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Award Winning Newsletter

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November 2016 Newsletter

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Students Teach High Schoolers at MASH Camp Page 8

Inside: RVU Honors Military with Appreciation Ceremony

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Students Celebrate Season with the Fall Festival

USIG and OBGYN Clubs Team Up for Neonatal Ultrasound Night

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Table of Contents 4

RVU Honors the Military with Appreciation Ceremony

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Fall Semester Electives Offer Twist on Traditional Classes

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Students Celebrate the Season with the Fall Festival

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RVUCOM-SU Campus Update

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Preceptor Spotlight: Joseph Morreale

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Get to Know RVU Staff: Kelly Farr

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"What are you looking forward to...?"

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Trick-or-Treat Street

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Students Teach Highschoolers at MASH Camp

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RVUCOM Represents at OMED '16

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Volunteer Efforts

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Military Track Leaders Train with South Metro Fire Rescue

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Campus Tidbits

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Achieving New Heights

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New Employees and Promotions

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Alumni Association Updates

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USIG and OBGYN Clubs Team Up for Neonatal Ultrasound Night

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Students Present at Research Appreciation Day

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Spotlight on Alumni: Kenton Asche

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Advancing Addiction Medicine by Clinton E. Adams, DO, FACHE, President and CEO

It was an honor to represent RVU and osteopathic medical schools at the White House's "Medicine Responds to Addiction II" Symposium in October. The symposium focused on the role of medical schools in preparing students for the crisis we face in substance use disorder (SUD). While over 20 million people are affected by SUD, only 10% are recognized and referred for treatment. Universities can no longer think in historic silos of discipline-based (or even system-based) curricular design. Adding another course or more lecture hours of learning outcomes only swells an already-bloated curriculum. Therefore, using advanced curricular mapping and purposefully interjecting important learning objectives of topics—such as pain, addiction, prevention, and psychosocial impact—into a continuum of the pedagogical approach (whether it be systems-, problem-, or team-based education) will provide reinforcement and the skill of integrative problem-solving we desire of our graduates. Fortunately, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has brought attention to the learning

environment; we don’t dare forget that students and graduates are subject to the same or greater potential for addiction as their patients. Consequently, the university’s bridge to residency training is one of the most important duties we have. The graduate must be prepared to transition to a competency-based learning environment and to embrace lifelong learning behaviors. The understanding and treatment of SUD relies heavily on techniques such as screening, brief intervention, and referral for treatment. This relies on empathy, communication skills, ethical precepts, and team-based trust, in addition to a sound understanding of best treatment practices. Many of these skills are not tested on national licensing exams or specialty certification; therefore, our transition to competency-based training, which encompasses these skills, may be a partial answer to the serious dilemma we face in addressing SUD. (Watch the White House Symposium at bit.ly/2gaKyBG.)

Silos are for Corn...Not Health Care! by Thomas N. Told, DO, FACOFP, dist., Dean and CAO

When I began medical practice, it was very rigid with a well-defined leadership structure: the physician occupied the top leadership position followed by physician assistants, nurses, technicians, administration, support personnel, and, finally, the patient. Each occupation operated in a silo of responsibility with little collaboration between caregivers. Dentists, social workers, and behavioral health counselors were regarded as community services and rarely engaged with the hospitals. Nurses were expected to stand when physicians entered the ward and to carry out orders without question—after all, their job was to be care managers and not formulators of care. This system worked very well for everyone except the patients and our country began to see the effect in the form of lower scores on health care outcomes when compared to our international neighbors. Today, America spends more and receives less than any other industrialized countries; we sit in last place in measures like infant mortality and access to care. Partitioning care—whether through strict scope of practice guidelines or special interests from unions or professional societies—stifles collaboration and fragments a patient’s care. Many of us

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have experienced this first-hand as consumers of health care. Members of American Dental Education Association recognized the need for communication and collaboration at the education level. They formed a group comprised of associations for nurses, pharmacists, and physicians— both osteopathic and allopathic. They discussed ways to dismantle the silos in medical education and to put better patient outcomes and safety at the center of care. They shelved discussions on scope of practice and focused instead on best practices. That effort has grown into a National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education and a restructuring of medical education, expanding into areas like social services and behavioral health. It is clear that no discipline can singlehandedly answer the health care needs of our country. It will take all of us working together to accomplish that goal. The sooner we learn to do that, the sooner our health grades as a nation will begin to improve.

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RVU Honors the Military with Appreciation Ceremony In what has become one of the most important traditions at RVU, students, faculty, and staff paid tribute to America’s armed forces with the sixth annual Military Appreciation Ceremony. The ceremony began with the Posting of the Colors, a traditional flag ceremony, which was performed by student doctors Amanda Ammentorp (OMS II, Air Force), Michael Bork (OMS II, Army), Mallory Krueger (OMS II, Air Force), Michelle Lu (OMS II, Navy), and Holly Spitzer (OMS I, Army). This was followed by a stirring rendition of the National Anthem, sung by RVU's acapella group, the SOAP Notes. Clinton E. Adams, DO, FACHE, President and CEO, Vice Admiral (Ret.), provided welcoming remarks, noting that despite America’s changes over the years, the military has been the concrete body that represents honor, courage, and commitment. He encouraged the students to embrace those values, as they look forward to careers as military physicians. Thomas N. Told, DO, FACOFP dist., Chief Academic Officer and Dean of RVUCOM, who served in the Army, spoke of military physicians throughout history and of the advances in medicine that the military has made. Anthony LaPorta, MD, FACS, Course Director of the Military Track, narrated the Missing Man/Prisoner of War Remembrance Ceremony. Four student doctors—Gavin Cardwell (OMS II, Navy), SD Spitzer, and Hayden Springer (OMS I, Air Force)—descended the auditorium stairs in unison, reverently carrying their dress hats. They approached a candlelit table which had been set with four place settings. As Dr. LaPorta spoke of the symbolism of each item, they placed their hats upon the empty plates to honor the service of those missing, taken prisoner, or killed in the line of duty. As the demonstration ended, Alexa Tyler, OMS II, sang a beautiful solo rendition of "Amazing Grace." Afterward, Dr. Told introduced and honored each of the visiting military dignitaries with a special RVU plaque. Keynote speaker, SEAL Command Master Chief Steven P. Viola shared experiences from his military career while offering advice to future military physicians: "You can’t do it by yourself. Get to know the line side. Tell them your capabilities and put it in a context that they will understand." He spoke on the relationships between soldiers and medical personnel and the importance of having faith in one another: "Everything you do begins with faith. Every discipline you start begins with faith: faith in your instructor, faith in your equipment, faith in your training, and faith in persons you will have your life." In conclusion of the event, the SOAP Notes sang "America the Beautiful" and the flags were retrieved in the Retiring of the Colors.

