MD University of Florida Christopher R Carpenter MD, MS Washington University in St. Louis Stephanie Carreiro MD The Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University Shaun D Carstairs MD Naval Medical Center San Diego Patrick M Carter MD University of Michigan School of Medicine Edward Castillo PhD, MPH University of California, San Diego Katherine Catallo MD Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Jeffrey Caterino MD, MPH The Ohio State University Srihari Cattamanchi MD Harvard Medical School / Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Anna Cedar OHSU Theodore C. Chan MD University of California, San Diego Apoorva K Chandar Case Western Reserve University Anna Marie Chang MD Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania

Andrew Chang MD Montefiore Medica Center Hsiao-Yun Chao MD Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital Kuan-Fu Chen MD PhD Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital Dinah K Chen BA Massachusetts General Hospital Alan Chiem MD UC Irvine Gerardo Chiricolo New York Methodist Hospital David T Chiu MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Bryan Y Choi MD Alpert Medical School of Brown University Hangyul M Chung-Esaki MD UCSF John Cienki MD Jackson Memorial Hospital Angela Cirilli MD North Shore-LIJ Health System Cindy Clesca Mount Sinai School of Medicine Amélie Coderre Hopital du Sacre-Coeur de Montreal Kenneth J Cody MD University of Pennsylvania Stephanie G Cohen MD Emory University Medical School Victor Cohen PharmD Maimonides Medical Center Hillary Cohen MD Maimonides Medical Center Antoinette Colacone Jewish General Hospital Dylan Cooper MD Indiana University School of Medicine Cheryl Courage Wayne State University Ryan A Coute BS Baystate Medical Center Philip W Craven University of Utah Cristal Cristia MD BIDMC Center for ResuscitationScience Tighe Crombie MD University of Ottawa Michael T Cudnik MD, MPH The Ohio State University Medical Center Rebecca M Cunningham MD University of Michigan Risa Cyr MD University of Massachussetts Preeti Dalawari MD, MSPH Saint Louis University Hospital Raoul Daoust MD, MSc Médecine d’Urgence, Hôpital Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Université de Montréal Devjani Das MD New York Hospital Queens Anita Datta MD RDMS New York Hospital Queens Jennifer M Davis MD Yale University School of Medicine

Barbara J Davis RN Christiana Care Health Systems Jackie Davis MD Carolinas Medical Center Jillian Davison MD Orlando Regional Medical Center Patricio De Hoyos Massachusetts General Hospital Robert A. De Lorenzo MD, FACEP Brooke Army Medical Center Jonathan dela Cruz MD Southern Illinois University School of Medicine M. Kit Delgado MD, MS Stanford University School of Medicine Marie-Pier Desjardins MD CHU Sainte-Justine Miranda K Devine BS Oregon Health and Science University Peter J Di Rocco Medical College of Wisconsin Shaneen Doctor MD University of Utah Kelly L Dodge MD Yale University School of Medicine Francesco Dojmi di Delupis MD Careggi Hospital Inter-institutional Integrated Department Fanglong Dong PhD University of Kansas Elizabeth A Donnelly PhD, MPH, LICSW, NREMT-B University of Windsor Sean Doran The University of Western Ontario Kelly M Doran MD Yale University School of Medicine and U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Katherine A. Douglass MD George Washington University Stephanie Dreher BA The Ohio State University Amy L Drendel MD Medical College of Wisconsin Scott Dresden MD Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Jeff Dubin MD, MBA MedStar Washington Hospital Center Nicole M Dubosh MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Susan Duffy MD, MPH Brown University Myto Duong MD Southern Illinois university Murat Durusu GATA School of Medicine Department of Emergency Medicine Reena Duseja MD UCSF James D Dziura PhD Yale School of Medicine Melody Eckardt MD, MPH Massachusetts General Hospital

Ashlee Edgell BA University of Cincinnati Jennifer Ehlers MD Stony Brook University Charles Eldridge MD St. Louis Children’s Hospital Marie-Carmelle Elie-Turenne MD University of Florida Timothy J Ellender MD Indiana University Department of Emergency Medicine Heather Ellsworth Regions Hospital Thomas W Engel Wayne State School of Medicine Joshua J Ennis MD University of Arizona Amy Ernst MD University of New Mexico Mark E Escott MD, MPH Baylor College of Medicine Barnet Eskin MD, PhD Morristown Memorial Hospital Stephanie Eucker MD, PhD University of Virginia Jahan Fahimi MD Alameda County Medical Center - Highland Hospital; University of California, San Francisco Timothy Fallon MD Brigham and Women’s Hospital Mark Favot MD Henry Ford Hospital Xin Feng University of Calgary Lisa Feng MPH George Washington University Antonio Ramon Fernandez PhD, NREMT-P EMS University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Stephanie J Fessler MD Emory University Michael R Filbin MD Massachusetts General Hospital John T Finnell MD, MSc Indiana University Christopher M Fischer MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School Miriam R Fischer MD Emory University Megan L Fix MD University of Utah William Fleischman MD Mount Sinai School of Medicine Ross J Fleischman MD, MCR Oregon Health and Science University C. Scott Forsythe BA University of North Carolina School of Medicine Mitchell S Fourman M.Phil Stony Brook University Medical Center Alise Frallicciardi MD University of Connecticut Health Center/Hartford Hospital Benjamin Friedman MD Albert Einstein College of Medicine

