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End-of-Term Spring 2020 Digital Exhibition Catalog Architectural Drawing Batik Body Archives / Digital Multimedia Book Arts Ceramics Color Photography Creative Writing Drawing Etching Fashion Design Fresco Painting Graphic Design Illustration Infographics Installation and Performance Art Interior Design Jewelry Design Painting Photography Sculpture Serigraphy Video

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Forward Steven Brittan, SACI President

To this very special group of SACI students who came in January and left in March as the Covid-19 crisis hit, I commend you for your courage and hard work throughout the semester. Reviewing the collection of artworks and designs in this catalog, you clearly rose to the challenge, quickly adjusting to the new format of distancelearning showing remarkable energy, creativity and inspiration to make this period of study (abroad and at home) a oncein-a-lifetime experience. I am also most grateful to our SACI faculty who immediately adapted to this new remote teaching environment and provided you with knowledge and skills in their respective disciplines with utmost care and attention. When I saw your artwork at the beginning of the year in the SACI studios, it was clear that you already showed talent and willingness to learn new things.

Although this has been a lifechanging and defining moment for us all, what is certain is our life perspectives have irrevocably changed and, while it is daunting, we are forced now to re-evaluate everything! As artists, our role is to observe, articulate, express, and visualize this new and changing world and to help give shape and meaning to new narratives with a critical eye and mind. This is a unique opportunity to reframe our values and to reset, and I feel sure you will be able to do so in an intelligent and creative manner. However brief your time spent in Florence, we at SACI all hope that it was meaningful and enjoyable and that you will come back and visit us again. We wish you continued success in your artistic pursuits and development of your ideas, building on this pivotal chapter in your life.

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ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING SYLVIE DUVERNOY

Since architectural drawing is not an end to itself but a means to communicate with the partners that will transform the design idea into an actual building, it has to be precise and accurate. It is a graphic language that must follow specific rules in order to avoid misunderstandings. There are many kinds of possible representations. Some attempt at matching our natural vision, some other are coded abstractions. All of them may produce beautiful drawings. Playing with the rules of representation can be turned into a delightful game, especially when using shading, colors and all tricks that will enhance the artistic aspect of the final drawings. The course is suitable for students in architecture, planning, restoration, design… or anyone interested in exploring new fields of graphic representation.

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This course addresses the questions of how we have to draw and why we draw as we do. It explores hand-drawing and digital approaches to both abstract representation and simulation of visual perception. Students learn computeraided drafting that is appropriate for presentation drawings and freehand drawing as a quicker and more expressive way to outline study sketches, conceptual diagrams, and travel sketches. The course is divided into lessons and practical exercises on: 2D representation: plan, section, facade; 3D representation; free-hand sketches; theory and color practice; and rendering techniques with Photoshop.


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1 Kevin Loumeau 2 Isabella Del Signore 3 Fabiola Vega 4 Jamie Steinberg

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1 Margaret McLaughlin 2 Eli Davis 3 Kathryn Pawlowski

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1 Abigail Stallings 2 Joseph Gerace 3 Kaily Snider 4 Carlo Cremonini

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BATIK K ATHY KNIPPEL

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The students were working normally and creatively up to the midterm. Then the world changed by the spread of the Coronavirus outbreak. Everyone returned to their homes and continued their courses online. Basic tool supply kits were sent out to each student. They were challenged to work at home, not even being able to go to stores to purchase supplies. They took on the challenge and I am proud to say that everyone participated to the best of their abilities, using very creative solutions to produce their artworks and follow all the lessons, often producing more than they would have during a normal uninterrupted class. I included three virtual field trips using photos from previous class trips, so that they could stay in touch with the Florence and Italy they had grown to love.

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This course covers the techniques of wax resist, paste resist, silk painting, and the tied and shaped resist processes of Shibori. Projects are designed to instruct students in ways of controlling the image-making process by solving color and design problems through manipulation of resists and dye bath sequences. Emphasis is placed upon familiarizing students with dyes and introducing them to other fiber techniques for the finishing and embellishment of fabrics, such as quilting, sewing, beading, embroidery, etc.


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1 Hannah Carey 2 Caroline Snyder 3 Sam Betts 4 Reva Preven

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1 Keelin Maloney 2 Stella Bronson 3 Henna Kuo 4 Emily Pelligrini 5 Dolymarie Mercado 6 Henna Kuo

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BODY ARCHIVES + DIGITAL MULTIMEDIA DEJAN ATANACKOVIC

The Archive of Gestures. More than ever before we are able to transmit and share. This ability grows every day. And the more we are able to transmit and share, the more we have a desire to do so. In the end, sharing becomes more important than what we share. Isn’t that a possible definition of an epidemic? The epidemic is a form of communication: an outcome of an insatiable desire to share and to be a part of a process of sharing, even when what is shared is entirely unknown, incomprehensible. The epidemic therefore occurs as a response to that desire. So, I believe it is really important to focus on the topic of communication itself, specifically to its essential element: the gesture. What is a gesture in its essence? A very incomplete response could be: gesture is a form of language. It is “performed” with the movement of hands, facial expressions, or with the entire body. A gesture is apparently a very limited, essential communication. On the other hand, a gesture can also be a very rich and poetic communication. It is often culturally imposed, a result of an imitation.

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We grow up imitating our own cultural surrounding or adapting to another. The gestures give form to our bodies. Do our gestures belong to us, or are we all part of a system of gestures that model us culturally, and without which we would be speechless? Gestures take place—and sometimes depend upon the place in which we find ourselves or to which we relate. To conlude, the students were asked to develop projects around the theme of the gesture. What are the gestures that describe our time? Is it panic, fear, hope, indifference? Can you think of gestures of indifference or hope? And can you think of a story to be told through gestures? Perhaps a story about a utopia, about love, or about the future? Think about a story to be told through performed, documented, and collected gestures.


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2 1 Marie-France Robichaud - Digital Multimedia 2 Zoe Iatridis - Body Archives

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1 Anastasia Gladkova - Body Archives 2 Lindsey Campbell - Body Archives 3 Nahee Kang - Body Archives 4 Natalie Lam - Body Archives 5 Anna Cahn - Body Archives 6 Sam Betts - Digital Multimedia

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BOOK ARTS PATRICIA SILVA

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Throughout this semester, students in the Introduction to Book Arts class were challenged in their assignments to address issues of environment, resilience and adaptation. In particular, the work of the second half of the semester drew on long-established traditions in book arts of reflecting on contemporary issues of both social and personal import. The students this semester were thrown an unprecedented challenge and were able to respond with their art in a reflective and creative way. Bravi!