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Missing Man / Prisoner of War Remembrance Ceremony "The table is small, symbolizing the frailty of the prisoner alone against our oppressors. Remember. The tablecloth is white, symbolizing the purity of intentions to respond to the country’s call to arms. Remember. The single rose displayed in a vase reminds us of the families and loved ones of our comrades in arms. Remember. The red ribbon tied so prominently on the vase is reminiscent of the ribbon worn on the lapel and breast of thousands who bear witness to their unyielding determination to demand a proper accounting of our missing. Remember. A slice of lemon is placed on the bread plate to remind us of the missing’s bitter fate. Remember. The glass is inverted so they cannot toast with us tonight. Remember. The chair is empty. They are not here. Remember. All of you who served with them and will serve with them and called them comrades, who depended on their might and aid, and relied upon them. For surely, they have not been forgotten."

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Students Celebrate the Season with the Fall Festival The leaves may be changing colors and pumpkins may be everywhere you look, but October 15th felt less like fall and more like a warm summer day—perfect for the outdoor festivities at RVU's annual Fall Festival. Scattered across the east lawn were booths, a bounce house, and other activities with costumed children running between each. At one booth, a child knocked over plastic pumpkins by tossing water balloons; at another, a military uniform-clad RVU student army-crawled under ropes alongside a toddler. Under a canopy, both young and older kids painted pumpkins; in the field, Dan Havens, Director of Security, drove a tractor with bales of hay and excited children piled in the back. Demonstrations of a fire truck and an ambulance, courtesy of South Metro Fire District, took place in the parking lot. The Fall Festival is a seasonal highlight for students, who dedicate many hours of their (rare) free time to planning, coordinating, and operating this community event. Leading the charge was Melanie White, OMS II, as well as members of both the Pediatrics Club and the RVU chapter of American College of Family Physicians. Amid the children were special guests this year: the Board of Trustees. "They enjoyed the experience very much," said Thomas N. Told, DO, FACOFP dist., Dean of RVUCOM. "We showed them our family spirit and hospitality."

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Trick or Treat Street

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Students Teach Highschoolers at MASH Camp On September 17th, RVUCOM held its annual Medical Academy of Science and Health (MASH) Camp, an event that provides high school students with a glimpse into the world of health care. Organized by the Rotary Community Corps at RVU (RCC/RVU), MASH Camp was packed with hands-on workshops covering wilderness medicine, ultrasound, anatomy lab, injections, pediatrics, primary care medicine, sports medicine, and surgery. In the wilderness medicine workshop, students learned "carries" for transporting a patient out of remote or treacherous areas. Next, they learned the basics of ultrasound and even practiced using the ultrasound themselves. They also practiced giving injections on oranges and hot dogs. The Pediatrics Club taught students how to take a patient history, while emphasizing the importance of talking and interacting with the patient. The Family Medicine Club taught them how to take vitals. Samuel Hart, OMS II, remarked, "The looks on their faces when they listened to the heart and tested the patellar reflexes were priceless!" In the sports medicine workshop, they learned how to wrap joints and use tape to help with sports injuries. Finally, the surgery club led the students in suturing and knot tying. "Teaching the students how to do basic suturing was fantastic!" said McKenna Abercrombie, OMS II. "They were eager to learn and picked up the skills very quickly. I think there may be a few future surgeons in the group!" At the conclusion of MASH Camp, participants received a t-shirt and a certificate of completion. One of the organizers of the event, Shayna Popkin, OMS II, said, "[MASH Camp] is something every medical student I know would have loved to [do] in high school. It was amazing to give these eager kids the opportunity to see what life in the health field is like and to watch their excitement for medicine grow."

"Thank you for hosting the MASH camp. All of the procedures in which I participated were engaging, informative, and fun. Although the cadavers were a shock at first, they gave me the ability to observe and interact with what I had only visualized through the preceding ultrasounds. The med students were the best part of the camp. The stories they shared were not only humorous but helped highlight all the positives and rewarding but difficult challenges they experience while in medical school." ~ Will Ton, Junior at Chaparral High School

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RVUCOM Excels at OMED '16 In September, RVU faculty, staff, students, and alumni traveled to Anaheim, California for OMED '16, an annual conference hosted by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA). During the weekend-long exhibition, RVU held two cut suit demonstrations led by Anthony LaPorta, MD, FACS, Course Director for the Military Track, and Strategic Operations, makers of the cut suit. As onlookers gathered around the booth, Dr. LaPorta performed surgeries with the assistance of various participants— one of them being a young boy. To the astonishment of the crowd, the boy performed a realistic surgery (his hand carefully guided by Dr. LaPorta) and even successfully stitched the incision. After the demonstration ended, Dr. LaPorta invited onlookers to try their hand at various procedures, including a crichothyrotomy and a chest decompression. During the conference, Clinton E. Adams, DO, FACHE, President and CEO of RVU, received the Distinguished Service Award, among the highest of honors bestowed by the AOA. He was chosen as the recipient due to his years of service to the osteopathic profession. "He has been instrumental in bringing to pass the Single Accreditation System and presently sits on the Board of the Accrediting Council for Graduate Medical Education," said Thomas N. Told, DO, FACOFP dist., Chief Academic Officer and Dean of RVUCOM. "We are proud of Dr. Adams' service to RVU and to the profession." Alissa Craft, DO, MBA, Vice-President of the AOA, said of Dr. Adams, "[He] has been a leader in so many ways—from representing osteopathic physicians in the military to serving as a Dean and University President, to serving as one of our initial representatives on the ACGME board. His entire career has been marked by exceptional service and that is exactly what this award was meant to recognize. The most meaningful aspect of him receiving this award is that it not only recognizes all of his accomplishments, but it also sets the bar for what all of us who follow in his footsteps aspire to [achieve]." Congratulations, Dr. Adams!

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Military Track Leaders Train with South Metro Fire Rescue Times they are a-changing...and for those in the medical field, that sometimes means putting one's self into dangerous situations. In the past, medical personnel wouldn't enter a crime scene until it was deemed safe by law enforcement. Unfortunately, as active shooter situations are on a steady rise, there is an urgent need for medical personnel to treat and/or extract patients immediately to save them. "The greatest avoidable mortality from blast and penetration injuries is hemorrhage control," said Ryan Shelton, Training Lieutenant for SMFR. "For our first responders, this requires a shift in tactics: quickly gain access to patients despite lack of an 'all clear' from law enforcement." Over the course of a week, RVU collaborated with South Metro Fire Rescue (SMFR) to provide training, called Active Treat Exercises. The exercises brought together EMT-Basics and Paramedics with law enforcement officers in a mock shooter drill. The scenario presented to the first responders was that a shooter had opened fire in an office setting, wounding several people. For each drill, officers led the way through the building, securing and guarding the room as medical personnel entered and assessed the victims. Upon encountering a victim, the responders utilized tourniquets and quick clot to resolve bleeding (made possible with the use of cut suits and simulators) in order to extract them. Anthony LaPorta, MD, FACS, Course Director of the Military Track and David Ross, DO, FACEP, Associate Director of Military Track, provided special training on chest needle decompressions and crichothyrotomies (surgically creating an airway in the patient’s neck). Additionally, Deidre McGee, Assistant for the Military Track, helped stage the exercises, providing wound simulations on the "victims" to make the training more realistic for the responders. Todd Parson, a fire fighter paramedic who participated in the exercises said, "The instruction from the physician was, by far, the best I have ever received. [He] was excellent and I have more confidence after spending time with him."