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Jonathan Fu BS Yale University School of Medicine Matthew J Fuller MD University of Utah Brian M Fuller MD Washington University School of Medicine David F Gaieski MD University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Douglas Gallo MD Pitt County Memorial Hospital Michael Ganetsky MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Travis Ganje MD University of Michigan Nidhi Garg MD New York Hospital Queens Fiona M Garlich MD Bellevue Hospital Center Gregory Garra DO Stony Brook University Eugenia C Garvin MD Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Romolo Gaspari MS, MD, PhD University of Massachusetts Medical School Nicholas Genes MD, PhD Mount Sinai School of Medicine Jacob Gessin MD UC Davis Medical Center Leila Getto MD Christiana Care Health Systems Brian C Geyer MD, PhD, MPH Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency Hina Z Ghory MD Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar Michael A Gibbs MD Carolinas Medical Center Brandon Giberson BS BIDMC Center for Resuscitation Science Jennifer Gibson Chambers MS University of New England Vikramjit S Gill MD University of Maryland Thomas Gilmore MD Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Lindsey J Glaspey BA Cooper University Hospital Guy Gleisberg MCHD Joshua Glick Penn State Hershey Medical Center Elizabeth M Goldberg MD Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University Alejandro Gonzalez MD University of Arizona Foster R Goss DO Tufts Medical Center Prasanthi Govindarajan MD, MAS UCSF Medical Center Monika Goyal MD University of Pennsylvania, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Dina Gozman MD University of Cincinnati Matthew Graber MD, PhD University of Kentucky Jocelyn Gravel MD, MSc Sainte-Justine UHC, Université de Montréal Jeffrey P Green MD UC Davis Medical Center Shamai A Grossman MD, MS Harvard Medical School Hallam M Gugelmann MD University of Pennsylvania Erkan Gunay MD Tepecik Research and Training Hospital Anurag Gupta MD, MBA Beth Israel Medical Center Todd Guth MD University of Colorado Joshua Guttman MD CM McGill University Alex Guttman MD Jewish General Hospital, McGill University Ani Habicht St Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor/ University of Michigan EM Residency John W Hafner MD, MPH University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria Elizabeth j Haines DO new york methodist Kari Haley BS Medical College of Wisconsin Josh Handbury MD Naval Medical Center Portsmouth Daniel A. Handel MD, MPH Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine Neal Handly MD MSc MS Drexel University College of Medicine Abigail Hankin-Wei MD Emory University Matthew L Hansen MD OHSU Bhakti Hansoti MD University of Chicago Lindsay M. Harmon MD Indiana University School of Medicine Kimberly W Hart MA University of Cincinnati Benjamin Hatten MD Oregon Health and Science University Jendi L Haug MD University of Texas Southwestern Jason Haukoos MD, MSc Denver Health Medical Center Samir A. Haydar DO, MPH Maine Medical Center Benjamin S. Heavrin MD, MBA Vanderbilt University Jonathan W Heidt MD Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis Heather Heipel BSc University of Ottawa Meghan Herbst MD Hartford Hospital Erik P Hess MD Mayo Clinic Jeremy Hess MD, MPH Emory University Udo Hoffmann MD, MPH Massachusetts General Hospital Christopher A. Hollweg MD, MPH NSLIJ, Long Island Jewish Medical Ctr James Holmes MD, MPH UC Davis School of Medicine Christopher P Holstege MD University of Virginia School of Medicine Rick Hong MD Cooper University Hospital Leah S Honigman MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School Emily Hoover The Ohio State University Laura R. Hopson MD University of Michigan Steven Horng MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center / Harvard Medical School Stacey L House MD, PhD Washington University in St. Louis Joseph House MD University of Michigan Darlene R House MD Indiana University Renee Hsia MD University of California San Francisco Yu-Hsiang Hsieh PhD Johns Hopkins University Olivier Hugli MD, MPH Lausanne University Hospital Seung Young Huh MD Aizawa Hospital Craig Hullett University of Arizona Meagan R Hunt MD University of Cincinnati College

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of Medicine Christopher L Hunter MD, Ph.D. Office of the Medical Director, Orange County EMS Abbas Husain MD Staten Island University Hospital Gregg Husk MD beth israel medical center Ameer F. Ibrahim MD, MS The State University of New York at Buffalo Taichi Imamura MD Shonan Kamakura General Hospital Utpal Inamdar MD, JD Yale New Haven Hospital Department of Emergency Medicine Graham Ingalsbe University of Miami Grant Innes MD University of Calgary Hillary R Irons MD,PhD Michigan State University Ryan C Jacobsen MD, EMT-P Truman Medical Center Gabrielle Jacquet MD Johns Hopkins University April Jaeger MD Sacred Heart Medical Center Shabnam Jain MD Emory University David Jaslow MD, MPH, EMT-P Albert Einstein Medical Center Rebecca Jeanmonod MD St. Luke’s Hospital and Health Network Dietrich Jehle MD SUNY@Buffalo John E Jesus MD Christiana Care Health Systems Brian Johnson MD, MPH Alameda County Medical Center Austin Johnson MD, PhD Denver Health Medical Center Nicholas J Johnson MD University of Pennsylvania Alan E Jones MD University of Mississippi Medical Center Kenneth Jones B. Sc. University of Colorado Courtney Marie Cora Jones MPH University of Rochester Medical Center Jonathan S Jones MD University of Mississippi Medical Center Courtney Marie Cora Jones University of Rochester Medical Center Jaime Jordan MD Harbor-UCLA Medical Center Matthew Jordan MD Resurrection Medical Center Joshua W. Joseph MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center / Harvard Medical School Kruti Joshi New York Hospital Queens Tammy Ju BA University of Florida David J Kammer MD Carolinas Medical Center Brandon Kandarian Mount Sinai School of Medicine Simon Katrib MD St. John Hospital and Medical Center Benjamin Katz MD Albany Medical Center Jessica H Katznelson MD Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Brent Kaziny MD University of Utah, School of Medicine Bory Kea MD University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco General Hospital Raashee S Kedia MD Mount Sinai School of Medicine Gabor D Kelen MD Johns Hopkins University Maura Kennedy MD, MPH Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Daniel Keyes MD St Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor/ University of Michigan EM Residency Jill Keyes MD Medical College of Wisconsin Rahul K Khare MD, MS Northwestern University James P Killeen MD University of California, San Diego Dana Kindermann MD MPH Georgetown University Hospital / Washington Hospital Center Kerry J King MD Naval Medical Center San Diego Thomas D Kirsch MD, MPH Johns Hopkins University Pamela Klein MD UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health Jeffrey Kline MD Carolinas Medical Center Paul Ko MD, FACEP SUNY Upstate Medical University Stephanie Kok MD University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria Justin Korinek MD University of Arizona Terry Kowalenko MD University of Michigan Scott P Krall MD Christus Spohn Memorial Hospital Amy Kule MD Oakland University / William Beaumont School of Medicine Kristin Kuzma MD UCSF Medical Center James Kwan MD Sydney Medical School Sangeeta Lamba MD University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Eddy Lang MD University of Calgary Andrew Laudenbach MD New York Methodist Hospital David J Ledrick MD MSVMC Lois Lee MD, MPH Children’s Hospital Boston David C Lee MD North Shore-LIJ Health System Wen-Ya Lee UT-Houston Sangil Lee Mayo clinic Grace M Lee MD Yale University School of Medicine Stephen J. Leech MD Orlando Regional Medical Center Salam Lehrfeld DO UTSouthwestern Medical Center Arielle Levy MD., MEd. Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics Gemma C. Lewis MD University of North Carolina Margaret R Lewis MD Carolinas Medical Center Roger Lewis MD, PhD UCLA Harbor Bradley Li MD New York Hospital Queens Michael M Liao MD Denver Health Medical Center Antonios Likourezos MA, MPH Maimonides Medical Center Michelle Lin MD University of California, San Francisco Margaret J Lin MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Daniel Lindberg MD Brigham & Women’s Hospital Grant S Lipman MD Stanford University School of Medicine Shan W Liu MD, SD Massachusetts General Hospital Devin Loewenstein Loyola University Health System

