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July-August, 2012

AWAEMAWARENESS

A bimonthly update to inform you of the current activities of our Academy in an effort to make this organization a strong advocate for women in academic emergency medicine.

Table of Contents In My Opinion - Thoughts on “Having It All� from your AWAEM President! !

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Article Review - Closing the Gap, or Not? !

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Resident Perspective - 10 Reasons Why Residents and Students Should Join AWAEM! ! Featured Women in Academic EM - Tracy Madsen & Renee Hsia! ! ! !

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Annual Meeting Didactic Summary - Negotiation!! ! Annual Luncheon Summary - Negotiation!! !

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AWAEM Committees 2012-2013!

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ANNOUNCEMENTS AWAEM is on PBWorks! We have created a community workspace for leadership and members to collaborate on projects, discuss hot topics, communicate about events, and much more. If you are a member, you should have received an email inviting you to join. If not, please email Holly Gouin, hgouin@saem.org. Like Us on Facebook - Check it out! See the latest news and tips for the women in academic EM.

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AWAEM AWARENESS July-August, 2012

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“You can have it all, just not all at once.” Sandra Schneider

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In My Opinion - Having It All

Words of Wisdom from your AWAEM President By Gloria Kuhn, DO Recently, women all over America have been electrified by the actions of two women, Anne-Marie Slaughter, PhD who quit a high profile job to spend more time with her family (see the article in The Atlantic, “Why Women Still Can’t Have it All”) and the Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg, who wrote an article on “how to have it all.” Because women reading these articles are bright, ambitious, and thoughtful, each of us interpreted the actions, and therefore the messages, of these women from our own perspective. From my perspective I was curious what the uproar was all about: both men and women have been opting out of high level, high stress careers for years with little or no comment. Just go to Hawaii: it is filled with those who have opted out and are now running hamburger joints, making ice cream, or driving taxis. Ina Garten left a business career to become a caterer and is now head of a food empire known all over by the name Barefoot Contessa. The world is also filled with those who have not opted out and continue to purse careers, some with immediate families and some without. Why the uproar? Obviously I was missing something. If I were not president of AWAEM I might or might not be writing this column, but since I am president I feel a need to share my thoughts. It was the 1960s and I wanted to be a doctor. Everyone except my mother knew that women should be wives and mothers and perhaps teachers or nurses. I became a doctor. Fast-forward to the 1980s and the Women’s Liberation Movement. My neighbor, a stay-at-home mom, was enchanted with the movement started by Gloria Steinem, Germaine Greer and Betty Friedan and wanted me to join. I replied that I was too busy living it to join anything, including the liberation movement. Emergency physician, program director, wife, and mother, I was struggling to keep all the balls in the air, let alone having an opinion on my being liberated. Externally and internally, I did have it all. A lot of days I had too much but I loved everything I was doing so never gave anything up: I just ran faster. Before I go any further, for the record, I have absolutely no regrets. But, this recent discussion about “having it all” has made me stop and do some thinking. IN MY OPINION Women’s Lib is the freedom to pursue your dreams and do what is right for you and your family. It is society not having the right to pigeonhole women into the roles that society feels are correct. IT IS TIME FOR WOMEN TO QUIT FEELING GUILTY ABOUT DOING WHAT IS RIGHT FOR THEM. Somehow, many women have viewed the advise of Ms. Sandberg, on how to successfully have a high powered career as telling them they must and making them feel guilty if they don’t, and Dr. Slaughter’s resignation and statement that the workplace has to change and become less demanding, as permission to leave a life which has become too demanding. I admit to having a certain sympathy for Ms. Sandberg. I remember being publicly castigated by women physicians when I said

