Rural News 10 May 2022 North Island

Page 1

MANAGEMENT

ANIMAL HEALTH

NEWS

Passion for sheep farming in New Zealand. PAGE 21

‘Pig’ of a new welfare code.

Live export experts ignored. PAGE 15

PAGE 24

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS MAY 10, 2022: ISSUE 750

www.ruralnews.co.nz

No boat to China! DAVID ANDERSON

SOME 300 farmers around the country – supplying 12,000 dairy cattle for export to China – have been left hundreds of thousands of dollars out of pocket due to the non-arrival of a live export ship. Livestock exporter, Hamilton-based Genetic Development (NZ) Exports, and its contracted farmer suppliers have been left high and dry after the carrier contracted by the company, Al Kuwait, was forced into dry dock to repair a broken propeller. The repairs were further delayed by shipping schedule disruptions, Covid affecting staff and parts delivery delays. “Thus it (the ship) cannot commit to coming, even by end of May,” an email to farmers from Genetic Developments explained. “Hence, we cannot ship the cattle that are currently in the pre-export isolation farm, near Tokoroa. Your cattle are at this farm and unfortunately we have to face the reality of local sale of these cattle.” This means the cattle due for export will now either have to be sold on the local market or sent back to farms where they came from. Some of the cattle were contracted at $1,100 a head but may now only be sold for $750 each – leaving some supplying farmers up to $350-a-head out of pocket. Meanwhile, those farmers who decide to take the animals back will have to pay for the transport of the animals themselves. Rural News understands that it is

not only farmers caught out; several transport operators, livestock agent companies – who procured the cattle from farmers on behalf of Genetic Development – are also currently left without payment. Genetic Development managing director Dave Hayman told Rural News the situation is “way beyond his worst nightmare” and his company has been left millions of dollars out of pocket. “We understand that some farmers are really annoyed about this situation, and it is extremely frustrating for us to be in this situation,” Hayman says. “We have our hands tied because the guys who buy the cattle will not receive the cattle because we can’t guarantee that they will be delivered to China.” Hayman says his company has a history of successful breeding stock shipments and providing premium value to farmers. He says in the past 18 months Genetic Development has exported tens of thousands of cattle to China and never had any problems “We work hard to maintain a good reputation with farmers and stock agents,” he adds. “We regret and apologise for stress to farmers from this failure of the export process, which we could not prevent and was totally unforeseen.” Hayman says they had been let down by the shipping company who he described as “less than forthcoming”. He added that the situation had been complicated by the fact there were only TO PAGE 4

An estimated 300 farmers supplying 12,000 dairy cattle for export to China have been left hundreds of thousands of dollars out of pocket due to the non-arrival of a live export ship.

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

NEWS 3 ISSUE 750

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More fert price rises SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

NEWS ��������������������������������������1-15 AGRIBUSINESS ���������������������� 16 HOUND, EDNA ����������������������� 18 CONTACTS ������������������������������ 18 OPINION ���������������������������� 18-20 MANAGEMENT ��������������� 21-23 ANIMAL HEALTH ����������� 24-25 MACHINERY AND PRODUCTS ���������������������� 26-30 RURAL TRADER �������������� 30-31

HEAD OFFICE Top Floor, 29 Northcroft Street, Takapuna, Auckland 0622 Phone: 09-307 0399 Fax: 09-307 0122 POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 Published by: Rural News Group Printed by: Inkwise NZ Ltd CONTACTS Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz

FARMERS ARE being told to expect further rises in fertiliser prices within weeks. Ballance has given farmers a headsup to expect a price rise after May 20. In March, the co-operative lowered the price of SustaiN to help farmers avoid feed shortages ahead of winter. Ballance general manager sales Jason Minkhorst says feed continues to be a challenge across the country. “So, we are holding at this lowered price for SustaiN and urea until 20 May 2022,” he told Rural News. “However, after this date our SustaiN and urea prices will begin a step change towards global prices.” Minkhorst says as we head into next season and prepare for spring, Ballance will be reviewing all prices across its product list. “The situation in Ukraine has put a squeeze on the availability of nutrients across the globe. Fortunately, we have not been impacted by these prices yet, but as our ships hit the water, these costs will impact our fertiliser prices.” He points out that since the situation in Ukraine has started, global

Farmers can expect further rises in fertiliser prices within weeks.

urea prices have lifted from around US$600/tonne to nearly US$1,000/ tonne. “We will do everything we can to absorb the impact as best we can and ensure that we have a consistent supply in the critical months ahead,” he says The recent global price increases are on the back of two years of high prices. Minkhorst told Rural News that several factors were behind the rise in fertiliser prices, including high energy costs driving up the cost of production of fertilisers, and export restric-

tions imposed by China, a large global exporter. Minkhorst says China has prioritised its own farmers over those in other countries, which has created shortages. Finally, the “ugly” factor impacting fertiliser prices is the Ukraine War. “This made a bad situation worse. And the timing was extremely bad,” he says. “Although we are far from Europe, the impacts of this war are being felt here in New Zealand, particularly as the sanctions have bitten. This is in the form of increased costs of fuel and in

our case, fertiliser.” Russia is the largest exporter of fertiliser in the world and also supplies a significant percentage of Europe’s energy needs. In addition, Belarus’ exports of potassium are disrupted because of its support for Russia. Collectively Russia and Belarus account for 40% of global potassium supply. As the war and sanctions progressed, there was a rise in fertiliser prices, particularly nitrogen and potassium. Minkhorst points out that global nitrogen prices rose to US$1,000/t and this excludes freight and local distribution costs. Ballance was not adversely impacted in the short to medium term as it does not source finished or raw materials directly from Russia, Belarus or Ukraine. “However, we are managing the knock-on, so that we can maintain surety of supply for our farmers and growers. “Our focus is helping farmers through this autumn, but we are also very aware of the impacts of the cost of fertiliser for the coming spring. We will be watching this closely over winter”.

Dairy prices retreat from lofty heights GLOBAL DAIRY prices are retreating as Omicron takes hold in more Chinese cities, disrupting the world’s biggest market. The fourth straight drop in whole milk powder (WMP) prices in last week’s Global Dairy Trade (GDT) auction has prompted at least one bank to shave 10c off the forecast milk price for this season. However, the season which ends on May 31, will still deliver a record payout for Fonterra farmer suppliers. The co-operative has a midpoint forecast of $9.60/kgMS.

Westpac senior agri economist Nathan Penny noted that overall prices in last week’s auction dived 8.5%, while key WMP prices slid by 6.5%. “This price fall is significant enough to warrant a 2021-22 milk price forecast downgrade,” he says. “On this basis, we have trimmed our forecast by 10 cents to $9.50/kgMS.” However, the bank is sticking to its opening forecast of $9.25 for the new season. Penny says he still expects this dip in Chinese demand will prove temporary as this Omicron

wave will eventually pass and Covid restrictions will thus ease. WMP prices have fallen almost 14% in the last four auctions. The price fall was not just limited to WMP. Butter and anhydrous milk fat led the price falls, plunging 12.5% and 12.1%, respectively. Cheddar posted the next largest fall, sliding 8.6%. “At this stage we continue to expect that generally this price weakness will prove temporary. The experience in other countries is that Omicron waves eventually pass. And

in Shanghai at least, this seems to tentatively be playing out.” ASB economist Nat Keall points out that China’s Omicron outbreak woes have seriously disrupted the local dairy market, with raw milk being diverted away from fresh milk and into powders, meaning the market has been well supplied in the near term. Keall also notes that NZ milk production is down 5% year-to-date as of the end of March, while global production looks likely to be flat at best this season.

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

4 NEWS

Fonterra reforms greenlighted SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FONTERRA’S NEW capital structure is likely to sail through the parliamentary process without any major changes. The Government, which has the numbers to pass the capital structure approved by co-operative shareholders into law, is hinting that it will only be seeking “tweaks”. Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor told Rural News that the legislation “is likely to land close to” what was approved by Fonterra shareholders in December. But he says the parliamentary select committee process will hear submissions from all parties, including independent processors unhappy with the new capital structure. “There will be further tweaks through the legislative process,” O’Connor says. “There’s no radical opposition and we will end up close to where we are right now.” O’Connor says he’s seeking the best possible outcome to ensure Fonterra is ready for its “next era of development”.

Fonterra chair Peter McBride says flexible shareholding model will help the co-op maintain a sustainable milk supply.

Fonterra was formed through the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act (DIRA) in 2001. The Government is worried about the impact on the new capital structure on several fronts: contestability of milk supply; a suppressed share price in the restricted farmers-only market; higher prices for farmers’ milk could flow through to NZ consumers; and value will be eroded for unit holders in the unit fund (Fonterra Shareholders Fund). O’Connor says because of Fonterra’s size and influence in the New Zealand

dairy sector, the Government needed to take into account any potential risks to the long-term performance, innovation, sustainability, and value creation in the wider dairy industry. “To that end we are also taking the opportunity to improve the transparency and independence of the raw milk price setting process, whilst also requiring a dividends and retention policy.” Jarden head of research Arie Dekker says having looked at various options, the Government has decided to support the capital restructur-

ing and amend the DIRA to specifically enable the unit fund to remain partially delinked on a permanent basis. “For Fonterra, we consider this is an important step forward.” Dekker points out that, in light of the risks that have been identified around contestability for farmers’ milk supply and its impact on value creation for the wider dairy industry, the Government has agreed existing DIRA regulatory settings should be strengthened to reduce these risks. “These fall into three buckets, with industry consultation being

THE BATTLE AGAINST M.BOVIS OVER?

sought on them. The consultation is not seeking comment on the capital restructure or other regulatory or alternative Government responses to the co-op’s capital restructuring.” Dekker says Fonterra was likely to readily accept two of the three proposed responses from the Government. Fonterra chairman Peter McBride acknowledged O’Connor and MPI’s work to develop proposed amendments to DIRA. “The Government’s aspirations for our industry are well aligned to the co-op’s,” McBride says. “We all want a high performing dairy industry, and a successful and innovative Fonterra is central to that. “A flexible shareholding model will help our co-op maintain a sustainable milk supply. A globally competitive co-op of scale is in everyone’s best interests.” McBride says the Government has signalled that while regulatory changes will not be in place by 1 June, it expects the amendments to DIRA to progress through Parliament this year.

NO WORKING farms in New Zealand are currently affected by bacterial disease Mycoplasma bovis. The only infected farm is a large beef feedlot, with planning underway to start clearing it later this year. Four years after the arrival of the disease in the country, eradication still remains the goal of the Government and the farming sector. Last week, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern thanked the primary sector for its efforts to eradicate the disease. She also acknowledged the pain and suffering endured by farmers. “No one in the world had attempted to eradicate M. bovis Jim van der Poel before, and if we were going to try something that had never been done, we needed to do so together,” Arden said. “I want to acknowledge how tough it’s been for those farmers who have lost their herds and stock genetics built up over decades. Your action has preserved our productive sectors that underpin the prosperity of all New Zealanders.” DairyNZ chairman Jim van der Poel said a lot was owed to farmers for their efforts in eradicating M. bovis and the robust biosecurity practices on-farm, which continues to be important. “This programme has at times been challenging for farmers and it’s important we acknowledge that. That work means we are now on a clear path to eradication and this transition will help maintain that status.” Beef + Lamb New Zealand chairman Andrew Morrison said his organisation was committed to ensuring the pest management programme worked for farmers. “Farmers will remain at the centre of our work because without them we can’t get to the point of proven absence of the disease.”

Farmers, stock agents and others left out of pocket FROM PAGE 1

about four ships in the world of the size and required quality to carry 12,000 head of cattle. Hayman added that Genetic Devel-

opment can’t get insurance to cover these kind of losses and therefore has no ability to pay farmers the agreed prices for the cattle. However, he is hopeful that prices gained at local

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

NEWS 5

Leave rural water schemes out of reforms DAVID ANDERSON

RURAL WATER schemes need to be exempted from the Government’s proposed Three Waters reforms. That’s the belief of West Otago farmer and member on the Glenkenich rural water scheme Hugh Gardyne. In a submission to the Rural Water Supplies Technical Working Group on the impacts of the Three Waters reforms, Gardyne says, “the objectives of virtually every stratum of Three Waters reform are contrary to the achievements and intent of rural water schemes”. He argues that because rural water schemes (RWS) vary so much, it is impossible to get consensus and “one size does not fit all”. The working group was set up by Local Government Minister and architect of the reforms Nanaia Mahuta to work with officials from the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) and Taumata Arowai to develop policy options and advice in respect of rural community schemes around the new water entities proposed in her Three

WORKING GROUP WHO’S WHO RURAL WATER Supplies Technical Working Group members: ● Bryan Cadogan, Clutha District Council, mayor (chair) ● Bill Bayfield, Taumata Arowai, chief executive (deputy Chair) ● Tony Lepper, Earnscleugh Irrigation Company, managing director ● Clive Manley, Ruapehu District Council, chief executive ● Craig Rowley, Waimate District Council, mayor ● Max Baxter, Ōtorohanga District Council, mayor ● Rob Phillips, Southland Regional Council, chief executive ● Bonita Bigham, South Taranaki District Council, board member ● Dr Charlotte Severne, Te Tumu Paeroa Māori Trustee ● Stephen Woodhead, independent ● Traci Houpapa, Federated Māori Authorities

Waters reforms. It was expected to report back to DIA at the end of April. As part of the reforms, drinking water quality safeguards are being extended to all drinking water suppliers, including small rural suppliers. However, concerns have been raised that this will place pressure on rural supplies and could lead to these schemes being stopped or altered, leaving some communities without a service. Gardyne argues that

despite the historic subsidies, local rural water schemes are selffinanced, self-funded and individually rated. “Ownership confers rights and massaging the notion that ownership will be held via some yetto-be determined share structure – subject to the whim of this or a future minister – is insulting to the founders of RWS that envisaged local ownership, local control for longstanding local benefits. “Ownership belongs to