Alvin Lomibao North Shore University Hospital Shawn London MD University of Connecticut School of Medicine Brit Long Mayo Clinic College of Medicine Paris B Lovett MD, MBA Thomas Jefferson University Garren M Low Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center Ronald B Low MD MS NYC HHC/NYU Marie M Lozon MD University of Michigan Nannette M Lugo-Amador MD University of Puerto Rico Jason B Lupow MD Montefiore Medical Center Anna MacDonald MD University of Toronto Gerald Maddalozzo DO St Michael’s Medical Center Nisreen H Maghraby MBBS Jewish General Hospital, McGill University Prashant Mahajan MD Children’s Hospital of Michigan Simon A Mahler MD Wake Forest University Medical School Shweta Malhotra MD Suny Downstate and Kings County Medical Center Alex F Manini MD, MS Mt. Sinai School of Medicine Carol Mannings MD University of Florida Keith A Marill MD Massachusetts General Hospital Jennifer R. Marin MD, MSc Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Dustin G Mark MD Kaiser Permanente Omayra L Marrero MD, MHA Carolinas Medical Center Richard Martin MD Temple University Ian B.K. Martin MD University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Scott Teanu Mataoa MD Yale New Haven Hospital Anitha E. Mathew MD Emory University Faisal Mawri MD University of Michigan Health System Ian May University of Michigan Natalie I Mazur BA Massachusetts General Hospital Scott McCann MD Christiana Care Health Systems Danielle M McCarthy MD Northwestern University Melissa L McCarthy ScD George Washington University Ryan McCormack NYU School of Medicine/ Bellevue Hospital Jonathan V. McCoy MD RWJUH/RWJMS Megan J McCullough North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System Megan McHugh PhD Northwestern University Mary Pat McKay MD, MPH George Washington University David J McLario DO, MS Denver Health Medical Center Samuel A McLean MD, MPH The University of North Carolina Shelley McLeod The University of Western Ontario Jason McMullan MD University of Cincinnati Candace McNaughton MD Vanderbilt University Andrew D McRae MD, PhD, FRCPC University of Calgary William J Meggs MD, MPH East Carolina University Aalap ehta St. Louis University Lisa Meister SUNY Downstate Andrew C Meltzer MD George Washington University Laura D Melville MD New York Methodist Hospital Margaret Menoch Emory University - Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Anil Menon MD Stanford University School of Medicine William J Meurer MD University of Michigan Niel F Miele MD University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Daniel G Miller MD University of Iowa Karen F Miller RN, MPA Vanderbilt University Medical Center Joseph Miller MD Henry Ford Hospital Truman J Milling MD University Medical Center at Brackenridge Angela M Mills MD University of Pennsylvania David Milzman MD Georgetown University School of Medicine James R Miner MD Hennepin County Medical Center Danielle Minett MD Christiana Care Health Systems Hal Minnigan MD, Ph.D. Indiana University Alice M Mitchell MD Carolinas Medical Center James H Moak MD University of Virginia Nicholas M Mohr MD University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine Jillian Mongelluzo MD University of California San Francisco Lisa Montgomery TTUHSC - Paul L Foster School of Medicine Chris Moore MD, RDMS Yale University School of Medicine Lisa Moreno-Walton MD, MS, MSCR Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans Eric Morley SUNY Downstate Dylan Morris University of Rochester Medical Center John Morrison MD St. Luke’s Hospital and Health Network Melinda J. Morton MD, MPH Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Mark Moseley MD, MHA The Ohio State University Medical Center Joshua B Moskovitz MD, MPH North Shore LIJ School of Medicine Ivette Motola MD Unviersity of Miami Miller School of Medicine C. Nee-Kofi Mould-Millman MD Emory University Jessica S Mounessa North Shore-LIJ Mary R Mulcare MD New York Presbyterian Hospital Antonio Muniz MD Dallas Regional Medical Center Mary K Murphy PhD Yale University Mary K Mutter University of Virginia

Roxanne Nagurka University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Yoko Nakamura MD Oregon Health & Science University Anthony M Napoli MD FACEP Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University Kalpana Narayan MD University of Pennsylvania Brett D. Nelson MD, MPH, DTM&H Massachusetts General Hospital Robert W Neumar MD, PhD University of Pennsylvania Craig D Newgard MD, MPH Oregon Health & Science University Greg Neyman MD St Michael’s Medical Center Vivienne Ng MD, MPH University of California, Davis Health System Thomas Nguyen MD Beth Israel Medical Center Wendy Nichols RN Christiana Care Health System Benjamin D Nicholson Virginia Commonwealth University Daniel K Nishijima MD University of California, Davis Jason T. Nomura MD Christiana Care Health System Jennifer Norton DO Albert Einstein College of Medicine Katie O’Conor Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Daniel O’Donnell MD Indiana University School of Medicine Steven R Offerman MD The Permanente Medical Group Scott Oglesbee BA, NREMT-P Albuquerque Ambulance Masashi Okubo Okinawa Chubu Hospital Travis D Olives MD MPH MEd Hennepin County Medical Center Nathan Olson MD Northwestern University Rodney Omron MD Johns Hopkins Brian J O’Neil MD, FACEP Wayne State School of Medicine Anwar D Osborne MD Emory University Frank Overly MD Brown University Carolyn Overman MD Emory University School of Medicine Michael G Paine University of Pennsylvania Linda Papa MD, MSc Orlando Regional Medical Center Amisha D Parekh MD New York Methodist Hospital Asad Patanwala University of Arizona Catherine Patocka MD McGill Emergency Medicine Residency Program, McGill University Y. Veronica Pei MD, MEd, MPH University Of Maryland School of Medicine Margarita E Pena MD St. John Hospital and Medical Center Usha Periyanayagam MD Northwestern University Sarah M. Perman MD MS University of Pennsylvania Giuseppe Perrotta MD Henry Ford Hospital Jeffrey J Perry MD University of Ottawa Warren M Perry BS Yale School of Medicine Danny Peterson The University of Western Ontario Kiemanh Pham MD MPH Johns Hopkins University Nicole E Piela MD Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center Jessica E Pierog DO, MS Stanford University Rachelle Pierre Mathieu George Washington Malford T Pillow MD Baylor College of Medicine Jesse M Pines MD, MBA George Washington University Julie Pitts University of Pennsylvania Timothy F Platts-Mills MD University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Michael C Plewa MD Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center Sharon N Poisson MD University of California San Francisco Joseph K Poku Medical Student Mayo Clinic Rachel Poley Queen’s University Christy L Poole Christiana Care Health System Lori Post PhD Yale University School of Medicine Ali Pourmand MD, MPH George Washington University Amelia Pousson MD George Washington University Michael Preis DO Carolinas Medical Center Michael Prystajecky University of Calgary Bryce Pulliam UC Davis Medical Center Genna Purcell Massachusetts General Hospital Michael Puskarich MD University of Mississippi Medical Center Munirih L. Qualls MD, MPH Brigham and Women’s Hospital James Quinn MD MS Stanford University Joni E Rabiner MD Children’s Hospital at Montefiore Luna Ragsdale MD, MPH Duke University Hima Rao MD Henry Ford Hospital Mitesh B. Rao MD, MHS Yale-New Haven Medical Center Brian Rapp Morristown Medical Center Douglas Rappaport University of Arizona Joseph M Reardon NREMT-B Harvard Medical School Loren Reed Southern Illinois university Scarlet Reichenbach MD BIDMC Elaine Reno MD University of Colorado Michael D Repplinger MD University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Yalda Rezaimer University of California, Irvine Karin V Rhodes MD, MS University of Pennsylvania John Richards MD UC Davis Medical Center Lynne D Richardson MD Mount Sinai School of Medicine Derek K Richardson MD Oregon Health & Science University Drew B Richardson MB BS FACEM Australian National University Antonio Riera MD Yale University School of

