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CLIMB THE WALLS BOULDERING AND BEYOND

THE EPIC JOURNEY LOCALS ON EL CAMINO DE SANTIAGO

IT’S A DOG’S LIFE HANG WITH BEST FRIENDS

Chris Sullivan This Is Us star on growing up in Sac, Emmy nominations, songwriting and more

Homegrown )

SACMAG.COM MARCH 2020


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ADVE RTISE M E NT

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Contents MARCH 2020

F E AT U R E S

40

THIS IS CHRIS Local boy Chris Sullivan— actor, singer/songwriter, podcaster—talks about “This Is Us,” growing up in Sacramento and more. By Catherine Warmerdam

48

IT’S A DOG’S WORLD This town loves its dogs. Here’s how. By Marybeth Bizjak

56

OUT IN THE OPEN An extra-large living space makes great use of natural materials, color and character. By Mari Tzikas Suarez

tim engle

SACMAG.COM March 2020

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Contents

48

73 90

SECTIONS

D E PA R T M E N T S

21 THE 916

31 HEALTH Rock Stars

Site for Vision Plants for Killers Honey Agency Leader

27 PARTY PICTURES

by Luna Anona

35 TRAVEL The Road

by David Watts Barton

Metro Chamber Dinner

31

MLK Celebration St. Andrew’s Society Supper

89 FOOD & DRINK Brother Act Eggstravaganza Portuguese Delights

IN EVERY ISSUE 18 EDITOR’S NOTE He’s Homegrown 73 ARTS & CULTURE 74 EVENTS CALENDAR 100 RESTAURANTS 110 A LOOK BACK

35

ON THE COVER Chris Sullivan photographed in Los Angeles tim engle

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SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE  March 2020  


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LOCAL EVENTS

Plan your weekend with a look at the online calendar of events, or upload information for an event you would like to list.

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SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE March 2020

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PUBLISHED BY SACRAMENTO MEDIA LLC CEO Stefan Wanczyk PRESIDENT John Balardo FO R I S S U E S O F T H E M AG A Z I N E SUBSCRIPTIONS To establish a subscription

or make changes to an existing subscription, please call (866) 660-6247 or go to sacmag.com/subscribe. SINGLE COPIES AND BACK ISSUES

To purchase back issues, please call (866) 660-6247. TO S U B M I T M AT E R I A L EVENTS CALENDAR Submit event information and related high-resolution images for the print calendar to kari@sacmag.com by the first of the month, two months before the month the event is to take place. To add an event to the online calendar, go to sacmag.com/events. PARTY PICTURES Please submit event information for coverage consideration to Darlena Belushin McKay at least one month prior to the event. Send event name, date, location, time, name of contact person and phone number to darlena@sacmag.com. ALSO PUBLISHED BY SACRAMENTO MEDIA LLC:

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SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE March 2020

SPIRITUAL HEALING LIFE COACHING CHAKRA BALANCING

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EDITOR’S NOTE

He’s Homegrown WHEN WE DECIDED TO FEATURE ACTOR CHRIS SULLIVAN IN THIS ISSUE, I had never watched one episode of “This

Is Us.” It’s in its fourth season, and when it started—even though I heard from everyone “you have to watch it!”—I just felt too busy to get sucked into the latest hot series. I’ve missed out on a lot of hit shows for this reason. Never started “Parks & Rec,” “Breaking Bad” or “Downton Abbey,” but I did watch all 500 seasons of “Mad Men” in one weekend of illness (was I really sick, or just drunk by osmosis?). So in November, to do my homework, I went to NBC.com and began the emotional journey that is “This Is Us.” It’s every bit as good as everyone said. From the first episode, Toby—Chris Sullivan’s character—has been one of my favorites. Funny and real and complicated. Master of the grand gesture. I’m not sure how Chris kept a straight face during some of the scenes, particularly in early Season 4 as a stressed father of a baby boy, snarking at his on-screen wife, Kate (Chrissy Metz) about how he came to forget bringing the infant’s all-crucial toy monkey—called, of course, Monkey—and believing that Other Monkey would have sufficed. It’s a tense scene, but funny to anyone who has had babies. Art director Gabe Teague and photographer Tim Engle flew to LA for the photo shoot with Chris, who revealed then that he and his reallife wife, Rachel Reichard, are expecting their first baby. I’m going to guess that a “This Is Us” fan out there will be presenting the baby boy with his own Monkey. After all the logistical maneuvering, it was a thrill to see a text from Gabe with a selfie of Chris and him: “Shoot went amazing!” Also in this issue, Marybeth Bizjak and her sidekick Guinness the wire-haired dachshund report on the dog scene in Sacramento. In keeping with tradition for our “pets” issues, our staff box shows some of the furred friends Sac Maggers live with. In the story, you’ll also see part-time office dog Jimmy—lover of chicken, hater of the postal carrier—enjoying some doggie baked goods. A couple of stories in this edition to inspire your athletic side: David Watts Barton’s piece about walking El Camino de Santiago—a journey that goes beyond the physical—and Luna Anona’s story about climbing, a sport that’s taken the region by storm and has plenty of metaphorical applications to life.

AND THERE’S MORE . . . We were very sad to learn the news from Staci O’Toole, the truffle huntress featured in the February issue, that one of her working dogs, Tone, was hit by a car and killed in January. “It left a giant hole in our hearts,” she wrote. “Your story and focus on him and the pictures really helped with the healing.” Sip, sip, sip! Sacramento Media will be launching a wine publication later in 2020. Sacramento Magazine’s Wine Country magazine will cover the regions surrounding our area, including Amador, El Dorado, Placer, Yolo and Lodi.

KRISTA MINARD krista@sacmag.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Tim Engle

“In all my years of photographing for Sacramento Magazine,” says photographer Tim Engle, “(the Chris Sullivan shoot) is one of the most complex and rewarding assignments to date.” But after a month of planning, everything came together seamlessly. “Chris and his team were a pleasure to work with. The team was so well organized and supportive of the shoot. I prepared for only one hour with Chris, but things went so smoothly that I ended up getting to spend two hours photographing him.”

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SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE  March 2020  

Caroline Winata

“I met (corgis) Ralph and George at a fundraiser a couple years ago and instantly fell in love,” says photographer Caroline Winata, whose company Pet Photos by Olin has one of the cutest websites ever. She says she is in love with the light and animals. For this issue, she took the two corgis’ pics. “Ralph is so cute and energetic while George is so regal and gentle,” she says. “I loved getting to see them again, and cuddling them. Really, the best part of my job is cuddling the dogs I photograph!”

David Watts Barton

David Watts Barton’s work has appeared in newspapers and magazines, online and on radio. A former music critic, columnist and feature writer at The Sacramento Bee, Barton was editor-in-chief of the local news website Sacramento Press, and has hosted “Insight” on Capital Public Radio. He travels full time, and blogs at therovingagent.com. “Walking El Camino,” he says, “and then reliving the experience (through writing) was a joy. But even more, it was hearing and sharing the stories of (other) people that made it so much fun.”


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MARCH 2020

The 916 i n s i d e: For Eyes / Help for Plant Killers / Honey Agency Gets It Done

Visionary Thinking Find out why Warby Parker, which has brought its popular eyewear to R Street, is hopping busy. See next page.

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chen

The 916

PERFECT PLANTS FOR PLANT KILLERS BY LUNA ANONA

See and Be Seen It may seem odd to think of a shop that sells something as pedestrian as eyeglasses as a happening spot. Yet stroll by WARBY PARKER in Sacramento’s Ice Blocks complex on any given Saturday and it’s impossible not to notice that the retailer is buzzing with more energy than the boccie court at nearby Beast + Bounty. In fact, some days the store is so crowded that customers have to wriggle their way to the shelves lined with frames bearing hip names like Felix, Welty and Chamberlain. Who knew eyeglasses could generate such zeal? Yes, Warby Parker’s prices are pretty great. Sure, customers rave about the convenience factor built into the business model. (Order in store and your prescription glasses arrive in your mailbox a few days later.) And yeah, they win kudos for donating a pair of glasses for every pair they sell. But the palpable energy inside Warby Parker is bigger than all that. “It seems weird to say this about a corporate brand, but it feels like they care about you,” says Amrit Rai, who was shopping for glasses with her mother on a recent Saturday. It’s that sort of brand loyalty that wins a company more than half a million Instagram followers and collaborations with tastemakers like Chloe Sevigny and Leith Clark. In the end, of course, it ultimately comes down the fact that the frames are on-trend and look great. “Coming to a place that’s a destination for eyewear fashion is really interesting. I’ve never seen a store like this,” says Rai. “It’s cool to have this much selection for something we take for granted every day.” —Catherine Warmerdam

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SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE  March 2020  

Have you ever brought home a beautiful plant that proceeded to wilt and wither before your eyes, even as you lovingly shoved it in the brightest spot in your house, sang it Fleetwood Mac, and sprinkled the composted remains of last month’s Postmates around it? Have you ever collected an alarming amount of shed leaves from the floor and wondered if this was all a cruel metaphor for the mess that was your life? I mean, same. But that’s in the past! This spring, it’s finally time to create the jungalows of our dreams. Here are eight plants that you probably can’t kill, plus tips from local plant pros for how to help your indoor garden thrive.

THREE PRO TIPS:

1.

If you’ve ever found yourself wondering when it’s time to water a plant, invest in a moisture meter. It’s a probe to insert into the pot that measures the moisture away from the surface—sometimes the surface will dry out, but that doesn’t always mean the plant needs water.

SANSEVIERIAS

DIEFFENBACHIA

AKA

Snake Plants or Mother-in-Law’s Tongue

Dumb Cane or Leopard Lily

Small Succulent or “that cute succulent I saw on Instagram”

BEST CONDITIONS

This hardy plant is ideal for first-time plant parents, as it can withstand full sun and handle low light. Wherever you throw it, you can probably grow it.

It prefers bright light and indirect sun, but will accept conditions up to full shade (although it will have stunted growth here).

Stick it by a window and treat it like a house plant.

p lo

Let it dry out between waterings.

“Water them every week or week and a half. In between, mist their leaves, as if they got rained on in the forest,” says Bahraini.

Water it every two to three weeks. “I tell people to give them two shot glasses of water,” says Bahraini.

A th te Ba

“They’re great for filtering the air. Some can live in an area with no windows—they can soak up fluorescent office lighting,” says Bahraini.

Under perfect conditions, this plant will produce unremarkable green buds. Many plant owners remove the buds because they are a waste of the plant’s energy. Buds that turn brown should be removed from the plant immediately.

This is the only succulent that can thrive with strong indirect sunlight.

c c

PLANT

HAWORTHIA

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE

BASIC CARE

GOOD TO KNOW


ELLEN SAMPSON is a California Certified Nursery Professional and Peace Lily enthusiast who works at the familyowned neighborhood garden center Talini’s Nursery, which was founded in 1976 in East Sacramento. Talini’s offers a host of unusual things that can’t always be found at bigger nurseries, such as uncommon perennials, artwork, statues and garden decor.

S

A

.

e ve f

t g

MEET THE PROS

5601 Folsom Blvd., (916) 451-8150 talinisnursery.com

MONA BAHRAINI grew up in Arizona and has a serious cactus obsession. When she moved to Sacramento in 2015, she started collecting succulents and cacti. Some 300 plants later, the dental hygienist found herself on disability and unable to work after an accident, so she started a blog about her plants to keep herself busy. After realizing that there wasn’t a shop in town that specialized in drought-tolerant plants, she opened The Prickly Pear, a succulent and cactus nursery that focuses on community outreach and special events. 816 U St., (480) 717-8452, thepricklypear.com

2.

Don’t let water collect in the saucer, and don’t put rocks or pieces of pottery in the bottom of your pots. With few exceptions, water in the saucer will kill new feeder roots in the bottom of your pot, and over time, rocks shift and will partially block drainage holes (which you probably won’t be able to notice until your plant croaks).

3.

Many plants are toxic when ingested. When selecting a plant for your home, make sure that it won’t be reachable by children or pets.

ZAMIOCULAS ZAMIIFOLIA

ALOE VERA

MAMMILLARIA SPINOSISSIMA

EPIPREMNUM AUREUM

TILLANDSIA

ZZ Plant or Zanzibar Gem

Aloe vera

Pincushion Cactus

Golden Pothos or Devil’s Ivy

Air Plant or “is that thing actually alive?”

Another perfect plant for plant killers! “It can handle low light, unlike most houseplants,” says Sampson.

They’re like cats: they can be inside if they’re directly by a window.

Direct sunlight for a minimum of six hours per day.

This is the plant to double down on if you want to transform your living room into a jungle. It will grow almost anywhere.

Bright, indirect light— rooms with southern- or eastern-facing windows are good candidates.

Allow soil to become dry at the top to touch between watering, and don’t over-water. Basically, it thrives on neglect.

Water deeply, but infrequently— about every 3 weeks.

Right around the time you remember that you have a cactus, it’s probably time to water it. “Water it once a month inside,” says Bahraini.

“Water it regularly so it’s not wet, not sopping, and not bone dry.” But don’t stress too much: “This is one that people are able to keep alive,” says Sampson.

“Air plant” means that it doesn’t need soil to survive. Mist them regularly and soak them in a bowl of water for a few hours or overnight every week or so.

Like succulents, this plant can be propagated by leaf cuttings, plus, like the Snake Plant, it has incredible air purifying properties.

"They love strong indirect light, but never direct sun. If they turn reddish brown or brown, that means they’re creating a protective layer. Once you move it into appropriate lighting, it turns into a lush, green plant,” says Bahraini.

Never let it sit in a dish of water. To encourage better flowering, allow it to enjoy a cooling period during the winter and stop watering it.

“If it keeps stretching out and stretching out, it’s not getting enough light. They tend to get really leggy if it’s too dark, so you end up with a plant that isn’t visually balanced. You can prevent that by turning it regularly and cutting it back,” says Sampson.

The water that you soak the air plants in should be room temperature. “After you’ve left them submerged, shake them out and don’t put them back in their displays until they’ve dried out,” says Sampson.

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SACMAG.COM March 2020

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The 916

How She Does It The founder of Honey agency details her day. BY CATHERINE WARMERDAM

W

e asked Meghan Phillips, founder and CEO of the design and marketing agency Honey, to walk us through a typical workday. “I must start by saying this: It’s not really a juggle. It’s more of a dance. Sometimes it’s a waltz, sometimes it’s breakdancing, and it’s not necessarily pretty,” she says. “But it’s my dance. It works for me. My biggest goal is to be intentional with all the pieces of the day. It’s not easy when there are work fires or sick kids, but when I give the dance more grace, it feels better.”

4:30 a.m. I rise before the rest of the house wakes. I get my

most focused work done while my two kids, two pups and husband are still sound asleep. This is my sacred time to start the day with a fresh cup of coffee and cream, candle burning, and my laptop. This one hour is one of my most critical hours to not spiral.

“TWO THINGS HONEY IS GOOD AT: WORKING INTENTIONALLY AND DILIGENTLY AND CELEBRATING OUR EFFORTS.”− MEGHAN PHILLIPS, FOUNDER AND CEO

6 a.m. I have been a cycling instructor for over

15 years. I have spent eight years teaching at Urban Flex Fitness in Carmichael. Bean Harrah is a beloved trainer, and her gym and the members keep me getting my morning endorphins like clockwork. My loyalty to my morning workout and teaching keeps me accountable.

7–8:15 a.m. My husband, an attorney in

downtown Sacramento, and I have it down to an art. We have a little over an hour to get ourselves looking client-ready and our two kids out the door. Backpacks packed, lunches made, jackets zipped. Hopefully everyone has matching shoes, and no one left their homework behind (including me!).

9 a.m. Walk in to the office, my home away

from home. My days are a mash-up of meetings, presentations, project collaborations, financial planning and personal to-dos. There is no work/life balance; it’s just all together. My assistant and my other brain, Michi, is always 10 steps ahead of me and ensures I don’t drop any balls. If there is one thing I know with my role today, it requires a very trusted partner like Michi.

Noon Insert coffee from Pachamama, Azul tacos

or green juice and ginger shots from Nektar between any (potentially all) meetings. Goal in 2020: Make my lunch more! Also, must pause to make sure my phone and computer are charged. I live a low-battery life. It’s quite a joke around the office.

3 p.m. My kiddos are getting out of school around this time. I try to get them at least once a week and try to hit the end of practices for pickup during sport season. The other days we have a wonderful caregiver of four years who picks them up and gets homework going until we get home around 6 p.m. Again, the village we have is amazing.

4 p.m. If it’s Friday, I make good use of the bar

cart and pour a light gin and tonic for the last client meeting of the day. Two things Honey is good at: working intentionally and diligently and celebrating our efforts. My evenings are with the family or on a sports field with them. But this year I decided to join a book club (well, to be honest, I only audiobook), and I am studying for the WSET [Wine & Spirit Education Trust] test in 2020, so I have a “very serious wine club” that meets monthly to study wine. It’s forced me to balance out the work/family dance for the things that give me joy. There were years it was all go, go, go and it didn’t feel good.

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SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE  March 2020  

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MARCH 2020

Party Pictures i n s i d e : Metro Chamber Dinner / MLK Celebration / St. Andrew’s Supper

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Sacramento Metro Chamber’s 125th annual Dinner and Business Awards at the Hyatt Regency

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1. Laine Himmelmann, Amen Obasuyi, Anna Fontus, Joe Hernandez 2. Khaim Morton, Justin Ward 3. Mark Briggs, Sally Briggs 4. Manny Cardoza, Grace Espindola, Shon Harris 5. Kelly Fong Rivas, Verna Sulpizio Hull 6. Erica Taylor, Jason Saslow 7. Kevin Nagle, Robert S. Nelsen SACMAG.COM March 2020

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Party Pictures

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1. iSound Performing Arts 2. Kim Mamou-Salinas, Taleah Lomax 3. John Johnson, Brittany Young 4. Ruby Bridges 5. Kindra Montgomery-Block, Elisha Greenwell 6. James Shelby, Christine Shelby 7. Alise Levine, Edie Lambert, Lloyd Levine 8. Samuel Harris, Daniel Hahn, David Gibson

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SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE  March 2020  

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St. Andrew’s Society of Sacramento’s Robert Burns Supper at North Ridge Country Club

1. Liz Tubbs 2. Scott White, Tearsa Sym, Cindy White 3. Doug MacDougall, Rosemarie MacDougall 4. Doug Walters, Sandi Walters 5. Vance McCausland, Art McCausland 6. Nathan Evenson, Elizabeth Evenson, Candace Jowers, Shauna Chatters, Travis Chatters 7. Victoria Summers, Rob Kubick 8. Linn Tyler, Judy Long 9. Isabella Rooks

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Mandi Saeteun

H E A LT H

Rock Stars More people than ever before are getting fit through the sport of climbing. BY LUNA ANONA

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t’s addictive. It’s a great way to make friends. It’s beneficial for your health. It’s climbing, and everyone is doing it. Once it was considered a fringe sport, but now more people than ever before identify as climbers: people who scale indoor and outdoor rocks and mountains for recreation, sport or simply because why the hell not? Making its debut at the Olympics in Tokyo this year, climbing isn’t a trend—it’s a transformative exercise for both mind and body that climbers argue everyone can benefit from. “You don’t have to have a certain body type or be super strong or super fit. You just come in,” says Vaughn Medford, general manager of Sacramento Pipeworks Climbing and Fitness. Here’s the lowdown on how, why and where to get high. WHY CLIMB? Acrophobia, or an extreme fear of heights, is rou-

tinely listed as one of the most common phobias in the United States, along with public speaking, insects and needles. For many of us, Ferris wheels, balcony rails and zip lines are to be avoided, er i n gusta fson

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much like politics chatter over Thanksgiving, but for an increasing number of adventurers, hanging out tens—and even hundreds—of feet above the ground is just another Friday. Why? Tom Hipp is 60 years old. He manages an auto shop, likes to ski, is a West Coast swing dancer, and when it’s nice outside, he climbs 400-foot cliffs. “It can be scary sometimes,” he admits, “but I found that overcoming fear when climbing has helped me in other areas of my life. I run a business, which can be scary, but climbing helped me work out how to do things that I was [professionally] afraid to do.” Tom says he’s also the healthiest he’s ever been in his life, thanks largely to climbing. “I expect to be able to climb into my 70s, at least,” he says. There’s also a sense of community. “Climbing can be a beautiful way to deepen both the connections with our bodies and people,” says Mandi Saeteun, a 32-year-old UI/UX designer and organizer of communities that seek visibility and inclusion in Sacramento. Looking to temper the stress of her job and meet new people, she started climbing at Pipeworks, where she SACMAG.COM March 2020

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Health quickly fell in love with the sport. “One in the arms, you create more efficiency.” of my favorite things to do is tackle a Noah Rezentes, assistant staff manboulder route with another person,” she ager at Granite Arch, a climbing gym in says. “Everyone brings a slightly different Rancho Cordova, agrees. “Footwork approach to climbing the same route. might be way more important than upperWith mutual and respectful collaborabody strength. The way you twist your tion, new ways of using our bodies can feet on most footholds changes your upbe unlocked. When you accomplish a per-body position. It’s a misconception climb through this experience, it can be that climbing is all about upper-body really rewarding.” strength,” he says. “CLIMBING ALLOWS—IT It’s a great way to practice It’s also a workout for your DEMANDS—FULL mindfulness, or the art of butt—and everything else. “EvCONCENTRATION,” “being here now.” Medford SAYS VAUGHN MEDFORD. eryone thinks that you’re pullpraises the meditative aspect ing yourself up by your arms all of climbing: “It takes 100 percent conthe time, but it really isn’t that,” Hipp centration,” he says. “Nowadays, there are says. “It’s more core and lower body. so many distractions in this world, and Climbing has helped me develop my glupeople are always partially focused on teal (buttock) muscles.” And, while some something else. Climbing allows—it deroutes certainly can be easier if you have mands—full concentration.” more upper-body strength, new climbers And then there’s the mental workout. don’t have to climb them until they’re “The creative problem-solving aspect of ready: “Some climbs are just like climbing climbing is what sets it apart from a traa ladder,” he explains. ditional workout,” says Kilian McMann, BUT IT’S DANGEROUS. YOU CAN FALL, a 26-year-old freelance graphic designer RIGHT? AND POTENTIALLY DIE? Acand illustrator who teaches climbing at cording to the annual publication Accithe West Sacramento Recreation Center dents in North American Climbing, 22 and sets the wall’s new routes. “Trying to deaths were reported in 2018, but the figure out the perfect sequence to move vast majority of deaths and serious acyour body to get up a wall is just fun, even cidents takes place outside of climbing when you fall. For me, it’s more interestgyms on actual rocks, with most being ing than reps in a weight room, and when preventable with safety checks, protecyou complete a route, it’s more satisfying tion and good communication. than finishing a set on the bench press.” “It’s very difficult to get hurt in a climbNot to mention that it’s (unsurprising gym. It’s a safe and controlled enviingly) really good for you. Physiatrist ronment,” says Hipp, who has been climbAdora L. H. Matthews, M.D., medical ing for 17 years. director of Sutter Rehabilitation Institute From his experience in both climbing in Rose–ville, notes that in addition to low-impact cardiovascular exercise benand working at a climbing gym, Rezentes efits, climbing offers increased neck and says most injuries occur when people general spinal flexibility, improved dynamic balance and increased upper and lower body strength. Where To Climb And, lastly, it’s fun. Who can say that Sacramento Granite Arch about the elliptical machine? I HAVE NO UPPER-BODY STRENGTH. AM I DOOMED? The ability (or lack thereof)

to do a pull-up is not a barrier to entry. “After almost three years of climbing consistently, I can only do three really solid pull-ups—but this alone would be a bad indicator of a climber’s potential,” Saeteun says. What’s more important than upperbody strength? Footwork. “Really strong footwork techniques can reduce the strain from your arms, which are what usually become depleted as they fill with lactic acid,” she explains. “By saving the energy

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Pipeworks Climbing and Fitness 116 North 16th St. (916) 341-0100 touchstoneclimbing. com/pipeworks

Perks: It has bouldering, top roping and lead climbing, plus a variety of classes (CrossFit, yoga, cycling and jiu-jitsu). There’s an enormous gym, 40-foot-tall lead wall, more than 110 climbing routes and a slack line.

overwork the tendons in their hands, which is something he’s done himself. “I worked my hands too hard too often and didn’t listen to people who said I needed to warm up,” he says. “Injuries are typically user error like that—mostly people overworking their bodies. We don’t have ER kind of injuries very often at all.” And as for injuries that do require medical attention? “In my medical practice, I have seen minor strains and sprains to the upper back and shoulders in novice climbers who either didn’t prepare by stretching well beforehand and donning protective gear, or who overdid their climbs before they built up their tolerance to the unique challenges of the activity,” says Matthews. “I have seen a few serious injuries, including skeletal fractures and head trauma. Fortunately, all of these injuries occurred in experienced climbers wearing protective gear, so they [recovered].” Carlo Traversi, who owns the Sacramento bouldering gym The Boulder Field, is a professional climber who has been climbing for 18 years, was a twotime Sport Climbing National Champion and has competed as part of the U.S. National Team for more than 10 years. His worst injury? A sprained ankle. That isn’t to say that climbing isn’t dangerous—but with proper precautions, it’s as safe as, if not safer than, other sports and athletic pursuits. L E A R N I N G T H E R O P E S (O R L AC K THEREOF) Most gyms will offer boulder-

ing, top roping and/or lead climbing. Many climbers alternate between the three, although some prefer just one.

