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DESIGNMARCH SPECIAL | The Reykjavík Grapevine Product Awards | Interviews | Full schedule inside |

Photo by Baldur Kristjáns


The Reykjavík Grapevine DesignMarch SPECIAL 2012

DesignMarch Festival Director's Address

Dear Reader, Velkominn To DesignMarch! As you may have heard, we Icelanders are particularly picky about our words. Isolated by the Atlantic Ocean, “Íslenska” has changed so little that

we all still read (suffer through) the ancient sagas in school, in their original form as they were written in the 800s. Whenever a modern phenomenon washes up on our shores, the Icelandic Language Council SWAT team is called in to decide on an appropriate term. For example, we use “tölva” (derived from

the words “number” and “all-knowing”) for computer, and app for, well, app. First things first, we think. Surely one cannot go about doing things without knowing what to call them, right? So naturally, the decision to put on a design festival was followed by the need to find a name for it. We were in new territory. The design scene in Iceland is so young that even the word for design itself, “hönnun” (work the aspiral “h” as though you were the big bad wolf blowing the house down and the ö is pronounced like ‘e’ in ‘the”), is a relatively new. We thought and thought. It was early 2009, and our offices were located by the Austurvöllur square. For a month and a half, we couldn’t hear our voices from the steady beat of the pots and pans revolution, not to mention our thoughts. So we bought earplugs and thought some more. Finally, someone came up with the idea “HönnunarMars” or “DesignMarch” in English. We thought it was only appropriate to name an entire month in our honour, while we were at it. If the Vikings did it, why shouldn’t we? And we thought, what better time

to launch a design festival for a young, emerging design scene than spring, when the Arctic nature comes to life after a long, polar winter—and the name evoked it beautifully. Cherry on top, both “Mars” and “March” have double meanings: the month of year, and to walk for an important cause. Perfect! And then, I broke my right arm. We finally had this fine name for our brand new festival, and I couldn’t even write it down! The following year we decided to organize a “speed dating” event for designers and buyers to create business opportunities. And again, we needed a name. We thought and thought and thought some more, and finally came up with “DesignMatch,” which was probably the worst idea ever, considering all the misunderstandings it has led to. This year, we have been trying to name our opening lecture series event. “DesignTalks” is our best idea so far, what do you think? Go listen to them by the way—among the speakers is the Finnish architect and urbanist Tuomas Toivonen, who will rap through his lecture. Yes, you read right, rap as in

hip-hop. What next? DesignWalks after the Talks, or a student work series DesignHatch to match the Match? Words aside, with DesignMarch, we want to show you a good time. Instead of a fancy pants design week for stuck-up professionals, ours is a town fair that ten percent of the entire nation joins. Whether it’s a fishermen’s hut, ice cream booth, gallery or café, DesignMarch turns Reykjavík into one huge venue for design. I hope you will meet fun people, be inspired and have the March (and Match and Talks) of your life. Sjáumst! Greipur Gíslason Festival Director DesignMarch Iceland Design Centre PS – For more information on the programme, venues and ticketing, turn the page, log on to www.designmarch.is and follow our blog, Facebook and Twitter!

Where Is Icelandic Design Today? Iceland Design Centre Manager Halla Helgadóttir explains The Iceland Design Centre was founded in the spring of 2008, just three months before the financial crash. “It’s something that people had been working toward for twenty to thirty years,” Halla Helgadóttir, a graphic designer for twenty years before stepping in as the Design Centre’s first manager, tells me. “I wouldn’t have said it back then, but I think it wound up being a good time to launch it. We needed something to focus on, outside of the banking and financial sector. We needed something inspirational, something that was going well.” Now three years later, Halla says the young Icelandic design scene is finding its roots. What is Icelandic design? I remember a foreign journalist asked me this question my first day on the job, and I said you can call me in a few years and perhaps I will know the answer. A few years have passed and I don’t really know the answer yet. Still, I can say, as a design nation, we are young. Our strengths are concepts, imagination and creativity. Our design is not based on materials, like in many other countries. We are exploring our materials now, but we haven’t been making much use of them. So this is a very new development? Well, we have our wool, and we’ve been working with that for many years. There is now a new generation of artists searching for our design language, our history, and our specialty. At the same time, many are not working in this national context at all. We should of course look at ourselves in an international context as well.

Words Anna Andersen Photography Alísa Kalyanova

It’s interesting to think about working within or outside a national context… Of course it’s cliché to say that a whole nation sees itself the same way, but still I think there is a strong sense of individuality and a sense that we can do anything. That can be our worst nightmare, like in the banking crash, but it can also be our best asset because we’re not easily intimidated. How does Icelandic design compare to Scandinavian design then? Scandinavian design is far more established than Icelandic design. Although Icelandic design fits into Nordic design, which is clean and minimalistic, the Scandinavian countries are historically more focused on materials. Today design is very much focused on the method—a way of thinking. It’s about using design to come up with solutions to problems—using it for the good, socially and economically. And as Iceland is breaking into the design industry today, this is also very much Iceland’s focus. You could say that we have yet to find our roots and materials. So where is THE fledgling design scene heading? Well, we have many different sectors. We have graphic design, architecture, fashion and products design—those are the main ones. Graphic designers and architects are already part of a big industry, so it’s easier for them, although with the crash, it’s not as easy for architects. But fashion and product design are young. I would like to see stronger design companies in Iceland—five to ten companies that would hire designers, giving them a place to learn the trade. It would be good to have more production here. Unfortunately, the business environment for these companies is tough here in Iceland. The government is always talking about innovation—everyone is talking about innovation, the banks are talking about innovation—but it doesn’t

matter if the companies shut down in their early stages. There are problems with the króna, the European Union and Customs. Some of the problems can be solved. The little Design Centre is trying to do something about it, but we really don’t have enough manpower. Now, with the influx of tourists, do you think Icelandic design may have become the new "Viking hat"? Well, I think tourists are important to design shops, as they are to all shops downtown, and I think it’s really interesting how design shops have kept