Medicine Robert Rifenburg DO Resurrection Medical Center Audra L Robinson MD Virginia Commonwealth University Alexander Rogers MD University of Michigan Jonathan G Rogg MD Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency Lior Rosenberg MD Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Richard E Rothman MD, PhD Johns Hopkins University Brian H Rowe MD, MSc University of Alberta Neil Roy MD Christiana Care Health Systems Daniel Runde MD St. Luke’s Roosevelt Daniel E Rusyniak MD Indiana University School of Medicine Matthew Ryan MD University of Florida Lydia M Sahlani MD The Ohio State University Medical Center John C Sakles MD University of Arizona Christopher Sala MD University of Connecticut School of Medicine Justin D. Salciccioli BIDMC Center for Resuscitation Science Rama A Salhi MHS University of Pennsylvania David Saloum MD Maimonides Medical Center David Salzman MD Northwestern University Margaret E Samuels-Kalow MD, MPhil BWH/MGH Harvard Affiliated EM Residency Arthur Sanders MD University of Arizona Comilla Sasson MD University of Colorado Ashley E Satorius MS University of Michigan Ayesha Sattar MD Stanford University School of Medicine Lauren M Sauer MD Johns Hopkins University Davut J Savaser MD MPH UCSD Anas Sawas MPH MS University of Utah Brandon T Sawyer BS University of Colorado School of Medicine Kelly Sawyer MD William Beaumont Hospital Eric M Schenfeld MD Carolinas Medical Center Ryan J Scheper Medical College of Wisconsin John Schneider Washington University in St. Louis Nicole Schneiderman MD Resurrection Medical Center David W. Schoenfeld MD Harvard Affiliated EM Residency at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Justin Schrager MPH Emory University School of Medicine Erika D Schroeder MD, MPH George Washington University Jeremiah D. Schuur MD, MHS Brigham & Womens Hospital/Harvard Medical School Jessica Schwartz University of Maryland School of Medicine Phillip A Scott MD University of Michigan Nicole Seleno MD Denver Health Medical Center Zina Semenovskaya MD SUNY Downstate/ King’s County Rachel Semmons Orlando Regional Medical Center Emily L. Senecal MD Massachusetts General Hospital - Harvard Medical School Michelle Sergel Cook County (Stroger) John Shabosky Southern Illinois University School of Medicine Beesan Shalabi Agha DO Emory University Nathan Shapiro MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Brian Sharp MD University of Michigan Hospital Yunfeng Shi Pennsylvania State University Takashi Shiga MD, M.P.H. Tokyo Bay Medical Center Matthew S Siket MD Massachusetts General Hospital Catherine Silberstein Stony Brook University Salvatore Silvestri MD Orlando Regional Medical Center Erin L Simon DO Akron General Medical Center Harold K Simon MD, MBA Emory University/ Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Daniel D Singer BA Stony Brook University Adam J Singer MD Stony Brook University Swati Singh MD UCSF Marco L.A. Sivilotti MD, MSc, FRCPC, FACEP, FACMT Queen’s University David E Slattery MD University of Nevada School of Medicine Albert G. Sledge, IV MD Maine Medical Center Jeffrey P Smith MD, MPH George Washington University Howard Smithline MD Baystate Medical Center Peter Smulowitz MD, MPH Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Mary E Smyrnioudis MD East Carolina University Mark Sochor MD, MS, FACEP University of Virginia Sarah Sommerkamp MD University of Maryland April Soward The University of North Carolina Cemal B Sozener MD, M.Eng. University of Michigan Daniel W Spaite MD University of Arizona Jeremy D Sperling MD Weill Cornell Medical College / NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital John T Stanton MD East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine Latha Ganti Stead MD, MS University of Florida Sarah Sterling MD University of Mississippi Medical Center Nancy Stevens Medical College of Wisconsin Ian G Stiell MD, MSc University of Ottawa Uwe Stolz MD University of Arizona Ian Storch Jefferson Medical College Alan B Storrow MD Vanderbilt University Jared Strote MD University of Washington Tania D Strout PhD, RN, MS Maine Medical Center Jonathan Studnek PhD Carolians Medical Center Robert Stuntz MD York Hospital Aaron M Stutz MD University of Arizona Amita Sudhir MD University of Virginia

Ashley F Sullivan MS, MPH Massachusetts General Hospital James Svenson MD University of Wisconsin Irina Svirsky MD MD University of Arizona Medical Center Robert Swor DO William Beaumont Hospital Kristin Swor Wolf MD University of Michigan Shahbaz Syed University of Calgary Sameer Syed The University of Western Ontario Christopher M Szlezak MD Yale School of Medicine Michael E Takacs MD MS University of Iowa James K Takayesu MD MSc Massachusetts General Hospital Otar Taktakishville MD Stony Brook University Nhi Tan BS Stony Brook University Mia Tanaka DO University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria Richard Tavernetti DO MSVMC Cena Tejani MD Newark Beth Israel Hospital Nick Testa MD Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center Molly Theissen MD Denver Health Medical Center Andrew J Thomas MPH NREMT-P Oregon Health & Science University Sheeja Thomas MD Yale University School of Medicine Lindsey Tilt New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital- Columbia University Sarah A Ting PhD Massachusetts General Hospital Shannon Toohey MD University of California, Irvine Vicken Y Totten MD, MS University Hospitals Case Medical Center Dave V Tran MPH University of Calgary Stephen Traub MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Michelle M Troendle MD East Carolina University Chu-Lin Tsai MD, ScD The University of Texas School of Public Health Samuel Turnipseed MD UC Davis Medical Center Joseph A Tyndall MD, MPH University of Florida Jennifer Urban BS Stony Brook University Shawn M Varney MD San Antonio Military Medical Center Arjun K Venkatesh MD, MBA Brigham and Women’s Hospital-Massachusetts General Hospital Christopher M Verdick BS University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria Boris Vidri Wayne State Gary M Vilke MD University of California, San Diego Cristina Villa-Roel MD, MSc University of Alberta Caroline G Vines MD University of Utah Deborah T Vinton Denver Health Medical Center Margaret Vo Paul L. Foster School of Medicine Jody A. Vogel MD Denver Health Medical Center Christopher T Vogt University of Pikeville Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine Kathryn Volz MD BIDMC Jeremy Voros MD Denver Health Emergency Medicine Residency Charles Vu MD UC Davis Medical Center Mary Jo Wagner MD Synergy Medical Education Alliance Laura Walker MD Yale-New Haven Hospital Sarah K Wallace AB Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Joshua Wallenstein MD Emory University Michael Wandell MD AspenBio Pharma Steven J Warrington MD Akron General Medical Center John A Watts PhD Carolinas Medical Center Kurt Weber orlando regional medical center Anthony J Weekes MD Carolinas Medical Center Lauren N Weinberger MD Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Scott Weiner MD Tufts Medical Center Rachel S Weiselberg MD North Shore University Hospital Steven Weiss MD University of New Mexico Moshe Weizberg MD Staten Island University Hospital Julie L Welch MD Indiana University Victoria C Weston BS University of Michigan Douglas A.E. White MD Alameda County Medical Center Lauren K Whiteside MD University of Michigan and Hurley Medical Center Elizabeth M Whitman MD MedStar Washington Hospital Center/Georgetown University Hospital Zev Wiener Harvard Medical School Scott T Wilber MD, MPH Summa Akron City Hospital, Northeast Ohio Medical University Lee G Wilbur MD Indiana University Ken Will MD Cook County (Stroger) Michael P Wilson PhD, MD University of California San Diego Michael Witting MD University of Maryland School of Medicine Catherine Wolff BA, EMT-B University of Pennsylvania Daniel Wood MD Emory University School of Medicine Wendy L Woolley DO Albany Medical Center Justin Yan MD The University of Western Ontario Diana L Yandell MD Synergy Medical Education Alliance Thomas Yeich MD York Hospital Pearl Zakroysky Massachusetts General Hospital Joshua M Zavitz DO University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria Wesley Zeger DO UNMC Shahriar Zehtabchi MD State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center Jessica Zerzan MD Maimonides Medical Center Mike Zimmer MD University of Michigan Shreni N Zinzuwadia MD NJMS and MMC