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This intensive course Introduces students to the traditions and methods of the handmade book, as well as the expressive possibilities available with bookworks. The student begins with simple foundational structures such as pamphlet-stitched and accordion style books and progress through more complex historical structures such as books sewn on supports, longstitch and coptic bindings. Exploration with materials is encouraged and students can combine other media (such as photography, screenprinting, 18

painting, etc.) they are familiar with in creating their bookworks. To help acquaint the student with the long and on-going tradition of book arts in Italy, time permitting, fieldtrips are be organized to visit contemporary artists (bookbinders, papermakers, letterpress printers) in their studios as well as visits to museums and institutions in the area which maintain collections relevant to the art of the book. Lastly, through slide presentations, sample works and lectures, the student are given an overview of the history of the book and its development in Western art.


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1 Samantha Simotas 2 Arais Meteyard 3 Sara Carrier 4 Adrienne Jeong

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3 1 Tara Shetty 2 Ginnia Araujo 3 Hannah Carey 4 Clara Dewar

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3 1 Katherine Compson 2 Danielle Delossantos 3 Reva Preven

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CERAMICS LISA NOCENTINI

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The students of the ceramic courses have reacted with patience and energy to the sudden turn of events due to the Coronavirus pandemic. They have had to deal with working at home, with no real studio space (often working in their kitchens or bedrooms), with no real clay available, no kilns, no glazes but, nevertheless, they have been able to produce some stunning work. Their curiosity and dedication to the medium has been apparent almost from the beginning of the lockdown. With very few means, a little air dry clay and acrylic colors, and, at times, random materials found at home, they all have created personal and imaginative works that show their effort and curiosity in facing and overcoming these difficult circumstances.

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The aim of the beginning course is to guide students through a progressive understanding of the complex nature of the ceramic medium. The course covers all basic techniques of forming and decorating clay through a series of practical demonstrations, slide shows, and short lectures covering the essential theoretic information on the nature of clay and glazes. Specific assignments are given for each new technique presented. Lowtemperature earthenware materials are used in the studio, since these are the ones that have been used in the Mediterranean area for centuries. Raku, sawdust saggar, and pit firings are also undertaken. When possible, field trips are organized to introduce students to local traditions and to contemporary artists’ work.


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1 Catherine Tisot - Beginning Ceramics 2 Erica Miget - Beginning Ceramics 3 Magdelena Kobeszko - Beginning Ceramics 4 Talia Putnoi - Beginning Ceramics

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1 Natalie Lam - Beginning Ceramics 2 Olivia Frechette - Beginning Ceramics 3 Sela Stazzone - Beginning Ceramics 4 Margaret McLaughlin - Intermediate Ceramics

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4 5 Abigail Stallings - Advanced Ceramics 6 Averi Biswas - Advanced Ceramics 7 Ramona Kuhn - Advanced Ceramics 8 Reva Preven - Advanced Ceramics 9 Hye Rin Woo - Advanced Ceramics


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COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY JACOPO SANTINI

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Resuming a class, for both students and teacher, in a situation of lockdown due to a pandemic, after a break and a sudden, forced return to their homes and having to do it through a seemingly lifeless distance learning platform sounds like a nightmare. Yet, surprisingly it has worked well. While I was a guide for them in Florence, my hometown, during the first half of the term, our roles switched upon their return to the US and they introduced me - as they had no alternative - to their homes, daily lives, and neighborhoods. It has been a beautiful, unique, fragile privilege. I am profoundly grateful that they have let me in. They confirmed the evident truth found in some good advice I was given a long time ago: be close to what is close to you.

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This course explores the process and uses of color-based image construction as a medium for expression. Students explore fundamental methods of image making through traditional color film exposure, digital exposure and scanning, manipulation, and export from the computer. Much attention is given to formal issues surrounding color theory as it applies to the light-based lensformed image. Many assignments use the Italian environment as a subject for exploration.


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1 Carmine Falcone - Advanced Color Photography 2 Micaela Rebelo - Advanced Color Photography 3 Brianna White-Ortiz - Advanced Color Photography 4 Hannah Roberts - Advanced Color Photography

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1 Roman Habibzai - Photography III: Color 2 Sara Carrier - Photography III: Color 3 Jessica Angelini - Photography III: Color 4 Desmond Magness - Advanced Color Photography

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4 1 Connor Harrington - Photography III: Color 2 Kayla Eremita - Photography III: Color 3 Zombie Hansoti - Advanced Color Photography 4 Michael Svizzero - Advanced Color Photography

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CREATIVE WRITING LEE FOUST

Despite our separation halfway through the semester, this creative writing workshop stayed together and continued to help one another to revise and hone their poems, stories, and quite a few combinations of text with visual art. It was a great group and there was a lot of superlative writing produced. I wish every student had sent me something, but hopefully these few are representative.

This course reviews the principles of poetic composition and fiction writing through analysis of contemporary models and group discussion of student’s work. The creative process is explored through the writing of fiction and poetry. Emphasis is placed upon travel writing, the foreign experience, and writers’ responses to the city of Florence itself. The possibilities of composing and incorporating text into the visual 30

arts are also explored. Short verse and prose texts are read to familiarize students with various stylistic approaches. As a means of provoking thought and discussion about the performative aspects of texts, students listen to recordings of authors reading from their work. Students visit, seek inspiration from, and write in various Florentine locations, and they present their own productions to the group for discussion on a regular basis.