A call has been made to exempt all rural water schemes from the Government’s proposed Three Waters reforms.

users. That aspect needs [to be] remedied. Ownership should remain with the RWS in perpetuity.” Gardyne adds that unless the working group “stands united opposing the direction rural water is headed, small rural schemes will get swallowed up in this process”. The submission accuses the work-

ing group of ignoring or accepting Mahuta’s intent, which it claims “is co-governance and equal representation by iwi”. It adds that a veto in favour of non-elected members (iwi) will scuttle any well-argued structure based on democracy. “As a member on the Glenkenich RWS, it is hard enough

getting timely, accurate information from our local council, without working through the five tiers of bureaucracy suggested in the current proposal,” Gardyne says. “The submission states that all rural water schemes ask for is that their local council support them with technical and professional advice,

complementing the competency of the elected scheme members.” He further argues that local knowledge is invaluable. “The comparative simplicity with which rural schemes now operate – with already significant overheads charged by TLAs – will just get more costly and more complicated under the proposed reforms.” Gardyne’s submission concludes that all rural water schemes should be removed from the proposed Three Waters reforms. “The specific needs of the many rural communities and a fuller understanding of the uniqueness and purpose of rural water schemes, be it only for stock water or with some potable component, needs to be respected by the Minister, the DIA and the working group members,” he says. “RWS are assets not chattels and DIA, councils and the working group have no moral right or authority to transfer them to a WSE structure without users’ consent.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

6 NEWS

Meat workers doing the mahi! PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

MEAT WORKERS are tired and fatigued with having to deal with Omicron in meat processing plants around the country. National Secretary of the Meat Workers Union, Daryl Carran, told Rural News that workers are doing overtime to try and catch up with the backlog in the kill caused by Covid and a general shortage of workers. He says it’s not easy work in the plants and people are also fatigued by the heat – as well as pressure to keep up throughput. Carran says his members have done an excellent job and the companies should be applauding their efforts. “We have instances where up to 70% of work-

ers in a plant have caught Omicron and production has been impacted by as much as 40% to 50% for up to 10 days,” he told Rural News. “The problem is compounded by the fact that the industry is finding it hard to get people. I know that farmers have struggled to get stock off their farms, but in saying that, it could have been potentially worse. That would have been a terrible disaster and had far reaching consequences.” Carran says the number of fully vaccinated workers in the industry varies from plant to plant, but on average he believes that number is between 70% and 75%. He says in some plants it could be as high as 85% and as low as 60% in others. “What we are hear-

National Secretary of the Meat Workers Union Daryl Carran says workers have done an excellent job and the companies should be applauding their efforts.

ing is that unvaccinated people are taking a bit longer to recover and the vaccinated people who have been boosted have had less impact

symptom-wise – but not always.” He says the common symptoms for the vaccinated is a runny nose, a bit of a sore throat and

headaches. But for the unvaccinated the effects of the virus are more severe. Carran reckons Omicron is now more preva-

lent in the South Island and notes that this has coincided with the drought in Southland and the demand by farmers to get stock killed. He says

while the actions of the companies in putting in place some stringent protocols did initially cost a bit of production, this has paid off in the long term and enabled works to improve their throughput. Carran says that the vast majority of meat processing companies have worked well with his union by using the government subsidies and freeing up unused sick leave for workers – many of whom are fatigued. He says his job is to ensure everyone remains calm despite the pressures. However, Carran is worried about the misinformation around vaccinations. He says it is unreal how “good, sensible people” have become mesmerised and fixated by the wrong information.

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

NEWS 7

Still some sticking points with new winter grazing rules SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FARMERS STILL have some concerns around the revised grazing regulations released last month. Restrictions on planting winter forage crops on slopes over 10 degrees and regulation wordings around ‘critical source areas’ exempted from cultivating or grazing cows are being contested by farmers. Federated Farmers Southland senior vice president Bernadette Hunt says farmers welcome some parts of the revised regulations – like the removal of specific requirements around pugging depths. Another amendment requiring grazed annual

forage crop paddocks to be re-sown as soon as conditions allow, instead of by a set date, has also been accepted. However, Hunt – who was part of the working group that reviewed the rules – told Rural News there are still some real concerns around slope restrictions. She says a 10 degrees slope isn’t very steep at all and will catch a lot of Southland farmland. “We have some real concerns about that,” she says. “We believe other rules around buffers and critical source areas would help mitigate the use of slopes.” A new condition has also been added where critical source areas in winter crop paddocks will need to be identified

Federated Farmers Southland senior vice president Bernadette Hunt says there are still some real concerns around slope restrictions.

and not cultivated or grazed. The Government claims these changes will help protect the soil and waterways by placing greater importance on paddock

selection and ensuring land is suitable for winter forage crops. But Hunt says while the group support this, the wording needs to change because it “might catch some land”.

She says Federated Farmers will continue to work with authorities and stakeholders to seek improvements. “Rules can be implemented and can also be changed. We will continue to work with other parties.” For now, farmers have a clear set of rules and an implementation date – November 1 – to work with. Hunt claims improvements made by Southland farmers around winter grazing practices over the past five years has been exponential. “Almost, in some way, I think the rules aren’t needed now,” she says. “But the rules will help the small number of farmers who haven’t done enough.

Hunt believes that the “vast majority” of farmers in the region have gone far beyond what the new regulations call for. In announcing the reviewed rules, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor says the NZ economy depends on the environment. “Cleaning up our winter grazing practices protects our freshwater resources, the welfare of our animals, and our exporting credentials,” he says. “The Government has listened to feedback from farmers, industry representatives, iwi and hapū, environmental groups and regional councils, and have improved the rules to ensure they work better to achieve environmental

outcomes.” O’Connor says the freshwater farm plan system, due to be introduced from later this year, will provide another practical way for farmers to identify and mitigate environmental risks. Following a report by the independent 2019 Winter Grazing Action Group, recommendations were made to the Government and changes have occurred. “I set up the group to focus on the importance of animal welfare in intensive winter grazing,” O’Connor added. “The group’s final report shows farmers have made progress, however there is still work to do and we will continue to support farmers to refine their practices.”

NO PLACE FOR DODGY OPERATORS! AGRICULTURE MINISTER Damien O’Connor says there is no place for dodgy operators in the Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) scheme. He says any employer not valuing the contribution of Pacific workers should lose the right to be part of the scheme. He was commenting on claims made to Rural News Group’s Hort

News by human rights lawyer Lisa Meto Fox on the poor treatment of Pacific workers. O’Connor says there have been stages through the RES scheme’s evolution where some employers had to be investigated. But O’Connor says he hasn’t received any recent complaints about ill-treatment of workers. He says the Government and farming

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sector appreciates and understands the value of the scheme for all countries involved. “I don’t know of any specific examples of poor treatment of workers but if it’s happening, it must stop immediately,” he told Rural News. The RSE scheme, launched in 2007, allows the horticulture and viticulture industries to recruit work-

ers from overseas for seasonal work when there are not enough New Zealand workers. The cap on workers was set at 5,000 places when the scheme was established in 2007, but the success of RSE has led to increased demand from employers. The Government recently made the decision to increase the cap to

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

8 NEWS

Rural health refused priority PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

“COMPLETELY AND utterly outrageous.” That’s how NZ Rural General Practice Network chair Dr Fiona Bolden describes the Government’s outright rejection of calls to make ‘rural’ a priority in the new Pae Ora Health Futures (POHF) Bill now before Parliament. The bill is the first major reform of the health service in more than 20 years and paves the way for a completely new structure that is supposed to deliver better health outcomes for NZ. But according to Bolden, who works as a rural GP, it won’t do this for the nearly 750,000 people who live in rural NZ. The genesis of the changes come from a

PARLOUS STATE OF RURAL HEALTH SERVICES DR FIONA Bolden says the rural health services are under huge pressure, She says there are plenty of places where you can’t even see GP at all and adds that rural hospitals are having real difficulty trying to see people. Bolden says many in the rural health workforce are coming up for retirement and have just about had enough. But she says many are staying on out of a sense of responsibility to their communities and many are burnt out. “The rural health service is limping along on the good will of its people and is further complicated by what’s happening with nursing,” she told Rural News. “Nurses working in practices get paid far less than those working for the DHBs and practices get no funding for nurses.” Rural News did approach the Minister of Health’s office for comment, but they did not respond.

review of the health service by Heather Simpson. In her review, according to Bolden, rural was seen as a priority and

was mentioned some 80 times in Simpson’s report. But when the legislation appeared, no men-

NZ Rural General Practice Network chair Dr Fiona Bolden.

tion was made of ‘rural’. The Rural GP Network made submissions to the select committee that heard submissions on the bill. Bolden says at the heart of the issue is that

rural GPs and others demanded that ‘rural’ should be given special legal status in the bill – along with Maori, Pacifica, women and the disabled. This status would require the new

health authorities to draw up a strategic plan to focus on ‘rural’. But the Labour and the Green MPs on the select committee rejected the inclusion of ‘rural’ saying: “Specifying other strategies in the legislation including for the rainbow and rural communities… could result in certain populations having too much or too little focus on them and… could result in a lack of flexibility in the system and an over emphasis on producing strategic plans rather than on innovative service design and provision.” Bolden says this is not correct. “They are saying they don’t need a rural health service and it is utterly outrageous and leave rural health out in the

wilderness,” she told Rural News. “You have got 750,000 people enrolled in rural practices, 194 rural general practices and 26 rural hospitals. At least a third of our workplaces are short of staff and we know that health outcomes for rural people are worse than they are for urban people. The health inequities in rural is massive.” Bolden says it is deeply disturbing that the Government has effectively ignored its own advice, which came from the Heather Simpson report. “It is very frustrating and for those of us who work in rural health and it’s pretty obvious that unless there is legislative requirements to highlight rural, nothing will happen,” she says.

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

NEWS 9

Health reforms should focus on outcomes and not bureaucracy PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

NATIONAL’S HEALTH spokesman Dr Shane Reti has joined in the chorus of criticism of Labour’s health reforms and the fact that ‘rural’ is not seen as a priority. Reti was a member of the select committee which conducted hearings into the Pae Ora Health Futures (POHF) Bill. He told Rural News that National wrote a formal ‘differing view’ to that of the Labour party majority on the select committee. Reti claims the

reforms are all about bureaucracy and not outcomes and says there is not a single commitment to a health outcome or target, but adds there will be layers and layers of bureaucracy. He says the reforms are ideologically driven and are about centralisation. He says National will focus on outcomes and not bureaucracy. “We are very concerned that Wellington bureaucrats are going to be making decisions that should be made by local people and the

Shane Reti claims the proposed health reforms are all about bureaucracy and not outcomes.

voice of local rural and provincial communities will be lost,” he told Rural News. “The bill is

a Treaty response and whether Labour believes that a Treaty response is a higher priority and

‘LEFT IN THE WILDERNESS’ LEO ARGENT

THE PROPOSED Pae Ora (Healthy Futures) Bill has appalled those serving the health needs of rural New Zealand. The New Zealand Rural General Practice Network (NZRGPN) claims the bill, recently recommended by the Health Select Committee to Parliament for a second reading, has left rural communities “in the wilderness”. In its oral submission to the select committee in January, NZGPRN made a call for rural communities to be identified as a priority population group – alongside Māori, Pacific people and the disabled. It argued that if the bill didn’t highlight a focus on rural communities and hold government agencies accountable for rural health

outcomes, the health inequities faced by rural New Zealanders will not improve. The Pae Ora Bill’s purpose is to ‘protect, promote and improve the health of all New Zealanders’ and achieve equity by reducing health disparities among New Zealand’s population groups, in particular Māori. It claims this will be achieved by providing new legal frameworks and principles for our health system, reforming structures and organisations into Health New Zealand – the new entity that replaces district health boards – in conjunction with iwi groups and a new Maori Health Authority. However, NZRGPN chief executive Dr Grant Davidson says the inequities in rural health outcomes are as “clear as day” and are even

worse for rural Māori. “For our voices to be ignored again is beyond disappointing and we are increasingly frustrated that rural communities are being overlooked by those with the power to effect real change,” he says. “For health equity for all New Zealanders, rural communities must be acknowledged as a priority population.” Davidson points out that New Zealand’s rural population contributes over 50% of GDP amongst industries from agriculture, tourism and more. He claims that the rural population has been “shafted”. “We thought the situation was now so bad that the health of rural New Zealanders could no longer be ignored. We were obviously wrong!”

deserves a great focus than rural and some other groups is a matter of opinion.” That is not to say Maori health is not a priority, because it is, says Reti. “But in my view, distribution of health resources should be based on need, not on a Treaty response. You can’t base a health system

on anything but need.” Reti has done time as a general practitioner working in rural communities in Northland in towns such as Dargaville and Rawene. He says he knows what it’s like to be miles away from laboratories and secondary tertiary receiving centres. “I understand that space. I know that rural areas struggle to get an equal level of care of more urban environments and there are a number of reasons for this,” he explains. “There are health workforce issues, data connectivity, data collection issues and a wide range of issues in rural that are more problematic than in urban and that has been the case for a while.” Reti believes the primary health care services in rural are “broken” and

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have been for a while. He says Covid is increasing the burdens on the sector. He points to the present long waiting lists for people trying to see a specialist, which he claims stands at over 30,000 nationwide. He says people should be able to access one within four months, and less if they have a serious problem. According to Reti, it will take until July 2024 to get the new system up and running and says, with the country trying to grapple with the Covid pandemic, he can’t think of a worse time to bring in reforms instead of focusing on the immediate needs of people. “More money, more bureaucracy and worse outcomes are the only things Andrew Little’s health reforms will deliver,” he says.