Laugavegur alive and what would we do without them. Foreigners say that it’s unusual to see so many fashion boutiques downtown, because in Denmark and the other Scandinavian countries, most designers sell their products in other shops. Of course I hope that the design scene will benefit from tourists, but I don’t think that’s their focus. You don’t fear that designers are going to start catering to tourists because it is such a big market? I’m not worried about the market. Some people will do that, but others won’t and that’s fine as well. If you look at

design as an industry, there are good things and bad things. Perhaps we need all these things. Of course it would be a bit boring if all the shops downtown were tourist shops—I wouldn’t want Laugavegur to turn into one big puffin store—but I think if we get too many puffin stores, they will go bankrupt and they will go away. But that’s a discussion for another time.


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The Reykjavík Grapevine DesignMarch SPECIAL2012

Go to designmarch.grapevine.is to read interviews with the winners. There is a lot of other cool stuff there too.

Design | Awards

2012 Edition

The Grapevine’s 2nd Annual Design Awards

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This year’s panel of judges consisted of:

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Last year we launched our annual Grapevine Product Awards. Only this year we can’t call them Product Awards because in addition to Best evine Produ rap of judges c Product and Best Product Line, our panel G decided that we should give out a Best ProjectE T LIN R D UC P RO HE Y E A award too. And, what a great idea. OF T

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Best Product, Best Product Line, and the NEW Best Project Award

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Auður Karítas Ásgeirsdóttir, Geysir Shop Hafsteinn Júlíusson, designer Sari Peltonen, Iceland Design Centre Tinna Gunnarsdóttir, Product Designer at Listaháskóla Íslands Hörður Kristbjörnsson, Reykjavík Grapevine’s Art Director They were given the following rules: 1. Awards are granted for Best Product and Best Product Line. One or two runners-up in each category should be named, in alphabetical order. All choices must be argued for in a concise manner. 2. The winning product and product line must have been introduced in 2011. 3. A product is a tangible item. Fashion design is not considered a product. It can, however, be considered a product line. 4. The panel is free to introduce a new award. And, after much deliberation, they decided The Grapevine’s Second Annual Design Awards should go to the following fantastic product, product line and project. Read on to find out why!

Skyr Konfekt

NotKnot

KRADS collaboration with LEGO

The outcome of “Designers and Farmers”—a project whose objective was to get farmers involved in creating new products—Skyr Konfekt is a wellthought out example of what design can do for society. By marrying one of the oldest professions with one of the newest ones, they were able to come up with a tasteful and tasty treat made from local, organic ingredients into the shape of a fun, innovative shape of an utter. And all of this beautifully packaged. We think it makes for a great souvenir and a fantastic conversation starter. At 400 ISK, it’s also proof that great design doesn’t have to be expensive and it doesn’t need a designer’s name attached to it either.

NotKnot is a fantastic idea that is easy to like, whether you are a design nerd or a rookie. NotKnot is a new take on local Icelandic material wool in the form of pillows with a beautiful form language. We appreciate Ragnheiður’s DIY method—from being involved with dying of the pillows to stuffing them. This line shows a strong independent vision from a promising Icelandic designer. With all the talk about mass production, NotKnot is exemplary of a handmade object that it is also very affordable.

From adults and children to professional designers and passers-by, KRADS takes a welcoming approach—it’s design for everybody. Their collaboration with LEGO is a visually strong concept that people are naturally drawn to, and the styling and communication is well thought-out as a whole. People react to it and believe in it—KRADS has developed it with sincere passion, and partakers have a very special relation to it due to the lifelong connection to LEGO. The project successfully adds a new dimension to a meaning-saturated object/brand—rethinking something so established in a fresh and relevant way is a hard thing to accomplish. It is a tool for learning, innovation and creativity combining aspects of teaching and experimentation. It is a beautiful mix of play and professionalism and brings a breath of fresh air to architecture. And most importantly—it is fun!

“Skyr is one of the oldest dairy products in Iceland. While it is marketed as a healthy food, Skyr Konfekt was not designed to be a “healthy” confectionary, but an irresistibly tasty experience making use of a traditional ingredient.” - Brynhildur Pálsdóttir of Skyr Konfekt Runner-up: Sasa Clock by Thorunn Árnadóttir The Sasa Clock is a visually beautiful and innovative metaphor of time, albeit a slower take on it. We love the multifunctional aspect of the product—the fact that it is a clock that can also be worn as a necklace. We are pleased that Thorunn followed through with the long process from idea to production.

“A knot is tough and strong and I wanted to change its purpose by making it soft and comforting.” – Ragnheiður Ösp Sigurðardóttir of Not Knot Runners-up: María Kristín Jónsdóttir, Þráður Original, fresh, and bold, Þráður is a great fresh take on accessorizing and jewellery. Perhaps its beauty lies in the fact that it is not easily defined—is it an accessory? Clothing? Jewellery? As a souvenir, it is light and easy to ship. We look forward to seeing a website, packaging and branding develop. Linda Árnadóttir, Scintilla One of the largest product lines in Iceland, Linda Árnadóttir’s Scintilla stands for high quality and the colourful, bold and previously unseen. She has a great sense for colour, and applies this to several product categories— towels, pillows, blankets, tablecloths, and bed linen—helping to make homes more vibrant and cosy. We are excited to see Linda—a veteran of the fashion scene—producing some more lasting items instead of fleeting seasonal lines.