“Questions and Closure” by Anthony Marin Questions There is a list of questions I want to ask but never will There is a list of questions I go through in my head Every time I’m alone and my mind can’t stop itself from searching for you There is a list of questions I want to ask if you’re listening somewhere Here I am asking them What do you think happens to the love that’s left behind When two lovers leave How blue do you think it gets Before it passes away does it pass away or does it still exist somewhere Waiting for us to come back When we lied to ourselves by Calling this unconditional and left Which one of us hurt more I shattered into a million little pieces and those pieces shattered into a million more Crumbled into dust till There was nothing left of me but the silence Tell me how love How did the grieving feel for you How did the mourning hurt How did you peel your eyes open after every blink Knowing I’d never be there staring back it must be hard to live with what ifs There must always be this constant dull aching in the pit of your stomach Trust me I feel it too How in the world did we get here How did we live through it And how are we still living How many months did it take before you stopped thinking of me Or are you still thinking of me

Cause if you are Then maybe I am too Thinking of you Thinking of me With me Around me Everywhere You and me and us Baby Ever since we left How many times did you pretend it was my body touching yours how many times did you search for me in your fantasies and end up crying instead of coming Don’t you lie to me I can tell when you’re lying Cause there’s always that little bit of Arrogance in your response Are you angry with me Are you okay And would you tell me if you’re not And if we ever see each other again Do you think you’d reach out and hold me Like you said you would The last time we spoke and You talked of the next time we would Or do you think we’d just look Shake in our skin as we pine to Absorb as much as we can of each other Cause by this time we’ve probably got Someone else waiting at home We were good together weren’t we And is it wrong that I’m asking. you these questions Tell me love That you have been Looking for these answers too

Closure I tried to find it but there was no answer at the end of the conversation

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“R.B.F”. by Talia Malchin There’s an infamous anomaly that harbors both resentment and pride in those which it plagues. It’s an inescapable tendency which may trouble those around you but often grants an air of importance for the insecure. Resting Bitch Face. This anomaly has served as a vessel for my true attitude since prepubescence, leading me to believe that there must have been many emotional and developmental factors which contribute to my constant external displeasure rather than a physical deformity or even actual internal disillusionment. I remember sitting in classrooms among other girls whom I perceived as effortlessly cool, and intentionally underpinning my expressions with nonchalance – or rather, lacking an expression at all. I can only assume that this deliberate stoicism evolved into my default face of indignation. I’ve had professors asking me if I’m okay in class, family telling me I look pissed off at the dinner table, and friends revealing that they thought I hated them when we first met. I

“A Wheel in The Tower” by Jared Mandile “If You Go Away” played and echoed through the building, I spun the wheel and watched the spokes move faster and faster. I imagined myself racing through the neighborhood on the shiny bike. I would see envy in every eye who beheld me in all of my glory. All the places I could have traveled flashed through my mind. I glanced at the sleek black pedals, and my eyes filled with desire as it drifted far away from these floors. My mind was grounded when I heard my mother’s calls for me, and I ran toward her hating each step that met concrete. I wanted to ask, but my eyes drifted to the rectangular indent in her pockets. I could hear her cooing, “It’s not in the cards, but soon.” The phrase repeated so many times it

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wouldn’t be surprised if the people in this very room mistook the downward-sloping corners of my mouth or chronically furrowed brow as a sign of annoyance. But how could the pursuit of a heightened confidence or even just a hailmary pass for a sense of control emerge as a dissociative, grim demeanor? I think my mom was right when she told me that if I make a face it’ll eventually get stuck that way. Or maybe the question is not how, but, why? I will admit that it has served me well in certain atmospheres, most notably the ones in which my share of control was little to none. Coldness is assumed while warmth pleasantly surprises. I’ve developed a consciously unconscious mechanism maintaining an arm’s length from competition. When in doubt, don’t. Avoiding is easier when you’re unapproachable in the first place. But maybe it’s just my face. It’s probably just my face. I promise I didn’t hate you based on first impressions. The space between my eyebrows will probably wrinkle sooner than the corners of my eyes. But it isn’t sad, it’s just my face — the incumbent expression is no more meaningful than the one meticulously curated. Excuse my R. B. F.

had become a mantra in our home. I thought of all the other kids whose destiny had seen fit to award generous gifts to them. I shifted my gaze from the cards, and I glanced backward. I was mesmerized by the light bouncing off the spinning metal. I’m mesmerized by the light bouncing off the spinning metal. Then the silver cylinder snaps into place. With sweat-soaked palms, I grip the instrument in my hands. I let out a small breath in anticipation. I am shaking, my eyes sting from sweat, and I’m pushing the steel of the barrel against my temple while pulling the hammer back. Moving my finger against the trigger and click. No bang. I exhale and pass the almost unbearable weight in my right hand over to my rival. They smile and stare me


straight in the eye and, with ease, place the gun against their head and pull the trigger. Click. Click. My mother inserted her favorite Jacques Brel tape and hit play. She began to dance, and I was reminded of all the times she had tangoed with the sisters of night and day. Her smile made the candles burn brighter as she glided to her chair. She took out the deteriorating cardboard box from her pocket. Inside the box was her favorite deck of cards. She sat down at the kitchen table. The aged cards moved between her fingers. I watched her calloused hands as they traced the deck. She had explained to me the meanings behind the cards many times, but I had never learned. She always had me hand her the final card, and she’d look at it before placing it down. Her trained tired fingers attempted to swap my card, and I’m sure she’s done this a hundred times. That time two cards fell on the table. She said, “Well, baby, it seems fate has new plans for you,” pushing the one card to the side. I glanced down at the remaining card. My curious eyes met that of the sphinx sitting atop a circle emblazed with symbols. “The wheel of fortune means good things are coming your way.” I couldn’t help but think of the other card. I never received an ideal hand. Never did I receive an ideal hand. When the gun slides across the table, and it reaches my hand, the weight of life itself weighs on me. I place the familiar barrel against my temple. Closing my eyes and gritting my teeth, I push down the hammer and pull the trigger met by the relief of a click. Gasping holding my head in my hands, I pass the gun over to my rival, finding my heart praying for this to be over. I must be owed a victory soon, right? My competitor without even flinching takes their turn, and before I can register what’s happened, I hear the click. I look up to see them returning the revolver. Why does time always move so fast?

they told. They showed all the times she laughed and cried. I stared at the gentle hands that would always be there for a hug. Hands that used to be strong enough to hold the world now would not stop shaking. A body that used to dance for hours was now stricken with fatigue. Her breath had become ragged, and I’d see her forcing herself forward because the world refused to slow down. Yet, she always struggled forward, and she marched with more dignity than God. Her strength was tremendous. She kept the yellowed crumbling cards with her. Despite being too faded, she still knew each card and the meaning that they held. The only card I recognized was the Tower, which she had tried so hard to turn into the Wheel of Fortune. I found myself wanting her comforting arms more than ever. Wanting her comforting arms more than ever, I exhale. I know that our tango has reached its denouement. My rival puts up their hand and asks, “Before our little game ends, do you mind answering a question?” I shake my head, and they respond, “There are two sisters: one gives birth to the other, and she, in turn, gives birth to the first. Who are the two sisters?” I looked down at the rectangular shape that would be in my pocket for the rest of my life. I answer, “day and night.” They nod, and with that, I firm my resolve and pull the trigger. Bang. As the bullet pierces my flesh and shatters my skull, the last neuron fires. Destiny provides a gift to me. Destiny provides a gift to me. We are sitting together at the round kitchen table listening to Jacques Brel. My mother’s shuffling the cards, and then she does a riffle shuffle for show. Her smile, the tape recorder, and the candles lighting the room are everything. The doorbell rang. As she got up to answer it, I find myself reaching for her. The only left card on the table is the Tower. “Ne me quitte pas,” I whisper as she drifts away, the candles extinguish, the tape goes silent, and my words echo through the empty building.

