Page 1

Celebrating Our 25th Anniversary

2340 S. River Road, Suite 208 | Des Plaines, IL 60018 | 847-813-9823 | www.saem.org JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2014

VOLUME XXIX NUMBER 1

RULES OF THE “GAME” The History of the External Collaboration Committee

ETHICS IN ACTION The Impaired Physician

JOINING AN SAEM ACADEMY:

CHRISTOPHER FEE, MD PAST CHAIR, SAEM ECC

A Resident’s Perspective

RESIDENTS AND MEDICAL STUDENTS Participating In Scholarly Activity

MICHAEL D. BROWN, MD CHAIR, SAEM ECC

To lead the advancement of emergency care through education and research, advocacy, and professional development in academic emergency medicine.


SAEM STAFF Chief Executive Officer Ronald S. Moen Ext. 212, rmoen@saem.org Director of Information Services & Administration James Pearson Ext. 225, jpearson@saem.org Accountant Mai Luu, MSA Ext. 208, mluu@saem.org Accounting Assistant Dipesh Patel Ext. 207, dpatel@saem.org Communications Manager/Newsletter Editor Karen Freund Ext. 202, kfreund@saem.org Assistant to the Executive Director Michelle Orlow Ext. 206, morlow@saem.org Education Coordinator Tricia Fry Ext. 213, tfry@saem.org Grants & Foundation Manager Melissa McMillian, CNP Ext. 203, mmcmillian@saem.org Marketing & Membership Manager Holly Byrd-Duncan, MBA Ext. 210, hbyrdduncan@saem.org Meeting Planner Maryanne Greketis, CMP Ext. 209, mgreketis@saem.org Membership Coordinator George Greaves Ext. 211, ggreaves@saem.org Systems Administrator/Database Analyst Michael Reed Ext. 205, mreed@saem.org Administrative Assistant Sarah Buchanan Ext. 201, sbuchanan@saem.org Administrative Assistant Elizabeth Oshinson Ext. 204, eoshinson@saem.org

AEM STAFF Editor in Chief David C. Cone, MD david.cone@yale.edu Journal Editor Kathleen Seal kseal@saem.org Journal Manager Sandi Arjona sandrak.arjona@gmail.com

2013-2014 BOARD OF DIRECTORS Alan E. Jones, MD President University of Mississippi Medical Center Robert S. Hockberger, MD President-Elect Harbor-UCLA Medical Center Andra L. Blomkalns, MD Secretary-Treasurer University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Cherri D. Hobgood, MD Past President Indiana University School of Medicine Kathleen J. Clem, MD, FACEP Loma Linda University School of Medicine D. Mark Courtney, MD Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Deborah B. Diercks, MD, MSc University of California, Davis, Medical Center James F. Holmes, Jr., MD, MPH University of California, Davis, Health System Amy H. Kaji, MD, PhD Harbor-UCLA Medical Center Brett A. Rosen, MD, Resident Member WellSpan York Hospital Sarah A. Stahmer, MD University of North Carolina School of Medicine The SAEM Newsletter is published bimonthly by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of SAEM. For Newsletter archives and e-Newsletters Click on Publications at www.saem.org Š 2014 Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior permission in writing from the copyright holder.


HIGHLIGHTS NEWSLETTER HIGHLIGHTS GUIDELINES N EWSLETTER G UIDELINES SAEM invites submissions to the Newsletter, published bimonthly six times a year in identical online and paper editions, academic emergency medicine in pertaining to President’s Message areas including:

4

    

Clinical practice Education of EM residents, off-service residents, medical students, and fellows Faculty development, CME Executive Director’s Message Politics and economics as they pertain to the academic environment General announcements and notices

5

Submit materials for consideration for publication at newsletter@saem.org. Please include the names and Ethics in Action affiliations of authors and a means of contact.

6

COMMERCIAL ADVERTISING 

4

President’s Message

5

Chief Executive’s Message

6

Cover Feature

8

Ethics in Action

9

Joining an SAEM Academy

Full-page advertisement: $2,100.00

8

(camera-ready, 7.5" wide x 9.75" high) Remembering Ron Krome 

Half-page advertisement: $1,250.00 (camera-ready, 7.5" wide x 4.75" high)

Quarter-page advertisement: $830

13

(camera-ready, 3.5" wide x 4.75" high)

Annual Award Winners

ACADEMIC ADVERTISING Full-page advertisement: $1,450.00

10

Resident and Student Advisory Committee

12

A Personal Journey

(camera-ready, 7.5" wide x 9.75" high) 

20

Half-page advertisement: $850.00 SonoGames™ (camera-ready, 7.5" wide x 4.75" high)

Quarter-page advertisement: $575

(camera-ready, 3.5" wide x 4.75" high) 

Classified advertisement (100 words or fewer): $155

22

Resident and Student  No extra chargeAdvisory for full four-color. Committee

 No bleeds.  An additional one-time fee of $50 will be charged if ad requires formatting.

S U B M I S S I O N D E Academic ADLINES January/February issue December 1 Announcements March/April issue February 1 May/June issue April 1 July/August issue June 1 September/October issue August 1 November/December issue October 1

28

20

Academic Announcements

21

Calls and Meetings Announcements


PRESIDENT’S M ESSAGE HALFWAY – SEIZE THE DAY Alan E. Jones, MD

University of Mississippi Medical Center Let’s define our terms: It’s not Halfway, Oregon, or the band Halfway, or the movie Halfway. We are talking about here, now, this moment, halfway through the current academic year, and, for me, halfway through my year as SAEM president. As defined by the Merriam-Webster dictionary, “halfway” is an adjective meaning “in the middle between two points.” This got me thinking about what had occurred in the first half of the year and what would occur in the second half of the year. Then I realized that that thought process is really not how we get things accomplished. In reality, there is no past and there is no future. There is only the present. And, as it seems, the biggest obstacles to the present are the past and the future. When we look back at the past, often we are faced with difficult memories, of disagreement, of anger, of hurt, or of other emotions that keep us from capitalizing on the present or at least moving forward in the present. And even if the past was great, it fades and becomes more distant and eventually is not so great (or helpful) anymore. And looking forward too intently into the future may cause us to lose focus on the present, find an excuse to procrastinate in the present, or make the present tasks seem insurmountable.

Alan E. Jones, MD

Perhaps the Roman poet Horace was correct when he wrote in the Odes back in 23 BC that one must carpe diem, or “seize the

4

day.” Really, in all actuality, our past should help us appreciate the present, and both should keep us from fretting about the future. So how does this relate to SAEM? Let’s agree as members of this great society to focus on the present. We have 25 years behind us, and I feel confident we have another 25 years ahead of us. This organization has come a long way, but still has a long way to go. But that is the past and the future. What we have now is the present. We have the present to work hard and donate our time, energy, talent and money to produce change that will make a difference and allow us to support each other. So my challenge to each SAEM member now is to reflect briefly on the past, then put it aside. Gaze for a moment at the future and the possibilities it holds. Then turn your attention to the present and ask yourself, “What can I do for this organization?” so that, at the end of this day, as you sit in the present, you know that you helped build on the past and prepare the future for our patients, our trainees, our colleagues, and our specialty. ◗ CARPE DIEM: Donate to the Foundation http://www.saem.org/saem-foundation Join an academy http://www.saem.org/saem-community/academies Nominate a colleague for an award http://www.saem.org/meetings/saem-awards


CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S M ESSAGE OUR ANNIVERSARY MEETING

Ronald S. Moen

In the last issue of the SAEM Newsletter, I spoke about being “all in” and the various meanings that phrase could have, depending on the context in which it is uttered. I especially wanted to emphasize the need for SAEM members and staff to be “all in” supporting the SAEM Foundation, and what that will mean for the future of academic emergency medicine. I’ll say more on how you can support the SAEM Foundation at a special event in Dallas later in this article.

Now it is time to turn our attention to SAEM’s 25th Anniversary Meeting. It will be held May 13-17, 2014, in Dallas, TX, and it will be a blockbuster, with more programs, special sessions, opportunities to learn new skills, and networking opportunities than at any previous Annual Meeting. As of the time of this writing, 103 didactic presentations have been accepted, and Dr. Chris Ross, chairman of the Program Committee, has stated “these are the best of the best” that have ever been submitted in the many years he has been on the Committee. We have also added a number of very special sessions to the Tuesday schedule: you will have to check the website to learn all about these, as I can’t give away any secrets in this article. I can tell you, however, that back by popular demand is “The Future of Emergency Medicine in Health Care Reform,” a panel featuring presentations by Dr. Jeremy Brown, director of the Office of Emergency Care Research at NIH; Dr. Atul Grover, chief policy officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges; and Mr. Gordon Wheeler, associate executive director of the Public Policy Division of ACEP in Washington, DC. Their presentations will be followed by an opportunity to ask them questions about their presentations and observations on the future of emergency medicine. This is certainly a session you will not want to miss.

American Medical Colleges. As attention to and consideration of the diversity of the United States population continue to inform decision-making in all areas of medicine, those who seek care in emergency departments will increasingly expect physicians and other health care providers to be sensitive to their identities and ethnic and cultural heritage in their health care decisions, and emergency department staffing will continue to be more inclusive and reflect that diverse population. Dr. Nivet has spent much of his life working to promote the transformation of organizations and communities through inclusiveness, and his presentation is another one you will not want to miss. This past November 22 marked 50 years since the assassination of President John F. Kennedy; the anniversary was accompanied by a resurgence of interest in the president’s life and death. During your time at the SAEM Annual Meeting in Dallas in May 2014, you will have the opportunity to visit the museum that has been established on the 6th floor of the former Texas School Book Depository building, from where Lee Harvey Oswald fired the shot heard around the world. This is not only a unique opportunity to revisit the life and times of President Kennedy, but also a time to mingle and network with good friends and make new friends: the SAEM Foundation has rented the Sixth Floor Museum and the other event space in the building for the Foundation’s annual reception. A contribution to the SAEM Foundation in 2014 will be your entry ticket to participate in this once-in-a-lifetime experience. The SAEM website will contain all the details for this event, which will be held on the evening of Thursday, May 15. Registration for the 2014 Annual Meeting will open in midJanuary, so check the website for details on the program and registration fees. Hotel reservations are already being accepted, so please visit the Annual Meeting registration page at http://www.saem.org/annual-meeting/registration/housing to book your rooms at the Sheraton Hotel in Dallas. See you there! ◗

We will also have a special session on diversity, featuring Marc A. Nivet, EdD, chief diversity officer for the Association of

SAVE THE DATE 2014 SAEM Annual Meeting Marking our 25th Anniversary

May 13-17, 2014 The Sheraton Dallas Hotel, Dallas, TX

Program Committee Chair – Christopher Ross, MD Watch for meeting updates and submission deadlines on the website! www.saem.org

5


COVER FEATURE THE SAEM EXTERNAL COLLABORATION COMMITTEE: A BRIEF HISTORY Christopher Fee, MD

Michael D. Brown, MD

“... discouraged the endorsement of products that were created without SAEM representation from the outset...” Christopher Fee, MD

Past Chair, SAEM External Collaboration Committee

Michael D. Brown, MD

Chair, SAEM External Collaboration Committee

Emergency medicine is often called the ultimate team sport in medicine. In the daily rush of EDs across the country, we witness the interplay of emergency physicians, nursing staff, clerical personnel, medical assistants, radiology technicians, housekeeping, and numerous other players, all highly trained, talented and dedicated. Each team member contributes to the overarching goal of providing effective, efficient, and equitable care to the 115 million patients that visit the ED each year. Unfortunately, the rules of the “game” in which we play have often been developed and disseminated without the explicit involvement of those on the front lines. In this era of performance metrics, public accountability, and cost constraints, the importance of emergency medicine input at the highest levels of development and decision-making is paramount. Several years ago, the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine leadership recognized the need to participate in setting the rules of our own game. To address this need, the SAEM Guidelines Committee (the precursor to the External Collaboration Committee) was created in 2007. This committee was composed of leaders within the Society who were not only accomplished researchers (whose work contributed to the formation of the guidelines), but many of whom had also served on guideline writing committees for other organizations. They realized the need to change the common practice among outside organizations according to which guidelines were crafted without EM input, and then sent to SAEM for endorsement. Consequently, SAEM established a policy that discouraged the endorsement of products that were created without SAEM representation from the outset, and made a concerted effort to be proactive in this process rather than reactive. SAEM reached out to other organizations to educate them on our expertise, and our willingness to work together on the development of guidelines affecting our patients and practice. Despite the commonly misunderstood moniker, the committee members did

