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BRITISH COLUMBIA BRITISH COLUMBIA

Canada Green Building Council

ISSUE 5, SPRING 2018, British Columbia Chapter - CaGBC Regional Publication /

VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE WEST

FOCUS

Surrey Biofuel: A smart, sustainable solution for Surrey’s organic waste MEC Headquarters: Design advances employee wellness

The World’s First Double LEED Platinum Convention Centre

Is B.C.’s Energy Step Code a blueprint for Canada?

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Join us for Canada’s premier green building event. June 5 – 7, 2018 | Beanfield Centre | Toronto, ON

Registration is now open. Early bird rates until April 3. » Industry education » Networking events » B2B meetings » Green building tours » Green Business Showcase

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Visit cagbc.org/blc2018 for more details.


Message from the British Columbia Chapter of the CaGBC

Welcome to the spring issue of BC FOCUS supplement produced in partnership with SABMag. Here at the Chapter we continue to celebrate and promote sustainable design and building innovation and are happy to bring you examples, the lessons learned, and the key ideas for how these projects succceeded.

We hope you find this supplement educational and informative. A special thank you to our volunteers, members, partners and friends in developing and providing some of this edition’s content, and of course our sponsors and advertiser who have helped make this publication happen. Our next edition of the BC FOCUS will be coming to you in the fall.

Beyond this edition, this spring we look forward to building momentum in the conversation around zero carbon buildings, retrofits, and the BC Step Code. Beginning in late March we will kick-off the first of a four-part innovation lunch series exploring innovations and policy related to zero carbon, including a key-findings presentation about CaGBC’s zero carbon Trade Mission to Netherlands and Austria. Please stay tuned to our website to find out about these and our many upcoming events and educational workshops.

Please continue to share with us your projects, lessons, and succeesses as we continue to showcase the many inspiring stories of the green building sector. These publications and your support of the Chapter greatly contribute to the strenthening, promotion, and success of our green building community.

Brad Doff, MES, Env. SP, LEED Green Assoc.

Morgan McDonald

Chapter Engagement Specialist, BC Chapter

Director of Operations, Ledcor Renew

Canada Green Building Council

Chair, BC Chapter, Canada Green Building Council

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STAY INFORMED WITH SABMAG E-NEWS Add your name to the distribution list of the monthly SABMag e-News. Stay up-to-date on news, seminars and events related to high-performance building, notifications about the Canadian Green Building Awards, and more. Reply to dgriffith@sabmagazine.com.

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to Our Generous Chapter Sponsors Chapter Sponsors

Platinum

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See a digital version of CaGBC British Columbia Chapter FOCUS at http://bit.ly/28O6xsr

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In this issue

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21 6 Upcoming Events & Membership Updates

14 Surrey Biofuel: A smart, sustainable solution for Surrey’s organic waste

24 Vancouver Convention Centre West The World’s First Double LEED Platinum Convention Centre

9 CaGBC’s Zero Carbon Building Standard 18 CaGBC’s A Roadmap for Retrofits in Canada represents the next frontier for Canada’s report details GHG emissions savings commercial building sector potential across the country 12 MEC Headquarters: Design advances employee wellness

21 Is B.C.’s Energy Step Code a blueprint for Canada?

27 Orchard Commons: A Social Evolution of Sustainable Building at UBC

30 Interview with Michael Bousfield: raising the performance bar

Environmental savings for this issue: Printed on Rolland Environ100 Satin, a 100% post-consumer fiber that is certified

12 trees

45,044 L water

682 kg waste

1,774 kg CO2

FSC and EcoLogo. It is processed chlorine-free, FSC-recycled and is manufactured using biogas energy.

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A joint publishing project of the British Columbia Chapter - CaGBC and SABMag. Address all inquiries to Don Griffith: dgriffith@sabmagazine.com Published by Janam Publications Inc. | www.sabmagazine.com | www.janam.net

COVER IMAGE: Vancouver Convention Centre. Architect: DA/MCM + LMN Architects. SPRING 2018 | BC FOCUS

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CaGBC MEMBERSHIP UPDATE Keep up to date by attending one of our diverse education sessions.

Get involved with the B.C. Chapter of the Canada Green Building Council The B.C. Chapter’s network of green building professionals is a premier source for education, training and cutting-edge green building information throughout B.C. We provide support and advocacy for green building programs including LEED, WELL Building Standard, and the Zero Carbon Building Standard. Through involvement with the chapter, individuals have the opportunity to access local educational, volunteering, networking and leadership opportunities.

Join Us! Our members are key innovators and thought leaders of tomorrow’s sustainable world. If you are not already a member, join the CaGBC and our public and private sector member organizations across the country to help transform Canada with greener buildings and healthier communities. All employees of a National member company (either a Green Building Specialist or Green Building Advocate) are entitled to a free B.C. Chapter membership (or other Chapter of their choice). If you are not an employee of a national member company you can join the B.C. Chapter as an individual for $100 per year. Emerging Green Professionals can join for just $35.

Find out more about our membership structure and the many benefits available at www.cagbc.org/britishcolumbia

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Designing the new normal We are home to BC’s largest consulting practice dedicated to the design and certification of high performance, net-zero and passive house projects. Surrey Biofuel is North America’s first fully-integrated, closed loop organic waste management system. The project has been awarded Envision Platinum Certification from the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure. Proud design and consulting partners for Surrey Biofuel Facility, UBC Orchard Commons, MEC Headquarters, and the Vancouver Convention Centre.

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Keep up to date by attending one of our diverse education sessions.

UPCOMING

EVENTS AND WORKSHOPS

in British Columbia

Private workshops are also available on topics which include: The WELL Building Standard, Introduction to LEED v4, LEED Green Associate Exam Kickstarter and Introduction to Energy Benchmarking. Please contact bdoff@cagbc.org for further information. You can also go to our website www.cagbc.org/britishcolumbia for information on our events and workshops.