Why had time always moved so fast? I followed the wrinkles on her hand, tracing the stories

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BLANK

You retract back into gloom. Trauma makes the past so distant.

Walking down a dark hallway. Nowhere in sight is the end, there are no other doors. You can’t turn around because there’s nothing to go back to. You’re exhausted, but resting means to melt. Melt away into nothing.

Human emotion seems halted. Yet human emotion is the cause. Disappointment, disengaging, disconnected, dissociated. The tiny threads holding me up have snapped and I am left alone.

But you’re also still. So still covered in a blanket which holds the weight of the world. You have no choice but to let it cover you. Press your body into the soft material beneath. Sink you deeper until you can sink no more. Unable to move, but there is no need to. No desire to. Coated and surrounded. Pressure pushing against you but without a source. Impossible to relieve but hardly felt. My eyes blur over everything I see. Meaningless items projected through the fallen chasm that is my mind. Distractions are momentary. Feelings that last only for a second. The flash of reality makes you nostalgic. Back to before this feeling, when normal was not an anomaly.

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Alone in a house, alone in a room, alone with myself, alone with my thoughts. Avoidance is not acceptance. But avoidance is all I have left. Nothing feels real. The harsh dissociation from reality which has so vastly encompassed me. The prospect of the future is incomprehensible. Dimly lit and a struggle to see, right now I see nothing. Can’t seem to grasp my role in the present. A blank canvas once filled with movement and color. I took for granted the pleasantry of being a viewer --KATIE TISOT


Alexia Papavasilakas

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DRAWING JOHN TAYLOR

Who could have predicted that the spring 2020 semester would go like this? The Intermediate/Advanced drawing class started well, luckily we covered all the principles and different media using the life model as our base. In the second half of the semester the students were given assignments to go out into the center of Florence and record ‘the passage of time’ in all its many layers and meanings.

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Little did we know that this project was about to take on new meaning and depth as subsequently the drawing class was scattered to the four winds, with students drawing from South Korea, to Hawaii, the U.S. and Italy. The standard of drawing was very high as students had a real historical event to document as it unfolded before their eyes. 1 Caroline Loeb, One of My Triplets - Advanced Drawing 2 Nahee Kang, Lockdown in South Korea - Advanced Drawing 3 Jacqueline Andrews, Self-Isolation - Advanced Drawing 4 Susanna Leffert, Bored - Intermediate Drawing


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1 Anna Cahn, My House - Advanced Drawing 2 Madeline Lush, An Indigenous Hawaiian Family - Advanced Drawing 3 Eli Davis, Back Woods in New Jersey - Advanced Drawing 4 Alexia Papavasilakis, notREM - Advanced Drawing

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1 Laura Silverman, Empty Shop - Advanced Drawing 2 Sofia Stark, Venezia - Intermediate Drawing 3 McKinley Streett, A View of Florence - Advanced Drawing 4 Mackenzie Starr, The Family Home - Advanced Drawing

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ETCHING PATRICIA CORDOBA

For this etching course, which was radically divided into two completely different ways of being, I can say the students did a great job, by putting in a lot of effort and commitment to adapt and create. Art confined or not confined, no matter which medium you use, is indestructible and eternal.

This introduction to intaglio printmaking provides a solid foundation in the basic techniques of monoprint, dry point, soft ground, line etching, and aquatint. The distinctive qualities of these techniques, as well as the ways in which they may be combined, are explored. Professional practice in proofing and printing is emphasized. Intaglio printmaking 40

is presented not only as a reproductive process, but also as a medium of tremendous expressive potential in its own right. The connection between etching and other media (drawing, painting, sculpture) is also examined. Students are expected to make use of the Uffizi Museum’s print archive, SACI’s collection of student and faculty work, and relevant reference works in the SACI library.


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1 Anastasia Gladkova, Landscape, softground - Intermediate Etching 2 Sara Carrier, Circle, Japanese mokuhanga - Intermediate Etching 3 Madeline Shaw, Wrenched, etched oil pastel - Beginning Etching 4 Lyla Zimmerman, Send me ur nudes, line etching, acquatint - Advanced Etching

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1 Adrienne Jeong, Lady Sun, linocut - Intermediate Etching 2 Sophia Linden, David by Michelangelo, linocut - Intermediate Etching 3 Wayne Stoner, After Morandi, monotype - Advanced Etching 4 Nicole Tubman, Trouble in the Brier Patch, linocut - Advanced Etching 5 Merritt Barnwell, Orvieto, softground - Beginning Etching

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FASHION DESIGN JESSICA HAYOZ

Personally, online teaching has been a great challenge but also an interesting opportunity to reinvent traditional teaching methods as well as an opportunity to discover a different, alternative way to communicate and collaborate remotely with students. For me, the most important issue was to continue with the teaching sessions to make sure that students could reach the end of the term with a true learning of the course’s program and aim. It was, as well, important to keep working in a creative and dynamic way on the various projects we started when in Florence. It was a particularly stressful and unexpected—if anything abrupt— experience for the students. However, they immediately showed a truly collaborative and enthusiastic approach, continuing to follow and participate in the online lessons, and the distance was not perceived as an

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insurmountable obstacle. This was all very motivating for me as a teacher. During these 5 weeks I have received really positive feedback from the students and all of them really did a great job. I wish them all the best for the future and I really believe gentler times are awaiting all of us, especially for those who are young and talented.


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Victoria Castiglione

Isabella Vallefuoco

Jacquemus is a company born out of the personal life and experiences of designer, Simon Porte Jacquemus. Growing up in a small town in the South of France named Mallemort to a family of farmers, Jacquemus moved to Paris to develop and pursue his career in fashion. Instead of embracing a more metropolitan and international style of clothing, he focused on developing a brand focused on the nostalgic celebration of his childhood town. The brand is a combination of sleek, high fashion designs with the intimate color palette and materials specific to Mallemort that are embedded in French archetypal designs. The clothes are minimal and handmade and play with the local, interlaced with the global.