IEME - Presenters with disclosures

The following didactic speakers have nothing to disclose:

Steven J Warrington, MD, Akron General Medical Center, Creator/owner/editor of FracturED: A Fracture in the ED

James Adams MD, Northwestern University

Edward P Sloan, MD, MPH, UIC College of Medicine, Advisory Board -Gore Medical, Genentech

Douglas Ander MD, Emory University School of Medicine

Gerald Maloney DO, CWRU/MetroHealth Medical Center

Felix K Ankel MD, Regions Hospital, University of Minnesota Medical School

Jennifer Marin MD, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh

Shellie Asher MD, Albany Medical Center

Ian Martin MD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Brent R Asplin MD, MPH, Fairview Medical Group

Brandon Maughan MD, MHS, Brown University

Holly Auer, University of Pennsylvania

Julie Mayglothling MD, Virginia Commonwealth

Thomas Balga PA-C ACEP, State Legislature/Regulatory Committee

Alyson McGregor MD, Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University

Jill Baren MD, University of Pennsylvania

Steven A McLaughlin MD, University of New Mexico School of Medicine

William G Barsan MD, University of Michigan

Gregory D Mears MD, EMS, Performance Improvement Center

Jay Baruch MD, Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital

William J Meurer MD, University of Michigan Mary Ellen Michel PhD, Center for the Clinical Trials Network, NIDA

IEME presenters with nothing to disclose Cullen Hegarty, MD, Regions Hospital

Kyle Warren, St Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor/ University of Michigan EM Residency

Erin S Berk, MD, University of Florida COM-Jacksonville

Kevin Reed, MD, Georgetown University and Washington Hospital Center

Srikar Adhikari, MD, University of Arizona Medical Center

Jillian Mongelluzzo, MD, University of California San Francisco

Srikar Adhikari, MD, University of Arizona Medical Center

Spencer Adoff, MD, Penn State Hershey Medical Center

Stephen W Smith, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center

Danielle Hart, MD, HCMC

Phyllis L Hendry, MD, University of Florida COM-Jacksonville

Michael C Plewa, MD, Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center

David H Salzman, MD, Northwestern University

Steven J Warrington, MD, Akron General Medical Center

Alise Frallicciardi, MD, Hartford Hospital/University of Connecticut

Scott Joing, MD, Hennepin County Medical Center

Abdelouahab Bellou MD, PhD, BLS-ACLS-PALS, University Hospital of Rennes, France

Jonathon Palmer, MD, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

David H Salzman, MD, Northwestern University

Aaron Bernard MD, The Ohio State University

Mark J Bullard, MD, Carolinas Medical Center

Margarita E Pena, MD, FACEP, St. John Hospital and Medical Center

Steven Bernstein MD, Yale University

Nathan Allen, MD, Baylor College of Medicine

Julie A Slick, MD, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans

Brooks Bock MD, CEO, Colorado Mountain Medical, P.C.

Lisa Moreno-Walton MD, MS, MSCR, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Patrick H Brunett MD, Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine

Kevin G Munjal MD, Mount Sinai Medical Center

Christopher R Carpenter MD, MS, Washington University in St. Louis

David H Newman MD, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine

Brendan G Carr MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania

Jason Nomura MD, RDMS, Christiana Care Health System

Wallace A Carter MD, New York Presbyterian Hospital

Edward J Otten MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Peter S Pang MD, Northwestern University

Leana S Wen, MD MSc, Brigham & Women's Hospital/Massachusetts General Hospital

Todd Guth, MD, University of Colorado

Chris A Ghaemmaghami, MD, University of Virginia School of Medicine

Karen Lind, MD, Maimonides Medical Center

Matthew A Silver, MD, Kaiser Permanente, San Diego Medical Center

Michael P Mallin, MD, University of Utah

Richard Bounds, MD, Christiana Care Health Systems

Paul A Olszynski, MD, CCFP (EM), University of Saskatchewan

Daniel J Lakoff, MD, Mount Sinai

Matthew Dawson, MD, RDMS, RDCS, University of Kentucky

Esther Chen MD, University of California, San Francisco/San Francisco General Hospital

Anand Swaminathan, MD, MPH, New York University/Bellevue Hospital Center

Chris Mendoza, MD, UMDNJ- Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Ann Chinnis MD, MSHA, CSC, Matrix Executive Coaching Esther Choo MD, MPH, Brown University

Joel Moll, MD, Emory University

Robert Cloutier MD, Oregon Health and Science University Brian Clyne MD, Brown University