“The outcome has been a number of very imaginative and unexpected projects, both in a formal and pragmatic sense, while giving the students a fresh approach to the design process.” – Kristján Eggertsson of Krads Runners-up: Christmas Creatures by Hafsteinn Júlíusson This is a wonderful idea that brings traditional local stories to a modern day urban setting and gets people— children and adults, visiting tourists and locals—talking. Projections of Iceland’s colourful Christmas folklore are certainly a new and welcome take on Christmas decorations. Order to Effect A topical project with a focus on local, healthy, organic and delicious food as well as sustainability, Order to Effect tackles the issues of our time—showing that food can be both fast and healthy! Furthermore, it adds to the scene of service design—a field with plenty of future opportunities in Iceland.

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24 Designers

25 STAKA

The product designers Bylgja Rún Svansdóttir and María Kristín Jónsdóttir premiere an accessories collection staka; skin, cut and moulded into neckwear, neckties and bowties. >> Opening party 22.03 frim 16-18. 38 Þrep, Laugavegur 49

26 Open

House at Grettisborg

Product designers Róshildur Jónsdóttir, Snæbjörn Þór Stefánsson, Ingunn Jónsdóttir and Aðalsteinn Stefánsson display products new and old in their studio Grettisborg. The Grettisborg apartments are open for viewing on Thursday 22.03 from 17-20. >> Grettisgata 51a

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This year, Reykjavík Letterpress offers up a letter soup where movable type, lead blocks, photopolymer plates and wood type are stirred together to make up a stupendous soup. Guests will be invited to observe the making of the soup to the accompaniment of Mrs. Helga Heidelberg and nationally renowned jazz musicians. >> Reykjavík Letterpress, Lindargata 50 (rear house)

34 Icelandic Illustrators From the books on the shelves in our living rooms to the cereal boxes in our kitchen cupboards, our homes are filled with illustrations, both obvious and hidden. Phobophobia is a collaborative art exhibition where 34 illustrators invite you to visit their home of illustrations. >> Bíó Paradís, Hverfisgata 54

Love Balls

4 ceramic designers present moustache cups in various shapes and sizes. Sales profits go directly to the Icelandic Cancer Society. >> Herrafataverslun Kormáks og Skjaldar, Laugavegur

30 Arctic

Plank

The Kex Veranda turns into a venue for brand new sustainable furniture from Iceland – sofas, benches, tables and lights – by Arctic Plank. The company designs and manufactures furniture and interiors from recycled materials. The items on display are made from pallets, concrete and recycled tarpaulin. >> Kex Hostel (on the veranda), Skúlagata 28

31 KRONbyKRONKRON

2012

Summer

Kronkron shows the new summer 2012 collection by KRONbyKRONKRON alongside photography by Saga Sig for KRONbyKRONKRON. >> Spring party, Thu 22.3. at 21. Kronkron, Laugavegur 63b

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and Farmers

The 2007-2011 project Designers and Farmers will be exhibited in its entirety for the first time. To mark the occasion, a homepage for the project will be launched, www.designersandfarmers. com. Designers and Farmers brings together the two professions to create unique produce and increased value. It is a collaboration between the Iceland Academy of the Arts and the food and biotech R&D agency Matís, and is supported by the Technical Development Fund, the Agricultural Productivity Fund and the Aurora Design Fund. >> Spark Design Space, Klapparstígur 33

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Helicopter, Begga Design, agustav 20BÉ shows summer collections by Helicopter and Begga Design as well as a new collection from agustav. Guests are also invited to visit the online gallery Muses.is. >> 20BÉ, Laugavegur 20b

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Trade introduces HOLSTER

The lovely staff of Ostabúðin will be dressing in HOLSTER while a photography exhibition adorns the dining room. At Kex Hostel, an installation elaborates on the utility of HOLSTER and how HOLSTER solves the problem of many a man who pounds the streets

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Recht - Field Dressing

Sruli Recht presents for display object design and show pieces from the recently presented collection "Field Dressing - Where the Darkness Divides" AW 2013. Featuring materials and design made with local Icelandic craftsmen: Horsetail-hair Satin, Spider-Silk Knit, Icelandic Wool, Atlantic White-Sided Dolphin Skin and objects such as Glass Shoes, Black Silver Jewellery, Sniper Rifle, Hunting Knife, Horse Saddle and Optical Frames. >> Bergstaðastræti 4

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Scintilla shows a new collection of bed linen with printed and woven, recurring patterns. Scintilla also introduces new scents developed from the nature of the West Fjords and exhibits work belonging to the research project Nordic Virtual Worlds. >> Tryggvagata 18

HOME

The design company IHANNA HOME / INGIBJÖRG HANNA exhibits accessories for the home. Opening Party, Thursday 22.03. from 18 - 20. >> Artíma gallerí, Smiðjustígur 10

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with a great deal in his pockets. >> Ostabúðin. Ostabúðin, Skólavörðustígur 8. Kex Hostel, Skúlagata

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Limited New Collection

unbridled enthusiasm

Orr goldsmiths introduce the unique properties of their jewelry design emphasising kinetic energy and unruliness. >> Orr, Bankastræti 11

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19 With

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Design Community in East Iceland shares stories, ideas and dreams about a platform for designers to work with local materials. This includes building a network to facilitate accessibility and supply of Icelandic materials as well as preserving and developing skills and knowledge in using these materials. >> Brims hús, Geirsgata 11

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Royal College of Art in collaboration with MAKE by Þorpið, Glamour The Concept Boutique, Thorunn Arnadottir og Nelly Ben Hayoun. Bureau ODYSSEY reassesses the notion of risk and tourism in order to speculate on future wonders, extrapolated tangents and cautionary tales. At the Bureau, we perform series of attractions/experiences/activities to question the horizon and its limits. We test and assess the impossible and propose visions of new leisure activities.