The vision for this brand will be to ground more international and couture designs in the vernacular of my hometown of Santa Fe, New Mexico. The color palette of every outfit will be based on a specific scene or area of Santa Fe, whether it be the palette of the sunset or the canyons of Tent Rocks. I intend to take Santa Fe out of its almost obsolete style and reputation and apply it to a more global and high fashion look, while still staying true to the traditions and site specific characteristics.

Merritt Barnwell

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Keelin Maloney


Lauren Lee-Burns (exert from Versace presentation)

Merritt Barnwell (exert from Gucci presentation)

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Jamie Steinberg (exert from Armani presentation)

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FRESCO PAINTING TIZIANO LUCCHESI

This moment of forced home teaching has expanded the possibilities and tools that can be used. In my course of wall painting techniques, I normally use video material associated with the book I published last year, so the students already used electronic learning equipment. But I had never thought about using digital retouching programs by editing and correcting directly on the screen. This was a pleasant discovery that I will continue to use in my future teaching method, regardless.

The Fresco Painting course takes students on a journey through the history of mural painting techniques. Students learn how these techniques evolved over time—focusing in the end on pre- and post-Renaissance frescoes. Through theory and practice, students learn how to 48

” prepare the plaster, apply it to the wall, paint the fresco, and remove and transport it. This class, which includes trips to Renaissance and modern frescoes in Florence, is of great value not only to studio art majors, but also to art history majors and persons interested in conservation.


1 Sofia Stark 3 Madeline Drexler

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1 Alexandra Rugg 2 Magdalena Kobezko 3 Jessica Angelini

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GRAPHIC DESIGN DUSKO STOJANOVIC

This course concentrates on the application of problem-solving methods to real-situation projects with Italian culture content. I view myself primarily as a facilitator of knowledge rather than an expert who simply delivers information to students. When planning a curriculum or interacting with students, I am always conscious of students’ different personalities and ways of learning, the knowledge they already possess, and what they will need to learn in the future. Feedback from students has been vital to the process of growth I have undergone since I began teaching. I listen and learn from my students in order to be able to teach them successfully.

The beginning course introduces the student to a basic vocabulary of design by theory, practice and historical background through a series of excercises which combine hand with digital techniques. The student learns about visual quality and visual language, composition, analysis and simplification of shape, and basic color theory. Students investigate the use of grids to lay out information on a page and learn how to create a booklet. This class is important to develop creativity and conceptual skills, and get acquainted with the basic use of the most used graphic design applications. 1 Eli Davis - Intermediate Graphic Design 2-3 Danielle Delossantos - Advanced Graphic Design 4 Carly Lucas - Advanced Graphic Design 5 Miriam Greenberg - Intermediate Graphic Design

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USER CASE I

JOTTIT

Persona: Micheal is a 22 y/o recent college graduate starting his first job at a marketing company in NYC. As such, he rides the subway to get to work every day. He is an aspiring novel writer, and dedicates some of his free time to this hobby. Additionally, he enjoys plaing basketball and barhopping with his friends. USER NEED

USER JOURNEY

USER ACTIONS

Context: Micheal is beginning his mornig commute, which includes two 10-minute subway rides and a short walk to his office building. He normally listens to music and browses social media during his commute. However, a fight breaks out on the subway today. Thinking that the context and choreography of the brawl is quite interesting, Micheal gets an idea for his novel, and needs to quickly write it down before he changing trains.

Quickly document his experiences as they translate to ideas for his writing before he transitions to the next part of his commute. IMMEDIATE EXPERIENCE

Micheal exits instagram, opens the Jottit app

DOCUMENTATION

Micheal writes down his idea and saves it to the app’s vault.

FINISH AND REPEAT Micheal returns to browsing Intagram. These steps repeat multiple times over the couse of the day.

EXTERNAL USAGE

EDITING

It’s 7pm, Micheal is back in his apartment, eating dinner. The reminder he set dings.

 Type Something...

Micheal what to keep and what to delete, and sorts his favorite pieces into the folder he keeps for his novel.

Micheal opens Jottit app, and reviews his writings for the day

Im hungy I want hambubgur  �­ 

7:00 7:00

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 TIT

Today 11:16 am

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9:28 AM 10:55 AM

Yesterday 7:54 pm

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Iphone Lock screen, Jottit reminder with logo. Details number of drafts availible to review/edit

ŠŠ  +  Š€ Š Locations Š ‹ 8 Items Š Œ‚ŠŽ Yesterday 7:54 pm  Œ Plot Devices

3 Days ago

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3 Days ago

A Tub too Small

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Drafts

User can edit each individual draft, as well as chooses whether to keep it, delete it or save in a seperate folder.

Editing screen. Designate each individual draft by time written.

Rate

15 Items

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Main Screen

Reasons I Love my Mom

 

Yesterday 8:32 pm

Yesterday 7:20 pm

†…  Untitled WIP 2

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Characters 15 Items

Yesterday 8:32 pm

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Text box with simple interface

Oversight Violet

Poems in the Moment  

The Exaltation of Minh ˆ 

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JOTTIT Your ( 5 ) daily writings are ready for review!

 

9:52 AM

Jottit app logo

Today 7:03 pm

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9:14 AM

FRONT STAGE

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The Exaltation of Minh

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Sunday February 02

 JOT

Micheal uses his massive volume of stored work to begin writing his novel

Subsection of an individual folder.

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4 1 Asha Newsom - Intermediate Graphic Design 2 Nahee Kang - Intermediate Graphic Design 3 Darina Abuzarova - Advanced Graphic Design 4 Jenna Scheen - Advanced Graphic Design

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3 1 Isaac Tellez - Advanced Graphic Design 2 Sela Stazzone - Intermediate Graphic Design 3 Kevin Loumeau - Intermediate Graphic Design 4 Carly Lucas - Advanced Graphic Design

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ILLUSTRATION FRANCESCO FAGNANI

Teaching this class was truly a compelling experience. Most of the students didn’t have any illustration experience, but since the first “warm up” exercise, the “Book of Me,” I think we established a good relationship. It took a while to bring them into this world and overcome some resistance to grapple with the different needs of so many fields of application, but especially at the end I saw a true interest, even (and maybe more) in the difficult situation that emerged with the virus. Some have expressed their desire to continue and start finding professional opportunities. As for me, I have to thank all of them for giving me the opportunity to grow and, yes, learn a lot. I’m going to miss them!