The following didactic speakers have disclosures

Todd Crocco MD, West Virginia University Michelle M Daniel MD, Brown University

Benjamin Abella MD, MPhil, University of Pennsylvania, Grant Recipient Doris Duke Fdn, NIH, NHLBI, AHA, Foundation Research Center Healthcare Agency, Speaker’s Bureau Philips Healthcare, Medivance Corp., Medtronic Foundation Principal Investigator Jeremy Ackerman MD, PhD, Emory University, InnerOptic Technology, Inc, CR Bard Michelle Biros MD, Hennepin County Medical Center, Consultant The Emmes Corporation Andra L Blomkalns MD, University of Cincinnati, SAEM BOD Member Edward W Boyer MD, PhD, University of Massachusetts, Advisory Board FDA, Grant Recipient NIDA Charles Cairns MD, University of North Carolina, Consultant bioMerieux, Grant Recipient Medtronic Foundation Clifton W Callaway MD, University of Pittsburgh, UPMC Health System Employee, NHLBI Grant Recipient, Co-inventor on patents related to defibrillation, Equipment loan from Medivance, Inc. F. Brian Clare MD, FACEP, CEO, Virginia Chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians (VACEP), Advisory Board IV Watch, Board Member TSystem Robert Cooney MD, Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center, Shareholder Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, Owner of Gatti Pharmacy, Indiana, PA Rebecca Cunningham MD, University of Michigan, Consultant Grants NIH/CDC, Grant Recipient NIH, CDC Deborah B Diercks MD, MSc, University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Consultant Beckman Coulter, SAEM and Society of Chest Pain Centers Board Member, Institutional Research Grants: Beckman Coulter, Carolinas Medical Center Marsha D Ford MD, Carolinas Poison Control Center, Grant Recipient Centers for Disease and Prevention Nicholas Genes MD, PhD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Advisory Board Medscape Inc., Emergency Physicians Monthly, Inc., Emergency Medicine Practice, Consultant Sunrise Consulting, Employee of Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Board Member of Medgadget.com Kennon Heard MD, Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center, Denver Health, McNeil Consumer Healthcare, Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Research, Consulting, Clinical Contracts Judd E Hollander MD, University of Pennsylvania, Grant Recipient Alere, Abbott, Brahms, Nanosphere, SAEM, Siemens, PA DOH, ACRIN, NIH, Board Member Annals of Emerg Med Editorial Board

Jay Lemery MD, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical College, Consultant CDC Climate and Health Division

Moira Davenport, MD, Allegheny General Hospital Nichole Deiorio MD, Oregon Health and Science University

Roger J Lewis MD, PhD, Los Angeles County-Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Advisory Board Aspen Bio Pharma, Inc., Consultant Berry Consultants, LLC, Octapharma

Stephanie J Doniger MD, RDMS, Children’s Hospital and Research Center Oakland

Christopher Lindsell PhD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Intellectual Property/Patents Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Suzanne Dooley-Hash MD, University of Michigan

Robert Lowe MD, MPH, Oregon Health and Science University, Shareholder Beckton-Dickinson, Bristol-Myer-Squibb, General Electric, Johnson and Johnson, Pfizer, Procter and Gamble, Intellectual Property/Patents Preliminary patent for monitoring equipment, held by my university Michael S Lyons MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Grant Recipient Gilead Sciences Gregg Margolis PhD, NREMT-P, US Dept of Health and Human Services, Employee National Registry of EMTs, Spouse is employee of United Bio Source Henderson McGinnis MD, Wake Forest University/Wake Forest Baptist Medical, Board Member Appalachian Center for Wilderness Medicine, Board of Directors Same River Solutions, PLLC

Gail D’Onofrio MD, MS, Yale University Katherine Douglass MD, George Washington University Basil Eldadah, MD, National Institute on Aging Susan E Farrell MD, EdM, Harvard School of Medicine Rosemarie Fernandez MD, University of Washington School of Medicine Michael T Fitch MD, PhD, Wake Forest School of Medicine Nathalie Flacke MD, Guebwiller & Colmar Hospital, France William Frohna MD, Washington Hospital Center Eric Goldlust MD, Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital Javier A Gonzalez del Rey MD, Med, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital David Gordon MD, Duke University

Zachary F Meisel MD, MPH, University of Pennsylvania, Spouse is Consultant for Bayer, Inc., Board Member of ZaBeCor Pharmaceuticals, Time Magazine Contributor

Marna Greenberg DO, Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network

Raina Merchant MS, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Grant Recipient NIH K23, 109083-01

N. Stuart Harris MD, MFA, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Arthur Pancioli MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Grant Recipient NINDS, Other Relationships Schering-Plough, Genentech

Mark Hauswald MD, University of New Mexico School of Medicine

Norman Paradis MD, University of Southern California, Zoll Circulation, Inc. Hypothermia and CPR Device, Adoneh LLC, CMO, CRO, Optical and Molecular Diagnostics

Robert Hendrickson, MD, Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine

Jesse Pines MD, MBA, MSCE, George Washington University School of Medicine, Advisory Board Given Imaging, Consultant Abbott Point-of-Care

Michael L Hochberg MD, Drexel University College of Medicine

Sanjey Gupta MD, New York Hospital Queens/Weill Cornell Medical College

Rod Hayward, MD, University of Michigan

Cherri D Hobgood MD, Indiana University School of Medicine

Mark Rosenberg DO, St. Joseph’s Regional Medical Center, St. Joseph Healthcare System Employee

Robert S Hockberger MD, Los Angeles County-Harbor-UCLA Medical Center

Jane Scott ScD, MSN, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health, Employee NIH/NHLBI

James Holliman MD, Uniformed Services University

Larry Stack MD, Vanderbilt University, Editor McGraw Hill Vincent P Verdile MD, Albany Medical College, Employee of Albany Medical Center

James Hoekstra MD, Wake Forest University James Holmes MD, MPH, UC Davis School of Medicine Jeffrey Hom MD, Stony Brook University School of Medicine Debra E Houry MD, MPH, Emory University School of Medicine

Jeannette Wolfe MD, Baystate Hospital Western Campus Tufts University, Contributor and on Advisory Board to Emergency Physician Monthly

Hans House MD, University of Iowa

Renee Y Hsia MD, University of California (San Francisco)/San Francisco General Hospital, UCSF Employee, Grant Recipient NIH CTSI KL2; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Diane Birnbaumer MD, University of California, Advisory Board Securisyn, Editorial Board Massachusetts Medical Society, Editorial Board Merck Manuals Center for Medical Education, Course Faculty TeamHealth, The Airway Course

Stephanie Kayden MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Alan E Jones MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center, SAEM Board Member

Phil B Fontanarosa MD, Northwestern University, Employee of AMA - JAMA

Sorabh Khandelwal MD, The Ohio State University

Leon L Haley MD, MHSA, Emory University, Advisory Board Junior League of Atlanta, Grant Recipient Dept of Defense, Other relationships Genesis Healthcare Associates

Anupam Kharbanda MD, MS, University of Minnesota

Jason Hoppe DO, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Consultant UpToDate Author of PCP chapter

Thomas Judge CCTP, LifeFlight of Maine, Advisory Board National EMS Advisory Council (member of Federal Advisory Panel non-paid), Executive Director of LifeFlight of Maine, Board Member St. George Volunteer FireFighters and Ambulance Assoc. Executive Director EMS (Volunteer non-paid position / non-profit)

Emily Senecal MD, Harvard Medical School, Co-author of “Emergency Management of Coding Patients”

Amy Kaji MD, PhD, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center Gabor Kelen MD, Johns Hopkins University Chad Kessler MD, MHPE, University of Illinois-Chicago