Aurum introduces two new jewelry collections, VAL and SVAN. Inspired by feathers and made in threedimensional form, this is the first unisex collection by Aurum. Aurum also presents the FOLD candleholders, a new product based on the FOLD jewelry collection. Kría Jewelry throws a party and introduces its new collection, The Cod Collection and Unnur Valdís presents her new lights Gunnhildur. Best of Design March so far. Co-curated by Aurora Design Fund and Form, Magazine for Nordic Architecture and Design. >> Aurum, Bankastræti 4

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Bureau ODYSSEY - Risk assessment for future leisure activities

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Kraum introduces five fresh re-designs of the classic Icelandic pancake pan, an item that has belonged to every local kitchen cupboard for decades. The pan has been produced in Iceland by Málmsteypan Hella since the 1950s. * The design of Huginn Muninn places an emphasis on combining look and function in quality materials. The collection´s foundation is gentlemen’s shirts and everyone should be able to find something to suit them here The designer and tailor Guðrún Guðjónsdóttir is the driving force behind Huginn Muninn. * A new lamp by Sigurður Már Helgason and Ólöf Davíðsdóttir is revealed at Kraum on DesignMarch. * Fashion designer Bryndís Sveinbjörnsdóttir shows the first collection of the new trademark Diadem. * Fashion designer Eva Vilhelmsdóttir shows the new collection “Flækjuflétta”, created in collaboration with the manufacturing company Glófi. * Guðlaug Geirsdóttir exhibits Horn, a reference to the beloved Icelandic sheep.

Group exhibition A sword, a cloud, a beam, a block, a jar and a slice of ice cream – these are just some of the items on display at the Association of Icelandic Product and Industrial Designers’ group exhibition. The Association’s largest event to date features new work by 32 designers. >> Opening on 22.03 from 16-18.

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A group of 9 artists and designers exhibits new design from recycled materials. >> Kirsuberjatréð Vesturgata 4

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Kar and the Hidden Hearts

The National Gallery exhibits new works by Tinna Gunnarsdóttir: BÓL, a bench inspired by the historic daybeds used in the Icelandic turf houses; KAR, a series of geometrically shaped flowerpots and an installation made of HIDDEN HEART pendulums. From delicate pendulums to large, durable pieces of outdoor furniture, Gunnarsdóttir works on a wide scale of projects. Her sense for form and material makes her one of the leading names of Icelandic product design. >> National Gallery of Iceland, Fríkirkjuvegur 7

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Hendrikka Waage reveals a new, potent jewelry collection Protection to ward off an evil eye. >> Leonard, Lækjargata 2 >> AndreA boutique, Strandgata 19, 220 Hafnarfjörður

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Design Forum pop up shop Design Forum Shop is bringing a selection of Finnish design from Helsinki to Reykjavik on Design March. The pop-up shop opens at Netagerðin and will only be open during DesignMarch. >> Netagerðin, Nýlendugata 14

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CCP, the multiplayer computer game EVE Online and the EVE Fanfest celebration taking place in Reykjavík step forward at Harpa. What is the importance of design in the EVE Online virtual world? What about the CSM Council, democratically selected by players themselves? Speaker is Pétur Jóhannes Óskarsson and the presentation is open to all. GusGus, Ham and other artists perform on the final evening of the EVE Fanfest CCP in Harpa. Entry fee ISK 2,900, tickets available online at www. midi.is. >> Harpa, Austurbakki 2

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Located in a former fishing net producing factory, Netagerðin exhibits design products which refer to the knotting of nets. Designers: Bryndís Bolladóttir, Stáss, Volki and Kongó. >> Opening Party, Thursday 22.3. 16-18. Netagerðin, Nýlendugata 14

Braid The Icelandic Textile Guild and the Icelandic Association of Ceramic Artists join forces to collaborate. The 12 projects exhibited braid ideas together to create new and fresh products. Braid reflects the DesignMarch 2012 theme: interdisciplinary collaboration. >> Reykjavík Art Museum, Hafnarhús, Tryggvagata

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Exhibition of furniture designed and produced in Iceland aims to promote new Icelandic manufacturing, in which well-considered design and excellent craftsmanship go hand in hand. Participants include ÁG Furniture, Axis, G. Á. Húsgögn, Sólóhúsgögn, Sýrusson and Zenus. Opening 22.03 from 19 - 21 >> The Maritime Museum, Grandagarður 8

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lecture and concert in Harpa

the scenes – From idea to reality

The Association of Icelandic Fashion Designers From concept work and first sketches to the final outcome of a finished garment, the Association of Icelandic Fashion Designers grants the audience an insight into fashion designers´ work process in the making of a collection. Behind the scenes – From idea to reality is both an artistic installation, a sound piece and a happening.

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Industrial designer Sigga Heimis and photographer Anna María open the doors to a brand new workshop in the old fishermens’ huts. Sigga shows new furniture made in Iceland as well as utilitarian art inspired by the sea and the past. Anna María exhibits her photographs and David Sandahl exhibits jewelry. >> Studio Sigga Heimis, Grandagarður 19

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by Sigga Heimis / Photography by Anna María

Architecture in models Exhibition of models of a gazebo in Hljómskálagarður by second year students of architecture at the Iceland Academy of the Arts. The gazebo serves a dual function – it is both a place for pause and contemplation and also a stage for small music events, theatre performances or other arts. >> Reykjavík City Hall

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A lecture series in which architects discuss conventional and unconventional approaches to their subject and a methodology which often is in retreat.