The Boulder Field

11335-G Folsom Blvd., Rancho Cordova (916) 852-7625 granitearch.com

8425 Belvedere Ave., #100 (916) 329-8994 theboulderfield.com

Perks: This climbing gym also offers bouldering, top roping and lead climbing, plus an outdoor boulder park (for gym members) with hand-sculpted natural features and six auto-belay units so you can top rope without a partner.

Perks: It’s one of the largest bouldering gyms in the country at 33,000 square feet. There’s an in-house cafe with coffee, kombucha and beer, plus yoga classes and cardio and strengthtraining equipment. There’s also a smaller bouldering wall meant especially for kids.

West Sacramento Recreation Center 2801 Jefferson Blvd., West Sacramento (916) 617-4770 cityofwestsacramento. org/government/ departments/parksrecreation

Perks: Top rope climbing with staff belayers and bouldering with free shoe and harness rentals, plus a climbing class on Tuesdays at 5 p.m.

SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE  March 2020  

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Bouldering: A form of climbing performed on small rock formations or artificial rock walls, typically no higher than 15 feet, without the use of ropes or harnesses. Traversi says: “I prefer bouldering because of the social nature of it. It’s hard to have conversations with people when

you are 50 feet up a wall, but with bouldering, it’s all about problem solving, sharing information and pushing each other on shorter challenges.” Top Roping: A form of climbing where the climber is securely attached to a rope that passes up and through an anchor

Elevation for All “If you’ve attended a climbing gym or climbing crag, you’ll often find that it is a sport dominated by white males,” says Mandi Saeteun, organizer of WomxnWorks climbing community. “This can be attributed to the burdening costs of entry (shoes, chalk, a harness and carabiner can start at $150, not including the monthly membership) or perhaps because historically, recreational sports such as climbing were a luxury afforded to those who had free time and mentors. Whatever the case may be, it can be difficult to feel welcomed or brave when you arrive at a place when no one looks like you. WomxnWorks is for “womxn”—a term Saeteun says celebrates inclusivity, “an alternative for people who fall across the spectrum of gender identity,” including cis

and trans women and femme/feminineidentifying genderqueer and non binary people—who are interested in gaining confidence, building strength and creating new friendships. The group meets at Pipeworks in Sacramento on the first Friday of each month at 6 p.m. It has grown from six members in 2018 to meet-ups of 40 today, with an active Facebook community of 300. The meet-ups are fun and informal, beginning with introductions and discussions, which range from the fear of falling to goal setting, or technical talks, which cover everything from essential knot-tying to footwork. After an hour, everyone pairs up and climbs together. Participants range from veterans to first-timers. For more information about WomxnWorks, visit womxnworks.com.

system at the top of the climb, and down to a belayer at the foot of the climb. McMann says: “Top rope is fun and gives you a little more time to figure out the route, where lead climbing carries more mental strain and a lot more gear.” Lead Climbing: A form of climbing that can be done solo or with a group. The climber uses a self-locking device that is used to arrest a fall. One end of the rope may be anchored below the climber with the coils of rope in a bag or on the climber’s back. For single-pitch climbs, the device may be secured at ground level, with the climber tied into the end of the rope. Hipp says: “Top roping is pretty low key and safe, but with lead climbing, the stakes go way up. It’s more challenging and about overcoming fear. A lot of climbers can handle lead climbing physically but not mentally. The fall is greater and farther, and it’s not just a simple and straightforward thing—there are body movement and equipment technicalities, too. I’m a very technical person, so I was interested in that.”

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The end of El Camino de Santiago near Fisterra, Spain

T R AV E L

The Road Walking El Camino de Santiago ranks as one of the world’s most epic journeys. These Sacramentans have firsthand knowledge.

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BY DAVID WATTS BARTON

he gravel road stretches ahead, carving through fields of winter wheat, rolling hills of grapevines and settlements from the tiniest villages to substantial cities with romantic, evocative names: Pamplona. Burgos. León. Santiago de Compostela. I have been walking for a week now, and I am still literally getting my footing. The blisters are getting worse and the backpack is killing my shoulder. My right hip has developed a strange click that dogs my every step. And I have a month still to walk. I have undertaken one of the world’s truly epic journeys, a challenging experience that almost anyone can do, alone or with others—if one is prepared to push physically and, at times, mentally. It touches both ancient and modern worlds, is intensely physical but also, potentially, deeply spiritual. And I didn’t train for it. No one trained for it back in the day. El Camino de Santiago, the Way of St. James, has drawn religious pilgrims from all over Europe since the first one undertook the journey in

950 C.E. to see ostensible relics of the saint who was one of Jesus’ first disciples. People died on the journey. Bandits and disease were ever-present dangers. Pilgrims walked barefoot. Blisters were the least of their worries. In 2020, an estimated 300,000 people from all around the world will walk the 500 miles from St. Jean Pied-de-Port in southern France over the Pyrenees and all the way across northern Spain to Santiago de Compostela. Others, with less time, will do the path in segments, most of them doing the last 62 miles (100 kilometers) from Sarria to Santiago, the minimum distance required to receive the treasured compostela, a certificate of completion of the journey. This piece of paper was once significant to pilgrims hoping to store up goodwill in heaven, and some still treasure it for that reason. But most modern pilgrims—peregrinos in Spanish—undertake the journey for a variety of reasons: for health (to lose weight, quit smoking), for emotional reasons (to mourn a relationship or death or to mark a break between jobs) or even vaguely spiritual ones. The mystique of El Camino is ancient and strong. SACMAG.COM March 2020

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Travel

David Watts Barton completed El Camino in 35 days last year.

The-iconic bridge in Puente a Reina, Spain, near the beginning of El Camino de Santiago

FRANCE

Local sisters, Janet Dawson and Patti Lamb (pictured during their trek in 2018), will attempt El Camino again in May.

For whatever reasons they do it, millions have now walked the varied path over the centuries, but never in such numbers as in recent decades. Having once fallen into disrepair, the route, which varies from asphalt to barely clear grassy paths, has recently become an international attraction, and the subject of numerous books and websites—even a popular 2010 movie (“The Way” starring Martin Sheen). El Camino draws people from all over Europe, Japan, Israel, South Africa and, in striking numbers, South Korea, where it was the subject of a popular television show. Like any good pilgrimage, the value is not in the arrival but in the journey, and while the scenery is of ancient forests and wildflower-festooned mountain passes, of tiny farming hamlets and magnificent cities, and those endless rolling hills of grapes and wheat and, if you’re lucky, a riot of red poppies, it is the inner journey that matters.

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PORTUGAL

El Camino de Santiago: SPAIN

“You’re not trying to conquer the Camino,” says Sacramentan Kerri Daniels, who has walked it numerous times. “People take it as a physical challenge, and it is, but it’s not just that. It’s not a destino; it’s a camino, a journey. It’s not about arriving in Santiago; it’s about what happens on the way. It’s EL CAMINO IS, AT ITS about the chalROOT, A PERSONAL, lenges you enINDIVIDUAL ADVENTURE. counter, and how you choose to resolve those challenges. That’s where the gems of El Camino are.” I undertook the trip for a smattering of reasons: As an inveterate walker, I wanted something I could really sink my teeth into. As a full-time traveler, I wanted to spend less time in big cities and more time in the European countryside. As a man, I wanted to see what happens when I step out of my routine and try something new. And I wouldn’t mind dropping 20 pounds.

There are several different approaches to Santiago de Compostela, which can start all over Europe and follow various trails. I met one young German who started in central France, and a rugged Czech who started in his home country—12 years ago. One can approach from Seville in the south of Spain (on Via de la Plata), on the original northern route, Camino Primitivo, or from Portugal, on Camino Portugués. But the most popular way starts in southern France, and is thus dubbed Camino Francés. The last is the way I took during my 35-day El Camino, in May and June of 2019. The local group Sacramento Pilgrims boasts nearly 500 members, and they meet regularly to connect, walk and help others prepare to make the trek themselves. Since Kerri Daniels, who runs the group, first walked El Camino in 2015, she has returned several times, and she regularly volunteers as a hospitalera in one of the albergues, or hostels, that line

SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE  March 2020  

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Travel El Camino like beads on a necklace. and the red wine begins flowing in the Daniels teaches classes on El Camino at mid-afternoon, is one of the great pleaREI several times a year, and her enthusures of El Camino. Intimacies beget siasm for the journey is fierce, her advice intimacies; friendships, even romances sound. bloom as peregrinos move slowly along Daniels counsels first-timers that, as the way, parting ways and then greeting much as they may be intimidated or uneach other like long-lost friends a few certain at the prospect of solo travel, El days later. Camino is, at its root, a personal, indiMost of those doing the entire 500 vidual adventure. miles aim to cover 10 to 15 miles a day, “It’s a selfish experience, in a wondersome slower, some considerably faster. ful way,” says Daniels. “How many times Many train for months in advance—I do we get to have this period of time didn’t—but as in life, this journey is lined where we get to base our decisions on not just with pleasures but with trials, what is best for us, not for anyone else? and some of them no amount of training Little by little, you shed those roles— can prevent. mother, partner, employee—and see who My own challenge was a ridiculous you really are.” amount of weight in my backpack, twice She adds that this is true for solo the 10 percent of body weight that most women as well. “This is a very safe slice veterans recommend. (I go nowhere of the world,” she says. “Don’t let that without my laptop or yoga mat.) The fear stop you.” From my experience, I extra weight, along with boots that didn’t would estimate that there are more allow for the substantial swelling of my women doing El Camino than men. feet, caused me problems. I finally broke Another enthusiastic peregrino is down and bought some Teva hiking sanAndy Byers, a retired insurance execudals, which instantly solved the issue. tive from Sacramento who has walked Boots are, in fact, quite unnecessary. several different routes and has volunMany people do El Camino in gym shoes. teered as a hospitalero. Whatever you wear, break them in first. “I always encourage people to do it If you happen to bring the wrong shoes, alone,” says Byers. “It’s an individual sport. you can buy new ones in most towns You’re never alone if you don’t want to be along the way; ditto for hiking poles (esalone, you meet people sential), windbreakers BEYOND THE PHYSICAL CHALLENGES, and anything else you all the time, but . . . I alPERHAPS THE GREATEST POTENTIAL ways go by myself, on could want. If you ISSUE ON EL CAMINO, AS IN LIFE, purpose. You get to have too much in your IS OTHER PEOPLE. know yourself better.” backpack, there are I travel alone most of services that will carry the year, but on El Camino I discovered your backpack to your next destination that, even solo, I was filling my life with for a few bucks. You may not be ready for a lot of other people’s voices: I walked El Camino, but it is ready for you. with downloaded podcasts on my iPhone, My problems were nothing compared keeping up with the infuriating latest. to what Char Vine of Natomas undertook After a week, I looked around and dewhen she tackled El Camino in a wheelcided that I was missing much of what I chair this past September. Traveling with came for. So I switched to an audiobook a group of others in a similar situation, on Spanish history, but that dropped as well as a woman who was blind, Vine away, too, and soon I was just walking. trained hard but still found unexpected Just. Walking. This alone was a great challenges. “It was way more intense benefit of El Camino. than I was thinking it was going to be,” Although it is possible to stay in hotels, she said in a Sacramento cafe upon her pensions and bed-and-breakfasts, most return. “The steeps were steeper and the peregrinos stay in the traditional alberdownhills harder than I expected. It was gues, in bunk beds with anywhere from definitely challenging—the flat tires, four to 20 people in a room, for as little learning how to push, how to help others as 5 euros a night. While this may not in the group and especially how to accept appeal to all, the camaraderie that dethe help. velops, especially as the boots come off “It was amazing how hard it was for

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people not to help me,” she adds. “I just wanted to do it on my own. And while it was more challenging than I thought, I did better than I expected. It was almost meditative at points.” The highlight, she says, was when the group entered Santiago on the sixth day, after having spent the last day going as slowly as possible to avoid the finish line. “As we came down into the main square, people started coming out of stores and homes and were cheering for us,” she recalls. “There was a band playing, and someone handed me a glass of sangria. People were amazed that we’d done it. It was goose bumps and tears . . . it was so unexpected to get that acknowledgment.” Vine and some of the people who went on her Camino are already planning a return trip, with a smaller group, going slower, carrying less and otherwise employing the wisdom gained on their maiden voyage. It is a lesson many peregrinos come home with. Beyond the physical challenges, perhaps the greatest potential issue on El Camino, as in life, is other people. Even those who are close can find that the physical challenges put intense strain on even the closest relationship. Two sisters, Janet Dawson of Land Park and Patti Lamb of West Sacramento, discovered this after a lifetime of being as close as sisters can be. The two are like a wellrehearsed comedy duo, bantering about their relative ages and arguing goodnaturedly but aggressively about the definition of the word “cull.” Dawson, the younger (as she is quick to remind her barely older sister), describes their relationship as “epic competitive.” Both are Type A adventurers whose boldness led them from careers with the state to El Camino. The trip was Lamb’s idea, but Dawson, who describes herself as having “deformed feet,” first joined in the training and eventually, despite misgivings, decided to accompany her older sister. The trouble started early, with Lamb badly breaking a toe just two weeks before the trip. Undaunted, she soldiered on, and all was well for the first 100 miles. But soon, one problem led to another, and finally, tendonitis. The two toughed it out for as long as they could,

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Because of such tales, Daniels counbut Lamb’s pain became unmanageable, and the time came to abort. sels potential peregrinos who are plan“We are best friends, and there’s no ning to go together to plan for one who’s easier to travel with than contingencies. “You need to talk about Patti,” says Dawson. “But the pain threw the fact that you and your partner are both of us off. The experience was difgoing to have solo experiences, even toficult. We had to learn from it so that we gether, and your objectives are going to could come back as friends. change. When you get out “YOU WALK, EAT AND There were parts where I there, it will be different FIND A PLACE TO SLEEP. than you thought it was wasn’t getting a good read from her. She was just strugCLEAN YOUR CLOTHES.” going to be. How do you gling to make every step, handle that? You need to be and I wasn’t sure we were going to return prepared for surprises.” as friends. It was heartbreaking.” For that reason, Daniels says that the Sacramento Pilgrims group is a resource Lamb suggested that Dawson go on alone, since her “deformed” feet were she is delighted to share with newbies. giving her no trouble. But, says Dawson, But it’s also useful for those returning “It was her dream. There was no way I from what can be a profound, even lifechanging experience. “It’s a self-help was going to walk into Santiago alone.” So, with Lamb now healed, the two group for returnees. You have so much sisters leave May 1 for Spain, a little to process, and friends and family are older and a lot wiser. This time, they’re done in 90 seconds. We try to match up prepared for challenges, and they’ve new people who are preparing with peomade a deal: “One of us is going to be a ple who have been, because those who little less stubborn,” says Lamb. “And are preparing want to hear the returnthe other is going to be a little nicer.” ees’ experience.”

Counsels Byers for first-timers, “It’s not complicated unless you make it complicated. You walk, eat and find a place to sleep. Clean your clothes. No news: You can be apart from the world, have a simple existence. You don’t need a lot of stuff. It’s an invaluable experience.” My own experience was challenging, but just enough, and relentlessly beautiful in every way. Once the pain subsided after two weeks, I had learned a few things about traveling light(er) and gained subtle insights about my role as an older man traveling and living with much younger people. I made some new friends. I discovered my perfect go-to karaoke song. And the quiet times, free of news and even of music, inspired me to write a few songs that I will soon record for a second album. Each song has a steady walking rhythm. On a more prosaic level, when I got on the scale at the end of the trek, despite all the wine and cheese and Spanish tortillas, I’d dropped 17 pounds. Not bad for a spiritual journey.

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THIS IS

BY CATHERINE WARMERDAM • PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIM ENGLE • STYLING BY LISA CERA AND TYLER MCDANIEL AT CROSBY CARTER MANAGEMENT

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S CHRIS

MENT

Sacramento gets to claim this shining This Is Us star as its own. SACMAG.COM March 2020

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W Little Chris

) Jesuit yearbook

)

hen it comes to descriptors, actor doesn’t come close to summing up what Chris Sullivan is all about. Fans of the critically acclaimed network drama “This Is Us” know him as the affable Toby Damon, the role that earned him an Emmy nomination in 2019. He was also in Steven Soderbergh’s turn-of-the-century medical drama “The Knick” and appeared on the big screen in “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”and on Broadway in “Nice Work If You Can Get It” and “Chicago.” But Sullivan, who grew up in Gold River and graduated from Jesuit High School, sets no boundaries on his creative life. A talented singer-songwriter, he performs under the name Joseph the Spouse and is set to release an album produced by Taylor Goldsmith, husband of “This Is Us” co-star Mandy Moore, this spring. And last summer he launched a podcast, “In Love . . . ” with “Smallville” actor Michael Rosenbaum. Is there anything Sullivan can’t do? We somehow doubt it.

Sweater by John Varvatos Glasses by SEE Eyewear

Congratulations on your Emmy nomination. That must have been a great feeling of accomplishment. It’s one of those things that you don’t ever set out to accomplish as a goal and then, right in the middle of it happening, it kind of blew my mind. I was sitting in the seats [at the awards show] with my wife, and it wasn’t until a couple of categories before when I said, “Rachel, in a few minutes they’re going to say my name and my face is going to be up there with all the other nominees.” It was hard to quantify until it was actually happening.

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When did acting first capture your attention? On one of my recent trips home, I was in my childhood bedroom and I found an unmarked envelope containing every report card I had ever received. I started going through them and saw that I always did well in school, it turns out, and I was always disruptive in class. It said so on one report card after the other. I think that acting, or expressing myself with my words and with my body, has always been my preferred form of communication. But acting as far as theater goes started my


creatively “Staying active is of the utmost importance to me. It doesn’t matter how I express that creativity, whether it’s through acting or music or singing or photography or any other thing. 

Shirt by ETON Hat by Goorin Bros Belt by Ralph Lauren Jeans by Hudson Coat by Tallia Orange

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freshman year at Jesuit. My mom saw this energy and directed me toward the play tryouts, which I hadn’t considered. I was an athlete and grew up training to possibly be a pro tennis player. But I auditioned for the play and I never looked back.

Did your parents take you to the theater when you were growing up? My oldest friend, Ryan Baker—we were in the Boy Scouts together in Fair Oaks—his parents

Shirt by The People of Sacramento Hat by Bailey of Hollywood Belt by Ralph Lauren Jeans by Hudson

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SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE  March 2020  

had season tickets to Music Circus and I used to go with them when they had an extra ticket, and then we would go to Rick’s Dessert Diner afterward. That was some of my first live theater. But one of the very first performances I ever saw was from the B Street Players. They came to my elementary school and did a performance in an attempt at getting young people interested in live theater. Incidentally, Tim Busfield came to direct an episode of “This Is Us.” We talked it out and are fairly certain that he was one of the performers at the show I saw.


We didn’t. I don’t think we were in school at the same time, but we have the same theater mentor, Ed Trafton, who is still the theater teacher at Jesuit. I got to speak to Greta briefly at the 2018 Golden Globes and we both reminisced and talked about how we owe a lot to Mr. Trafton.

How often are you able to get back to Sacramento? I get back several times a year. I was in Sacramento when I found out about the Emmy nomination. My dad and my brother and I are restoring a classic car together, so I go up there to work on that.

The characters on “This Is Us” are so relatable in all their emotional messiness. The show’s creators dared to make you full-fledged humans, warts and all. The interesting part about the Pearson family is that they’ve been dubbed the perfect family by the viewing audience. This is a family with successful people and unsuccessful people and addicts and people with anxiety issues and depression and alcoholism and anger issues. So I find it fascinating that this family has been idealized by our audience. Because everyone’s family is dysfunctional in some way, I think everyone feels they can relate to one of the characters. What our writing staff does so amazingly is they kind of have this distillation process where they can get the audience very close to a character in a short amount of time with very key pieces of information. It helps attach the audience to the characters and to the stories in a deeper way. Our writing staff has done a pretty amazing job of making us all three-dimensional.

) , Chris s first acting headshot

)

, Chris s first theater gig Defending the Caveman ,,

,,

Sacramento is home to another star who’s grown into a major Hollywood player, Greta Gerwig. Did you know one another back then?

You did quite a lot of stage work prior to working in TV and film. Do you feel as though the theater feeds a different part of you? I don’t know if it’s different parts of me so much. I think that, whether it’s film or television or the stage, there are different skills and techniques that are used in order to tell a story in any of those formats. So in that way I do exercise different parts of myself.

more that I am honest “The and vulnerable and loving and accepting and compassionate, the more of that comes flying my way. 

Chris with brother Bryan

You’re also a singer and songwriter. Tell me about your early musical influences and your musical pursuits today. Music is something I’ve always loved. My earliest influences were John Prine, Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson and Johnny Cash. Then I got into Pearl Jam and Sound Garden and Nirvana and I’m now landing on bands like Dawes and some of the great songwriters of our time, like Jason Isbell. Staying creatively active is of the utmost importance to me. It doesn’t matter how I express that creativity, whether it’s through acting or

) Chris singing with wife Rachel

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)


) Playing Taserface

You and your wife, Rachel Reichard,

,, ) have sung together on your projects. This Is Us cast What was that experience like?

,,

Yes, we still do sing together. She has an incredible ear for harmony and vocal arrangements and did a lot of the harmony work on the Joseph the Spouse record. I am probably happiest when she and I are singing together. There’s a feeling that comes up that’s kind of hard to match any other way.

) ,, Playing Toby on This Is Us ,,

) At the 2019 Emmys

You’re known for pushing boundaries with your wardrobe. Has fashion always been important to you? Expressing myself through how I dress has always been a part of who I am. It’s definitely a part of my disruptive nature—and I mean disruptive in the best way possible. I like challenging myself, and I like challenging others. I like pushing my own comfort levels. The way that I participate in any and all of the current conversations—whether it’s the LGBTQ rights conversations or the Me Too movement conversations—is to challenge what it means to be a cisgender, middle-aged white male and challenge traditional definitions of masculinity. There are old rules still in the playbook about how we’re supposed to behave and dress. We’re quickly rewriting that playbook, and I want to be a part of that. If that means a little bit of makeup or fingernail polish or loud colors, I find that exhilarating. And you know what? It makes me happy.

You have created a podcast with Michael Rosenbaum that is steeped in the language of vulnerability. Tell me about the connection between that quest for vulnerability and your acting and songwriting work. They’re definitely connected. I’ve learned that I need to communicate openly in the world the way that I want to be communicated to. So the more that I am honest and vulnerable and loving and accepting and compassionate, the more of that comes flying my way. It’s enjoyable but it’s also not completely unselfish. I want my life to be full of those things so I put them out there, and sure enough they return to me. The podcast is essentially two members of the problematic demographic: the middle-aged, straight white male, the antagonist in most of these situations. We have conversations to try to demonstrate what it means to be vulnerable and honest.

Gratitude and positivity are big themes in the podcast and in your life. Are you an upbeat person by nature, or do you have to work at it? It’s definitely something that I have to work at. The misconception about people who are in the public eye is that they are extroverted. But there are a lot of introverted people in our industry. I’m far more introverted than I used to behave. I was a very loud and boisterous young man. I’m very aware and very conscious of where my energies are spent, and I want it to be positive.

How did growing up in Sacramento shape your outlook and your perspective on success? To me, it’s all about how you address your ego. My mom and dad raised me in a way that taught me to be very grateful and very respectful. To have any kind of ego around what is happening for me right now would imply that I am not here by the hands of hundreds of other people. It starts with my mom and dad, it starts with Ed Trafton, it jumps to Rob Becker, who gave me my first theater job, then to Tommy Kail, who gave me my first Broadway job that took me to New York. So to have any kind of ego or bravado about where I’ve landed would not pay tribute to the people who helped me along the way.