that life has seasons and perhaps early in a woman’s career it is enough to be a good doctor, do some teaching, and concentrate on raising a family. I also gave advice on how to have a demanding career in academics and raise a family (outsourcing housework, yard work, laundry, and being part of a carpool played a large part in my advice). Many women felt that I was being condescending and did not give them credit for being able to do it all. I mentally shrugged, smiled, thanked them for their attention, and sat down. I don’t intend to give advice in this column but I would like to state what I think AWAEM should be doing for our members. Members of AWAEM have chosen to pursue careers in academic medicine. Many are trying to figure out how to have fulfilling careers and raise healthy families. AWAEM should be a source of support and advice from members who have tackled, and in some cases solved, the problems many other members are working to solve. This organization needs to affirm the right of women to do what is best for them in their careers and lives. It is time to give up guilt (I am an expert in feeling guilty because not each of my roles got the same amount of attention each day; whichever area of my life was in most trouble got the most attention.) I also know that giving up guilt is easier said then done. However, there is a message in the angst of women who are discussing the cases of Dr. Slaughter and Ms. Sandberg: we can have it all but having it all comes at a price. The more of “having it all” that we have, the higher the price. Whether the price is too high is a decision each of us must make with those we have chosen to spend our lives with. I will always believe that we can have it all but not all at once. I will defend the right of each woman to choose whether the price paid to have it all is or is not too high. Dr. Slaughter chose to give up a demanding career to spend more time with her child who needed her attention. She may not be able to re-enter a demanding career. If not, then that is society’s loss and society needs to rethink giving up talented people because they choose to have seasons in their lives. But, whatever path each of us chooses, it is right for us and we do not need to feel guilty or that we have failed. It is time for us to accept ourselves, our goals, aspirations, and the reality of what price we are willing to pay. Only then will we truly become liberated. Article by Dr. Slaughter: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2012/07/why-womenstill-can-8217-t-have-it-all/9020/ Editorial in the NYTimes http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/22/us/elite-women-put-a-newspin-on-work-life-debate.html Video of advice from Ms. Sandberg http://www.ted.com (search for Sheryl Sandberg)


AWAEM AWARENESS July-August, 2012

Closing the Gap, or Not? A Review of “Gender Differences in the Salaries of Physician Researchers” By Leila Getto, MD

This question is re-examined frequently. In the June 13th issue of JAMA, Reshma Jagsti, et al. gave us an answer in their manuscript titled “Gender Differences in the Salaries of Physician Researchers”. The authors focused on whether or not male and female physician researchers who performed similar work were paid equally and if not, was the difference explained by disparities in specialty, productivity, or other factors such as marital or parental status? In 2009-2010, the authors sent a survey to 1729 recipients of NIH K08 and K23 grants between the years of 2000-2003. After a 71% response rate, they limited the analysis to 800 physicians who continued to practice in US academic institutions and divulged their annual salary. They used a linear regression model of selfreported annual salary considering characteristics such as gender, age, marital status, parental status, specialty, institution type, rank and other factors related to their grant funding. The mean salary was approximately $167,000 for women and $200,000 for men. Even after adjusting for factors such as specialty, rank, research time and others, males were paid on average $13,000 more than women. The factors that the authors adjusted for

also described interesting gender differences. Men were more likely to be married and have children than women in this group of surveyed grant recipients. Women tended to be in lower-paying specialties, less likely to hold administrative leadership positions, and had fewer publications and work hours than men in this cohort. The authors concluded that gender differences in salary exist in this relatively similar group of mid-career academic physicians, even after adjustment for differences in specialty, institutional characteristics, academic rank, work hours, and other factors. Their discussion is excellent and they raise questions as to why women are being paid less. Did men prioritize compensation more than women did, with women negotiating less aggressively regarding salary? Did women gain nonmonetary benefits instead? Was gender bias and discrimination occurring? How will we close this gap? Let’s discuss this article on the AWAEM workspace, PBworks, in the Current Events folder.