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USIG and OBGYN Clubs Team Up for Neonatal Ultrasound Night Students recently practiced ultrasounds on expectant mothers at Prenatal Ultrasound Night, a workshop coordinated by both Ultrasound Interest Group (USIG) and Obstetrics and Gynecology Club (OBGYN). Approximately 30 students participated, taking turns scanning with ultrasound machines under the direction of F. Brent Keeler, MD, of Aurora Women's Clinic, and Brandi Ring, MD, of Mile High OB/GYN Associates. Dr. Ring opened the workshop with a discussion on identifying a pregnancy using the ultrasound, what the fetus looks like at various stages, where to scan the abdomen based on the stage of the pregnancy, and how to find the placenta. Additionally, the students learned how to determine if it is an extrauterine pregnancy (a dangerous condition in which the embryo attaches outside of the uterus) and how to use measurements to pinpoint the age and development. During the course of the evening, students also used Doppler to hear the heartbeats of the fetuses and practiced ultrasound guided amniocentesis on phantom models. The ultrasound workshop was a huge success, on both an academic level and an emotional level: "LOVED ultrasounding beautiful pregnant ladies today and practicing amnios!" said Nisa Fraser, OMS II. "Baby hands in utero make me melt. Thanks, future moms!" SD Coates added that this event was the first time a partner of one of the expectant mothers was able to see his baby, which was a wonderful moment to experience. The event was organized by Aya Ahram, OMS II, Codee Champney, OMS II, Daniel Coates, OMS II, and Ashley Woodworth, OMS II, with collaboration by the OBGYN club. USIG is planning the second annual Ultrafest event for March 2017 (see back cover for more information), which will include prenatal sessions and other ultrasound opportunities.

How Well Do You Know the Constitution? Have you ever tried unscrambling the entire preamble to the Constitution? Students recently tested their knowledge of the document with trivia and an unscrambling challenge of the preamble on Constitution Day—a day to commemorate the formation and signing of the United States Constitution, as well as to recognize all who are born in the country or, by naturalization, have become citizens. Students also ate cake, found American-themed words in a wall-size word search, and received copies of one of the nation's most important documents. The activities, planned by the staff of the Frank Ritchel Ames Memorial Library and the Office of Student Financial Services, were all part of the celebration.

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Students Present at Research Appreciation Day Gathered in the second floor hallway for the fifth annual Research Appreciation Day, RVU students presented research posters, which covered a range of topics such as diseases, medical technology, human biology, socioeconomic factors, and case study findings. Viewers walked from poster to poster, often stopping to discuss the procedures and results with the author. Four research categories were represented: Biomedical, Clinical, Medical Education, or Public Health/Epidemiology. Amid the viewers were several judges, who were grading posters (and authors) on criteria such as research methods, conclusions, data, preparation, and even enthusiasm. Following the poster competition, special guests were invited to speak on this year's theme, "Personalized Medicine": Michaela Schedel, PhD, Assistant Professor at National Jewish Health, spoke on "The Pathogenic Role of CD8+ T Cells in Steroid Resistant Asthma"; Nate Kahn, PhD, Manager of the DNA Biorepository at UCHealth, on "How to Train Your Dragon—Designing Research for Precision Medicine"; and the keynote speaker, Antonio Jimeno, MD, PhD, Professor in the Division of Medical Oncology at University of Colorado School of Medicine, on "Advanced Animal Models of Cancer: Current Status and Future Application for Immunology and Immune Therapy Development." Following the guest speakers, students gave oral presentations one by one, effusing the passion and dedication that went into their research. Following the oral presentations, an awards ceremony was conducted (see next page for winners) and the event concluded. Research Appreciation Day is coordinated by the Research and Scholarly Activity Committee each year with the goal of celebrating and promoting the role of research in the medical field.

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Congratulations to the winners! Biomedical Research Poster 1st Place: Andrew Wojtanowski, OMS I 2nd Place: Spencer Hill, OMS II, and Samuel Holley, OMS II Public Health, Medical Eduction, or Clinical Research Poster 1st Place: Neal Ferrin, OMS II 2nd Place: Laurie Bezjian, OMS III, and Patrick Wallace, OMS III

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Outstanding Performance - Oral Research Presentation (Medium Auditorium) Charles Simpkin, OMS IV Outstanding Performance - Oral Research Presentation (Large Auditorium) Natalie Poliektov, OMS I Best Overall Research Poster Andrew Wojtanowski, OMS I

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Multitasking in the Learning Environment by Judy Thorton, MA, Director of Educational Support

Because access to all kinds of technology is so easy, students multitask. They are convinced they can do two or three things at the same time without compromising the quality of what they produce. According to research, only 5% of us can multitask effectively. Even though students think they are effective learners while multitasking, studies show that it has negative effects in the learning environment. • Texting during lectures: students who did not text and had their phones turned off during lecture scored significantly higher on the quiz following the lecture. • “Distractive Windows” (games, pictures, emails, instant messaging, web surfing): studies show that students have distractive windows open 42% of class time. Students who use distractive windows during lectures had significantly lower scores on quizzes, final exams, and final course averages. • Instant messaging while reading: students took 22–59% longer to read a passage if they used instant messaging while reading. • Using a laptop for things other than note-taking during lectures: students showed less ability to pay close attention to the lecture, found the lectures more confusing, and lacked understanding of the lecture material when compared with students who only used their laptops for note-taking and lecture-directed use. Study also showed that the more laptops were used for non-course related material, the lower the student’s class performance. By 2020, there will be 50 billion connected devices and individuals will possess between 5 to 10 devices each. As technology adds more devices, multitasking is likely to increase in all areas of our lives. Students need to recognize how tethered they are to technology and must learn to use electronic devices responsively. Before you check your email, instant message, or decide to do some web surfing during lecture, think about your ability to multitask.

Announcing the New Print Center! As RVU continues to grow, a new department has been established to provide services to students, faculty, and staff: the Print Center. The Print Center, which will be managed by Hannah Golesh in her new role as Print Center Administrator, will streamline the University’s print needs. It will also reduce outsourcing and incorporate additional services (such as business card production, poster printing, lamination, spiral binding, and large production jobs). Producing these items and providing additional services inhouse will give us flexibility and put us in control of our final products, from beginning to end. RVU departments and students will be able to send their print jobs directly to the Print Center and pick them up at a convenient time. This should save time and eliminate any confusion with other jobs being printed at the same time. The Print Center is located within the Frank Ritchel Ames Memorial Library.