CONGRATULATIONS TO CHRIS SULLIVAN AND RACHEL REICHARD ON THEIR SOON-TO-ARRIVE FIRST CHILD. FOR A FUN GENDER REVEAL, CHECK OUT @SULLIVANGRAMS ON INSTAGRAM.

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Taserface: Marvel Studios / "This Is Us" set: Ron Batzdorff/NBC / Singing (previous page): Steve Agee

music or singing or photography or any other thing. I found that when I attached myself too closely to the identity of being an actor, when I wasn’t acting I fell into a sort of slump and wondered who am I. So music and the other projects are ways that I express myself as a creative being. I believe that we are at our best when we are being creative and collaborative. As for songwriting, there are things that I can express through songwriting that I might not ever get the chance to express through acting. Plus, I’ve always loved to sing, whether it’s Broadway musicals or my own songs. Joseph the Spouse is the character I’m performing under for this round of songs. I’ve been writing songs with [Dawes frontman] Taylor Goldsmith and he produced my latest record, which will probably be released this spring.


are old rules “There still in the playbook about how we’re supposed to behave and dress. We’re quickly rewriting that playbook, and I want to be a part of that. 

Suit by Paisley & Gray Shirt and Pocket Square by ETON Sunglasses by SEE Eyewear

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IT'S a

OG D 'S

WORLD (we just live in it) BY MARYBETH BIZJAK PHOTOGRAPHY BY CAROLINE WINATA

SACR AMENTO IS CR AZY FOR CANINES. DOGS HAVE THE LIFE THESE DAYS. They get to go everywhere: the supermarket, the cafe, the nail salon, even church. They travel by plane and stay in five-star hotels. They sleep in bed with their humans and sometimes even eat the same food. Why? Because of us. We are simply crazy for our dogs. Here, we look at the ways some of Sacramento’s most rabid dog lovers live and love.

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DOG-FRIENDLY RESTAURANTS AND BARS

JUNO’S KITCHEN Water bowls on the sidewalk and a friendly welcome from the dog-loving staff, who may even sneak your pal a piece of smoked trout from the kitchen. 3675 J St.; junoskitchen.com DRAKE’S: THE BARN Wide-open spaces at this outdoor tap room/pizzeria allow dogs room to roam. 985 Riverfront St., West Sacramento; drinkdrakes.com THE WATERBOY Excellent Mediterranean fare for you; great people-watching on the patio for your pooch. 2000 Capitol Ave.; waterboy restaurant.com HOOK & LADDER MANUFACTURING CO. Hit up the nearby Bark Park, then stroll here for a bite to eat on the enclosed sidewalk patio. 1630 S St.; hookand ladder916.com MIDTOWN’S CANTINA ALLEY Mexican street food served in an open-air setting, so every table is dog friendly. 2320 Jazz Alley; cantinaalley.com LOWBRAU Your pup can sun himself on the wood deck while you quench your thirst at this hip midtown beer garden. 1050 20th St.; lowbrausacramento.com FIXINS SOUL KITCHEN Grits, fried chicken and Southern hospitality for you, a roomy patio for your dog. 3428 Third Ave.; fixinssoulkitchen.com BURGERS & BREW This popular burger joint caters to canines with lots of outdoor seating on the sidewalk. 403 Third St., Davis

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ThE Instagram StaR HE HAS SHORT, STUMPY LEGS and a million-dollar smile. Meet Ralph the corgi, a social-media star and one of Sacramento’s leading celebrities. Ralph, who lives in Carmichael, has more than 300,000 Instagram followers who eagerly await updates on his adventures. One day, he might be in New York visiting his agent. (Yes, he has an agent.) The next, he might be swimming in the pool (wearing a life jacket—Ralph’s all about safety) or hanging out in the park. Whatever he does and wherever he goes, Ralph attracts attention. At 7, he’s been an Internet sensation since he was a tiny pup, when his owner began posting photos of him on her Facebook page. Soon, he had his own Facebook page and Instagram account (@ralphthecorgi), and his following steadily grew. In 2015, he went viral when a YouTube video of Ralph meeting a BuzzFeed producer was posted. The video got millions of views, and Ralph’s following exploded. Like most Instagram stars, Ralph gets approached with business opportunities. But he’s a low-key influencer who has to believe in the

product he’s endorsing. Ralph has partnered with Stainmaster and Banfield Pet Hospital, and he filmed a promo for the movie “Baywatch.” Recently, he worked as an extra on an upcoming major motion picture. Ralph even has his own annual calendar, with some proceeds going to animal charities. He has fans all over the world: Thailand, Singapore, Myanmar, Hong Kong. But success hasn’t turned Ralph’s head. “He has no idea he’s a celebrity,” says his human, Brittany. (She prefers to keep her last name private.) Ralph has a sidekick: George, a 9-year-old corgi who joined the family shortly after Ralph. According to Brittany, George is content leaving the spotlight to Ralph. He’s also a good sport, willing to pose with Ralph in costumes—they’ve dressed up as pilgrims, reindeer, cowboys, snowmen and superheroes. At the end of the day, Ralph is just a dog who likes to make people smile. “I hear from people who say they were going through a dark time,” says Brittany. “Going to Ralph’s page helped them.”


Caroline Winata: Jill Carmel

ThE PhotographeR CAROLINE WINATA HAS NEVER MET A DOG SHE CAN’T PHOTOGRAPH. “Dogs like me,” she says. In the past 14 years, Winata has photographed thousands of dogs in all stages of life, from their sweet puppy days to their heartbreaking final moments on earth. A graphic artist by training, she started out taking pictures of her own pup, Milou, an active Portuguese water dog whose energy Winata channeled by enrolling her in agility competitions. Eventually, she started photographing other people’s dogs at the events and, because she was good at it, was invited to work as a photographer at American Kennel Club shows and other competitions and invitationals. Under the name Pet Photos by Olin (Olin is her nickname), Winata has a downtown photo studio where people can bring their dogs for their close-ups. A typical session lasts about a half hour and starts with Winata on the floor, letting the dog sniff her and feeding it treats. Once the dog is comfortable, she photographs it in front of a simple, single-color screen. She uses toys and “high-value treats” to encourage cooperation, and she likes to get the animal leaping in the air or sitting on a chair. Once, she photographed a Great Dane squeezing through a small tunnel for comic effect. Some dogs are smiley, others pensive. Her goal is to capture the animal’s unique personality. Some pet owners return to her over and over for photo sessions. “I see their dogs in their youth and in their prime,” she says. “Then I see them old and cuddled up with their human.” Endof-life portraits are particularly poignant. “It’s pretty remarkable to be invited into somebody’s house and see their love,” she says. She always insists on getting a photo of the person with the dying dog. “It’s about their bond.” While Winata does photograph cats and horses as well as canines, dogs remain her favorite subject. “I get to see the best of dogs and their people,” she explains simply. “Everybody who walks through my door loves their dog.”

"I get to see the best of dogs and their people."

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ThE PupPY raiseR DEBBIE VANDERFORD HAS AN UNUSUAL VOLUNTEER GIG: She’s a puppy raiser. Working with the Santa Rosa-based organization Canine Companions for Independence, she trains puppies that are slated to later become assistance dogs for people with disabilities and others. Since 2008, this Sacramento resident has raised eight puppies for the group. The puppy (always a Labrador retriever or a Lab/golden retriever mix) comes to her when it’s 8 weeks old. For the next year and a half, she and the dog are virtually inseparable. She takes it everywhere: to church, the grocery store, restaurants, movie theaters, sporting events, on public transportation. Her job is to get the dog accustomed to a wide range of circumstances, so that it will eventually be a calm, well-behaved companion. She also has to teach the pup about 40 commands: things like sit, down, heel, bed, car, wait, quiet and speak. Once the dog is about 18 months old, it goes back to Santa Rosa for six months with a professional trainer. “That’s where they fine-tune all of the skills that we’ve taught them, and add more complex commands,” Vanderford says. Then, the people who have been selected to receive the dogs come to Santa Rosa, and trainers match each dog with a person based on the dogs’ skills and strengths. The recipients include disabled adults, children and veterans who need assistance with everyday tasks, as well as professionals who use dogs in their work, such as teachers and social workers. Once the puppy she raised has been matched with a person, Vanderford receives a call with the news. She cries every time. “It’s a beautiful thing,” she says. “I’m so proud of them.” One of her former puppies now works with abused children at a hospital in Tacoma, Washington. Several others are service dogs for people with mobility issues. Vanderford stays in touch with them all. Occasionally, a dog washes out of the program. At that point, the puppy raiser gets first dibs. Vanderford fears that Harris, the dog she’s training right now, may not make it. “He’s a delight with a big personality, and he’s distracted by everything,” she says, adding jokingly that he has ADHD. If he gets cut from the program, she and her husband, Ken, will happily take him back. “We have fallen in love with him,” she says. Harris returns to Santa Rosa for further training this August. Meanwhile, Vanderford has already signed up for another puppy. The job is hard but the rewards are great. “I can’t compare it to anything but having children,” she says. “The work that the dogs do and the lives that they change are the reason we are puppy raisers.”

BEYOND KIBBLE

THESE LOCAL RETAILERS OFFER TASTY ALTERNATIVES FOR THE PICKY PET.

HEALTHY HOUNDS

This is probably the most chic dog food retailer in town, in no small part due to the fact that one of its founders is star sushi chef Billy Ngo, owner of Kru. With two locations (East Sac and midtown’s Ice Blocks development), this company sells small-batch dog food made with locally sourced produce, USDA-certified meats and no additives or preservatives. It’s a farm-to-doggy-dish approach designed to appeal to pet-owning locavores. The food, prepared on-site, comes in vacuumpacked bags and is “minimally cooked” to make it safe for consumption and easy to digest. The recipes for all seven blends were formulated with the help of a veterinary nutritionist. But there’s nothing in them that a human being couldn’t eat quite happily. “One customer told me she’s tried every single blend,” says co-owner Tim Tseng. “If I had to pick one, I’d go with pork and quinoa. It sounds pretty tasty.” FLAVORS Chicken/potato; beef/ sweet potato; turkey/brown rice; pork/quinoa; venison/lentil; lamb/ rice; fish/sushi rice RAW OR COOKED Cooked MONEY SAVER Discount on bulk orders (25 pounds)

This East Sac specialty butcher shop takes a boutique approach to whole-animal butchery, sourcing meats from local family farms such as Stemple Creek Ranch and Skyelark Ranch. While human customers are its main focus, the store also sells a proprietary dog food blend made from its beef and lamb trimmings. The recipe was developed by an employee while working at a San Francisco butcher shop, with modifications crowd-sourced from V. Miller customers. Ingredients include sweet potato, carrots, celery, brown rice, whole-milk yogurt, bone meal and eggs with their shells. (The shells provide calcium and “do wonders for a dog’s coat,” says owner Eric Miller.) While the mix is raw, some customers prefer to heat it up for their pooches. Miller’s own dog will eat it cooked or raw, but nothing surprises him when it comes to a customer’s willingness to cater to a pet. “We have one lady who comes in and buys T-bone steak for her dog on his birthday,” he says.

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SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE  March 2020  

breast and beefsteak, similar to jerky for humans LOCATIONS 3608 McKinley Blvd., (916) 346-4416; 1715 R St., (916) 3464466; healthyhounds.com

V. MILLER MEATS

FLAVORS Beef/lamb RAW OR COOKED Raw TREATS Dehydrated beef heart,

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PRICE $4–$6/pound TREATS Dehydrated chicken

PRICE $8/pound LOCATION 4801 Folsom Blvd.,

(916) 400-4127; vmillermeats.com


MAD BUTCHER MEAT COMPANY

Open since the 1970s, this butcher shop recently added dog food to its human offerings. It manufactures and packages the food in a USDAinspected facility, using locally sourced products and no additives. The grain-free food comes in three versions: protein and bones; protein and vegetables; and “complete diet” with protein, bones, organs, vegetables, fruits and supplemental vitamins. It’s sold raw, and according to coowner Kelly Shum, it should remain that way: Cooking could cause the bones to splinter. Mad Butcher is popular with local dog breeders; some purchase up to 500 pounds at a time. The store will do a custom blend if you bring in your recipe and order a minimum of 200 pounds. Mad Butcher’s dog food isn’t just for canines, says Shum: She has customers who feed it to their cats, snakes and other reptiles. “I have a guy who comes in a couple of times a month with a lizard on his chest,” she says. FLAVORS Beef, chicken, turkey, duck, rabbit; a fish version is coming soon RAW OR COOKED Raw PRICE $2.95–$5.95/pound

TREATS Lamb and beef bones;

smoked chicken breast and beef liver; carrot/chicken strips LOCATION 6480 Florin Perkins Road, (916) 383-4943; madbutch ermeat.com

PAWS AND THE PALETTE

Gabriel Teague (2)

This charming midtown boutique puts the fun in dog food. Billing itself as a dog bakery, it carries a wide range of vegan, gluten-free baked goods specifically formulated for canines, from cookies and cannolis to whole birthday cakes. All the treats are made at a local commercial kitchen with natural ingredients such as peanut butter, pumpkin and molasses. Colorful cutout cookies in whimsical shapes (Scottie dogs, paw prints) are decorated with cream cheese or yogurt icing and sprinkles, while bone-shaped birthday cakes are made with yogurt, honey, bananas and gluten-free flour and come in several sizes. You can hold your dog’s birthday party in the shop, complete with balloons and guests (doggy or human). The store also sells packaged cake and biscuit mixes and doggy ice cream. Store owner Lisa Spurney holds “yappy hour” in the shop most weekdays from 3 to 5 p.m., with half-priced treats and nonalcoholic “Bowser Beer” for your pup. PRODUCTS Brownies, cookies,

TREATS There’s a whole table

truffles, pupcakes, birthday cakes and more PRICE $2.50 (truffle)–$36.95 (large birthday cake)

of natural chews and treats, sold by the piece LOCATION 1014 24th St., (916) 337-3370; pawsandthepalette.com

THE TraineR DON’T CALL HER A DOG WHISPERER. Janie Raju prefers the term canine communicator. A dog trainer for the past 11 years, Raju has an uncanny ability to know what a dog is thinking and feeling: why, for instance, it insists on peeing in the house or lunging at the mail carrier. She works with pet owners to correct those and other undesirable behaviors: barking, digging, chewing, door dashing, aggression, even carsickness. Raju got her start as a dog expert back in the Great Recession, after losing her job as a commercial appraiser. Researching new careers, she learned dog walking was a growing field. The only problem? She was afraid of dogs. But she likes a challenge, so she signed up with the ASPCA as a volunteer dog walker and enrolled in a dog walking school. She discovered she was a natural, so she started her own business, Paradise For Your Pets, offering walking services along with private training. When it comes to dogs, Raju is firm but kind. “They need to learn manners,” she explains. “Spoiled dogs are the same as spoiled kids.” She believes in positive reinforcement: treats, toys and praise. But that doesn’t mean you can’t take away treats or give them the cold shoulder if they misbehave. Raju helps people learn their dog’s body language. “That’s how they communicate,” she says. Then, she shows them ways to channel the dog’s behavior in the right direction. She once worked with a rescue border collie named Josie, who went wild every time she heard another dog bark. Realizing Josie needed a job, Raju allowed her to herd her own big dog. Josie instantly calmed down. “You could see the joy on her face,” Raju says. “When a dog feels like it has a purpose, it’s much more relaxed.” Training rescue dogs is a big part of her business. Raju likes to work with owners before the dog even comes home. (In fact, most dog training is actually human training.) It takes about a year and lots of repetition to create a well-trained pooch, she says. Humans and canines learn very differently. “Dogs are very black and white, no gray areas,” she explains. “It’s like programming a computer. If you do it right, you’ll have less troubleshooting to do.” While dogs are the mainstay of her business, Raju also works with felines. She can train a cat to sit, shake, play fetch, go on off-leash walks and get their nails clipped. Kittens are easier to train than an older cat. And dogs are much easier to train than cats. “Cats choose to listen,” she says. “Dogs want to listen.” Ultimately, Raju says that training a pet is a lifelong process. The key? “Be firm, fair and loving.” SACMAG.COM March 2020

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THE DOG MAMA Sacramento resident Debbie Soto has a deep and enduring bond with her 9-year-old bichon-poodle mix, Charlie. The two are virtually inseparable, from the time they get up in the morning until they go to bed at night. Actually, they don’t even separate at night, since Charlie shares a bed with Debbie and her husband, Steve. Charlie came to live with the Sotos when he just a puppy. “I loved him at first sight,” recalls Debbie. He quickly became mama’s boy, sticking close to Debbie at all times. (“He walks me to the bathroom,” she says.) She takes him pretty much everywhere she goes. He has his favorite restaurants (Three Sisters, Origami) and his favorite store (Target). Like Debbie, he’s an ardent Giants fan who attends the annual Dog Days of Summer game in San Francisco. He loves to go for long drives in the country and has taken several cross-country trips by plane. He has stayed at Airbnbs in New York City and the Hollywood hills. “He’s a good traveler,” Debbie boasts. At night, Charlie cuddles up with Debbie on the sofa to watch TV. When he decides it’s time for bed, he jumps off the couch, stands by the TV and stares Debbie down until she agrees to join him in the bedroom. “We just laugh at him,” she says. “He really is the ruler of the roost.” Their connection is strong. When Debbie leaves the house without him, he sits at the door and whimpers. On her return, he runs in circles with joy until he gets out of breath and starts to cough. He’d rather play with Debbie than with other dogs. Together, they visit patients at Mercy Medical Center and UC Davis. “I call him my smile maker,” she says. To put it simply, Charlie isn’t a pet or a companion. He’s family. “He’s got us wrapped around his little paw,” Debbie explains. “I might be his best buddy. He’s certainly mine.”

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ThE DoG SwappeR AMY MAHON HAS A DEAL WITH HER FAMILY: My dog is your dog. And vice versa. It all started a few years ago when Mahon’s next-door neighbors in Sacramento got a puppy, a golden retriever named Phoebe that they left in the backyard, day and night. Mahon, who had a dog of her own (an easygoing black Lab named Murphy), couldn’t bear to see the animal alone and neglected. So with the neighbors’ permission, she began bringing Phoebe over to her house every day to play with Murphy. Eventually, Mahon fell in love with the dog and offered her neighbors money if they’d let her keep Phoebe. They accepted. Mahon’s sister, who lives a half mile away, had a golden retriever of her own named Ruby. The three dogs played together constantly, and when Mahon had to move out of her home during a renovation, Phoebe went to stay with Mahon’s sister and Ruby. As the renovation neared its end, the sister said she had no intention of returning Phoebe. When Mahon laughed, her sister replied, “I’m serious. You can’t have her back. Ruby will just die.” Mahon’s father, meanwhile, had just moved into a care home and couldn’t bring his dog, a little terrier mix named Buddy, with him. So Buddy went to live with Mahon and Murphy, and Phoebe went to live with Ruby. Now, all four dogs are part of one big, happy family. They get together all the time, says Mahon. “We play musical dogs quite often,” she says. “When my sister goes on vacation, the girls come stay with me. Everybody loves each other.”


Gabriel Teague

The AdvocatE WHEN GINA KNEPP RETIRED LAST YEAR as the high-profile director of Front Street Animal Shelter, Sacramento thought it had lost one of its fiercest supporters of lost, stray and homeless animals. But that didn’t last long. Within days, Knepp had jumped back into the fray with plans to create a new kind of animal shelter geared toward the city’s young, urban hipsters. Knepp teamed up with local influencer Zayn Silmi to open R Street Shelter, a “concierge-style” shelter in the Ice Blocks development on R Street. Located behind the aptly named Beast + Bounty restaurant, it’s a slick boutique operation where people pay a little extra to get the exact animal they want. No more going to the city shelter and peering into cage after cage of Chihuahuas and pit bull mixes. If you want, say, a white Pomeranian, R Street Shelter will reach out to every shelter and rescue organization within a 50-mile radius to find you one. R Street Shelter encourages people to come in and stay awhile, with freerange puppies and rotating art exhibits. There will be social events in the courtyard such as yoga with kittens, puppy parades and Sunday morning “meow mimosas.” “It’s kind of bougie,” Knepp admits. Bigger events like R Street Brewfest in May will raise money for the nonprofit shelter. Knepp hopes to eventually raise $1 million that can be shared with other local rescue groups. After working for the city more than three decades, Knepp is excited about her new, “rogue” gig. “I get to be my real, genuine self,” she explains. And as Sacramento becomes increasingly dog-centric, she thinks this new kind of shelter will attract a new breed of animal lover. “The sky’s the limit,” she says.

R Street Shelter will reach out to every shelter and rescue organiztion within a 50-mile radius.

SACMAG.COM March 2020

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Out in the

Open

NATURAL MATERIALS, COLOR AND CHARACTER CREATE COMFORT AND FLOW THROUGHOUT AN EXTRA-LARGE LIVING SPACE. By Mari Tzikas Suarez

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The great room’s size required custom pieces of great scale, including the den table and chairs, a leather bench and the massive 120-inch sofa.

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Tanforan sourced a number of antiques to complement the couple’s art collection and create a balanced mix of old and new design. Their collection of antique books is displayed throughout the space.

T

here are countless advantages to open-concept living. But when there aren’t any walls to define your primary living spaces, one small design change can quickly be a catalyst for a full overhaul. That’s exactly what happened when a Carmichael couple brought in designer Victoria Tanforan of Pacific Design Group to design a custom dining table and buffet piece for their great—and we mean great—room. Cut to two years later, and she would be completing a full redesign of all the various “zones”—a total refurnishing of the living room, dining room and den, cosmetic upgrades to the kitchen and powder room, and lighting and paint refreshes throughout. Located by Ancil Hoffman Park, the ranch-style home features a strategic mix of natural materials that feels indigenous to the neighborhood but also fresh and modern. “I love to work with materials that are inspired by nature,” says Tanforan. “In a space where each room spills into the next, it’s a fun challenge to use so many materials while also keeping the space feeling balanced. We went through countless samples of wood, metal, fabric, rattan, paint, rugs, greenery and more. We would plot these materials all over the great room and study the way they show up at different times of day.” In the end, a “modern California ranch” aesthetic made this great room more than just great—it brought dimension and style that pretty much anyone would be open to.

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“I started on this home at a time when it seemed like everyone was keeping to neutral grays and whites,” says Tanforan. “The owners wanted their space to feel personal, warm, not like it’s trying to be a model home.”

SACMAG.COM March 2020

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Sacramento Magazine Readers Love Their Pets!

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A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION DD2020SacMag.pdf

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by their peers, Dr. Amy Woo and Dr. Kristine Balcom are given the highest marks by their patients because of the caring treatment patients receive in their office. From the moment they walk in the door, patients know their comfort will be paramount. A fireplace with oak furniture and a playroom for kids puts everyone at ease. Serving Sacramento for more than 25 years, they teach patients

Amy M. Woo, DDS

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Kelly A. Brewer, DDS

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the latest in dental care and prevention as well as offering a wide array of cosmetic dentistry, implants and 1-hour teeth whitening procedures.

Dr. Amy Woo Dental Care 2627 K Street, Sacramento 916.443.8955 www.DrAmyWoo.com

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A special advertising section

If you’re shopping for a new cosmetic surgeon or dentist, or are new to the area, you’ll want to know about these titans of cosmetic surgery and dentistry who have the cutting-edge training, state-of-the-art facilities and chairside manner to keep patients coming back for years. Cosmetic Surgery + Dentistry 0320.indd 63

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Andrea Willey, M.D.

