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A horse shoe valley was identified as already containing large fragmented patches of significant vegetation. The remaining land in the valley showed poor land use capability. Strong reluctance to arable use, poor water tables, erosion prone. The valley featured topography that is not suited to development ie steep aspect. The valley is also a significant water catchment. The ridge line of the valley forms the boundary of a new reserve

Reversing landscape

mosaics

B

Ryan Aldrich

Dairy Flat

A concept placing a bush reserves at the centre of city nodes, density decrees moving out from the node. This reverses the normal pattern of having significant foliage in the country side away from the city. Roads have typically been built along arable soil paths these are low land and often flood plains. This land will be retained for arable use. The typical landscape mosaic is now reversed.

Auckland CBD

Reserve core

case study site

Dairy Flat

Development zones around a reserve core Ecology forms reserves through development

Development zones are dictated by topography. The areas featuring slopes less than 10 degrees are commercial, areas with steeper slopes are residential. A large flat area relatively close to the motorway was identified in dairy flat as suitable for industrial. dairy flat as suitable for industrial.

The central reserve was identified as being similar in size to that of Central park, New York. This spatial reference started an investigation of the New York grid system. A radial grid like that of the garden city model was used with dimensions attempted from New York. The radial system regulates density. This is as cadastral areas contract closer to the core forced by the roads.

Dairy Flat

Auckland CBD

Ryan Aldrich


Context Project intent This project continues form a previous investigation. It aims to refine the Growth strategy concept developed in the previous work. Shifting the scale and focusing on one patch achieve this. The project is investigating the form of patch B.

Explaining previous work and location This project is a continuation from a previous investigation. The previous investigation explored potential areas for development and growth of Auckland city. The study was focused on Auckland’s north shore particularly around the Silverdale area. GIS was used extensively to map out landscape pattern, ecology, hydrology and other relevant issues were mapped graphically. This work lead to the discovery of three development areas forming the accordingly named tri patched scheme. This scheme had a range of rules forming it. The arable land was retained for cropping or pasture. Land containing significant vegetation was retained as reserve. Slopes best for development were identified. The investigation had a focus of retaining the current and vanishing costal quality of the north of Auckland. This was to be achieved by looking inland for development areas. This is just a small selection of some of the key components forming the scheme. The theory takes the form of having a core patch of significant bush. This bush is expanded in most cases over adjacent land identified as needing revegetation. Surrounding this bush is land best suited for development. Between patches and along exterior roads is most often land best suited for cropping or pasture.

Ryan Aldrich


Ryan Aldrich


Refining the patch

A similar system to that of the last project was used to refine the areas of the patch though on a smaller scale. Layers of landscape pattern, ecology, and hydrology were examined. The resulting form was very similar to that of the large scale except boundaries are refined and more aliened to the landscape. A radial rign road was identierfyed and also influenced the development zone.

Ryan Aldrich


Hydrology

Water ways + elevation

Arable land

Ryan Aldrich


Development area

A horse shoe valley was identified as already containing large fragmented patches of significant vegetation. The remaining land in the valley showed poor land use capability. Strong reluctance to arable use, poor water tables, erosion prone. The valley featured topography that is not suited to development ie steep aspect. The valley is also a significant water catchment. The ridge line of the valley forms the boundary of a new reserve.

area: 861 ha

Ryan Aldrich


Ryan Aldrich


Establishing zones

Development zones are dictated by topography. The areas featuring slopes less than 10 degrees are commercial, areas with steeper slopes are residential. A large flat area relatively close to the motorway was identified in dairy flat as suitable for industrial. The area of land within the valley that does not have poor land use capability is zoned to become parkland.

Ryan Aldrich


Ryan Aldrich


Circulation / Density

The central reserve was identified as being similar in size to that of Central park, New York. This spatial reference started an investigation of the New York grid system. A radial grid like that of the garden city model was used with dimensions attempted from New York. The radial system regulates density. This is as cadastral areas contract closer to the core forced by the roads.

Ryan Aldrich


Ryan Aldrich


Zooming in (50 ha)

A 50 ha area was selected from the extent to investigate the concept at a different resolution. This increased detail leads to repeating the process of mapping the landscape pattern and environmental processes. Within the established grid land around waterways are buffered and put into reserve. Similarly land with aspect to steep for typical development is placed into reserve. There are also small areas of vegetation scattered across the grid that are placed into reserve. This creates pedestrian and wildlife corridors.

Land Cover

Rivers Ryan Aldrich

Slope


Ryan Aldrich


Zooming in (50 ha)

Ryan Aldrich


Ryan Aldrich


Reversing Landscape mosaics, Summary

R

m Landscape is fragmented, it can be described as heterogeneous tiles. ‘Reversing landscape mosaics’ or ‘tri-patched’ at a larger scale are concepts placing bush reserves at the centre of city nodes, density decrees moving out from the node. This reverses the normal pattern of having significant foliage in the country side away from the city. Roads have typically and coincidentally been built along arable soil paths. This land will be retained for arable use. The typical landscape mosaic is now reversed.

Ryan Aldrich


A horse shoe valley was identified as already containing large fragmented patches of significant vegetation. The remaining land in the valley showed poor land use capability. Strong reluctance to arable use, poor water tables, erosion prone. The valley featured topography that is not suited to development ie steep aspect. The valley is also a significant water catchment. The ridge line of the valley forms the boundary of a new reserve

Reversing landscape

mosaics

B

Ryan Aldrich

Dairy Flat

A concept placing a bush reserves at the centre of city nodes, density decrees moving out from the node. This reverses the normal pattern of having significant foliage in the country side away from the city. Roads have typically been built along arable soil paths these are low land and often flood plains. This land will be retained for arable use. The typical landscape mosaic is now reversed.

Auckland CBD

Reserve core

case study site

Dairy Flat

Development zones around a reserve core Ecology forms reserves through development

Development zones are dictated by topography. The areas featuring slopes less than 10 degrees are commercial, areas with steeper slopes are residential. A large flat area relatively close to the motorway was identified in dairy flat as suitable for industrial. dairy flat as suitable for industrial.

The central reserve was identified as being similar in size to that of Central park, New York. This spatial reference started an investigation of the New York grid system. A radial grid like that of the garden city model was used with dimensions attempted from New York. The radial system regulates density. This is as cadastral areas contract closer to the core forced by the roads.

Dairy Flat

Auckland CBD

Ryan Aldrich


Reversing Landscape mosaics, Ryan Aldrich