“The most important gift anyone can give a girl is a belief in her own power as an individual, her value without reference to gender, her respect as a person with potential.” Emilie Buchwald

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AWAEM AWARENESS July-August, 2012

Resident Perspective

10 Reasons Why Residents and Students Should Join AWAEM By Leana S. Wen, MD, MSc

As one of the AWAEM resident representatives and the President of the AAEM Resident and Student Association, I am frequently asked what emergency physicians-in-training have to gain from AWAEM. Why join a network of women in academic EM? Aren’t issues relevant to academic women EPs relevant to everyone else? I’m a believer in equality, and have had outstanding male colleagues and mentors throughout my training. Yet, AWAEM can provide additional valuable perspective to the woman (or man) interested in Academic EM. Here is a list of 10 topics AWAEM addresses for its valued members: #1. Lessons from those who have been there and succeeded. What choices did they make along the way and why? What regrets (if any) do they have? What kind of faculty development is needed to recruit, promote, and retain women in academic EM? How can we learn about these options when we are looking for jobs? #2. Key decisions to make during training that lead to a successful academic career. What did they do during their training that led them to where they are now? What advice do they have for us when it comes to critical (yet infrequently mentioned) topics such as selecting a female-friendly residency and negotiating for our first job? #3. Unique demands of being a female academic EP. What are the challenges that existed for our mentors, and what are the challenges that still exist today? How did they deal with these challenges?

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#4. Key leadership lessons. Studies have shown that there are different characteristics to being a successful female versus male leader. Learn from female mentors about what they think it takes to be a great attending, administrator, teacher, researcher, and leader.

“Our strength is our members and our future is our medical students and residents.”

#5. How to influence on a larger level. There are few women in top leadership positions, such as department Chairs, hospital administration, and senior government roles. Learn about the hidden barriers, and how we can work together with our mentors to overcome them. Learn how to make sure we are true to ourselves as socially accountable physicians and members of society. #6. How to make a difference to our patients. No doubt, there are excellent male physicians that we have much to learn from too. Women EPs may offer additional dimensions to patient care. Gender-specific research in EM is an exciting new field that young women EPs can learn about and contribute to through AWAEM. #7. Practical aspects of work-life integration. It’s almost a cliché to talk about “work-life balance” in a discussion of professional women’s issues, yet it’s something that all women (and probably many men) will think about at some point in their careers. How did our role models who appear to “have it all” do it? What are the sacrifices they had to make? How did they structure their work and home lives? #8. How to take care of ourselves and those around us. Being a female academic physician and having a family can be equivalent to several full-time jobs. It’s important that we take care of ourselves and our loved ones. How did our role models seek and find wellness? How can we make sure self-care is part of our routine?

Gloria Kuhn, DO, PhD AWAEM President, 2012-13

#9. The importance of mentorship. Everything we’ve discussed ties into mentorship. Behind every star performer is a star mentor, and while we should continue to seek mentorship in all those around us, female mentorship adds an additional critical dimension and nuance. Learn from those in our lives who are professional and research mentors, and make sure to seek out personal mentors too. #10. The importance of networking. The key to AWAEM is that it not only offers senior mentorship to junior women, but also peer-to-peer networking. Enabling an atmosphere of mutual support and collaboration is key, and AWAEM offers the opportunity for us to celebrate each other’s successes. This is an opportunity to establish a network that is inclusive, collegial, and supportive. Becoming an academic emergency physician brings its separate challenges and requires active work. AWAEM offers many much-needed opportunities for residents and students. I am very honored to be a part of AWAEM, and hope that you decide to join the really amazing leaders who make up this organization! I would love to hear your comments on my column! Please email me, wen.leana@gmail.com, follow me on Twitter, @DrLeanaWen, and read my blog, http:// whendoctorsdontlisten.blogspot.com.


AWAEM AWARENESS July-August, 2012

Featured Women in Academic EM:

Commitment to Women’s Health & Research By Priya Kuppusamy, MD

Tracy Madsen, MD Women's Health in Emergency Care Fellow at Brown University

! Tracy Madsen is featured in our newsletter this month for her commitment to Women’s Health. Her interest in Women’s Health dates back to medical school at Boston University where she served as co-chair of the American Medical Women’s Association local chapter and developed strong advocacy skills through her involvement with the Abuse and Violence Awareness Project.