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

10 NEWS

New cattle genetic rules stifle imports DAVID ANDERSON

RECENTLY UPDATED import protocols means that imports of cattle genetic material into NZ from other countries has effectively come to a standstill. Claims have been made that the new protocols, based on Biosecurity NZ’s new Bovine Germplasm (embryos and semen) Import Health Standard, are unworkable. The new standard for bovine germplasm was issued on 25 August 2021 with new measures for managing Mycoplasma bovis and a number of other cattle diseases and came into effect on April 25 this year. “A transition period of eight months has meant that industry and trading partners have been able to prepare for the changes, which provide protection to New Zealand from 15 bovine diseases,” Biosecurity NZ says. “New Zealand’s import health standards are continually reviewed and amended to take into account changing biosecurity threats and trade requirements. If any New Zealand importers are unsure how to meet the new bovine germplasm

IHS, they are encouraged to contact Biosecurity New Zealand for further guidance.” However, Amy Dickens from New South Wales-based cattle stud JAD Speckle Park, told Rural News that experienced embryo transfer technicians believe the new processing protocols will not produce viable embryos. She says the new rules mean Australia cannot currently export embryos or semen to New Zealand. “This export market is now closed for Australia, but equally as unfortunate is that New Zealand breeders can no longer access genetics from Australia,” Dickens adds. “In the meantime, cattle genetics cannot be imported into NZ, which will be a significant issue for NZ’s beef and dairy cattle industries.” She claims that the new protocols require far more rigorous health testing and also a change to the way the embryos are processed. “Experienced embryo transfer technicians are of the opinion that the new processing will not produce viable embryos,” Dickens adds. “It could be a couple of years before things change to

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It is claimed that new rules mean Australia cannot currently export embryos or semen to New Zealand.

allow embryo exports from Australia to NZ.” Biosecurity NZ animal and plant health director Peter Thomson told Rural News that it had consulted extensively with industry and trading partners on the proposed measures and the scientific evidence that was considered while developing the measures.

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land to substantiate this claim.” Thomson says there is not currently a validated test for M. bovis in embryos, as there is for semen, so treatment with antibiotics is currently the only option to meet NZ’s biosecurity requirements. “Biosecurity New Zealand remains open to receiving and assessing any other options that sufficiently mitigate the risk of M. bovis in imported embryos.”

Dickens says while the semen protocols look like they will be workable in a shorter timeframe, it will require dialogue between MPI and its Australian equivalent government agency around how to interpret compliance of the new protocol. “There have certainly been no conclusive negotiations with Australia to formulate new veterinary certificates and import permits,” she adds. “Therefore, zero knowledge about when importation of cattle genetics into NZ may resume.” However, Thomson says MPI is currently very close to finalising a new veterinary certificate with the Australian Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment (DAWE). “We understand DAWE consulted with Australian germplasm exporters to ensure the measures are workable for them.” He does concede that it is possible there may be a short delay with finalising this certificate. “In the interim, Biosecurity New Zealand will assess any urgent bovine germplasm import requests on a case-bycase basis to reduce impacts to trade, while ensuring New Zealand is protected from biosecurity threats.”

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

NEWS 11

Ahuwhenua comp back on track PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

THE 2022 Ahuwhenua Trophy competition to find the top Māori sheep and beef farm is back on track, after having been postponed earlier in the year due to Covid-19. Judging of the entrants in this competition resumes in May, as well as the judging for the Ahuwhenua Young Maori Farmer Award, which is run in conjunction with the senior event. Ahuwhenua Trophy chair Nuku Hadfield says, with Covid restrictions now being progressively lifted, it was decided that it is safe to resume the judging process. She says entrants and sponsors have all been consulted and they are happy with this decision. Hadfield says the only change to the programme now is the cancellation of the announcement of finalists at a function at Parliament. “We will be announcing the finalists once the first-round judging process is complete,” she told Rural News. “People

will have a chance to meet this year’s finalists at their respective field days in August and September. These events have always proved popular and are an excellent way of showcasing the achievements of our finalists.” Hadfield says 2022 has been a very challenging year for many Māori sheep and beef farmers, especially those on the East Coast of the North Island. “The heavy rains in March had a catastrophic effect on some Māori farms – akin to the devastating Cyclone Bola in 1988,” she says. “The torrential rain caused massive slips on many farms, destroying fences, tracks and other infrastructure. Stock have also been lost or affected by the storms. It will take considerable time and effort to restore these farms to their former states.” But Hadfield says, despite these setbacks, the prospects are good for another excellent Ahuwhenua Trophy competition. She says the

Ahuwhenua Trophy has always been a highlight of the year for the agri sector and the 2022 competition will be no exception. The field days for the

finalists will take place in the last week of August and the first two weeks of September, with the awards dinner to be held on Friday 21 October in Hawke’s Bay.

After having been postponed earlier in the year due to Covid-19 2022, the Ahuwhenua Trophy competition to find the top Māori sheep and beef farm is back on track.

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

12 NEWS

Farmers overwhelmed by new regulations and compliance requirements PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

FARMERS ARE getting overwhelmed by all the new regulations and compliance requirements they are facing now and in the future. Leading farm consultant Phil Journeaux, of AgFirst, told Rural News that farming is a complicated enough business as it is. But he says the compliance cost on farm – in terms of time and paperwork – is growing rapidly and with the advent of all the water, animal welfare and labour regulations, the pressure is on farmers. “I have been doing a lot of work in the last few years around greenhouse gas emissions, which is very complicated and this has yet to really hit farmers,” Journeaux explains. “I don’t think they (farmers) understand how much paperwork and compliance they will be required to do. This whole compliance thing is becoming a really big component of farming and that’s why a lot of farmers are reaching for advisors to help them work it through.” Therein lies the chal-

lenge. It is well-known that there are insufficient farm consultants that are fully trained to meet what is expected to be a huge influx of demand for the likes of Journeaux and other experienced farm advisors. Recently, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced that the Government was investing $25 million to “expand and strengthen the primary sector advisory services to ensure farmers and growers have access to the highest quality farm planning support and advice”. “Employers hiring new advisers, or upskilling existing staff, could receive up to $22,500 annually per adviser to help cover salary and training costs,” he said in a statement. “A career pathway scheme will focus on growing the diversity and number of advisers, with an emphasis on attracting more women and Māori into roles.” Journeaux says the announcement is quite exciting because there is an issue with capacity in terms of consultancy and advisors working with farmers through all the

Farm Consultant Phil Journeaux says the pressure is on farmers with the advent of all the new water, animal welfare and labour regulations.

new plans that are being put in place. He believes that up until now, consultancy firms have been reluctant to hire large numbers of graduates because of the cost of paying them plus the cost of allocating a senior advisor to work alongside trainees until they are able to work by themselves. “I think what the Government is offering will

go a long way to assist that,” Journeaux adds. “In the past we might have taken on one or two graduates each year; now we can look at picking up four or five and that I think would be much the same across most of the consultancy firms.” But he is quick to point out that it could take up to three years to have new graduates fully trained. Journeaux

says the graduates get a good theoretical grounding at university, but this knowledge has to be translated into what is practically needed on a farm. He says they can only learn this by working alongside an experienced consultant to see how they handle the situation. “The fact is you are dealing with a whole range of issues: You have

got the farm financial business, you have got the farm system and how that works and then you have got the environmental-type issues,” Journeaux adds. “It’s a case of how do you put all that together in a package that farmers can work with and make sure the farm business is viable at the end of it? To me, that is a practical skill you learn in the field

rather than in a lecture hall at a university.” Journeaux says the aim is to get about 100 more people qualified to help farmers with their various plans. He says farmers need to have trust in consultants and respect their advice and this is about experience which takes time – hence the three year time lag to get the new advisors up to speed.

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

NEWS 13

Good bosses make a difference SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

SECURING A great employer is the key for young people entering the dairy industry. That’s the view of 2022 Auckland/Hauraki Dairy Industry Awards Share Farmer of the Year winner Danielle Hovmand. Hovmand will complete her second year as a contract milker for Sue Broomfield on her 106ha Patetonga farm, milking 270 cows. Next year, she will move to another farm owned by Broomfield at Springdale, with better pasture growth, in-shed feeding and higher milk production. Hovmand enjoys working for Broomfield and says having a great employer is impor-

BEST OF THE BEST NEW ZEALAND Dairy Awards general manager Robin Congdon says the 32 finalists from 11 regions are the cream of the crop from all the entries received. “It was fantastic to attend the regional dinners and feel the excitement of the wins and see the journey each finalist has taken, both professionally and personally,” says Congdon. “The awards promote best practice and celebrate all entrants and finalists. It’s not just about winning, it’s a programme of learning, connecting and personal and professional growth.” The finalists include a mix of gender, age, farming experience and career backgrounds amongst the regional finalists, along with 18 finalists who were on a work visa – six in the Dairy Trainee category, 11 in the Dairy Manager category and one in the Share Farmer category. Dairy Industry Awards finalist Danielle Hovmand says having a great employer is important.

tant. Her advice to other youngsters eyeing a career in dairying is to find an employer who will help you transition into dairy farming with ease. “Find someone that can set you up to suc-

ceed,” she told Rural News. “The person you work for makes a huge difference; it greatly helps you carve out a pathway as a successful dairy farmer.” Hovmand, who took

part in the NZ Dairy Awards last year, says the competition pushed her outside her comfort zone and increased networking opportunities. “By analysing my busi-

ness and learning to capitalise on my strengths and overcome any weaknesses, I’ve gained a better understanding of my farming business, my farming system, where I

want my business to be in the future and how I’m going to get there,” she says. Hovmand didn’t consider dairy farming as part of her career until

a university placement during a summer break. “I was given the opportunity to try every aspect of farming. I enjoy challenging myself to make improvements to my farming system and that there is a clear pathway of progression within the industry.” The 25-year-old believes farmers are guardians for future generations. Hovmand joins finalists from 10 other regions at the national awards night in Christchurch this weekend (May 13-15). A total of 32 finalists will compete for a total prize pool worth around $200,000 and the honour of winning either the 2022 New Zealand Share Farmer of the Year, 2022 New Zealand Dairy Manager of the Year or the 2022 New Zealand Dairy Trainee of the year title.

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

14 NEWS

Labour MPs support will kill live export business DAVID ANDERSON

LABOUR’S ‘RURAL’ MPs have towed the party line and backed Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor’s move to wind-up NZ’s $280 million-a-year live export industry. Both National and ACT rejected the plan to ban the export of live animals. This follows a divided select committee report on whether the bill should be passed or not. O’Connor drew up the bill to ban live animal export by sea following the sinking of the Gulf Livestock 1 in 2020, which saw the deaths of 41 sailors and 6,000

cattle. It failed to win the full support of Parliament’s Primary Production Select Committee. “The Primary Production Committee has examined the Animal Welfare Amendment Bill,” its report said. “The votes were tied, and we were unable to agree on whether the bill should be passed.” However, with the Government’s support, it is expected the bill will pass through Parliament – where Labour has an outright majority. National and Act registered opposing views to their Labour colleagues over the bill, mainly related to its economic impact.

Live exporters believe the Government was swayed more by protestors than industry in its move to soon ban the practice.

“It is the view of National Party committee members the projected economic loss caused by such a ban has been grossly underestimated, and that rural communities across New Zea-

leadership role in setting and maintaining worldleading compliance standards”. ACT member Mark Cameron agreed, saying New Zealand should develop a “’gold standard’

land will be detrimentally affected by both job and revenue loss,” they wrote in its dissenting view. National suggested that the Ministry for Primary Industires (MPI) should instead “take a

approach for our livestock export industry”. Labour members conceded that there were economic impacts of the legislation, saying the committee was advised “livestock export contributes $261 million to New Zealand’s economy annually”. They were also not swayed by the views of submitters who warned the ban could lead to an increase in the annual slaughter of 1.8 million bobby calves, which could be sent overseas. “The slaughter of bobby calves is wasteful compared to their use as breeding stock overseas,” the report says. “Submitters said that the

ban could potentially add around 130,000 more.” There were also differing views on whether banning live exports would improve New Zealand’s reputation. In fact, some submitters argued that a ban could be reputationally damaging to NZ. “Banning livestock export would undermine New Zealand’s reputation as a well-managed agricultural economy and transparent trading partner,” the report said. The bill will now go back to Parliament, where it is expected to be passed, then the ban would be put in place in April next year.

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

NEWS 15

Live export experts ignored DAVID ANDERSON

NATIONAL’S ANIMAL welfare spokesperson Nicola Grigg claims the Government completely ignored compelling evidence from cattle breeders, vets and export industry experts in its push to ban live animal shipments. Grigg’s claim follows Parliament’s recently completed Primary Production Select Committee inquiry into the Animal Welfare Amendment Bill, which will ban the export of live animals by sea from April next year. “It was a foregone conclusion,” Grigg told Rural News. “The MPI [Ministry for Primary Industries] report states ‘given the Government has made clear its commitment to

Nicola Grigg accuses both MPI and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor of deliberately ignoring submitters opposing the ban.

the ban being in place by 30 April 2023, the recommendations in this report are intended to give effect to this decision… the Bill should progress as it was presented to the House at the First Reading’.” Grigg says this made

an absolute mockery of the select committee process and the inquiry and accuses both MPI and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor of deliberately ignoring submitters opposing the ban. “To me that stinks,” she adds. “Clearly it was

a predetermined outcome and there was no intention to listen to any evidence, any science, any experience from international jurisdictions – making it a total waste of time to all those people who put hours and hours into submissions.”