Working on the boundaries of visual art and design, Jóhanna Helga Þorkelsdóttir welcomes guests to come and enjoy “the sun” at her exhibition revolving around humans’ need for sunlight. During the short days of winter, natural light is scarce. Þorkelsdóttir’s installation features lights imitating sunlight. >> The SÍM Hall, Hafnarstræti 16

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Exhibition of Laufey Jónsdóttir´s fashion drawings. One is a series of drawings made for the National Museum of Iceland of Icelandic dresses from the mid-twentieth century, the other a series of fashion drawings inspired by the first series. >> STEiNUNN, verbúð 17, Grandagarður

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Architecture and methodology, Lecture Series

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To mark the beginning of the international distribution of the Wheel of Nutrition plate, HAF brings you the Wheel of Nutrition: Aperativo edition. Icelandic musicians play music from the new HAF Mix and a limited stock of the Nutrition Wheel plate is available for purchase . >> Event in Austurstræti 9 on 23.03 from 18-21.

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HVER presents a collection of chairs, an anonymous journey between missing profiles. It will also launch sales for the HEY collection, inspired by the magical harmonies of the rural landscapes of Iceland, presented at the Fuorisalone in Milan. Opening party on friday 23.03 from 17-19. >> Fiskislóð 31

City

A city rises in the halls of the City Hall. Families and children (8 years +) can have land assigned to them within a city plan, which will be positioned on the floor of the City Hall. There, they can build houses, squares and gardens. All materials are recycled.

2 Profileless

elu r

9 Model

of nutrition, The Aperativo edition

Bir

4 Design

ner service and cutlery for children decorated with the romantic and timeless illustrations of Muggur from the children’s book “Dimmalimm“. >> Kraum, Aðalstræti 10

13 Wheel

elu im yn Re

The design company Farmers Market opens new headquarters and a concept store at Hólmaslóð 2. Designers and musicians join forces to magic up a suitably celebratory mood. Out in Grandi, adventures lurk in every corner! >> Opening on 20.03 from 18-20. Farmers Market, Hólmaslóð 2

* Helga Egilson displays a new din-

ta ga lla ta lva Só ga lla va Ás

& Friends

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The design duo Snæfríð Þorsteins and Hildigunnur Gunnarsdóttir exhibit their newest work, large letter tablets that play with light, shadow and letter frequency. Intellectual texts, the breaking-up of the obvious and mobility also feature strongly in this thought-provoking piece. >> Crymogea, Barónsstígur 27

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asa 2012 The jewelry from asa 2012 is characterized by simple and delicate lines, femininity and refinement. The designers behind asa are Tinna Gunnarsdóttir, Áslaug Saja and Ása Gunnlaugsdóttir. >> The Nordic House

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On St. Benedict’s Day, Crymogea releases a special edition of Birds of Iceland by Benedikt Gröndal. The 19th century book of illustrations was redesigned by Snæfríð Þorsteins and Hildigunnur Gunnarsdóttir in 2011 and is now released in a limited edition of 100 copies. Release Event 21.3. at 20:00 >> Hotel Natura, Nauthólsvegur 52

An exhibition of works by the 9 recipients of Skúlaverðlaunin Prize from 2008. The Skúlaverðlaunin are supported by the Federation of Icelandic Industries. >> Kringlan 4-12

39 Þóra

Four Corners and designer Ingibjörg Sigurðardóttir. >> Opening Party on 22.3. 17-20. 4Horn, Suðurlandsbraut 8 42 Local

light

It’s blowing a breeze from the northeast! Products and backgrounds to the product development project Norðaustan 10 are introduced at Epal. The project took place this past autumn in the North and East of Iceland, where designers worked in collaboration with local companies in order to increase possibilities for product development and manufacturing in the areas. >> Epal, Skeifan 6

43 FLUX

Watch designers at work – observe the design and making of an electric race car, see graphic arts and product design, the piece “Walking on rock and glass”, light installation “LUX – Ode to the incandescent light bulb” by Lighthouse and listen to sound art by Hafdís Bjarnadóttir. >> Opening Party 23.3. at 20.30. Toppstöðin – powerhouse of ingenuity and skill. Rafstöðvarvegur 4, Elliðaárdal, 110 Reykjavík

41 Worlds

of Form

4Horn (Four Corners) exhibits Worlds of Form, patterns from The Icelandic Book of Ornaments and Patterns. The exhibition is a collaboration between

Icelandic Textile Guild Group Exhibition

49

DesignTalks

Design and cross-disciplinary collaboration

>>

March 22, 2012, 10:00 - 15:30 Gamla Bíó, Ingólfsstræti 2a.

DesignMarch opens with DesignTalks, a one-day-long series of lectures on topical issues within the creative industries. This year, the theme for the Talks is crossdisciplinary collaboration. From science to saunas, graphic design to food, the speakers are four internationally acclaimed designers that work on the boundaries between different fields: Marije Vogelzang, eating designer The leading name in food design, Dutch Marije Vogelzang uses food as a tool to interact, explore, engage and enjoy. In the past 12 years, she created dozens of installations, performances and other projects

The Icelandic Textile Guild restages a large exhibition held by the Guild at the Summer Festival of the Arts 2011 in Akureyri. A unique opportunity to view works by 40 Icelandic textile designers. >> Korpúlfstaðir

45 Loop

Norðaustan 10

Academy of the Arts

Open house in new headquarters of Department of Design and Architecture in Þverholt 11. Events include: * Eco Trophelia Iceland: eco-friendly food creation Eco Trophelia Iceland is a student competition in eco-friendly innovation of food and drink products. Iceland Academy of the Arts welcomes guests and passers-by to see all the projects submitted for the competition. Curator: HAF by Hafsteinn Juliusson. * KRADS - PLAYTIME Iceland Academy of the Arts organizes an Open Day. First year students of architecture will be immersed in the process of the workshop PLAYTIME run by KRADS in collaboration with LEGO. 24.03 11:00 - 16:00 * Grafían A sales show of works by second year students in graphic design at the Iceland Academy of the Arts. Expect creative energy, experimentation and fine workmanship! 24/03 12:00-16:00, 25.03 12:00-16:00 >> Iceland Academy of the Arts, Þverholt 11

44 The

Designers in the Spot-

EPAL exhibits works by 20 Icelandic designers. Ranging from fully-formed products to ideas in their embryonic form, the exhibition features furniture, toys, lights, blankets and utilitarian objects.