2018

TOPIC

TYPE OF EVENT

LOCATION

March 27

LEED Green Associate Kickstarter

Workshop

Victoria

March 29

CaGBC Innovation Series: Zero Carbon Trade Mission

Lunch/Networking

Vancouver

May 1

CaGBC Innovation Series: Zero Carbon Workshop

Workshop

Vancouver

May 1

CaGBC Innovation Series: Zero Carbon Pilot Project

Lunch/Networking

Vancouver

TBA

CaGBC Innovation Series: Zero Carbon

Workshop

Vancouver

May 24-25

Green Professional Building Skills: Mechanical & HVAC-R

Workshop

Vancouver

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CaGBC’s Zero Carbon Building Standard represents the next frontier for Canada’s commercial building sector By Mark Hutchinson, Vice President of Green Building Programs, Canada Green Building Council

In December 2016, the Pan Canadian Framework cited sustainable buildings as one of the means to attain reductions in GHG emissions, specifying specific measures to help drive down the industry’s emissions. This watershed moment for the green building industry put a spotlight on building performance as a critical solution to climate change. Changing the conversation – reducing carbon emissions in commercial, institutional and multi-family buildings Building on the industry’s progress, the CaGBC has been working to spearhead the next evolution of green building, aimed at meeting the needs of the emerging low-carbon economy. Launched on May 29, the CaGBC’s Zero Carbon Building Standard is a critical step toward mitigating building emissions. As Canada’s first green building program to make carbon emissions the key indicator for building performance, the Standard positions Canada in an elite group of countries working on similar initiatives, including Australia, France, Brazil and the US. Recognizing carbon emissions as a key indicator of building performance is an important and fundamental shift for our industry. To date, regulators and those incenting carbon emission reductions (including CaGBC) have focused on energy efficiency - however the most important factor in the carbon footprint of a building is often not its energy performance, but the carbon intensity of the electricity and fossil fuels used. Recognizing the differences in regional electrical grids and fuel choices is therefore critical to accurately assessing environmental impacts and guiding investments. The CaGBC Zero Carbon Building program reinforces the importance of energy efficiency, while also driving careful choices about the types of energy used and encouraging more renewable energy generation both on the building site and offsite.

Photo: Simon Carr SPRING 2018 | BC FOCUS

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Why Canada’s CRE industry needs to take notice of the shift to low carbon CaGBC is not alone in expanding from a strict focus on energy efficiency. Regulators are increasingly recognizing the importance of addressing building emissions holistically, and carbon is bound to become increasingly important to both new construction and the operation of existing buildings. For example, the City of Vancouver’s updated Green Buildings Policy for Rezonings includes GHG intensity requirements, and Toronto is considering the same. On the existing buildings front, the Province of Ontario recently mandated energy and water reporting for large buildings, and others are planning to follow suit; it is not at all inconceivable that carbon emissions will also be part of reporting and disclosure requirements at some point in the future. Finally, all Canadian provinces will soon be impacted by one form or another of carbon pricing, changing how different forms of energy impact operating costs.

The themes of simplicity and flexibility also apply to the requirements for the design of new construction projects. Recognizing that the design stage provides a unique opportunity to make decisions that will yield reliable longterm carbon reductions, a couple of key design elements were incorporated in order to guide industry. Specifically, there are requirements for thermal energy demand intensity (a measure of the building envelope and ventilation strategies) and for on-site renewable energy generation. Both of these strategies are going to be key to meeting carbon emission reduction targets in the long run. Shifting the focus to emissions and providing flexibility to meet a zero carbon balance creates an opportunity to apply new approaches, technologies and products, spurring Canadian innovation along the way.

One step at a time Leaders that are quick to address building emissions will benefit from recognition while future-proofing their assets, positioning themselves for long-term savings and securing their place in the growing low-carbon economy.

Simplicity and flexibility are key to the Zero Carbon Building Standard The ultimate measure of success is the actual volume of carbon emissions from building operations year over year. In order to recognize the inherent limitations of existing buildings, the requirements of the CaGBC’s Zero Carbon Building Standard have been kept minimal, focusing primarily on the key outcome: reduced carbon emissions. Cost effectiveness is enhanced by providing the flexibility to drive carbon reductions by whatever means make the most sense for a given building. This can include energy efficiency measures, fuel-switching, and generating renewable energy on the building site or off-site.

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Carbon emissions are going to be a key metric of building performance going forward, both for environmental and economic reasons. The CaGBC, through the release of the Zero Carbon Building Standard, is providing commercial, institutional and multi-family asset owners and managers with a framework, developed through extensive industry consultation, which allows them to begin the process of transitioning to the lowcarbon economy of the future. The Standard is not intended to overwhelm with the possible challenges of immediately achieving a zero carbon balance. Rather, it aims to raise awareness of the growing importance of carbon emissions, provide a framework for assessing those emissions, and inform strategies to reduce them. To start learning about zero carbon for your buildings, visit cagbc.org/zerocarbon. Public registration for the Standard is now available online.


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MEC HEADQUARTERS Design advances employee wellness Mountain Equipment Co-op’s commitment to promoting healthy, active and sustainable lifestyles begins with MEC employees. The outdoor retailer’s new head office on Great Northern Way on the False Creek Flats [Vancouver, BC] is designed to encourage interaction between staff through activity-based programming, while minimizing the facility’s impact on the environment. By Ben Nielsen, Architect AIBC

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Significant space is set aside for fitness and related activities including a climbing/ bouldering room, yoga and fitness studio, roof deck amenity area and an outdoor basketball court. The building’s elevators have been deliberately under designed for a building of this size, encouraging the use of stairs. The generous feature stair rises through a central atrium that allows for visual connections between floors. Social programming aggregates around this atrium, forming a hub of interactivity at the building’s heart that culminates in the lunchroom and access to the roof deck.