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Fall Semester Electives History of Medicine I: Society and Disease in the History of American Medicine Directed by Jenifer Fisher, MLIS The History of Medicine elective at RVU offers students an opportunity to explore some of the major historical themes of their profession through readings and class discussions. This semester, students have analyzed disease and its social context throughout America’s past. Students have looked at how illness and contagion were handled before germ theory was discovered. They’ve examined several historical epidemics, including the Yellow Fever Outbreak of 1793 that struck Philadelphia only four years after the country’s founding, as well as the Influenza Pandemic of 1918 that killed more people than World War I. The class is currently discussing historical outbreaks with lingering repercussions, such as lead poisoning, both through a historical and modern lens. While the course touches upon many topics that are controversial and hard to talk about at times, it is important to understand that history can impart many invaluable insights upon student doctors. One currently-enrolled student described the experience thusly: "Studying medical humanities has helped me realize how far men and women have come in the development of medicine and how far we still need to go. As a result, I feel more responsibility to continue the progression of medicine in my own studies and future practice." And that is the main goal of the course: by learning from the past, students at RVU have the chance to develop empathy, becoming more well-rounded physicians who understand the complexities and difficulties faced by the medical establishment, both today and throughout history. Literature & Medicine: Graphic Novels I: The Patient Perspective Directed by Tina L. Hefty, MLIS Comics in the curriculum? As unusual as it may sound, the use of comics to teach medical humanities has been gaining momentum in medical schools across the nation. With the launch of the Literature & Medicine: Graphic Novels elective at RVU, students now have the chance to read and discuss graphic pathographies— full-length novels that use panel-style illustrations and text to tell a story about health and illness—with their peers. For example, students are currently reading Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, & Me, a graphic novel written by Ellen Forney, which illustrates the grief and recovery of a young woman after receiving a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. By reading the stories of real patients, coupled with the powerful imagery found in graphic novels, students can begin to understand the complexity of human emotions that accompany illness. They can pause to reflect on how culture, gender, and society may affect a patient’s experience and consider how their own lived experiences may inform their future medical practice. "After reading our first graphic novel of the semester," said one student, "I can now say that you cannot stereotype these masterpieces as mere 'comic books.' Through the illustrations, insights, and unspoken messages contained within these books, I’ve learned more about myself as person and reenergized the drive behind my will to become a great physician."

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Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine Southern Utah

The Value of a Strong Team

by David Park, DO, FAAFP, FACOFP, RVU Vice Dean and Campus Dean for RVUCOM-SU The greatest strength of any organization is not its governance structure, impressive buildings, or brilliant strategic plan. The greatest strength is the people who work together as a team to achieve the organization’s mission and vision. I believe RVU owes its success to this very strength. After ten years of flourishing in Colorado, our team is bringing that strength, excellence, and success to the neighboring state of Utah. Who are the members of this team, you may ask? Well, I suspect that as you are reading this in the Vista View, it is probable that you are part of this team. Our team members consists of RVUCOM’s past students who have established a national reputation of excellence, our current students who continue to excel and impress, our talented faculty who deliver the educational curriculum and serve as mentors, our dedicated staff who support the day-to-day success of our operations, our effective administrators who oversee RVU’s operational efficiency, our eminent Board of Trustees who provide leadership and guidance, and our loyal family and friends who support everything we do. All of us make up the team and it is apparent that we have a strong team. The RVUCOM-SU campus is a geographical expansion of our team. This expansion was initially led by RVUCOM Dean, Dr. Thomas N. Told, who laid the foundation and framework over three years ago. A year ago, I was hired as Vice Dean and the RVUCOM-SU Campus Dean to help lead the development. Working closely with experienced faculty and staff, our architectural team received significant input in the design of the ultra-modern 104,000 square feet building in Ivins (which is on target to be completed by June 2017). This brand new, state-of-the-art building was intentionally designed to most effectively deliver RVUCOM’s proven curriculum simultaneously and synchronously with the Colorado campus. For future clinical clerkship rotations, we have increased the number of hospital affiliations and are constantly increasing the number of credentialed adjunct faculty in Utah. We currently have affiliation agreements with fifteen Utah hospitals and seventeen medical groups to give us access to over 500 preceptors in Utah. We are getting prepared. We have hired our first cadre of employees at the RVUCOM-SU campus and I would like to acknowledge these talented and dedicated team members: Sarah Anderson (Executive Assistant), Whitney Johnson (Admissions Counselor), Tommy Gugino (Admissions/Marketing Coordinator), and Judy Caldwell, DO (Clinical Faculty). With the full green light from COCA accrediting agency, we are in the process of interviewing and accepting our inaugural RVUCOM-SU class of 125 students. We look forward to the entire RVU team in our concomitant launch of the first day of class on July 25, 2017. One University; one College of Osteopathic Medicine; two campuses; and one team achieving new heights in medical education.

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Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine Southern Utah

Building the Framework of RVUCOM-SU Faculty and staff of RVUCOM-SU recently toured the construction site, getting a glimpse of their future office spaces, labs and lecture halls. Currently, the groundwork is being laid for the first two buildings of the student housing complex. The framing of the housing buildings is expected to start within the next few weeks. Meanwhile, the metal work for the building’s superstructure is being installed on the main site. Once the siding and the roof is complete, the construction team will focus on weatherizing the outside of the building. Inside the building, the construction team is beginning to frame offices, labs, and meeting spaces with metal, as well as installing duct wear, plumbing, and electrical. According to Chuck Flood, Lead Project Manager, the RVUCOM-SU campus construction is on track to be completed on schedule. Visit http://www.rvu.edu/utah-campus-webcam-feed/ for a live feed of the construction progress.

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Preceptor Spotlight: Joseph M. Morreale, MD Joseph M. Morreale, MD, is a board certified spine surgeon at the Center for Spine and Orthopedics, one of the nation’s leading spine and orthopedic practices, in Thornton, Colorado. He specializes in orthopedic surgery of the spine and is currently involved in studies of cervical and lumbar artificial discs and minimally invasive spine surgery techniques. Dr. Morreale completed his medical degree at Thomas Jefferson University’s Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Then, he completed an orthopedic surgery residency at Temple University Hospital (also in Philadelphia) and a Spine Fellowship at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Dr. Morreale was one of RVUCOM's first preceptors, having started in 2010! "Teaching students keeps me feeling young and interested in medicine," he said. Earlier this year, Dr. Morreale even received a preceptor award from RVU’s Department of Clinical Affairs for his great work with the students. The award was given to him (and his practice partner, Doru Georgescu, MD, FACS) because of his "graciousness to bring on more and more students [while] providing valuable learning experiences." For students beginning their clinical rotations, Dr. Morreale had advice to share: "Even if you’re interested in a specialty, take the time to learn as much as you can about [other areas]. You never know when that information will be useful to you in the future." In his spare time, he likes to bike, ski, and spend time with his kids.