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Renee Hsia, MD, MSc Assistant Professor University of California, San Francisco

! Renee Hsia is featured in our newsletter for her commitment to research. She currently resides in San Francisco where she is assistant clinical professor at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). She is also the first true research-track faculty member in her department and division at San Francisco General Hospital. She attended Harvard She is a real goMedical School and getter who is driven Dr. Tracy Madsen has ! Tracy attended to answer her very then obtained a built the foundation Brown University for relevant and timely Masters degree in for an outstanding research questions. residency where she Health Policy, Planning academic career and There is no doubt in continued to pursue her and Finance from the will distinguish my mind that she has interest in Women’s Health. London School of herself as an expert already and will in women’s health. She has held many Economics. She continue to leadership roles while contribute to completed residency at Brian Clyne, MD advancing research serving on local and Stanford University national committees and through each phase Judd E. Hollander, MD including Resident Division of training, Renee Program Chairperson for the actively pursued American Medical Women’s Association. During her year as policy-oriented research opportunities. Chief Resident, she published research looking at the gender ! In 2008, Renee played a key role in developing a effects on time-to-EKG in the Emergency Department. She is research infrastructure within the newly created Department of currently doing a fellowship in the newly-created Women’s Emergency Medicine at UCSF. She has served as research Health in Emergency Care at Brown University in Providence, faculty mentor to numerous residents and spends a significant Rhode Island. percentage of her time lecturing and teaching students. ! As a result of her proactive nature and hard work, she has authored over forty-two peer-reviewed manuscripts, sixty abstracts and eleven chapters in emergency medicine textbooks. She has also received several recognitions, including ACEP Best Paper Award in 2008 and SAEM’s Best in Session Presentation in 2009 and Young Investigator Award in 2011.


AWAEM AWARENESS July-August, 2012

Annual Luncheon Table Discussion Summary Successful Negotiating Gail D’Onofrio, Facilitator; Gloria Kuhn, Recorder Do Some Reading Articles Ask for a Raise? Most Women Hesitate: NPR http://www.npr.org/2011 (accessed 5.12.2012) Women, Repeat This: Don’t Ask, Don’t Get, Linda Babcock www.nytimes. com/2008 (accessed 5.12.2012) Books 1) Women Don’t Ask: Negotiation and the Gender Divide, Linda Babcock and Sara Laschever 2) Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In, Roger Fisher and William L. Ury Learn Some Skills 1) Determine your style of negotiation and then practice with someone (a mentor) to determine what mannerisms to keep and what to change. 2) Take a class in negotiation. 3) Give yourself and the other person time to think. 4) Know how to use time. After making your request, don’t fill the silence while the other person processes what you have said with a nervous laugh or more words. Allow time for the person you are negotiating with to make a decision; the first response is often “no” if you apply pressure. 5) A negotiation is just that: you may not get all of what you want. Decide what you will accept in return for what you are asking. If the other person suggests an alternative what will you accept? What is your best alternative to a negotiated agreement (BATNA)? 6) Don’t threaten i.e. you will leave unless you are prepared to act on this. (Have a backup plan.) 7) Don’t blindside your chair or boss. They should hear your requests from you; not another member of the department or someone outside the department. 8) Don’t wait too long to ask, don’t apologize, and don’t downplay your worth. 9) Ask for a meeting and if the secretary asks what this is about tell her you have a request/plan of action. 10) Send a confirmatory e-mail after the meeting stating what you think was said/agreed on and ask for a timeline for the next meeting or decision if resolution was not agreed upon in the initial meeting. 11) When agreement is achieved, send an e-mail with a thank you and outline of what you will be doing as a result of the agreement. Do Some Thinking and Be Prepared 1) Be prepared: Know your goals, objectives, action plan, and timeline when you ask for resources 2) What are the things you have done in the past which will make you the right person to carry out this plan 3) Everything costs money: what is the cost, use of resources and how will that be of value (see 4) 4) Be prepared to suggest how this will work in with the overall needs of the department 5) Demonstrate how the request will help the department when asking for resources to implement a program i.e. for residency Consider Yourself a Valuable Asset Recommendations when asking for personal needs: 1) Be prepared to negotiate in a give/take manner. If you want a particular change in your schedule what are you prepared to give up i.e. no weekends but you will work nights. Is this a permanent change or short term and for how long?