Finnsdóttir

Mýrin in Kringlan Shopping Centre exhibits new work by the ceramic artist Þóra Finnsdóttir. Selected by the Danish design magazine RUM as one of five most distinguished ceramic artists in Denmark, Finnsdóttir works with forms related to the everyday and places these in a different context and material. >> Mýrin, Kringlan 4-12

40 Iceland

Vat ns

46

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38 Outstanding

is out and about

Students from the Agricultural University of Iceland´s Environmental and Landscape Planning Department show how careful planning and thoughtful planting can tame wind and form shelter. Students stage events with public participation in central Reykjavík and in the car parks around the Kringlan Shopping Centre. 24/03 13:00 - 17:00

r

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Gröndal’s Birds of Iceland - Special Edition

in the 17 Building

A guarantee for better communities

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arg ata

hol t

An exhibition of submitted proposals for a competition of ideas for the surroundings of the Nordic House. Opening and presentation of prizes will take place on 24.03. at 14:00. A walk through the competition proposals takes place on 25.03. at 14:00.

Lau

Lind

Lan gah líð

Creative workshops for rowdy children of all ages and design for children on display: Bimbi, Fafu, Móra, Íslandsfiskar, Krummi the coathanger, Puzzled by Iceland, wooden building blocks from Icelandic larch, Moli the little flyboy and design from Ólátagarður itself. >> Ólátagarður, Snorrabraut 56

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of spring – Vatnsmýrin in the future

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45 Hát

.

í Ólátagarði / Be as rowdy as you like!

Kiosk shows spring fashion in an unusual way. The games begin on Friday 23.03. at 17-20 at Hotel Lind, with a premiere and light refreshments on the house. During the weekend, Kiosk is found in the window of Senter at Tryggvagata 28, Skaparinn by Skálholtsstígur, Minja at Skólavörðustígur 12, Munnharpan in Harpa, Conference Centre and Kiosk at Laugavegur 65. >> Hótel Lind, Rauðarárstígur 18

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The 17 building comes alive and transforms itself for DesignMarch! The cream of Icelandic fashion designers comes together and guests have the opportunity to meet the designers and find a bargain. The building will house a pop-up kitchen by Gló while Kaldi bar serves drinks. Music, art exhibitions and installations will take place around the house. >> Laugavegur 91

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Kaffitár – all Reykjavík locations. // Hafnarborg, Strandgata 32, Hafnarfjörður. // Háskólatorg, Universty of Iceland. // Hótel Natura, Nauthólsvegur 52. // Hönnunarsafn Íslands, Garðatorg 1, Garðabær // Kex Hostel, Skúlagata 28 // Iceland Academy of the Arts, Þverholt 11 // National Gallery, Fríkirkjuvegur 7 // The Nordic House, Sturlugata 5 // Reykjavík Art Museum // Reykjavík City Hall // Reykjavik University // Tourist Information Center, Aðalstræti 2

Get the official DesignMarch mobile app from Android market or App store.

Eyjaslóð

ENNEMM / SÍA / NM51061

Complete event listings can be found in the DesignMarch brochure, online at DesignMarch.is and in the DesignMarch app. Event schedule may change. DesignMarch brochures with complete listings can be found in various event locations and key places such as:

46 Roots

language

An exhibition of works by six Icelandic designers who all express themselves through knitting. The works exhibited are made within a certain framework and testify to the designers’ full artistic freedom for expression which does not stoop to perceived laws of market and fashion. Curated by designer Steinunn Sigurðardóttir. >> Museum of Design and Applied Art, Garðatorg 1, 210 Garðabær

GÓA Erla Sólveig Óskarsdóttir The Museum of Design and Applied Art shows Góa, a table for guests designed especially for the Museum by furniture designer Erla Sólveig Óskarsdóttir. Made of aluminium, Góa can be used both indoors and outdoors, and is the only Icelandic outdoors table currently on the market. >> Museum of Design and Applied Art, Garðatorg 1, 210 Garðabær

Tuomas Toivonen, architect, urbanist and musician Based in World Design Capital Helsinki 2012, architect Tuomas Toivonen is the founder of design studio NOW for Architecture and Urbanism as well as an accomplished musician. Toivonen’s recent project Culture Sauna seeks to revive the urban bathing culture in Helsinki. Koert van Mensvoort, artist, scientist A modern day polymath, Koert van Mensvoort has a doctorate in philosophy as well as degrees in computer science and arts. His work with Nextnature.net focuses on the challenges of our times and the interplay of man, nature and technology.

FÍT 2012 The Association of Icelandic Graphic Designers presents the best in graphic design in Iceland. The 11th annual prize ceremony takes place on Wednesday, 21.03. at 18. >> Hafnarborg, Strandgata 34, 220 Hafnarfjörður

47 MUNDI

The Journey

Mundi’s AW12-13 collection The Journey is presented in Rauðhólar, a cluster of pseudocraters in Elliðaárhraun lava fields on the outskirts of Reykjavík. Expect magical surroundings and a unique view of The Journey. >> 24.03 16:30 - 17:30, Rauðhólar

48 66°NORTH

focusing on food. Vogelzang is also the founder and designer of the experimental restaurant PROEF in Rotterdam and Amsterdam.