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1 - WIND TOWERS VISIBLE OVER FOUR STOREY VOLUME ALIGNED TO ADJACENT STREET. 2 - RAIN GARDEN LANDSCAPING SOFTENS THE APPROACH TO HAND-CARVED WOODEN DOORS. 3 - IMPROMPTU GATHERING SPACES LOCATED ADJACENT TO ATRIUM. 4 - MULTIPURPOSE ROOM SERVES EQUALLY FOR STAFF MEETINGS AND YOGA SESSIONS. ROOF INSULATION PROVIDED BY TECH-CRETE PROCESSORS LTD., AND FIBERGLASS WINDOWS BY CASCADIA WINDOWS & DOORS.

ARCHITECT Proscenium Architecture & Interiors Inc. DESIGN TEAM Hugh Cochlin, Architect AIBC, Principal In Charge. Greg Piccini, Architect AIBC. Ron Clay, RAIC. Kerri Shinkewski, RID. Alissa Foss, Ryan Yapyuco, Matthew Kurnicki, Architect AIBC. Ben Nielsen, Architect AIBC. Yumi Cross, RID. Elena Vilis, Benjamin Beckwith PROJECT MANAGER Corin Flood STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS Fast+Epp MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL Pageau Morel & Associates CONSULTANTS Sharp & Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Bennett Land Surveying Ltd., Kerr Wood Leidal Assoc. Ltd. - Civil, Geopacific Consultants Ltd. - Geotechnical, Golder Associates Ltd. - Environmental, FVB Energy Inc. – District energy, Jim Bush & Associates – Cost consultant, Bunt and Associates Ltd. – Transportation planners, LMDG Code Consultants Ltd., Stantec Consulting - Commissioning. CONTRACTOR AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGER Ventana Construction Corporation 12

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B

A

Site plan/level one

N

A Existing building

B Sky Train above


Hybrid ventilation diagram 5 - THE FEATURE STAIR ASSERTS ITSELF AS PART OF THE ENTRY SEQUENCE TO ENCOURAGE USE. 6 - THE ATRIUM VISUALLY CONNECTS FLOORS AND DEPARTMENTS TO FOSTER COLLABORATION AND INTERACTION.

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The slender-bar building form is driven by the desire to provide effective natural lighting to the majority of work spaces, while the intersection of those bars allows for interconnected spaces that naturally link individuals and workgroups within the building. One bar faces the street to satisfy urban design requirements to maintain consistent setbacks, while the second is aligned to cardinal axes to optimize the performance of daylight control strategies. The primary structural system is comprised of glue-laminated timber components with panelized timber and composite assemblies for floors, walls and roof. The majority of these components are extracted and fabricated regionally. The timber structure is light weight, and as a result, the concrete required for foundations and seismic structures is reduced in size, which in turn reduces the building’s embodied energy and carbon load. Integrating disciplines is key to the success of this design. This project is governed by sustainable initiatives including solar optimization, natural lighting strategies, and high-performance building envelope design, as well as the integration of a passive ventilation strategy. Three wind towers sense prevailing wind directions and open louvres windward to allow for passively assisted, high volume, low speed fresh air intake. This air is tempered and distributed via floor plenums. Exhaust air is drawn out of the building using low speed fans assisted by suction provided on the leeward side of the tower.

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With a focus on physical activity programming, aggregation of social spaces around a visually accessible atrium, and a sustainability governed integrated design process, MEC’s head office provides space for an active company to work and play while resting lightly on the earth. The building was certified LEED® Platinum in 2017. Awards won include: 2015 Canadian Green Building Award, 2015 Canadian Wood Council Design Award (Commercial), 2015 The Wood Design & Building Merit Award (Commercial). 2018 ASHRAE Technology Award, 2017 27th Energia Award for Energy Efficiency. Pageau Morel et Associés won a first place Technology Award for the Mountain Equipment Co-op head office. BEN NIELSEN, ARCHITECT AIBC, AIBC AAA MRAIC LEED AP IS AT PROSCENIUM ARCHITECTURE & INTERIORS INC., VANCOUVER. SPRING 2018 | BC FOCUS

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SURREY BIOFUEL 1 2

A smart, sustainable solution for Surrey’s organic waste By Eric Dunford The newly awarded Envision Platinum City of Surrey Biofuel Facility is the largest facility of its kind in Canada and the first closed-loop fullyintegrated organics waste management system in North America. Simply put, it will transform food scraps from the community into biofuel that will offset the natural gas used by the City’s fleet of waste collecting vehicles. The City of Surrey Biofuel Facility is the central feature of Surrey’s Rethink Waste diversion program that promotes the separation of waste within the City. The facility will convert the City’s collected kitchen and yard waste, along with commercial waste from across the region, into 100% renewable natural gas (RNG), and compost through a closed loop process. Odours from the processing activity are controlled by enclosing the facility’s critical areas and treating facility air through biofilters and air scrubbers to remove odour and dust before the air is discharged into the atmosphere.

1 - WEST-FACING VIEW OF THE SURREY BIOFUEL FACILITY. 2 - FACILITY AIR VAPOUR STACK.

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From food scraps to fuel

FortisBC has teamed up with municipalities like the City of Surrey, to use organic waste from local residents and businesses to create Renewable Natural Gas. Learn how you can support the growth of this carbon neutral energy in B.C. That’s energy at work. fortisbc.com/rng Renewable Natural Gas is produced in a different manner than conventional natural gas. It is derived from biogas, which is produced from decomposing organic waste from landfills, agricultural waste and wastewater from treatment facilities. The biogas is captured and cleaned to create carbon neutral Renewable Natural Gas (also called biomethane). FortisBC Energy Inc. uses the FortisBC name and logo under license from Fortis Inc. (18-046.8 03/2018) SPRING 2018 | BC FOCUS

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Biogas is both renewable energy and derived through non-harmful means; a double benefit for our environment. The compost produced by the facility is tested to ensure it passes provincial and federal regulations before being offered for commercial and residential uses. This nutrient rich compost has multiple benefits, including: • Attracts earth worms that aerate the soil • Supporting microorganisms in soil that make plants more resistant to disease • Adds nutrients to the soil while protecting the chemical balance • Increases water retention in soil

3 FACTS • Up to 120,000 gigajoules of renewable natural gas (RNG) • Up to 115,000 tonnes of organic waste processed annually • able to process 100% of the City’s organic waste • approximately 40,000 tonnes of CO2e reduction per year • Up to 45,000 tonnes of compost More information on the Surrey Biofuel Facility is available at http://www.surreybiofuel.ca/

This facility is transforming waste into a renewable resource, with a capacity to process up to 115,000 tonnes of organic waste annually into useable energy, all while reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. At capacity, the facility will process 100% of the City’s organic waste over the 25-year contract term, along with commercial organic waste. It is estimated that this diversion of waste from the landfill will amount to approximately 40,000 tonnes of CO2e reduction per year.