6

not draft guidelines themselves (which would have been a timeconsuming and expensive undertaking). The SAEM Guidelines Committee made big strides with respect to successfully nominating SAEM representatives to serve on external guideline writing committees with a number of organizations, but the playing field was changing. Specialty societies had traditionally created treatment guidelines based on expert opinion and the scientific literature. However, performance (or quality) measurement was gaining prominence; these measures quantify compliance with guideline recommendations at the facility or provider level, with the ultimate aim of improving outcomes. Performance measures were also increasingly tied to public reporting and financial incentives. The SAEM leadership and Guidelines Committee recognized this seismic shift and recommended that SAEM join the National Quality Forum (NQF) as a member organization. The NQF is a non-profit that has been empowered by Congress to review and endorse standards for measuring health care performance for the United States. Additionally, the NQF oversees maintenance of endorsed measures to assure they remain relevant in light of new research and of experience with the measures. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), among others, may choose to implement performance metrics from the list of those endorsed by the NQF. Thus, the NQF occupies a powerful position and wields a great deal of influence in the arena of performance measurement. In 2010, the Guidelines Committee was re-branded as the External Collaboration Committee (ECC) to more accurately reflect the nature of its goals and objectives. Chris Fee was named chair of the ECC, which continued to nominate SAEM representatives to outside organizations involved with writing clinical practice guidelines and other relevant activities. At that time, the ECC reassessed the costs and benefits of SAEM becoming involved in the de novo development of clinical practice guidelines and performance measures. Given the significant costs in terms of time and resources, the ECC again recommended against SAEM embarking on such an endeavor, Continued on Page 7


Continued from Page 6 but suggested that SAEM formally establish better collaborative lines of communication with ACEP in their guideline and quality measure production. After SAEM became an NQF member organization, the ECC began to provide expert review of performance measures up for possible endorsement. While we believe that SAEM input and commentary to the NQF on these proposed measures are important and may have some influence on the decision to endorse them or not, it became increasingly clear that EM input at higher levels within the NQF would be far more valuable in prioritizing the needs of our patients and practices. Therefore, the ECC established a surveillance system to remain abreast of opportunities to nominate representatives to NQF committees and other leadership positions. Due to the structure of the NQF committees, which are generally made up of an interdisciplinary group of physicians, content and process measure experts, and other stakeholders, it proved difficult to gain a seat at the table. Over time, it became apparent that to be successful in having SAEM nominees named to these higher-level NQF positions, EM needed to present a unified voice. SAEM and ACEP have recently established a liaison between the ECC and the ACEP Quality and Performance Committee (QPC) to harness the power of a unified nomination (Chris Fee currently serves in this

SAEM

role). For NQF committees where multiple EM representatives are likely to be named, SAEM and ACEP may continue to submit independent nominees. For NQF committees where EM representation would be ideal but not guaranteed, the SAEM ECC and ACEP QPC attempt to identify a single nominee that could represent the interests of both organizations; thus far, this collaborative strategy has proven much more effective. The 2013-2014 External Collaboration Committee, chaired by Michael Brown, continues to work towards establishing a proactive stance with external organizations. Success often brings more opportunity, and this has certainly been the case with the ECC. Throughout the course of the year, SAEM is asked to participate in various projects and committees. To facilitate the process of identifying content experts within the SAEM ranks, the ECC has been charged with compiling a list of SAEM content experts as well as a list of those who already serve as representatives to other organizations. Once fully operational, the database and new prioritization system should increase the efficiency and expediency of the ECC. Though the path to establishing the rules of our game is rarely clear or unobstructed, SAEM and the ECC have developed fruitful collaborations with a number of external organizations, and will continue to advocate for rules that ultimately benefit our patients. â——

Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Save The Dates

|

May 13-17, 2014

DALLAS 7


ETHICS IN ACTION THE IMPAIRED PHYSICIAN Ethan Cowan, MD, MS

Department of Emergency Medicine and Epidemiology & Population Health – Albert Einstein College of Medicine

CASE PRESENTATION

One of your colleagues and close friends, an emergency medicine physician, was recently involved in a serious motorcycle accident. He sustained multiple orthopedic injuries and was out of work on disability for 5 months. Upon returning to work you notice that he is irritable, easily provoked and argumentative. Some of his outbursts have resulted in formal patient complaints and write-ups by hospital staff. Although he had always been highly sociable and engaged, he now seems to be withdrawn. He has had several episodes at work where the staff described him as being “out of it” and sleepy. At first you attribute his behavior to the stress of returning to work after such a long absence, but as his behavior becomes more erratic you become concerned. One day you get a distressed call from your colleague’s wife, who believes her husband has become addicted to pain medications. She tells you that, over the last few months, he has visited multiple physicians, each of whom has prescribed a generous dose of opioid pain medications. Today she happened to be looking through his closet and found hundreds of tablets of hydrocodone and OxyContin.

DISCUSSION

The American College of Emergency Physicians defines physician impairment as occurring “when a physician’s professional performance is adversely affected by mental or physical illness, aging, alcoholism, chemical dependence or any other circumstance that interferes with his or her ability to engage safely in patient care.”1 Drug and alcohol abuse are among the most well-recognized causes of physician impairment, but other issues, such as mental illness and cognitive disorders, can also result in a significant decline in one’s ability to carry out normal patient care responsibilities. In regard to substance abuse, multiple studies have documented that approximately 10-12% of all physicians will develop a disabling substance abuse problem at some point in their career, similar to rates in the general populace.2,3

8

The case vignette brings up both ethical and legal issues surrounding physician impairment. Two issues that must be assessed when confronting a possibly impaired physician is the degree of danger, if any, the impairment presents to patients, and whether or not to confront and disclose. In most cases of drug and alcohol abuse, it is almost impossible for the affected physician to prevent their addiction from eventually encroaching on and ultimately affecting the care they provide to patients. Even if the physician never shows up to work intoxicated, the long-term effects of both drug and alcohol abuse can take a significant toll on cognitive function and impair one’s ability to provide quality patient care. If, as in the case presented, the physician’s work behavior is suspicious for abuse and addiction, there can be no doubt about the potential harm that this physician poses to patients. Once there is a reasonable suspicion of physician impairment, there is both an ethical and a legal obligation to report it. The one caveat is that a physician must be immediately reported if they show up to work intoxicated and pose an immediate threat to patients. From an ethical standpoint, disclosure can be justified by the “harm principle.” In the case of physician impairment, the potential harm to patients from being treated by an impaired provider overrides the physician’s right to privacy. From a legal standpoint, the legal obligation to report an impaired physician varies from state to state, and it’s important to know your own state’s reporting requirements. An intermediate option between reporting and not reporting to state licensing boards that is available in most states is having the impaired physician voluntarily enroll in a physician’s health program (PHP). These programs are established by state medical societies to assist impaired physicians. They offer a way for the physician to undergo treatment and rehabilitation without being subjected to formal disciplinary action. PHP programs tend to be rigorous. Almost all require post-treatment random drug and alcohol screening, sometimes for years, after the physician completes the rehabilitation program. So long as the physician complies with the PHP’s procedures, they can avoid formal reporting to the state’s medical board for disciplinary action such as loss of a medical license. Although many physicians have fears about reporting a colleague, an important thing to remember is that reporting, more often than not, turns out to be the best course of action Continued on Page 9


JOINING AN SAEM ACADEMY: A RESIDENT’S PERSPECTIVE Marie Carmelle Tabuteau, DO, MBA

PGY 3 Emergency Medicine – Emory University Chair - ADIEM Resident Subcommittee Why should a resident join an SAEM academy? How much can a person at the resident member level contribute to its work? As the chair of the Resident Subcommittee of the SAEM Academy for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Medicine (ADIEM), I feel it is good to pause and reflect on the value of ADIEM and on why such an academy is crucial to our specialty. Interview season has been in full swing, and the need to recruit and retain residents from diverse backgrounds and interests should be a key driver for success. Why should this matter? From Marie Carmelle my perspective, the most meaningful Tabuteau, DO, MBA memories are the experiences I have had and the knowledge I have gained from my patients, attendings, and fellow residents. I am honored to train in a large metropolitan hospital, in an emergency department that sees patients from many different cultures, patients whose individual perspectives affect the way they interact with emergency department staff and must inform the way we as physicians interact with them. My residency program too is inclusive of people from diverse backgrounds and experiences. Simply put, we strive to mirror the community in which we live. On any given shift, for example, I have worked

Continued from Page 8 for the physician as well as the patients. If the physician agrees to undergo treatment and enrolls in a PHP, they have a high likelihood of having a successful rehabilitation and re-entry into the workforce.

CASE OUTCOME AND LESSONS LEARNED

After the call from your colleague’s wife and his pattern of recent behavior, there was no doubt that he was suffering from an addiction that was significantly impairing his ability to provide safe patient care. You felt you had an ethical, professional and legal obligation to report him. You informed your chairman and hospital administration of your suspicion and the evidence you believed supported ongoing impairment. Your chairman called your colleague into his office and presented the evidence to him. Your colleague was given the option of either voluntarily enrolling in a physician’s health program or arguing his case before the state medical board. Upon being confronted with the suspicion of impairment from drug abuse, your colleague admitted his addiction and agreed to voluntary treatment.

with residents that have had medical training in the Middle East, as well as with a new intern from the Midwest caring for their first patient in the South. As an African American woman whose family is from Haiti, I have grown and have been motivated to be a better physician by sharing my personal background and experiences with my patients and my colleagues and learning about theirs. Each of us brings our unique contributions to the tapestry of experience and understanding woven by each encounter with the variety of individuals and cultures represented in the emergency department every day, combining in strength and unity that have inspired me to strive to be a better and more aware person. One of the vehicles SAEM uses to address specific concerns within our specialty is its academies. The mission of ADIEM, the academy with which I am involved, is to increase and ensure inclusion and diversity of the physician workforce at all levels, eliminate disparities in clinical care and outcomes, and encourage the training of EM physicians to deliver culturally appropriate health care. Residents can share their own valuable experiences and insights, as well as their time and talents, to help all SAEM academies fulfill their missions and contribute to the development of academic emergency medicine. I am proud to be a member of ADIEM and to be making my own contribution; I encourage all residents to discover their own interests and passions and to join SAEM academies to help create the future of our specialty. Please visit SAEM’s academy landing page at www.saem.org/ saem-community/academies for more information; feel free to contact me at contact me at m.c.tabuteau@emory.edu for more information on ADIEM. ◗

The main lesson from this case is that physician impairment is a common, albeit under-recognized problem. Although the legal obligation to report varies by state, it can be argued that once you have identified impairment in a colleague, you, as a physician, have both an ethical and a professional obligation to report. Ultimately, reporting with subsequent treatment can save a colleague’s career and protect patients from harm. ◗

BIBLIOGRAPHY 1.  American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP): Policy Statements. Physician Impairment. Retrieved November 5, 2013, from http://www.acep.org/ Clinical---Practice-Management/Physician-Impairment/ 2. 1. Hughes PH, Brandenburg N, Baldwin DC, Jr, et al. Prevalence of substance use among US physicians. JAMA 1992; 267(17):2333-2339. 3. 2. McLellan AT, Skipper GS, Campbell M, DuPont RL. Five year outcomes in a cohort study of physicians treated for substance use disorders in the United States. BMJ 2008; 337:a2038.

9


RESIDENT AND STUDENT ADVISORY COM M ITTEE GET SCHOLARLY Adam Kellogg, MD

Associate Program Director – Baystate Medical Center - Tufts University School of Medicine One requirement the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has for trainees in emergency medicine is that “residents should participate in scholarly activity.” The goal is to improve resident understanding of research methodologies and give you the ability to critically appraise the literature.

A REQUIREMENT...

There are a variety of ways that this requirement can be met, and individual programs will vary in what they will accept. The ACGME gives examples of suitable activities, including: “preparation of a scholarly paper, such as a collective review or case report; active participation in a research project, or formulation and implementation of an original research project; or an emergency department quality improvement project.”

AND AN OPPORTUNITY...

Performing research and writing are a key part of a career in academic medicine. So regardless of whether your program would accept a book chapter, educational innovation, or outside presentation to fulfill this requirement, you should consider using your Scholarly Project as an opportunity to try out research. The additional experiences gained are numerous: • In-depth literature search • Preparing a research protocol • Navigating the Institutional Review Board (IRB)

10

• Analyzing data • Preparing and submitting a manuscript Completing a research project will not only provide a foundation of research skills, but will also leave you more versed in the medical literature and better able to critically appraise new evidence to inform your patient care.

THE SECRETS TO SUCCESS

Now that you are giving a research project serious consideration, we need to make sure you are set up for success. If the finish line is submission for publication in a peer-reviewed journal, there are three main factors that will determine if you get there: 1. Feasibility 2. Mentorship 3. Institutional support

FEASIBILITY

With all of the other demands on your time, it is critical that the project you choose is of realistic scope. The more ambitious you get, the earlier a start you are going to need. If you are getting towards the latter part of your residency, you may want to focus on a case report, or on joining a pre-existing project. But if you start planning early in your training (by the end of first year), you absolutely can devise and execute a study, especially if you choose a topic of genuine interest to you. Really caring about the question you are trying to answer will keep you going when your project hits a few bumps in the road. The best way to figure out if your really cool idea is feasible is to discuss it with a faculty mentor. Continued on Page 11


Continued from Page 10

MENTORSHIP

A good mentor, one who is invested in your success, will make all the difference. They can offer guidance in focusing on an answerable question. Their experience navigating the primary literature and your institution’s IRB can save you time and energy. And they will serve as the principal investigator on your study, but fear not: they will let you do most of the work. A great place to start seeking mentorship is with your department’s research director. Even if they are not the right person to serve as your mentor, they can probably point you in the direction of someone who is.

INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT

Beyond an experienced researcher to serve as your mentor, your institution may be able to provide you with additional support.

There may be internal grants and awards available to fund resident projects. You may have biostatisticians available to help you with power calculations and data analysis. Your department likely has a faculty member sitting on the IRB who can help you hone your submission. You may even have research associates to assist in data collection so that you can get your project done. Most academic institutions have numerous resources available to facilitate their residents and faculty in completing research. You just need to tap into them. Whether the idea of a research project is invigorating or daunting, you should see this as an opportunity to improve your skills and grow as a physician. You may not envision a career that involves research, but who knows? You may surprise yourself and find a new direction. You would certainly not be the first to do so. ◗

VIRTUAL SAEM Among the many innovations and celebrations surrounding the 25th anniversary of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine will be a new “Virtual SAEM” course program, a collection of presentations that will be recorded at SAEM’s Annual Meeting in Dallas, TX in May 2014. Through an agreement with Astute Technology, SAEM will digitally capture up to 75 hours of content over four days of the meeting, including both a camera feed and a graphics feed (slides, PowerPoint presentations). Both meeting attendees and those who are unable to be in Dallas will be able to purchase course materials ahead of the meeting, at registration; during the meeting; and after the meeting, at pricing to be determined. The materials will be available after they have been recorded for unlimited access once purchased, downloadable as PDFs and MP3 audio, and streamable via Mac, PC, smartphone and tablet. CME testing, evaluation and certification will be provided. Check the SAEM website in the upcoming weeks for more information on this opportunity to experience the best of SAEM 2014, even if you can’t make it to Dallas in May. ◗

LOOKING BACK… John Ma, MD Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine

When I was a junior faculty member, I was impressed by how our leaders always made an effort to encourage and assist all SAEM members, regardless of status or seniority. Leaders such as Jerris Hedges, Bill Barsan, and John Marx (just to name a few) set an incredible example for us all. I will be eternally grateful. I hope we all continue to pay it forward during the next 25 years.

11


25TH ANNIVERSARY OF SAEM A PERSONAL JOURNEY Marcus L. Martin, MD I was honored to serve as president of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine during the 2001-2002 program year. I had been a member of the University Association of Emergency Medicine (UAEM) and the Society for Teachers of Emergency Medicine (STEM), the forerunners of SAEM and the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD); from SAEM’s beginning as Marcus L. Martin, MD an organization in 1989, I had the great opportunity to witness marvelous progress, including the development of our own journal in hardcopy and online formats, the purchase of a building headquarters in Michigan, multiple grants for fellowships, sabbaticals and other awards, including national recognition through the Council of Academic Societies. My 12 years of service on the SAEM Board included terms as chair of the Nominating Committee, secretarytreasurer, and president-elect; and I eagerly started my term as president, setting out to accomplish many goals as I looked forward to the “march to the Arch at St. Lou in ’02,” as we called the buildup to the 2002 Annual Meeting. As I arrived for the May 2001 SAEM Annual Meeting to take on my role as president, I felt warm and very welcomed in the culturally rich city of Atlanta. In the Atlanta airport, a large mural hanging on the wall in the main terminal caught my attention. It was a picture of children of many races and ethnicities representing “Rainbow Atlanta.” On May 6, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution had published an article on the increase in integration in the area titled “Rainbow Atlanta: Census Shows Racial Barriers Disappearing in the City, Suburbs.” The stage was nicely set to more fully engage SAEM on a journey of inclusiveness and diversity that had been initiated during the period leading up to the Annual Meeting. In 2000, during my time as president-elect of SAEM, the SAEM Diversity Interest Group created a position statement on diversity that was published in Academic Emergency Medicine in September of that year, stating that the Society believed that “attaining diversity in emergency medicine residencies and faculty that reflect our multicultural society is a desirable and achievable goal.” Subsequently, during my year as president, following up on this statement, SAEM developed the Underrepresented Member Research/Mentoring Task Force. Its goal, as its name suggests, was to provide mentoring to members of SAEM from underrepresented communities and to address cultural competency through the development of teaching materials. Ultimately, the task force was involved in the 2003 creation of a Monograph on Cultural Competency for use by members of SAEM and CORD (see http://www.med-ed.virginia.edu/courses/ culture/index.cfm). Over the years, I watched the SAEM family become more diverse and talented. I saw members become involved who had not previously been engaged. Advancements in research and education were taking place in emergency medicine that

12

would ultimately improve patient care, advancements that were coming from a broader, more diverse community of emergency medicine researchers, educators and clinicians. I witnessed the growth in academic quality and caliber of the organization, and I was very much impressed by the educational and research accomplishments of our young SAEM members, especially as demonstrated during the Annual Meeting’s oral, didactic and awards presentations. During my terms on the Board of Directors and as president-elect, president and past president, I had the great opportunity to work with and learn from many other Board and committee members and SAEM presidents, including Drs. Barsan, Ling, Binder, Sklar, Goldfrank, Dronen, Marx, Syverud, Schneider, and Zink. Other developments during my presidency included technological changes, such as the extinction of the traditional slide trays that had in the past fueled the Imago Obscura Award at the Annual Meeting, replaced by computer presentations. Projects included a faculty development academic handbook, the SAEM Research Fund, a “virtual advisor” project, and a Boardinitiated survey, “Projecting SAEM into the Year 2010,” to help determine the potential direction of the Society’s development in the future. It was also good to see simulation in emergency medicine gaining in popularity as a training modality. Fellowship programs in emergency medicine were growing, and interest in and support of funding for emergency medicine initiatives grew during my presidency. In addition to the many committees, task forces and board initiatives, a new committee was formed with the goal of developing and implementing a public relations plan for SAEM, with emphasis on marketing the Annual Meeting, bolstering membership and informing other organizations about SAEM. During my presidency, SAEM held its first successful mail ballot election. As we looked to the future of SAEM, we projected that all forms of membership would grow to nearly 7,500 by 2010. There would be less dependence on paper communications and greater use of electronic media, and more authority for the executive director to make independent day-to-day decisions. Other significant changes outlined during my presidency were the production of more products and services, more advocacy, greater development of clinical research, and increased reliance on headquarters staff to assist officers, committee chairs and members in working to achieve organizational goals and endowment growth. In 2001, SAEM also established and published a position statement on the filming of emergency patients. The purpose was to protect patients seeking emergency care who are vulnerable to intrusions into their privacy and confidentiality by filming. Image recording for quality improvement or for education of medical personnel associated with the work place was determined to be acceptable with the appropriate consent of the person being filmed. Continued on Page 13


2013 SAEM MIDWEST REGIONAL MEETING RECAP 3. CME CREDIT

• CME credit is still available if you did not turn in the forms at the meeting. • For Summa Health Systems CME, please send completed forms to Jennifer Frey (freyja@summahealth.org). You may also request forms/CME certificates if needed. • For CE Symmetry CME for the keynote address by Dr. Robert Summers, please complete the form online at http://tinyurl.com/ACS-Upstream. (Any yellow CME forms that were turned in at the meeting have been submitted to CE Symmetry, and you do not need complete the online version).

4. SAEM MEMBERSHIP AND PARTICIPATION

Thank you for your participation in the 23rd Annual Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Midwest Regional meeting on November 8, 2013. We greatly appreciate all of the presenters, moderators, and panelists who made such meaningful contributions to the event. There was great research, fantastic discussions, and excellent exchanges of ideas. We hope everyone enjoyed the event and look forward to meeting again in the fall of 2014. A few items to note:

1. CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR AWARD WINNERS • Best Faculty Oral Presentation: Dr. Michael Plewa, Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center

• Best Resident Oral Presentation: Dr. Ryan Hartman, Summa Akron City Hospital • Best Medical Student Oral Presentation: Nathaniel Hunt, Wayne State University • Best Poster: Dr. Rajesh Patel, Sinai-Grace Hospital Detroit Medical Center

• If you are not a member, we do hope you will consider joining SAEM and attending the 2014 Annual Meeting in Dallas, TX. Please visit www.saem.org for more information.

5. REGISTRATION FEES

• If your registration fee was not paid, you (or the individual you designated for your group) will receive an invoice for the balance via email shortly. Thanks again and best wishes, Colleen & Jennifer (Mary) Colleen Bhalla, MD, FACEP Chair, 2013 SAEM Midwest Regional Meeting Resident Research Director, Department of Emergency Medicine, Summa Akron City Hospital Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) Jennifer Frey, PhD, CCRP Research Program Director, Department of Emergency Medicine, Summa Akron City Hospital

2. ABSTRACT PUBLICATION

• Each corresponding author should have received an email regarding possible publication of your abstract in Academic Emergency Medicine.

Continued from Page 12 My term as president was also marked by the tragedies of September 11, 2001. It was a trying time for Americans as we experienced terrible acts of terrorism on our soil. It is painful to recall the events of that day. When the attacks occurred, I was in the midst of a meeting of my emergency department’s newly formed Emergency Medicine Center for Education, Research and Technology (EMCERT) Advisory Board. During the 24 hours after the attacks, SAEM received numerous messages from members around the country conveying thoughts and prayers for victims and their families, and for our colleagues in New York, Washington, and Shanksville who responded to the tragedy.

SAEM has continuously grown in national prominence, size and complexity. I was humbled that the SAEM Diversity Interest Group (now the Academy for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Medicine) in 2008 honored me with the naming of its Marcus L. Martin Leadership Award for “significant and sustained contributions to the achievement of patient care, research and education in emergency medicine.” It was certainly my privilege to serve over 12 years on the SAEM Board and as SAEM president during the most productive time of my academic journey in emergency medicine. “Growing up” with SAEM and serving with many outstanding colleagues along the way made the journey sweet. Happy 25th Anniversary, SAEM! ◗

13


THE ROLE OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE FUTURE OF AMERICAN MEDICAL CARE Reminiscing on the Twentieth Anniversary of the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation Meeting on the Role of Emergency Medicine Lewis R. Goldfrank, MD Twenty years ago, in the fall of 1993, Louis J. Ling, MD, and I went as SAEM presidents to see Thomas H. Meikle, Jr., MD, the president of the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, at this elegant office on East 64th Street in Manhattan to propose a Macy Foundation conference on “The Role of Emergency Medicine in the Future of American Medical Care.” The Clinton health care plan was in the making, and Lewis R. Goldfrank, MD this was an ideal time for a meeting about what clinical emergency medicine was. Who did it? What was the safety net? What was emergency medicine education? And what was the emergency medicine research agenda? The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation organizational priorities were and are to improve the health of the public by advancing the education and training of health professionals, to foster innovation in health professional education and to align the education of health professionals with contemporary health needs and a changing health care system. Meikle, a former dean of Cornell Medical School and at the time the leader of the Macy Foundation, immediately agreed that this was a vital project. He was a master of organization, requiring innumerable preparatory steps directed by a balanced planning committee that was led by a recognized educator, thoracic surgeon and president of the National Board of Medical Examiners, L. Thompson Bowles, MD, PhD. As an appropriate visionary balance to Louis Ling and myself, the committee also included Raymond Baxter, PhD, then administrator and health policy expert at the Lewin Group, and L. Greg Paulson, an internist and expert in health policy and public health. We hoped that attendees would go to beautiful historic Williamsburg, Virginia from April 17—20, 1994, where we were to be isolated to reflect on “the Role of Emergency Medicine.” Tom Meikle and Tom Bowles were experts in selecting people from every walk of life, all the medical strata, lawyers, journalists, many states in the country, many types of hospitals—all committed to an open-minded analysis of the key questions of what emergency medicine should become. We needed commissioned papers to offer background for the plenary and group sessions, and we got the best: 1. Peter Rosen: The History of Emergency Medicine 2. Arthur L. Kellermann: What is Clinical Emergency Medicine? 3. Ron J. Anderson: The Emergency Department as Safety Net for Non-emergent Care. 4. Glenn C. Hamilton: Education in Emergency Medicine 5. Gabor D. Kelen and Charles G. Brown: The Future of Emergency Medicine Research

14

Louis Ling and I had to convince “the organizations” (ACEP and SAEM) that this was a no-risk decision, that this Macy Foundation effort had worked for other specialties, and that we believed in the process. And indeed, the meeting was a resounding success: the recommendations that were crafted there through the unanimous accord of 32 of the participants have, as you will recognize, been realized to a great extent. They were:

RECOMMENDATIONS

The following recommendations, endorsed by 32 of the participants, represent the Planning Committee’s summary of general discussions at the conference. 1. The United States Public Health Service, in its next “Statement of Public Health Objectives for the Nation,” should specify, as a new goal, that access to high-quality emergency medical care should be available for all persons who need such care. 2. Federal, state, and local governmental organizations, including the Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME), should ensure that the number of residency positions in emergency medicine is not reduced as planning for health care reform proceeds. 3. The Society of [sic] Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM), the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) should revise the classification of EDs. This classification should reflect the level of care available for emergency patients and indicate whether the facilities are adequate and whether appropriately qualified and credentialed emergency physicians are available 24 hours a day. In addition, this classification of EDs should establish minimum qualifications for physicians, nurses, and other health professionals who provide services in EDs, with special attention to the qualifications of “moonlighters.” 4. State medical licensing boards, the National Board of Medical Examiners, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), and medical school deans and faculties must ensure that every medical student has acquired the appropriate knowledge and skills to care for emergency patients. This education must be provided through educational experiences supervised by appropriately qualified emergency physicians. 5. The deans and faculty of all LCME-accredited medical schools, with the assistance of the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Association of Academic Health Centers, should establish in their schools appropriately staffed and supported academic departments of emergency medicine. 6. ACEP and SAEM should quickly convene a conference to develop an agenda for research in emergency medicine and to define strategic options for implementing that agenda. The network of collaborators in emergency medicine and public policy that was established in 1994 has worked both to create the stimulus and to develop the roadmap for our success today, with clear progress in implementing almost all six of those recommendations. ◗