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Students in this course: • learn both to develop their individual creative potential and to fine tune each project for specific audiences • meet professional illustrators who give presentations on their work • use techniques such as watercolor, écoline, pen and ink, colored pencils, and collage, and are encouraged to experiment • learn layout and typography guidelines for designing covers and pages and for creating meaningful illustrated sequences • are introduced to Adobe Creative suite in case they never worked with Illustrator, Photoshop or Indesign for the final showcase of their illustrations


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1 Bridget Hannah 2 Rebecca Silverman 3 Amanda Hoggard 4 Darina Abuzarova 5 Natalie Lam

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6 3 1 Hannah Levine-Drizin 2 Genevive Kirk 3 Emily Pellegrini

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4 Annie Myron 5 Katrina Wasserman 6 Alexia Papavasilakis


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1 MJ King 2 Sophie Levit 3 Kayla Eremita 4 Liza Doyle

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INFOGRAPHICS CAMILL A TORNA

The Infographics class is usually attractive for graphic design students but also for students from studio arts or other majors. This class made no exception and critiques were as fascinating as usual. The Spring 2020 term’s experience was of course impacted by the Covid-19 crisis, nevertheless with distance learning we managed to bring all of our 5 projects home! Our Infographics class traditionally starts with two subjective projects, a data collection about one day and a tangible and intangible selfportrait. More objective is the third project, a visual lexicon on specific design terms. A longer research and brochure layout follows with project 4, explaining the main concepts at the base of the book “Factfulness” by Hans Rosling.

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Finally, a collaborative studio with Prof. Deborah O’Neil and the students of EMOD, the Executive Master program in Organization Development at BGSU. We met and got to know each other’s selfportraits and work during 30-people Zoom sessions, resulting in our students developing visual toolkits to facilitate the dialogic sessions of EMOD with their three capstone clients.


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1 Caroline Polich 2 Carly Lucas 3 Asha Newsom 4 Bridget Hannah

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1 Isaac Tellez 2 Madeline Shaw 3 Sophie Levit

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1 Jenna Scheen 2 Kevin Loumeau 3 Hannah Levine-Drizin 4 Talia Malchin

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INSTALLATION + PERFORMANCE PIETRO GAGLIANÒ

The theme at the center of this semester was “The Golden Age”: a request to the students to imagine if it dwells in a nostalgic past, in a future to be built or in a present time to be lived in fullness. The difficult circumstances in which the second half of the semester took place have pushed this challenge even further: how is it possible to practice Performance Art in online education, performance being the artistic language, that more than any other, is based on presence, on experience, on the shared participation of artists and spectators? The students courageously embarked on this new challenge and we learned, all together, new possibilities of pedagogy, giving life under the leaden skies of the lockdown to a small Golden Age made of artistic visions, goodwill, reciprocity and courage.

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Installation and Performance Art are both based on the merger of Space and Time and on a relationship between the artist and the audience which is interdependent. Utilizing their interests and abilities in a variety of subjects and media, students in this course create environments that immerse the viewer in a sensory/intellectual/emotional experience. Students may incorporate a variety of media, including photographs, paintings, drawings, videos, sounds, sculptural materials, found objects, their own body and/or someone else’s body in works that expand the physical boundaries of art beyond the “neutral” wall or the display of isolated objects on pedestals.


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2 1 Emily Wisniewski - A Reflection on the Queer Body in Spirituality, Video Performance, 13:06, still from video 2 Melissa Morris - Sounding it out‌. A collaborative virtual installation about connection through sound, in a moment of upheaval and uncertainty, across space and time (soundingitout.com)

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1 David Neal - Via Nuova de’ Caccini, video, still from video 2 Brianna White-Ortiz - Untitled, performance, still from video documentation

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3 1 Noa Oberman - Outfits, performance, still from video documentation 2 John Anthony Marin - The Elements, walk and poetry in the public space 3 Talia Putnoi - Pieces, installation 4 Joseph Cimino - S.O.S., performance, still from video documentation

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INTERIOR DESIGN DANIELE BEDINI

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The students have worked on an eco-sustainable re-use of a shipping container, transformed into a tiny student’s house. All of the students were beginners, without any Interior Design skills. Despite a remote virtual part of the course, students have worked hard and have obtained exceptional results in terms of acquiring design process skills, basic knowledge about how to draw and render, a familiarity about the use of materials and furniture production. Useful information about eco-sustainability, ergonomy, psychological aspects and more was also acquired by the students during the course, making their preparation truly interdisciplinary and verging on professional.

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Students gain international experience of Italian design culture through direct exposure to worldclass design and designers. They experience firsthand the creative process that makes Italy a world leader and trendsetter in interior design. To foster understanding of basic concepts of interior design, 68

special emphasis is placed on the work process from concept development to technical drawing; project presentation; and visual communication. Goals are to spur creativity and expand critical understanding through development of research and observation skills. Students explore multidisciplinary perspectives on the history of interior design, Italian design, theories of modern and contemporary design, lighting design, new technologies, and sustainable solutions to design problems. They see interiors of historical and contemporary significance and have the rare opportunity to visit major Italian design firms and architecture studios.


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JEWELRY DESIGN NAOMI MUIRHEAD

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Beginning level Jewelry Design students learn design transfer, cutting, drilling, piercing, filing, sanding, polishing, and soldering skills for jewelry fabrication from sheet metal. They learn techniques and incorporate the use of rivets, ring-making, bezel stone setting, and stone inlay. This was the plan until the global health crisis forced my students to return to their homes in the US and Costa Rica. After mid-term, distance learning commenced. A true challenge to any studio arts course, jewelry making is even more restricted when most of the students did not have access to tools, supplies, and machinery. Fortunately, they already learned the basics of soldering, forming, and finishing works in metal and most had already completed the rivet and ring projects.

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I am very proud of their perseverance, dedication, ingenuity, and creativity in completing their jewelry projects and working beyond the normal expectations of the course in a limited and sometimes uninspiring situation with stay-at-home orders. In the end, the works that were created were impressive and clever. I’m convinced that most of the work would not have been imagined in the normal studio course, and the outcomes are inspiring.