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The partners responsible for the Facility are City of Surrey and Renewi Canada [formerly Orgaworld Canada]. FortisBC is a partner for the distribution of the renewable natural gas produced by the Facility. Stantec provided architectural, structural, mechanical, electrical and civil design services. ERIC DUNFORD IS A SUSTAINABILITY CONSULTANT AT STANTEC. HIS WORK IS FOCUSED ON FACILITATING SUSTAINABLE DESIGN SOLUTIONS FOR PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE.

3 - FACILITY INTERIOR - DRIVE AISLE AND COMPOST STORAGE BAYS. 4. FACILITY INTERIOR - DRIVE AISLE AND COMPOST STORAGE BAYS 5 - FACILITY INTERIOR - RECEIVING AREA. 6 - FACILITY INTERIOR - DRIVE AISLE AND ANAEROBIC DIGESTION REACTORS.

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Canada’s leading expert in organic waste processing

Canada’s leading expert

Giving life to in organic wastenew processing

used

Giving materials. new life to used materials. Formerly Orgaworld, Renew is a leading waste-to-product business ideally positioned to be a part of the emerging circular economy an economy that keeps resources in use for as long as possible through recycling and recovery. We efficiently convert food and yard waste into nutrient rich fertilizer that is used for agricultural applications. The result is that we are protecting the world from contamination, preserving finite natural resources and enabling customers to meet their sustainability goals.

Formerly Orgaworld, Renewi is a leading waste-to-product business ideally positioned to be a part of the emerging circular economy - an economy that keeps resources in use for as long as possible through recycling and recovery. We efficiently convert food and yard waste into renewable biomethane gas that powers the City’s waste collection trucks and nutrient rich fertilizer that is used for agricultural applications. The result is that we are protecting the world from contamination, preserving finite natural resources and enabling customers to meet their sustainability goals.

Renewi Canada – Surrey 9752 192 Street, Surrey, BC, V4N 4C7 778-806-1206

Renewi Canada – Head Office 2940 Dingman Drive, London, ON, N6N 1G4 519-663-4446

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CaGBC’s A Roadmap for Retrofits in Canada report details GHG emissions savings potential across the country

Research shows that 80 per cent of existing buildings will still be standing in 2030. It goes without saying that the industry needs to address the sustainability of these buildings if we are to succeed in reducing emissions overall. Thankfully, the potential is enormous: not just in terms of the possibility for carbon reductions (up to 51 per cent), but also in terms of energy savings and economic impact. 18

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By Akua Schatz, Director of Advocacy & Development for the Canada Green Building Council


Despite the diversity of our energy grids, every province has a significant role to play in meeting climate objectives. This province-specific approach to emissions reductions potential is the key component of the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC)’s recently released A Roadmap for Retrofits in Canada, which demonstrates the critical role that existing buildings play in advancing Canada’s low-carbon future. Among its findings, the report details how targeted strategic investments in existing buildings represent a significant opportunity for substantial carbon reductions across the country. It also shows how each region can contribute to meeting Canada’s climate change goals through a targeted approach to building retrofits and clean energy. Furthermore, the report provides government and industry with recommendations for increasing the uptake of building retrofits and introduces carbon as a key indicator of building performance. The report identifies four actions that could enable large buildings in Canada to achieve up to a 51 per cent reduction in carbon emissions by 2030 compared to 2005: 1. Recommission buildings that have yet to achieve high performance status by optimizing existing building systems for improved control and operational performance; 2. Undertake deep retrofits in buildings to high-performance standards such as LEED, focusing on energy reduction and ensuring that key building systems such as lighting, HVAC and envelopes are upgraded; 3. Incorporate solar or other on-site renewable energy systems in buildings; 4. Work with jurisdictions and the private sector to switch to low-carbon fuel sources in buildings.

A SHIFT IN FOCUS FROM ENERGY TO CARBON The report also emphasizes the importance of using carbon as a key indicator in evaluating building performance. While energy is often used as a proxy for carbon performance, because energy data is more readily available and relates directly to costs, evaluating a building’s energy performance alone fails to consider how carbon emissions vary between electricity grids across the country and between fuels used on site. What this means is that building owners, managers, tenants, service providers, and policymakers need to adopt a subtle yet important shift from exclusively addressing “energy use intensity” and “energy performance” to a view that also prioritizes “total carbon footprint” and “carbon performance”.

If building performance is to be assessed based on carbon, fuel switching (electrification) will play an increasingly important role. This means making a switch from building systems that use natural gas or other carbon-intensive fuel to those that use high-efficiency electricity-based systems or low-carbon fuels like renewable biomass and low carbon district heating/cooling systems. The report notes that in order for the switch to electrification to provide carbon benefits, it needs to take place only in regions where the electricity grid’s carbon intensity is below 530 gCO2e/kWh (assuming a conservative air source heat pump efficiency (COP) of 2.5). Electricity grids in every province in Canada are forecasted to operate below this threshold by 2027. Therefore, regions that today have carbon-intensive electricity grids (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia) will soon realize a carbon benefit from electrification. A Roadmap for Retrofits in Canada will be followed by a third CaGBC report, to be published this spring, which will provide policy options that would overcome barriers that hinder the implementation of retrofit projects and identify the financing mechanisms necessary to stimulate the retrofit economy.

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IS B.C.’S ENERGY STEP CODE A BLUEPRINT FOR CANADA? PHOTO: STEPHEN HUI, PEMBINA INSTITUTE.

Innovative building standard off to a promising start By Tom-Pierre Frappé-Sénéclauze, Pembina Institute

In 2017, British Columbia introduced what might be North America’s most innovative beyond-code standard for energy efficiency. The B.C. Energy Step Code is an opt-in regulation that enables local governments to pursue improved levels of performance for new homes and buildings — creating healthier and more comfortable spaces that are more affordable to heat. It’s a promising experiment that could chart a path for the rest of Canada.

The Province created the framework in collaboration with industry, local governments, and civil society. But will local governments use it? Eight months after enactment, the answer appears to be a resounding “yes.” The Energy Step Code allows cities and towns in B.C. to require or incentivize one of five levels of improved building performance, from current code performance all the way to net-zero energy ready. Net-zero energy ready buildings are ultra-efficient; they could produce on-site (or nearby) as much energy as they consume over the course of a year — for example, by putting solar panels on the roof or on the canopy of an adjacent parking lot.

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The Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, Canada’s buildings strategy, and the B.C. Climate Leadership Plan have set targets for all new buildings to meet net-zero energy ready standards by 2030 or 2032. B.C.’s Energy Step Code is the first roadmap to achieving this goal, providing much needed clarity to the industry and to authorities having jurisdiction. The Energy Step Code is performancebased: instead of prescribing how to build, like traditional prescriptive codes, it sets energy efficiency targets and lets the designer or builder decide how to meet them. Compliance is assessed through energy modelling software and on-site testing, greatly simplifying the permitting process and providing greater design flexibility.

LOCAL GOVERNMENTS STEP UP As of January 22, 17 municipalities in B.C. have signalled their intent to use the Energy Step Code — together accounting for over half of the province’s population. (We include Vancouver, as the City has committed to creating equivalencies between its building bylaw and the Energy Step Code.) As each municipality considers its options for incentivizing or requiring higher building performance, the question arises: At what step of the code should we begin? An extensive costing study, completed last summer, offers some insight. It costed thousands of simulations for 10 archetypes, representing a range of possible design choices that could comply with each performance step in the six climate zones of B.C. A first of its kind in Canada, this study revealed that significant reductions in energy use, carbon pollution, and utility costs already can be achieved at very moderate additional construction costs for the first three steps.

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PHOTO: STEPHEN HUI, PEMBINA INSTITUTE.


For example, the lowest capital cost designs meeting Step 3 for homes and apartment buildings in most parts of the province result in at least 20 per cent energy savings and 50 per cent emissions reductions (in some cases up to 90 per cent), for less than two per cent incremental construction costs. The designs needed to meet these performance criteria are familiar to the industry, which already regularly builds to this level under a series of voluntary programs. Given the existence of low cost solutions and the market’s readiness, many local governments are opting to adopt Step 3, either as a requirement or as a minimum threshold for access to added density or other incentives. Metro Vancouver’s three North Shore municipalities, for example, are aligning their policies and planning to require Step 3 for new low and mid-rise residential buildings starting in July. Richmond, Surrey, Burnaby, and New Westminster are also considering requiring or incentivizing Step 3 for residential buildings.

Tom-Pierre Frappé-Sénéclauze is the director of the Buildings and Urban Solutions Program at the Pembina Institute (www.pembina. org), and a cofounder of Three for All B.C. (www.threeforall.ca), a coalition working to inspire and inform local government action on energy efficiency through judicious use of the B.C. Energy Step Code.

The potential carbon pollution reductions from adopting Step 3 are significant — and make a strong case for dispensing with the first two steps in many areas. For single-family homes, for example, the marginal cost for builders and consumers of moving from Step 2 to 3 is about a one per cent increase in capital costs. Going up the step decreases emissions by another 20 per cent to 25 per cent below base code while maintaining energy costs at the same level. If all of the major municipalities in Metro Vancouver adopted Step 3 for residential buildings, over one million tonnes of carbon emissions would be avoided cumulatively between 2018 and 2030. The introduction of the Energy Step Code also presents an opportunity to address some ongoing issue with compliance and enforcement of energy codes. Interviews with local manufacturers, builders, energy advisors, and municipal staff clarified some gaps to be addressed, but also revealed a healthy optimism about the industry’s capacity to deliver if given sufficient time to prepare and support for training. To monitor implementation, a multi-stakeholder advisory group was formed: the Energy Step Code Council. Serving as a “bridge” between the province, utilities, local governments, and industry, the council ensures coordination of training opportunities and communication of the standard.

STEPPING OUT BEYOND B.C. Such innovation need not be limited to B.C. Developing a multi-tiered framework in other Canadian provinces would allow municipalities to get a leg up and start building the industry capacity and experience required to smoothly transition to net-zero energy ready construction. All around the country, energy efficient buildings are being built and recognized for the multiple benefits they provide, including better air quality, reduced mould and moisture, and more affordable energy costs. A national energy step code could help accelerate this market transformation. Why wait?

PHOTO: CLAYTON TOWNHOME DEVELOPMENT IN SURREY BC, ACHIEVING ENERGY STAR FOR NEW HOMES (PART 9, STEP 3).

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VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE WEST – THE WORLD’S FIRST DOUBLE LEED PLATINUM CONVENTION CENTRE With the ambitious goal of being the most sustainable convention centre in the world, Vancouver Convention Centre and BC Pavilion Corporation (PavCo) set out to pursue LEED Operations and Maintenance: Existing Buildings (LEED EB) to the highest award level, Platinum, and voluntarily registered under the newest, most stringent version of the standard – LEED v4. In 2016, the Convention Centre achieved this goal, and with it became the first Double LEED Platinum convention centre in the world, and the first LEED Platinum building in Canada to be certified under version 4 of the LEED EB rating system. By Helen Brennek & Maeri Machado The iconic Vancouver Convention Centre West is located on picturesque Coal Harbour in downtown Vancouver. The 1M ft2 building was already known for its commitment to sustainability, earning LEED NC Platinum certification upon its completion in 2009. Achievement of LEED EB under version 4 at the Platinum level complements this award, and solidifies the Convention Centre’s position as a world class leader in sustainability, not only in the initial design and construction of the facility, but also by expanding the sustainability emphasis to the operations practices and ongoing maintenance of the facility. Space types in the building primarily include meeting rooms, conference spaces, and pre-function areas, as well as commercial kitchens and back-of-house support areas. Its green roof – with an area of over six acres - is the largest in Canada. The building also contributes to sustainability through extensive and leading-edge marine habitat restoration. 24

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1- VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE WEST IS HOME TO THE LARGEST GREENROOF IN CANADA, WITH RECLAIMED WATER USED FOR IRRIGATION, LOW IMPACT MAINTENANCE, AND INTEGRATED APPROACHES TO PEST MANAGEMENT. 2 - STAIRS ARE PROMINENTLY FEATURED AND PROMPT OCCUPANTS TO TAKE ACTIVE CIRCULATION OPTIONS RATHER THAN THE ELEVATORS. 3 - THE CONVENTION CENTRE’S ONGOING MONITORING OF THE ADJACENT RESTORED MARINE HABITAT CONTRIBUTES TO WORLD-LEADING RESEARCH ON MEDIUM AND LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF SIMILAR RESTORED HABITATS. 4 - PRE-FUNCTION AREAS OFFER A DIVERSITY OF USES, AMONG THEM, STANDING RECEPTIONS AS A MORE ACTIVE ALTERNATIVE TO SEATED PRESENTATIONS.

The Convention Centre showcases leading best practices in the industry including employing a scratch kitchen to support the health of event attendees, and reporting on event sustainability metrics. Building management strives to continuously improve operational sustainability through effective engagement with suppliers, clients, employees, and the public. These efforts resulted in the building being named the second ASTM Level 4 Certified Green Venue in the world.

LEADING EDGE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PRACTICES The West building employs a state-of-the-art heating and cooling system and has put in place comprehensive plans and policies to optimize energy efficiency. The system chillers use seawater from the adjacent Vancouver Harbour for free cooling and are capable of both heating and cooling, preventing the need for a boiler system. Since construction, the building has implemented energy saving retrofits and employs energy management best practices, described below, as a way to proactively monitor and operate the building efficiently. As a result, the West building uses 44% less energy than NRCan’s benchmark for convention centres, and earned 19 of the 20 points available for energy performance in LEED EB.

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Some of the energy saving features employed at the Convention Centre include: — LED lighting retrofits for nearly all interior light fixtures. — Installing energy sub-metering by area to enable feedback to clients and tenants regarding the energy consumption of their event. — Carefully adapting equipment schedules to match the ever-changing events schedules, ensuring equipment is not unnecessarily running. — Reducing unnecessary heating, cooling, and fan energy consumption with demand-control ventilation and CO2 sensors. — Actively tracking and offsetting all carbon emissions related to energy consumption.

PUTTING OCCUPANTS FIRST Vancouver Convention Centre is the first venue in the Americas to achieve Healthy Venue Accreditation from the World Obesity Foundation. Operational practices supporting this achievement include the scratch kitchen, nutritious menu offerings, employee health options, and fitness options for events. Operating a scratch kitchen enables healthy choices to be made on behalf of conference attendees by eliminating unnecessary sugars, sodium, and oils from prepared foods. The building provides wholegrain baked goods, and appropriately selects oils for cooking (trans-fats are banned). SPRING 2018 | BC FOCUS

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For employees, excess food is provided as discounted healthy meals. Fitness events such as lunchtime yoga or organized runs are held, and discounted rates are available at the on-site gym. For events, fitness options are provided, such as walking seminars, standing options in conferences (with appropriate furniture), and fitness sessions such as walking/running tours of the city, or yoga during breaks. The location provides well-used public exercise space via its seawall bike and walking route, and encourages active transportation to the building with its proximity to bike and transit routes, resulting in a 92% reduction in single-occupancy vehicle trips. The building has outstanding occupant comfort, with surveys showing that all aspects of the indoor environment have satisfaction well above 80%. Fullheight glazing allows for views of the surrounding natural landscape, providing a psychological benefit.

5 5 - VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE WEST’S FACILITIES INCLUDE A BLACKWATER TREATMENT PLANT WHICH IS EXPANDING TO INCREASE THE QUANTITY OF WATER THAT CAN BE RECLAIMED FOR USE IN IRRIGATION AND FLUSH FIXTURES.

GOING ABOVE AND BEYOND IN WATER CONSERVATION In addition to implementing a policy to ensure only low-flow fixtures and fittings are used at the building, the Convention Centre is actively engaged to monitor, report and decrease water consumption. The West building’s blackwater treatment plant enables it to reuse water from flush fixtures for grey water uses such as flush fixtures and irrigation. On average, more than 50% of flush fixture demand is met by reclaimed water. The building is also expanding the storage capacity of the blackwater treatment plant to further decrease potable water consumption at the building.

While the seawater cooling is ordinarily recognized for its energy efficiency benefits, its use also means that no cooling tower make-up water is required for the building.

Due to these practices and retrofits, the building realises an indoor water use reduction of more than 35% overall, which achieves the maximum number of points and exemplary performance under the LEED EB v4 credit.

A WORLD LEADER WALKING THE TALK

The irrigation system is monitored for leaks and uses moisture sensors to prevent overwatering; green roof irrigation is shut off, except during times of drought. Additional sensors and zones enable partial and full shut off of different areas. Native and adaptive vegetation is planted throughout the site, including the green roof, to improve resilience of the meadow environment and help eliminate the need for irrigation. There is extensive water submetering informing building management practices. Submetering process water was a challenge for this building, but it enables detailed water consumption reporting to be provided to clients on a per-event basis, and allows repeat events to track their water consumption from one event to the next. The Convention Centre goes above and beyond to provide reporting to clients, including one event that required measurement and counting of every pitcher of water served to attendees (prior to submetering installation).