Marcia Perry MD, University of Michigan Timothy Platts-Mills MD, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Stacy Poznanski DO, Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine Susan Promes MD, University of California, San Francisco Megan Ranney MD, MPH, Brown University Eric Revue MD, Louis Pasteur’s Hospital, France Richard E Rothman MD, PhD, The Johns Hopkins University Richard M Ruddy MD, University of Cincinnati Basmah Safdar MD, Yale-New Haven Hospital Sally A Santen MD, PhD, University of Michigan Comilla Sasson MD, MS, University of Colorado Thomas Scalea MD, University of Maryland Rawle A Seupaul MD, Indiana University Anand Shah MD, University of Pennsylvania Phillip Shayne MD, Emory University Marco Sivilotti MD, MSc Queens University Catherine Stoney PhD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) National Institutes of Health (NIH) Selim Suner MD, MS, Brown University Jason Thurman MD, Vanderbilt University Stephen Trzeciak MD, Cooper Hospital/University Medical Center Janis Tupesis MD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine Jody Vogel MD, Denver Health Medical Center John A Vozenilek MD, Northwestern University Roxanne Vrees MD, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University Mary Jo Wagner MD, Synergy Medical Education Alliance/Michigan State University Joshua Wallenstein MD, Emory University Scott Weiner MD, MPH, Tufts Medical Center Bjorn Westgard MD, MA, University of Minnesota Lauren Whiteside MD, University of Michigan Scott T Wilber MD, MPH, Summa Akron City Hospital Catherine G Wolff MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania Stewart W Wright MD, Med, University of Cincinnati Lalena M Yarris MD, Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine Brian J Zink MD, Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital Sandra M Schneider MD, University of Rochester William Dale MD, PhD, University of Chicago Pamela Dyne MD, UCLA, Medical Center/Olive View Elisabeth Edelstein MD, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital/Jefferson Medical College Alexander Garza MD, Department of Homeland Security James A Gordon MD, MPA, Harvard University Jason S Haukoos MD, MSc, Denver Health Medical Center Katherine L Heilpern MD, Emory University Robin R Hemphill MD, MPH, National Center for Patient Safety, VA Medical System

Keith E Kocher MD, MPH, MPhil, University of Michigan

Laura Hopson MD, University of Michigan Medical School

Michael Kohn MD, MPP, University of California San Francisco

Richard Hunt MD, National Center for Injury Prevention & Control John Marx MD, Carolinas Medical Center

Robert Silbergleit MD, University of Michigan, Employee of University of Michigan Health System, Grant Recipient NIH

Walter Koroshetz, MD, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

Jeffrey A Kline MD, Carolinas Medical Center, Shareholder CP Diagnostics LLC, Grant Recipient AHRQ, Genentech, Intellectual Property/Patents Carolinas Healthcare

Ernest Wang MD, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Shareholder Pfizer

Gloria Kuhn DO, PhD, Wayne State University

Nathan Kuppermann MD, MPH, University of California-Davis, Intellectual Property or Patents Co-owners of InsuCalc, a company which makes an educational wheel for patients with diabetes

Rakesh Mistry MD, University of Pennsylvania

Kevin J Knoop MD, Naval Medical Hospital

Brent R. King MD, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Shareholder Johnson and Johnson

Terry Kowalenko MD, University of Michigan, Spouse is Genentech Employee

James Miner MD, Hennepin County Medical Center

H.F. Samuel Lam MD, Advocate Christ Medical Center Eddy S Lang MD, University of Calgary Hollynn Larrabee MD, West Virginia University

Kathryn Montgomery, Northwestern University Ryan Mutter PhD, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Craig Newgard MD, Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine Karin Rhodes MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania

Eric Legome MD, Kings County Hospital Center

Jeremiah Schuur MD, MHS, Brigham & Womens Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Adam Levine MD, Brown University Medical School

Chris Thomson MD, MS, Centra Medical Group

Resa E Lewiss MD, RDMS, St. Luke’s/Roosevelt Hospital Center

Patti Wolter, Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University

Michelle Lin MD, University of California (San Francisco)/San Francisco General Hospital

Terry L Vanden Hoek MD, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago

Robert Lipton PhD, University of Michigan Eve D Losman MD, University of Michigan

87


exhibitor announcement Airway Cam Technologies, Inc.

Challenger Corporation

www.airwaycam.com

www.challenger.com

Airway Cam Technologies a leader in airway management education for over fifteen years, is a one-source supplier for your equipment and training needs. We are exclusive sellers of the Airway Training Series six-mannequin set of high quality intubation trainers. we also carry the full line of TruCorp mannequins. .

Challenger provides learning and testing tools for program directors and institutions to quantify the skill sets of residents and PAs in training. Challengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reporting system yields compliance, performance and remediation data on individual users, program years, and for your entire program. These statistical outputs permit client institutions to prove compliance and effectiveness to certifying organizations.

George Washington University Department of Emergency Medicine Section of Clinical Research

John Peter Smith Health Network

Wayne, PA

Washington, DC

Please visit our booth to participate in a video survey about wireless capsule endoscopy in the ER for upper GI hemorrhage.

Fort Worth, TX

Academic Emergency Medicine Group supporting a new Emergency Medicine Residency Program at a large, urban Level 1 Trauma Center in Fort Worth TX. Core and Clinical Faculty recruiting services supporting the Academic Emergency Medicine Group.

Sheridan Healthcare, Inc.

Shift Administrators, Inc.

800-816-6791

www.shiftadmin.com

Sunrise, FL

88

Memphis, TN

CSL Behring

www.cslbehring-us.com. CSL Behring is a global leader in the plasma protein biotherapeutics industry. CSL Behring manufactures and markets a range of safe and effective plasma-derived and recombinant products and related services. The companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s products are used for organ transplantation, inherited emphysema, in the prevention of hemolytic diseases in the newborn, in cardiac surgery, and in the treatment of burns and shock. Additional therapies are used in the treatment of hemophilia, von Willebrand disease, other bleeding disorders, and immune deficiency disorders. CSL Behring is a subsidiary of CSL Limited, a biopharmaceutical company with headquarters in Melbourne, Australia.

Education Management Solutions Exton, PA

www.ems-works.com (EMS) is the leader in simulation management and skills evaluation software and audio-video technology. Our enterprise and portable solutions are ideal for emergency management and disaster preparedness training. From audio-video recording of simulated events, data capture and centralized storage to debriefing, evaluation, scoring, and inventory management, our turnkey solutions and support are unmatched. Stop by our booth for a demo of our solution and a chance to win an iPOD Nano.

Masimo

MD Associates, Inc.

www.massimo.com

www.mdassociatesinc.com

Masimo is a global medical technology company responsible for the invention of award-winning noninvasive technologies, medical devices, and sensors that are revolutionizing patient monitoring, including Massimo SET, Masimo rainbow SET Pulse CO-Oximetry, noninvasive and continuous hemoglobin (SpHb), acoustic respiration rate (RRa), Masimo SafetyNet, and SEDLine, (EEGbased) Brain Function Monitors.

Revenue cycle management firm assisting groups with credentialing, billing, coding, bad debt collections and providing ala carte services as needed.