Admissions Hosts Open House for Prospective Students The Admissions Department hosted the annual Open House in September, attended by pre-med advisors and undergraduate students from the Denver area. Following tours given by Student Ambassadors, the evening included presentations on the programs offered at RVU. In addition, OPP Fellows Laura Gibbons, OMS IV, and Brandon Hoy, OMS IV, demonstrated osteopathic manipulative techniques and answered questions. The event wrapped up with breakout sessions highlighting the various honors tracks. "We have received excellent feedback on this event and want to thank everyone who helped make the night a success," said Cyndi Windecker, Admissions Counselor. The Admissions team continues to conduct interviews and host Tour and Transcript Review days for prospective students. Feel free to stop in the Admissions office and talk to these candidates! You can contact Admissions to find out when the interviews are being held or just greet them in the hallways.

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Get to Know the RVU Staff Kelly Farr, MA Job Title: Human Resources Coordinator • RVU Start Date: February 23rd, 2015 • Started career in editing and marketing for the publishing industry • Previously worked at Nestle Purina • Moved to Denver in 2008 Tell us about your family. I have a great brother who teaches art and architecture at a university in Dubai. My mom and dad have always been supportive of me and, fortunately, are still living. My mom lives in Denver and my dad lives in Florida. What are your hobbies or interests? I like to go to movies, read autobiographies and crime thrillers (Lisa Unger is one of my favorite authors—read Beautiful Lies), and watch Masterpiece Mystery on PBS.

What are your department's FAQs? When am I eligible for the 401(k)? The 1st day of the month after 90 days from your start date. If I'm not making changes to my benefits, do I still need to go to the website during enrollment? Yes! Everyone must go online each year to make (or waive) their benefit selections. Do I have to file a Workers Compensation Claim if I'm injured? Yes! It's for your protection in case something arises from the incident in the future. Can I make changes to my benefits? No, you can only make changes during the Open Enrollment period (which occurs every fall) or if you have a Qualifying Event. This includes: birth/adoption of a child; change in marital status; death of a spouse or child; or change in spouse's employment.

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Who inspires you? Nelson Mandela. The Clinton Foundation. My grandparents. People who rescue animals. What are you most proud of? I edited a book that was published: Crisis of Conscience [by Raymond Franz]. If you could have a superpower, what would it be? Being able to touch people and heal them of a disease. Who wouldn't want to do that? What's your secret talent? Writing and playing the baritone saxophone. What's the last book you read? Life by Keith Richards. What is your favorite place in the world? Watching wheat fields burn in autumn around where I grew up in rural Campbell, Missouri. What would you like to be known for? Being honest and working with integrity.

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What are you most looking forward to this year? Stella Chan, MSBS '17 "I'm looking forward to exploring more of Colorado and perhaps even learning how to snowboard (when there's time). [It] will be the first time I experience snow so I'm both excited and scared of this!"

Steven Prueitt, OMS I "I am most looking forward to Anatomy courses."

Danyelle Beltz, OMS II "I'm looking forward to the new: new lessons, new trials, new adventures with friends. I'll never be bored at RVU."

Tate Correll, OMS II "I'm looking forward to having more of the pieces come together. As a second-year student, I'm starting to feel more like I'm becoming a doctor. It's exciting to imagine how much more I'll know by the time I graduate!"

Ryan Thompson, OMS II "I am looking forward to finishing up my didactic work and crushing the boards! The idea of not having a test every week is pure bliss."

Phillip Miller, OMS IV "Working with Dr. [Sarah Curtis Lopez]; my friends from St. Barnabas said she's Da Bomb-Diggity!"

Cherylene Abalos, OMS III "I am most excited about actually seeing patients! I'm interested in seeing this textbook knowledge come together in a real live patient, seeing how doctors care for their patients, learning how they put everything together in their treatment plans. For all those first- and second-year students that feel like they just can't retain everything, I want to tell you that there is hope. [Since] I have been in rotations, I'm surprised about how much I actually recall from studying!"

Yelena Coffield, OMS IV "I am most excited about all the travel, free dinners, and hotel stays this year. Fourth year is not entirely horrible!"

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Brian Smith, OMS IV "Graduating! Because that's the whole point, right?"

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Volunteer Efforts • RVU's American College of Family Physicians (ACOFP) student chapter has been very busy lately with their volunteering efforts! - They coordinated a blood drive through Bonfils, in which 40 donations were collected (their goal was 29)! The next blood drive will be on December 6th. - Every month, 8-10 volunteers visit the Denver Rescue Mission, helping to prepare food for the homeless. The next visit will be on December 1st. - They collected food items for Holy Love Lutheran Church, motivating RVUers to donate by creating a competition. In total, there were over 350 items donated—half of which were donated by the second-year students! Hayley Hallstern, OMS II, Community Liaison for ACOFP, said "[The church] was amazed by our donation and wants everyone to know how grateful they are! Their food pantry is now very well-stocked." - Several members of the ACOFP—SD Hallstern, Katie Teixeira, OMS II, and Danielle Lattes, OMS I—spoke with Smoky Hill High School students who are interested in entering the medical field. They discussed osteopathic medicine and life as med students. One high school student wrote: "I think this is exactly something I want to do. [You] have opened my mind up to this career. I am glad [you] opened up about...how you've gotten to where you are in terms of school. Thank you so much." - Finally, the ACOFP organized a successful supply drive by giving the students what they want: Casual Dress Mondays. With a dollar donation, students were able to dress down every other week. This provided enough money to purchase such supplies as over-the-counter medicine and glucose strips for CORE Clinic (a student-run, free health clinic) and socks and personal hygiene items for Homeless Care Packages. In response to the work her fellow students are doing, SD Hellstern exclaimed, "I am so proud to be part of such an awesome medical school community!" • Stephanie Franquemont, OMS IV, volunteered on the medical team for the American Diabetes Association's Tour de Cure in September. The Tour de Cure is an event that raises money and awareness for diabetes research. SD Franquemont and fellow volunteers worked at aid stations along the routes.

Tiffany Robak, OMS II, at Bonfils Blood Drive

Collected food from ACOFP drive

• The Christian Medical/Dental Association (CMDA) organized a clothing exchange and drive. While the primary purpose of this exchange was to provide fellow students with new-to-them clothing, the secondary purpose was to gather clothing for donation. After the exchange ended, all remaining clothes (four large garbage bags full of clothes!) were donated to a shelter that resells clothing, with over 80% of proceeds going toward skills training for the homeless or unemployed. • Student Osteopathic Medical Association (SOMA) held a book drive for the Colorado Correctional Center in September. They requested books which were donated for the purpose of contributing to prisoner education. In all, they collected over 35 books. Additionally, SOMA collected pledges to vote from 85 people during the #DOtheVote drive, hosted by National SOMA. This accomplishment landed them in 2nd place among all osteopathic medical schools in the nation!

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Mallory Krueger, OMS II, and SD Teixeira at Denver Rescue

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Campus Tidbits Along with Adjunct Faculty Tiemdow Phumiruk, MD, several students participated in Centennial's Chalk Art Festival in September. Monica Mills, OMS III, Emily TchenTomasino, OMS III, and Jesse Troutman, OMS III, drew an anatomically accurate heart, while Dr. Dow drew a mermaid. Beautiful work!