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WASTE AS A VALUABLE RESOURCE The Convention Centre’s treatment and reuse of wastewater isn’t the only way waste is treated as a valuable resource. The Convention Centre has an exceptional waste diversion rate for ongoing consumables, often exceeding 90% at the West building, due to thorough tenant engagement and progressive on-site sorting. Waste from facility maintenance and renovation projects is also predominantly diverted at a rate of more than 90%.

Vancouver Convention Centre is arguably the most sustainable convention centre in the world. At the heart of this claim is its management’s ambition to decrease the facility’s environmental footprint and create positive health impacts in many innovative ways. These practices include all building systems, from maintaining a green roof – the largest in Canada – that provides habitat, increases biodiversity, and is home to pollinators unseen in BC since 1932, to restoring, monitoring, and preserving the adjacent marine habitat. From top to bottom, the Convention Centre is working every day towards a smaller, more sustainable operations footprint. With double LEED Platinum certifications, Healthy Venue Accreditation, and ASTM Level 4 (Green Venue) certification, Vancouver Convention Centre is walking the talk. Interested readers can see for themselves – check out the educational signage on over 70 electronic screens throughout the facility, or go on one of more than 120 public tours offered annually. HELEN BRENNEK AND MAERI MACHADO ARE, RESPECTIVELY, PROJECT MANAGER, SUSTAINABILITY & ENERGY AND DIRECTOR B.C., SUSTAINABILITY & ENERGY AT WSP.


ORCHARD COMMONS: A Social Evolution of Sustainable Building at UBC 1

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The University of British Columbia (UBC) has a distinguished history of green building. With its evolving sustainable building mandate, UBC is set to advance notions surrounding social sustainability at Orchard Commons, the second of five mixed-used ‘hubs’ contemplated by the University’s Point Grey Campus Master Plan. To foster social connection and create a more active and lively public realm, Orchard Commons challenges past conventions by integrating residence life with academic uses, connecting it with the campus at large. By Kathy Wardle and Derek Newby Photos by Michael Elkan

Level one N A Loading B Dining C Dining back of house D Servery E Dining F Event G Study

C D

H I J K L M N

Bathroom Music practice room Mechanical Electrical Classroom Staff office Lounge

E

F H

G

B

B L

N M

I K

J

1 - VIEW OF VANTAGE COLLEGE ACADEMIC WING. 2 - OUTDOOR SEATING FACING THE COURTYARD COMMONS.

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Comprised of two residential towers connected to an academic wing by a socially-focused commons block, the 41,620 m2 (448,000 ft2) mixed-use facility combines 1,048 student housing beds, a 400-seat dining hall, classrooms, amenities, and a daycare into one facility. A key component is the academic wing purpose-built for Vantage College, UBC’s innovative academic program for international students requiring focused English language support. Building upon notable projects on campus, including the Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability, UBC was deliberate in establishing a mandate for social sustainability. In addition to environmental and economic sustainability goals, the intended design set out to raise the bar by prioritizing eight social sustainability and human well-being aspirations for the project: • Design an exceptional learning environment; • Foster a connected, healthy, and safe community; • Engage with food and nutrition; • Promote active and healthy lifestyles; • Engage the surrounding community; • Create universal accessibility; • Enable mirco-opportunities to experience nature; and • Strengthen a sense of place and legibility of the campus. The key to achieving the university’s social sustainability goals was to design a facility that demonstrates a sense of generosity and fosters social connection through expressing the themes of transparency, daylight, and wood. In the often rainy climate, maximizing daylight throughout the student residences and academic wing was central in the building plan to improve and promote well-being and a sense of place.

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Social spaces are animated with light through glazed atria and clerestories, and corridors terminate in glass to create intuitive wayfinding and provide connection to the outdoors. Wood is integrated in an expressive way, specifically deployed in social spaces such as informal learning space, lounges, and the dining hall. Wood has a universal appeal and was chosen for its inherent ability to evoke a sense of generosity and welcome, and for its connection to the rainforest setting of coastal British Columbia.

The dining hall exemplifies these themes, and is situated in a highly visible location in the commons block, bathed in daylight and defined by an expressive timber structure. Combined with the facility’s central location on campus, the dining hall and associated food services ‘Open Kitchen’ creates a welcoming atmosphere not just for residents, but for the entire campus community.

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The dining hall also features a rooftop garden, providing outdoor social space with raised garden beds available for the use of ‘Open Kitchen’. Within an existing campus such as UBC, taller buildings are required to bring the density that contributes to an active and lively character. To break down the social stratification that can occur in high-rise buildings, the two 52m-tall residential towers feature a number of three-storey lounges that are defined by transparency and visibility, with the levels connected by a wood convenience stair. Residents are encouraged to move between the levels of their ‘living room’, promoting activity throughout the towers and fostering a greater sense of community. The lounges are located at the end of each building, immediately adjacent to the street, making them highly prominent to the campus. The deliberate placement of the lounges creates a visible interface with the campus at large, and prioritizes amazing views of the surrounding waters of the Strait of Georgia for all residents.

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Orchard Commons also met several environmental sustainability goals, targeting LEED Canada 2009 Gold certification. Healthy, local, and recycled content materials are used throughout, complying with the standard, and 80% of the demolition and construction waste was diverted from site. 45% less potable water is used through the integration of low-flow and flush fixtures in the housing and academic program areas.

Rainwater and stormwater are managed on site through common measures such as site and roof water collection and retention, and native landscaping. Achieving high energy performance was a priority, and Orchard Commons is estimated to reduce energy consumption by 54% based on the reference standard MNECB. The facility balances the high energy demand of the large commercial kitchen with a highly efficient building enclosure, resulting in good overall energy performance even when compared with many standalone residences without kitchens.