HIGHLIGHTING THE SAEM EMIG GRANT Corey Heitz, MD

Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine Emergency medicine interest groups (EMIGs) help attract, interest, and educate aspiring physicians who have an interest in emergency medicine as a specialty. The SAEM Foundation each year provides grants up to $500 to assist these groups in the development of educational activities. The goals of the grant are to promote EM education at the student level, to identify educational methodologies that advance undergraduate education, and to support EMIGs nationally. Applications are reviewed by committee, and are graded on areas such as relevance to EM, clarity and realistic achievability of objectives, innovativeness, applicant qualifications (commitment to EM, mentorship, prior project completion), and institutional support for those projects requiring significant resources in excess of the award amount. The deadline for the upcoming year, July 1, 2014-June 30, 2015, is January 6, 2014. Applicants can go to http://bit.ly/HNfD8S for information regarding the application process. Applicants should be representatives of EMIGs, and the primary applicant may be a medical student if there is a faculty co-applicant. Faculty applicants must be SAEM members. The 2013-2014 awardees included Mike Kiefer at OHSU, “EM Ultrasound Blog as an Adjunct to the Preclinical Curriculum”; Julian Villar at UCSF, “Avalanche Rescue and Wilderness Trauma”; and Timothy Fortuna, VTCSOM, “Regional Emergency Medicine Interest Group Student Symposium.” ◗

THE INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE The International Student Association of Emergency Medicine (ISAEM) was founded in October 2013 in Odense, Denmark by medical students Larshan Perinpam of Aarhus University and AnhNhi Thi Huynh of the University of Southern Denmark. Their aim in founding the organization was to create an international voice and network for medical student organizations in emergency medicine. The first member organization of ISAEM is Studerendes Organisation for Akutmedicinsk Speciale (SOFAS), a Danish organization for medical students interested in emergency medicine. The founders hope that in time ISAEM will become a venue for cooperation and collaboration among student EM organizations worldwide. ◗

For more information, please visit ISAEM’s website at isaem.net.

15


PRESIDENTS OF UA/EM – STEM – SAEM Charles Frey, MD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alan R. Dimick, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robert B. Rutherford, MD. . . . . . . . . . James R. Mackenzie, MD . . . . . . . . . . George Johnson, Jr., MD. . . . . . . . . . . Leslie E. Rudolf, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David K. Wagner, MD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carl Jelenko, III, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ronald L. Krome, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kenneth L. Mattox, MD . . . . . . . . . . . . W. Kendall McNabney, MD. . . . . . . . . Joseph F. Waeckerle, MD . . . . . . . . . . Barry W. Wolcott, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack B. Peacock, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Richard C. Levy, MD, MPH. . . . . . . . . Steven J. Davidson, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . Richard M. Nowak, MD . . . . . . . . . . . . Ernest Ruiz, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robert H. Dailey, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Rosen, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C.C. Roussi, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G. Richard Braen, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harvey W. Meislin, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank J. Baker, II, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . John R. Lumpkin, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harold A. Jayne, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kenneth V. Iserson, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . Glenn C. Hamilton, MD . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Schelble, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

16

UA/EM 1970-1971 UA/EM 1971-1972 UA/EM 1972-1973 UA/EM 1973-1974 UA/EM 1974-1975 UA/EM 1975-1976 UA/EM 1976-1977 UA/EM 1977-1978 UA/EM 1978-1979 UA/EM 1979-1980 UA/EM 1980-1981 UA/EM 1981-1982 UA/EM 1982-1983 UA/EM 1983-1984 UA/EM 1984-1985 UA/EM 1985-1986 UA/EM 1986-1987 UA/EM 1987-1988 STEM 1975-1976 STEM 1976-1977 STEM 1977-1978 STEM 1978-1979 STEM 1979-1980 STEM 1980-1981 STEM 1981-1982 STEM 1982-1983 STEM 1983-1984 STEM 1984-1985 STEM 1985-1986

Thomas O. Stair, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Ann Cooper, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . Gabor D. Kelen, MD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . James T. Niemann, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . Arthur B. Sanders, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . Jerris R. Hedges, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . William G. Barsan, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . Louis J. Ling, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louis S. Binder, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David P. Sklar, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lewis R. Goldfrank, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . Steven C. Dronen, MD . . . . . . . . . . . . . John A. Marx, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scott A. Syverud, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sandra M. Schneider, MD. . . . . . . . . . Brian J. Zink, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marcus L. Martin, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roger J. Lewis, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Donald M. Yealy, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carey D. Chisholm, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . Glenn C. Hamilton, MD . . . . . . . . . . . . James W. Hoekstra, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . Judd E. Hollander, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katherine L. Heilpern, MD. . . . . . . . . Jill Baren, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeff Kline, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Debra Houry, MD, MPH. . . . . . . . . . . . Cherri D. Hobgood, MD . . . . . . . . . . . . Alan E. Jones, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

STEM 1986-1987 STEM 1987-1988 STEM 1988-1989 SAEM 1988-1989 SAEM 1989-1990 SAEM 1990-1991 SAEM 1991-1992 SAEM 1992-1993 SAEM 1993-1994 SAEM 1994-1995 SAEM 1995-1996 SAEM 1996-1997 SAEM 1997-1998 SAEM 1998-1999 SAEM 1999-2000 SAEM 2000-2001 SAEM 2001-2002 SAEM 2002-2003 SAEM 2003-2004 SAEM 2004-2005 SAEM 2005-2006 SAEM 2006-2007 SAEM 2007-2008 SAEM 2008-2009 SAEM 2009-2010 SAEM 2010-2011 SAEM 2011-2012 SAEM 2012-2013 SAEM 2013-2014


SAVE THE DATE AACEM AND AAAEM ANNUAL RETREAT APRIL 6-9, 2014 Hyatt Regency Mission Bay San Diego, CA

General Highlights Sunday, April 6—Welcome Reception Monday, April 7—Keynote: The Academic Medical Center: Adrift in a Sea of Change Monday, April 7—Survival Skills: Art of Negotiation and Difficult Conversations Monday, April 7—Dinner Tuesday, April 8—Benchmark Survey

AACEM Agenda Highlights

AAAEM Agenda Highlights

Tuesday, April 8

Tuesday, April 8

 What wakes me up at night?

 Get to know you

 Chair Challenges

 Business Meeting

 TED Talks

 Succession Planning/ Advancement

Wednesday, April 9 

History of EM From Those in the Front Lines

 Rapid Fire Sessions Wednesday, April 9  Panel Discussion—Patient Experience  Population Management

For more information and a complete agenda, please visit SAEM.org.

ACADEMY of ADMINISTRATORS in ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE An Academy of SAEM

17


THE AMERICAN BOARD OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE NEW VIDEOS ABEM has new videos posted on its website. One is an informal demonstration of the technology that will be used in the upcoming eOral certification examination. The other recounts ABEM’s work on behalf of diplomates during the past year.

ADDITIONAL EMS TESTING DATES ABEM has opened additional dates for the EMS certification examination on March 20, 21, and 22, 2014. Physicians who have an approved EMS certification application on file with ABEM and who did not take the examination in October 2013 may take the examination in March. Physicians who took the examination in October and physicians who did not apply for certification by the 2013 deadline are not eligible to take the examination in March 2014. Additional information is available on the ABEM website. If you have any questions, please contact ABEM at 517.332.4800, ext. 387 or subspecialties@abem.org.

NEW WEBSITE PLATFORM ABEM has upgraded the content management system of its website. The new platform is compatible with a wider variety of equipment types (including Apple® products), devices (e.g., tablets and smart phones), and browsers. The new content management system will allow for a more user-friendly experience for visitors and diplomates, as well as provide a more efficient means of implementing changes to website operations. If you experience any problems with the website, please send an email to communications@abem.org, or call 517.332.4800, ext. 345.

ABEM INTRODUCING ENHANCED ORAL EXAMINATION The ABEM certification examinations will soon have a new look. They will be enhanced to include new types of dynamic stimuli, such as video clips of patients or procedures, moving ultrasounds and rhythm strips, and dynamic vital signs. The enhanced oral examination, or “eOral,” will increase the realism of the examination by using improved high-resolution imaging via an interactive, computerized interface, which will also facilitate examinercandidate interactions. A video providing a glimpse of the new examination format is posted on the ABEM website for resident, candidate, faculty, and public viewing. The eOral will be gradually phased into the current oral examination format beginning in 2015, when three cases will be presented in the new format. The enhanced qualifying examination (or “eMCQ”) will begin in 2014. Sample questions, along with corresponding stimuli, are available here. These questions were tested during the 2011 eMCQ pilot, and will not be used in future examinations.

ABOUT ABEM Founded in 1976, the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) develops and administers the Emergency Medicine certification examination for physicians who have met the ABEM credentialing requirements. ABEM has nearly 30,000 emergency physicians currently certified. ABEM is not a membership organization, but a non-profit, independent evaluation organization. ABEM is one of 24 Member Boards of the American Board of Medical Specialties.

18


OUR MISSION is to advance the education of medical students in emergency and acute care medicine. We provide the unified voice of EM clerkship directors and medical student educators on a national level. We offer a forum for educators to share ideas, generate solutions, collaborate on research, and develop peer-reviewed resources for educators and students.

Upcoming Project

Accomplishments National representation of EM in UME: • Full voting member of the Alliance for Clinical Education along with the other six core specialties Resources for Educators: • Designed and published National fourth year, third year and pediatric EM curricula • Clerkship Primer • Developing EPA/Milestones for UME in EM Resources for Students: • CDEMcurriculum.org • Self-Study Modules (cases based on National 4th year curriculum) • DIEM cases (interactive timed cases assessing clinical reasoning) Assessment tools: • NBME Advanced EM Exam • CDEM Tests – Standardized validated FREE exams based on NBME Platform Collaborations: • Multiple collaborative projects with CORD for Education • Collaboration with SAEM for advancement of UME • New relationship with EMRA • Developing relations with International Education Organizations • Collaboration with other Academies on multiple projects National Meetings: • Three-day CDEM track at CORD Academic Assembly • Enhanced Educator focused material at SAEM Annual Meeting • AAMC

EPA/Milestones for EM Although at present, Milestones are only at the GME level, several members of the CDEM executive board are participating in Milestones projects, including the Joint Milestones Task Force (JMTF), a group of CORD members exploring EPA's, and an AAMC-sponsored task force exploring universal milestones that would be applicable to all medical school graduates. For those interested, please contact CDEM@saem.org. Who Should Join CDEM? • • •

Clerkship Directors Program Directors and Assistant/Associate Program Directors Any faculty involved in teaching medical students

What CDEM can do for you: o o o

Provides numerous resources for you to effectively interact with and train your students Provides ability to collaborate with educators around the country Fosters opportunity to develop multi-institutional research projects on multiple levels

This is our National Organization representing YOUR interests!

Upcoming Meetings: CORD Academic Assembly

th

nd

March 30 – April 2

New Orleans

Full Three Day CDEM Track dedicated to UME issues Excellent opportunity to interact and collaborate with educators SAEM Annual Meeting

May 13 – 17th Dallas

Multiple Didactic and Innovations sessions relevant to Education Networking and collaboration with other Academies

19


ACADEM IC ANNOUNCEM ENTS The Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Missouri School of Medicine in Columbia

is launching a residency program that will matriculate its inaugural class in July 2014.

Michael Brown, MD, has been appointed as the

founding chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine.

Daniel J. DeBehnke, MD, MBA, chief clinical

integration officer at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) and professor of emergency medicine, has been named chief executive officer of Medical College Physicians Group (MCP) and senior associate dean for Clinical Affairs – Adult Practice, effective September 1, 2013. He had been serving as interim CEO since March 2013.

CLASSIFIEDS RUTGERS-ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON MEDICAL SCHOOL has an immediate need for Emergency Medicine faculty. Responsibilities will include delivery of clinical care at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, research and teaching Emergency Medicine residents and medical students. Opportunities also exist to participate in all initiatives of this growing department which include observation medicine, toxicology, EMS, disaster medicine and emergency ultrasound. This tertiary care hospital is a Level I Trauma Center and comprehensive stroke center with 72,000 annual patient visits. This is an excellent opportunity with an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer offering great benefits and a very competitive compensation package. For full details, please contact Daniel Stern at Daniel Stern & Associates, 800-438-2476 or sternd@danielstern.com.