Surgical & Aesthetic Dermatology FOCUS: Mohs micrographic and reconstructive surgery and aesthetic dermatology. E D UCATION: UCSF School of Medicine, Internship Yale, Dermatology University of Minnesota, Advanced Dermatologic Surgery at OHSU. HONOR S: UC Regents Scholar, Frank H. Buck Scholar. WHAT S ETS H E R APART: Dr. Willey is a uniquely talented Mohs micrographic and reconstructive surgeon and leader in aesthetic dermatology with expertise in laser surgery, facial and body contouring, and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery. I N NOVATION S: Advancing techniques in dermatologic surgery and expanding laser and light technology for restoring youth and preventing skin cancer. AFI LLIATION S: Fellow ACMS, ASDS, ASLMS, AAD. CONTACT INFORMATION: 2277 Fair Oaks Boulevard, Suite 402 Sacramento, CA 95825 T 916-922-SKIN F 916-922-MOHS andreawilleymd.com skin@andreawilleymd.com

Kendall Homer, D.M.D. Eric Grove, D.D.S. FOCUS: General Dentistry, including cosmetics, implant restoration, and emergency dental care. EDUCATION: Dr. Homer completed his B.A. at Sacramento State and earned his Doctorate of Medical Dentistry from Washington University. Dr. Grove received a B.S. from Pacific Union College and a Doctorate of Dental Surgery from Loma Linda University. PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS: Drs. Homer and Grove belong to the ADA/ CDA/SDDS. Dr. Grove is also an active participant in the SDDS. WHAT SETS THEM APART: Dr. Homer’s and Dr. Grove’s patients’ appreciation is evident in client loyalty, with 40-year plus patients bringing their children and grandchildren in for treatment. CHARITABLE WORK: Dr. Homer supports Save Ourselves, an organization that provides counseling and peer support to people living with breast cancer. Dr. Grove has participated in overseas dental mission trips and also participates in the Smiles for Big Kids program in Sacramento. FREE ADVICE: Studies have linked diabetes, heart disease and stroke to gum disease. Oral health is a significant part of overall well-being. CONTACT INFORMATION: Kendall Homer D.M.D. / Eric Grove D.D.S. 9216 Kiefer Blvd., Suite 5, Sacramento (916) 363-9171 www.grovehomerdentists.com dentist@grovehomerdentists.com

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Laser & Skin Surgery Center of Northern CA Suzanne L. Kilmer, M.D.

FOCUS: Dermatologic and Cosmetic Surgery specializing in lasers, injectables and CoolSculpting. With over 40 lasers and devices onsite, we have the ability to provide comprehensive care that is customized to the individual patient. EDUCATION: Medical Degree- UCD School of Medicine. Internship, Residency, Chief Resident- UCD School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology. Clinical & Research Fellow in Cutaneous Laser Surgery-Harvard Medical School Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine. AFFILIATIONS: American Society for Lasers in Medicine and Surgery (ASLMS), American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS), American Academy of Dermatology, AMA, AOA Medical Honor Society. HONORS: Elected to American Dermatological Association 2011. Elected to ASDS Board of Directors 2009. ASLMS: Board of Directors 1998-2001, President 2002, Secretary 2015-2018, Presidential citation for excellence in research and education with cutaneous lasers 2010, and Ellet Drake Lectureship Award 2009. Honoree Sturge Webber Foundation 2008. ASDS Iron Surgeon 2014 GREATEST PERSONAL ACHIEVEMENT: Three wonderful children. GREATEST PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENT: First female president of ASLMS. WHAT SETS THEM APART: Unsurpassed patient care and groundbreaking research including over 120 FDA clinical trials that have led to innovations in the treatment of wrinkles, scars, vessels, excess fat, birthmarks, tattoos and hair removal including the landmark studies for Laser Resurfacing, Thermage, Fraxel and Coolsculpting. CHARITABLE WORK: Shriners Hospitals for Children, Physicians for Hope, New Beginnings: Radiation Mark Removal Program. ADVICE: The truth always wins. CONTACT INFORMATION: 3835 J Street, Sacramento • (916) 456-0400 • lasercenter@skinlasers.com • www.skinlasers.com From L to R: Rebecca Sprague, NP-C, Susan Silva, M.D., Suzanne Kilmer, M.D., Vera Chotzen, M.D., Marla McClaren, M.D., Anne Zhuang, M.D.

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Arnold Almonte, D.O.

The Almonte Center for Facial Cosmetic Surgery SPECIALTY: Dr. Almonte is Board-Certified in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He has performed over 5,000 successful surgeries, focusing exclusively on surgical procedures of the face. EDUCATION: Dr. Almonte attended Loma Linda University in California, and medical school at Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Iowa. For his specialty he attended Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. MEMBERSHIPS: American Osteopathic Association, American College of Osteopathic Surgeons, American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery, and Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons of California. INNOVATION: The “A-Lift” is our unique facelift under local anesthesia—no general anesthesia. Other most popular procedures include Browlift, Fat Transfer, Botox, Fillers, and Microneedling. ARTISTRY: Dr. Almonte takes an artistic approach to treating his patients and giving them a natural, youthful look. We will ensure that we are performing the safest and most effective procedure(s) for your desired results. We provide world-class plastic surgery care before, during and after surgery. ADVICE: Expertise comes from years of doing one thing over and over. For whatever service you need, seek out a specialist. CONTACT INFORMATION: 1420 Blue Oaks Blvd., Suite 100 Roseville, CA 95747 www.DrAlmonte.com (916) 771-2062

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Cosmetic & Anti-Aging Dentistry at Arden Park Dental Care Shahnaz L. Formoli, D.D.S.

FOCUS: Are you 100% satisfied with your smile? Could your teeth be whiter? Straighter? Bigger? Smaller? Or are you missing teeth? Whether we like it or not one of the first things people see are your teeth, in a lot cases they make the first impression! Here, at Arden Park Dental Care we change lives one smile at a time. We see patients come in and hate to smile out of embarrassment, or refuse to date because they hate their teeth, or even not attend some important event simply because he/she does not like their teeth! The good news is there are so many ways to fix your smile now! With 2 decades of experience in transforming smiles in the Sacramento area, Dr. Formoli, is a top in the field of Cosmetic and Implant dentistry and is widely considered a pioneer in the field of cosmetic dentistry. Dr. Formoli has transformed thousands of smiles, helping her patients restore their youth one smile at a time. Mention this ad and receive a free Consultation and 20% off any treatment. CONTACT INFORMATION: 4360 Arden Way, Suite #3, Sacramento, CA 95864 (916) 485-4800 • www.sacramentocosmeticdentist.com Office@ardenparkdc.com

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Kenneth M. Toft, M.D. Toft Facial Surgery

FOCUS: Dr. Kenneth M. Toft is considered Sacramento’s expert in facial plastic surgery. EDUCATION: He began his surgical training at Stanford University, continued his studies as a Clinical Instructor in Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at UCLA, and has been the Medical Director of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Mercy San Juan Medical Center for thirteen years. This impressive pedigree is backed up with exceptional results. WHAT SETS HIM APART: Focusing entirely on the face, Dr. Toft has a reputation of giving patients natural appearing results with a quick recovery utilizing the most modern techniques available. Dr. Toft uses his expertise to minimize the signs of surgery so his patients can return to their active lifestyle looking refreshed, youthful and balanced. Not ready for surgery? Dr. Toft also personally performs all fillers, Botox®, Dysport®, and Photofacial treatments. In addition, a licensed Medical Esthetician can provide expertise in corrective peels, Dermasweep treatments, and pharmaceutical-grade skincare. If you are considering facial plastic surgery or would like to attend an informational seminar, make an appointment with “the expert” in Facial Plastic Surgery, Kenneth M. Toft, M.D. CONTACT INFORMATION: 959 Reserve Drive • Roseville • (916) 782-TOFT (8638) www.ToftFacialSurgery.com

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Dr. Matthew R. Comfort

Dr. Christopher J. Comfort

Dr. Christopher J. Comfort, DDS, FAGD, AAACD Dr. Matthew R. Comfort, DDS, AACD (Accreditation Candidate) Dr. Christopher Comfort and Dr. Matthew Comfort, the Comfort Brothers Cosmetic Dentistry, have a combined 55 years of clinical practice in cosmetics, smile rejuvenation/reconstructive, and trauma dentistry. Carrying on the dental legacy of three generations of the Conforto/ Comfort Family, these two brothers are highly trained, with Chris attaining Accreditation from the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry, and Fellow in the Academy of Facial Esthetics. Matt is not too far behind, having attained MIP status (Accreditation in Progress) in the AACD, mastership candidate in the Academy of General Dentistry, and both brothers enroll in over 100 hours of courses per year, and belong to numerous academies including, Bioethetics, the America Academy of Implant Dentistry, Sports Dentistry, International Association of Dental Traumatology, American Dental Society of Anesthesiology, and the Academy of Oral Systemic Health. Both have been recognized by their peers as America’s Top Dentists for 9 consecutive years. Cosmetic Dentistry is performed at its highest level, with functional alignment of the teeth performed prior to every case to maximize the smile enhancement process. THREE LOCATIONS: Matthew R Comfort, DDS — Love Your Smile Roseville Office: 568 N. Sunrise Avenue, Suite 390, Roseville, CA 95661 916-786-2010 • www.mattcomfortdds.com Christopher J. Comfort, DDS — Creating Beautiful Smiles Encinitas Office: 895 Santa Fe Drive, Encinitas, CA 92007 • 760-454-7222 Mammoth Lakes: 170 Mountain Boulevard, Mammoth Lakes, CA 93546 • 760-934-3730 • www.drCcomfort.com

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Breast Augmentation/Lift Tummy Tuck/Liposuction Face, Neck & Eyelid Rejuvenation

Photo by Ryan Greenleaf

FUE Hair Grafts

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S C H E D U L E A C O N S U LT T O D AY www.dr.Pirko.com | 95 Scripps Drive, Sacramento • (916) 929-1833

DrPirko

DrPirko

2/12/20 11:11 AM


Travis T. Tollefson, M.D. MPH, FACS UC Davis Health

Dr. Tollefson is a fellowship-trained, double board-certified Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery expert who has been serving the Sacramento and Northern California area for the last 15 years. He specializes in the full spectrum of pediatric and adult facial restorative and aesthetic surgery, such as rhinoplasty to reshape the nose, surgery after facial skin cancer removal, or reconstructive surgery of the face, ears, lip, palate, or nose in children and adults. Call to schedule a consultation with Dr Tollefson and his team to discuss possible non-surgical and surgical facial treatment options, ranging from fillers and BotoxŽ to surgical procedures. CONTACT INFORMATION: 2521 Stockton Blvd., #6206, Sacramento, CA 95817• (916)734-2347 www.drtravistollefson.com

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“THE SHOW DEFIES YOU NOT TO BE MOVED.” -TIME OUT NEW YORK

MARCH 3-8

APRIL 7-12

TICKETS: (916) 557-1999 · BroadwaySacramento.com Memorial Auditorium · For Groups of 10+: (916) 557-1198 · SEASON SPONSOR WELLS FARGO

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MARCH 2020

Arts & Culture i n s i d e : Anne Lamott / Sac Ballet’s Homegrown / ARTHOUSE / Events Calendar

Lawyer by Day, Actor by Night

Photo location: The Bank

“IF THERE’S A RAVING BITCH IN THE SHOW,” jokes actor Beth

Edwards, “it’s usually me.” She’s not entirely sure why she gets typecast this way, says Edwards, though she suspects being nearly 6 feet tall has something to do with it. But in her current role as Judy in Big Idea Theatre’s “Small Mouth Sounds,” she won’t get to rave much, at least not in the typical way: The action takes place at a silent retreat. Last year, Edwards boldly shaved her head bald to star as a dying ovarian cancer patient in “Wit,” also at Big Idea. Going to such extremes may not be unusual in the theater world, but what’s a little different about Edwards is that acting is, for her, a side dish: By day, she’s a lawyer for Sutter Health. t er e nce du f f y

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A West Virginia native, Edwards first took acting classes while living in Atlanta, post-college. After moving to Sacramento in the late ’90s, she started improv classes with Ed Claudio at the Actor’s Workshop and has since performed primarily at Big Idea (which she also co-managed for two years). Outside of lawyering and acting, Edwards is devoted to her 12-year-old dog, Elliot. With all that’s on her plate, cleaning her Land Park home sometimes gets the shaft, she admits. “I’m not an overly fastidious housekeeper,” she says with a laugh. “Small Mouth Sounds” runs March 6 through April 4 at Big Idea Theatre, 1616 Del Paso Blvd. For information, visit big ideatheatre.org.—CATHY CASSINOS-CARR SACMAG.COM March 2020

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Arts & Culture EVENTS CALENDAR Axis Gallery March 6–29 Murray Bowles: Sixteen Frames, photographs of the Bay Area’s underground music scene. Reception March 14, 6–9 p.m. Verge Center for the Arts, 625 S St., axisgallery.org

Gallery at 48 Natoma Through March 12

DA N C E

SPEAKER

Homegrown

An Evening With Anne Lamott

This festival of new works presents world premieres by three choreographers: Jennifer Archibald, resident choreographer for Cincinnati Ballet; Nicole Haskins, Sacramento Ballet alumna; and Isaac Bates-Vinueza, Sacramento Ballet dancer. March 26–29. Tickets $60. The Sofia, 2700 Capitol Ave.; (916) 443-5300, ext. 1; sacballet.org

Known for her humor and unflinching honesty, Lamott is the author of seven novels, including “Hard Laughter,” “Rosie” and “Joe Jones,” and several nonfiction books, such as “Operating Instructions” and “Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life.” March 23. Tickets $12–$58. Harris Center, 10 College Parkway, Folsom; (916) 608-6888; harriscenter.net

Mid-California Highlights: From the Sierra to the Sea, juried exhibit of 65 paintings by members of NorCal California Art Club chapters. 48 Natoma St., Folsom, (916) 4616601, facebook.com/ Galleryat48Natoma

ARTHOUSE on R Honors

Women’s History Month

A Womxn’s Markeplace, a talk by artist Kathrine Lemke Waste, opera singing by Olivia Smith, a dance performance by Omonivie Okhade, art receptions and more take place at R Street’s Fuller Building. March 14. Free (tea party $30 by reservation). 1021 R St.; (916) 4764433; arthouseonr.com

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“A Bronx Tale” Based on the life of Chazz Palminteri, this musical, set in the Bronx in the 1960s, tells the story of a young man who is caught between his love for his family and his desire to be a mob boss. March 3–8. Tickets $26–$102. Memorial Auditorium, 1515 J St.; (916) 808-5181; broadwaysacramento.com

96th Annual Camellia Show March 7–8 Camellia Society of Sacramento hosts the oldest camellia show in the country, with thousands of camellias on display, a trophy table, photo contest and plant sale. Free. Elks Lodge, 6446 Riverside Blvd., camelliasocietyof sacramento.org F E S T I VA L S

24th Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade

March 21–April 12

March 14

Symbiosis, works by Tanya Jenkins, Michael Marotte, Kristen Edington and their Bella Vista High School advanced art students. Reception March 21, 6–8 p.m. 7425 Winding Way, Fair Oaks, (916) 966-2453, acaistudios.com

For Sacramento’s biggest annual parade, thousands in green line the streets of Old Sac to cheer on Irish and Highland dancers, pipe and drum bands, and marchers representing myriad cultural and civic groups. Free. oldsacramento.com

Through July 19

MUSICAL

HOME & GARDEN

ACAI Gallery & Studios

Crocker Art Museum

ART

through January 2021. Free. 254 Old Davis Road, Davis, (530) 7528500, manettishrem museum.ucdavis.edu

Bill Viola: The Raft (video installation), through May 10; The Splendor of Germany: 18th Century Drawings, through May 10; Continuing: Granville Redmond: The Eloquent Palette, through May 17; American Expressions/African Roots: Akinsanya Kambon’s Ceramic Sculpture, through July 5; Cool Clay: Contemporary Ceramics, through July 19. $6–$12. 216 O St., (916) 808-7000, crockerart.org

Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art Through January 2021 Stephen Kaltenbach: The Beginning and The End, through May 10; New Era, installation by Doug Aitken, through June 14; Gesture: The Human Figure After Abstraction, works by first generation UC Davis art department faculty,

Edge of Spring Celtic Fantasy Faire March 20–21 Enjoy Celtic and fantasy-themed bands, bicycle jousting, knights in armored combat and more. $18.99–$24.99, younger than 13 free. @ The Grounds Roseville, 700 Event Center Drive, Roseville, eventbrite.com

Brazilian Carnaval 2020 March 21 The Brazilian Center of Sacramento’s annual extravaganza boasts live music, dancers and dancing, capoeira, food and drink, art and family activities. $5. CLARA, 2420 N St. (916) 3877344, braziliancenter sac.org FUNDRAISERS

18th Annual Authors on the Move March 14 Sacramento Public Library Foundation

Lower left: “Potential” by Margarita Chaplinska

ART

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11: Peter Yarrow; March 13: Special EFX Featuring Chieli Minucci; March 14–15: Sacramento Master Singers; March 18: CJ Chenier; March 21: Duo Quartet. See website for tickets. 2700 Capitol Ave., (916) 4435300, bstreettheatre.org

Midtown Vanguard Jazz Series March 8, 22 March 8: Joe Mazzaferro Quintet; March 22: Dale Head and His Mindwinder Orchestra. $15–$25. The Auditorium at CLARA, 1425 24th St., www.facebook.com/ MidtownVanguardJazz

Harris Center Concerts March 10–29

The Tap Pack, March 31 at Harris Center hosts 40-plus authors, keynote speaker Susan Orlean, dinner, wine, a live auction and book sales. $250. Hyatt Regency Sacramento, 1209 L St., (916) 836-3540, sac libraryfoundation.org

River City Food Bank: 17th Annual Empty Bowls March 16–17 Monday dinner or Tuesday luncheon features soup served in take-home bowls handmade by local artisans and students. $50. Memorial Auditorium, 1515 J St., rivercityfood bank.org

Magic of Music Food & Wine Event March 20 Food and drink from local purveyors plus live and silent auctions to benefit Sacramento Youth Symphony. $20–$40. Scottish Rite Masonic Center, 6151 H St., sacramentoyouth symphony.org

DAN C E

Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo March 13 The acclaimed, all-male comic ballet troupe has parodied famous ballets for decades. $12.50–$85. Mondavi Center, UC Davis campus, (530) 7542787, mondaviarts.org

Enra: Dreams March 29 The Japanese ensemble combines dance with music and computer graphics. $15.50–$55. Harris Center, Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway, Folsom, (916) 608-6888, harris center.net

The Tap Pack March 31 Direct from Australia, the quintet of talented tappers perform with Rat Pack-inspired banter, vocals and live jazz. $15.50–$55. Harris Center, Folsom Lake College, 10 College

Parkway, Folsom, (916) 608-6888, harris center.net MUSIC

Crest Theatre Concerts March 2–13 March 2: The Black Jacket Symphony Presents Pink Floyd’s The Dark Side of the Moon; March 6: The Fab Four: The Ultimate Tribute; March 13: Bad Ass Blues: Elvin Bishop and Tommy Castro. See website for tickets. 1013 K St., (916) 476-3356, crestsacra mento.com

Sacramento Jazz Cooperative: Jazz at Dante March 2–30 March 2: Larry Dunlap Trio. $25; March 23: Gilman and Porter Play 176 Keys and Rhythm. $20–$35; March 30: Elizabeth Unpingco Quartet. $25. Dante Club, 2330 Fair Oaks Blvd., (916) 993-5505, sacramentojazzcoop.org

Mondavi Center Concerts March 4–21 March 4: Buddy Guy, Jimmie Vaughan and Charlie Musselwhite; March 4–7: Melissa Aldana Quartet; March 6: UC Davis Symphony Orchestra and University Chorus; March 7: San Francisco Symphony; March 8: Curtis on Tour; March 9: Cécile McLorin Salvant; March 13–14: Dreamers’ Circus; March 15: A Celebration of Music: Musicians From Davis Public Schools; March 17: Shannon Sharon and Socks in the Frying Pan; March 20: Mnozil Brass; March 21: Alfredo Rodríguez and Pedrito Martinez. See website for tickets. UC Davis campus, (530) 7542787, mondaviarts.org

B Street Theatre Music Series at The Sofia March 6–21 March 6–8: Maestro Anoushiravan Rohani and Reza Rohani; March

March 10: The Music of Cream; March 13: Michael Doucet and Tom Rigney With Flambeau: Cajun Night 3; March 14: Folsom Lake Symphony Family Concert; March 14: Siberian State Symphony Orchestra; March 15: St. Patrick’s Day in Ireland; March 17: Seamus Egan; March 19: Ronnie Milsap; March 21–22: Sacramento Baroque Soloists: Ecstasy of the Chaconne; March 21: Sacramento Guitar Society: Muriel Anderson’s Wanderlust; March 27: Taj Mahal; March 27: Walter Trout; March 28: Voices of California; March 29: Altan, with McKeever School of Irish Dance. See website for tickets. Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway, Folsom, (916) 608-6888, harriscenter.net

Sacramento Philharmonic Orchestra & Opera: Organ Recital March 13–14 Robert Moody conducts Beethoven’s Symphony No. 4 and Saint-Saëns Symphony No. 3 (Organ Symphony), with organist James Jones. $32–$52. Fremont Presbyterian Church, 5770 Carlson Drive, (916) 5947333, sacphilopera.org

port Blvd., camellia symphony.org

Sacramento Choral Society & Orchestra: Verdi Requiem March 21 The funerary choral work features four soloists and guest chorus Schola Cantorum from Sacred Heart Church. $20–$50. Memorial Auditorium, 1515 J St., (916) 536-9065, sacra mentochoral.com

Mariachi Festival de Sacramento March 22 Performances by Mariachi Divas, Mariachi Los Reyes, Mariachi Nuevo Mexico, Dinorah and Ballet Folklorico Nube De Oro. $43–$153. Memorial Auditorium, 1515 J St., (916) 5416302, facebook.com/ events/4276973 24592925

Golden 1 Center Concerts March 25, 28 March 25: JoJo Siwa, with The Belles; March 28: V101.1 Heart of Hip-Hop. See website for tickets. 500 David J. Stern Walk, (800) 745-3000, golden1. centersacramento.com FILM

“Jesus Christ Superstar” March 7–10 Screening of the 1973 musical, sing along and live appearances by stars Ted Neeley and Yvonne Elliman. $15. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St., (916) 486-0906, crestsacramento.com FOOD & DRINK

10th Annual Capitol Beer Fest March 7 Tastings from 125-plus craft brewers, 20 food trucks and live music. $45/$70 VIP. Capitol Mall. capitolbeer fest.com

Camellia Symphony: Rising Stars

Shamrock’n Roll Festival and Beer Garden

March 15

March 14

A showcase of young talent. $10–$35. C.K. McClatchy High School Auditorium, 3066 Free-

All-day family festival features a beer garden, live music, games, food trucks, arts and crafts. SACMAG.COM March 2020

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Arts & Culture

SPORTS & REC

Blue Diamond Almonds Shamrock’n Weekend

$12–$62. Harris Center, Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway, Folsom, (916) 608-6888, harriscenter.net

“Byhalia, Mississippi”

March 14–15

March 3–April 12

On Saturday, do the 5K, 10K or kids’ Leprechaun Half-Mile Dash; on Sunday, the half marathon promises live music, and beer at the finish line. Sutter Health Park, 400 Ballpark Drive, West Sacramento. Register at shamrocknhalf.com.

In Evan Linder’s edgy new tale, a workingclass white couple faces turmoil in their Southern town when their newborn turns out to be black. $20–$47. B Street Theatre at The Sofia, 2700 Capitol Ave., (916) 443-5300, bstreettheatre.org

TA L K S

Gary Younge

“I Never Saw Another Butterfly”

March 2

March 4–8

The award-winning author, broadcaster and columnist for The Guardian speaks about gun violence. $12.50–$45. Mondavi Center, UC Davis campus, (530) 7542787, mondaviarts.org

Sacramento Theatre Company’s Young Professionals Conservatory students present a play based on poetry written in a Nazi concentration camp by the Jewish children of Prague. $17–$20. 1419 H St., (916) 446-7501, sactheatre.org

An Evening With Rick Steves March 4 The travel expert presents tips and pics for traveling in Europe. $30. 1013 K St., (916) 476-3356, crestsacra mento.com

National Geographic Live: Brian Skerry— Ocean Soul March 9 The wildlife photographer presents intimate photos of inhabitants living in the ocean depths. $12–$42. Harris Center, Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway, Folsom, (916) 608-6888, harris center.net

Paul Nicklen March 18 Sacramento Speakers Series welcomes the acclaimed National Geographic explorer, marine biologist, photographer and filmmaker. By series subscription. Memorial Auditorium, 1515 J St., (916) 388-1100, sacra mentospeakers.com T H E AT E R

“Chicago—The Musical” March 5–9 On national tour: the sexy musical, based on real scandals from Prohibition-era Chicago. $43–$92. Harris Center, Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway, Folsom, (916) 608-6888, harriscenter.net

“Camelot” March 6–29 Davis Musical Theatre Company presents the musical tale about the legend of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. $16–$18. Jean Henderson Performing Arts Center, 607 Peña Drive, Davis, (530) 756-3682, dmtc.org

“Small Mouth Sounds” March 6–April 4 At a silent retreat in the woods, six archetypal personalities escaping modern city life confront their inner demons and each other. $12–$18. Big Idea Theatre, 1616 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 9603036, bigideatheatre.org

“The New Colossus”

“The Mikado”

March 3–4

March 11–12

The Actors’ Gang weaves 12 immigrants’ tales from different eras in U.S. history into a single narrative.