An exhibition of jewelry by Icelandic goldsmiths and contemporary designers offers an insight into the local jewelry design. Referring to both nature and cultural roots, “Roots” looks at what the goldsmiths and jewelry designers turn to for ideas, their choices of material and methods. The exhibition is curated in collaboration with the Icelandic Goldsmith‘s Association. >> Hafnarborg, Strandgata 32, 220 Hafnarfjörður

Fashion Show

66°NORTH puts on a fashion show at the unique Blue Lagoon. The show is a collaboration between 66°NORTH, the Blue Lagoon, Icelandair and Iceland Naturally. >> 23.03 18:30 - 20:30, The Blue Lagoon

Hjalti Karlsson, graphic designer Icelandic Hjalti Karlsson has been running the design studio Karlssonwilker in New York for 12 years, with clients including Vitra, MoMA and New York Times Magazine. Karlssonwilker designed the visual identity for DesignMarch 2012. The talks are hosted by professor Guðmundur Oddur Magnússon of the Iceland Academy of the Arts. Tickets (ISK 3900) are available at www. midi.is, the fee includes refreshments. DesignTalks open Iceland’s most important annual design festival. The one-day-program features the foremost local design thinkers alongside internationally renowned names. Previous speakers to have inspired the audiences include Winy Maas, Ilkka Suppanen, Siggi Eggertsson, Bjarke Ingels and Paul Bennett.

úla

ga ta


The Reykjavík Grapevine DesignMarch SPECIAL 2012

Snoop-Around is a photo/interview website that visits creative people at their homes, work or studio spaces and brings you a unique view of their lives. Visit them at www.snoop-around.com

Designing An Experience Snoop-Around visits Hafsteinn Júlíusson of HAF Words Ása Baldursdóttir Photos Nanna Dís HAF is displaying The Wheel of Nutrition at DesignMarch. The Wheel, which is designed by HAF and Rui Pereira, is an archetype of a ceramic plate enhanced with explanatory graphics and distinctive colours. The idea is to remind people about the fundamental values of nutrition through the plate’s design. The plate is produced in three sizes, Diet, Extraordinary and Supersize, which are meant to correspond to people’s different nutritional needs. We met with Director of HAF Hafsteinn Júlíusson to learn a little bit more about the product.

ny’s general manager, my wife, Karitas Sveinsdóttir, who is an interior designer, works closely with me and approves the designs before we move to the final stage of our product production, and my best friend Daníel Ólafsson, who is educated in business, does the sales and marketing.

When did you start HAF and how did it evolve to where it is now? I started the HAF project when I graduated in 2008 with a BA in product design. Shortly after my graduation my designs were published internationally and I got a lot of positive feedback. After I finished my Master’s studies in January 2010, I decided to make a company of it to follow up on all the attention I got, but I´ve also always been fascinated by things like branding in product design and such. The team consists of family and friends, which makes the company more personal. My father is the compa-

Tell me about The Wheel of Nutrition that you are showcasing at DesignMarch this year… I was having beers with Rui Pereira, a classmate from design studies in Milano, when we got the idea for The Wheel of Nutrition. We thought the idea had to exist somewhere in the world, so we googled it. But nobody had produced this concept so we had to do it! The Wheel of Nutrition very much embodies our motto that design is health and environmentalism and that people can have a positive experience with the things we make. The product itself has to have some kind

of message. I am not going to design and produce a new chair, just to make a new chair. There are already so many good chairs in the world. The reason for designing a product is important.

through the products that we design. We are also producing experiences in our design projects, not only materialistic things. I’m very interested in the idea of experiencing things.

So, are you a health junkie yourself? Well not exactly. I am not a vegetarian or a passionate environmentalist myself. But we are reminding people about issues tied to health and the environment

Do you think it’s important to understand the story behind the design? Well, it’s important to think about stories and how the products are

presented. Our products, for example, do not have the same elements—each product is unique. There is no particular style, which becomes a style; you know what I mean? My design is about the concept behind the products and experiences that I design. We can’t be caught up in the Ikea development, where everyone has to buy the same thing. But that’s a story for another interview.


The Reykjavík Grapevine DesignMarch SPECIAL 2012

The exhibit “Fashion – Gorgeous Gowns” at the National Museum is open through September 2. Steinunn is also curating an exhibit at the Icelandic Design Centre entitled ‘Fingramál’, which opens March 21, as well as an exhibit at her studio during DesignMarch featuring fashion illustrations by her colleague Laufey Jónsdóttir. At the end of the month, STEiNUNN design will also be commemorated on a stamp.

An Elegant Twist Veteran designer Steinunn on the past and present of Icelandic fashion Steinunn Sigurðardóttir is a woman who takes care in the details. Running her fingers down the back of a long gray jacket of her own design, Steinunn looks the garment over with a discerning eye. It is mid-day in her new studio not far from the old harbour, and the space is bright; freshly painted, raw, white. “Look,” she says, her voice underscored by a sense of marvel that persists throughout our conversation: “Just a simple jacket. But see the finishing on every seam? You could own this for thirty years.” Thirty years, likewise, is about how long Steinunn has been studying her craft; after graduating from Parsons, she spent sixteen years designing for some of the world’s biggest names in fashion—including Gucci, Calvin Klein, Donna Karan, and Ralph Lauren, among others—before moving back to Iceland to work full-time on her own label—STEiNUNN, founded in 2000. “It takes years to build a good designer,” Steinunn says. “It doesn’t happen overnight. I’ve been through hundreds and hundreds of collections. I’ve been in fittings on anything from leather to fur, to underwear, to evening dresses. For fashion designers, everybody thinks it’s easy. It’s not. You have to know your textiles. You have to know your patternmaking. I really want people to start knowing the difference.” Knowing fashion history is key Understanding the difference, of course, requires knowledge of, not only textiles and patternmaking, but largely, also, fashion history. “You don’t have to love everything that was done in the old days, but at least know the story,” Steinunn says. “Learn from the story, and then move forward. I think that’s the key.” As curator of a new exhibition at the National Museum titled “Fashion – Gorgeous Gowns,” and featuring an overview of Icelandic fashion—particularly ‘model’ dresses—in the years 1947-1970, Steinunn is indeed grappling with questions concerning posterity in fashion.