David C. Gordon, MD, has been promoted to the position of associate professor in the Division of Emergency Medicine at Duke University School of Medicine. Bernard L. Lopez, MD, MS, has been appointed

Associate Dean for Diversity and Community Engagement at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, PA. In this role, he will lead the school’s strategic efforts to enhance diversity and inclusion amongst students, residents, and faculty. Dr. Lopez is currently Professor and Vice Chairman of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Jefferson.

Stacey L. Poznanski, DO, was featured in the online blog Academic Life in Emergency Medicine’s “Faculty Hero” series in November 2013.

Call for Photographs for the Clinical Images Exhibit at the 2014 SAEM Annual Meeting SAEM is now accepting original high-quality images relevant to the practice of emergency medicine for presentation at the 2014 SAEM Annual Meeting in Dallas. Accepted submissions will be displayed at the Clinical Images Exhibit and may be featured in the Clinical Pearls session or the Visual Diagnosis medical student/resident contest. For more information, please contact Elizabeth Oshinson at eoshinson@saem.org or visit our website www.SAEM.org

IT’S 2014. DID YOUR MEMBERSHIP GET LEFT BACK IN 2013? Renew today! Visit the SAEM website for more information and to pay your dues. Don’t miss out on the benefits of SAEM membership.

20


CALLS AND M EETING ANNOUNCEM ENTS CALL FOR PAPERS 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference: Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes The 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) Consensus Conference, Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care, will be held on Tuesday, May 13, 2014, the first day of the SAEM Annual Meeting in Dallas, TX. Original papers on this topic, if accepted, will be published together with the conference proceedings in the December 2014 issue of AEM. Gender-specific medicine is the “science of how normal human biology differs between men and women and how the manifestations, mechanisms, and treatment of disease vary as a function of gender.� While gender-specific medicine incorporates advances in reproductive health issues, the AEM Consensus Conference will focus on broad disease-specific EM issues that are relevant to both women and men. The key domains of the conference are cardiovascular/resuscitation, cerebrovascular, pain, trauma/injury/ violence, diagnostic imaging, mental health, and substance abuse. Consensus Goal: The goal of the 2014 AEM Consensus Conference is to stimulate EM researchers to methodically recognize, investigate, and translate the impact of gender on their clinical research outcomes. The conference proposes to build a foundation upon which researchers can build interdisciplinary scholarship, networks of expertise, discussion forums, multicenter collaborations, evidence-based publications, and improved education. The overarching themes of the conference have been guided and informed by NIH research priorities on gender medicine, and include study of lifespan, sex/gender distinctions, health disparities/differences, and diversity and interdisciplinary research. Consensus Objectives: 1) Summarize and consolidate existing data and create a blueprint that furthers gender-specific research in the prevention, diagnosis, and management of acute diseases. 2) Discuss the conceptual models for designing studies and analysis that incorporate gender as an independent variable. 3) Build a multinational interdisciplinary consortium to study gender medicine for acute conditions. Accepted manuscripts will describe relevant research concepts in gender-specific areas, with priority placed on differential disease risk, vulnerability, progression, and outcomes. They may include work in clinical/translational, health systems, policy, or basic sciences research. Descriptions of specific research, projects, or collaborations may be used for illustrative purposes but should not comprise the core of the submission. Original contributions describing relevant research or concepts on these or similar topics will be considered, and original high-quality research may also be submitted alone or in conjunction with concept papers. Papers will be considered for publication in the December 2014 issue of AEM if received by Monday, March 11, 2014. All submissions will undergo peer review, and publication cannot be guaranteed. For queries, please contact Marna Rayl Greenberg, DO, MPH (Marna.Greenberg@lvh.com) or Basmah Safdar, MD (basmah.safdar@yale.edu), 2014 Consensus Conference co-chairs. Information and updates will be posted regularly in AEM, the SAEM Newsletter, and on both the AEM and the SAEM websites.

Call for Papers 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization The 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization, will be held on May 12, 2015, immediately preceding the SAEM Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA. Original papers on this topic, if accepted, will be published together with the conference proceedings in the December 2015 issue of AEM. Diagnostic imaging is integral and beneficial to the practice of emergency medicine. Over the last several decades, emergency department (ED) diagnostic imaging has increased without a commensurate rise in identified pathology or improvement in patient-centered outcomes. Unnecessary imaging results in increased resource use and significant exposure risks. ED diagnostic imaging has become the focus of many stakeholders, including patients and various regulatory agencies. This multidisciplinary consensus conference represents the first coordinated effort to further our evidence-based knowledge of ED diagnostic imaging. This consensus conference will formulate the research priorities for emergency diagnostic imaging, initiate a collaborative dialogue between stakeholders, and align this research agenda with that of federal funding agencies. Consensus Goal: The overall mission of the 2015 AEM consensus conference will be to create a prioritized research agenda in emergency diagnostic imaging for the next decade and beyond. The consensus conference will feature expert keynote speakers, panel discussions including nationally recognized experts, and facilitated breakout group sessions to develop consensus on research agendas by topic. Optimizing diagnostic imaging in the ED is a timely topic that is relevant to all who practice emergency medicine. Furthermore, the conference content spans many other specialties (e.g. radiology, pediatrics, cardiology, surgery, internal medicine), all of which will be invited to participate in the conference to optimize the agenda and for future collaboration in order to improve emergency diagnostic imaging use. Consensus Objectives: 1. Understand the current state of evidence regarding diagnostic imaging utilization in the ED and identify opportunities, limitations, and gaps in knowledge of previous study designs and methodology 2. Develop a consensus statement that emphasizes the priorities and opportunities for research in emergency diagnostic imaging that will result in practice changes, and the most effective methodologic approaches to emergency diagnostic imaging research 3. D  evelop a multidisciplinary network to perform emergency diagnostic imaging research

21


CALLS AND M EETING ANNOUNCEM ENTS - CONT. 4. Explore and improve knowledge of specific funding mechanisms available to perform research in emergency diagnostic imaging Accepted manuscripts will present original, high-quality research in emergency diagnostic imaging in areas such as clinical decision rules, shared decision making, knowledge translation, comparative effectiveness research, and multidisciplinary collaboration. They may include work in clinical/translational, health systems, policy, or basic sciences research. Papers will be considered for publication in the December 2015 issue of AEM if received by April 17, 2015. All submissions will undergo peer review, and publication cannot be guaranteed. For queries, please contact Jennifer R. Marin, MD, MSc (jennifer.marin@chp.edu) or Angela M. Mills, MD (millsa@uphs.upenn.edu), the 2015 consensus conference co-chairs. Information and updates will be regularly posted in AEM, the SAEM Newsletter, and on the journal and SAEM websites.

INTERACTIVE CME TRAINING: ABDOMINAL PAIN IN THE OLDER ADULT How often do you encounter older patients in the emergency department with abdominal pain? Do you find it difficult to communicate with them? Is treatment challenging? Learn how to interact, diagnose, and treat older adults more effectively through this interactive online training tool titled “Abdominal Pain in the Older Adult” FREE for non-CME participants; or $95 for 6 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. This program is brought to you by AGEM (an academy of SAEM) and is funded through the generous support of the Retirement Research Foundation. Accreditation Statement This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. The University of California, Irvine School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Designation Statement The University of California, Irvine School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 6 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. California Assembly Bill 1195 This activity is in compliance with California Assembly Bill 1195, which requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. For specific information regarding Bill 1195 and definitions of cultural and linguistic competency, please visit the CME website at http://www.cme.uci.edu. Disclosure Policy It is the policy of the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine

22

and the University of California CME Consortium to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all CME activities. Full disclosure of conflicts and conflict resolutions will be made prior to the activity.

CALLING ALL MEDICAL STUDENTS! Jump-start a Career in Academic Emergency Medicine

SAEM is looking for 17 energetic, self-starting, responsible, and enthusiastic medical students to work with the Program Committee at the SAEM Annual Meeting in Dallas, May 13-17, 2014. The Program Committee is responsible for the planning, coordination, and execution of SAEM’s Annual Meeting. It is comprised of nearly 40 faculty members selected by the president of SAEM from emergency medicine programs all over the country. Benefits for medical student ambassadors: • Waiver of your registration fee to the SAEM Annual Meeting* • Pairing with a member of the Program Committee who will act as an adviser regarding future EM pursuits • Opportunity to learn about the current research and educational activities taking place in the field of emergency medicine • Opportunity to form relationships with faculty members from EM programs around the country • A personal letter from the Program Committee chair sent to your dean of student affairs acknowledging your contributions to the PC Requirements and expectations of medical student ambassadors: • Arrive in time to attend orientation and property tour on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 at 3:00 pm and stay through 12:00 pm on Saturday, May 17. • Attend daily Program Committee meetings • Perform assigned tasks and responsibilities, including but not limited to: • Approximately 6 hours of responsibilities per day • Attend daily Program Committee meetings • Attend research and didactic sessions • Solicit evaluations from meeting participants and enter results into online database • Assist with AV needs • Facilitate transitions between lectures • Be responsive and flexible to the needs of the Program Committee Interested medical students should submit their name and contact information to Elizabeth Oshinson at eoshinson@saem.org. Please write “Medical Student Ambassadors” in the subject line and attach a CV and a statement of interest indicating your motivations for volunteering with the Program Committee (<150 words).** Deadline is February 1, 2014. Successful candidates will be notified by February 20, 2014. * Travel and hotel will be the responsibility of the individual student; however. SAEM will provide the emails of students interested in sharing lodging expenses. ** PDF format preferred. Please combine your CV and statement of interest into a single document.


CALLS AND M EETING ANNOUNCEM ENTS - CONT. SAEM SEEKS AWARD NOMINATIONS FOR 2014 The Awards Committee would like to consider as many exceptional candidates as possible. For submission information, please visit the SAEM awards webpage at http://www.saem.org/meetings/saem-awards

Hal Jayne Educational Excellence Award Deadline: January 10, 2014 SAEM seeks nominations for the Hal Jayne Educational Excellence Award. Complimentary to the Research Award, this award is presented to a member of SAEM who has made outstanding contributions to emergency medicine through the teaching of others and by improving our knowledge base regarding the teaching of learners.

Excellence in Research Award Deadline: January 10, 2014 SAEM seeks nominations for the Excellence in Research Award. Complimentary to the Hal Jayne Education Award, this award is presented to a member of SAEM who has made outstanding contributions to emergency medicine through the creation and sharing of new knowledge.

Advancement of Women in Academic Emergency Medicine Award Deadline: January 10, 2014 SAEM is soliciting nominees for the Advancement of Women in Academic Emergency Medicine Award. This award recognizes an SAEM member who has made significant contributions to the advancement of women in academic emergency medicine.

John Marx Leadership Award Deadline: January 10, 2014 SAEM seeks nominations for the Leadership Award. This award honors a SAEM member who has made exceptional contributions to emergency medicine through leadership – locally, regionally, nationally or internationally – with priority given to those with demonstrated leadership within SAEM.

Medical Student Excellence in Emergency Medicine Award Deadline: June 1, 2014 SAEM is pleased to sponsor the Medical Student Excellence in Emergency Medicine Award. This award is made available to each medical school to select a senior medical student who has demonstrated excellence in the specialty of emergency medicine.

EARLY VIEW for ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE Academic Emergency Medicine has been loading articles on "Early View" as soon as they are processed now - so be sure to check this feature regularly on the journal's Wiley Online Library (WOL) homepage, regularly. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)15532712/earlyview Academic Emergency Medicine on the Wiley Online Library Platform Make sure you keep checking the journal’s home page on the recently implemented platform, Wiley Online Library (WOL) http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)15532712. Many new features appear in the form of “modules” and will be updated on a regular basis. The new platform is more robust and easier to navigate, with enhanced online functionality. Visit often and stay tuned for updates! VIRTUAL ISSUES "Virtual Issues" are now a key feature of the journal's home page. A virtual issue is basically just a collection of articles on a given topic. The idea is that a reader will go there to look for a particular issue, but then will see our other offerings on that topic, as well, increasing our full-text download numbers and helping insure the broadest dissemination of our authors' work. We now have four "virtual issues" online. Go to to the journal's home page on the Wiley Online Library (WOL) platform "Find Issues" on the left-hand side and click on the feature. Three additional virtual issues, in addition to the initial geriatrics one, are up and running on: ultrasound, toxicology and injury prevention. Again, consult the "Find Issues" area and click on the desired issue. http:/onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111(ISSN)1553-2712.

Abstracts en Español! Beginning with the September issue, Academic Emergency Medicine will be publishing the abstracts of the various articles in Spanish. They will be presented alongside the English abstracts in the online versions of each paper (pdf, html, and mobile apps). The Spanish abstracts will also be included in the print edition of the journal for any papers that originate in Spanish-speaking countries, or are likely to be of particular interest to emergency physicians in Spanish-speaking countries. This project would not be possible without technical assistance and generous funding from our publisher, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., and the language assistance of Emergencias, the journal of the Sociedad Española de Medicina de Urgencias y Emergencias (SEMES).

