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Š CICO Books 2014

SEWING SCHOOL BASICS A step-by-step course for first-time stitchers

Includ e 9 full- s siz pull-ou e t pattern s

JANE BOLSOVER


© CICO Books 2014


© CICO Books 2014 Contents Introduction 6 How to use this book 7

SECTION 1

Let’s get started

8

Tools for the job 8 Choosing paper patterns and fabrics 11 Preparing paper patterns and cutting out 22

SECTION 2

Workshops and projects

32

Workshop 1

Plain sewing 32

Workshop 7

Gathers, shirring, and smocking 104

The Project

Embellished envelope pillow 50

The Project

Little girl’s shirred sundress 114

Workshop 2

Zippers 52

Workshop 8

Darts and waist finishes 118

The Project

Brilliant bean bags 60

The Project

Jeans-style skirt 126

Workshop 3

Hems 62

Workshop 9

Tucks, pleats, and more fastenings 130

The Project

Reversible throw 68

The Project

Organdy evening skirt 140

Workshop 4

Fancy stitches and pockets 70

The Project

1950s-style embroidered apron 79

Workshop 5

Quilting and appliqué 82

The Project

Vintage-style pillow 89

Workshop 6

Patchwork and binding 92

The Project

Recycled patchwork bedspread 101

Glossary 182 Useful addresses 186 Author’s acknowledgments 186 Index 187 How to use the pattern sheets 192

Workshop 10 The Project Workshop 11 The Project Workshop 12 The Project

Necklines and collars 144 The perfect summer dress 151

Sleeves and sleeve finishes 156 Baby’s smocked dress and pants 163

Simple curtains 168 Contrast-lined curtains 179


© CICO Books 2014

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workshop 1: plain sewing—the sewing project

Embellished envelope pillow You will need Five circular design templates traced off from the pattern sheets at the back of this book (see page 192) / yd (50cm) of 54in- (137cm-) wide linen, silk, or velvet fabric

An envelope pillow, which has an overlapping opening at the back rather than a zipper, is one of the easiest projects to begin with and a perfect way to put into practice some of the techniques you’ve just learned in the Plain Sewing workshop. This one uses simple running stitch to embellish the front cover with contemporary circular designs, and is fastened at the back with a button and buttonhole.

2 3

1/8 yd (10cm) of 36- (90cm-) wide lightweight fusible interfacing

Cutting out your fabric Draw out your pattern pieces on paper—for the front, draw a 171/4 in (44cm) square, and for the backs, draw a 101/4 x 171/4 in (26 x 44cm) rectangle and a 13 x 171/4 in (33 x 44cm) rectangle. Cut out one fabric piece from each of these pattern pieces, making sure that the long edges of the patterns are parallel to the selvages.

Matching thread 16 x 16in (41 x 41cm) pillow form

2 Using one color at

Stranded embroidery floss in contrasting colors Crewel needle Dressmaker’s carbon paper One 7/8 in (22mm) button One 3/8 in (10mm) reinforcing button

Note 5/8 in (1.5cm) seam allowances are included unless otherwise stated.

Stitch seams with right sides together and notches matching, unless otherwise stated.

1 Finish all four edges of the front piece (see page 39). Using dressmaker’s carbon paper and a pencil, trace the five circular designs from the templates onto the wrong side of the front piece.

a time, thread the crewel needle with all six strands of the embroidery floss, with it doubled to create 12 strands, as this will make big, bold stitches. Using the photograph as a guide, and working from the wrong side of the fabric, hand sew parallel rows of running stitches (see page 34) across one of the large circles (2), keeping the stitches about 3/8 in (1cm) in length and as even as possible.

3 On the other large circle (5), using a different color of floss, start at the center and sew the running stitches in the spiral pattern, again making the stitches even in length, until you reach the outer edge of the circle. On the medium-size circle (4), stitch bands of longer individual stitches radiating out from the center, changing the color of the floss with each band of stitches. Finally, sew individual straight stitches across the two small circles (1 and 3), scattering them in any direction, until the circles are filled.


Š CICO Books 2014

4 From the interfacing (see pages 18 and 19), cut two 15/8 x 171/4 in (4 x 44cm) rectangles. Iron the interfacing to the wrong side of each back piece along one long edge. Along each interfaced edge, fold and press 3/8 in (1cm) and then a further 11/4 in (3cm) to the wrong side, enclosing the interfacing and raw edge. Pin and machine stitch in place, close to the inner pressed edge of each, and then finish the remaining raw edges of each back piece.

5 Lay the front piece right side up on a flat surface, and then place the smaller back piece right side down on top, with finished edges even. Place the remaining back piece on top of that, right side down, keeping the finished edges even and overlapping the hemmed edges. Pin and baste the pieces together around the four finished edges. Machine stitch the pieces together, pivoting the fabric at the corners (see page 37). Remove the basting, trim the corners (see page 38), and turn the cover right side out through the back opening; press.

6 Using pins, mark the position of the buttonhole (see page 47) on the top back piece, halfway down the opening, equidistant from the edge of the hem and the stitching line, and parallel to them. Keeping the lower back out of the way, machine stitch a buttonhole at the position marked (see pages 47–8). Hand sew the larger button to the underneath back piece to correspond, using the reinforcing button to secure (see page 46). Insert your pillow form through the back opening and fasten with the button.


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workshop 2: zippers—the project

© CICO Books 2014

Brilliant bean bags You will need Bean bag templates traced off from the pattern sheets at the back of the book (see page 192) 21/3 yd (2.20m) of 45in- (112cm-) wide cotton print fabric 1yd (90cm) of 45in(112cm-) wide contrasting cotton fabric 31/4 yd (2.90m) of 45in- (112cm-) wide lining fabric

They’re bold, fun, versatile, and the ultimate in relaxation. Make them in a trendy cotton print for a teenager’s bedroom, or a coated cotton fabric for outdoor living. A simple liner containing the beads is hidden inside thanks to an invisible zipper, allowing the outer cover to be easily laundered.

Cutting out your fabric From the print fabric cut out two side panels. From the contrasting fabric cut out two base pieces, one top, and one handle. From the lining fabric cut out two side panels, two base pieces, and one top, making sure that the grainlines are parallel to the selvages on every piece that you cut out (see page 27).

Making the inner bag

2 Fold a lining side

22in (56cm) invisible zipper to match contrasting fabric Matching thread 5 cubic feet (0.14 cubic meters) of fire-retardant polystyrene bean bag filling beads

Note / in (1.5cm) seam allowances are included unless otherwise stated. 5 8

1 Finish the straight edges of the lining base pieces and stitch them together, leaving a large central opening to allow for the filling to be added. Press the seam open and the opening edges 5/8 in (1.5cm) to the wrong side.

panel in half along one of the “V” sections, matching top notches and raw edges. Pin and baste the raw edges together and then stitch from the matched notches on the top edge down to the dot, taking a 5/8 in (1.5cm) seam allowance and reverse stitching at each end to secure. Finish the seam allowances together and press to one side. Repeat with the remaining “V” sections on both side panels.

Stitch seams with right sides together and notches matching, unless otherwise stated.

4 Matching notches to

3 Pin, baste, and stitch the side panels together at the side seams. Finish the seam allowances together and press to one side.

side seams, stitch the top piece to the top edges of the side panels, snipping into the seam allowances of the side panels to help you to stitch around the circle. Finish the seam allowances together and press toward the side panels. Repeat to attach the base to the side panels, matching up the seams. Turn the inner bag right side out through the opening in the base, and fill with the beads. Slipstitch the opening edges closed (see page 34).


Š CICO Books 2014 Making the cover

5 Finish the straight edges of the two base pieces. Positioning the zipper centrally along these straight edges, install the invisible zipper, following steps 1, 2, and 3 of Applying an Invisible Zipper on page 58. Repeat step 3 to close the seam above the zipper.

6 Stitch the “V� sections and join the side panels, as shown in steps 2 and 3 of Making the Inner Bag. Fold the handle piece in half lengthwise and stitch the long edges together, reverse stitching at each end to secure. Press the seam open. Turn the handle right side out and press flat with the seam running down the center back. Topstitch the folded edges 1/4 in (6mm) from the edge (see page 42).

Making a doorstop

7 Matching notches, pin and baste

8 With the wrong side of the cover to the right side

the handle to the right side of the top piece. Attach the top and base to the side panels following step 4 of Making the Inner Bag, ensuring that the zipper is open before you begin, so that you will be able to turn the cover right side out.

of the inner bag, catch the two tops together at the side seams with a few hand stitches in the seam allowances. Turn the cover right side out, carefully working the inner bag down through the zipper opening. Holding the handle, give the bean bag a shake to straighten out the inner bag. Make sure that it is sitting correctly inside, then close the zipper.

A scaled-down version of the bean bag makes a fabulous doorstop. Trace off the doorstop templates from the pattern sheet at the back of the book, and cut out from 1/3 yd (30cm) of 45in(112cm-) wide cotton fabric. Using 3/8 in (1cm) seams, make up the cover following steps 1, 2, and 3 of Making the Inner Bag, then follow step 7 of Making the Cover to make and attach the handle. Now follow step 4 of Making the Inner Bag, filling it with rice or lentils and adding dried lavender if desired, before stitching the opening closed.


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© CICO Books 2014

workshop 6: patchwork and binding—the project

Creating a quilt sandwich Press the assembled patchwork top. Seam the three backing pieces together with 5/8 in (1.5cm) seams, placing the smaller pieces each side of the larger piece; press the seams open. Layer the patchwork top, batting, and backing together (see Preparing the Quilt Sandwich and Basting the Layers Together on pages 82 and 83).

Finishing the bedspread Trim the backing and batting edges even with the patchwork top and attach the binding to the edges following the Binding Square Corners method on page 100. To complete the bedspread, stitch the shirt buttons randomly to some of the corners of the patches, using a reinforcement button underneath each one (see page 46). The buttons hold the layers together across the bedspread, so position them with this in mind. Remove all of the basting stitches.

Increasing the size of your patchwork bedspread The following quantities will help you to purchase the right amount of materials for a larger bedspread. Make up the patchwork top using the same method as for the twin (single) bed and then measure it to find out the sizes to which you should cut out your backing, batting, and binding. Remember to stitch the backing together with a larger piece in the middle. For a double bedspread Approximate finished size: 931/2 x 981/2 in (237.5 x 250cm) Template A: Cut 80 patches Template B: Cut 30 patches Arrange the patches in 10 rows of 8 template A’s and 3 template B’s, in a similar manner to that shown in the patchwork assembly diagram for the twin (single) bedspread on page 101.

For a US queen- (UK king-) size bedspread

Also needed for a double or a US queen- (UK king-) size bedspread

Approximate finished size: 981/2 x 981/2 in (250 x 250cm). Template A: Cut 80 patches Template B: Cut 40 patches Arrange the patches in 10 rows of 8 template A’s and 4 template B’s, in a similar manner to that shown in the patchwork assembly diagram for the twin (single) bedspread on page 101.

81/2 yd (7.70m) of 45in- (112cm-) wide fabric in a coordinating color for the backing and binding 120 x 120in (305cm x 305cm) cotton batting


© CICO Books 2014


© CICO Books 2014

The complete sewing course for beginners ■

Learn how to make your own clothes and home furnishings.

12 structured workshops teach you all the sewing skills you need, from simple hand embroidery to dressmaking. ■

Each workshop finishes with a step-by-step project, using the skills mastered in the workshop.

Includes a pull-out section with full-size paper patterns for a jeans-style skirt, an apron, a child’s sundress, a sleeveless dress, a pleated skirt, a baby’s smocked dress, a detachable collar, a bean bag, and a doorstop. ■

craft

www.rylandpeters.com

Sewing School Basics  

by Jane Bolsover. Published by CICO Books 2014.

Sewing School Basics  

by Jane Bolsover. Published by CICO Books 2014.

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