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1 Samuel Betts - cast aluminum, resin, blue sea glass 2 Talia Rugg - cast resin, pigment, chain, leather 3 Stella Bronson - sterling silver 4 Margaret McLaughlin - wood, crushed stone, epoxy, stainless steel pins, beads, yarn

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4 1 Alexa Barboza - plants, leather, concrete, chain, aluminum dowels, string 2 Olivia Frechette - sterling silver, copper, liver of sulfur 3 Merejo Carter - copper, brass, wood, salt patina 4 Tyler Gundrum - stone, modeling clay, wire, chain, pigment

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1 Genevive Kirk - walnut shells 2 Amy Harff - earrings: sterling silver, brass; necklace: sterling silver (lost wax cast); rings: brass, sterling silver 3 Isabella Del Signore - modeling clay, acrylic paint, upcycled jewelry parts 4 Joseph Gerace - copper

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PAINTING ANNA ROSE

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The combined Beginning and Intermediate Painting course builds on the foundations of oil painting, reinforcing and expanding on key techniques and concepts of the medium. At midterm, facing the unexpected reality of online learning and the reduced resources in their home studios, students rose to the challenge, furthering their respective practices by using painting to actively think about the dramatically altered world around them. Rather than an in-studio life model for example, students used friends and family to study the figure, which offered an opportunity to reflect on the meaning of intimacy and closeness in the time of social distancing. Similarly, the still life took on new meaning as a lens to examine the passage of time in isolation, while the relationship between landscape and memory encouraged students to consider their shifting relationships to the natural world.

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1 Sofia Stark, Grapefruits and Paradise, oil - Intermediate Painting 2 Sydney Reaper, Untitled, oil on canvas - Intermediate Painting 3 Ramona Kuhn, There and Back Again, oil on canvas paper - Beginning Painting

2 Pages 78-79: 4 Liza Doyle, Dressed With Nowhere to Go, oil - Intermediate Painting 5 Caroline Loeb, Untitled, oil on canvas paper - Beginning Painting 6 Perri Funk, Untitled, oil on canvas paper - Beginning Painting 7 Hannah Roberts, Untitled, oil on canvas - Beginning Painting 8 Natalie Zoltners, Untitled, oil on canvas - Beginning Painting 9 Madeline Drexler, Camp Shirt, oil - Intermediate Painting 10 Isabella Del Signore, Isolation, acrylic, spray paint - Beginning Painting

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PAINTING REGAN WHEAT + KIRSTEN STROMBERG

As a continuation of their research into the visual language of painting and it’s fundamental principles and expressive elements, intermediate and advanced painting students developed a project this semester called ‘Hidden in Plain Sight/ Hidden in Plane Site.’ Little did we know that that which was hidden, the virus, would change their semester entirely and profoundly affect all aspects of all our lives. The project proposed a reflection on the relationship between the visible and the invisible, that which is seen and not seen, and how we can bring forms, experiences, and stories that are hidden, unspoken or unknown to light (or vice versa). Each student developed this overarching theme in their own way, exploring a visual form best suited for their subject matter which ranged from autobiographical, social, political, historical, formal and/or psychological content.

Regan Wheat, Painting Instructor

Kirsten Stromberg, Program Director MFA in Studio Art

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2 1 Zoe Iatridis - Intermediate Painting 2 Caroline Polich, Two Trees - Intermediate Painting 3 Adrienne Jong - Intermediate Painting 4 Blake Morton - Intermediate Painting 5 Sophia Linden, Everyone’s Inside - Intermediate Painting

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1 Alexia Papavasilakis, Hiding - Intermediate Painting 2 Kayla Eremita - Advanced Painting 3 Sofia Love, Princess Sofia - Advanced Painting 4 Anna Cahn, Home - Advanced Painting

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1 Jacqueline Andrews, Remembered Landscapes - Advanced Painting 2 Amanda Hoggard, Fruitful - Advanced Painting 3 MJ King, Train Station - Advanced Painting 4 Melissa Morris, Infra-re(a)d - Advanced Painting (Graduate)

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1 Madeline Lush - Intermediate Painting 2 Nicole Tubman - Advanced Painting 3 Katrina Wasserman, Henry Hill - Intermediate Painting 4 Merritt Barnwell - Advanced Painting

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1 Mackenzie Starr, A New Frontier - Advanced Painting 2 Annie Myron, Long Lost Friends - Advanced Painting 3 Joe Cimino, Untitled #2 - Advanced Painting (Graduate) 4 Emily Wisniewski, Snowdrop - Advanced Painting (Graduate)

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PHOTOGRAPHY ROMEO DI LORETO

“Altering our Methods of Creating” “Thinking and re-developing what we began”—“Improvising this, with want we (only) have”—“Using fully what surrounds our physical and emotional”—“The challenge here is do we really desire this?” We need to consider what is the most important thing that exists? I say life and personal health and safety. Is creating important to my being and what I call life? If so, then nothing should stop us, and I should not ever have any excuses. I speak to myself at myself: I work generally in a certain style, with specific materials, in specific spaces. I HAVE NONE OF THIS... NOT I, NOT YOU, MOST OF US ARE IN A SURREAL REALITY ... OF NOTHINGNESS! We need and can finally break all barriers, stereotypes and formulas of what is or is not. What I will name or coin to myself “A New Visionary Renaissance.” If we really want, we will do! And without any obstacles. New art forms and techniques may surface out that have never been considered, and why? Due to the desperate desire to make, to create and express ourselves from this surreal nothingness.

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With the distance lessons I prepared, and with the help from my TAs, Kelli Perletti and Iris Richardson, we guided you, and stimulated you in a pathway which you may have never walked. What is critical is collaboration, discussion and pure openness to allow mistakes; remember a mistake is nothing but a beginning of something extraordinary and new. I thank each one of you greatly, for everything you have provided to me during these difficult moments and uncertainty together. You have provided me with the certainty of existence.