23


2014 2014 SAEM SAEM Residency Residency & & Fellowship Fellowship Fair Fair 2014 SAEM Residency & Fellowship Fair Friday, May 16, 2014 2014 SAEM Residency & Fellowship Fair Friday, 4:30 May - 6:3016,pm2014 4:30 - Dallas 6:30 pm Friday, May 16, 16, 2014 2014 Sheraton Hotel Friday, May Sheraton Dallas Hotel 4:30 6:30 pm 4:30 - 6:30 pm Sheraton Dallas Dallas Hotel Hotel Sheraton

We would like to invite you to participate in the SAEM Residency & Fellowship Fair, to be held on Friday, We would like to invite you to participate in the SAEM Residency & Fellowship Fair, to be held on Friday, May 16 from to like 6:30topm at theyou Sheraton Dallas inHotel during the 2014 SAEM Annual Meeting. We 4:30 would invite to participate participate the SAEM SAEM Residency & Fellowship Fellowship Fair, to to be beDon’t held on on Friday, Friday, May 16 from 4:30 tolike 6:30topm at the Sheraton DallasinHotel during Residency the 2014 SAEM Annual Meeting. Don’t We would invite you to the & Fair, held miss out onMay this 16 unique opportunity to network with hundreds of medical students interested in the specialty fromopportunity 4:30 to to 6:30 6:30topm pm the Sheraton Sheraton DallasofHotel Hotel during the 2014 2014 SAEMinAnnual Annual Meeting. Don’t Don’t miss out onMay this16 unique network with hundreds medical students interested the specialty from 4:30 atat the Dallas during the SAEM Meeting. of emergency medicine and residents in search of a promising fellowship. The fair is a combined event that missmedicine out on on this this unique opportunity toofnetwork network with hundreds hundreds ofThe medical students interested inthat the specialty specialty of emergency and residents in searchto a promising fellowship. fair isstudents a combined eventin out unique opportunity with of medical interested the offers your miss institution the opportunity to showcase your residency and fellowship programs either in one comof emergency emergency medicine and andtoresidents residents inyour search of aa promising promising fellowship. The fair fair combined event that that offers your of institution the medicine opportunity showcasein residency and fellowship programs either one com-event search of fellowship. The isis aa in combined bined display or as separate exhibits. offers your your institution institution the the opportunity opportunity to or showcase yourexhibits. residency and and fellowship fellowship programs programs either either in in one one comcombined display as separate offers to showcase your residency bined display or as separate exhibits. The early registration fee is $175 per table untilbined April 1, 2014. Aprilexhibits. 1, 2014, the fee, including for onor asAfter separate The early registration fee is $175 per table until Aprildisplay 1, 2014. After April 1, 2014, the fee, including for onsite registration on May 16, 2014, is $220. The fee is used to cover the cost the table rentaltheand The early early registration fee isis $175 $175 per table until April 2014. Afterof April 2014, fee,set-up. including for for ononsite registration onregistration May 16, 2014, $220.per The fee until is used to cover the cost ofApril the table rental set-up. The fee table April 1,1, 2014. After 1,1, 2014, theand fee, including site registration registration on applications May 16, 16, 2014, 2014,will $220. The fee feeonisisaused used coverfirst the cost cost of the the table rental rental and and set-up. set-up. *Space is limited; be accepted firsttocome, served basis. site on May isis $220. The cover the of table *Space is limited; applications will be accepted on a firsttocome, first served basis. *Space isis limited; limited; applications applications will will be be accepted accepted on on aa first first come, come, first first served served basis. basis. *Space To reserve a table, please contact Michelle Orlow at morlow@saem.org or visit To reserve a table, please contact Michelle Orlow at morlow@saem.org or visit or visit visit Towww.saem.org/annual-meeting reserve aa table, table, please please contact contact Michelle Michelle Orlow morlow@saem.org or for moreOrlow information. To reserve atat morlow@saem.org www.saem.org/annual-meeting for more information. www.saem.org/annual-meeting for for more more information. information. www.saem.org/annual-meeting

®

Apply for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars  program Application  Deadline:  Feb.  28,  2014   Resident physicians are invited to apply for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholars program, which offers a master’s degree graduate-level study and research in a university-based, post-residency training program. Scholars receive generous funding for two years of study with protected time for research. Program highlights: - leadership training; - mentoring; - protected research time; - national networking; - health policy, health services, and community-based research training; and - financial support for research projects and professional travel. For more information and to apply online visit http://rwjcsp.unc.edu.  

24


F O U N D A T I O N The SAEM Foundation relies on donations from individuals like you to provide grants that make possible the ongoing development of academic emergency medicine. In times like these when government funding is limited, we can ensure our researchers and educators continue to receive the support they need. DONATE TODAY AT HTTP://WWW.SAEM.ORG/SAEM-FOUNDATION

In the coming decades, the number of older adults in your ED will more than double...are you ready? The Academy of Geriatric Emergency Medicine can help you: • Improve your clinical care of older patients •

Learn about The Geriatric ED Guidelines initiative (a collaboration between SAEM, ACEP, ENA, and AGS), which covers resources, staffing, environment, and policies for Geriatric EDs

Prepare your trainees to care for older patients

Access and download our educational materials: • Lectures, training curricula, and simulation cases available • Geriatric EM Journal Club: Modeled after the highly successful ACP Journal Club, it provides expert review and commentary on articles critical to geriatric EM Connect with AGEM members available to give grand rounds talks

• Advance your research agenda • •

Connect with AGEM investigators (NIH and foundation-funded, including 8 with K23 grants) Receive mentoring and counseling (for junior and mid-career investigator members of AGEM)

JOIN AGEM TODAY!! Limited time offer: DISCOUNT GROUP RATE (50% OFF!)

10 faculty memberships for $500

1. Identify 10 faculty members at your institution that would like to join AGEM. 2. Fill out the academy group membership form on the website http://www.saem.org/ membership/saem-membership-dues. Remember to include the full name and email address of each individual. 3. Decide how you will pay for the group membership. SAEM will only accept one payment for the group - it cannot be split – but the payment could come from your department or institution. 4. Submit your application and payment as close to January 1 as possible. Questions about AGEM? Contact marian.betz@ucdenver.edu

25


The Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Alabama School of Medicine is seeking talented residency trained Emergency Medicine physicians at all academic ranks to join our faculty. The University offers both tenure and non tenure earning positions.

THI EVER

NG’S

The University of Alabama Hospital is a 903-bed teaching hospital, with a state of the art emergency department that occupies an area the size of a football field. The Department treats over 75,000 patients annually and houses Alabama’s only designated Level I trauma center. The Department’s dynamic, challenging emergency medicine residency training program is the only one of its kind in the State of Alabama.

Y ER BIGG

The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) is a major research center with over $440 million in NIH and other extramural funding. The Department of Emergency Medicine hosts a nationally-recognized research program and is a site for the NIHfunded Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC). The Department has been highly successful in developing extramural research support in this warmly collaborative institution.

S.

XA IN TE

Birmingham Alabama is a vibrant, diverse, beautiful city located in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. The metropolitan area is home to over one million people, who enjoy recreational activities year round because of its mild southern Climate. Birmingham combines big city amenities with Southern charm and hospitality.

Including our super-sized Including our super-sized SAEM Annual Meeting shindig* SAEM Conference shindig* May 16 in Dallas.

A highly competitive salary is offered. Applicants must be EM board eligible or certified. UAB is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer committed to fostering a diverse, equitable and family-friendly environment in which all faculty and staff can excel and achieve work/life balance irrespective of ethnicity, gender, faith, and sexual orientation. UAB also encourages applications from individuals with disabilities and veterans

May 15 in Dallas.

*This swanky soiree is for residents and medical *This swanky soiree is for residents only. students only. All others need not apply. Or even All others need not apply. Or even approach approach the door. the door.

A pre-employment background investigation is performed on candidates selected for employment. In addition, UAB Medicine maintains a drug-free and tobacco-free work environment. Physicians and other clinical faculty candidates who will be employed by the University of Alabama Health Services Foundation (UAHSF) or other UAB Medicine entities, must successfully complete a pre-employment drug and nicotine screen to be hired.

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:

Please send your curriculum vitae to: Janyce Sanford, M.D., Associate Professor & Chair of Emergency Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham; Department of Emergency Medicine; 619 South 19th Street; OHB 251; Birmingham, AL 35249-7013

UNIVERSITY of MISSOURI UNIVERSITY of MISSOURI Director of Emergency Medicine Ultrasound Director of Emergency Medicine Ultrasound The Emergency Medicine Department at the University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) School of Medicine is seeking an

The Emergency Medicine Department at the University of Missouri-Columbia of MedicineinisEmergency seeking anMedicine Emergency Emergency Ultrasound Director. Candidates must be (MU) boardSchool certified/prepared or Ultrasound Pediatric Director. Emergency Medicine at the University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) School Medicine is seeking Candidates must be boardThe certified/prepared in Department Emergency Medicine or Pediatric Emergency Medicine andoffellowship-trained Emergency Emergency Medicine and fellowship-trained in Emergency Ultrasound. We are an energetic and talented facultyinan creating Ultrasound Director. Candidates certified/prepared inquality, Emergency Medicine teamwork, ortoPediatric Ultrasound. We are an energetic andcentered talented faculty creating a patientmust centered environment of excellence. We are committed innovation, quality, aEmergency patient environment of excellence. Webe areboard committed to innovation, collaboration, valuing Emergency Medicine and fellowship-trained Emergency Ultrasound. collaboration, teamwork, valuing the individual, and honoring the of dignity of thespirit. human spirit. We are an energetic and talented faculty creating the individual, and honoring the dignity theinhuman centered environment of excellence. We are committed to innovation, quality, collaboration, teamwork, valuing UNIVERSITYa patient of MISSOURI

Faculty track (tenure or non-tenure) andand academic rank will be commensurate with candidate’s experience and career goals. These physicians will the individual, honoring the dignity the human spirit. track (tenure or non-tenure) andof academic rank will than be commensurate withannually, candidate’s and career practice at MU’s UniversityFaculty Hospital, a designated Level I trauma center with more 40,000 ED visits andexperience MU Women’s and Children’s goals. These physicians will practice at MU’s University Hospital, a designated Level I trauma center with more than Hospital, which has approximately 14,000 ED visits annually. Faculty track (tenure or non-tenure) and academic rank will be commensurate with candidate’s experience and career 40,000 ED visits annually, and MU Women’s and Children’s Hospital, which has approximately 14,000 ED visits annually.

Director of Emergency Medicine Ultrasound

goals.inThese physicians will practiceofatmedicine, MU’s University Hospital, a designated Levelengineering, I trauma center withand more thanprofessions MU is one of the few institutions the country with colleges veterinary medicine, agriculture, nursing health 40,000 ED of visits annually, and andwith Children’s Hospital, which hasthan approximately 14,000 ED visits annually. fellows on one campus. The School MU of Medicine’s more 650 MU faculty andcolleges scientists more 1,000 medical students, residents, is one the fewthan institutions inWomen’s thephysicians country of educate medicine, veterinary medicine, agriculture, engineering, and other students seekingnursing advanced anddegrees. health professions on one campus. The School of Medicine’s more than 650 faculty physicians and scientists

cy Medicine Department at the University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) School ofinstudents, Medicine is seeking an MU is one of the few institutions the country with colleges of medicine, veterinary medicine, agriculture, engineering, educate more than 1,000 medical residents, fellows and other seeking advanced degrees. With our burgeoning having its first year of EM residents in Pediatric 2014, we are thrilled to students be contributing to thisphysicians legacy. Learn online at: ltrasound Director. Candidates must be department boardnursing certified/prepared in Emergency Medicine or and health professions on one campus. The School of Medicine’s more than 650 faculty and more scientists medicine.missouri.edu/emergency/ Medicine and fellowship-trained in EmergencyWith Ultrasound. We are an energetic and talented faculty creating educate more than 1,000 medical students, residents, fellows and other students seeking advanced degrees. our burgeoning department having its first year of EM residents in 2014, we are thrilled to be contributing to this tered environment of Columbia excellence.area We offers are committed innovation, quality, collaboration, teamwork, valuing The exceptional outdoor recreation, excellent schools, quality music and cultural events, as well as the excitement and energy of legacy. to Learn more online at: medicine.missouri.edu/emergency/ l, and honoring the dignity of the human With our burgeoning department havingand its Kansas first yearCity. of EM residents in 2014, we are thrilled to be contributing to this a SEC University town, spirit. all conveniently located between St. Louis legacy. Learn more onlineexceptional at: medicine.missouri.edu/emergency/ The Columbia area offers outdoor recreation, excellent schools, quality music and cultural events, as well as Candidates should send current CV which includes three listedexperience referencesand to:career (tenure or non-tenure) and academic rank awill beexcitement commensurate with candidate’s the and energy of a SEC University town, all conveniently located between St. Louis and Kansas City. physicians will practice at MU’s University Hospital, a designated Level I trauma center with more thanProfessor The Columbia area offers exceptional outdoor recreation, excellentand schools, Marc A. Borenstein, MD, FACEP Chairquality music and cultural events, as well as its annually, and MU Women’s and Children’sthe Hospital, whichand hasenergy approximately 14,000 ED avisits excitement ofMedicine a SEC University town, all conveniently located between St. Louis and Department Emergency University ofannually. Missouri - Columbia, School of Medicine Candidates should send current CV which includes three listed references to:Kansas City.