Grigg says many of those submitters that were ignored included livestock agents, importers/exporters and vets. However, she concedes that there was also evidence from those who had been on live shipments and who had wit-

nessed horrific events. “Don’t get me wrong, we certainly heard evidence of substandard practice and no fairminded New Zealander will accept or tolerate that and nor will we [National].” Grigg says that is why National was keen for the Government to open its mind to a legislated standard – what she describes as a “gold standard” – for live exports rather than an outright ban. “This would set standards like built-for-purpose ships with feed, water and air conditioning systems,” she says. “As well as maximum stocking densities, vet and stock handler training, better reporting, exporter licensing and an importer quality assurance programme.” She says a licensing

regime like this would ensure New Zealand exporters adopt the highest animal welfare standards in the world. “Wouldn’t it be great if NZ was world leading in this space and set the standards that the rest of the world had to follow?” Grigg, who is also National’s spokesperson for Rural Communities, believes the projected economic loss caused by the live export ban has been grossly underestimated. “National asked for more robust financial implications of the ban, but this was never provided.” She says rural communities across New Zealand will be adversely affected in both job and revenue loss from the ban. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

16 AGRIBUSINESS

Helping feed the needy! SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

NEW ZEALAND generates 571,000 tonnes of food waste annually – including residential and commercial food waste. It is estimated that 60% of food going to landfill is still edible. For the past 10 years, an organisation founded by Deborah Manning has been collecting food before it goes to waste and distributing it to frontline agencies, helping to feed our most vulnerable. Fresh fruit and vegetable category currently makes up 46% of KiwiHarvest’s total rescuedfood volume. Pukekohe-based Balle Brothers is just one of 275 active food donors working with KiwiHarvest. Dacey Balle, managing

Fresh fruit and vegetables currently make up 46% of KiwiHarvest’s total rescued-food volume.

director of Balle Brothers, says they have been supplying KiwiHarvest onions, potatoes, carrots and sweet potatoes for the past 10 years. The vegetables are picked up from Balle Brothers farms by T&G and delivered to

KiwiHarvest. “Our mantra is real food, for real people, every day,” Dacey Balle says. “We have an innate desire to make sure people everywhere have access to fresh nutritious

food. “In our communities this is becoming much harder, and the pandemic has really exposed some of the inequities in the supply chain. “The partnership with KiwiHarvest has enabled

us to focus on what we do best – large scale production and distribution of fresh produce. “By working with the skill set of KiwiHarvest we can get healthy food out into the community and achieve our combined goals together” Since its launch in 2012, KiwiHarvest has distributed over 7.7 million kg of food – 22 million meal equivalents. Over 20m kg of carbon dioxide equivalent has been diverted from landfill. Manning told Rural News that KiwiHarvest is incredibly proud of what it has achieved over the past ten years. She says KiwiHarvest wouldn’t be the success it is today without the support of our valued donors and partners.

WHAT IS KIWIHARVEST? WITH 11 trucks on the road, KiwiHarvest is New Zealand’s largest food rescue social venture. Works with the food supply chain including growers to rescue the good food that they are not able to sell. Apart from providing much needed food support to Kiwis doing it tough, KiwiHarvest prevents food from ending up in landfill where it produces methane as it degrades. It has five branches nationwide – Auckland (North Shore and East Tamaki) Queenstown, Dunedin and Invercargill. It currently has 275 active food donors and supplies rescued food to 235 recipient agencies. Fresh fruit and vegetable category currently makes up 46% of total rescued food volume.

“The fresh produce we receive from fruit and vegetable farmers across the country helps us to provide healthy and nourishing food to communities in need, making up nearly half of the total food rescued at KiwiHarvest. “In the past two years, the horticulture industry has been significantly

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

18 OPINION EDITORIAL

EDNA

A sick joke! WHEN THE Covid pandemic broke out over two years ago, Jacinda Ardern waxed lyrical about the importance of the rural-based primary sector and how it would pull the NZ economy through the tough times ahead. It has delivered on that with interest. The sector has come together like never before, from workers on farms, in orchards and processing plants – not to mention the marketers and managers who have got our product to market on time and at good prices. However, it’s come at a price: people in rural NZ are fatigued and are having to cope with the additional burden of a bundle of stressful compliance. The Government has set about reforming the health system, but 750,000 rural people (or about a 6th of the population) have been left out in the cold – when they already get a second-rate health service. It takes more than a year in some cases to see a specialist, long distances to drive to see a GP, if there is one, an almost non-existent mental health service and a grossly overworked and underpaid health work-force. As one GP explained, “Mental health is a low priority because they are too busy dealing with urgent medical issues”. Other doctors have said they are leaving because of the clumsy and inept bureaucracy, while others have talked about huge mental health issues in rural communities. The Rural General Practice Network is rightly outraged at the failure of Health Minister Andrew Little to legally prioritise rural health in the new Pae Ora Health Futures Bill. Yes, under the bill there is a legal requirement to produce special strategies to deal with Maori, Pacifica, people with disabilities and women – but not for rural. It seems rural is being left to fend for itself and once again left out in the wilderness. National’s Dr Shane Reti, who has worked as a rural GP, is right when he says the distribution of health services must be based on need – not on ideology, which he accuses the Government of doing. The chance to improve and prioritise rural health services is now all but gone. Rural people and their health providers have seemingly been condemned to receiving poorer health services and outcomes than their urban counterparts.

RURALNEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

HEAD OFFICE POSTAL ADDRESS: PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 Phone 09-307 0399 PUBLISHER: Brian Hight ......................................... Ph 09 307 0399 GENERAL MANAGER: Adam Fricker ....................................... Ph 021-842 226 CONSULTING EDITOR: David Anderson .................................. Ph 09 307 0399 davida@ruralnews.co.nz

“We’re gonna need deeper troughs!”

Want to share your opinion or gossip with the Hound? Send your emails to: hound@ruralnews.co.nz

THE HOUND Get real!

Muddy waters!

The Hound wonders why so much fuss was made about the PM’s recent overseas trip to Singapore and Japan. It appears, to this old mutt, that the press pack who attended this trip, along with the PM and Trade Minister Damien O’Connor (whose sole purpose seems to have been to carry Ms Ardern’s handbag), seemed to have over-imbibed on the Government Kool-Aid after three years of closed borders and over-egged just how much of big a deal this overseas junket actually was. The facts were that, of the 50 people on the week-long jaunt, only 12 were real business people – with three of these failing to make it to Japan due to that country’s strict Covid test regime. The other 38 were just a bunch of politicians, bureaucrats, media and government spin doctors – making it more a glorified junket for officials and hangers-on than some earth-shattering trade delegation!

A recent Official Information Act (OIA) release shows that the Government paid almost $30k to an ‘advertising guru’ for key advice that shaped its disastrous $3 million Three Waters advertising campaign last year. The OIA shows that advertising consultant Kim Wicksteed was paid $25,024 for a ‘marketing and communications’ strategy for Nanaia Mahuta’s Three Waters reforms. Wicksteed was also paid an additional $3,588 to participate in the – wait for it – “Three Waters Reform Programme Critical Friends Advisory Group”. His advice shaped the contentious and much pilloried advertising, featuring poorly drawn comic characters and green slime coming out of taps, which cost the Department of Internal Affairs more than $3 million. The advertising campaign aimed to muddy the waters and show that local councils were doing a poor job. Ultimately it failed to win.

PRODUCTION: Dave Ferguson ...................... Ph 027 272 5372 davef@ruralnews.co.nz Becky Williams .......................Ph 021 100 4381 beckyw@ruralnews.co.nz REPORTERS: Sudesh Kissun ........................ Ph 021 963 177 sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz Peter Burke ........................... Ph 021 224 2184 peterb@ruralnews.co.nz MACHINERY EDITOR: Mark Daniel ............................. Ph 021 906 723 markd@ruralnews.co.nz

Why bother?

Say what?

A mate of the Hound’s recently applied for membership with Ashburton-based farm supply co-operative Ruralco. He reports that by the time he’d downloaded all the paperwork there was something like 67 pages he had to read, sign and wade through. “I won’t go into all the information they wanted,” the perplexed farmer says. “But it came across as like they were paying me – not the other way round!” Other people have told your mate of similar issues faced when trying to sign up Farmlands. In fact, yours truly has looked at joining that rural supply co-op on a number of occasions, but he just couldn’t be bothered after looking at the convoluted process needed to go through to sign up. Funny how these farming co-operatives are all mad keen on more people joining them, but then make it such an onerous ordeal to sign up!

This old mutt almost choked while chewing his bone when he happened upon the latest politicallycorrect advice that’s been given to public servants about the way that they must communicate with people to be more ‘inclusive’. According to the Public Service Commission (the general advisory body for the public service), “We encourage the use of gender-neutral language whenever possible. This makes communications more inclusive for all people and has a positive impact on gender equality. Examples of gender-neutral language: spouse or partner — not husband or wife; parent — not mother or father; police officer — not policeman or policewoman; they, them or their — not ‘he or she’! If you think these public service censors are over-the-top, wait until you see the advice provided to the bureaucrats when conversing with the rainbow community!

AUCKLAND SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Stephen Pollard .......................... Ph 021 963 166 stephenp@ruralnews.co.nz

WELLINGTON SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Ron Mackay ................................. Ph 021 453 914 ronm@ruralnews.co.nz

WAIKATO SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Lisa Wise .................................. Ph 027 369 9218 lisaw@ruralnews.co.nz

SOUTH ISLAND SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Kaye Sutherland ....................... Ph 021 221 1994 kayes@ruralnews.co.nz

ABC audited circulation 79,553 as at 31/03/2019

DIGITAL STRATEGIST: Jessica Marshall ................ Ph 021 0232 6446

Rural News is published by Rural News Group Ltd. All editorial copy and photographs are subject to copyright and may not be reproduced without prior written permission of the publisher. Opinions or comments expressed within this publication are not necessarily those of staff, management or directors of Rural News Group Ltd.


RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

OPINION 19

Years of methane chicanery! DON NICOLSON

THE PASSAGE of time has taught me that most people have been so bombarded with climate change stories and the ‘need to do something’, they believe it. So, when discussing climate change and methane’s relevance, keeping it short and simple is critical to avoid being branded a denier – the go-to insult for the threatened. I don’t deny the weather changes. Or that the climate varies. History exposes all of that. Further, I expect that the resources of the world must be used wisely and efficiently. That is best found in open markets (as opposed to legislated) and where property rights are upheld. Late last century, Michael Mann of Pennsylvania State University created and published a global temperature graph known since as the Hockey Stick. It showed a sudden temperature lurch upward since industrialisation. As a relative new chum to the senior ranks of Federated Farmers, locally and nationally, I recall thinking, “Geez, if that graph’s accurate, mankind’s got a big problem”. Leading up to and after the Fight Against Ridiculous Taxes (FART) rallies in 2003, I was seen as one of the prime antagonists to any notion government could tax the natural processes of cattle and sheep burping methane. But I still had this niggling concern: “Heck, what if these emissions are helping to fry the world too?” Even so, I spent until the end of my Feds tenure in 2011 holding the line on behalf of farming. Disappointingly, in the years since, it seems that most farming leadership has given up the fight for what is right and sold out to the beltway vested interest noise and misinformation. I’ve become acutely

aware of the many deceptions that led to where we are now, so why haven’t they? The Mann Hockey Stick was found fraudulent. Naughty Michael had redrawn the global temperature graph for the last 1,000 years. He’d only wiped out the Medieval Warm Period and the Little Ice Age by the stroke of a pen to suit

Don Nicolson claims that most farming leadership has given up the fight for what is right and sold out to the beltway vested interests.

the climate alarmism frenzy! It was a major catalyst (of the many) the global climate alarmist club wanted to drive a fear-ofthe-future ethos home. And so, to methane. Incessantly we’ve been told that methane (CH4) is a problem – one of the biggest, baddest greenhouse gases (GHGs) that’s making the world overheat. Worse, they say, more CH4 brings on warming at many times the rate of CO2. But I discovered that for all those who work on climate change sciences, the key discipline is physics. Many papers are available, but a simple excerpt from just one, eminent Physicists W. A. van Wijngaarden1 and W. Happer2, “Methane and Climate”, November 22, 2019 explains: “Given the huge benefits of more CO2 to agriculture, to forestry, and to primary

photosynthetic productivity in general, more CO2 is almost certainly benefitting the world. And radiative effects of CH4 and N2O, another greenhouse gas produced by human activities, are so small that they are irrelevant to climate.” When the laws of physics are applied to

methane in the atmosphere and its molecular ability to absorb infrared radiation, it’s clear that it is physically impossible for methane to cause anything but an immeasurably small warming (or cooling for that matter). It’s that simple! After 25 years of a repetitive methane beat-

up, NZ ruminant animal agriculture is about to face an even tighter noose – all based off a litany of lies told often and well-orchestrated by vested interests. Recently, James Shaw has alluded to a cost of $200m of farming and taxpayers’ cash so far to keep the fatally-flawed

methane fable going. That will be much more if HWEN gets the tick and all in a frivolous pursuit of a non-problem. A quarter century of methane chicanery now exposed surely means that parties to HWEN have no reason to play in the Government’s muddy methane paddock

– period. But then the HWEN parties wouldn’t want that would they? Repeating a lie one thousand times until it seems a truth, is still a lie. • Don Nicolson was national president of Federated Farmers from 2008-2011 and an ACT party candidate in 2011 and 2014.