1 Samantha Simotas - Photography I 2 Isabella Del Signore, American Dream - Photography I 3 Darina Abuzarova - Photography I 4 Merejo Carter - Photography I

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1 Isabella Vallefuoco, Bianca - Photography I 2 Tyler Gundrum, Taken Back - Photography I 3 Katherine Comfort, Easter - Photography II 4 Katherine Compson - Photography I 3

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1 Samara Handelsman, Mastectomy Quilt - Photography II 2 Carlyann Campione, Fear Abates the New - Photography II / Digital Multimedia 3 Michael Svizzero - Photography II 4 Connor Harrington - Photography II

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1 Carlo Cremonini - Advanced Photography 2 Olivia McDougall - Advanced Photography 3 Carmine Falcone, Good Morning God - Advanced Photography 4 Hannah Roberts, Self-portrait - Advanced Photography

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2 1 Eric J. Frey, Shadows of Time I, toner on paper over LED light panel, 60x60 cm - Photography II 2 Micaela Rebelo - Advanced Photography

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SCULPTURE JOHN TAYLOR

Every semester I always tell my students in the sculpture classes that if we were stranded on a desert island we would have to make art out of anything that was available; that technique and tools are not the most important thing, but that what matters is what is in the creative mind. I firmly believe that this second half of the semester was a moment when students learned to explore that agility so essential to an artist. After much deliberation and taking into account the amount of time, availability and cost of materials in the U.S., it was decided to make a new project for the second half of the semester that would involve both the additive and subtractive sculptural methods. The idea of the project was to reproduce and enlarge the unfinished marble piece that we started in Florence, and to transfer it into Styrofoam and plaster. This entailed taking pieces of Styrofoam and assembling them into a form, which could then be 92

‘carved.’ Multiple shaped layers were adhered to each other using plaster (thinking of how a 3D printer builds up in layers), which eliminates the need for thick expensive pieces. The primary requirement for this form was that it should be of a sufficient size so that the softer material holds up. This shaped piece was then skimmed over with plaster, carved and then sanded to a fine finish. Other effects were achieved by applying a wax polish or application of color. All material requirements were based on things that can be found in local hardware/craft stores, and/or around the house.


1 Anna Boden 3 Talia Rugg

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4 2 Eli Davis 4 Alexia Papavasilakis

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1 Mackenzie Starr 2 Catherine Tisot 3 Merritt Barnwell 4 Tyler Gundrum

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SERIGRAPHY K ATHY KNIPPEL

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The students were working normally and creatively up to the midterm. Then the world changed by the spread of the Coronavirus outbreak. Everyone returned to their homes and continued their courses online. Basic tool supply kits were sent out to each student. They were challenged to work at home, not even being able to go to stores to purchase supplies. They took on the challenge and I am proud to say that everyone participated to the best of their abilities, using very creative solutions to produce their artworks and follow all the lessons, often producing more than they would have during a normal uninterrupted class. I included three virtual field trips using photos from previous class trips, so that they could stay in touch with the Florence and Italy they had grown to love.

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This course covers a variety of techniques, including the making of stencils for screen printing, paper stencils, hand-cut stencils, and an emphasis on photographic emulsion techniques. Students study various ways of utilizing the photo screen process with hand-drawn and painted transparencies, photocopies, litho films, and separations created with computer programs such as Photoshop. Students are encouraged to use the photo screen print potential to realize works and prints incorporating concepts from other disciplines such as photography, drawing, painting, and graphic design.


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1 Annie Myron 2 Alexander Peters 3 Emily Pellegrini 4 Magdalena Kobeszko 5 Brianna White-Ortiz 6 Danielle Delossantos

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1 Lyla Zimmerman 2 Jessica Angelini 3 Fabiola Vega 4 Jenna Scheen 5 Hannah Carey 6 Carlyann Campione 7 Linnea Del Deo

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1 Mckinley Streett 2 Sara Carrier 3 Carly Lucas 4 Victoria Castiglione 5 Zoe Iatridis 6 Perri Funk

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VIDEO BASILIO DI SAN JUAN GUERRERA

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Student filmmakers worked through the pre- and postproduction process to simultaneously create a solo and group short film learning the language of video and cinema. They learned various ways of telling stories through films including character development, plot breakdowns, structure, and style, and explored the moving picture through the analysis of many television and film forms. Throughout the semester, for their individual films, each student continuously developed and refined a story, established characters, and wrote several drafts of a script and shot list. Additional steps in the pre-production process included casting, location scouting, establishing a visual direction, and planning. Once having completed the pre-production phase, they then were responsible for the shooting, recording audio and

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editing of a final film. For the group film, students learned how to coordinate with one another to utilize their different skillsets and came together to make a cohesive film. This year students had made an incredible effort during this transition period in order to make a film from their homes. Congratulations to all of them.

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1 Olivia McDougall, film poster for A River Unseen 2 Hannah Levine- Drizin, film poster for Foil 3 Film poster for Group project, Cut Short

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Studio Arts College International

Accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD), SACI offers a wide range of innovative, hands-on graduate and undergraduate programs in traditional and contemporary studio arts, design, conservation, art history, and Italian language and culture. Merging disciplines and emphasizing the critical role of art and design both socially and environmentally, SACI’s programs offer rare opportunities to experience one of the great artistic and cultural centers of the world not as a tourist, but as a resident. In Florence, students engage with a thriving local art community that is rich in both Renaissance and contemporary art forms. Partnerships with local museums, galleries, and artists provide hands-on field experience through class projects and design internships. SACI-supported volunteer opportunities offer even more connection and involvement in the city. Students also have numerous travel opportunities, as part of class field trips with faculty to visit other famous cities in Italy. SACI student find a supportive learning environment where they can be creative, discover their passion, and define their own paths. VIRTUAL EXHIBITION This catalog is digitally published as the SACI Spring 2020 end-of-term selection of student work. Although the physical exhibition was cancelled due to the COVID-19 global health crisis, this catalog features studio art and creative writing courses at Studio Arts College International (SACI) in Florence, Italy. DIGITAL EXHIBITION COORDINATION Christina Gednalske, Špela Zidar GRAPHIC DESIGN / COPY EDITING Naomi Muirhead / Lou Lodge Studio Arts College International Palazzo dei Cartelloni Via Sant’Antonino, 11 50123 Florence, Italy info@saci-florence.edu www.saci-florence.edu Copyright © 2020 Studio Arts College International, SACI Press. All rights reserved.

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INDEX Forward

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Architectural Drawing

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Batik 10 Body Archives / Digital Multimedia 14 Book Arts 18 Ceramics 22 Color Photography 26 Creative Writing 30 Drawing 36 Etching 40 Fashion Design 44 Fresco Painting 48 Graphic Design 52 Illustration 56 Infographics 60 Installation and Performance Art 64 Interior Design 68 Jewelry Design 72 Painting (1) 76 Painting (2) 80 Photography 86 Sculpture 92 Serigraphy 96 Video 100 Studio Arts College International / Credits 102

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www.saci-florence.edu

Profile for SACI Florence

SACI End-of-Term Spring 2020 Digital Exhibition Catalog  

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