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2) If asking for support for faculty development, how will cost be repaid in programs you are prepared to work on that will benefit the department. Remember: the Chair may not be able to grant your request but may come up with an alternative. Ask for time to think it over and when a decision will be made or when you would like to meet again and discuss further. Be prepared to make a counter-offer. * In addition to the luncheon small group discussion, this also contains recommendations and comments from a panel discussion led by Dr. Jeannette Wolf on Negotiation. Speakers who participated in the panel: Jeannette Wolf, Kathleen Clem, Kate Heilpern, and Brent King.

Kathleen Clem, Facilitator;Linda Druelinger, Recorder ZOPA = Zone of Possible Agreement." Discovering the ZOPA is critical in working toward resolution. Work to test the ZOPA. Seek to understand how the other party views its alternatives as well as how it perceives your own." Build on shared interests, bridge conflicting interests, and use different interests as exchanges. Explore options as possibilities, not commitments." Adopt an attitude of curiosity. Ask open questions. BATNA = Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement. This is your preferred course of action; what you would do if there is not agreement." It is not your bottom line. Once you have identified your BANTA you can put a value on it." That value is your “walkaway” when you negotiate. Don’t fall into the trap of deciding how the other party should see their BATNA, rather than how they really do. Ask the other party for a critique of your proposal. Individuals at this table presented a personal negotiating challenge that served as the springboard for a discussion, focusing in particular on the ZOPA and BATNA concepts. The bullet points from the discussion are as follows: • One of the difficulties in negotiating for protected time in academics involves the competing forces of clinical requirements and scholarship/administrative duties. • It is essential to 'track' what you do - DATA is an essential tool in negotiation discussions. • Know your BATNA prior to the discussion – so you will already know if you need to walk away. • When reviewing a contract be sure to understand the details - it is essential that you and your 'boss' are in agreement on what is important and the specifics of expectations (both yours and his/hers) • In negotiating for credit, 'fight' for the principle – move from positions to interests. • Remember there is value even in failed negotiations (learning tool) • A useful negotiating strategy is to be sure to look at the big picture what value is added to your group and makes the 'pie bigger'.


AWAEM AWARENESS July-August, 2012

XX, XY and the Art of Asking What, When and How to Negotiate By Elizabath Ter Haar, MD & Jeanette Wolfe, MD ! If you were lucky enough to attend the AWAEM Academy Block at SAEM this year, then you certainly remember the dynamic speakers and the interesting material they presented. If your mind is not quite the steel trap you wish it was, then the summary below can jog your memory. For those of you unable to attend, the following will serve to fill you in on the basics. ! Jeannette Wolfe MD, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Tufts School of Medicine Baystate Campus, gave a presentation on negotiation titled: XX, XY and the Art of Asking – What, When and How to Negotiate. The goals of the talk were to examine gender differences in negotiation, go through case studies with an expert panel, and provide concrete solutions for how to negotiate better. As her talk unfolded, it became clear that in order for women to advance professionally they must be masters in the art of negotiation and yet many women feel totally unprepared or uncomfortable with their negotiation skills. Dr. Wolfe broke down five major ways in which men and women diverge in how they perceive, approach and experience negotiation in the workplace and what we can do to bridge the gap. Negotiation Difference #1: Locus of Control The prequel to negotiation is actually getting to the negotiation table in the first place. Men often see themselves as the makers of their own destiny; women do not. In a study by CNN/Money in 2007 which surveyed MBAs on how much they expected to make over the next 5 years, men’s estimates were 25% higher than women’s estimates. Men see themselves as the one in control, the one responsible for advancing their careers, while women often assume it is their supervisor’s job to recognize their good work and promote them and they wait to be asked.