Katie Rose-Borcherding, OMS III, married Justin Borcherding, on July 12th. The ceremony was held in Egmont, British Columbia. The couple met while attending Seattle Pacific University. Photographer credit: jenniferpicardphotography

James Hampson, Legislative Assistant to Congressman Ken Buck, visited RVU on September 1st. He met with the executive team, sat in a class, watched a cut suit demonstration, learned about the standardized patient facility, and toured the campus.

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Campus Tidbits The Pet Therapy Program at RVU has a new face this year! Buddy, a standard poodle, has been a pet therapy dog since spring of 2016. He also visits patients, families and staff at Castle Rock Adventist Hospital. Be sure to stop by and meet him at the next Pet Therapy day!

As summer wound to a close, RVU students spent time outdoors whenever possible: practicing yoga, playing volleyball, and participating in a spikeball tournament.

Tate Correll (nĂŠe Van Winkle), OMS II, married Michael Correll, in July. The ceremony and reception was held at her childhood home in Larkspur, Colorado. The couple met in 2011 at an indoor soccer game and even dated long-distance for two years, while SD Correll volunteered for the Peace Corps in Botswana! As she said, "He's a very supportive (and patient) guy!" Congratulations, SD Correll!

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Achieving New Heights Highlighting the Accomplishments of Our Faculty, Staff and Physicians in Training

Noelani Arango, OMS III, presented research, titled, "Surgical Training for Torso Exsanguination in Weightlessness and Difficult Sea States" at the International Trauma Life Support (ITLS) Research Forum in October. The research describes how austere environments, space travel, and difficult sea states have a great need for hemorrhage control and other complex surgical procedures by surgeons and non-surgeons alike. The research concludes that these procedures should be technically feasible in weightless environments and difficult sea states if cardinal principles are respected. She also won the Excellence in Research Award while at ITLS. Anna Elseth (née Austin), OMS IV, presented the research, "Sleep Recovery in Total Immersion Surgical Training - Training as if Real" at the prestigious American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress (a forum described by the founder, Owen Wangensteen, as being "for young investigators in surgery... who are presenting what is new and best in surgery each year"). Her research assessed heart rate variability, how it changed with immersion training, and found that variability increased and medical students habituated (meaning they had better recovery each successive night). The goal was to determine if habituation increases learning capabilities and retention. Stella Chan, MSBS '17, presented a poster at Stanford’s Bay Area Civic Engagement Symposium and Poster session. The poster, "Pairing cancer screening exams with a Women’s Health Day event to in-

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centivize medical care and services for homeless women in San Francisco," focused on the Women’s Health Day program that Ms. Chan coordinated while working at Tom Waddell Urban Health Clinic. The program incentivized cancer screening tests by pairing them with donated resources, a clothing "store" for free clothing distribution, foot care, massage, raffles, and prizes. The results of the research led to Ms. Chan receiving an award from San Francisco’s Department of Public Health. Beau Condie, OMS I, received RVU's Brandon Trusell Service Scholarship, which is awarded to an incoming student that demonstrates a strong commitment to service. SD Condie has demonstrated this passion first as an Eagle Scout, then as a Service Leader and Exploration Camp Mentor. Additionally, he has worked with Camp Kesem, forming a partnership between the camp and University of Colorado Boulder's Pediatrics Club. Melanie J. Fortin, MSBS '17, won the Chris Barry Award for Best Journal Article of the Year! The award, given by the Ophthalmic Photographers' Society, was created to highlight the skills and expertise of its members and colleagues. Ms. Fortin's research, titled, "Management of New or Recurrent Choroidal Neovascularization in TelescopeImplanted Eyes" has been published in the organizations's journal, Journal of Ophthalmic Photography. Jason Hofstede, OMS III, presented the research, "Stress, Habituation and Heart Rate Variability" at the ITLS Research Forum. The research suggests that surgery can be successfully conducted in prohibitive environments. It also suggests that experts are able to suppress heart rate variability to cope with

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Achieving New Heights Highlighting the Accomplishments of Our Faculty, Staff and Physicians in Training

stress and are able to move in and out of concentration easier than non-experts. Olivia Klinkhammer, OMS III, presented research at the ITLS Research Forum in October. Her research, "The Cost Effectiveness of Research: Are These Objective Measurements the Tools of the Future?" focuses on the use of salivary biomarkers and heart rate variability to determine habituation in the learning environment.

Amanda Wolf, OMS II, co-authored the research, "Ecosystem Services and Disservices for a Vulnerable Population: Findings from Urban Waterways and Wetlands in an American Desert City," which was published in Human Ecology (44:4). The research explored the role of ecosystem services and disservices in bridging the gap between biophysical and social vulnerability.

Anthony LaPorta, MD, FACS, Professor of Clinical Surgery, is assisting the American College of Surgeons with a Skills Training/ Personal Statement Workshop and a Mock Interview Practice Session with Surgeons.

Joseph LaPorta, OMS III, is the recipient of the Walter S. Strode DO Memorial Scholarship. The scholarship was named after the late Walter S. Strode, DO.

Katie Teixeira, OMS II, is the recipient of the National Health Service Corps Scholarship, a competitive program that awards scholarships to students pursuing eligible primary care health professions training. In return, scholars commit to providing primary care health services in underserved communities.

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Renato Rapada, OMS II, presented two research projects at the International Surgical Simulation Summit in St. Johns, Canada. The first, "Development and Refinement of a High-Fidelity Surgical Phantom for Examining Torso Exsanguination in Weightlessness and Difficult Oceanic Conditions," explored the ability of individual surgeons to perform emergency laparotomy and abdominal hemorrhage control surgery in zero gravity and multiple different weather conditions at sea, using the cut suit as a surgical simulator. The second, "The Effects of High Deck Accelerations on Surgical Tasks," examined the ability of human concentration and interactions within surgical teams to stabilize the most common injuries from Improvised Explosive Devices aboard smaller naval ships in turbulent sea conditions.

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Achieving New Heights Highlighting the Accomplishments of Our Faculty, Staff and Physicians in Training

David Park, DO, FAACP, FACOFP, Campus Dean for RVUCOM-SU, and David Wood, DO '12, co-authored an article, "Evaluating Breast Masses in Adults", that was published in Osteopathic Family Physician Journal. The article discusses the importance being able to identify a breast mass and to assess if it is benign or cancerous.

Second-year student doctors, McKenna Abercrombie, OMS II, and Samuel Holley, OMS II, (above) presented the research, "A Comparison of Family Medicine Resi-

dency Selection Rates by US Medical Students" at the Engaging Communities in Education and Research Conference in Breckenridge, Colorado. The research suggests that enrollment in a rural and wilderness track increases the percentage of students selecting family medicine for residency, while also showing that the rate of RVU students selecting family medicine residencies was statistically higher than US medical students as a whole. The research was co-authored by Trenton Argyle, OMS II, David Ross, DO, FACEP, Director of Rural and Wilderness Honors Track, and Jennifer Williams, PhD, Executive Director of Institutional Planning and Assessment. Brianna Anthony, OMS V, Camille Z. Bentley, DO, MPH, FACOFP, Chair of Honors Tracks and Special Programs, and Charlie Echeverria, OMS V, presented "Osteopathic Manual Medicine in the Rural Global Medicine Setting" at the American Academy of Family Physicians' 13th annual Global Medicine Workshop. The presentation introduced the concept of Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine and its benefits as an additional form of therapy when providing health care to those living in rural and poor villages in the rural global outreach setting.