1 Hospital Drive Rooma 1E10 Columbia, 65212three listed references to: the few institutions in the country with colleges of medicine, veterinary medicine, agriculture, engineering, Candidates should send current CV whichMO includes Marc A. Borenstein, MD, FACEP (573)of882-3496 Email: borensteinm@missouri.edu • Apply online: hrs.missouri.edu/find-a-job/academic health professions on one campus.Phone: The School Medicine’s• more than 650 faculty physicians andProfessor scientists and Chair e than 1,000 medical students, residents, fellows and other students seeking advanced degrees. Marc A. Borenstein, MD, FACEP Department Emergency Medicine The University of Missouri-Columbia is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and complies with the guidelines of the Professor and Chair University ofwelcomes Missouri - Columbia, School of Medicine Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The department applications from underrepresented physician groups. geoning department having its first year of EM residents in 2014, we are thrilled to be contributing to this Department Emergency 1 Hospital DriveMedicine more online at: medicine.missouri.edu/emergency/ University of MissouriRoom - Columbia, 1E10 School of Medicine 1 Hospital Columbia, MODrive 65212 a area offers exceptional outdoor recreation, excellent schools, quality music and cultural events, as well as 1E10 Room nt and energy of a SEC University town, all conveniently located between St. Louis and Kansas City. Columbia, MO 65212 Phone: (573) 882-3496

26

Candidates should send a current CV which includes three listed references to: Email:Phone: (573) 882-3496 borensteinm@missouri.edu


Brigham and Women's Hospital Harvard Medical School Global Health Researcher

Brody School of Medicine EMERGENCY MEDICINE FACULTY

The Department of Emergency Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital is The Department of Emergency Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital currently seeking a full-time faculty position for an academic emergency physician currently seeking full-time faculty for an academic emergency toisjoin the Division of aInternational Healthposition and Humanitarian Programs in the physician to the Division of International andwill Humanitarian Department of join Emergency Medicine. The successfulHealth candidate be eligible for Programs the Department of Emergency Medicine. successful an academicin appointment at Harvard Medical School at the rankThe of Instructor or Assistant commensurate with experience, trainingatand achievement. candidateProfessor, will be eligible for an academic appointment Harvard MedicalThe position support including Professor, access to grant writing and School offers at theexcellent rank ofacademic Instructor or Assistant commensurate statistical analysis, training unparalleled opportunities, competitive and an with experience, andresearch achievement. The position offerssalary, excellent outstanding comprehensive benefit package.

academic support including access to grant writing and statistical analysis, unparalleled research opportunities, competitive salary, and an outstanding

The successful candidate will be a fellowship-trained emergency medicine comprehensive benefit package. physician with proven academic record in global health and experience in program management, fundraising and grant A history of successful academic The successful candidate will be management. a fellowship-trained emergency medicine scholarship, including successful collaboration, publication, and grant funding are physician with an interest in global health and experience in program strongly desired. Candidates are required to have completed an advanced research management, grant management. A history of successful training such as fundraising a fellowship and as well as emergency medicine residency training academic scholarship, including successful collaboration, publication, program or be board certified in emergency medicine.

and grant funding are strongly desired. Candidates are required to have

completed an advanced training such as a fellowship asM. well as Interested candidates shouldresearch send a letter and Curriculum Vitae to Ron Walls, MD, Chairman, Department of Emergency and Women’s emergency medicine residency training Medicine, program Brigham or be board certified in Hospital. Please apply by email to mdeloge@partners.org emergency medicine. Interestedand candidates send a letter Medical and Curriculum Vitae to Ron M. Brigham Women'sshould Hospital/Harvard School are Equal Walls, MD, Chairman, Department of Emergency and Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employers activelyMedicine, committedBrigham to increasing Women’s Hospital. Please apply bywith email to mdeloge@partners.org the diversity of our faculty; people disabilities, veterans, women and members of underrepresented minority groups are therefore strongly Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School are Equal encouraged to apply. Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employers actively committed to increasing the diversity of our faculty; people with disabilities, veterans, women and members of underrepresented minority groups are therefore strongly encouraged to apply.

◊ Clinician-Educator ◊ Pediatric Emergency Medicine ◊ Ultrasound ◊

The Department of Emergency Medicine at East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine seeks BC/BP emergency physicians and pediatric emergency physicians for tenure or clinical track positions at the rank of assistant professor or above, depending on qualifications. We are expanding our faculty to increase our cadre of clinicianeducators and further develop programs in pediatric EM, ultrasound, and clinical research. Our current faculty members possess diverse interests and expertise leading to extensive state and national-level involvement. The emergency medicine residency is well-established and includes 12 EM and 2 EM/IM residents per year. We treat more than 120,000 patients per year in a state-of-the-art ED at Vidant Medical Center. VMC is an 900 bed level I trauma, cardiac, and regional stroke center. Our tertiary care catchment area includes more than 1.5 million people in eastern North Carolina, many of whom arrive via our integrated mobile critical care and air medical service. Our new children’s ED opened in July 2012, and a new children’s hospital opened in June 2013. Greenville, NC is a fast-growing university community located near beautiful North Carolina beaches.Cultural and recreational opportunities are abundant. Compensation is competitive and commensurate with qualifications; excellent fringe benefits are provided. Successful applicants will possess outstanding clinical and teaching skills and qualify for appropriate privileges from ECU Physicians and VMC.

Confidential inquiry may be made to: Theodore Delbridge, MD, MPH, Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine delbridget@ecu.edu ECU is an EEO/AA employer and accommodates individuals with disabilities. Applicants must comply with the Immigration Reform and Control Act. Proper documentation of identity and employability required at the time of employment. Current references must be provided upon request

www.ecu.edu/ecuem • 252-744-1418

The University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, invites applicants for Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine. The University of California, Irvine, has a vibrant scientific community with outstanding collaborative opportunities. The Emergency Department is a 35-bed clinical unit with 7 resuscitation bays, caring for more than 47,000 patients per year. The ACS-verified Level I trauma center has 3600 activations per year, and the ACS-verified Burn Center cares for more than 300 patients. UC Irvine was recently verified officially as a Level II Pediatric Trauma Center. In addition, the department is designated as a Base Hospital, Joint Commission and Orange County Cardiac and Stroke Receiving Center. The department is the most capable in the area for disaster preparedness and response, and is one of only nine comprehensive emergency departments in California. The department houses 19 full-time faculty (2 Ph.D.), four Clinical Instructor fellows, and a fully accredited PGY 1, 2, 3 EM residency (since 1988). The research effort is focused in the Center for Trauma and Injury Prevention Research and the Center for Disaster Medical Sciences. The Division of Emergency Ultrasound is internationally known, as UC Irvine was the first medical school to adopt a four-year integrated ultrasound curriculum. Other faculty in the department lead significant efforts in educational technology and simulation, and EMR implementation. The department publishes the Western Journal of Emergency Medicine: Integrating Emergency Care with Population Health, an open-access peer reviewed international journal. Applicants for this position must have an M.D., or M.D./Ph.D. degrees, with Master’s degree and/or subspecialty fellowship training desirable. Board certification in Emergency Medicine is required, as is an academic record sufficient for appointment in the Clinical X (Scholar) Line or In-Residence series at the full professor level. Candidates must have a strong record of scholarly activity and peer reviewed publications, including a research program with extramural funding. The candidates should also hold, or be eligible for, a medical license in the State of California. The successful candidate will be responsible for the effective management of all administrative and operational processes of the department, providing not only comprehensive, interactive clinical services, but also supporting the teaching, educational and research missions of the department, school and university. The candidate must have strong interpersonal skills, and be able to work cooperatively and congenially within a diverse academic and clinical environment. Candidates with leadership skills and vision for enhancing the clinical and academic components of a multi-disciplinary department are especially encouraged to submit applications to: Applicants should complete an online application profile and upload their Curriculum vitae electronically to be considered for the position: https:// recruit.ap.uci.edu/apply/JPF02153.

1 UCI is an equal opportunity employer committed to excellence through diversity and strongly encourages applications from all qualified applicants, including women and minorities. UCI is responsive to the needs of dual career couples, is dedicated to work-life balance through an array of familyfriendly policies, and is the recipient of an NSF ADVANCE Award for gender equity.

27


The Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio is recruiting for highly qualified full-time or part-time residency trained academic Emergency Medicine Physicians. Optimal candidates will have an established track record of peer-reviewed research, excellence in education and outstanding clinical service. University Hospital, the primary affiliated teaching hospital of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, is a 498 bed, Level 1 trauma center which treats 70,000 emergency patients annually. The University Hospital Emergency Department serves as the primary source for uncompensated and indigent care as well as the major regional tertiary referral center with a focus on transplant, neurologic, cardiac, diabetes and cancer care. A new, state of the art Emergency Department with 80 beds will open in early 2014. The successful candidate will join a diverse, enthusiastic group of academic Emergency Physicians committed to creating the premiere Emergency Medicine residency program and academic department in Texas. Our initial class of Emergency Medicine residents started July 2013. Academic Emergency Physicians with expertise in EMS, Ultrasound, Toxicology, and multiple dual-board certified EM / IM physicians currently round out the faculty. The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio offers a highly competitive salary, comprehensive insurance package, and generous retirement plan. Academic appointment and salary will be commensurate with experience. Candidates are invited to send their curriculum vitae to: Bruce Adams, M.D., FACEP, Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, MC 7840, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900. Email: adamsb@uthscsa.edu. All faculty appointments are designated as security sensitive positions. The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio is an Equal Employment Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer. http://emergencymedicine.uthscsa.edu/

Academic-affiliated Community Physicians

Academic-affiliated Community Physicians The Division of Emergency Medicine at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center is

The Division of Emergency Medicine at the University of Utah Health recruiting for a number of physicians to staff University-affiliated community hospital Sciences is recruiting a number of physicians to staff UniversityemergencyCenter departments in westernfor Wyoming and Utah regions. These hospitals are located in rural community sites thatemergency will also be used for trainingin medical students, affiliated community hospital departments western Wyoming residents, and fellows. Direct access to the main University hospital will be available by and Utah regions. These hospitals are located in rural community sites that EMR, telemedicine, and air medical transport. Opportunities for part-time work, off-site will also used academic for training medical students, residents, and fellows. Direct CME, andbe blended practices are also available. access to the main University hospital will be available by EMR, telemedicine, Theair University Utah is the primary medical for teaching and research in the and and medicaloftransport. Opportunities part-time work,institution off-site CME, state. Candidates must be boardare certified/prepared and have an interest in education of blended academic practices also available. residents and medical students. A competitive salary with an excellent benefits package

is offered. The University Utah is an EEO/AA employer andand encourages applications The University of Utah isofthe primary medical teaching research institution minorities. infrom the women state. and Candidates must be board certified/prepared and have an interest inInterested education of residents medical students. A competitive salary with an parties must apply and online: http://utah.peopleadmin.com/postings/28004 excellent benefits is offered. The University of Utah is an EEO/AA or if you need more package information, please contact: employer and encourages applications from women and minorities. Erik D. Barton, MD, MS, MBA

Interested parties must apply online: http://utah.peopleadmin.com/postings/28004 Division Chief or if you need more information, please contact: Division of Emergency Medicine University of Utah School of Medicine

Erik30D.North Barton, MD,RM MS, MBA 1900 East, 1C26 SaltDivision Lake City, Utah 84132 Chief 581-2730 Division Fax: of(801) Emergency Medicine (801) 585-6699 Universityerik.barton@hsc.utah.edu of Utah School of Medicine 30 North 1900 East, RM 1C26 Salt Lake City, Utah 84132 (801) 581-2730 Fax: (801) 585-6699 erik.barton@hsc.utah.edu

Department of Department o Department of Emergency Medicine Emergency Medicin Emergency Medicine The Department of Emergency Medicine of the University of The Department of Emergency Medicine of the University of Rochester Medical Center Emergency Medicine Faculty Rochester Medical Centerhas has open open Emergency Medicine Faculty positions for for work at atour academicsite, site, well as our positions work ourprimary primary academic as as well as our community affiliates standingemergency emergency department. community affiliatesand andour our free free standing department.

NIH-funded Fellowship Training in Clinical Informatics NIH-funded Fellowship TrainingTraining in Clinical Informatics NIH-funded Fellowship in Clinical Informatics The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Department of Emergency Medicine and Division of Bioinformatics, Department Medicine, seek outstanding applicants for and The University of California, San Diegoof (UCSD) Department of Emergency Medicine The University ofinCalifornia, San ofDiego (UCSD) Department ofanEmergency fellowship Clinical Informatics. The training program is funded by NIH Division of training Bioinformatics, Department Medicine, seek outstanding applicants for National Medicine Library of Medicine (NLM) biomedical informatics training grant. fellowship training in Clinical Informatics. The training program is funded by an NIH Division of Bioinformatics, Department of Medicine, seek outstandingNational applicants for Library of Medicine (NLM) biomedical informatics training grant.