SonoSim, Inc.

TeamHealth

Irvine, CA

Kilmamock, VA

Columbia, SC

Santa Monica, CA www.sonosim.com

www.teamhealth.com

Knoxville, TN

Shift Admin is a completely web-based schedule management system designed for emergency medicine.

SonoSim creates the SonoSim Ultrasound Training Solution, a revolutionary, real-patient based ultrasound training product. It uses a laptop computer training environment to deliver unparalleled didactic content, knowledge assessment and hands-on training. The refreshingly engaging learning experience allows users the freedom to learn anytime-anywhere.

TeamHealth is a physician-led, clinical outsourcing organization committed to providing exceptional patient care. Our physicians work in stable contracts, free from administrative hassles. We provide them with competitive compensation, professional liability insurance, continuing medical education, and career growth opportunities.


exhibitor announcement Elite Medical Scribes

EmCare, Inc.

Emergency Consultants, Inc.

Emergency Medical Associates

www.elitemedicalscribes.com

www.emcare.com

www.eci-med.com

www.EMA.net/careers

Elite Medical Scribes is the premier scribe training, staffing, and scribe program management company for hospitals, physician groups, and clinics. With established methods and techniques, we have created a unique program, which maximizes efficiency of patient care and enhances the quality of health care overall. With Elite, there is no hassle in establishing a new scribe program, or simply enhancing your existing program. From recruitment, to hiring, training, and management Elite has you covered.

*Co-Sponsor of the Opening Reception

Minneapolis, MN

Dallas, TX

Physicians who choose EmCare find an abundance of career opportunities. With more than 500 exclusive contracts with client hospitals in nearly 40 states – large or small, rural and urban, a teaching hospital or one that is part of a larger system – you’ll find abundant and challenging opportunities.

Traverse City, MI

Livingston, NJ

www.emp.com

EMA is a premier, democratic emergency medicine physician practice which provides its physicians with an exceptional life-work balance, outstanding compensation and unlimited growth opportunities. EMA has an unwavering commitment to delivering high-quality patient care and unparalleled patient satisfaction. For over 34 years, EMA physicians have been recognized for innovation, leadership and research in the field of emergency medicine. We are seeking BC/BE EM physicians for career positions on the east coast.

EKR Therapeutics Bedminster, NJ www.ekrtx.com

EMP Physician Recruiting Traverse City, MI

Medtronic

Medviks Telehealth Inc.

Physio-Control

Questcare Partners

www.medtronic.com

www.medviks.com

www.physio-control.com

www.questcare.net

Medtronic’s Spinal and Biologics business is glad it can support your program. We are not only dedicated to providing the spinal and biologics products that patients need, but also supporting educational conferences and programs for physicians and other health care providers that are directly or indirectly related to spine disease, spine associated neurological disease states or conditions, oral/cranial maxillofacial disease states and dental restorations, general orthopedic trauma and musculoskeletal disease states.

Virtual emergency department scribe service using recently graduated medical doctors.

Physio-Control partners with professional responders all over the world to provide solutions in emergency care. With leading edge technologies such as the LIFENET System for efficient patient data management and the LUCUS Chest Compression System, Physio-Control is partnering with emergency response teams to improve patient care and save lives.

Questcare Partners is a physician-owned and operated Emergency Medicine organization. We are a truly democratic group with an entrepreneurial vision and dedication to career growth and development. State-of-the-art emergency care is delivered in nineteen ultramodern facilities located throughout Dallas/Fort Worth, El Paso, and San Antonio (a JV via Level 5 Healthcare).

US Army

Nebraska Air National Guard

Limbs & Things

US Army Medical Corp., one of the largest health care systems in the world. AMEDD operates more than 600 medical centers, clinics, research facilities around the world.

www.goang.com

www.limbsandthings.com

As an Air Guard health professional, you will benefit from the wide range of medical challenges presented by our diverse missions. You may find yourself in the middle of the action during a natural disaster or a homeland crisis - situations where your skills are critical and your character can make all the difference..

Limbs & Things is committed to serving training markets in Clinical Skills, Women’s HEalth and the Surgical Specialties. Our goal is to produce products which allow clinical educators to successfully deliver their curriculumn requirements for physical examination and procedural skills..

Memphis, TN

Teed & Company Norwalk, CT

www.teedco.com

Teed & Company is the nation’s preeminent emergency medicine search and recruitment firm. From chief search to director to academic or clinical positions, Teed & Company provides comprehensive service to hospitals, staffing groups and partnerships. Senior level physicians and newly graduating residents have found Teed & Company’s in-depth knowledge of the marketplace a resource on which to depend. For expert knowledge and guidance in furthering your own career, visit our booth in the exhibit hall.

Pearland, TX

www.healthcare.goarmy.com/saem

Stop by the US Army Medical booth today or contact a member of the US Army Health Care Team at 855-276-9517 and ask about our two-year commitment for health care professionals ages 43-60.

Redmond, WA

Lincoln, NE

Dallas, TX

Savannah, GA

89


EVEL 1

RIVER EXHIBITION HALL - LEVEL 1

QUET

150 010 200

RECEPTION

8’ X10’

10’ X10’ BOOTH

3,200 1,600 1,600

175 84 89

133 65 59

upon specific program requirements. Level 1 ceiling height: ation. Banquet capacities are based on 66” rounds.

S NINE

90


LOBBY - LEVEL 3

al

e

ur ng

BALLROOM - LEVEL 4

CONFERENCE

RECEPTION

20 16 34 16 20 20 16

30 30 125 30 30 30 30

CLASSROOM

18 18 60 18 18 24 24

U-SHAPE

HOLLOW SQUARE

15 15 35 15 15 21 18

18 18 40 18 18 24 21

MEETING ROOMS

Lincoln Boardroom Columbus A Columbus B Columbus A & B

TOTAL AREA

DIMENSIONS

BANQUET

THEATER

CONFERENCE

RECEPTION

CLASSROOM

U-SHAPE

HOLLOW SQUARE

720 600 600 1,200

30’ x 24’ 25’ x 24’ 25’ x 24’ 50’ x 24’

N/A 30 40 80

N/A 40 40 80

20 16 16 34

N/A 40 40 125

N/A 24 24 30

N/A 15 15 30

N/A 20 20 36

Numbers shown assume maximum capacities and are subject to change upon specific program requirements. Level 3 ceiling height: 10’. Minimum audio-visual & head table has been taken into consideration. Banquet capacities are based on 66” rounds.

S

S

UR

FIVE

NS

BANQUET

THEATER

RECEPTION

CLASSROOM (3 PER 6)

20’

3,160

4,200

4,600

2,400

MEETING ROOMS

Chicago Ballroom VI

TOTAL AREA

DIMENSIONS

BANQUET

THEATER

RECEPTION

CLASSROOM (3 PER 6)

4,875

63’x 78’

300

480

500

240

91


NOTES

92



SAEM 2012 Annual Meeting Program