Words Valgerður Þóroddsdóttir Photos National Museum of Iceland

“I always talk about this piece,” Steinunn says, referring to a red, embroidered two-piece suit in the show, “because the woman who owned it was a farmer in Hveragerði, around 1947. And sixty-some years later, I mean, you could wear that today and still look spectacular.”

“So there’s little bit of naiveté in all of this, which is kind of beautiful. Their resourcefulness intrigued me. And maybe that is the Icelandic fashion.”

It is not only in terms of the quality of fabrics and textiles that garments stand a chance of lasting; it is also the “mark of good design,” Steinunn says, “how the piece stands up to time.” “The exhibit kind of shows how women, actually, made an effort. There is something about the preciousness, that you put care and effort into everything you owned, the value of that, you almost want to grasp that today. They seemed to have taken a lot more care in choosing what they were going to wear. They planned this. They went to find the colour and the fabric. This took a long time,” she says. “We are used to going on a Friday afternoon and buying something to wear and going out the same night, which I understand. But for me, that raises the questions: Where is the value of things we own? Is everything just throwaway? I’m hoping that an exhibit like this will open people’s eyes. Make fewer. Buy fewer. But leave them behind. I want your grandchildren to be able to say, ‘Oh, my grandmother owned that dress, and what a fabulous dress.’” ‘Fashion’ thus highlights not only what has been preserved, but also what we have lost. “There was a lot of elegance here,” says Steinunn. “Today you’re not finding that same kind of elegance.” Despite the fact that Icelandic women had few resources to work with, they were able, with expert skill, to imitate high fashion looks from the major fashion centres of the time, like Paris, and New York.

“You can see the influences, if you just go through fashion history. You can see how we actually wanted to be part of the outside world. I found images from Irving Penn or Cecil Beaton and lined them up in the right year in order to see the influences. In some cases you can see the lack of good fabrications. There’s one dress in the show which looks almost couture made, but it’s made out of a curtain fabric,” Steinunn says. It’s about resourcefulness “So there’s little bit of naiveté in all of this, which is kind of beautiful. Their resourcefulness intrigued me. And maybe that is the Icelandic fashion.” This resourcefulness plays into Steinunn’s views about fashion in general, which she describes as a refined sense of eclecticism. “It’s how they mix it, that makes it so fantastic,” she says.

“That for me is fashion: how you take pieces from everybody and mix it into your own. I own the throwaway pieces, but I also own the pieces you would never let go. And you should mix them together. How somebody else mixes differently from the other: That is fashion.” In fact, Steinunn is hesitant to admit to there being much fashion in that sense in Iceland today—that is, to there being a calibre of taste that can compete with that found in big cities abroad. “Icelandic women today, they’re not looking for elegance in the same way that you can see in a big, urban city. They are good at mixing old dress with new. The kind of ready-to-wear fashion... definitely not couture fashion. I don’t think we can talk about Icelandic fashion, per se; it’s more of a street fashion. For me it lacks a little bit in the knowledge of textiles. And that’s what

menswear fashion is picking up today. So there are twists that we need to catch up on.” “I always find it interesting to see to dress the same how everybody Þetta er starts ódýrasta way, how we seem to follow. Always we mynstrið. try to find a trend in Iceland. And I want Þetta er ódýrasta Icelandic people to drop that. I want mynstrið. Þetta er ódýrasta Allt sem þarf them to be more... eccentric.” mynstrið. á upphlutinn, In the end, what Steinunn has done Allt90.530 frá kr. with thissettið exhibit issem theþarf same thing she á upphlutinn, Allt sem has done in her ownþarf designs: honour a settið frá 90.530 kr. á upphlutinn, craft. “Do you know how many women Allar upplýsingar um hefð settiðthanked frá 90.530 kr.for this have actually me gerðir búninga eru exhibit?”ogSteinunn says. “That surprised Allar upplýsingar hefð veittar á staðnum. me. I learned from my um grandmothers gerðir eru Allarogupplýsingar um hefð and I dedicate my búninga career to that fact.” veittarbúninga áfashion staðnum. og gerðir eru tells a story as Steinunn says well as any historical document. “Why veittar á staðnum. shouldn’t it be in a museum?”

Margar gerðir af búningasilfri. Margar gerðir Margar gerðir af búningasilfri. af búningasilfri.

GULLKISTAN

Frakkastíg 10 / sími: 551-3160 thjodbuningasilfur.is

Margar gerðir af búningasilfri. Margar gerðir Margar gerðir Þetta er ódýrasta af búningasilfri. mynstrið. af búningasilfri. Þetta er ódýrasta mynstrið. Þetta er ódýrasta Allt sem þarf mynstrið. á upphlutinn, Allt90.530 sem þarf settið frá kr. á upphlutinn, Allt sem þarf settið frá 90.530 kr. á upphlutinn,

Allar upplýsingar um hefð

settið frá 90.530 kr.

og gerðir búninga eru

Allar upplýsingar veittar á staðnum. um hefð gerðir búninga eru Allarogupplýsingar um hefð veittarbúninga á staðnum. og gerðir eru veittar á staðnum.

GULLKISTAN

Frakkastíg 10 / sími: 551-3160 thjodbuningasilfur.is

SENDUM Í PÓSTKRÖFU.

Gullkistan - Frakkastíg 10 - Sími: 551-3160.


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