New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players presents a new, critically acclaimed version of the celebrated comic opera.

76

“Ride Sally Ride: The Story of Amelia Earhart and Sally Ride,” through March 7 at B Street Theatre at The Sofia

$16–$69. Harris Center, Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway, Folsom, (916) 608-6888, harriscenter.net

“Admissions” March 11–April 12 When the son of a white liberal couple—working to diversify their elite prep school—sets his sights on an Ivy League, personal ambition collides with progressive values. Winner of 2018 Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Play. $28–$42. Capital Stage, 2215 J St., (916) 9955464, capstage.org

“Of Mice and Men” Through March 15 Adapted from John Steinbeck’s novel, the story of a friendship of two migrant workers in California during the Great Depression. $7–$25. Woodland Opera House, 340 Second St., Woodland, (530) 666-9617, wood landoperahouse.org

“Pride and Prejudice” March 20–April 19 Jane Austen’s oh-so English comedy of manners reveals the folly in making hasty first impressions. $19–$21. Chautauqua Playhouse, 5235 Engle Road, Carmichael, (916) 489-7529, cplayhouse.org

“Once on This Island” March 20–22 On national tour: the musical tale of a Caribbean girl who embodies the power of love to bring people together. $43–$88. Harris Center, Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway, Folsom, (916) 608-6888, harriscenter.net

“Hamlet” Through March 22 Sacramento Theatre Company presents Shakespeare’s most popular play of all time: a dark tragedy about family honor, death and revenge. $25–$40. 1419 H St., (916) 446-7501, sactheatre.org

“Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” March 25–May 3 In 1967 San Francisco, a white liberal couple’s progressiveness is challenged when their daughter wants to marry an older black doctor. Sacramento Theatre Company presents. $25–$40. 1419 H St., (916) 446-7501, sactheatre.org

“Seeds” March 26 In this documentary drama about property clashes, GM food and the biotech industry, a Saskatchewan farmer battles Monsanto. $12–$52. Harris Center, Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway, Folsom, (916) 608-6888, harriscenter.net FA M I LY T H E AT E R

“Ride Sally Ride: The Story of Amelia Earhart and Sally Ride” Through March 7 Astronaut Sally Ride

and her idol, pilot Amelia Earhart, explore the breaking of gender barriers in aviation history. Ages 7 and up. $19–$24. B Street Theatre at The Sofia, 2700 Capitol Ave., (916) 443-5300, bstreettheatre.org

“The Berenstain Bears on Stage” March 7–29 A musical tour through five of the Berenstain Bears books. $13–$18. Sutter Street Theatre, 717 Sutter St., Folsom, (916) 353-1001, sutter streettheatre.com

“Curious George: The Golden Meatball” March 27–April 5 Join everyone’s favorite monkey and The Man with the Yellow Hat on a musical adventure to Europe for a culinary competition. $7–$25. Woodland Opera House, 340 Second St., Woodland, (530) 666-9617, woodlandopera house.org

Rudy Meyers Photography

Free. Fremont Park, 1515 Q St., chastengold.org

SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE  March 2020  

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Cover Represented by PATRICIA SEIDE The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor agents and are not employees of the Company.Š2020 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. CalRE License #01908304.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

C O L D W E L L B A N K E R R E S IDE N T IA L B R O K E R A G E

El Dorado Hills | $1,545,000

Enjoy gorgeous Serrano Country Club Golf Course views from this sophisticated home featuring main floor and upstairs master suites, plus owned solar! There is a formal dining/ living room with a gas fireplace, a butler's pantry and a great room that opens to the patio. The chef's kitchen has a marble island. Outside offers a Serrano Room, a bio flare fireplace, an outdoor kitchen, a pool and spa.

Patricia Seide 916.941.3006 patricia.seide@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #00892540

Carmichael | $1,250,000

Heading up the floral lined pathway you know you are entering a treasured home. Enjoy approximately 3,000 square feet of traditional architecture. The first floor has formal dining and living rooms, a chef’s kitchen, a brick fireplace in the family room, plus a bedroom and bath. Ascend the staircase to the master suite, two bedrooms and a bath. The yard has a lap pool, sports court and a patio.

Carlos Kozlowski 916.973.4506 carlos.kozlowski@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #00878571

Carmichael | $1,100,000

This four bedroom, three bath home features a stunning kitchen with a large island, a whole home theater system and a backyard complete with patios, a gated pool, garden area, a barn, fruit trees and a "mini-house."

Betty Brody 916.300.5202 betty@bettybrody.com | CalRE #01415304

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

C O L D W EL L B A N K E R RE SI DE N TI AL BRO K E RAG E

Carmichael | $995,000

This pristine ranch-style gem has five bedrooms, three baths and a four-car garage. The separate family room opens to the gourmet kitchen. Head outside to the park-like yard with a pool sitting on roughly .55 of an acre.

Tom Phillips 916.799.4571 tomphillipssacrealtor@gmail.com | CalRE #01401556

El Dorado Hills | $849,000

This Serrano home has four bedrooms, three and one-half baths, and a bonus room. Amenities include a chef's kitchen, a butler's pantry and an office. Outside has a gated courtyard, an outdoor fireplace and fruit trees.

Patricia Seide 916.941.3006 patricia.seide@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #00892540

LUXURY IS EXCLUSIVE When a marketing program has been designed exclusively for high-end properties and an affluent clientele, the results are extraordinary.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Carmichael | $1,574,950

Truly special property with 5br/5ba home on over an acre in the private gated community of Autumn Point. 2,700(+/-) sq ft 8-car garage. Park-like yard w/pool, spa, outdoor kitchen & fireplace, plus, a hidden play area.

Tom Phillips 916.799.4571 tomphillipssacrealtor@gmail.com | CalRE #01401556

Sacramento | $919,000

Fair Oaks | Price Upon Request

Chris Reyes 916.871.9228 Chris@RealEstateReyes.com | CalRE #01999258

Laura Moore 916.716.9069 lmoore@lauramoorerealestate.com | CalRE #01247653

Sacramento | $745,000

Sacramento | $710,000

Christina Hinds 916.341.7806 christina.hinds@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01902832

Angela Heinzer 916.212.1881 angela.heinzer@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01004189

Updated three bedroom, two bath main house with a detached guest quarter that has a full kitchen and bath along with full alley access. Close to restaurants, shopping, and entertainment. Welcome to the neighborhood!

This three bedroom, two bath home has an open concept complete with an updated kitchen with a marble island. There's a separate living room and a gorgeous master suite. The backyard offers a patio, grass and a courtyard.

This traditional style home in Phoenix Field has five bedrooms, plus a bonus room, three baths and a large kitchen. The master suite has a cozy double-sided fireplace. The backyard offers a pool and a built-in barbecue.

Beautifully remodeled in 2015 and located across from Curtis Park. The living room is spacious with fireplace and high ceiling. The floor plan flows wonderfully throughout. Well-designed kitchen with marble countertops.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Elk Grove | $699,000

Sacramento | $699,000

Exquisite home in the prestigious Lakeside Community. Features a dramatic entry with updated kitchen, a fabulous wine parlor and a backyard oasis perfect for entertaining! A Must See!

This gorgeous newly remodeled two-story home is over 2,700 square feet and has five bedrooms and three baths. This home features a low maintenance backyard, updated kitchen and baths, and tons of space for entertaining.

Shanda Lusich 916.214.8479 shanda.lusich@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01070238

Steve Gonzalez 916.804.5691 steve.gonzalez@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #02023204

Sacramento | $695,000

Sacramento | $679,000

This stunning two-story home offers a little over 3700 square feet of open livable space with four rooms, a downstairs office and four bathrooms.

A highly sought-after Little Pocket home that backs to the Sacramento River. This beautiful home features three bedrooms and two baths with a spacious deck ideal for entertaining overlooking the park-like backyard.

Robert Graham 916.229.7831 robertbgraham01@gmail.com | CalRE #01950494

Christina Ellermeyer 916.548.2053 Cellermeyer@gmail.com | CalRE #01714452

Sacramento | $675,000

Carmichael | $649,000

A beautifully remodeled U.S. Homes Roosevelt model. The home features an updated kitchen, an oversized master suite with sliding door, great master bath and a home office with built in cabinetry and a work area.

This lovely fully remodeled single story home has three bedrooms, two full baths & one-half bath. A stunning kitchen complete with Quartz countertops & a farmhouse style sink, which opens to a light filled family room.

Richard Landrey 916.205.6639 richard.landrey@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01017177

Shanda Lusich 916.214.8479 shanda.lusich@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01070238

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Roseville | Price Upon Request

Carmichael | $599,950

Laura Moore 916.716.9069 lmoore@lauramoorerealestate.com | CalRE #01247653

Angela Heinzer 916.212.1881 angela.heinzer@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01004189

Sacramento | $599,900

El Dorado Hills | $599,000

Paloma Begin 916.628.8561 palomabegin@gmail.com | CalRE #01254423

Pat Quan 916.812.4341 pquan@pacbell.net | CalRE #01918240

Chic single story with a great-room floorplan, open feel and lots of windows. Features neutral designer colors, travertine floors, crown molding, shutters and stainless appliances. Enjoy beautifully landscaped rear yard.

This classic 1928 Woodlake Tudor offers beautiful hardwood floors, four bedrooms, two updated baths, large formal living room with fireplace, formal dining room, open kitchen, office/bonus room, and large backyard.

3br/3ba home with loft features a spacious open floor plan and vaulted ceilings, kitchen with breakfast nook, oversized family room with fireplace and master suite. Enjoy a backyard with covered patio and pool.

A beautiful and special one-story home with an oversized private backyard. This three bed, two bath home offers natural light, tasteful updates, quality craftsmanship, remodeled kitchen and family room & excellent value.

Sacramento | $595,000

Gold River | Price Upon Request

Tom Phillips 916.799.4571 tomphillipssacrealtor@gmail.com | CalRE #01401556

David Delihant 916.284.7356 david.delihant@camoves.com | CalRE #01438916

This spectacular home offers four bedrooms, two and one-half baths, a wonderful open floor plan with separate living and family rooms plus a large kitchen. Outside has an amazing park-like yard, great for entertaining.

This remodeled gem features remodeled kitchen and bathrooms with custom cabinetry, a large backyard with dual patios, electric sun shade and tasteful landscaping. Finished garage has epoxy floor, cabinets & LED lights.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Truckee | $532,000

Sacramento | $529,000

Classic mountain cabin has a great floor plan with high vaulted wood ceilings, loft, mud room and 2 car garage. Cabin has 2 bedrooms downstairs and spacious master suite and loft upstairs. In an excellent location.

Vibrant urban residence in upscale L Street Lofts, close to everything Midtown and Downtown has to offer. 6th floor east facing unit w/great morning light & expansive windows providing a unique view across Midtown.

Lynn Richardson 530.412.0706 lynn.richardson@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #00937210

Rob Farmer 916.524.1066 rob.farmer@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #02013511

Fair Oaks | $525,000

Placerville | $525,000

Near the Fair Oaks Village, this single-story home features three bedrooms, two and one-half baths, a lovely kitchen with granite countertops, pantry and dining bar. Plus pool, decking and pergola.

A Beautiful home...2017 built 3 bedroom, 2 full bathroom home ~2125 sq ft on ~10 acres and has a detached 3 car garage, barn, shed, workshop, chicken coop, feed shed and owned solar. Close to 50, shops, dining and more.

Cindy Swinger 916.768.3732 cswinger@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01253829

Cristy Eastman 916.995.4644 EastmanRealtors@gmail.com | CalRE #01485992

Sacramento | $499,000

Elk Grove | $495,000

This three bedroom, one and one-half bath South Land Park home is located on the highly sought after Nevis Court. Recent updates include HVAV, roof, siding, front door, rear slider, fresh paint, light fixtures and more!

Welcome to this Elk Grove Stunner located in Schuler Ranch, close to top rated schools and incredible parks. This home is ideal for entertaining and has four bedrooms plus a loft and office and three full bathrooms.

Richard Goore 916.870.6896 Richard@RichardGooreRealEstate.com | CalRE #02019995

Andrea Lembach 916.524.3535 andrea@lembachgroup.com | CalRE #01900099

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Roseville | $475,000

Sacramento | $470,000

Steve Ostrom 916.308.2446 Homes@RosevilleAndRocklin.com | CalRE #01344154

Ed Corominas 916.599.9389 Ed@EdCorominas.com | CalRE #01095218

Carmichael | $455,000

Sacramento | Price Upon Request

Joe Gibson 916.798.3258 joe.gibson@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01088927

Debi (Skelly) Clutter 916.834.7734 debi.clutter@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01257906

Elk Grove | $434,900

Sacramento | $429,000

Pattie Mori 916.801.9794 pmori@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #00972586

Tiegen Boberg 916.747.0773 tiegen@tiegenboberg.com | CalRE #01964215

This four bedroom, three bath gem is located near shopping, dining, and fantastic local trails and parks. Enjoy a great floor plan with a bedroom and bath on the first floor. Upstairs has a loft area and a lovely master.

This move-in ready four bedroom, three bath home with a sizable backyard is located in the heart of Carmichael. You will love the great floor plan with separate family and dining rooms, a cozy fireplace and lush carpet.

Heritage Lakeside 55 and over active resort community offers a built-in swimming pool, putting green, tennis courts and more! This three bedroom, two bath home has a great floor plan and a large backyard for entertaining.

This renovated three bedroom, two and one-half bath home features original beamed ceilings, refinished hardwood floors, an incredible kitchen with quartz counters, custom painted cabinets and a wonderful pool.

3br/2ba single-story home on a corner lot is in a sought-after neighborhood. This home features a spacious kitchen with dining bar, formal living room, formal dining room and a family room that opens to the backyard.

This is Midtown living at it's finest! This 2br/2ba condo offers a private outdoor patio just moments from the resort-like pool. Enjoy a newer kitchen and real hardwood floors throughout while in a prime location.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Elk Grove | $399,900

Sacramento | $370,000

4 bedroom home in the heart of Laguna, centrally located in Elk Grove near shopping, restaurants and public transportation. It features high ceilings, formal dining, granite kitchen counters and a backyard pergola.

Built in 2007, this three bedroom, two bath single-story home has an open floor plan with the kitchen overlooking the family room with a fireplace. Granite counters and stainless steel appliances complete the kitchen.

Deanne Sinclair 916.425.7787 | CalRE #01895197 Kathy Barragan 916.302.6232 | CalRE #01349161

Kathy Brill Burk 916.768.4288 kathy.brill@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01415628

Galt | $365,000

Antelope | $365,000

Remodeled 3 bedroom, 2 full bath with RV access. Features newer cabinets, granite countertops and tile floors. Offers an open floor plan with vaulted ceilings and large kitchen. Living room has stacked stone fireplace.

Well-cared for home in the heart of Antelope. This contemporary beauty features granite vanities, gas range oven, spacious kitchen, family/dining room combo, master bedroom with en suite bathroom and great backyard.

Tammy Goolsby 209.332.0250 tammy.goolsby@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01987204

Tim Comstock 916.548.7102 tim.comstock@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01879462

Sacramento | $350,000

Citrus Heights | $335,000

This property is a great 3br/2ba opportunity at a great price on a coveted street that shows pride of ownership in neighboring homes. The single-story home has been well cared for and is in near original condition.

This charming three bedroom, two bath gem sits on nearly a quarter acre. Updates include quartz counters, stainless steel appliances and laminate flooring. Attached is a workshop style garage, a bonus room and RV access.

Mark Delgado 916.705.2298 mark.delgado@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01411594

Melinda Shrader 916.747.7535 melinda.shrader@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #00994757

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Sacramento | $335,000

Rio Linda | $330,000

Captivating, under 1.5 acres waterfront parcel with approximately 450 feet of river frontage, breathtaking vistas and a rip-rap along the river bank in the Garden Highway community situated along the Sacramento River.

This premium corner lot home has three bedrooms, two baths, a gated entry, and green space behind it. The interior offers a fantastic floor plan, fresh paint and cleaned, and the garage has a utility sink. No HOA.

Rich Cazneaux 916.212.4444 | CalRE #01447558 Maggie Sekul 916.341.7812 | CalRE #01296369

Steve Ostrom 916.308.2446 Homes@RosevilleAndRocklin.com | CalRE #01344154

Sacramento | $324,900

Sacramento | $284,900

Mark Delgado 916.705.2298 mark.delgado@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01411594

Mark Delgado 916.705.2298 mark.delgado@cbnorcal.com | CalRE #01411594

This home is located in the great Sacramento neighborhood of Tallac Village. Enjoy a move-in ready three bedroom, one bathroom home which features a large covered patio in the backyard and much more. Cul-de-sac location.

Orangevale | $660,000

Fair Oaks | $635,000

2 bedroom, 1 bathroom home located on a fenced, corner lot. The kitchen includes newer quartz counter-tops, white shaker cabinets, tiled flooring and recessed LED lighting. Offers an enclosed patio and a covered patio.

Lincoln | $550,000

Elk Grove | $649,500

This five bedroom, four and one-half bath gem has a brick fireplace and a spacious kitchen. Outside offers patio areas, a pool, hot tub and RV access.

This spectacular home has four bedrooms and two and one-half baths. There are oversized living and family rooms. The home sits on roughly .78 acres.

Gorgeous Meritage built solar-owned home features a downstairs master suite, low maintenance backyard, 4 upstairs bedrooms plus theater loft.

6br/5ba entertainers delight in the prestigious Stonelake community with open concept living. Enjoy the large backyard great for entertaining.

Cameron Ripley 530.635.0283 cameron.ripley@cbnorcal.com CalRE #02094909

Tom Phillips 916.799.4571 tomphillipssacrealtor@gmail.com CalRE #01401556

Peggy Urieff 916.622.3787 Peggy@Westplacer.com CalRE #01441446

Michele Mihalko 916.690.4433 michele.mihalko@cbnorcal.com CalRE #02027278

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Sacramento | $549,900

Galt | $539,900

Orangevale | $480,000

Fair Oaks | $449,900

This tasteful two bedroom, one bath cottage offers inlaid wood floors, an updated kitchen, professionally designed yards and an extra-long driveway.

Sitting on almost 2 acres, this approximately 2090 square foot home has room to grow inside and out offering 2 master bedrooms and fenced-in backyard.

This four bedroom, two and one-half bath home has an open floor plan on an approximately 1.24 flat acre lot. The backyard patio deck has nice views.

Beautiful home features 3 full bedrooms plus a den downstairs and a master retreat upstairs with a large walk in closet and double vanity bathroom.

Mark Peters 916.600.2039 mark.peters@cbnorcal.com CalRE #01424396

Alison Traverse Warren 916.690.6960 alison.warren@cbnorcal.com CalRE #01733854

Dale Apodaca 916.308.6161 Dale@HomesAtSac.com CalRE #01233424

Destiny Slothower 916.806.2207 D.Slothower@yahoo.com CalRE #01883204

Elk Grove | $449,000

Elk Grove | $426,000

Cameron Park | $399,900

Sacramento | $399,900

The lovely home has four bedrooms, a bonus room, and two and one-half baths. Features include an updated kitchen, RV access and a three-car garage.

Spacious 4br/2ba home features a large kitchen with granite counter tops and white cabinets, spacious bedrooms, updated bathrooms and oversized lot.

Views from every room of this turn key 3 bdrm home on a private lot with spacious deck backing to open space. Walk to nearby lake. Excellent schools!

Mid-century modern home features a living room with wood floors and fireplace, formal dining area w/ French doors, updated kitchen and roomy backyard.

Mark DeGennaro 916.849.4810 Mark@MarkDRealty.com CalRE #01394970

Robert Graham 916.229.7831 robertbgraham01@gmail.com CalRE #01950494

Paula McQuaid-Glesener 916.969.6377 paula.glesener@cbnorcal.com CalRE #01188634

Veronica Hunter 916.398.0128 SoldByV@gmail.com CalRE #01905685

Woodland | $399,000

Roseville | $399,000

Elk Grove | $379,950

Sacramento | Price Upon Request

Tastefully updated home nestled on half of an acre! Stunning bright eat in kitchen with granite counters and wood-like laminate flooring throughout.

This home has a beautiful wooden trellis in your front entrance & gorgeous hardwood floors in the living room & upgraded fixtures throughout the home.

This three bedroom, two bath home offers separate living/family rooms, a formal dining area, a wood burning fireplace and a great covered patio!

This updated Sutterville Park bungalow is complete with two bedrooms, an updated kitchen and bath, refinished hardwood floors and an enclosed patio.

Miyo Santana-Freeman 209.482.6702 Miyo.Freeman@cbnorcal.com CalRE #01405445

Michael Culbertson 916.251.6480 michael.culbertson@cbnorcal.com CalRE #02019319

Lisa M. Steele 916.743.5611 lisa.steele@cbnorcal.com CalRE #01237871

Viki Benbow 916.284.7133 viki@vikibenbow.com CalRE #00356708

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Sacramento | $369,900

Elk Grove | $365,000

Sacramento | $349,000

Roseville | $330,000

This charming Natomas Creek four bedroom, two and one-half bath home offers a wonderful kitchen complete with an island and custom patio landscape.

Classic ranch style home featuring three or four bedrooms, two baths, living room fireplace, large kitchen with eating area and a two-car garage.

Beautiful home featuring natural light, huge multi-purpose kitchen island, lovely garden, dining buffet and one of the largest yards in the community.

Excellent three bedroom Roseville home is turnkey ready with newly installed carpet, tall ceilings, kitchen, great room and private master retreat.

Jen Colburn 916.399.3878 jencolburn@gmail.com CalRE #02001773

Sue Olson 916.601.8834 sue@sueolson.net CalRE #00784986

Dale Smith 916.524.3205 Dale.Smith@cbnorcal.com CalRE #00944086

Peggy Urieff 916.622.3787 Peggy@Westplacer.com CalRE #01441446

Woodland | $329,000

Sacramento | $320,000

Sacramento | $299,000

Sacramento | $299,000

Wonderful 3br/2ba home on corner lot featuring large living and dining area, kitchen with stainless appliances, spacious master suite and rock patio.

This adorable three bedroom, two bathroom home features a cute kitchen. The backyard showcases a beautiful brick patio with a pergola overhead.

Gorgeous 2br/2ba condo w/balcony.

Heritage Park Home is one of Sacramento's premier active adult 55+ communities featuring laminate floors, tile counters, newer appliances and more.