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

20 OPINION

Death and taxes the only answers! Lincoln University animal health scientist and vet Jim Gibbs says New Zealand’s ruminant industries do not have a methane mitigation miracle coming anytime soon and asks, ‘are we going to slaughter livestock instead?’ In the first of a two articles on the issue, he outlines where things are currently at. IN THE past several months, three separate articles have appeared purporting to explain the current situation in New Zealand cattle and sheep industries, regarding methane emission research. First, Harry Clark, the adviser to government on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, then Mark Aspin, chair of the GHG research consortia, and John Roche, MPI’s chief scientific adviser; for brevity, I’ll summarise, because all three were effectively identical: We have not produced

a single enteric methane or GHG mitigation tool for New Zealand ruminant industries. Not one. But we have torched $200 million taxpayer and levy dollars and worked very hard to get to this point. Jetting off to all those international conferences to boast what New Zealand was spending is exhausting, but we did it for you. Trust us, there will be a methane mitigation tool coming soon… not sure what or when, but we are sure something will turn up soon. Soon. These articles are

meant to soften up farmers for the next act. Here’s what none of them said, but the cattle and sheep farmers of New Zealand deserved to hear about methane mitigation in 2022: About the first written line in every document published internationally on climate change policy recommendations is this: FOOD PRODUCTION SHOULD NOT BE REDUCED. This Government has promised various international non-government bodies that New Zealand will dramatically reduce

Jim Gibbs says New Zealand’s ruminant industries do not have a methane mitigation miracle coming anytime soon.

enteric methane and (urine-associated) nitrous oxide emissions. Without an effective enteric methane mitigation tool, the only means the Government – and the various collaborators above – have to reduce emissions from livestock is to slaughter them. The maths is simple.

For example, a 25% reduction across all cattle and sheep sector industries in enteric methane emissions is achieved by slaughtering 25% of the herd and flock. When this happens, New Zealand will be again be seen an international agriculture leader, but for all the wrong rea-

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sons. Our country will reduce food production via slaughtering herds and flocks. We will be unique among OECD nations, proud New Zealand will meet this Government’s arbitrary promises on GHG by being the first economy to significantly reduce our protein-food production and exports to an increasingly hungry world, in the name of GHG. In addition, even after that slaughter, New Zealand food producers – called dairy, beef and lamb farmers – will also be taxed on what food they do produce and export to the world. This tax on food production will not remedy one mouthful of methane produced. It serves only to force New Zealand food producers to reduce production, so as

to reduce methane. How this tax will work, and how much, has almost certainly been decided already via focus groups and private polling. However, to keep the restless peasant hordes outside of Auckland and Wellington inside their farm fences, we’ve had a grand, big consultation process – through He Waka Eke Noa – while the tame levy bodies drip feed out the bad news. In the next article, I will dispel the false hope of a coming mitigation tool for New Zealand, which is the stock-intrade of the puff articles above. I will anchor a few ruminant methane facts that help us understand why we have no mitigation tools available – and why none are coming for the pastures of New Zealand anytime soon.

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

MANAGEMENT 21

Passion for NZ sheep farming JESSICA MARSHALL jessica@ruralnews.co.nz

WHEN BRAZILIAN Dayanne Almeida chose to move to New Zealand, it was our sheep farming expertise that attracted her. She is now repaying this passion by promoting the country’s ovine sector to the world via her vast network of social media channels. Almeida, an animal science graduate, first fell in love with sheep at a field day back in her home country of Brazil. “Overseas experience, living abroad, learning a new language were all exciting things I guess that would be listed alongside sheep farming. But none was as important as learning all about sheep farming in NZ,” she told Rural News. She sent over 500 emails over a two-year period, eventually receiving a reply from a Central Hawke’s Bay ram breeder who was happy to take her on. Initially, Almeida meant to stay on in New Zealand for three to four weeks but that has turned into five years working on farm. She says the mindset

New Zealand’s sheep farming expertise attracted Brazilian Dayanne Almeida to move to this country.

of Kiwi farmers is admirable. “I usually say to farmers in Brazil that whatever Kiwi farmers decide to do they will put their mind and heart to it and will succeed at it because of their mindset,” she says. “The do-it-yourself, team and community spirit, hard work, right attitude, initiative, incredible resilience and honesty are in my top 10 Kiwi farmer traits that I highlight to Brazilian farmers when I get asked what the secret to the sheep

farming success in NZ is.” Life in New Zealand was ‘a shock’ to start with, Almeida concedes. “Any big city has its challenges but it was quite a change coming to NZ and living here,” she says, adding that the culture was another shock. However, she found New Zealand is more relaxed. “I felt so welcomed, and absolutely loved the community spirit, the strong will to help others so everyone gets a chance to try,” she adds. “On the other hand, it

is not that easy to make friends here. Kiwis are more reserved, don’t show or struggle to show affection as naturally as we [Brazilians] do. “But they have never judged me from being who I am in any place I have worked and any team I have been part of.” Since arriving in New Zealand, Almeida has taken to social media using her ‘Canal Sheepnutter’ Facebook and Instagram accounts to introduce thousands of people to New Zealand’s

way of farming. She says it came out of a need to find a purpose and something to help people in Brazil and from further afar. “So, I started sharing my day to day life on the farm firstly with my friends on Facebook, then I created a page to widen out my audience in South America,” she says. The page led to invitations to speak at farming events in Brazil. “It always amazes me how other countries see NZ farming as the leader when it comes to effi-

ciency and sustainability, more than our own Kiwi farmers give themselves credit for,” Almeida told Rural News. “Working, studying

and sharing my life in NZ has helped me immensely in building my portfolio and recognition in the sheep farming sector in Brazil.”

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

22 MANAGEMENT

Turning theory in practicality LEO ARGENT

KIRSTIN DUESS believes the findings of her research work into soil drainage in Southland will have benefits for other parts of New Zealand as well. The final-year Lincoln University PhD candidate was the 2021 winner of the NZ Society of Soil Science/Fertiliser Association of NZ Postgraduate Bursary Award. The $5,000 award recognises the efforts and likely contribution to New Zealand soil science arising from a doctorate study. Duess’ postgraduate research saw her lead a long-term field study on soil and catchment hydrology in Southland. The findings will help understand the role mole and tile drains play in that region’s unique landscape. “We were interested in understanding the hydrology of a small catchment that is drained by a mole and tile drainage system on a sheep farm near Otahuti in Southland,” she told Rural News. The Otahuti landscape of gently undulating, loess-derived soils (i.e. soils formed in deposits of wind-blown silt) with low permeability and poor drainage is widespread across the Southland plains – as well as in other parts of NZ. Duess explains that mole and tile drainage is a common soil management practice in Southland. It aims to reduce the amount of time that

the soil is saturated with water from rain and/or a high water table. “These drainage systems improve the land for agriculture. However, they also have environmental and hydrological consequences, which challenge the sustainable management of these landscapes,” she adds. “Several studies have shown that nutrients, faecal bacteria and sediment are discharged from these drains into surface waters. This causes water quality to decline.” Duess says improving the understanding of the soil hydrology of catchments with modified drainage is important for the development and calibration of hydrological and nutrient-loss models. These are heavily relied on for managing agricultural landscapes. “Because mole channel drainage is an unregulated activity, there is very little knowledge about its regional extent, or how long the mole drains actually last,” she explains. “Commonly they are assumed to degrade after about 10 years. However, there are very few studies that actually confirm this.” Her research found that by using a noninvasive geophysical technique called GroundPenetrating Radar (GPR) to identify the mole channels that, even after 30 years without maintenance, these artificial drains are still present and functioning. “We found that the

TEAM EFFORT KIRSTEN DUESS is quick to acknowledge the many people that helped with her successful research project. “I couldn’t have done this without the funders of my PhD, Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research and Environment Southland,” she says. “I‘d also especially like to thank Regan Strang and Rachael Millar of Strang Farms Ltd at Otahuti. They welcomed me and my sensors and probes onto their beautiful farm and worked around me and my solar panel-mounted deer posts for three whole years.” Duess says while her PhD has been challenging, it has also been very rewarding. She adds that gaining the award was a real confidence booster before starting her my new career at Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research in February. “I wouldn’t be where I am without the support of my many great mentors, friends and colleagues, who have given me so much of their time and energy to help turn ideas into reality and put it all into the written word!”

Kirsten Duess’ postgraduate research saw her lead a long-term field study on soil and catchment hydrology in Southland and the role mole and tile drains play in that region.

mole drainage network was not installed at one time, but over multiple times across several years, each with a slightly different configuration. The result has been a very dense network of mole channels.” Duess and her team installed a comprehensive network of sensors to monitor how the water moved. “We discovered that

most of the water that exited the tile drain was sourced from the flat, upslope areas between two drainage hollows (swales), and that this water movement was facilitated by the mole channel network.” They also found that winter and spring were the seasons where most contaminants were lost to surface water, and that nitrate losses were low,

but phosphate and pathogen (E. coli and Campylobacter) losses could be very high. “This finding is important as it helps to target the timing of any on-farm solutions that mitigate surface water contamination from mole and tile-drained loess landscapes,” she says. “We also discovered that, despite being low permeability soils, the

movement of water to groundwater (i.e. deep drainage) was in fact a significant component of the water balance.” Duess says this finding is important because deep drainage is commonly assumed to be negligible when modelling flow pathways in these soils. “This is another piece in the puzzle of understanding how water moves from the surface to become groundwater, so that we can better estimate the current state and quantity of our groundwater resources,” she explains. “It will also help with predicting changes in hydrology and water quality – due to past and future land use change and the process of climate change using hydrological modelling techniques.”

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Duess believe the results of her research will help to manage the landscape more effectively. “Our study is a good demonstration of how long-term, integrated studies (soil variability, surface hydrology, soil and groundwater process and water chemistry) can be used to address multiple questions from many different angles and across a variety of interrelated disciplines.” She says these include things such as planning mitigation strategies, quantifying peak contaminant loads and when they occur, as well as helping calibrate computer models of hydrology of drain catchments for better understanding of stream flow and contaminant loading. And improved soil mapping techniques


RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

MANAGEMENT 23

Talking about difficult things a must! FARMERS IN New Zealand have to be prepared for anything – from the ever-changing weather to issues with stock, crops and machinery. Advance care planning is the process of thinking about, talking about and planning for future health care – including end-oflife care. It helps you, the important people in your life and your health care team understand what you want – especially if you can no longer speak for yourself. Rolleston farmer Thomas Mitchell is fronting a promotion for the Health Quality & Safety Commission’s Kia whakarite: Be pre-

pared advance care planning campaign. Mitchell runs cattle, grazes horses and owns a business supplying steel cattle and sheep yards. He also has a young family (partner Jerrica and two-year-old son Carter) and is now turning his mind to how he might support them if something happened to him. An advance care plan includes what is meaningful to you, your values and the ways you would like those caring for you to look after your spiritual and emotional needs. It can also cover whether you want to donate your organs, what sort of

Rolleston farmer Thomas Mitchell says advance care planning is something important for both him and his family.

funeral you would like and where your important papers are. Before his involvement with Kia whakarite,

advance care planning was a new concept to Mitchell. However, he now sees it as something important for both him

and his family. “We are all going to die one day and many of us will face poor health before then, so it is

important to be prepared. I’m only 32 so hopefully it is a way off yet,” Mitchell says. “However, with a family now I am conscious that I am the breadwinner for our household. Given I work in a dangerous job, it is a distinct possibility that I may have an accident, so we need to be prepared for that.” Mitchell has now started discussions about advance care planning with his family and thinks it is something people should talk about more. “It’s the sensible thing to do and eliminates many difficult situations that could arise in the future,” he adds.

While it is natural that people are hesitant about discussing advance care planning, as getting sick and dying isn’t something people like to think about too much. Mitchell believes the most important part of advance care planning is starting the conversation. “Have discussions with friends and loved ones about the things that are important to you, so they understand your wishes and can tell your health care team if you are ever unable to.” Free advance care planning resources are available at myacp.org. nz or by contacting your local health provider.

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

24 ANIMAL HEALTH

‘Pig’ of a new welfare code DAVID ANDERSON

NZ’S PIG farming sector believes if a new draft welfare code for pigs is adopted it could spell the end of the country’s pork industry. The National Animal Welfare Advisory Committee (NAWAC) recently issued a proposed draft code for pig welfare for public consultation. Pig farming body NZ Pork says it could result in the deaths of up to an additional 60,000 piglets every year and will also require almost every indoor and outdoor pig farm in the country to be partly or totally re-built. It adds that the new regulations will force local consumers to rely on imported pork produced using standards illegal in New Zealand. “The New Zealand

pork sector welcomes and encourages positive change where there are proven and wellresearched animal welfare outcomes for all pigs,” says NZ Pork chief executive Brent Kliess. “However, this draft code lacks scientific credibility and justification.” Kliess says the draft code goes well beyond the welfare requirements of other countries. “It includes colossal changes to the minimum space allowance required for grower pigs, a ban or significant limitation on the traditional use of farrowing systems (farrowing crates), an effective ban on mating stalls and sets a minimum weaning age of 28 days for piglets.” Kliess claims the new code imposes unachievable minimum standards

Pork NZ says no other country has completely banned the use of farrowing crates, which it claims is necessary during the highly vulnerable stage of new-born piglets’ lives.

on farmers and will effectively wipe out New Zealand’s pig industry. “Furthermore, an independent economic analysis commissioned by the Government concludes the draft code is bad news for consumers,” he adds. “It will lead to a predicted 18.2%

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increase in the price of all New Zealand-produced pork and a tsunami of imported pork undercutting local farmers and reducing sales of born and raised New Zealand pork.” Kliess describes farrowing crates as “the maternity ward for sows” and says these are specifically designed and proven to significantly reduce the main causes of piglet deaths – such as starvation, hypothermia and being accidentally crushed by the sow. “Our calculations estimate that up to 60,000 additional piglets would die every year, depending on which of the two farrowing options is finally adopted,” he adds. “We believe that temporary confinement of the sow at a time when piglets are at their most

vulnerable is a reasonable compromise when the alternative is the death of 1-2 piglets in every litter in a free farrowing situation.” Kliess says no other country has completely banned the use of farrowing crates and that is because these enabled a period of temporary confinement, which he claims is necessary during the highly vulnerable stage of newborn piglets’ lives. He adds that NZ Pork is particularly concerned at the unprecedented increase in the minimum space allowance for growing pigs proposed within the new code. “We acknowledge that there is scientific evidence supporting an increase in the current minimum space requirements for growing pigs,

NZ PORK says it’s disappointed that NAWAC accepted extremely limited input from farmers and the industry’s technical advisers – including its own animal welfare scientist – into the proposed changes. Kliess says NAWAC itself has no experience at all of pig farming. “We believe the draft code is clear evidence of this. An independent report by Australian animal welfare and animal science experts agrees and has highlighted significant flaws in NAWAC’s methodology and conclusions,” he explains. “We’re puzzled why NAWAC and the Government believe it is a good idea to impose welfare standards further removed from those in most of the world, while allowing pork to be imported and consumed here that is produced to standards that are currently illegal in New Zealand.” Kliess says other parts of the world are waking up to this contradiction and demanding that imported pork products are produced to equivalent standards. “Is it the Government’s intention to wipe out New Zealand’s pig industry by imposing minimum standards that will be impossible for most farmers to meet?”

however the proposed increases are unaffordable and unjustifiable.” Kliess says NAWAC’s focus on space as the priority indicator of good welfare rather than overall welfare outcomes for all pigs and their physical, health and behavioural requirements does not make sense. “In fact, both of the proposed minimum space requirement options in the draft code significantly exceed those required in the rest of the world – even countries that have subsidies, government funding and protected markets.”