Solution: Now that your vision for what may be negotiable has changed, acquire data to support your negotiation. The AAMC and salary surveys may have information about the local reimbursement rates. If you have a job interview you can ask to speak with other members of the group to see what was negotiable when they joined the group. You can also get ideas from your current colleagues. Negotiation Difference #3: Threshold to negotiate Men are more likely to ask for a better deal without any cue that a better deal is possible; if a cue is given that negotiation is possible, even more men will negotiate. Women often need a little more reassurance before they start to negotiate. They want to know that not only is negotiation possible but that it also is expected or acceptable. Women, given the same cues, negotiate at much lower rates. The Harvard Business Review in 2003 did a study of MBA grads from Carnegie Mellon and found that men reported negotiating their salaries 57% of the time, while women did 7% of time. On average, individuals who negotiated started out with approximately 7% higher base salary. Solution: Keep your eyes open for opportunities to negotiate and practice doing so in low-risk scenarios. Continued on the next page.

What to do? Take the initiative and start to see yourself as the one in control of your career. Solution: As you start to see yourself as the one in charge of driving your career forward, develop a 5 year plan that details your goals. Break down your plan into achievable parts that you can begin working toward today, such as developing a new research project, designing a new lecture, or calling the residency director of another residency to give a grand rounds presentation. Negotiation Difference #2: Concept of what is actually negotiable Studies have shown that men are four times more likely to believe that something is potentially negotiable than women. Anecdotally, you may have noticed that the men in your life will negotiate many things that would not have crossed your mind to negotiate, such as rental cars, seating at restaurant, hotel room upgrades, or airline rebookings. Professionally this can put women at a disadvantage as they do not realize the breadth of potentially negotiable options. For example here is a list of non-salary potentially negotiable items in academic medicine: signing bonus, conference fees, membership fees, moving costs, CME, non-clinical time, administrative help, office space, computer or software discounts, mentorship, committee assignment, and scheduling.

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“Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate.” - John F. Kennedy


AWAEM AWARENESS July-August, 2012

XX, XY and the Art of Asking -

What, When and How to Negotiate - continued By Elizabath Ter Haar, MD & Jeanette Wolfe, MD Negotiation difference #4: Perceived Risks of Negotiation In general, men are more comfortable with compartmentalizing interactions, and they also perceive minimal downsides to negotiation. In contrast, women do not compartmentalize as much, and worry that their overall work reputation may be jeopardized by aggressive negotiation. A woman’s innate desire to be liked and accepted by her peers makes her vulnerable to being undervalued and underpaid as she is afraid that the process of negotiation will make her appear demanding, entitled and less likeable. Unfortunately, this fear has been validated. A study by Bowles, published in Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes in 2007 had evaluators look at written and videotaped interviews where gender and negotiation were controlled. In this study, evaluators viewing women negotiating with a classically male script, rated the women as more demanding and less likable than their male counterparts. Societal norms prescribe certain gender roles, such as men being dominant and competitive, and women being deferential and collaborative. Traditional negotiation falls under this “dominance” prescriptive and women who try to mimic men often suffer negative repercussions. Solution: Negotiate Differently Traditional negotiation follows the concept that available resources make up a pie that needs to be divided with each negotiator directly competing for the size of his or her own “piece”. Again, this distributive negotiation style is well aligned with male prescriptives. An alternative model is called “expand the pie” negotiation which is a more collaborative approach and usually a better fit for women. In this model, the negotiator focuses on ways that he or she can obtain prioritized items in lieu of concession of lesser important items (that may be desirable to the other negotiator.) For example, a woman may choose to work more overnights if it allows her more control over her entire schedule. Negotiation Difference #5: Mindset & Comfort Level with Negotiation Men tend to be more comfortable with negotiation than women. They are accustomed to competing with their peers and do not see the process as personal or emotional. They see the process as necessary, and they see it in context as an expected and valuable part of business. Women tend to have more social experiences that focus on collaboration rather than competition, and they often find it difficult to tolerate negotiations. They usually see the process as quite personal and due to their fears of jeopardizing their relationships in the workplace (see Negotiation difference #4), typically have more anxiety and emotions over the process than men. Communication differences also come into play as women use certain language and behaviors to portray themselves as cooperative rather than aggressive. Challenges arise as women’s anxiety results in them being flustered and hurried during negotiations, and using deferential language that does little to promote their cause.