While attending the Colorado Medical Society's Presidential Gala in Keystone, a group of RVUCOM students achieved new heights...on the dance floor. Vincent Giron, OMS II, won a dance competition, while Shreyash Pradhan, OMS II, and Annelisa Pessetto, OMS I, also placed. Meanwhile, Cicily Hummer, OMS I, won the Simon Says competition. This shows that RVU students can't help but display excellence in everything they do!

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Welcome to our New Faculty and Staff! Judy Caldwell, DO Clinical Faculty, RVUCOM-SU Dr. Caldwell graduated from Western University College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific (COMP). During her time at COMP, she was recalled for Operation Desert Storm and served at Camp Pendleton in California as an E-6 Navy Hospital Corpsman. She then completed a one-year undergraduate teaching fellowship, specializing in osteopathic manipulation. Dr. Caldwell completed a rotating internship and family medicine residency at San Bernardino County Medical Center (now Arrowhead Regional Medical Center) in California. She is board certified in family medicine along with osteopathic manipulative treatment. After a few years of solo private practice, she began teaching osteopathic principles and practices (OPP) at Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine, even receiving a teaching award from the students in 2009. Dr. Caldwell was also one of the founding clinical faculty at William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Mississippi and, later, she became Chair of the Family Medicine Department. She taught OPP, clinical skills, and clinical content while facilitating the development of curriculum for all four years of osteopathic medical students. She has taught OPP at residencies and national and state meetings, as well. Welcome, Dr. Caldwell! Tommy Gugino, MA Admissions and Marketing Coordinator, RVUCOM-SU Tommy hails from Las Vegas, Nevada. His educational background includes a Bachelor of Science degree in Communication with an emphasis in Public Relations and a Master of Arts degree in Professional Communication with an emphasis in Marketing—both degrees were awarded by Southern Utah University. Tommy had a public relations internship with Wicked

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Creative and the Neil Simon Festival, then worked at Southern Utah University as the Media Relations Coordinator. Tommy says that he’s excited to join RVU as he gets to help to build the Southern Utah campus from the ground up. "I get the incredible opportunity to help students achieve their dream and promote this amazing institution to the media in Utah." In his spare time, Tommy enjoys playing tennis and cooking. He also recently finished performing in the Tuacahn Center for the Arts’ production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame as a member of the onstage choir. He will be performing in It’s a Wonderful Life, a musical at Brigham’s Playhouse throughout the holiday season. An interesting fact about Tommy is that he has a fraternal twin brother. Welcome, Tommy! Kristin Kelley-Gomez Clinical Rotations Coordinator Originally from Albuquerque, New Mexico, Kristin brings years of experience working at universities including Grand Canyon University as an Administrative Assistant and, more recently, at Metropolitan College in Albuquerque as a Director of Admissions and Director of Administrative Services. She earned her Bachelor of Art degree in Business Administration from the University of Memphis. She moved to Colorado when her husband’s job was transferred here. Kristin says that she’s excited to be at RVU as she’ll be helping future doctors achieve their career goals. She has been happily married for eleven years and is the mother of three children—which includes a set of twins! When not working, you will often find Kristin watching football, cooking, or completing a craft project (especially scrapbooking). A fun fact about Kristin is that she has known her husband since fourth grade! Welcome, Kristin!

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Welcome to our New Faculty and Staff! Nelson (Hank) Padgett II Security Officer Hank considers both Florida and Colorado to be his home states, as he has spent a lot of time in each of these locations. He served in the United States Army in the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg in North Carolina and in the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Armored Division in Gelnhausen, Germany. From there, Hank worked for the Colorado Department of Corrections for over 20 years in roles including: Lieutenant of Custody and Control; Case Management and

Disciplinary Officer; Emergency Response Team Member; Special Operations Response Team Member (Hostage Rescue); and, Use of Force Instructor in Pressure Point Control Tactics and Speed Cuffing. Hank says that he’s happy to use his experiences to aid in keeping Rocky Vista University a safe place. He has been married for 35 years and has one daughter, who is currently in high school. He enjoys weightlifting, backpacking, hunting, fishing, listening to music, and dancing the two-step and the West Coast Swing. Interestingly, Hank has known his wife since first grade! Welcome, Hank!

Promotions and Appointments Mike Jorgensen, PhD, has been appointed as the Anatomy Fellowship Director. He will work closely with the pre-doctoral Anatomy Fellows in preparing their cadaver prosections, their systems-based lectures for presentation to first-year students, and their individual research projects. He also directs the application, interview, and selection process for Anatomy Fellowship candidates.

Hannah Golesh has been promoted to Print Center Administrator. In this role, she will help streamline the University’s print needs and oversee the production of the printed materials in the new Print Center. (Read more about the new Print Center on page 14!) She previously worked as Marketing Assistant. Hannah has been with RVU since March 2013.

Congratulations, Dr. Jorgensen!

Congratulations, Hannah!

Mobile Mammograms Coming to RVU! Rocky Vista Health Center has coordinated with University of Colorado Health to set up a recurring visit from the Pink Life Saver mobile mammography motorcoach. This provides convenient and easy access for women to receive their annual mammogram. The hot pink van will be visiting the campus every fourth Thursday of the month, starting on December 22nd. This service is for women who are 40 years or older; most insurance accepted. For more information or to set an appointment, call UCHealth at (720) 848-1030.

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From the Rocky Vista University Alumni Association

VU

A LU M N I A SSO C I AT ION

Greetings RVU Alumni, staff, and students, The past couple of months at RVU have been busy but exciting! At the beginning of October, RVU hosted Military Appreciation Day. This is an annual event to show appreciation for not only the military medical students at RVU, but to each and every branch of the military while also sending our love, thoughts and thanks to those military members fighting each and every day. On behalf of the entire Alumni Association and all of RVU, I want to again say thank you to all of the members of our military. I am also proud to report that among all civilian medical schools in the country, RVU consistently ranks among the top in regards to students on military scholarships. Near the end of October, RVU hosted the annual Research Appreciation Day. This event allows students, residents, and faculty alike to present formal research, case studies, and research reports in a formal setting. Every year, keynote speakers are invited to present their research and participate in the poster competition. There were some great projects and very interesting posters presented this year. A special congratulations to our student winners! OMED '16, an annual national osteopathic medical conference, took place a little over a month ago in Anaheim, California. This is an enormous conference filled with presentations, opportunities for continued medical education, and hands-on practice, as well as a chance to meet up with friends and mentors. I am happy to say there were a number of RVU alumni who attended this conference. Next year’s conference is in Philadelphia and I hope to see a strong RVU presence there, as well! I would also like to point out that our very own Dr. Clinton Adams, RVU President and CEO, was awarded an AOA Distinguished Service Award at OMED '16 for his continued commitment to patient care and medical education. Congratulations, Dr. Adams! There are still spots available on the Alumni board. If you would like to be on the board or know anyone who would like to be on the board, please contact Julie Rosenthal at jrosenthal@rvu.edu. Stay tuned, as the Alumni Association has some exciting projects in the works like help with Step 3 COMLEX through the Rocky Mountain OPTI and Department of Clinical Affairs, and an Amazon Smile account (see below) that will help to fund the RVU Alumni Association. I’ll touch on these next month with more details. Lastly, if you haven’t already, make sure to pay your RVU alumni dues. It helps us to fund things like yearly scholarships and meetings. Also, be sure to alert us with any name or address changes.