Miyo Santana-Freeman 209.482.6702 Miyo.Freeman@cbnorcal.com CalRE #01405445

Patti Brecht 916.768.9892 patti.brecht@camoves.com CalRE #01476740

Michael Wayne Jackson 415.483.6009 Michael.Jackson@cbnorcal.com CalRE #01513285

Davron Abzalov 916.220.8511 davron.realty@gmail.com CalRE #02090647

YOUR HOME CAN BE A

SUPERSTAR! Don’t miss this chance to showcase your home on the hottest real estate show around. At Home in Northern California is a weekly Coldwell BankerŽ TV program featuring fabulous local properties for sale. Check it out on Saturdays at 4:30 pm on The CW. Find out how to shine a spotlight on your home. Contact your local Coldwell Banker office today for details. ColdwellBankerHomes.com

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MARCH 2020

Food & Drink i n s i d e: Brother Act / Devilishly Good / Portuguese Pastry

Brown, Strong and Good What whiskey will not cure, there is no cure for. So goes the old Irish proverb. Take the cure at LOCKED BARREL, a whiskey lounge that opened earlier this year in downtown’s Elks Tower. Offering more than 400 whiskeys, along with classic whiskey cocktails, it would almost certainly please Mark Twain, who once opined that “Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.” 921 11th St.; (916) 246-1545; lockedbarrel.com Chad Brown t yler & christina

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Food & Drink

All in the Family For brothers Fred and Matt Haines, building a restaurant empire is all relative. BY MARYBETH BIZJAK A QUARTER-CENTURY IN BUSINESS is nothing to scoff at these days. With

restaurants closing right and left, one that remains open and successful (not to mention relevant) for more than two decades is close to amazing. This year, 33rd Street Bistro in East Sacramento will mark its 25th anniversary. When brothers Fred and Matt Haines debuted the business in 1995, they faced a very different restaurant environment than today’s. There were far fewer restaurants and much less competition. Fred, who had worked as a chef in Oregon and Washington state, brought with him a distinct Pacific Northwest sensibility—salmon roasted in a wood oven, for instance— that was new to Sacramento. With Fred in the kitchen and Matt handling the business, the pair went on an amazing run, opening eateries in Davis, El Dorado Hills, Land Park and midtown. Some worked; others worked for a while, then closed. But 33rd Street Bistro is still going strong. The brothers’ most recent venture, Wildwood Kitchen & Bar in the upscale Pavilions shopping center, had a bumpy beginning. Opening in late 2017, it was popular with the well-heeled Sierra Oaks and Arden Arcade crowd. But only a year in, a kitchen fire forced the restaurant to close for six months. The timing was terrible: Bandera had just gone out of business, and its regulars were transferring their loyalty to other restaurants in the area—places like Ruth’s Chris, Cafe Bernardo and Piatti. Wildwood missed out on that opportunity. Now reopened since November 2018, Wildwood has found its footing. Fortunately, the fire didn’t touch the sleek dining room, which was designed by the highly regarded interior designer Bruce Benning. It still has its original cozy booths and bar-height community tables. The rectangular bar, with its beautiful backlit wall of whiskeys, is still there, as is the glassed-in wine cellar. There’s local art on the walls, and a curtain of braided rope that partially obscures a mirrored wall. A large, modern light fixture that looks like illuminated branches hangs over the space, giving it a sexy glow. One of Wildwood’s biggest draws is the 125-seat patio, a buzzing spot with outdoor sofas, fire MATT AND FRED HAVE RIDpits and live music four days a week. DEN A RESTAURANT ROLLER With three other restaurants to run, Matt COASTER OVER THE PAST 25 and Fred handed over day-to-day operations YEARS. THEY’RE STILL HERE. to chef Victor Cruz and general manager Sikha Das. The menu features Fred’s trademark fusion of New American and global cuisines. There’s naan and ahi poke, pancetta prawns and barbecued salmon salad, rock shrimp risotto and a wood-grilled burger. Wildwood was the first restaurant in Sacramento to serve the Impossible Burger, a plant-based burger substitute that took the world by storm. (Even Burger King sells them now.) The kitchen also serves cavatappi pasta with Impossible Bolognese sauce. Matt, now 57, and Fred, 62, have ridden a restaurant roller coaster over the past 25 years. Yelp and social media changed the game. Now, everyone’s a restaurant critic. A rising minimum wage has also been a challenge. Yet they’re still here. “I used to hope we’d still be around in 20 years,” says Fred. “There are a lot of ups and downs in life and in business.” One thing that hasn’t changed, says Matt: “We’re still brothers.”

Matt and Fred Haines

WILDWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR 556 Pavilions Lane; (916) 922-2858; wildwoodpavilions.com

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Key lime pie

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Rock shrimp risotto

A booth at Wildwood

Wildwood burger

Pancetta prawns r a c h e l va l l e y

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Food & Drink

Bread Is His Life

Deviled eggs from Revolution Winery & Kitchen

Hard-Boiled Memories Deviled eggs are nostalgia on a plate. The appetizer that your grandmother brought to every family function is now popping up on restaurant menus all over Sacramento, with chefs adding their signature flair to this otherwise humble finger food. At Revolution Winery & Kitchen, owner Gina Genshlea likes having deviled eggs on the menu “because the best things are the simple things.” In this case, simple means yolks mixed with salt, pepper and two types of mustard. For garnish, “we like to use pickled red onion because it gives it a little crunch along with an acid element, which highlights the flavor of the eggs. We also add a little piece of lardon, which is optional, plus a small sprig of dill to wake it up, and finally a tiny sprinkle of paprika.” Customers can’t get enough of them. “We have some people who come in and that’s all they get.” Joseph Pruner, executive chef at Woodlake Tavern, describes deviled eggs as “one of those things that brings back childhood memories.” He first started seeing them on menus in San Francisco eight years ago and knew they’d be a hit. His rendition starts with eggs from Vega Farms, which are boiled for seven and a half minutes. Once cooled, the yolks are mixed with house-made creme fraiche, Dijon mustard, olive oil, crispy shallots and chives. “I prefer the creme fraiche to mayonnaise because it makes the yolks a little more airy,” says Pruner. “It’s a pretty simple recipe, but it’s really technique-driven.” At Boulevard Bistro in Elk Grove, chef-owner Bret Bohlmann says that “deviled eggs are wonderful because they’re a blank canvas. You can garnish them with whatever you want—it’s limitless.” His version, which is prepared with house-made aioli, might be embellished with deep-fried duck confit, mustard seeds blanched in white wine, or three types of tobiko. “We change up the garnishes depending on what we’ve got around. We sell a ton of them, because everything’s better with eggs.” —Catherine Warmerdam

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Bills would like a word with you. A concert flutist turned baker whose sausage rolls won the approval of revered judge Mary Berry on “The Great American Baking Show” (the stateside version of “The Great British Bake Off”), Duarte Bills is an ambassador for sweet treats from mainland Portugal and the Azores islands. “Portuguese food is completely overlooked compared to other European traditions, and it’s our time to share it with the world,” says Duarte Bills, a Loomis native whose great-grandparents emigrated from the Azores. As a youngster, Duarte Bills was a picky eater, preferring to eat mainly the cakes and breads that were a staple in his household. “In our Portuguese family, like most, bread is like a religion. When it comes out of the oven, everyone gathers around and there’s butter ready to be spread on that hot bread,” he says. “When I think back to my early food memories, they’re all about sweets and things that came out of the oven.” Duarte Bills wasn’t much of a cook JEREMIAH DUARTE BILLS TEACHES CLASSES, HOLDS POPwhen he moved away to college (he EVENTS, IS WRITING A COOKgraduated from the San Francisco BOOK, LEADS PASTRY TOURS Conservatory of Music and earned a OF PORTUGAL AND INTERVIEWS master’s from The Juilliard School), BAKERS FOR HIS PODCAST. but he taught himself to bake. The first recipe he tried was for massa sovada, or Portuguese sweet bread. Baking occupied more and more of his time as he traveled overseas to learn recipes and techniques directly from Portuguese bakers. These days, he’s a pro at turning out delicacies like bolinhos de caramelo e noz, tiny walnut-topped cakes from the island of Faial, and pastéis de nata, the eggy custard tarts for which Portugal is famous. Today, Duarte Bills concentrates on teaching baking classes out of his Sacramento apartment, baking goodies for pop-up events, writing a cookbook, leading pastry tours of Portugal and interviewing fellow bakers on the third season of “Flour Hour,” the podcast he hosts with fellow “Baking Show” competitor Amanda Faber. “The baking community is a really warm, loving place to be, as you can imagine, so Amanda and I are thrilled to be part of it in a way that we might not be able to if we were just posting Instagram photos,” explains Duarte Bills, who dedicates at least one episode each season to Portuguese recipes. “It’s been amazing to be able to share my love of community, creativity and Portuguese baking with the world.”—CATHERINE WARMERDAM

Jeremiah Duarte Bills

Queijadas

Top left: Gabriel Teague; bottom right: Nicolette Lovell (portrait) and Jeremiah Duarte Bills (pastries)

IF YOU’VE NEVER TASTED a Portuguese dessert, Jeremiah Duarte

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2020 SACRAMENTO

FIVE STAR AWARD WINNERS These days, it takes a village to manage your financial world. Whether it is managing your assets with a wealth manager, navigating the ever-changing tax landscape, sorting out your estate and succession planning or picking the right life insurance, finding the right team can be a daunting task. In fact, many consumers have a hard time figuring out where to even begin. Sometimes, a few simple questions can put you on the right path. Asking professionals what makes working with them a unique experience can help you understand how they work and if their style meshes with your own. This is a great place to start! Five Star Professional uses its own proprietary research methodology to name outstanding professionals, then works with publications such as Sacramento Magazine to spread the word about award winners. Each award candidate undergoes a thorough research process (detailed here) before being considered for the final list of award winners. For the complete list of winners, go to www.fivestarprofessional.com.

RESEARCH DISCLOSURES In order to consider a broad population of high-quality wealth managers, award candidates are identified by one of three sources: firm nomination, peer nomination or prequalification based on industry standing. Self-nominations are not accepted. Sacramento award candidates were identified using internal and external research data. Candidates do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final lists of Five Star Wealth Managers. • The Five Star award is not indicative of a professional’s future performance. • Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their clients’ assets. • The inclusion of a professional on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the professional by Five Star Professional or Sacramento Magazine. • Working with a Five Star Wealth Managerl or any professional is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected professionals will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. • Five Star Professional is not an advisory firm and the content of this article should not be considered financial advice. For more information on the Five Star Wealth Manager award program, research and selection criteria, go to fivestarprofessional.com/research. • 1,006 award candidates in the Sacramento area were considered for the Five Star Wealth Manager award. 99 (approximately 10% of the award candidates) were named 2020 Five Star Wealth Managers.

All award winners are listed in this publication. Financial Planning Dan Ahmad ∙ Peak Financial Freedom Group Pages 2 & 3 Richard Keith Allison ∙ Securities America, Inc. Page 4 Marina Alexandra Armbruster ∙ PlanMember Securities Corporation Page 6 Brian Daniel Bain ∙ Valic David Bastoni ∙ Bastoni Financial Services Joyce Ann Blonskij ∙ Blonskij Financial Services, Inc. FIVE STAR WEALTH MANAGER CRITERIA DETERMINATION OF AWARD WINNERS

Award candidates who satisfied 10 objective eligibility and evaluation criteria were named 2020 Five Star Wealth Managers. Eligibility Criteria – Required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative. 2. Actively employed as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of five years. 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review. 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal firm standards. 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation Criteria – Considered: 6. One-year client retention rate. 7. Five-year client retention rate. 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered. 9. Number of client households served. 10. Education and professional designations. Regulatory Review: As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; been convicted of a felony. Within the past 11 years the wealth manager has not: been terminated from a wealth management or financial services firm; filed for personal bankruptcy; had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them (and no more than five total pending, dismissed or denied) with any regulatory authority. Five Star Professional conducts a regulatory review of each nominated wealth manager using the Investment Adviser Public Disclosure (IAPD) website. Five Star Professional also uses multiple supporting processes to help ensure that a favorable regulatory and complaint history exists. Data submitted through these processes was applied per the above criteria; each wealth manager who passes the Five Star Professional regulatory review must attest that they meet the definition of favorable regulatory history based upon the criteria listed above. Five Star Professional promotes via local advertising the opportunity for consumers to confidentially submit complaints regarding a wealth manager.

Christopher J. Bulman ∙ Bulman Wealth Group

Rob Anthony Santoriello ∙ Securities America Lamar Simpson ∙ LPL Financial Page 6 Charlotte Sloan ∙ AXA Advisors Page 4 Oscar B. Snyder, III ∙ LPL Financial Page 5 David Edward Stone ∙ Lincoln Financial Advisors Violetta Sit Terpeluk ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Ronald W. Tolle Jr. ∙ Morgan Stanley

Investments

Jeffrey W. DeBoer ∙ DeBoer Financial Group

William Thomas Corley ∙ Corley Investment Management

Julia K. Earle ∙ LPL Financial

Sterling Dalatri ∙ Morgan Stanley

Jim Files ∙ Peak Financial Freedom Group

Patty M. Estopinal ∙ Robert W. Baird & Company

Catherine Lynne Heath ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Courtney Elizabeth McHarg ∙ McHarg & Associates Wealth Planning Page 5 Cynthia S. Meyers ∙ Confluence Financial Planning, LLC

Robert James Ferriman ∙ Robert W. Baird & Company Kevin J. Mounkes ∙ Wells Fargo Advisors John J. Zezini ∙ LPL Financial Page 6

Leslie Roper Day ∙ Leslie Roper Day & Associates Page 5 Continued on FS-7

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WEALTH MANAGERS

Peak Financial Freedom Group

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YEAR WINNER Left to right: Two-year winners Dan Ahmad and Jim Files (On the set of “The Peak Financial Freedom Show”)

At Peak Financial Freedom Group, Our Top Priority Is to Help You Stop Worrying About Your Money If you’re retired or nearing retirement, you can’t afford mistakes. If you’re like most people, you’re confused and worried about your money. You probably worry a lot. What you’ve worked so hard to accumulate over the years must be protected against large losses. What you have right now must last your entire lifetime — you literally can’t afford to run out of money. It takes time and expertise to create an actual plan in writing for your financial security. You or your advisor can’t rush through the process. Going through an actual planning process is the only way to eliminate the worries you have about your money. Peak Financial Freedom Group puts everything we have into creating your comprehensive, written retirement income plan because your retirement deserves nothing less than our best. Wealth Manager Award Winner

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Actively licensed as a registered investment adviser or as a principal of a registered investment adviser firm for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not; A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them and/or a total of five settled, pending, dismissed or denied complaints with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one clients’ experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy within the past 11 years; E. Been terminated from a financial services firm within the past 11 years; F. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their clients’ assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 1,350 Sacramento-area wealth managers were considered for the award; 99 (10% of candidates) were named 2020 Five Star Wealth Managers. 2019: 997 considered, 115 winners; 2018: 902 considered, 99 winners; 2017: 641 considered, 170 winners; 2016: 597 considered, 179 winners; 2015: 1,011 considered, 210 winners; 2014: 809 considered, 167 winners; 2013: 1,040 considered, 202 winners; 2012: 881 considered, 175 winners.

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WEALTH MANAGERS

HIGHLIGHTS

· · · · · ·

50 years’ combined experience Co-authors with Larry King Retirement income planning Providing entire plans in writing Risk reduction modeling Working with retirees and pre-retirees

· · · · · ·

Co-authors with Jack Canfield Conservative asset planning Presented to thousands of people Six weekend radio broadcasts Income tax analysis Fee audit and potential reduction

What Would You Feel Like If You Didn’t Have to Worry About Your Money? We are registered investment advisors with a fiduciary duty to do what is in your best interest, such as protecting your assets against large stock market losses and helping to reduce your fees. We are accountable to our clients — we say what we do and do what we say — put everything in writing and create customized income plans that are designed to provide dependable income for life. We have built Peak Financial Freedom Group on integrity and trust, because doing what is right for you is better for both you and our business. We help meet your goals and needs with tailored solutions and we believe financial advice is about having a plan that is customized to reflect your life’s goals beyond just your finances. We help you make more informed and effective financial decisions that allow you to feel relieved, confident, self-assured and empowered — all which provide you financial freedom. Our ultimate purpose is to help you stop worrying about your money.

2520 Douglas Boulevard, Suite 110 • Roseville, CA 95661 Phone: 916-791-7063 • www.peakfin.com

Two-year winners Dan Ahmad and Jim Files: Authors, TV and Radio Show Hosts Promotion paid for by Peak Financial Freedom Group, LLC. Investment Advisor Representatives of and Advisory Services offered through Fiduciary Solutions LLC, a Registered Investment Advisor. Peak Financial Freedom Group LLC is primarily a fixed insurance sales organization and provides no Advisory Services. PFFG Insurance Agency LLC is a licensed insurance agency and provides no Advisory Services. Peak Financial Freedom Group LLC, PFFG Insurance Agency LLC, and Fiduciary Solutions LLC are separate affiliated entities. If you place assets under management with our firm, we are paid an advisory fee and if you purchase an annuity from our firm, we are paid commissions from an insurance company. PFFG Insurance Agency CA Insurance License 0N14013, Jim Files CA Insurance License 0F06511 & Dan Ahmad CA Insurance License 0732913. Wealth Manager Award Winner

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Actively licensed as a registered investment adviser or as a principal of a registered investment adviser firm for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not; A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them and/or a total of five settled, pending, dismissed or denied complaints with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one clients’ experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy within the past 11 years; E. Been terminated from a financial services firm within the past 11 years; F. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their clients’ assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 1,350 Sacramento-area wealth managers were considered for the award; 99 (10% of candidates) were named 2020 Five Star Wealth Managers. 2019: 997 considered, 115 winners; 2018: 902 considered, 99 winners; 2017: 641 considered, 170 winners; 2016: 597 considered, 179 winners; 2015: 1,011 considered, 210 winners; 2014: 809 considered, 167 winners; 2013: 1,040 considered, 202 winners; 2012: 881 considered, 175 winners.

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WEALTH MANAGERS

Richard Allison Investment Advisor Representative

Thank You for Your Continued Trust and Referrals ∙ Independent, objective advice to help you achieve your goals

∙ Retirement planning and wealth preservation

∙ Providing you with personalized financial solutions

∙ Specializing in retirement income strategies

Smart planning starts with a clear understanding of your personal and financial needs and goals. Only then can I develop customized strategies to put the pieces of your financial life into a cohesive plan to secure your future. My goal is to take the uncertainty out of creating and protecting wealth and, ultimately, to guide you through the ever-changing world of retirement programs and rules. My mission is to become your trusted advisor. I am a 2012 – 2020 Five Star Wealth Manager award winner. 1375 Exposition Boulevard, Suite 201 • Sacramento, CA 95815 Office: 916-437-4263 • Cell: 530-902-0382 richard.allison@securitiesamerica.com www.allisonwealthmanagement.com

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YEAR WINNER Nine-year winner Richard Allison, Investment Advisor Representative

Richard K. Allison is a registered representative of, and offers securities through, Securities America, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC, Advisory services offered through Securities America Advisors, Inc., Richard K. Allison Investment Advisor Representative. Allison Wealth Management and the Securities America companies are not affiliated. CA Ins. Lic. 0D67551. Wealth Manager Award Winner

Charlotte Sloan Financial Professional

Helping You Plan for Tomorrow so You Can Live for Today ∙ Focusing on retirement planning, life insurance, investing and annuity By combining my knowledge and experience in financial services with my focus on building lasting relationships, I’m determined to deliver sound investment and insurance strategies that can help you take control of your financial future. My education and experience enable me to explain complex issues and strategies in clear language. 2020 Five Star Wealth Manager award winner Charlotte Sloan, Financial Professional

AXA Advisors

When it’s time to implement your strategy, we’ll work together to review the options and alternatives. Next, you can select a combination of products and services that make sense and suit your needs. I offer a variety of financial products and services that are designed to help you plan for, build and achieve a more secure financial future.

193 Blue Ravine Road, Suite 110 • Folsom, CA 95630 Office: 916-294-4425 • Cell: 415-279-3012 charlotte-ann.sloan@axa-advisors.com • www.charlottesloan.com

Securities offered through AXA Advisors, LLC (212-314-4600), member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisory products and services offered through AXA Advisors, LLC, an investment advisor registered with the SEC. Annuity and insurance products offered through AXA Network, LLC, which conducts business in California as AXA Network Insurance Agency of California, LLC. CA Insurance Lic 0678681 AGE-149915(12/19)(exp.12/21).

Wealth Manager Award Winner

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Actively licensed as a registered investment adviser or as a principal of a registered investment adviser firm for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not; A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them and/or a total of five settled, pending, dismissed or denied complaints with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one clients’ experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy within the past 11 years; E. Been terminated from a financial services firm within the past 11 years; F. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their clients’ assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 1,350 Sacramento-area wealth managers were considered for the award; 99 (10% of candidates) were named 2020 Five Star Wealth Managers. 2019: 997 considered, 115 winners; 2018: 902 considered, 99 winners; 2017: 641 considered, 170 winners; 2016: 597 considered, 179 winners; 2015: 1,011 considered, 210 winners; 2014: 809 considered, 167 winners; 2013: 1,040 considered, 202 winners; 2012: 881 considered, 175 winners.

FS • 4

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

WEALTH MANAGERS

Leslie Roper Day CFP®, AIF®, Founder

Down-to-Earth Financial Advice ∙ Comfortable, caring environment ∙ Personalized strategies for your needs

Leslie Roper Day, a sixth-generation Sacramentan, has enjoyed serving her friends, family and neighbors as a financial planner for over 30 years. In 2008, she founded her own firm, Leslie Roper Day & Associates, to provide a truly independent and extensive approach to financial planning for her clients. The firm is dedicated to building long-lasting relationships and works with clients of all ages, from retirees to rock stars and rocket scientists.

Left to right: Taryn Griffith, Client Service Specialist; Landon Tymochko, CFP®, Financial Advisor; 2020 winner Leslie Roper Day, CFP®, AIF®, Founder; Shari Segon, Practice Manager; Maja Cook, Administrative Assistant

Leslie Roper Day is a Registered Representative and Investment Adviser Representative with/and offers securities and advisory services through Commonwealth Financial Network®, Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser. Fixed insurance products and services offered by Leslie Roper Day & Associates or CES Insurance Agency. CA Insurance License 0808285.

950 Glenn Drive, Suite 230 • Folsom, CA 95630 Office: 916-984-1150 • info@LeslieRoperDay.com LeslieRoperDay.com Wealth Manager Award Winner

Oscar B. Snyder III

Courtney McHarg

LUTCF®, AIF®

LPL Financial Advisor, Principal, CRPC®

McHarg & Associates Wealth Planning 967 Reserve Drive Roseville, CA 95678 Office: 916-781-6691 bernie.snyder@lpl.com www.snyderwealth.com

9

YEAR WINNER

Proactive Planning for a Solid Future

601 University Avenue, Suite 108 Sacramento, CA 95825 Phone: 916-922-5812 courtney@mawealthplanning.com www.mchargassociates.com

9

YEAR WINNER

Inspiring Confidence in Your Retirement

∙ Holistic financial planning ∙ Retirement distribution strategies ∙ Risk management and legacy planning

∙ Retirement planning strategies and investments ∙ Retirement income strategies ∙ Domestic partner planning ∙ Women’s financial strategies

Since 1985, Oscar has advised families and businesses on all facets of their financial lives. He is committed to helping people tune out the noise so that they can focus on what is important.

Courtney brings 20 years of experience as a financial planner and wealth manager to clients seeking to maintain and grow their assets throughout retirement.

Oscar Bernie Snyder is a Registered Representative with, and securities and advisory services offered through, LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. CA Insurance Lic. 0525426.

The financial consultants at McHarg & Associates Wealth Planning are registered representatives with, and securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC.

Wealth Manager Award Winner

Wealth Manager Award Winner

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Actively licensed as a registered investment adviser or as a principal of a registered investment adviser firm for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not; A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them and/or a total of five settled, pending, dismissed or denied complaints with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one clients’ experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy within the past 11 years; E. Been terminated from a financial services firm within the past 11 years; F. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their clients’ assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 1,350 Sacramento-area wealth managers were considered for the award; 99 (10% of candidates) were named 2020 Five Star Wealth Managers. 2019: 997 considered, 115 winners; 2018: 902 considered, 99 winners; 2017: 641 considered, 170 winners; 2016: 597 considered, 179 winners; 2015: 1,011 considered, 210 winners; 2014: 809 considered, 167 winners; 2013: 1,040 considered, 202 winners; 2012: 881 considered, 175 winners.

FS • 5

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

WEALTH MANAGERS John J. Zezini

Marina Armbruster

CFP®, CRPC®, AAMS®

Financial Advisor

5930 Granite Lake Drive, Suite 130 Granite Bay, CA 95746 Phone: 916-400-9791 john@granitebaywealth.com www.granitebaywealth.com CA Insurance Lic. 0B41055

6

Beyond Investing

YEAR WINNER

2009 V. Street, Suite 201 Sacramento, CA 95818 Phone: 916-393-2583 Cell: 916-761-9558 marina@schoolbenefitservices.com schoolbenefitservices.com

5

A PlanMember Financial Center

YEAR WINNER

I am dedicated to helping my clients pursue their investment and planning goals. I believe it is important to invest the time to understand what is important to you before investing any of your money. It is also important that I understand the level of risk you are comfortable accepting so we can balance it with the proper investment strategies to pursue your long-term goals. My business is structured with your objective in mind.

∙ Retirement planning consulting and benefits optimization ∙ Investment and income planning For nearly three decades my focus has been on providing financial services for districts and education professionals. I work closely with clients and their families to provide personalized investment, insurance and retirement planning services tailored to their specific needs and designed to achieve their desired financial goals. Districts also have unique challenges. By providing retirement consulting, including financial sales and services, including insurance and investments, I help districts offer comprehensive plans for their employees. Let me help you take the guesswork out of planning for retirement and have a clear vision of the road to your tomorrow.

John Zezini is a registered representative with and securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advice offered through Granite Bay Wealth Management, a Registered Investment Advisor and separate entity from LPL Financial.