Kliess says the NZ pig sector is committed to improving welfare outcomes across the board and accepts some areas in the current code need to change to keep up with good practice informed by the latest science. “However, the proposed changes are prescriptive rather than outcome-based and will effectively mean almost every commercial farm, both indoors and outdoors, will have to be partially or fully rebuilt. Some farmers will choose to exit the industry.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

ANIMAL HEALTH 25

New rules put cow control systems under scrutiny AN INDEPENDENT advisory body for animal welfare is proposing new minimum standards around controlling cow behaviour with electricity. Also under the spotlight is virtual fencing systems, now being actively marketed by farm technology providers. The National Animal Welfare Advisory Committee (NAWAC) says it has concerns around the use of electricity for controlling dairy cattle behaviour, “in particular regarding the potential for misuse or abuse and potential malfunction of equipment if not designed, manufactured, used or maintained adequately”.

NAWAC is therefore proposing new minimum standards relating to the use of electrified backing and top gates, electro immobilisation and electroejaculation. It is proposing that electro immobilisation devices must not be used. “NAWAC considers that this minimum standard should be made a regulation,” according to a discussion document released last month. NAWAC is proposing a new minimum standard that electrified backing and top gates must not be used. Also proposed are minimum standards to safeguard the welfare of bulls during electroejaculation.

NAWAC says it has concerns around the use of electricity for controlling dairy cattle behaviour.

On virtual fences, NAWAC says that current systems appear to have various safeguards in place to prevent operators applying shocks to animals directly and therefore the risk of misuse and abuse would

be considered low in comparison to handheld devices, such as electric prodders. However, NAWAC is proposing an amendment to safeguard the welfare of dairy cattle with regard to emerging technologies,

which will also apply to virtual fencing systems. It says farm facilities, equipment and technologies used with animals must be designed, constructed, maintained and used in a manner that minimises the likelihood

of distress, pain or injury to animals. Dairy cattle that do not adapt to new technologies must be provided with alternative management. Aversive techniques for training animals to new technolo-

gies should not be used. NAWAC is now seeking feedback on a proposed new draft code of welfare for dairy cattle. It says the objective is to lift regulations to address changes in good practice, available technology and science. The new code makes explicit recognition of sentience in the Animal Welfare Act – as well as consulting on recommendations for regulations. As well as seeking views from dairy farmers and others affected by the changes, NAWAC is also encouraging views from animal advocates and the general public. Consultation opened on 28 April and closes on 9 June.

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

26 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

A new approach to apprenticeships MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

BY TAKING a new approach to its apprenticeship programme, agricultural equipment supplier Norwood says it is ensuring farmers’ machinery will be supported in the future, while also bringing a wider range of people into the industry. This year’s intake of 22 apprentices is spread across 12 of Norwood’s nationwide dealerships. This takes the company’s overall cadre of apprentices and learners to

more than 70 people. The apprentices work towards recognised NZQA qualifications, while pursuing a career in parts supply, or servicing and repair of agricultural, construction, or outdoor power equipment. Well subscribed with over 240 applications for this year’s “earn while you learn” places, Norwood’s Apprenticeship Programme manager Len Richards says there are a wide range of trades available for apprenticeships. “But in my view, agricultural equipment is one of the most excit-

ing,” he told Rural News. “It offers a wide range of technology that’s interesting and varied and can be modified depending on its use.” Richards says Norwood has always brought on apprentices, but each dealership did it differently – with varying start times and support processes in place. In 2021, the company moved to a centralised recruitment model to apply a more structured approach, working in partnership with each of its 25 dealerships, to manage the recruitment

Norwood’s nationwide dealerships around NZ currently have more than 70 people working as apprentices and learners.

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from its national support office in Palmerston North. “Dealerships are busy enough with their day-today work keeping farmers moving, so we are trying to lighten their load, as well as offering the apprentices themselves a more consistent and focussed learning experience,” says Richards. Recruitment occurs at the same time for all dealerships, allowing each year’s intake to

go through their training in one cohort. The benefit of this is allowing apprentices the chance to develop strong relationships to support them through their training. Richards adds that support for the apprentices at their dealerships will be provided via a new mentoring programme, where trainees are buddied up for up to two years with an experienced person in the workshop. The programme is

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workshops. The company says last year this was given a boost through a government programme, which allowed the company to bring on additional people who had been negatively affected by Covid-19 – with a particular focus on Māori and Pasifika. “In our mind an apprentice isn’t just a young male who’s aged between 17 and 19,” Richard says. “Last year, we brought in two female technical apprentices, two apprentices in their mid-50s and this year’s cohort has an age range of 17 to 34 and encompasses a range of different cultures and nationalities.” www.norwood.co.nz

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run in conjunction with MITO/Te Pūkenga, but where possible, Norwood delivers its own technical training and carries out the internal assessment of its apprentices on their journey towards becoming qualified. “Together with our purpose-built national training centre and technical support team in Palmerston North and our product specialists out in the regions, we make sure our apprentices do their training on our products using our diagnostic tools,” he explains. Alongside the development of young people in the industry, Norwood is also working to improve diversity in its

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 27

Belt merger added to rake manufacturer’s arsenal

Pottinger says its recently released Mergento VT 9220 belt merger rake is better suited to ‘fragile’ crops such as lucerne and clover.

markd@ruralnews.co.nz

WHILE MOST rakes or swathers are tine-based, over the last few years more and more manufacturers have been adding belt-based mergers to their product offerings. The choice is brought about as some users believe that “raking” grass across the ground, particularly with larger machines, increases the

six rows of tine bars to lift the cut crop from the ground. With the aid of a roller crop press for short crops, it then drops the material from a point about 120mm above the conveyors. Each conveyor assembly is centrally mounted, which is said to offer even weight distribution. At the same time, the machine also delivers 3-D ground tracking – particularly on uneven ground

Offering left, right or central delivery, the machine can also be set up to deliver two single swaths if required. Configured for central delivery, a working width of 9.2 metres can be achieved, while in side delivery, this reduces the overall working width to 8.7 metres. risk of soil contamination and can also result in leaf loss. The latest manufacturer to offer the solution is Pottinger, with its recently released Mergento VT 9220 belt merger. The company suggests it is better suited to ‘fragile’ crops such as lucerne, clover or alfalfa. However, it will also work equally well in conventional grass or straw crops. Offering left, right or central delivery, the machine can also be set up to deliver two single swaths if required. Configured for central delivery, a working width of 9.2 metres can be achieved, while in side delivery, this reduces the overall working width to 8.7 metres. An over-dimensioned, central-spine frame – fitted with rear wheel equipment – carries twin lateral frames that support the conveyor assemblies. Up front, the pick-up uses

or slopes. Carried on a chassis roller system, the conveyor units use three hydraulic cylinders to react quickly to ground adaption. It also offers vertical movement from +475mm to -195mm and lateral movement from +30 to -13 degrees. To facilitate a clean pick-up, inclination of the conveyor in the direction of travel can be adjusted from +11.5 to 0 degrees. Overall control of the unit, including direction of travel and belt positioning, is taken care of with an in-cab terminal. The machine has the added benefit of automated switch on/ switch off at the headland. This is aid to increase the output with tidy swath starts and finishes as the operator does not need to clear the belt between bouts. Production is scheduled to start in August, with availability towards the end of the year. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

28 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Pigtail standards made to last FEEDBACK FROM farmers highlighted frustration at the time and cost involved in frequently replacing failed pigtail posts. Farmer, engineer and owner of Strainrite, Maurice Wooster, says that his company has been manufacturing its own pigtail standards for decades. He works closely with local farmers to design and produce standards that are free of the faults that farmers say are often found in cheaper, imported pigtail standards. “At Strainrite, we press-form the foot into a shallow ‘U’ shape, so that the edges curl downwards when it’s trodden in. These edges, or sides, give it superior strength without adding any additional weight,” Wooster explains.

“Each foot is also machine-press crimped on to the shaft, which makes the join much stronger than if it was just welded on. We’re the only ones who do both these things. Some other manufacturers use flat bar or wire section feet, but they aren’t as effective.” Darfield dairy farmer Mark Mulholland agrees. “The foot on some of the opposition standards breaks off when you’re pushing them in. There is a weakness in their manufacture,” he says. “The Strainrite standards have a more robust foot which stands up to a fair bit of abuse.” The uniquely-shaped Strainrite foot has other advantages. “It also provides better ground-hold because the ‘U’ shape compresses the

Farmer engineer and owner of Strainrite Maurice Wooster.

earth as it goes in. Just like cleats do on a tractor wheel. That means that our standards don’t fall out, even when they’re bent,” explains Wooster.

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The company briefly used moulded plastic feet on some of its pigtail standard range several years ago, but quickly moved away from the practice after negative farmer feedback. This revealed that the plastic often became brittle and snapped in the cold and tended to deflect and break in the heat. Customer experience drives Strainrite’s product development and the company has incorporated other features in its pigtail standards range that help reduce the frustrations farmers say are often associated with the use of cheaper alternatives. Brandon Given, a fifthgeneration sheep and beef farmer near Raglan, highlights some of the issues. “The sort of problems

that we’ve had in the past with our electric fence posts have been that they rust out, they easily bend or break and don’t last much longer than a year,” he explains. “The best thing for us living on the coast is Strainrite’s galvanised steel shaft. It’s made out of good spring steel and it doesn’t bend. We have pretty hard conditions through winter and there’s no rust to be seen.” The company uses hot-dipping in its galvanising process. Wooster says that this provides corrosion protection that adheres better and gives a thicker coating than other alternatives such as zincplating, which may only last one to two years. Farmers have identified sun damage to plastic insulators and fittings

as another factor in pigtail standard failure. Strainrite responded by UV stabilising all plastic throughout its pigtail posts range. The move has been met with positive feedback. “The plastic out here corrodes in the sun and starts to fracture and short. Strainrite’s UV feature has been great. We’ve had the standards for a year now and all the plastic is still in great condition. I’d definitely recommend them,” says Given. “The UV stabiliser in the Strainrite pigtail standards is essential because their life is in the elements. Other standards become brittle and shatter over time,” Mulholland adds. Despite initial misgivings, Wooster experimented once with offshore man-

ufacturing for a line of products. However, the quality was so inconsistent that he resumed manufacturing in New Zealand. Wooster says that it was an important business lesson and confirmed what he had believed all along: he couldn’t control manufacturing overseas and could only be confident of high quality products if he kept manufacturing in-house. Recent overseas supply-chain issues have highlighted another advantage of manufacturing locally, Wooster says. He also believes that many Kiwi famers are proud to support practical, reliable, New Zealand-made products. Strainrite opened a new plant last year to keep up with customer demand.

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MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 29

Simple but effective! MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

SOMETIMES THE simplest solutions can deliver much better results. German cultivator, drill and sprayer manufacturer Horsch has developed two options of angled/tilted spray nozzle caps for use in band application and ridged crops. A grey nozzle offers a 17.5-degree angle for a 10cm tilt, while, a red nozzle with 8.75-degree

angle for a 5cm tilt. The company says by using a combination of straight and angled nozzle caps, operators can achieve a broad range of row width configurations. In band spraying application, a 25cm nozzle spacing, the angled nozzles allow the row width to be adapted by 5cm (red nozzles) or 10cm (grey nozzles). As an example, a row spacing of 45cm is possible in sugar beet. The combination of the main

(HD) and secondary (ND) nozzles with a 25cm spacing is also said to provide highly-effective wetting of ridged crops. Available this season, each cap is

equipped with an Agrotop RowFan 40-02 E nozzle – including seal and nozzle inserter. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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For your local dealer go to: jcbagriculture.co.nz *Standard CFS terms, conditions and fees apply. 2.99% finance requires minimum 30% deposit, monthly repayments in arrears over a 36 month term. GST back in month 3. Offer ends 30/06/2022 or while stocks last.


RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

30 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS / RURAL TRADER CONTROL FLYSTRIKE & LICE INCLUDES:

• Jetter unit • Pump & Hose kit • Delivery to nearest main centre

7680

$

+GST

SUPPLYING FARMERS SINCE 1962

CRAIGCO SENSOR JET • Robust construction • Auto shut gate • Total 20 jets • Lambs only 5 jets • Side jets for lice • Adjustable V panels • Davey Twin Impellor Pump • 6.5 or 9.0hp motors

SHEEP JETTERS SINCE 1992

GUARANTEED PERFORMANCE QUICK TO SETUP – EASY TO USE – JOB DONE

PH 06-835 6863 • MOB 021-061 1800 JETTER VIDEO: www.craigcojetters.com ®

BOOK SHIRE HAIR RAMS HARDY, LOW INPUT EASY CARE

• NO DAGGING • NO SHEARING • NO DIP, DRENCH OR CHEMICALS SINCE 1989 ®

Also Tufty (polled Highland) bulls, cows and calves available

Ph 03-225 5283 or 027-225 5283

www.organic-rams.co.nz • tim@organic-rams.co.nz

Hands no longer needed for headland turns A SOFTWARE update for Valtra tractors combines Auto U-Pilot headland management and Valtra Guide automated steering to help deliver automated headland turns. SmartTurn is the final piece of the puzzle that allows all field operations to be carried out without the driver touching the steering wheel. The technology is said to improve precision, save time, fuel and prevent soil compaction. Valtra notes that the system also enables the driver to focus on the quality of work and it improves safety and accuracy in dark, foggy and dusty conditions. Working with SmartTurn begins by defining the field boundary and headland from where the required turning radius is calibrated, according to the implement width and by turning the tractor sharply to the right and left. The operator then chooses between the U-turn and part-field automatic turning mode. The former sees the tractor make a small U-shaped turn on the headland into the adjacent undriven way line. In the case of the latter, LASER FF95

DIESEL HEATER

Due to Covid related delays, new stock will not be arriving until later in the year - order now to secure yours! ü Huge 9.5kW output. ü Diesel is approx. 30-50% less than “on demand” Electricity or Gas. ü DIY Install or we can arrange. ü No wood to cut, cart or store. ü No mess, N O indoor diesel odours. ü As easy to use as a light switch.

0800 379 247 www.avonheating.co.nz

Valtra’s SmartTurn software allows all field operations to be carried out without the driver touching the steering wheel.

a smaller headland is required, as the tractor turns back into the third, fourth or further way line. Available now for fifth generation N and T Series tractors, the software update will be available for fourth generation models and for other fifth generation models later this year, without the need for any mechanical modifications to tractors equipped with Valtra Guide. In other Valtra news, until now Valtra tractors have only been able to offer section control, working in conjunction with ISOBUS-compatible machines such as sprayers, to divide the working area into 24 or 36 sections. But now the company’s latest version increases this to as many

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as 96 sections. Meanwhile, its MultiBoom feature makes it possible to simultaneously control up to three different booms automatically. Valtra says this makes the system ideal for controlling the likes of ISOBUS-compatible seed drills, sprayers, fertiliser spreaders and row crop cultivators. The sections on the new version can also be controlled by separate feeders in one,

two or three consecutive rows. Alternatively, operators can automate control of one implement at front of the tractor and the other at the rear. Using a seed drill as an example, fertiliser can be spread in the first feed system, seed in the next and starter fertiliser or small seed in the third. “Depending on the implement, the seed and fertiliser hoppers are

EASIER ENTRY TO RTK ADOPTERS OF GPS technology over the last decade have been quick to realise the benefits and also that increased accuracy has the potential to unlock greater benefits. Unfortunately, many people’s journeys have hit a wall as a move to realtime kinematic positioning (RTK precision) means a sizeable investment in technology. Usually this involves getting new receivers or adding supplementary modules. However, that may be about to change given that John Deere’s new StarFire 7000 receiver provides an accuracy of +/-2.5cm, without having to invest in any extra hardware. It also comes with the bonus of better satellite network coverage. The 7000 unit comes with a new StarFire RTK correction signal that can be activated by purchasing a renewable licence. A pull-in time of fewer than 10 minutes, means that field work can start

up to three times faster than previously. Meanwhile, recorded field boundaries have a repeatability of at least five years. Like previous models, the new receiver offers the free SF1 correction signal as standard and this can be upgraded to radio and mobile RTK. The StarFire 7000 receives Galileo and Beidou satellite signals in addition to GPS and Glonass. Offered as standalone and integrated versions, compatible with new and existing machines, the latter is built directly into the roof of the machine from the factory. The handles on the sides of the universal receiver make it easier to move from machine to machine or implements. Aimed at deterring thieves, a PIN code set up makes the universal receiver less attractive for those with light fingers. Meanwhile, additional protection can be implemented with a mechanical lock.

RAINWEAR! flexible & dry BUFFALO BOOTS! 175% more crack resistant

FLEXISKIN MAX

BIB OVERALLS

$99

JACKET

$109

valued at $160

valued at $230

100% Waterproof Fleece Collar Hood Visor

Acid Resistant Durable Seams

FLEXISKIN MAX

Flexible

LEGGINGS

$88

valued at $140 PHONE

9am-5pm

0800 16 00 24

ONLINE

earthwalk.co.nz

often divided between two or more sections,” the company claims. “Section control 96 can command each of these sections and feeders with centimetre accuracy.” Operated from the touchscreen on the SmartTouch armrest, the interface is similar to the existing one. It requires the tractor to be equipped with auto guidance and ISOBUS implement control. Users of fourth and fifth generation Valtra tractors with section control 36 will have free access to the new features once their tractor software is updated at the next scheduled maintenance. Those using section control 24 can purchase an upgrade to the new version, which is available now for fifth generation Valtra tractors.

ZIP STRIP quick lacing

$20

175% more water & in stock now crack resistant

SLIP ON

LACE UP

$170

$165

STEEL TOE X (with Scuff Guard)

STEEL TOE X (with Scuff Guard)

valued at $280

valued at $320

STEEL TOE (without Scuff Guard)

PLAIN TOE (without Scuff Guard) Colour = Dark Brown Buffalo Leather Stitched On Soles 175% more crack resistant than normal leather

free shipping

PLAIN TOE (without Scuff Guard)

SIZES SELLING OUT FAST New Zealand owned & operated

sizes: BOOTS 5 - 13 (NZ)

RAINWEAR XS - 4XL


RURAL NEWS // MAY 10, 2022

RURAL TRADER 31 tunnel houses Grow vegetables all year round Very affordable and easy to install New Zealand designed and made 40 years producing tunnel houses Range of models sized from 2m - 10m

Free Range & Barn Eggs SUPPLIERS OF:

• Nest boxes - manual or automated • Feed & Drinking • Plastic egg trays

T T T T T

QUALITY PRODUCTS MADE IN EUROPE OR BY PPP

"Hassle-free travel for mature travellers’’ • 8 days, departs 7 April & 20 October. A special place for a safe and relaxing close-to-home all inclusive holiday.

A trusted name in Poultry Industry for over 50 years ❖

t/f

03 214 4262 |

e

info@morrifield.com

www.morrifield.com

Quadbar introduces the new

735

$

+GST

FLEXIBAR Flexibar includes all the safety and convenience features of the Quadbar with the added advantages of: • A flexible joint that allows the bar to flex rearwards in the event of contact with an overhead obstacle • The joint facilitates some sideways flexibility before locking and becoming more of a traditional crush protection device

Recommended by Worksafe. ACC subsidy available

• In the event of a rearwards flip there is negligible movement from the flexible joint • The top section of the Flexibar can also be easily removed for transportation inside a vehicle.

For a Quadbar, call me, Stuart Davidson, owner of Quadbar NZ. Phone: 021-182 8115 Email: sales@quadbar.co.nz or for more info go to www.quadbar.co.nz

BURGESS RUBBER UTE TRAY MAT

7 days, 10 May & 23 August. A leisurely South Pacific escape with great sightseeing, food & entertainment.

FLY OR LICE PROBLEMS?

9 days, depart 29 May. Join us for the 47th Gold Guitar Awards in Gore including sightseeing in Catlins, Dunedin and Invercargill.

The magic eye sheepjetter since 1989

Quality construction and options • Get the contractors choice Featuring...

• Incredible chemical economy • Amazing ease 1500+ per hour • Unique self adjusting sides • Environmentally and user friendly • Automatically activated • Proven effective on lice as well as fly • Compatible with all dip chemicals • Accurate, effective application

• 14 days, depart 15 December Auckland to Auckland. A close to home festive cruise. For full details

www.travelwiseholidays.co.nz

07 573 8512 | dipping@electrodip.co.nz – www.electrodip.com

Call for delivery options

NON SLIP - NO MORE CARGO MOVEMENT!

BEST QUALITY | BEST Price | BEST ADVICE BEST QUALITY | BEST Price | BEST ADVICE

BEST QUALITY | BEST Price | BEST ADVICE WATER TANKS, PUMPS & FILTRATION WATER TANKS, PUMPS & FILTRATION

WATER TANKS, PUMPS FILTRATION DEVAN CALPEDA • PURETEC • OASIS CLEARWATER DEVAN •• PROMAX PROMAX • •CALPEDA • PURETEC •& OASIS CLEARWATER www.burgessmatting.co.nz

Call us on 0800 80 85 70

DEVAN •TANKS, RX • CALPEDA • AQUA • OASIS CLEARWATER WATER PUMPS & FILTRATION

DEVAN • PROMAX • CALPEDA • •PURETEC • OASIS CLEARWATER P: 326 8888 www.thetankguy.co.nz P:0508 0508 326 8888 • www.thetankguy.co.nz A: A: 30 30 Turners RoadRoad – Feilding Turners – Feilding

P: 0508 326 8888 • www.thetankguy.co.nz A: 30 Turners Road – Feilding

FOOTWEAR LTD

FARM BOOTS KIWI MADE FOR 3 GENERATIONS

Visit www.lastrite.co.nz for more quality products

YARDMATE SOFT TOE This is designed for

heavy duty uses and is perfect for fencers, high country farmers and hunters walking through tough, rugged country. With an upper constructed from thick full grain leather, a leather insole and mid-sole, which is stitched and screwed to a cleated rubber repairable sole. A tough heel counter for better ankle support, this boot will handle the tough environment. Yardmate also available in Steel toe. Sizes 4-15 including half sizes.

GUSSET CASUAL BOOT For casual occasions in town and around home, the Gusset boot is a really comfortable and stylish option. A turned out, one piece full grain leather upper, with elastic side panels construction, ensures comfort and sleek appearance. Being fully leather lined with a leather in-sole adds to the comfort. The rough, flexible Navana fully repairable sole, ensures durability and the ability to handle the kids playing fields. Toe – Soft Toe Colour – Harley Tawny Sole – Navana Rubber/Replaceable sole

10 HALL ROAD, RD5, WHANGAREI Phone 09-436 2794 OR 027-436 2793

Control the Roll with TRAX LifeGuard ®

With increased stress on NZ farmers this year, farm accidents are more likely. If you operate a quad bike, consider installing a TRAX LifeGuard to protect what matters most – you and your family. ACC even has a cashback offer to help protect farming families. Contact your local Motorcycle dealer today.

0800 782 376 www.traxequipment.co.nz


Frost Friendly Valve! Full Flow Ball Full Flow Ball Valves The Hansen Full Flow Ball Valve’s reputation for holding up in frosty weather is quite simply unsurpassed! The extraordinarily high quality design coupled with a host of practical features makes it the ultimate user experience. What’s more it’s the only NZ made Ball Valve with a 100% replacement warranty.

True Full Flow Bore 25mm Ball Valve = 25mm Bore

High Pressure Rated Full Flow Bore 16bar (235psi)

Male/Female or Female Thread Options

Smooth Open/Close & Removable Handles

HAND TESTED Frost Friendly

www.hansenproducts.co.nz


NLY - GET I EO M

ICK! QU

LIMITED T I

N

MUST END Y 31ST MA

FARM BUILDINGS PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY RN-SHED-MAY22-NTH

NLY - GET I EO M

SALE MUS T END *Terms & Conditions Apply

31 STM AY!

FARM BUILDINGS PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY

ICK! QU

LIMITED T I

N

MUST END T Y 31S MA


NLY - GET I EO M

“Our first reaction when we won the shed for free was astonishment because we’ve never won anything bigger than a yoghurt maker before. It was last minute when we finally decided on what the shed specifications were, and we put in the order on the day that the prize draw entries finished. It was a great help to us in terms of cash flow at the time.”

ICK! QU

LIMITED T I

N

MUST END T Y 31S MA

Hugh & Sue Mingard - Christchurch

4 colour options to choose from:

Largest Range. Unlimited Options.

All Ned’s Sheds® feature: POLES: H5 treated shed poles TIMBER: Verified timber (SG8) IRON: Corrugated 0.4mm Zincalume or colour

FEATURES:

Roof, rearwall & 2 sidewalls, 1.0m overhang at the front and 70mm on the rearwall & sidewalls

NEW DESIGN!

B A R N S

&

S T A B L E S

ROOF ONLY

m

Bays: 2 x 3.6m Depth: 3.6m (1 x 3.6m) Height: 3.6 – 3.0m Consent Exempt Design

*VH/1.0

6,997

EA+GST

MAILER SPECIAL

$

COLOURSTEEL ADD $1,000

2 Bay, 6m Deep Shed For Only $7.5k!

Incl. Roller Door, PA Door, Spouting & Flashings

2 Bay Gable

5,397

$

EA+GST

MAILER SPECIAL

Bays: 2 x 3.6 Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 3.6 – 3.0m Consent Exempt Design

COLOURSTEEL ADD $800

PACKAGE DEAL!

m

MAILER SPECIAL

12,997

$

EA+GST

S H E D S ,

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

Consent Exempt Design *VH/1.0

Pioneer Red

NEW! Price now includes professional roller door installation.