AJ Ryan, DO '13 Alumni Association President

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Did you know you can now support the RVU Alumni Association through everyday purchases on Amazon? AmazonSmile allows you to donate 0.5% of your purchase (every purchase!), which will be sent automatically to the organization of your choice. Visit www.smile.amazon.com and type "Rocky Vista University Alumni Association" in the search bar. It'll save your selection from that point on. Whenever you shop on Amazon, just log in at smile.amazon.com!

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V U A

From the Rocky Vista University Alumni Association

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A SSO C I AT ION

congratulations to all of our alumni on their achievements! Engagements, Marriages, and Births Melissa Caha (nĂŠe Ripp), DO '13, and her husband, Justin, welcomed a baby girl named Avery Ann on August 4th. Avery weighed 7 pounds and was 19 inches long. Dr. Caha is currently in a Pediatrics residency program at University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. Kristen Knowles, DO '12, married Rennie Mora on August 27th at the McNichols Building in Civic Center Park in Denver, Colorado. The couple met in 2012 at a neighborhood cantina prior to beginning residency. Dr. Knowles is an emergency physician at both Lutheran Medical Center in Wheatridge and Good Samaritan in Lafayette. Job Acceptances, Fellowships, and Other Accomplishments Brett Johnson, DO '13, joined a family practice, Syringa Hospital and Clinics in rural Grangeville, Idaho, in July. He completed his residency program at Sierra Vista Health Center in Arizona. At Syringa, Dr. Johnson has the pleasure of working with Dr. Matthew Told, son of Thomas N. Told, DO, Dean of RVUCOM.

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Jessica Reissig (nĂŠe Egrid), DO '13, was awarded a Resident Scholarship by the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS). This scholarship is awarded to orthopaedic surgery residents who are interested in exploring the foot and ankle specialty further and are in good academic standing. Dr. Reissig is a PGY-4 in the orthopedic surgery residency program at Plainview Hospital in Plainview, New York. Nicole Wielandt, DO '12, accepted a position as an anesthesiologist at Essentia Health-Fargo in Fargo, North Dakota. She recently completed her residency at University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska.

Posters and Publications David Wood, DO '12, co-authored an article, "Evaluating Breast Masses in Adults" along with David Park, DO, Campus Dean of RVUCOM-SU. The article was published in the Osteopathic Family Physician. The article discusses the importance being able to identify a breast mass and to assess if it is benign or cancerous.

Glenn Engelman, DO '16, Michael Gleason, DO '16, and Kyle Kubes, DO '16, have published a research in the journal, Postgraduate Medicine. The research, titled

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V U A

From the Rocky Vista University Alumni Association "An Evaluation of Pre-Hospital Emergency Medical Systems for Suspected ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction in Colorado," discusses how patients who present with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) benefit from

LU M N I

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rapid cardiac reperfusion therapy and that emergency medical service agencies can improve patient outcomes by calling STEMI alerts to the receiving facility.

Spotlight on Alumni: Kenton Asche, DO '13 Following completion of a residency program at University of Kentucky, RVUCOM alumni Kenton Asche, DO ’13, has returned to Colorado. He currently works as an Emergency Physician at Southwest Memorial Hospital (SWMH), a busy rural emergency department in Cortez, Colorado, and recently became the EMS Medical Director for eight pre-hospital agencies. "[Emergency medicine] has always been a strong interest of mine and was ultimately how I became interested in medicine," he says. "Continually improving EMS processes and emphasizing the importance of first-line of patient contact is a rewarding opportunity." With regard to working in the emergency department, sometimes it’s the nonemergencies that matter most: "It’s no secret that most 'emergencies' are not true emergencies. [However], walking a patient through an understanding of their current problem, offering reassurance and recommendations can really change their life. I think this is what is truly rewarding and memorable about being a physician." As a recipient of the Colorado Trust scholarship, Dr. Asche was required to return to Colorado to practice in a rural area. However, he had no issue fulfilling this requirement: "I always knew that I wanted to live and practice in Colorado, so it was a perfect fit." As a member of RVU’s inaugural Rural and Wilderness Medicine Honors Track, he had been open to the idea of being a rural physician from the start. "Dr. Thomas Told [Dean of RVUCOM] started the rural program at RVU… [he] helped shape my motivations for becoming a physician. I learned so much from Dr. Told and his years of experience." While the faculty helped him develop as a physician, it was his fellow classmates he remembers most fondly. "Believe it or not, attending medical school was some of the most fun I’ve had in my life!" he says. "As second year [students], a group of us skied 50 days in a ski season—and somehow still found time to study more than we ever thought possible. They were certainly the best friends I’ve had in [my] life so far." Nevertheless, medical school (and subsequently, residency) was not always a good time: "Avoid burnout,” he recommends to current students. "Take care of yourself. Medicine is a rough profession and residency is even more difficult than medical school. There will be 'traps' and situations every day which will try to grind you down and [make your career] quite undesirable. If you take care of yourself, exercise, do what makes you happy, and make time for the important people in your life, burnout will be much less likely to take over your career." (Beside giving advice, he is also helping students in another way: as RVUCOM's newest preceptor!) In his free time, Dr. Asche and his fiancée, Theresa—an emergency room nurse—love to spend time in the San Juan Mountains and the desert of southwest Colorado. "We’ve been so fortunate to move back to this amazing state!"

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The Vista View is published by the Rocky Vista University Marketing Department.

8401 S. Chambers Road, Parker, CO 80134 720.875.2800

To make comments, suggestions, submissions, or to be added to the newsletter mailing list, please email marketing@rvu.edu

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Rocky Vista University provides quality healthcare education while inspiring students to serve with compassion, integrity and excellence.

2016 November - RVU Vista View  

In this issue: Students Teach High Schoolers at Mash Camp - RVU Honors Military with Appreciation Ceremony - Students Celebrate Season with...

2016 November - RVU Vista View  

In this issue: Students Teach High Schoolers at Mash Camp - RVU Honors Military with Appreciation Ceremony - Students Celebrate Season with...

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