Representatives registered with and offer only securities and advisory services through PlanMember Securities Corporation, a registered broker/dealer, investment advisor and member FINRA/SIPC. PlanMember is not liable for ancillary products or services offered by this representative and School Benefit Services. School Benefit Services and PlanMember Securities Corporation are independently owned and operated companies. CA Insurance License 0786197.

Wealth Manager Award Winner

Wealth Manager Award Winner

∙ Inheritance planning ∙ Retirement planning

∙ Wealth preservation strategies ∙ Diversified investments

Lamar Simpson

Financial Planner and Advisor, Chartered Retirement Planning CounselorSM

601 University Avenue, Suite 108 Sacramento, CA 95825 Office: 916-333-5910 lamar@simpsonwealthplanning.com www.simpsonwealthplanning.com

6

YEAR WINNER

It’s important to find someone you can trust to help develop your personal wealth. Lamar Simpson of Simpson Wealth Planning has the experience and personal character to make the most of your investment options. He’s invested in the success of every client and personally handles your investments, never outsourcing to brokers.

Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Wealth Manager Award Winner

“Keep up with market conditions, so you are always knowledgeable.”

Looking for Other Great Professionals? Go to www.fivestarprofessional.com · Wealth Managers · Real Estate Agents · Mortgage Professionals · Home/Auto Insurance Professionals Professionals interested in learning more about Five Star Professional, please call 888-438-5782.

— Five Star award winner

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Actively licensed as a registered investment adviser or as a principal of a registered investment adviser firm for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not; A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them and/or a total of five settled, pending, dismissed or denied complaints with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one clients’ experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy within the past 11 years; E. Been terminated from a financial services firm within the past 11 years; F. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their clients’ assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 1,350 Sacramento-area wealth managers were considered for the award; 99 (10% of candidates) were named 2020 Five Star Wealth Managers. 2019: 997 considered, 115 winners; 2018: 902 considered, 99 winners; 2017: 641 considered, 170 winners; 2016: 597 considered, 179 winners; 2015: 1,011 considered, 210 winners; 2014: 809 considered, 167 winners; 2013: 1,040 considered, 202 winners; 2012: 881 considered, 175 winners.

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BlueMountainCommunities.com Blue Mountain Pg. 99.indd 99

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MARCH 2020

Restaurants As a reader service, Sacramento Magazine offers the following list of noteworthy restaurants in the Sacramento region. This is not intended to be a complete directory, and not all restaurants profiled appear every month.

ARDEN ARCADE CAFE VINOTECA Located in Arden Town Center, Cafe Vinoteca serves some of the loveliest Italian-inspired cuisine in the city. 3535 Fair Oaks Blvd.; (916) 4871331; cafevinoteca.com. L–D. Italian. $$$ THE KITCHEN Part supper club, part theatrical production, part cocktail party: this Michelin starred restaurant is like no other in Sacramento. You need to make reservations months in advance for the multi-course dinner. The food is complex and mindblowingly creative. 2225 Hurley Way; (916) 568-7171; thekitchenrestaurant.com. D. American. $$$$ LEATHERBY’S FAMILY CREAMERY Go for the ice cream, all made on the premises and used in shakes, malts and towering sundaes. 2333 Arden Way; (916) 920-8382; leatherbys.net. L–D. Sandwiches/ice cream. $ PLAN B The menu is compact, with a handful of appetizers and several wonderful salads. Plan B’s claim to fame is its stellar mussels, offered six ways. 555 La Sierra Drive; (916) 483-3000; planbrestaurant.com. D. New American/French. $$–$$$

BROADWAY ANDY NGUYEN VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT This bastion of Buddhist-inspired vegetarian cuisine serves food that is fresh and flavorful. 2007 Broadway; (916) 736-1157; andynguyenvegetarian.com. L–D. Vegetarian/Asian. $

KATHMANDU KITCHEN This family-owned restaurant envelops you in a cocoon of exotic fragrances. Order the lal maas (lamb curry with chili sauce) or chicken saagwala (stir fried chicken, spinach and curry). 1728 Broadway; (916) 441-2172; kathmandukitchensacra mento.net. L–D. Indian/Nepalese/vegetarian. $ REAL PIE COMPANY At this homey pie shop, you’ll find the pies of your dreams, made with seasonal fruit sourced from local farms. In addition to dessert pies, you can order savory pot pies, shepherd’s pies and dishes like mac and cheese, all available to eat in or take out. 2425 24th St.; (916) 838-4007; realpiecom pany.com. L–D. American. $ TOWER CAFE This place is a hot spot on weekend mornings. Regulars swear by the New Mexico blueberry cornmeal pancakes and the thick-cut, custardy French toast. Breakfast is all-American, but lunch and dinner have a global flavor. 1518 Broadway; (916) 4410222; towercafe.com. B–L–D. World fusion. $$

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Tacos from Tiger

CAPAY ROAD TRIP BAR & GRILL This family-friendly joint serves up classic roadhouse fare, from salads and burgers to chops. 24989 State Highway 16; (530) 796-3777; roadtripbg.com. B–L–D. American. $–$$

DAVIS BISTRO 33 DAVIS This restaurant, located in historic City Hall, offers an appealing menu of Pacific Northwest-inspired dishes. 226 F St.; (530) 756-4556; bistro33davis.com. B–L–D. New American. $$ BURGERS AND BREW The casual, publike restaurant uses high-quality, locally sourced ingredients and serves an interesting selection of beers and ales. 1409 R St.; (916) 442-0900; burgersbrew.com. L–D. Burgers. $ CAFE BERNARDO For description, see listing under “Downtown.” 234 D St.; (530) 750-5101; cafeber nardo.com. B–L–D. New American. $

CREPEVILLE This bustling creperie serves many variations on the crepe theme, from entrée to dessert. 330 Third St.; (530) 750-2400. B–L–D. Crepes. $ DE VERE’S IRISH PUB For description, see listing under “Downtown.” 217 E St.; (530) 204-5533; de verespub.com. L–D. Irish pub. $$ MIKUNI JAPANESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR For description, see listing under “Downtown.” 500 First St.; (530) 756-2111; mikunisushi.com. L–D. Japanese/sushi. $$ THE MUSTARD SEED Dinner selections at this former house feature elegant California cuisine, and range from crab-stuffed trout to shrimp risotto. Wines are reasonably priced and exclusively from California. 222 D St.; (530) 758-5750; mustardseedofdavis.com. L–D. New American. $$–$$$ OSTERIA FASULO This restaurant has a beautiful outdoor courtyard bordered by trellised grapevines. The menu is proudly Italian, with wonderful pastas and robust meat dishes. Try the vanilla panna cotta

EatSee

IRON GRILL Come here for a sizzlingly romantic dinner or a cocktail-laden business meeting. With a compact menu anchored in traditional American dishes, the restaurant encourages family-style dining. 2422 13th St.; (916) 737-5115; irongrillsacramento. com L–D–Br. American. $$–$$$

SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE  March 2020  

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A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

MARKET PLACE

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Restaurants for dessert. 2657 Portage Bay East; (530) 758-1324; osteriafasulo.com. L–D. Italian. $$$–$$$$ SEASONS This attractive, upscale restaurant showcases seasonal products; the menu changes every three months. Pizzas are great; so are the bountiful salads. But you’ll find the kitchen’s real talent in its creative appetizers and limited entrées. 102 F St.; (530) 750-1801; seasonsdavis.com. L–D. New American. $$–$$$ YAKITORI YUCHAN This busy little restaurant focuses on skewered grilled meats, seafood and vegetables. Most items are meant to be shared; bring an adventurous palate and a group of food-loving friends. 109 E St.; (530) 753-3196; yakitoriyuchan. com. D. Japanese. $–$$

DIXON CATTLEMENS This classic Western steakhouse serves up big slabs of prime rib, porterhouse, T-bone and cowboy steaks, plus all the trimmings: shrimp cocktail and loaded potato skins. 250 Dorset Court; (707) 678-5518; cattlemens.com. D. Steakhouse. $$$

DOWNTOWN BRASSERIE CAPITALE This beautifully designed restaurant is based on a traditional French brasserie. The menu hits the high points of the brasserie canon, everything from onion soup to steak frites. 1201 K St.; (916) 329-8033; brasseriecapitale.com. L–D. French. $$–$$$

CAFE BERNARDO The menu offers straightforward fare guaranteed to please just about everyone. Breakfast includes huevos rancheros and eggs Bernardo with housemade hollandaise sauce. Lunch and dinner feature chewy-crusted pizzas, burgers, sandwiches and substantial entrées such as pan-seared chicken breast with mashed potatoes. 1431 R St.; (916) 9309191; cafebernardo.com. B–L–D. New American. $ CAFETERIA 15L Go to Cafeteria 15L for modern, approachably priced comfort food in a casual yet stylish environment. The menu emphasizes fun fare, such as mac ’n’ cheese, truffle tater tots, and fried chicken and waffle with gravy and pecan butter. 1116 15th St.; (916) 492-1960; cafeteria15l.com. L–D. Californian. $$ CAMDEN SPIT & LARDER Chef Oliver Ridgeway’s swank brasserie appeals to lobbyists, lawyers and legislators with its gin-forward cocktails and a menu that’s a mash-up of British chop-house classics, English schoolboy favorites and elevated pub fare. 555 Capitol Mall; (916) 619-8897; camdenspitandlarder. com. L–D. Steakhouse. $$$–$$$$ DE VERE’S IRISH PUB Don’t head to de Vere’s if you’re seeking a quiet evening—the raucous, high-energy pub is noisy and packed with revelers. The wood bar (imported from Ireland) is enormous, and the food is high-quality pub fare. 1521 L St.; (916) 231-9947. deverespub.com. L–D. Irish pub. $$ ECHO & RIG Located in the lobby of The Sawyer hotel, this outpost of a Vegas steakhouse is sleek and unstuffy. Prices are considerably gentler than at most other steakhouses, but the quality of the meat is high. In addition to standard cuts like filet, NY steak and rib-eye, you’ll find butcher cuts such as hanger, bavette, skirt and tri-tip. 500 J St.; (877) 678-6255; echoandrig.com. B–L–D–Br. Steakhouse. $$$

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Nigiri combo from Mikuni Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar ELLA This stunning restaurant (owned by the Selland family and designed by award-winning European architects) is an elegant oasis compared to the gritty hustle and bustle outside. From the open kitchen, the staff turns out innovative dishes and old favorites. The emphasis is on seasonal, local and artisanal. 1131 K St.; (916) 443-3772; elladiningroomandbar. com. L–D. New American. $$$$

492-4450; grangerestaurantandbar.com. B–L–Br. Californian/American. $$$$

EMPRESS TAVERN Located in the basement of the Crest Theatre, this restaurant has a catacomb vibe. It’s a modern version of an old English carvery: whole chickens, prime rib roasts and hams turn slowly on a rotisserie in the open kitchen, and diners can order sides like whipped potatoes with pork gravy. The bar features a gin-focused cocktail menu and a long beer list. 1013 K St.; (916) 662-7694; empresstavern.com. L–D. New American carvery. $$$

MAS TACO BAR Tasty little tacos are the headliners at this casual eatery and come with all sorts of delicious fillings: braised short rib, Korean fried chicken, banh mi shrimp and roasted cauliflower. You can also get Latin-flavored rice bowls, salads and starters such as elote (Mexican street corn) and habanero fire balls (a mixture of roasted chilies, cream cheese, bacon and pepper jack, rolled into balls and fried). 1800 15th St.; mastacobar.com. L–D–Br. Mexican. $$

FOX & GOOSE PUBLIC HOUSE This tavern plates up some of the best breakfasts in town, along with pub staples like beer-battered fish and chips, a Cornish pasty or Welsh rarebit. 1001 R St.; (916) 443-8825; foxandgoose.com. B–L–D. English pub. $ FRANK FAT’S Downtown Sacramento’s oldest restaurant, Fat’s is a favorite of the Capitol crowd. The restaurant is well known for its steaks—especially Frank’s Style New York Steak—and its brandy-fried chicken. This is Chinese cuisine at its most sophisticated. 806 L St.; (916) 442-7092; fatsrestaurants. com. L–D. Chinese. $$$ GRANGE RESTAURANT & BAR Located in The Citizen Hotel, Grange proves that a hotel restaurant doesn’t have to be pedestrian. The menu changes frequently and spotlights some of the area’s best producers. At dinner, the ambience in the stunning dining room is seductive and low-lit. 926 J St.; (916)

MAGPIE CAFE This restaurant has a casual, unassuming vibe, and its hallmark is clean, simple fare that tastes like the best version of itself. 1601 16th St.; (916) 452-7594; magpiecafe.com. B–L–D. Californian. $$

THE MELTING POT Fondue goes upscale here. Try the Wisconsin Trio cheese fondue, prepared at your table with fontina, Butterkase and Gorgonzola cheese. 814 15th St.; (916) 443-2347; meltingpot. com/sacramento. D. Fondue/American. $$–$$$$ MIKUNI JAPANESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR This hip sushi bar serves its sushi with a side of sass. There are three sushi bars and a dense menu of appetizers, rice bowls, bento boxes and sushi rolls. 1530 J St.; (916) 447-2112; mikunisushi.com. L–D. Japanese/sushi. $$ MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE From cozy, candlelit booths and stunning, glass-enclosed wine room to the crisply outfitted chefs, Morton’s oozes Special Occasion. Red meat is the star here. 621 Capitol Mall; (916) 442-5091; mortons.com/sacramento. D. Steakhouse. $$$$

Jeremy Sykes

BURGERS AND BREW The casual, publike restaurant uses high-quality, locally sourced ingredients and serves an interesting selection of beers. 1409 R St.; (916) 442-0900; burgersbrew.com. L–D. Burgers. $

SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE  March 2020  

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DINING GUIDE

24989 STATE HWY. 16 CAPAY [530] 796-3777 ROADTRIPBG.COM WEDNESDAY - SUNDAY 7AM - 9PM CLOSED MONDAYS + TUESDAYS

1110 T STREET, SACRAMENTO 916.822.4665 thecoconutthai.com • happy hour 4:30-6PM THAI FOOD • VEGAN • GLUTEN FREE

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Restaurants P.F. CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO With its lofty ceilings, striking artwork and sweeping staircase, this is the place to come if you’re seeking a little glamour with your Asian cuisine. The extensive menu offers dishes whose origins spring from many regions throughout China but that reflect a California sensibility. 1530 J St.; (916) 288-0970; pfchangs.com. L–D. Chinese. $$ PIZZA ROCK The narrow space is loud, but there’s a sense of festivity in the air, and the pizza is darned good. Choose from five different styles of pizza: Classic Italian, Classic American, Neapolitan, Sicilian and Roman. 1020 K St.; (916) 737-5777; pizzarock sacramento.com. L–D. Pizza/Italian/American. $$ URBAN ROOTS BREWING & SMOKEHOUSE At this casual brewery, a massive smoker turns out succulent meats—brisket, ribs, turkey and sausage. Sides include collard greens, mac and cheese, yams and poblano cheese grits. Sit indoors or out at long picnic tables. 1322 V St.; (916) 706-3741; urbanrootsbrewing.com. L–D. Barbecue. $$

EAST SACRAMENTO BACON & BUTTER Lively and delightfully urban, the place is packed with fans of chef Billy Zoellin’s homey flapjacks, biscuits and other breakfasty fare. 3839 J St.; (916) 475-1801; baconandbuttersac.com. B–L. Breakfast. $–$$ CANON With Michelin-starred chef Brad Cecchi at the helm, this breezily chic restaurant offers an ambitious menu of globally inspired sharable plates. Much of the menu is vegetarian, vegan or gluten free, but you can also order from a small selection of hearty meat, poultry and fish dishes. 1719 34th St.; (916) 469-2433; canoneastsac.com. Global/New American. D–Br. $$$–$$$$ CELESTIN’S Gumbo is the signature dish at this charming, minuscule restaurant specializing in Creole and Cajun cuisine. It comes in six varieties, including chicken, vegetarian and seafood. But the pièce de resistance is the namesake Celestin’s gumbo, chock-full of chicken, sea scallops, wild shrimp, rock cod and sausage. 3610 McKinley Blvd.; (916) 2584060; celestinsgumbo.com. L–D. Cajun/Creole. $$ CLUBHOUSE 56 This is your classic sports bar, from the multiple TVs and two giant screens broadcasting games via DIRECTV to the local sports memorabilia on the walls. The food, too, is classic sports-bar fare: burgers, sandwiches and apps such as tacos and jalapeño poppers. The place is dark, casual and convivial, Sacramento’s very own Cheers. 734 56th St.; (916) 454-5656; ch56sports.com. Br–L–D. Sports bar. $$ JUNO’S KITCHEN AND DELICATESSEN This tiny eatery serves some of the best sandwiches in town. Owner Mark Helms also offers an intriguing selection of salads and “pan” dishes such as shrimp mac ’n’ cheese. But you can’t go wrong with the smoked trout sandwich or the grilled chicken sandwich. Though there’s only a handful of tables, takeout is a tasty option. 3675 J St.; (916) 456-4522; junoskitchen.com. L. Bistro. $ KRU Kru turns out exciting Japanese fare, and there’s a craft cocktail bar, outdoor patios and an omakase bar. 3135 Folsom Blvd.; (916) 551-1559; krurestaurant. com. L–D. Japanese. $$$–$$$$ THE MIMOSA HOUSE This small local chain offers a comprehensive lineup of breakfast fare: omelets, scrambles, Benedicts, crepes, waffles, burritos and, of course, mimosas. The lunch/dinner menu is similarly broad, with burgers, salads, grilled sandwiches and Mexican “street food.” 5641 J St.; (916) 400-4084; mimosahouse.com. B–L–D. American. $$ OBO’ ITALIAN TABLE & BAR This casual Italian eatery

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Origami Asian Grill’s rice bowl is beautifully designed and efficiently run. There are hot dishes and cold salads behind the glass cases, ready for the taking. But the stars of the menu are the freshly made pastas and wood-oven pizzas. There’s also a full bar serving Italian-theme craft cocktails. 3145 Folsom Blvd.; (916) 822-8720; oboitalian.com. L–D. Italian. $$ ONESPEED Chef Rick Mahan, who built his stellar reputation at The Waterboy in midtown, branched out with a more casual concept at his East Sac eatery. The open bistro has a tiled pizza oven that cranks out chewy, flavorful pizzas. 4818 Folsom Blvd.; (916) 706-1748; onespeedpizza.com. B–L–D. Pizza. $$ ORIGAMI ASIAN GRILL Most of the time, this is a fast-casual eatery serving Asian-flavored rice bowls, banh mi sandwiches, salads and ramen. But on Friday and Saturday nights, the two talented chefs behind Origami offer an elevated tasting menu for a handful of lucky diners at the counter. (By reservation only.) 4801 Folsom Blvd.; (916) 400-3075; origami asiangrill.com. L–D. Asian fusion. $–$$$ SELLAND’S MARKET-CAFE Choose from an array of appetizers and hot items along with crowd-pleasing side dishes and pizza. This high-quality takeout food can be a real lifesaver. 5340 H St.; (916) 736-3333; sellands.com. L–D–Br. Gourmet takeout. $$ STAR GINGER ASIAN GRILL AND NOODLE BAR Offering affordably priced dishes inspired by the street foods of Thailand, Vietnam and Singapore, this restaurant’s spicy Thai chicken soup is a delicious bargain. 3101 Folsom Blvd.; (916) 231-8888; starginger restaurant.com. L–D. Pan-Asian. $ 33RD STREET BISTRO This boisterous restaurant has a large bar with great views of the open kitchen

and a covered outdoor patio. The menu is American comfort food, and many of the dishes have a Northwestern attitude. The bistro also offers a great breakfast. 3301 Folsom Blvd.; (916) 455-2233; 33rdstreet bistro.com. B–L–D. American/Northwestern. $$ 3 HERMANAS With the 2018 opening of this little Mexican eatery, all three Saenz sisters now have their own Sacramento restaurants. Like its sibling restaurants, Tres Hermanas and Three Sisters, this one serves hearty, classic Mexican fare such as ensalada norteña and camarones a la diabla, along with vegan and vegetarian options. 3260 J St.; (916) 382-9079; 3hermanasonj.com. L–D–Br. Mexican. $$

EL DORADO HILLS AJI JAPANESE BISTRO This casually elegant restaurant offers an innovative menu of Japanese street food, interesting fusion entrées, traditional dishes such as teriyaki and tempura and sushi. 4361 Town Center Blvd.; (916) 941-9181; ajibistroedh.com. L–D. Japanese/sushi. $–$$ BAMIYAN AFGHAN RESTAURANT Must-order dishes include mantoo (dumplings filled with spiced ground beef) and skewered, charbroiled leg of lamb. For dessert, Afghani-style vanilla ice cream is sprinkled with dates, figs and pistachios. 1121 White Rock Road; (916) 941-8787; afghancuisine.com. D. Afghan. $$–$$$ MILESTONE This unstuffy eatery serves great takes on comfort-food classics like pot roast and fried chicken. It’s straightforward, without pretense or gimmickry. The setting is like a Napa country porch, and the service is warm and approachable. 4359 Town Center Blvd.; (916) 934-0790; milestonerestaurant edh.com. L–D–Br. New American. $$–$$

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A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

DINING GUIDE

CATTLEMENS STEAKHOUSE & SALOON Serving exclusively Harris Ranch “Natural Beef”, Cattlemens ages and hand-cuts all beef selections on site. Signature steaks include the famous “Sizzling Prime Rib”, “King of Steaks” 32-oz. Porterhouse, New York Strip and Filet Mignon. Other popular items are Baby Back Pork Ribs, Grilled Salmon, Chicken and Pasta. All entrees are served up with all the fixin’s — All-You-Can-Eat tossed salad, hot sourdough bread and ranch-style beans. A popular spot for “More Beef for Your Buck” weeknight dinner specials and kid friendly dining. Seven days a week, Happy Hour is 4-6 pm in the saloon with savory small plates and thirst quenching hand-crafted cocktails served nightly. Full banquet and reception facilities are available for both day and evening events. Reservations accepted. Open at 4 p.m. seven days per week. 2000 Taylor Rd., Roseville | 916-782-5587 12409 Folsom Blvd., Rancho Cordova 916-985-3030 Hwy 80 at Currey Rd., Dixon | 707-678-5518 www.cattlemens.com

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LEATHERBY’S FAMILY CREAMERY Sacramento’s favorite ice cream parlour for 35+ years. Our award-winning ice cream and sauces are made fresh daily and served in generous portions. We also offer a large variety of delicious sandwiches–from our specialty crab sandwich to great burgers. Leatherby’s is the perfect old fashioned ice cream parlour for families, friends, large groups or parties. Sun–Thur: 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Fri–Sat: 11 a.m.–12 a.m. Sacramento | Arden Way | 916-920-8382 Citrus Heights | Antelope Road | 916-729-4021 Elk Grove | Laguna Blvd | 916-691-3334 www.leatherbys.net

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Restaurants SELLAND’S MARKET-CAFE For description, see listing under “East Sacramento.” 4370 Town Center Blvd.; (916) 932-5025; sellands.com. L–D–Br. Gourmet takeout. $$ SIENNA RESTAURANT A luxurious Tuscan interior features a large bar and pretty patios. The menu includes a playful melange of global cuisine, including fresh seafood, hand-cut steaks, stone hearth pizzas, inventive appetizers and a stacked French dip sandwich. Live music Thursday–Saturday nights. Sunday brunch includes a made-to-order omelet bar and unlimited mimosas. 3909 Park Drive; (916) 941-9694; siennarestaurants.com. L–D–Br. Global. $$–$$$

ELK GROVE BOULEVARD BISTRO Located in a cozy 1908 bungalow, this bistro is one of the region’s best-kept dining secrets. Chef/owner Bret Bohlmann is a passionate supporter of local farmers and winemakers, and his innovative food sings with freshness and seasonality. 8941 Elk Grove Blvd.; (916) 685-2220; blvdbistro. com. D–Br. New American. $$–$$$ LEATHERBY’S FAMILY CREAMERY For description, see listing under “Arden Arcade.” 8238 Laguna Blvd.; (916) 691-3334; leatherbys.net. L–D. Sandwiches/ice cream. $ MIKUNI JAPANESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR For description, see listing under “Downtown.” 8525 Bond Road; (916) 714-2112; mikunisushi.com. L–D. Japanese/sushi. $$ THAI CHILI This plain restaurant offers an entire menu just for vegetarians, plus interesting meat and fish dishes. 8696 Elk Grove Blvd.; (916) 714-3519; thaichilielkgrove.net. L–D. Thai. $$