Our Department includesaawell well regarded regarded EM Program, Our Department includes EMResidency Residency Program, Research and Fellowship programs. Our main site, Strong Memorial Research and Fellowship programs. Our main site, Strong Memorial Hospital, is the regional referral and trauma center. Hospital, is the regional referral and trauma center.

and home an NIH-funded of information Biomedical technology Computing.(IT) In and addition, there is UCSD is a to national leader in National the field Center of health innovation strong collaboration with UCSD Jacobs School Engineering, one of the and home to an NIH-funded National Center of of Biomedical Computing. In nation’s addition,top there is ranked Engineering Schools, and the Qualcomm Institute for Telecommunications and strong collaboration with UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering, one of the nation’s top UCSD is a national leader in the field of health information technology (IT) and innovation Information Technology located atthe UCSD. ranked Engineering Schools, and Qualcomm Institute for Telecommunications and and home to an NIH-funded Information Technology located atNational UCSD. Center of Biomedical Computing. In addition, there strong collaboration with UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering, of the The successful applicant will have a strong clinical background and interest in one pursuing a nation’s top ranked Engineering Schools, theclinical for Telecommunications and career in clinicalapplicant informatics health IT. InQualcomm addition to NIHInstitute training support, fellows will The successful willand have aand strong background and interest in pursuing a have to worklocated as faculty physicians in UCSD’s Emergency careerthe in opportunity clinical informatics and healthat IT.UCSD. In addition to NIH two training support,Departments fellows will Information Technology (combined census of to 61,000 with a levelin1 UCSD’s trauma center, and residency and have the opportunity work annually), as faculty physicians two Emergency Departments fellowship Advanced degrees, including Masterscenter, in Advanced Studies,and are (combinedprograms. census of 61,000 annually), with a level 1a trauma and residency available and strongly encouraged as partaincluding ofstrong the two-year training program.Studies, Opportunities fellowship programs. Advanced aclinical Masters in Advanced are to in pursuing a The successful applicant willdegrees, have background and interest pursue doctoral program are also available. The goal the fellowship is totraining develop support, available and strongly encouraged as part of the two-year training program. Opportunities to career ina clinical informatics and health IT. In of addition to NIH fellows will outstanding activeprogram clinical leaders expertise informatics and healthisIT. pursue a doctoral are alsowith available. Theingoal of the fellowship to develop have the opportunity toleaders work with as faculty UCSD’s outstanding active clinical expertisephysicians in informaticsinand health IT.two Emergency Departmen (combined census of 61,000 annually), with a level 1 trauma center, and residency and For more information, please contact: fellowship programs. Advanced degrees,please including a Masters in Advanced Studies, are For more information, contact: Jimas Killeen, available and strongly encouraged partMD of the two-year training program. Opportunitie Clinical Information Director Jim Killeen, MD pursue a doctoral program are also available. The goal of the fellowship is to develop Department of Emergency Medicine Clinical Information Director outstanding active clinical leaders with expertise in informatics and health IT. UC San Diego Health System Department of Emergency Medicine jkilleen@ucsd.edu UC San Diego Health System jkilleen@ucsd.edu

We are seeking BC/BE candidates with dynamic personalities who

We are seeking BC/BE candidates with dynamic personalities are interested in a diverse Emergency Medicine experience with who great potential career Emergency development, Medicine promotion, experience and career with are interested in afor diverse our department. With these sites, there also greatlongevity potentialwithin for career development, promotion, andis career ample within opportunity become involved academics longevity our to department. Withinthese sites,and there is also administration. ample opportunity to become involved in academics and administration. Rochester, New York is located in upstate New York offers excellent schools, low cost of living, many opportunities both professionally

and personally, and easy access to metropolitan Rochester, New York is located in Canada, upstateincluding New York offers excellent Toronto theofnortheast schools, lowand cost living, United many States. opportunities both professionally and personally, and easy access to Canada, including metropolitan Interested applicants please contact: Toronto and the northeast United States. Michael Kamali, MD, FACEP

Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine Interested applicants please contact: Michael_kamali@urmc.rochester.edu 585-463-2970 Michael Kamali, MD, FACEP

Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine Michael_kamali@urmc.rochester.edu 585-463-2970

28

and

fellowship training in Clinical Informatics. The training program is funded by an NIH Natio UCSD of is aMedicine national leader in thebiomedical field of healthinformatics information technology and innovation Library (NLM) training (IT) grant.

For more information, please contact:

UCSD is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer JimtoKilleen, MD with aUCSD strongisinstitutional commitment excellence through diversity. an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer with a strong institutional commitment to excellence through diversity. Clinical Information Director

Department of Emergency Medicine of •Emergency of #Emergency 200 WestDepartment ArborDepartment Drive, 8676 San Medicine Diego, Medicine CA 92103 UC San Health System 200 West T: Arbor Drive, # 8676 • San Diego, CA 92103 619-543-7342 • Diego F: 619-543-3115 jkilleen@ucsd.edu T:http://emergencymed.ucsd.edu 619-543-7342 • F: 619-543-3115 http://emergencymed.ucsd.edu

UCSD is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer with a strong institutional commitment to excellence through diversity.

Department of Emergency Medicine 200 West Arbor Drive, # 8676 • San Diego, CA 92103 T: 619-543-7342 • F: 619-543-3115


Vice Chair of Clinical Operations | University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Toxicologist, Emergency Medicine Faculty Division of Emergency Medicine The Division of Emergency Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) is seeking a highly motivated, BE/BC, academically-oriented Emergency Medicine physician with fellowship training in Toxicology. This individual will have the opportunity to develop a robust Toxicology program, with the long-term goal of a Toxicology Fellowship. This position offers numerous opportunities for collaboration, including the Palmetto Poison Control Center, Department of Pediatrics, College of Pharmacy, the Hollings National Cancer Institute, and more. The Division of Emergency Medicine is a rapidly growing academic program with strong collaborations across campus and in the community. The recruit will be actively involved in planning activities and scholarly projects in the Division related to toxicology. This faculty member will be responsible for EM resident and pediatric EM fellow toxicology education. Opportunities for clinical, educational, and research collaboration exist across campus. MUSC is the only ACS-certified Level-1 trauma center and National Cancer Institute in the state, and serves as a tertiary medical center for both adult and pediatric patients across the Southeast. Division faculty work clinically at the MUSC Adult and Pediatric Emergency Departments and the Ashley River Tower Emergency Department, with a combined annual volume of approximately 70,000 patients. If you are interested in building a prominent Toxicology program in one of the most desirable cities in the US, please send your CV to: Edward C. Jauch, MD MS, Professor, Director, Division of Emergency Medicine Medical University of South Carolina, 169 Ashley Avenue, MSC 300 Charleston, SC 29425 jauch@musc.edu

The Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio is seeking candidates for the position of Vice Chair of Clinical Operations. The position will be responsible for all clinical operations of the Emergency Department at the University Hospital System. University Hospital, the primary affiliated teaching hospital of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, is a 498 bed, Level 1 trauma center which treats 70,000 emergency patients annually. The University Hospital Emergency Department serves as the primary source for uncompensated and indigent care as well as the major regional tertiary referral center with a focus on transplant, neurologic, cardiac, diabetes and cancer care. A new, state of the art Emergency Department with 80 beds will open in early 2014. Ancillary job responsibilities outside of UHS includes development of an OBS Unit and Urgent Care Center etc.. Candidates should have extensive experience in clinical operations and be eligible for appointment to the rank of associate professor or professor. The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio offers a highly competitive salary, comprehensive insurance package, and generous retirement plan. Academic appointment and salary will be commensurate with experience. Candidates are invited to send their curriculum vitae to: Bruce Adams, M.D., FACEP, Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, MC 7840, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900. Email: adamsb@uthscsa.edu. All faculty appointments are designated as security sensitive positions. The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio is an Equal Employment Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer. For more information, please contact: Dr. Bruce D. Adams Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine 210-567-4292 | adambs@uthscsa.edu

MUSC is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer.

Associate Director of Emergency Medicine- Denver Health Department of Emergency Medicine The Denver Health Department of Emergency Medicine is seeking candidates for the position of Associate Director of Emergency Medicine. The position is responsible for all clinical operations for the Adult Emergency Department at Denver Health. The Emergency Department at Denver Health sees more than 75,000 patients per year; serves as the host for the Denver Health Residency in Emergency Medicine; and provides medical direction for the Denver Health Paramedic Division and 911 system for the City and County of Denver. Denver Health is a 525 bed tertiary care referral center and Level I Trauma Center. Academic appointments are in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Candidates must be residency trained and board certified in emergency medicine, should have extensive experience in clinical operations and administration, and be eligible for appointment to the rank of associate professor or professor. An advanced degree such as an MBA or MPH is preferred. Academic rank and salary will be commensurate with skills and experience. Denver Health offers a full benefits package. Interested candidates should submit a CV, cover letter, and list of references to: Adrianna.padgett@dhha.org For more information please contact: Dr. Christopher B. Colwell at Christopher.colwell@dhha.org

29


Powerful Presenting the 2011 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample

T

he Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) is the largest all-payer emergency department (ED) database in the United

States, containing national and regional statistics for both treat-and-release visits and those resulting in a hospital admission. The 2011 NEDS provides estimates for nearly 131 million hospital-based ED visits, making it an exceptional resource for high-profile health delivery research. The NEDS is part of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), the largest collection multi-year, all-payer, encounter-level health care data in the United States. HCUP provides the tools for cutting-edge health care research and policy analyses that can make a difference in our Nation’s health care. Rely on the power of the NEDS to help answer your most important research questions. ■

Powerful Data. Meaningful Answers. Explore the power of HCUP at www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov.

30


MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION Full Name:

Title:

Date:

Office Address Address Line 1: Address Line 2: City, State:

Zip:

E-mail:

Phone:

Home Address Address Line 1: Address Line 2: City, State:

Zip:

E-mail:

Phone:

Preferred Contact Method:

Mail

Are you a Current Member?

Yes

Email

Gender:

No

Date of Birth:

Membership Selection* *If you are a current member and are just registering for additional academies or interest groups, please select your member type and circle Yes above.

Male

Academy Selection**

** You may join as many academies as you wish. Prices are as follows: Active/Faculty......$100 Associate/Fellow/YP1/YP2/Emeritus......$50 Resident/Medical Student......$25

Faculty………………………………..…………………………………… $ 595.00 Associate………………………...…………………………….………… $ 265.00 AEUS …….$100/$50/$25 AAAEM……………….…………………………………………………… $ 495.00 Resident and Fellow………………………………...……………… $ 170.00 CDEM…….$100/$50/$25 Medical Student………………………………………………………… $ 100.00 Young Physician Year 1…………………….……………………… $ 325.00 GEMA…..$100/$50/$25 Young Physician Year 2…………………...………………………… $ 425.00 International…………………..………………………………………… varies AWAEM….$100/$50/$25 Emeritus……...…………………………………………………………… $ 100.00 Interest Group Selection*** Academic Informatics Airway CPR/Ischemia/Reperfusion Disaster Medicine Educational Research EMS Method of Payment:

Check

Female

ADIEM…$100/$50/$25 AGEM..$100/$50/$25 SIM..$100/$50/$25

***The first interest group selection is free. Each selection thereafter is $25 per interest group. You may join as many interest groups as you like.

Evidence-Based Medicine Health Services & Outcomes Medical Quality Mgt Neurologic Emergencies Operations Palliative Medicine

Credit Card (VS, MC, DC, AX)

Patient Safety Pediatric EM Public health Research Directors Sports Medicine Toxicology Grand Total:

Trauma Triage Uniformed Services Wilderness Medicine

Name as it appears on Card: Credit Card Number:

Expiration Date:

Security Code:

Billing Address: City, State:

Zip:

Please submit membership application to SAEM • By mail: SAEM 2340 S. River Road, Suite 208, Des Plaines, IL 60018 • By e-mail: membership@saem.org • By fax: 847-813-5450.


Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

2340 S. River Road, Suite 208 Des Plaines, IL 60018

NON PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID SAEM

FUTURE FUTURE SAEM SAEM ANNUAL ANNUAL MEETINGS MEETINGS 2013

SAEM Leadership Forum May 14-15, 2013 SAEM Annual Meeting 2014 Topics: May 14-18 SAEM Annual Meeting “Leadership” The Westin Peachtree Plaza,May Atlanta, GA 13-17 “Developing and Sustaining a Vision” Sheraton Hotel, Dallas, TX “Strategic Planning” AEM Consensus Conference “Building a Team” May 15, 2013 “Conflict Resolution” 2015 Care: Topic: “Global Health and Emergency “How to Run a Meeting” A Research Agenda” SAEM Annual Meeting “ED Operations Overview” MayMD, 13-16 Co-Chairs: Stephan Hargarten, MPH Management” Sheraton Hotel and Marina,“Change San Diego, CA Mark Hauswald, MD “Negotiating for Your Dept./Faculty” Jon Mark Hirshon, MD, MPH “Overview of Dept. Finances” Ian B.K. Martin, MD “Communication Skills”

2014

SAEM Annual Meeting May 14-17 Sheraton Hotel, Dallas, TX

2015

SAEM Annual Meeting May 13-16 Sheraton Hotel and Marina, San Diego, CA


January-February 2014 SAEM Newsletter  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you