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Solution: To improve your comfort level with negotiation, plan out your negotiation scenario beforehand. Consider the timing of your meeting in relation to the fiscal year and in relation to your recent accomplishments or awards. Prepare a clear summary of your contributions to the department and be prepared to explain how fulfilling your requests will ultimately benefit the entire department by using an “expand the pie” negotiation tactic. Practice your approach with a friend or a mentor and focus on desensitizing the process to make it less emotional. Limit your word count. Prepare yourself immediately prior to the negotiation by remaining calm, prepared and positive. Finally, keep in mind that your first negotiation may just be a stepping stone to further discussions as your director or chair may require some time to consider your requests. Two good books on negotiation resources: Knowing your Value by M. Brzezinski. Ask For It: How women can use the power of negotiation to get what they really want by Linda Babcock and Sara Lashever

“Start out with an ideal and end up with a deal.” Karl Albrecht


AWAEM AWARENESS July-August, 2012

Available Committees for 2012-2013 Time to get involved! If you are interested in helping with any of these committees, as a member or possibly leadership role, please e-mail the Chair so you can be included. "If you do not hear from the Chair within a week (or no Chair is listed) please contact Gloria Kuhn, DO (gkuhn@med.wayne.edu) as sometimes messages do get lost in the cyberspace of e-mail land. We need people like you to keep AWAEM a success!! AWAEM Guidelines & Policies Chair: Esther Choo echomd@gmail.com Co-Chair: Sue Watts

Past Chair & Mentor: Linda Druelinger ldruelin@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu Past Mentor: Kerry Broderick

Awards Chair: Kinjal Sethuraman kinjal.sethuraman@gmail.com Co-Chair: Priya Kuppusamy Mentor: Michelle Biros

Research Chair: Marna Greenberg: mrgdo@ptd.net Co-Chairs: Esther Choo, Julie Welch, Basmah Safdar

E-Communications Chair: Stacey Poznanski stacey.poznanski@gmail.com Co-Chair: Leila Getto Mentor: Gloria Kuhn Medical School Initiatives Chair: Keme Carter kcarter@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu Membership Chair: Neha Raukar nraukar@gmail.com Co-Chair: Tracy Sanson

SAEM Meeting Initiatives Chair: Alyson McGregor amcgregormd@gmail.com Co-Chairs: Esther Choo, Preeti Jois, Basmah Safdar, Julie Welch, Jeannette Wolfe, Tracy Madsen Wellness Chair: Dara Kass darakass@gmail.com Resident Initiatives Taskforce: Co-Chairs: Michelle Lall & Ciera Barclay-Buchanan Leana Wen (Resident RSA), Suzanne Bryce (Resident RSA) Global Emergency Medicine Taskforce Chair: Bhakti Hansoti

Regional Mentoring Chair: Angela Fisher

“I’m a woman of very few words, but lots of action.” !

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Mae West

Many Photos found via Google Images. For a list of Photo Credits, please contact Stacey Poznanski, DO at stacey.poznanski@gmail.com


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