FAIR OAKS MIKUNI JAPANESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR For description, see listing under “Downtown.” 4323 Hazel Ave.; (916) 961-2112; mikunisushi.com. L–D. Japanese/sushi. $$ SUNFLOWER DRIVE IN This casual spot serves healthful, wholesome vegetarian and vegan fare. Faves include the Nutburger, the egg salad sandwich and fruit smoothies. 10344 Fair Oaks Blvd.; (916) 9674331; sunflowerdrivein.com. L–D. Vegetarian. $

FOLSOM BACCHUS HOUSE WINE BAR & BISTRO With a seasonal menu packed with innovative, globally influenced dishes, this restaurant has plenty to choose from. 1004 E. Bidwell St.; (916) 984-7500; bacchus housebistro.com. L–D–Br. New American. $$–$$$ BACK BISTRO A warm pocket of coziness and urban sophistication in a retail center, this place offers an appealing menu of casual nibbles and swankier entrées. But it’s the wine program that really knocks this charming little bistro out of the park. 230 Palladio Parkway, Suite 1201; (916) 986-9100; backbis tro.com. D. New American/Mediterranean. $$–$$$ CHICAGO FIRE Oodles of melted cheese blanket the pizzas that fly out of the kitchen of this busy restaurant, a local chain with four locations, including two in Folsom. Here, you get to choose between thincrust, deep-dish and stuffed pizzas. 614 Sutter St.; (916) 353-0140. Also: 310 Palladio Parkway; (916) 984-0140; chicagofire.com. L–D. Pizza. $ FAT’S ASIA BISTRO AND DIM SUM BAR This glamor-

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Croque Madame from Paragary’s ous restaurant looks like a set from an Indiana Jones movie, with tall palm trees and an enormous golden Buddha atop a water fountain. The menu focuses on Asian cuisine, from Mongolian beef and Hong Kong chow mein to Thai chicken satay served with a fiery curry-peanut sauce. 2585 Iron Point Road; (916) 983-1133; fatsrestaurants.com. L–D. Pan-Asian. $$ LAND OCEAN The menu hits all the steakhouse high notes: hand-cut steaks, lobster, seafood and rotisserie, entrée salads and sandwiches. 2720 E. Bidwell St.; (916) 983-7000; landoceanrestaurants.com. L–D–Br. New American/steakhouse. $$$ SCOTT’S SEAFOOD GRILL & BAR This restaurant offers a solid menu of delicious seafood, from crab cakes and calamari to roasted lobster tail. 9611 Greenback Lane; (916) 989-6711; scottsseafood.net. L–D. Seafood. $$$–$$$$ THAI PARADISE Standouts on the extensive menu include spring rolls, tom kha koong (coconut milk soup with prawns), green curry, spicy scallops and pad thai. Try the fried banana with ice cream for dessert. 2770 E. Bidwell St.; (916) 984-8988; thai paradisefolsom.com. L–D. Thai. $$

GARDEN HIGHWAY CRAWDADS ON THE RIVER This riverfront restaurant draws crowds looking for a great place to party on the water during warm-weather months. Boats pull up to the restaurant’s deck, where you can sip a cocktail, and roll-up doors blur the line between indoors and out. The Cajun-inspired menu includes fish tacos and several fun entrées. 1375 Garden Highway; (916) 929-2268; saccrawdads.com. L–D– Br. Cajun/American. $$

GRANITE BAY HAWKS One of Placer County’s best restaurants, Hawks is known for elegant cuisine and beautiful interior. Framed photos of farmscapes remind diners of owners Molly Hawks and Michael Fagnoni’s commitment to locally sourced ingredients. The seasonal menu is full of delicious surprises, such as seared scallop and sea urchin. 5530 Douglas Blvd.; (916) 791-6200; hawksrestaurant.com. L–D–Br. New American/French. $$$–$$$$

GREENHAVEN/POCKET SCOTT’S SEAFOOD ON THE RIVER Located in The Westin Sacramento, Scott’s has a patio and a view of the river. Breakfast dishes include crab cake Benedict, and lunch entrées range from petrale sole to a prawn Caesar salad. For dinner, splurge on a lobster tail or choose a more modestly priced grilled salmon. 4800 Riverside Blvd.; (916) 379-5959; scottsseafood.net/ theriver. B–L–D. Seafood. $$$–$$$$

LAND PARK RIVERSIDE CLUBHOUSE The busy kitchen focuses on a solid menu of American classics. Beautifully designed, the restaurant features a stunning outdoor waterfall and a tri-level fireplace. 2633 Riverside Blvd.; (916) 448-9988; riversideclubhouse.com. L–D– Br. American/New American. $$ TAYLOR’S KITCHEN Step inside the cozy space and you’ll notice the focal point is an open kitchen where the chefs prepare meats and produce sold at Taylor’s Market next door. 2924 Freeport Blvd.; (916) 4435154; taylorskitchen.com. D–Br. American. $$$

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LINCOLN HIGH STEAKS This Thunder Valley Casino restaurant is a meat lover’s paradise, offering up everything from an 8-ounce prime fi let to a 26-ounce bone-in New York steak. Side dishes range from sweet potato casserole to five-cheese macaroni. 1200 Athens Ave.; (916) 408-8327; thundervalleyresort.com. D. Steakhouse. $$$$ MERIDIANS Located in Sun City Lincoln Hills’ Orchard Creek Lodge, this elegant restaurant offers comfort and reliability. The menu is American to its core, featuring classic dishes such as grilled porterhouse pork chop and pot roast with mashed potatoes and pan gravy. 965 Orchard Creek Lane; (916) 625-4040; meridiansrestaurant.com. B–L–D. American. $$$.

MIDTOWN BEAST + BOUNTY The beating heart of this chic restaurant is its open hearth, where meats and vegetables are roasted over a wood fire. The meaty rib-eye, served over potatoes roasted in the meat’s fat, is meant to be shared. So is the pizza, thin, flat and seductively charred from the wood-burning pizza oven. 1701 R St.; (916) 244-4016; eatbeastandbounty.com. L–D–Br. American. $$$ 58 DEGREES & HOLDING CO. This wine bar showcases an astonishing number of wines by the glass— all available in 3- and 6-ounce pours. There’s also an abbreviated menu of small plates designed to complement and enhance the wines. 1217 18th St.; (916) 442-5858; 58degrees.com. L–D. Wine bar. $$

HOOK & LADDER MANUFACTURING COMPANY Located in a Quonset hut, this restaurant is both hip and cozy. Despite the barlike ambience, Hook & Ladder is serious about food. All the pastas and desserts are made in-house. 1630 S St.; (916) 442-4885; hook andladder916.com. L–D–Br. Californian. $$ LOCALIS This upscale restaurant is a pleasant surprise. Localis (Latin for “local”) is a dinner-only restaurant with a tiny, inventive menu of ingredientdriven dishes. Chef Christopher Barnum-Dann works with local farms to source most of the menu within 100 miles. 2031 S St.; (916) 737-7699; localissacra mento.com. D. Californian. $$$–$$$$ LOWBRAU BIERHALLE This chic yet casual watering hole serves house-made sausages, duck fat fries and stand-out beers. Long communal tables make for an experience that’s convivial. 1050 20th St.; (916) 7062636; lowbrausacramento.com. L–D–Br. Beer hall. $ MULVANEY’S BUILDING & LOAN Distinctive and cozy, this topflight restaurant exudes the generous affability of its owner, chef Patrick Mulvaney. It’s housed in a brick firehouse from the late 1800s, and the lush patio is a popular spot in warm months. The menu changes frequently and is focused on locally sourced, seasonal ingredients. 1215 19th St.; (916) 441-6022; mulvaneysbl.com. L–D. Californian. $$$ PARAGARY’S This legendary restaurant focuses on elegant, Mediterranean-inspired cuisine. 1401 28th St.; (916) 457-5737; paragarys.com. L–D–Br. New American/Californian. $$–$$$ THE WATERBOY This Mediterranean-inspired restaurant produces perhaps the finest cooking in the region. You can’t go wrong if you order one of the

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HAWKS PUBLIC HOUSE At this sophisticated gastropub, the menu includes beautifully executed dishes like country pâté and baked rigatoni. The pastas are made in-house, and even the burger is top-notch. 1525 Alhambra Blvd.; (916) 588-4440; hawkspublic house.com. L–D–Br. Mediterranean gastropub. $$$

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Restaurants lovely salads, followed by the gnocchi, ravioli or a simple piece of fish. You’ll also find French classics such as veal sweetbreads and pomme frites. 2000 Capitol Ave.; (916) 498-9891; waterboyrestaurant. com. L–D. Mediterranean. $$$$ ZOCALO This Mexican restaurant is one of the best places to while away an evening with friends over margaritas. The menu has regional Mexican specialties such as tacos de cazuela, a casserole-ish concoction of steak, chorizo, and cheese served with housemade tortillas. 1801 Capitol Ave.; (916) 441-0303; zocalo sacramento.com. L–D–Br. Mexican. $$

NORTH SACRAMENTO WOODLAKE TAVERN This restaurant offers a seasonal take on barbecue. The menu includes brisket, ribs, roasted chicken, shrimp and grits, and rustic drop biscuits that are crunchy, savory and buttery. 1431 Del Paso Blvd.; (916) 514-0405; woodlaketavern. com. D. Barbecue/American. $$–$$$

OAK PARK LA VENADITA This inviting, casual taqueria has a concise menu that includes inventive street tacos, a brightly flavored ceviche and an enchilada with rich mole sauce. It also boasts a full bar and an enticing menu of craft cocktails. 3501 Third Ave.; (916) 4004676; lavenaditasac.com. L–D. Mexican. $$

OLD SACRAMENTO THE FIREHOUSE Since opening in 1960, this has been Sacramento’s go-to restaurant for romantic atmosphere and historic charm. Located in a 1853 firehouse, the food is special-occasion worthy, and the wine list represents more than 2,100 labels. 1112 Second St.; (916) 442-4772; firehouseoldsac.com. L–D. Californian/American. $$$$ PILOTHOUSE Housed in the history-steeped Delta King riverboat, this is one of the most romantic restaurants in the city. On Sundays, it puts on one of the prettiest champagne brunches around. 1000 Front St.; (916) 441-4440; deltaking.com. B–L–Br. American. $$–$$$ RIO CITY CAFE Located on the riverbank, the bustling restaurant offers stunning views of Tower Bridge. The menu changes seasonally and offers a wide selection of creative, solid dishes. 1110 Front St.; (916) 442-8226; riocitycafe.com. L–D–Br. New American. $$

Rack of lamb from Zinfandel Grille “Folsom.” 500 N. Sunrise Ave.; (916) 771-2020; chi cagofire.com. L–D. Pizza. $ FAT’S ASIA BISTRO AND DIM SUM BAR For description, see listing under “Folsom.” 1500 Eureka Road; (916) 787-3287; fatsrestaurants.com. L–D. Pan-Asian. $$ LA PROVENCE RESTAURANT & TERRACE At this elegant French restaurant, the seasonal menu features items such as bouillabaisse and soupe au pistou. 110 Diamond Creek Place; (916) 789-2002; laprovence roseville.com. L–D–Br. French. $$$–$$$$

POCKET/GREENHAVEN

MCCORMICK & SCHMICK’S SEAFOOD & STEAKS Sophisticated restaurant with a large menu. 1194 Roseville Parkway; (916) 960-4875; mccormickand schmicks.com. L–D. Seafood/American. $$–$$$

CACIO At this tiny restaurant, the fare is high-quality Italian comfort food with an emphasis on pasta. Service is warm and homey and reservations (even at lunch) are a must. 7600 Greenhaven Drive; (916) 399-9309; caciosacramento.com. L–D. Italian. $$

PAUL MARTIN’S AMERICAN BISTRO The bustling restaurant is a local favorite. The kitchen offers a great list of small plates and robust, approachable entrées. 1455 Eureka Road; (916) 783-3600; paulmartinsamericangrill.com. L–D–Br. New American. $$–$$$

RANCHO CORDOVA CATTLEMENS For description, see listing under “Dixon.” 12409 Folsom Blvd.; (916) 985-3030; cattle mens.com. D. Steakhouse. $$$

ROSEVILLE CATTLEMENS For description, see listing under “Dixon.” 2000 Taylor Road; (916) 782-5587; cattle mens.com. D. Steakhouse. $$$ CHICAGO FIRE For description, see listing under

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RUEN THAI Simple and serene, Ruen Thai is a family-owned restaurant that offers a surprisingly large selection of fresh-tasting food. 1470 Eureka Road; (916) 774-1499; ruenthai.net. L–D. Thai. $ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE This swanky dinner house serves some of the tastiest meat in town. Expertly cooked steaks are seared at 1,800 degrees. Don’t miss the cowboy rib-eye or the fork-tender filet mignon. 1185 Galleria Blvd.; (916) 780-6910; ruths chris.com. D. Steakhouse. $$$$ YARD HOUSE With its lengthy menu, big flavors and loud music, there’s nothing retiring about this restaurant. There are close to 130 beers on tap, and the

food includes beer-friendly small plates. 1166 Roseville Parkway; (916) 780-9273; yardhouse.com/CA/ Roseville. L–D. American/bar food. $$ ZOCALO For description, see listing under “Midtown.” 1182 Roseville Parkway; (916) 788-0303; zocalosac ramento.com/roseville. L–D–Br. Mexican. $$

SIERRA OAKS CAFE BERNARDO AT PAVILIONS For description, see listing under “Midtown.” 515 Pavilions Lane; (916) 922-2870; cafebernardo.com. B–L–D. New American. $ ETTORE’S This bakery is a convivial spot for a casual meal. It’s hard to take your eyes off the dessert cases long enough to choose your savory items. But you’ll soon discover the kitchen’s talent extends to the wonderful pizzas, cooked in a wood-burning oven, hearty sandwiches and burgers, and fresh salads. 2376 Fair Oaks Blvd.; (916) 482-0708; ettores.com. B–L–D. Bakery/New American. $–$$ LEMON GRASS RESTAURANT Lemon Grass serves delicious, upscale Asian fare such as salad rolls, green curry and catfish in a clay pot. Everything tastes fresh, light and clean. 601 Munroe St.; (916) 486-4891; lemongrassrestaurant.com. L–D. Pan-Asian. $$$ PIATTI Muted colors and dark wood provide a comfortable, contemporary vibe. The culinary focus is on Italian cuisine with an American influence. The menu includes delightful variations on Italian staples—margherita, pesto or roasted chicken pizzas; ravioli, pappardelle and fettuccine pasta dishes. 571 Pavilions Lane; (916) 649-8885; piatti.com/sacra mento. L–D. Italian/American. $$

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION ROXY RESTAURANT AND BAR The innovative New American menu is seasonal and locally focused, with many of the ingredients sourced from area farms and ranches. 2381 Fair Oaks Blvd.; (916) 489-2000; roxy restaurantandbar.com. L–D–Br. American/Californian/steakhouse. $$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE For description, see listing under “Roseville.” 501 Pavilions Lane; (916) 286-2702; ruthschris.com. L (Fridays only)–D. Steakhouse. $$$$ ZINFANDEL GRILLE Open for more than two decades, Zinfandel Grille is an enduring dining favorite, serving wood-fired pizzas, pasta, fish and other Mediterranean entrées. 2384 Fair Oaks Blvd.; (916) 485-7100; zinfandelgrille.com. L–D. New American. $$$

SOUTH SACRAMENTO FRASINETTI’S This friendly, eager-to-please restaurant shares space with Frasinetti’s Winery. The menu is old-school Italian—think minestrone and spaghetti and meatballs—and the portions are huge. 7395 Frasinetti Road; (916) 383-2444; frasinetti. com. L–D. Italian. $$–$$$ LALO’S RESTAURANT If you’re craving real Mexican food, come here for the carne asada tacos or the moist pork tamales. Taco flavors range from grilled pork and beef tongue to buche (fried pork stomach); traditional Mexican sandwiches also are available. 5063 24th St.; (916) 736-2389. L–D. Mexican. $

TAHOE PARK BACON & BUTTER For description, see listing under “East Sacramento.” 5913 Broadway; (916) 346-4445; baconandbuttersac.com. B–L. Breakfast/American. $–$$

WEST SACRAMENTO BRODERICK ROADHOUSE Burgers rule at this appealingly scruffy bar/restaurant. In addition to the juicy beef burgers, there’s also a selection of more avant-garde versions, including the duck burger. 319 Sixth St.; (916) 372-2436; broderickroadhouse.com. L–D–Br. Burgers. $ BURGERS AND BREW For description, see listing under “Downtown.” 317 Third St., (530) 572-0909; burgersbrew.com. L–D. Burgers. $ LA CROSTA PIZZA BAR This casual pizza joint serves first-rate pies baked in a wood-burning oven, along with inventive flatbread sandwiches and a small selection of Italian entrées. 330 Third St.; (916) 3890372; lacrostapizzabar.com. L–D–Br. Pizza. $$–$$$ VIENTIANE RESTAURANT This dynamic spot offers some dishes you might not find at other Thai restaurants, such as garlic quail, deep-fried and lavished with pepper and garlic. 1001 Jefferson Blvd.; (916) 373-1556. L–D. Thai/Laotian. $ Subscription rates: $18 for one year, U.S. only. All out-of-state subscribers add $3 per year. Single copies: $4.95. Change of address: Please send your new address and your old address mailing label. Allow six to eight weeks’ advance notice. Send all remittances and requests to Sacramento Magazine, 5750 New King Drive, Suite 100, Troy, MI 48098. Customer service inquiries: Call (866) 660-6247. Copyright 2020 by Sacramento Media LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission from the publisher is prohibited. Prices quoted in advertisements are subject to change without notice. Sacramento Magazine (ISSN 0747-8712) Volume 46, Number 3, March 2020. Sacramento Magazine (ISSN 0747-8712) is published monthly by Sacramento Media, LLC, 231 Lathrop Way, Suite A, Sacramento, CA 95815. Periodical postage paid at Troy, MI and additional offices. Postmaster: Send change of address to Sacramento Magazine, 5750 New King Dr., Suite 100, Troy, MI 48098

Continued from FS-1

Wealth Managers Angela K. Adler ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Ariel Agustin ∙ Merrill Lynch Mark Isaac Aizenberg ∙ Wells Fargo Advisors Sarkis Aubrey Anduze ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Jaime Elizabeth Barretta ∙ LPL Financial

Glenn David Kenes ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Bret Andrew Glover ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Daniel Kennedy Poppers ∙ Lundqvist Wealth Strategies

Garrick David Gookin ∙ South Placer Wealth Management Group

James Kersey ∙ J. W. Cole Advisors

Deanna M. Quintanilla ∙ Wells Fargo Advisors

Scott Gordon ∙ Pacific Investment Consultants

Kevin Kimura ∙ Merrill Lynch Johnny A. Kovalek ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Christeen Marie Reeg ∙ Pacific Investment Consultants

Louis J. Barrientos ∙ FC360 James W. Biller ∙ Wedbush Securities

Colin S. Grahl ∙ WGG Wealth Partners

Timothy A. Brockway ∙ Asset Strategies Group

Stephen Bernard Halterbeck ∙ D.A. Davidson & Company

Robert James Burton ∙ Wells Fargo Advisors

Wolfgang Johannes Hawlisch ∙ Morgan Stanley

Daniel Cairns ∙ Robert W. Baird & Company

Brad Lewis Heaps ∙ Charles Schwab & Company

James Scott Cave ∙ LPL Financial

Ben Coy Hester ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Ken Lee Christie ∙ Spectrum Wealth Advisory Group, LLC

Joseph M. Hinojos ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Nancy Ellen Cole ∙ Western International Securities

Lester L. Holmes ∙ Holmes Financial/Berthel Fisher & Company

Sheryl Conklin ∙ Conklin Financial Planning Judith Anne Davidson ∙ Merrill Lynch A. Bruce Dickson ∙ Dickson Financial Advisors, LLC Rachel Eaton ∙ Merrill Lynch Kent R. Elliott ∙ Robert W. Baird & Company Stephen Dean Erickson ∙ Cetera Advisor Networks

Rani Hathaway Pettis ∙ Wells Fargo Advisors

Trevor Kenneth Kern ∙ Zeller Kern Wealth Advisors

Norielle Raenier Gottschalk ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Rupa N. Jack ∙ Morgan Stanley Ryan Jantzen ∙ Pacific Investment Consultants Amanda E. Johnson ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Timothy Clark Johnson ∙ Wells Fargo Advisors Seth Levin kaplan ∙ Robert W. Baird & Company

John Landberg ∙ Robert W. Baird & Company Stan B. Leavitt ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Stanley Chow Cho Leong ∙ Wisdom Pointe Wealth Advisors Steven Albert Liaty ∙ Wells Fargo Advisors David Allan Loeffler ∙ Wells Fargo Advisors

Monika Lynn Reyes ∙ WGG Wealth Partners Gregg Anthony Roh ∙ Wells Fargo Advisors Matthew Harold Schmitt ∙ Robert W. Baird & Company Derek Tadao Seo ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Terry Dale Sherrill ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Sean Michael Lucas ∙ Merrill Lynch

W. Alan Silva ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Douglas Kenneth Macfarlane ∙ Robert W. Baird & Company

Julie L. Small ∙ Merrill Lynch James Josiah Stagg ∙ Wells Fargo Advisors

Ronald W. Mammen ∙ Cetera Advisor Networks

Scott Carmack Thomas ∙ Royal Alliance Associates

Russell Joseph Martinez ∙ Morgan Stanley

Dru A. Torvend ∙ Hometown Advisors, Inc.

David L. Odom ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Zach Adam Vail ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Cody OKeefe ∙ Westlake, Grahl, & Glover

Timothy Vas Dias ∙ Ameritas Investment Corporation

Chris Packard ∙ Packard Financial

Terry Ward ∙ Merrill Lynch

Kenneth Richard Peters ∙ Wells Fargo Advisors

Stephen Michael Westlake ∙ WGG Wealth Partnerss

Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, Certified finanCial Planner™ and federally registered CFP (with flame design) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. The Chartered Financial Consultant credential [ChFC®] is a financial planning designation awarded by The American College. The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Actively licensed as a registered investment adviser or as a principal of a registered investment adviser firm for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not; A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them and/or a total of five settled, pending, dismissed or denied complaints with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one clients’ experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy within the past 11 years; E. Been terminated from a financial services firm within the past 11 years; F. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their clients’ assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 1,350 Sacramento-area wealth managers were considered for the award; 99 (10% of candidates) were named 2020 Five Star Wealth Managers. 2019: 997 considered, 115 winners; 2018: 902 considered, 99 winners; 2017: 641 considered, 170 winners; 2016: 597 considered, 179 winners; 2015: 1,011 considered, 210 winners; 2014: 809 considered, 167 winners; 2013: 1,040 considered, 202 winners; 2012: 881 considered, 175 winners.

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Rikki Foster ∙ Bangerter Financial Services

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THE CENTER FOR SACRAMENTO HISTORY sometimes gets a little help from its friends.

Image Investigators

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Take the above photograph, which was classified as unidentified. Center staff posted it online, saying that its glass plate black-and-white negative was dated circa 1915. Soon, some sharp individuals commented that it was taken during the construction of St. Elizabeth Catholic Church at 12th and S streets. They noted the position of the state Capitol in the background and the fact that the building is set on an angle compared to the house next to it, then compared the architecture to that of the modern day church. Mystery solved! If you would like to try your hand at identifying some photos, go to centerforsacramento history.org and follow the Mystery Image link.—DARLENA BELUSHIN MCKAY

Center for Sacramento History, City of Sacramento Collection, 1984/x-03/0074

A LOOK BACK

SACRAMENTO MAGAZINE  March 2020  

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We’re honored to deliver healthy starts. Our Roseville and South Sacramento Medical Centers are proud to be named to Cal Hospital Compare’s 2019 Maternity Care Honor Roll, which recognizes our efforts to reduce cesarean births for first-time moms with low-risk pregnancies, helping our patients and newborns enjoy a safe and healthy start together.

See calhospitalcompare.org for more details about the Maternity Care Honor Roll.

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Profile for Sacramento Magazine

Sacramento Magazine March 2020  

Sacramento Magazine's March 2020 digital edition. On the cover is This Is Us actor and Sacramento native, Chris Sullivan.

Sacramento Magazine March 2020  

Sacramento Magazine's March 2020 digital edition. On the cover is This Is Us actor and Sacramento native, Chris Sullivan.