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The performance of the commercial kitchen is enhanced with targeted energy conservation measures including exhaust air heat recovery and a sophisticated exhaust hood management protocol that limits operation to match activities in the kitchen. With its focus on social sustainability, Orchard Commons represents an evolution of UBC’s approach to green building design. A new green building plan for the campus is anticipated for summer 2018, and it is expected that UBC will continue to raise the bar. It is hoped that the new green building plan will balance environmental performance targets with a continued commitment to design and operate healthy and socially sustainable buildings on campus. KATHY WARDLE IS DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH, AND DEREK NEWBY IS SENIOR ASSOCIATE , BOTH OF PERKINS+WILL, VANCOUVER. ARTICLE EDITED BY TARA HARRISON OF PERKINS+WILL. 3 - SOCIAL STAIRS IN COMMONS BLOCK EXPRESSED WITH DAYLIGHT, TRANSPARENCY, AND WOOD. 4 - WOOD STAIRCASE MOVING BETWEEN THE LEVELS IN THE ACADEMIC WING. 5 - ENTRANCE TO DINING HALL AND OPEN KITCHEN WELCOMING THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY. 6 - DOUBLE-HEIGHT STUDENT RESIDENTIAL LOUNGE PRIORITIZING AMAZING VIEWS OF UBC’S NATURAL CAMPUS SETTING. 7 - TOP FLOOR INFORMAL STUDY SPACE OF 3-STOREY STUDENT RESIDENTIAL LOUNGE.

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INTERVIEW WITH MICHAEL BOUSFIELD Cascadia Windows & Doors raises the performance bar

MICHAEL BOUSFIELD IS TECHNICAL DIRECTOR AT CASCADIA WINDOWS & DOORS.

Cascadia Windows & Doors [http://www.cascadiawindows.com] was founded in 2008 in Langley by a collective of building science and window specialists with the intent to innovate, commercialize and produce the most energy-efficient building products in the marketplace. Cascadia manufactures resilient, versatile and sustainable building envelope products, including fiberglass windows, doors, and fiberglass cladding support systems forged from high-quality pultruded fiberglass. It’s mission is to lead North America’s transition to energy efficient building design by offering products that substantially reduce CO2 emissions which, in turn, affect climate change.

frames have similar thermal performance as the best double-glazed IG units [centre of glass] available today, so when coupled with double glazing, the fiberglass frame doesn’t drag down the thermal performance. BC FOCUS What’s the word on the Universal Series which you launched recently?

MB The Universal Series is our newest line of windows and doors. It’s the first commercially available all-fiberglass Passive House Certified window and door system, which showcases the latest in energy efficient window and door

BC FOCUS Did Cascadia start out by using fiberglass and why?

technology. It offers one frame in place of many,

MB Yes – Cascadia’s founders wanted to help building designs be more

and improves on our existing lines in every way.

energy efficient by developing, and – if need be – manufacturing, a

The benefits are: Passive House certified thermal

commercial grade and highly thermally efficient window system. Aluminum

performance, commercial grade strength and

and vinyl materials each embody one of these characteristics, but not both.

sizes, inward and outward operation in one

Fiberglass does, and provides high-strength, and long-service-life windows

system, and LBC Red-List Free. Cascadia’s first

with excellent thermal performance. It’s a trickier material to manufacture

Passive House international certification just

with, but we believe that the results are worth it, and have specialized solely

completed in March.

in fiberglass since our start.

BC FOCUS Do you see a growing market for such

BC FOCUS Cascadia publicizes its ability to innovate. What means do you

high-performance products?

have to do that?

MB The demand for products that contribute

MB

Cascadia’s focus on improving energy conservation in buildings

to higher energy efficiency is certainly growing.

necessitates innovation. As far as the ability to innovate goes, we have

The requirement for high energy efficiency in all

a team and a culture that fosters it. For example, several team members

buildings, from single-family homes to high rises,

who lead product development are also part of our senior management

is here. Passive House, Net Zero, and LEED are in

team. This streamlines decision making at a lot of points in the innovation

place to help us cut the energy use of buildings.

process. Also, these individuals enjoy a working level of tolerance from our

And that’s what we need to do, reduce our

production department, as we often need to use part of the production

energy demand. The BC Step Code shows that

environment as an R&D space. Finally, we have an understanding owner

governments are going to mandate higher energy

group, who are familiar with, and supportive of the very non-linear path

efficiency in buildings. Cascadia aims to address

that innovative projects inevitably take.

the thermally weakest link in the building envelope

BC FOCUS You came up with the curtain wall vent adaptor. Why is that considered an innovation?

MB The Vent Adaptor allows the thermally weakest part of curtain wall

– the openings for windows and doors. We have to use our expertise and continually improve to make the most thermally-efficient windows and doors. That’s why we’re here.

systems, the operable vents, to realize excellent thermal performance by using a fiberglass sash and frame in place of aluminum. Insulated fiberglass

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1 - BUILDING AT SFU UNIVERSITY. PHOTO: PAUL GRDINA PHOTOGRAPHY. 2 - RESIDENCE IN WASHINGTON STATE.


YOUR LEED V4 QUICK-REFERENCE

CANADIAN DIRECTORY OF PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR SUSTAINABLE, HIGH-PERFORMANCE BUILDING

Visit our on-line Directory to see hundreds of listings of companies which supply products and services for sustainable, high-performance building. Listings are organized by Product Category and by LEED v4 Category. Our LEED v4 Directory is created with the help of our partner:

OUR 2018 PARTNERS SITE | LANDSCAPING | RAINWATER HARVESTING

>Interface

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THERMAL & WINDOWS >Cascadia Windows & Doors >Eco Insulating Glass Inc.

>Uponor >Viessmann Manufacturing Company Inc.

>Inline Fiberglass Ltd.

GREEN DESIGN SUPPORT + PROFESSIONALS

>Innotech Windows + Doors

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Concrete Institute

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INTERIOR FINISHES >CBR Products >Columbia Forest Products >Forbo Flooring Systems

>Efficiency Nova Scotia >FABRIQ architecture >Pomerleau >RJC Engineers

www.sabmagazine.com/directoryv4.html SPRING 2018 | BC FOCUS

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