2 Bay Lean-to

2 Bay Carport

Karaka

Ned’s Sheds® are all good for high wind zone, 0.6 kPa snow-load areas. This suits most of the North Island. If you need help and want to know which shed you need for your place, give the local Goldpine team a yell, they’ll be able to help you out with your shed requirements.

1 + 2 BAY SHEDS

Bays: 2 x 3.0 Depth: 4.0m (1 x 4.0m) Height: 2.8 – 2.4m

Grey Friars

“Sheds that do the trick”

Over 30 years of experience in farm buildings Two distinct brands available in the range Largest range of farm buildings in the market Hundreds of standard plans available Full custom design service

INCL. Spouting & flashings

Ironsand

COLOURSTEEL ADD $2,100

NEW! Price now includes professional roller door installation.

B A R N S

&

S T A B L E S

2 Bay Lean-to S H E D S ,

B A R N S

&

Bays: 2 x 4.5m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 4.2 – 3.6m

S T A B L E S

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

*VH/1.0

11,497

$

COLOURSTEEL ADD

$1,700

2 Bay Lean-to S H E D S ,

B A R N S

Jump on to www.goldpine.co.nz

&

S T A B L E S

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

Want to know more about Goldpine Farm Buildings? Give us a call on 0800 2 GOLDPINE

MAILER SPECIAL

7,500

$

Consent Exempt Design

COLOURSTEEL ADD $1,800

MAILER SPECIAL

Bays: 2 x 3.6m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 3.0 – 2.4m

COLOURSTEEL ADD

Bays: 2 x 3.6m Depth: 7.0m (2 x 3.5m) Height: 3.6 – 3.0m Consent Exempt Design

$1,200

MAILER SPECIAL

11,297

$ *VH/1.0

COLOURSTEEL ADD

$1,600

2 Bay Gable S H E D S ,

B A R N S

&

S T A B L E S

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

2 Bay Lean-to S H E D S ,

B A R N S

&

S T A B L E S

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

Bays: 2 x 4.5m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 3.6 – 3.0m Consent Exempt Design

Bays: 2 x 4.5m Depth: 9.0m (2 x 4.5m) Height: 3.9 – 3.0m Consent Exempt Design

MAILER SPECIAL

11,297

$

EA+GST

EA+GST

11,797

$

The Gissy

EA+GST

Consent Exempt Design

MAILER SPECIAL

COLOURSTEEL ADD $1,600

MAILER SPECIAL

14,397

$

EA+GST

S H E D S ,

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

Bays: 1 x 4.0 Depth: 7.0m (2 x 3.5m) Height: 3.6 – 3.0m

EA+GST

1 Bay Lean-to

PACKAGE DEAL!

m

EA+GST

INCL. Roller door, PA door, spouting & clearlight

COLOURSTEEL ADD $2,300

*WIN YOUR SHED FOR FREE TERMS AND CONDITIONS: Orders must be placed, with a non refundable deposit and a valid online entry completed by 5.30pm on 31st May 2022. Max. value of “WIN YOUR SHED FOR FREE” is $20,000 excl. GST. Draw will take place on 9th June 2022. All prices exclusive of GST and are from 2nd – 31st May 2022 only, while stocks last. Sheds are compliant to the 1170 building code requirements. Offer valid on these Standard Kitset Sheds only and for payments made via a Goldpine account. These shed offers are not available in conjunction with any other shed offer. Prices are for North Island stores only. Photographs are for illustrative purposes only. Recommended Retail Prices (RRPs) and savings vary between regions in the North Island.

NED ex sta

STR of a sta


y.

WALL OF FAME

Ange Childs

Graeme Fairless

Diane Edwards

Wayne Randle

Jim Hedley

Jerry Philip

Andy Dingfelder

Graham Cooke

Lisa Turner & Stu Wilson

Gene Bryant

Shed Winner 2008 Gore

Shed Winner 2009 Feilding

Shed Winner 2009 Invercargill

Shed Winner 2010 Christchurch

Shed Winner 2010 Masterton

Shed Winner 2010 Amberley

Shed Winner 2011 Hastings

Shed Winner 2011 Amberley

Shed Winner 2011 Wanganui

Shed Winner 2011 Richmond

Earl Woods

Stephen Rodgers

Gary Dennison

Mike Priebe

Aly Youngman

Beth & Ron Richardson

David Hayes

Lyn Andrew

Rebecca Boyd

Tony Brown

Shed Winner 2011 Cromwell

Shed Winner 2012 Timaru

Tim Waller

Shed Winner 2011 Waihi

Shed Winner 2012 Waihi

Shed Winner 2013 Culverden

Shed Winner 2013 Te Awamutu

Shed Winner 2013 Ashburton

Shed Winner 2013 Katikati

Shed Winner 2014 Invercargill

Shed Winner 2015 Mossburn

Shed Winner 2015 Morrinsville

?

Mark Lupton Shed Winner 2016 Putaruru

Benn Fanderlinden & Louise Mason Shed Winner 2016 Richmond

Ken McNeur

Bruce Berkahn

Dale Cooper

Michael Sims

Frank & Jan McIsaac

Aaron Begg

Hugh & Sue Mingard

Shed Winner 2017 Havelock North

Shed Winner 2017 Bulls

Shed Winner 2018 Waimiha

Shed Winner Feb 2019 Greymouth

Shed Winner Sep 2019 Putaruru

Shed Winner Feb 2020 Tapawera

Shed Winners Feb 2021 Christchurch

30 1!

This could be YOU!

You could be #3

Shed Winner May 2022

We could build our Strongbuilt® Sheds lighter, but we don’t and won’t. That’s why Strongbuilt® Sheds are...

PLUS FREE FREIGHT Easy to build yourself

Engineered with strength for NZ conditions

3 BAY SHEDS

Built to last the distance & protect your possessions

A timber frame that takes the knocks

Designed to meet your needs

is included in all Strongbuilt® Shed prices shown within a 30km radius of any Goldpine Store.

3 Bay, 6m Deep Shed For Under $10k!

NEW! Price now includes professional roller door installation.

&

S T A B L E S

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

MAILER SPECIAL

16,697

$

Consent Exempt Design

*VH/1.0

Bays: 3 x 3.6m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 3.0 – 2.4m Consent Exempt Design

MAILER SPECIAL

9,900

$

COLOURSTEEL ADD $1,600

3 Bay Gable

&

S T A B L E S

12,697

Consent Exempt Design

S T A B L E S

NEW DESIGN!

Incl. 2 x Roller Doors, PA Door, Spouting & Flashings

Bays: 3 x 3.6 Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 3.0 – 2.4m

Bays: 3 x 3.6m Depth: 7.0m (2 x 3.5m) Height: 3.7 – 3.0m Consent Exempt Design

MAILER SPECIAL

11,900

$

Consent Exempt Design

*VH/1.0

15,797

COLOURSTEEL ADD $2,100

COLOURSTEEL ADD $2,000

PACKAGE DEAL!

m

MAILER SPECIAL

16,497

$

EA+GST

Consent Exempt Design *VH/1.0

The Taupo

MAILER SPECIAL

$

NEW DESIGN!

COLOURSTEEL ADD $1,800

NEW! Price now includes professional roller door installation.

3 Bay Lean-to

&

EA+GST

MAILER SPECIAL

$

B A R N S

Bays: 3 x 3.6m Depth: 7.0m (2 x 3.5m) Height: 3.6 – 3.0m

EA+GST

B A R N S

S H E D S ,

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

COLOURSTEEL ADD $2,400

NED’S SHEDS® TERMS & CONDITIONS: $500 deposit is required. Freight is not included, prices are ex nearest Goldpine store. Prices based on high wind zone, 0.6 kPa snow loading (*unless otherwise stated) and 300 kPa soil loading. Neds’ Sheds® come in easy to construct kitset form. STRONGBUILT® TERMS & CONDITIONS: 10% deposit is required. Freight included is within a 30km radius of any Goldpine store. Prices based on high wind zone, 0.75 kPa snow loading (*unless otherwise stated) and 300 kPa soil loading. STRONGBUILT® Sheds come in easy to construct kitset form.

3 Bay Gable S H E D S ,

B A R N S

&

S T A B L E S

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

Bays: 3 x 4.5m Depth: 9.0m (2 x 4.5m) Height: 4.2 – 3.6m

MAILER SPECIAL

21,197

$

EA+GST

S H E D S ,

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

Bays: 3 x 4.0m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 3.6 – 3.0m

EA+GST

COLOURSTEEL ADD $2,500

The Taranaki

3 Bay Lean-to

12,900

COLOURSTEEL ADD $2,000

EA+GST

B A R N S

Bays: 3 x 3.6m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.6m) Height: 3.6 – 3.0m

$

EA+GST

S H E D S ,

Consent Exempt Design

MAILER SPECIAL

EA+GST

3 Bay Lean-to

PACKAGE DEAL!

Bays: 3 x 4.2m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 4.0 – 3.4m

COLOURSTEEL ADD $3,200

Ned’s Sheds® and Strongbuilt® prices include plans, PS1, H5 treated poles, SG8 verified timber (rafters, purlins and girts), cladding as specified and all fixings required. Roller doors include professional installation. Spouting, clearlight, flashings and gates etc are at extra cost unless stated. Photographs are for illustrative purposes only. Sheds come in easy to construct kitset form.

3 Bay Lean-to

Bays: 3 x 4.5m Depth: 8.0m (2 x 4.0m) Height: 3.8 – 3.0m Consent Exempt Design *VH/1.0

FARM BUILDINGS PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY

MAILER SPECIAL

18,197

$

EA+GST

Incl. Roller Door, PA Door, Internal Wall

The Coromandel

COLOURSTEEL ADD $2,500


NLY - GET I EO M

4 BAY SHEDS

NEW! Price now includes professional roller door installation.

16,300

$

Consent Exempt Design

NEW DESIGN!

S H E D S ,

B A R N S

&

S T A B L E S

S H E D S ,

B A R N S

&

Bays: 4 x 4.5 Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 3.6 – 3.0m

MAILER SPECIAL

22,297

$

Consent Exempt Design

S T A B L E S

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

COLOURSTEEL ADD $3,300

EA+GST

17,297

$

COLOURSTEEL ADD $2,400

Consent Exempt Design

4 Bay Lean-to

Bays: 4 x 4.5m Depth: 8.0m (2 x 4.0m) Height: 3.8 – 3.0m

COLOURSTEEL ADD $2,700

MAILER SPECIAL

*VH/1.0

LIFESTYLE BARNS

22,697

$

COLOURSTEEL ADD $3,100

The Ruapehu

Bays: 4 x 3.6m Depth: 7.0m (2 x 3.5m) Height: 3.7 – 3.0m

MAILER SPECIAL

14,900

$

Consent Exempt Design

NEW! Price now includes professional roller door installation.

NEW! Price now includes professional roller door installation.

EA+GST

18,797

$

EA+GST

MAILER SPECIAL

EA+GST

Bays: 4 x 4.5m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 3.6 – 3.0m

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

4 Bay Lean-to

COLOURSTEEL ADD $2,600

PACKAGE DEAL!

m

MAILER SPECIAL

Consent Exempt Design *VH/1.0

4 Bay Gable

Incl. Roller Door, PA Door, Internal Wall

MAILER SPECIAL

EA+GST

Bays: 4 x 4.2m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 4.0 – 3.4m

EA+GST

The Bay of Islands

Bays: 4 x 3.6m Depth: 7.0m (2 x 3.5m) Height: 3.6 – 3.0m

FARM BUILDINGS PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY

FARM BUILDINGS PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY

Largest Range. Unlimited Options.

4 Bay Lean-to

ICK! QU

LIMITED T I

N

MUST END Y 31ST MA

COLOURSTEEL ADD $2,400

Friesian Lifestyle Barn Bays: 3 x 4.0m Depth: 12.0m (2 x 6.0m) Height: 3.0 - 4.6 - 3.0m

S H E D S ,

B A R N S

&

Bays: 3 x 4.0 Depth: 8.0m (2 x 4.0m) Height: 3.0 - 4.6 - 3.0m

MAILER SPECIAL

S T A B L E S

29,797

$

INCL. PA door, flashings, spouting, 3 x roller doors

COLOURSTEEL ADD $5,100

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

39,997

$

MAILER SPECIAL EA+GST

Angus Lifestyle Barn

PACKAGE DEAL!

m

PACKAGE DEAL!

COLOURSTEEL ADD $6,300

KEEP THINGS ROLLING PROFESSIONAL ROLLER DOOR INSTALLATION NOW INCLUDED

To make it easier for everyone involved, we have shifted to a new process to have roller door installations handled by specialists. This move alleviates the risk of damage and provides a professionally installed roller door, adding the perfect finishing touch to any farm building.

Goldpine Stores Give us a call on 0800 2 GOLDPINE Jump on to www.goldpine.co.nz

WAIHI 2 Dean Crescent Ph: (07) 863 9167

MORRINSVILLE 4 Marshall St Ph: (07) 889 5553

TE AWAMUTU 520 Ohaupo Rd Ph: (07) 870 5158

PUTARURU 100 Taupo St Ph: (07) 883 8334

OTOROHANGA 1 Phillips Ave Ph: (07) 873 8183

STRATFORD Cnr Monmouth & SH3 Ph: (06) 765 4256

HASTINGS 1412 Omahu Rd Ph: (06) 879 5580

DANNEVIRKE Cnr SH2 & Laws Rd Ph: (06) 374 4101

FEILDING 39 Kawakawa Rd Ph: (06) 323 2718

MASTERTON 89 Ngaumutawa Rd Ph: (06) 377 7425

EA+GST

INCL. PA door, flashings, spouting, 3 x roller doors

FARM BUILDINGS PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY