__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

MANAGEMENT

ANIMAL HEALTH PAGE 35 NO INTEREST NO BRAINER

Overseer helps with FEP.

Less work, better results.

PAGE 31

1/3 1/3 1/3

Buy a KingQuad now, put it to work straight away, pay it off in 2023, all at 0% interest. Pay 1/3 up front, 1/3 next year and 1/3 in two years’ time. The KingQuad will get through a ton of work in that time, plus it’ll be under warranty the whole way. Too easy.

Turn to page 1

SUZUKI.CO.NZ

Price excludes GST. Finance offer based on new Suzuki KingQuad ATV from 20 January – 30 April 2021, or while stocks last. The offer is based on 0% interest rate over 24 months and an up-front payment of one third of the MRP, $300 documentation fee and $10.35 PPSR; a further payment of one third to be paid in 12 months; and a final payment of one third in 24 months. Normal UDC lending and credit criteria apply. Offer not available in conjunction with any other promotion.

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS MARCH 9, 2021: ISSUE 721 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

CAM-RN-MAR21-NTH

CHECK OUT THE GOLDPINE MAILER FOR MORE GREAT DEALS! www.goldpine.co.nz

THIS MONTH: We check out some great solutions to your projects & as always we have some great deals on exclusive products.


SUPERPOSTS®, RHINOS®, POSTS & STRAINERS

SAVE 16% 1.8m x 100mm Rounded Superpost®

PRODUCED FROM FURTHER DOWN THE TREE, MEANS THE ROUNDED SUPERPOST® IS STRONGER THAN AN EQUIVALENT ROUND

Pointed ALL SU

guaraPEnRPOSTS teed

“You B reak

GREAT PRODUCT. USE THEM WHENEVER I CAN.

THE UNIQUE SHAPE OF THE ROUNDED SUPERPOST® IS A TRADEMARK OF GOLDPINE

‘Em, W e Repla

ce ’Em”

PRODUCED FROM HIGH DENSITY, MATURE TREES WHICH GIVES THE ROUNDED SUPERPOST® ITS HIGH STRENGTH

RRP $10.15

8

$ 47 EA+GST

“That 125mm Rounded Superpost is a great product and I use them whenever I can. For the thousands I have driven over the years I have only had a few break; I have tried some other posts but they just haven’t performed as well.”

THE ROUNDED SUPERPOST® HAS A 50 YEAR TREATMENT GUARANTEE AND A “YOU BREAK ‘EM, WE’LL REPLACE ‘EM” GUARANTEE - THAT’S GREAT VALUE! THE SMOOTH CURVED FINISH MEANS THE ROUNDED SUPERPOST® LOOKS LIKE A ROUND, IS EASY TO HANDLE AND GIVES 360° ATTACHMENT OPTIONS

Glenn Blackmore Blackmore Fencing

SAVE 23%

FLAT FACE & SMOOTH FINISH.

1.8m RHINO® Xtreme

“The flat face of the Rhino and the smooth finish of the rails made putting the fence up easy and the finished fence line looks great.”

Unpointed

PRODUCED FROM FURTHER DOWN THE TREE, MEANS THE RHINO® IS STRONGER THAN AN EQUIVALENT ROUND

BIGGER .1 NO THAN A D N ROU

Mark Lupton

RRP $19.85

1527

$

Putaruru

ONLY THE GENUINE RHINO® HAS A 50 YEAR TREATMENT GUARANTEE - THAT’S GREAT VALUE!

PRODUCED FROM HIGH DENSITY, MATURE TREES WHICH GIVES THE RHINO® ITS HIGH STRENGTH

BEING SMOOTH MEANS THE RHINO® LOOKS LIKE A ROUND, IS EASY TO HANDLE AND GIVES 360° ATTACHMENT OPTIONS

EA+GST

SAVE 23%

SAVE 19%

SAVE 17%

SAVE 21%

1.8m x 90mm Superpost®

1.8m No.1 Quarter

2.7m x 175mm Strainer

Unpointed

Unpointed

Pointed

2.4m x 175mm Strainer Pointed

ALL SU

guaraPERnPOSTS teed

“You Br ea

THE UNIQUE SHAPE OF THE RHINO® IS A TRADEMARK OF GOLDPINE

k ‘Em, W e Repla

ce ’Em”

RRP $6.55

5

RRP $10.35

8

$ 27

36

$ 57

EA+GST

$

97

$

EA+GST

RRP $41.35

3177

RRP $47.15

EA+GST

EA+GST

OUTDOOR TIMBER LIMITED STOCK

EXCLUSIVE TO GOLDPINE

TR ADE TIMBER

DECKING TIMBER

Strength Tested, Strength Guaranteed Strength verified A match for any stock H3.2 treated

6.0m lengths only

6

90mm x 45mm Rougher Headed - Smooth Edges H3.2 Treated 6.0m lengths only

FENCE RAILS

A GREAT OPTION FOR: • FENCE RAILS • HAND RAILS • DECKING TIMBER

$ 67

/M+GST

LIMITED STOCK

2.4m x 550mm x 18mm Plywood H3.2

DURAPLY

® PROUDLY

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

All prices, both RRP and promotional, are exclusive of GST and are for 1-31 March 2021 only and whilst stocks last. Photographs are for illustrative purposes only.

$

ONLY

35

EA+GST

NARROW SHEET SPECIAL

Perfect for: • Shed lining • Shelving • Work bench tops • Trailers

ONLY

3

$ 95 /M+GST

GREAT TO WORK WITH. QUALITY PRODUCT.

EXCLUSIVE TO GOLDPINE

T RADE PLY

WHILE STOCKS LASTS! GET IN QUICK!

WHEN DURABILITY & SIZE MATTERS Suitable for: • Retaining walls • Heavy duty farm rails • Raised gardens • Garden edging

H4 Treated 4.8m lengths only

8

$ 57

/M+GST

Give us a call on 0800 2 GOLDPINE

“The boys at Goldpine suggested Big Boy Timber for our retaining wall. With lengths at 6.0m long it was fast, easy to build and it’s really strong. Very happy with my choice of Big Boy Timber!”

Mark Lane Nelson

Jump on to www.goldpine.co.nz

R r R


MANAGEMENT

ANIMAL HEALTH

NEWS

Overseer helps with FEP.

Less work, better results.

Wool-only strategy paying off PAGE 21

PAGE 31

PAGE 35

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS MARCH 9, 2021: ISSUE 721 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Board grilling! DAVID ANDERSON

BEEF+LAMB NZ directors can expect a grilling at its annual meeting in Invercargill on March 17 over their decision to award themselves a hefty pay rise. Sheep and beef farmers around the

country have been left flabbergasted about the process and appropriateness of a board resolution, to be presented at the meeting, asking for a substantial increase in director fees for both the Meat Board and Beef+Lamb NZ (BLNZ).

Levypayers are also questioning why BLNZ chair Andrew Morrison summarily disestablished the Directors Independent Remuneration Committee (DIRC) late last year. The DIRC was set up in 2016, by previous BLNZ chair James Parsons, as

an independent body to recommend any changes in director remuneration. This was seen as a sound move and in line with how many other farmerowned organisations operate – including Dairy NZ and Fonterra. TO PAGE 3

Zooming in on Covid A small group of chief executives from key government agencies responsible for matters pertaining to the border called the ‘border executive’ includes the CEO’s of MPI, Customs, MFAT, MBIE, NZTE and Transport. The role of this group is to ensure that there is good coordination around border-related issues. Pictured is MPI director general Ray Smith, Ashley Bloomfield and Christine Stevenson, CEO Customs, prepare for a meeting of the ‘Border Executive’ at MPI’s HQ in Wellington. See more on MPI’s Covid management page 5.

$8 ON THE CARDS? SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

AN $8-PLUS milk price for Fonterra farmers this season could be on the cards. Last week’s impressive Global Dairy Trade (GDT) auction results are raising prospects of Fonterra’s milk price passing $8/kgMS for only the second time ever. In 201314, Fonterra suppliers received a milk price of $8.40/kgMS. Westpac senior agri economist Nathan Penny believes there is “a chance” of an $8 milk price. Penny says Fonterra farmers who follow the GDT auctions closely will be expecting a lift in the co-operative’s forecast milk price. “Whole milk powder prices have risen by nearly 30% since Fonterra last updated the milk price forecast,” Penny told Rural News. Fonterra last month lifted its forecast farmgate milk price range to $6.90 – $7.50/kgMS. Westpac has lifted its forecast milk payout to $7.90/kgMS. Waikato farmer Andrew McGiven says the 21% lift in WMP prices in the latest GDT auction will give Fonterra’s board confidence to lift the milk price range. He says the GDT result was a huge surprise and “must certainly be due to demand outstripping supply for our products”. “I guess this result will give the TO PAGE 3

NO INTEREST NO BRAINER 1/3 1/3 1/3

Buy a KingQuad now, put it to work straight away, pay it off in 2023, all at 0% interest. Pay 1/3 up front, 1/3 next year and 1/3 in two years’ time. The KingQuad will get through a ton of work in that time, plus it’ll be under warranty the whole way. Too easy.

SUZUKI.CO.NZ

Price excludes GST. Finance offer based on new Suzuki KingQuad ATV from 20 January – 30 April 2021, or while stocks last. The offer is based on 0% interest rate over 24 months and an up-front payment of one third of the MRP, $300 documentation fee and $10.35 PPSR; a further payment of one third to be paid in 12 months; and a final payment of one third in 24 months. Normal UDC lending and credit criteria apply. Offer not available in conjunction with any other promotion.


k iwi ow

ed

pr

100%

y all

DEUTZ-FAHR 6G SERIES

o w ne

d a neD r nd ope

4

at

Farming for future generations

ly oud loc

YEAR DEUTZ CARE

WARRANTY

4000 HOURS*

ON 6G SERIES TRACTORS

More speeds means more power. • Five models with power outputs from 135 to 205 HP • Stage 3A Six cylinder DeutzAG engine. No Ad-Blue. • Heavy duty high-performance drive-line • 5 Range, 6-speed Powershift transmissions • Up to 125 L/min of hydraulic flow • Spacious suspended cabin • Optional 50km and front suspension

Fully automated transmission with three driver modes.

See why New Zealand medium to large farms are enjoying this as their tractor of choice for the tough jobs, from loading to carting and machinery work.

Deutz Fahr NZ

Detached bonnet reduces noise and vibration

Tier three electronic engine

ll range o

f

T

ASK ABOU

a fu

Full suspension for driver comfort

FI

NA

MODELS FOR GRASS, STUBBLE AND PRUNINGS

on

s

S L A E D R U O N C E o p ti

maschio nz

MASCHIO MULCHERS RANGE • High rotor speeds / low vibration • 15-200 horsepower, 1m - 6.2m working widths • Models suitable for grass, straw, stubble and prunings • Long life bearings

• The Tigre model can mulch prunings up to 12cm in diameter • Toothed transmission drive belts • Counter blades for producing finer mulching of coarse materials

Power Farming NZ WHANGAREI

09 438 9163 MASTERTON

PF96814RN

06 370 8240

PUKEKOHE

0800 570 571 NELSON

03 544 5723

TAURANGA

TE AWAMUTU

MORRINSVILLE

BLENHEIM

GREYMOUTH

CHRISTCHURCH

07 543 0021 03 577 5508

07 870 2411

03 768 4370

07 889 5059

03 349 5975

ROTORUA

07 349 6528 ASHBURTON

03 307 7153

GISBORNE

06 868 8908 TIMARU

03 687 4127

Terms and conditions apply. Warranty offer ends 30/4/2021. Warranty has two years comprehensive warranty and four years power-train warranty. Offer valid on Deutz-Fahr 6G Series tractors.

HAWERA

0800 480 309 DUNEDIN

03 489 3489

HASTINGS

FEILDING

06 879 9998

06 323 8182

GORE

INVERCARGILL

03 208 9395

03 215 9039


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

NEWS 3

An $8-plus payout this year?

ISSUE 721

www.ruralnews.co.nz

FROM PAGE 1

NEWS��������������������������������������1-21 AGRIBUSINESS���������������22-23 MARKETS������������������������� 24-25 HOUND, EDNA���������������������� 26 CONTACTS����������������������������� 26 OPINION��������������������������� 26-29 MANAGEMENT�������������� 30-32 ANIMAL HEALTH������������33-35 MACHINERY AND PRODUCTS���������������������� 36-38 RURAL TRADER������������� 38-39

Fonterra board some confidence if they do look at milk price upsides for this season, and may even allow them to extend the range higher into the sevens. Your guess is as good as mine on this one.” BNZ senior economist Doug Steel agrees that there is “significant upward pressure” on Fonterra’s forecast range mid-point of $7.20/kgMS and the bank’s forecast of $7.40/kgMS. However, it’s hard to predict an $8-plus milk price. The effect of foreign exchange on the second half of the season and the amount of product forward sold by Fonterra need to be taken into account. Steel says BNZ’s modelling shows that last week’s GDT result would translate into a $9.09/kgMS payout. “Now, that will be our forecast payout if we sell all our milk at today’s price…how much milk from this season have we sold and how much is left to

sell, we don’t know.” Steel says clearly a 21% jump in WMP prices would mean a lift in the price. All eyes would now be on Fonterra as it announces the co-op’s half-year results next week. Fonterra chief executive Miles Hurrell says the co-op is assessing the situation, running the numbers on its forecast farmgate milk price and talking to sales teams on the ground to gauge future demand. “While GDT results are one key input to the farmgate milk price, there are many other factors we need to consider – including, how far we are through the season, our sales book, foreign exchange and any ongoing impacts from Covid-19.” Fonterra attributed last week’s extraordinary GDT results to continuing strong demand from China and South East Asia, and a reliable supply chain that had earned the trust of buyers around the globe.

Fonterra chief executive Miles Hurrell says the co-op is running the numbers on its forecast farmgate milk price.

Hard questions for BLNZ board

HEAD OFFICE Top Floor, 29 Northcroft Street, Takapuna, Auckland 0622 Phone: 09-307 0399 Fax: 09-307 0122

FROM PAGE 1

However, Rural News understand that the three members of the DIRC – David Nelson, Derrick Milton and Bruce Wills – were informed of the committee’s disestablishment by Morrison at a primary sector event last November. They were given no prior warning of the DIRC’s dissolution. One concerned levypayer says he was “very disappointed” with Morrison’s reasoning for dismissing the DIRC, when he contacted the BLNZ chair about it. “I really feel it is poor process,” the farmer says. “If they (the board) had serious concerns about the DIRC

POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 Published by: Rural News Group Printed by: Inkwise NZ Ltd CONTACTS Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz ABC audited circulation 79,553 as at 31.03.2019

they should have had some sort of review, but to just sack them is like a dictatorship.” Other farmers are also angry to see the removal of the DIRC, which now sees the BLNZ board deciding for themselves about how much they are to be paid. Rural News has also discovered that well before the DIRC was disestablished in November, Christchurchbased management consultants Mitchell Notley and Associates (MNA) were hired by the BLNZ board to prepare a report on director renumeration. The MNA report, presented to the board in June 2020, suggested a

substantial increase in Meat Board director fees and also a lift in BLNZ director payments. This has now gone forward in the board’s resolution to the annual meeting to substantially increase director payments. All current BLNZ directors sit on both the Meat Board and BLNZ boards, while Andrew Morrison chairs both bodies. In its controversial resolution, the board is proposing a 38% ($10,950) increase in the Meat Board chair’s annual remuneration and a 23% ($3,700) increase in all the other directors’ fees. In addition, it also proposes a 2% ($1,200) increase in the BLNZ chair’s annual remuneration and a 7% ($2,320) increase in all

IT’S ABOUT TIME SOMEONE STARTED THINKING LIKE A FARMER. You have enough to do without worrying about the perfect drench programme. To help, we went back to basics to create the Turbo® 3-stage parasite control programme for growing cattle. With four world-first products that combine the most effective ingredients for higher potency, better safety and coverage of key parasites at the right times – including resistant strains. It’s innovative, reliable and available exclusively through leading veterinary practices nationwide.

TURBO® CATTLE DRENCH PROGRAMME

STAGE 1

First oral drench treatment for weaned calves. Protect against worm parasites and bridge the gap between removal of coccidiostat meal and natural coccidiosis immunity.

TURBO® Initial Oral Drench

STAGE 2 PROUDLY

NZ

OWNED

Available exclusively through veterinary practices nationwide. Visit www.alleva.co.nz for more information. TURBO® is a registered trademark of Alleva Animal Health Ltd. TURBO Pour-on (A011722), TURBO Injection (A011742), TURBO Initial (A011703) and TURBO Advance (A011714) are registered pursuant to the ACVM Act 1997. See www.foodsafety.govt.nz for registration conditions.

TURBO® Advance Oral Drench

STAGE 3 TURBO® Pour On or Injection

Routine treatment of growing cattle that can be drenched orally. Can be used in cattle under 120kg.

Routine treatment for growing cattle that are too big to be drenched orally. Rain resistant pour-on and injectable options with the added benefit of lice control.

the other directors pay. Currently, the combined annual director fees for a Meat Board and Beef and Lamb director is $50,300, while chairman Andrew Morrison earns $99,050. If the resolution passes, a director’s annual pay will jump to $54,680 and the chairman’s to $112,800 a year. Meanwhile, on the board of DairyNZ – which is a much bigger organisation than BLNZ in both revenue and number of employees – directors currently earn $45,500 a year and chairman Jim van der Poel is paid $93,000. Board chair defends moves pages 8-9


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

4 NEWS

Is wool sector sustainable? JESSICA MARSHALL jessica@ruralnews.co.nz

NEW ZEALAND’S wool industry might not be sustainable, says the chairman of Campaign for Wool NZ. Tom O’Sullivan says 2020 was the first time

in three generations of his family farm that it had cost more to shear his sheep than he earned from the price of wool on the market. “That’s totally not sustainable,” O’Sullivan told Rural News. “Globally, consum-

ers have been obsessed or romanced by synthetic fibres.” He says that while fine wools like Merino do well on the market because they can be used for clothing, it only makes up 10% of New Zealand wool products.

Central Districts Field Days Site #AG34

Teach me how to trim properly and I can minimise lameness

A further 80% of New Zealand wool is strong wool, used mainly for carpets and rugs. Data from Stats NZ reveals that total wool exports fell 30.2% to $367 million in the year to January 2021. The data suggests that New Zealand earned more from live animal exports than from wool clip. O’Sullivan is concerned that it will reach a point where farmers are only shearing sheep for animal health purposes. He says that farmers are now moving away from farming the Romney and Perendale breeds that produce strong wool and are purchasing Wiltshires instead. “In my personal opinion, the New Zealand wool industry has very

Tom O’Sullivan says in 2020 it him cost more to shear his sheep than he earned from wool.

much rested on its laurels,” he says, pointing to the lack of movement in the research and development space. The global Campaign for Wool was founded by the Prince of Wales in 2008 in reaction to the rise of synthetic fibres. In 2011, the New Zealand arm of the Campaign was launched with the aim of educating Kiwis and creating awareness about wool.

FARMER FINED FOR BOVIS BREACH PETER BURKE

Hoof trimming is a learnt skill and takes time to perfect. Our one-day on-farm lameness management & practical workshops from $295+GST pp provide, on-going practical supported learning trimmers need to develop & master their technique. Improve herd health by investing in your people, it not only makes financial sense - it’s farming best practice. Visit dhi.ac.nz for our national training program and event details. Meets criteria for milk companies best farm practice programs.

Raising the standard of hoof care.

Call us on 03 662 8015 Or visit dhi.ac.nz

The Campaign has moved towards supporting specific companies in New Zealand, something they were previously hesitant to do. Its website now features a list of companies, including Bremworth (formerly Cavalier Bremworth), which use New Zealand wool in their products. “We have to get people to buy more wool and consumers need to know what products to

buy,” O’Sullivan says. He adds that the pandemic has been “a problem like it is for everyone”. With lockdowns and alert level changes cancelling events, some marketing has had to be put on hold. O’Sullivan says the effects on exports is not as bad as it is for other sectors because wool does not have an expiry date the way that consumable products like milk and meat do. “Over time, two years or so, the quality will decline slightly, however, supply chain issues have had an impact,” he says. In the meantime, it’s a case of building up consumer demand in order to ensure the sector’s survival.

peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

FAILURE TO follow directives not to move stock because of the Mycoplasma bovis threat and breaking NAIT rules has landed a South Canterbury farmer with a $21,000 fine. Daniel Bernard Thomas appeared for sentencing in the Timaru District Court last week on four charges under the Biosecurity Act and one charge under the National Animal Identification and Tracing Act 2012. At the time of the offending in 2019, Thomas’ Omarama farm was subject to a Notice of Direction (NOD) which prohibits cattle moving from his farm without approval by the Ministry for Primary Industries. An MPI investigation found

WILSON www.wilsonplastics.co.nz

WT 200

that in April 2019, Thomas sold and allowed the transportation of 153 yearling bulls to a farm in Pahiatua. Then in May, he transported another 32 cattle to a sale yard, again without the required permission from MPI. The livestock agent, who did not know the animals were under a NOD, sold 26 of these animals to three clients and one buyer then on-sold some of the animals to two other farm owners. Finally, in June (2019), Thomas transported 44 cattle to a meat processing plant and failed to disclose whether his animals were under MPI surveillance or movement control under the NAIT rules. MPI’s manager of compliance investigations, Gerry Anderson, says Thomas fell short of his obligations.

“It’s vital that all people in charge of cattle or deer follow these important rules. Our ability to track and trace animals is a critical factor in managing biosecurity threats such as Mycoplasma bovis,” he says. “Biosecurity outbreaks have the potential to devastate the agricultural industry. We all need to do our part to prevent that or we all lose.” Anderson says people who break the rules should know that MPI takes this offending very seriously. In sentencing, Judge Mill took into account Thomas’s early guilty plea, his participation in a restorative justice conference with the victims and his previous good character.   @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

BREAK-FEEDING...

200 litres specially designed for break-feeding. They can be towed when full and also can reel in metres of alkathene.

RDT 200 WT 75

PORTABLE TROUGHS...

AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL FARM OR IRRIGATION STOCKIST

PHONE

06 357 8562


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

NEWS 5

Managing Covid issues top of the list for MPI PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

DEALING WITH the outfall from Covid-19 is one of the top priorities in the coming year for Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) boss Ray Smith. He told Rural News that getting his front line staff vaccinated is essential so that they and other staff can support farmers and industry through the “inevitable” future outbreaks of the virus. “I don’t underestimate the Covid issue and we can’t afford to have our industries closed down or not meet trading expectations,” he told Rural News.

MPI director general Ray Smith says getting his front line staff vaccinated is essential so that they and other staff can support farmers and industry.

Smith says he’s full of praise for the way the agricultural sector has coped with Covid during the past year. “They have been awesome. We have taken our ag sector community through three lockdowns of different forms and our export revenues will be similar to last year,” he says. “Volume is good, but the exchange rate may peel a bit off the final result.” Smith says MPI staff have performed exceptionally well and stuck to the rules and not one of them has become infected with the virus. For his part, Smith is a member of a small group of chief executives from

key government agencies responsible for matters pertaining to the border. The group called the ‘border executive’ includes the CEO’s of Customs, MFAT, MBIE, NZTE and Transport. Smith says the role of this group is to ensure that there is good coordination around borderrelated issues. Smith says another interesting aside to the Covid crisis is that a number of MPI’s leading epidemiologists who were working on the M. bovis outbreak have been working with colleagues from the Ministry of Health on Covid. He says this highlights the transferable nature of their skills.

MPI LOST TOUCH MPI BOSS Ray Smith says with the advent of the climate change proposals and the new essential fresh water regulations, MPI is gearing itself up to help farmers deal with these matters by getting more staff out into the field. He believes that climate change is the biggest challenge of this generation. “When I first started it was obvious to me that MPI had lost its outreach and in a sense it had lost some key relationships,” Smith told Rural News. “So we have built an agricultural investment service that has started to put that back and we have more people now based regionally. They have tended to deal with adverse events and things like that, which is good. But I am keen to build that service even further so we can stand alongside farmers and be an independent voice.” He says the aim is get back some of what was lost many years ago with the demise of the Farm Advisory officers. Smith believes that most farmers want to make the right decisions but are sometimes stymied because they don’t know where to turn for the best independent advice. He says MPI has a role to play in this area and consequently plans to expand its advisory service. He says there

is a need for more qualified people to point farmers in the right direction on environmental issues. “I think Fonterra is doing quite an exceptional job on this,” Smith told Rural News. “Nobody is perfect, but I think they have really stepped forward and they have put a big investment into this. They are not the only ones, but I have been quite impressed with the plans I have seen. For example, I was out on a farm in the Wairarapa recently where the farmer had his farm plan and [was] trying to follow it, which I think that is great.” But Smith concedes that there still needs to be better integration and collaboration across the wider agri sector. For example, MPI is now working much closer with regional and local government to the benefit of both parties. He’s hopeful that integrated farm plans will bring industry groups together and that there will much improved data sharing. Smith sees MPI as a facilitator of outcomes in the agri sector – bringing groups together and creating partnerships that agree on key strategic objectives and collectively deliver on these for the benefit of individual industries and NZ as a whole.

HOW DO WE DEFINE A

True Triple WITH A WINNING HAND

Recent advertising by Alleva Animal Health, titled “How do you define a true triple?” suggests the actives in a combination sheep drench should work as well together, as they would if you had time to administer them individually, to be a “true triple”. Alleva also claims older triple drenches never had to prove they meet that standard. We may have “older” triple drenches, but most farmers know with age comes wisdom. When MATRIX® HI-MINERAL was registered in NZ in 2005, the regulator was provided with studies that showed all 3 of the main actives were individually

RURAL ONLINE READING THE PAPER ONLINE HAS NEVER BEEN EASIER.

Go to www.ruralnewsgroup.co.nz

MATRIX® HI-MINERAL and the MATRIX® family of products

remain the most popular triple active mineralised oral

drenches for sheep in the NZ market today. FACT.

MATRIX® the TRUSTED TRIPLE since 2005. MATRIX® Hi-Mineral, MATRIX® Mini-Dose Hi-Mineral, Iver MATRIX® Mini-Dose Hi-Mineral, Iver MATRIX® Tape Hi-Mineral and MATRIX® TAPE Hi-Mineral represent the MATRIX® Sheep family made here in New Zealand for New Zealand sheep farmers.

safe and effective when combined in the product. As you would expect with registration of the pioneer triple active sheep drench in NZ. That’s why we stand proudly behind the MATRIX®

brand and why we call MATRIX® the TRUSTED TRIPLE.

PROUDLY AVAILABLE FROM YOUR LOCAL PARTICIPATING VETERINARY CLINIC Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health New Zealand Limited. Level 3, 2 Osterley Way, Manukau, Auckland, New Zealand. MATRIX® is a registered trademarks of the Boehringer Ingelheim Group. Registered pursuant to the ACVM Act 1997, No’s. A009390, A010132, A009418, A011065 & A010120. © Copyright 2021 Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health New Zealand Limited. All rights reserved. NZ-OVI-0002-2021.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

6 NEWS

A brighter outlook for venison? JESSICA MARSHALL jessica@ruralnews.co.nz

IMPROVED MARKET conditions for venison are expected for the 2021 season, according to industry body Deer

kilogram. “This year, we are seeing restaurants starting to reopen in North America. Also, prices for all meat in major world markets have begun what economists expect will be

son during September and October,” says DINZ chair Ian Walker. He says that in 2020, amidst Covid-19 lockdowns in Europe, contracts were offered at between $7 and $7.20 per

Industry NZ (DINZ). “In the next few weeks, some venison companies will be offering minimum price supply contracts for the game season, for shipment of chilled veni-

There may be light at the end of the tunnel for the country’s venison producers.

a steady, long-run climb,” Walker says. However, the most recent Westpac Meat

e v a S

BIG ON FUEL Up to

16

c

OFF

Per Litre

EVERY DAY

ACCESS DISCOUNTS HERE...

Get your SuperCard now and start saving Visit nzfarmsource.co.nz/fuel or call us on 0800 731 266 T&C’s apply. See nzfarmsource.co.nz/rewards for full details.

*

Matters report, released 19 February, suggests a slightly less optimistic outlook. It states that venison prices have remained weak in 2021 so far. According to the report, prices have so far slid 2.9%. “However, we see light at the end of the tunnel for venison producers,” it reads. The report predicts that in the German market, vaccine rollout will boost demand and prices over the course of 2021. It also notes that pickup will be gradual and price pickup won’t happen until midway through the year. Meanwhile, Walker says there are two markets where growth is occurring: China and the United States. “Prospects in North America and demand from China – a develop-

ing market for venison – keeps growing.” He says that DINZ will be working with five major venison marketing companies to build year-round demand for venison, particularly at retail and online for home delivery. “We fully recognise that deer farmers need a schedule premium over lamb to make venison production a competitive land use. The industry was achieving that until the impact of Covid,” Walker adds. “Venison prices will improve. And hopefully none of us will have to deal with another pandemic in our lifetimes.” He says that because deer farmers can bank on getting better prices during the chilled season, they should target getting venison animals away before the end of October, if that fits with their farm system.

CLEAN AND GREEN TO PAY? FONTERRA SAYS there is a genuine understanding among farmer shareholders about the global demand for sustainably produced dairy. The co-operative’s group director Farm Source, Richard Allen, says Fonterra’s competitors in the US and Europe are bolstering their environmental credentials. He was commenting on the launch of details of how the co-op will pay farmers for producing sustainable, high quality milk as part of the ‘co-operative difference’ framework. From June 1, 2021, up to 10 cents of each farm’s milk payment will be determined by the farm’s sustainability credentials and milk quality. The 10c/kgMS ‘co-operative difference’ payment is made up of two parts: 7c/kgMS for achievements under environment, co-op & prosperity, animals, and people & community focus areas. Once these targets are achieved, another 3c/ kgMS will be awarded to farmers who meet the ‘excellence’ standard under the milk quality framework. Allen says the payment is another way Fonterra can recognise farmers. “We want to reward the on-farm efforts that demonstrate our co-op’s care for the environment, animals, people and communities. It’s these actions which help ensure we’re the dairy company of choice for customers around the world and for New Zealand dairy farmers, for generations to come,” says Allen. – Sudesh Kissun


THE MOST POTENT MOLECULE EVER DEVELOPED… ...NOW IN COMBINATION Eprinomectin. It’s the most potent molecule ever developed for worm control in cattle(1). Now we have combined it with levamisole to create new TURBO® Pour-on. It’s the future of worm control offering the potency and productivity you would expect from an eprinomectin pour-on with the resistance fighting power of a combination. And thanks to Alleva’s patented DMI-sorb™ technology rain won’t affect efficacy. Available exclusively from leading veterinary practices nationwide.

motional Giveaway 10 Year Anniversary Pro

CELEBRATE OUR 10TH ANNIVERSARY AND RECEIVE A HIKOKI BRUSHLESS 2PC DRILL & IMPACT DRIVER KIT WITH 2 X LI-ION BATTERIES & CHARGER WITH EVERY 5L OF TURBO POUR-ON PURCHASED*

ALLEVA.CO.NZ | PROUDLY NZ OWNED PROUDLY

NZ

OWNED

® TURBO is registered trademark of Alleva Animal Health Ltd. TURBO pour-on (A011722) is registered pursuant to the ACVM Act 1997. See www.foodsafety.govt.nz for registration conditions. *Promotional items received may differ from advertised images and available while stocks last. Offer applies to Turbo Pour-on only.(1) Shoop W, Michael B, Egerton J, Mrozik H, Fisher M. ‘Titration of subcutaneously administered eprinomectin against mature and immature nematodes in cattle’. Journal of Parasitology. 2001 87(6): pp1466-9.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

8 NEWS

Farmers will get the final say a controversial move to increase both Beef+Lamb NZ (BLNZ) and New Zealand Meat Board (NZMB) director fees goes ahead.

DAVID ANDERSON

ANDREW MORRISON says farmers will ultimately have the final say on whether or not

The BLNZ and NZMB chair made this comment in response to a number of questions put to him by Rural News about the process and reasoning

that has seen its directors recommend themselves a healthy pay increase at this month’s annual meeting in Invercargill on March 17.

Chair Andrew Morrison has especially defended the huge lift in NZ Meat Board director fees.

YAMAHA

WOLVERINE X2 “IT’S TIME TO GO YAMAHA”

LOW COST OF ENTRY

ZERO TO PAY

FOR 12 MONTHS 4.95% P.A FIXED RATE

*

BULLET PROOF ENGINE

PROVEN RELIABILITY

847CC

3 YEAR

PARALLEL TWIN LIQUID COOLED, 4-STROKE, DOHC

GENUINE FULL FACTORY WARRANTY

FIELDAYS SPECIAL

GET FREE

YAMAHA ACCESSORIES WORTH

1000*

$

EX GST

36 MONTH LOAN TERM

ON ATV & ROV

LIMITED TIME ONLY

COMMERCIAL APPLICANTS ONLY ANNUAL REPAYMENTS ONLY

WOLVERINE X2 NOW ONLY

$

19,999 + GST

FIND YOUR LOCAL DEALER AT:

www.yamaha-motor.co.nz

*Promotion available between 1/03/21 to 30/04/21 on new Wolverine X2 units (YXE850PB) through participating authorised Yamaha dealers while stocks last. Each eligible unit sold will receive a $1,000 ex GST Yamaha accessories credit, on units warranty registered on or before 30/04/21. See your participating authorised Yamaha dealership for details. *FINANCE DISCLAIMER: Promotion available between 1/01/21 to 31/03/21 on new farm vehicles (AG125, AG200, TTR230/A, TW200, XT250, YFM350FA, YFM450FB, YFM450FB/P, YFM700FA, YFM700FB/P, YXC700P, YXE850PBL, YXE850PK, YXF850, YXM700, YXE1000PSEM, YXF1000PSEM), through participating authorised Yamaha dealers while stocks last. Offer available for specified models, and warranty registered on or before 31/03/21. Zero deposit; zero repayments for the first 12 months and 4.95% p.a. fixed interest rate on a 36 month loan term. Asset backed commercial applicants only with NZBN registered for minimum of 1 year. Maximum amount financed is $35,000 and applies to AG125, AG200, TTR230/A, TW200, XT250, YFM350FA, YFM450FB, YFM450FB/P, YFM700FA, YFM700FB/P, YXC700P, YXE850PBL, YXE850PK, YXF850, YXM700, YXE1000PSEM, YXF1000PSEM. Offer available from January 1, 2021 to March 31, 2021 with final settlement date of April 30, 2021. Credit criteria, fees, charges and conditions apply including an application fee of $325, $10 PPSR fee and a dealer administration fee. Finance to approved applicants by Yamaha Motor Finance New Zealand Ltd. (YMF) NZBN 9429036270798 FSP 9622. At participating Yamaha dealerships while stocks last. Information provided is general only and does not take into account your particular objectives, financial situation and needs.

Morrison has especially defended the huge lift in NZMB director fees, which sees a 38% jump in the chair’s annual remuneration and a 23% increase in all the other directors’ fees. “It’s important to note the responsibilities of the [Meat] Board, and how different the role is from the BLNZ board,” he argued. “The NZMB administers $2.5 billion of quota in an increasingly complex environment – the complexity of the roles in quota management brought about by issues such as Brexit and Covid19 have been huge.” Morrison also claims that because the NZMB is investing over $70 million of farmer reserves and changing from fixed interest to a balanced portfolio of fixed interest and equities to increase returns and grow the fund. “This has required significantly more time from the board in policy development and monitoring – including the development of the Statement of Investment Policies and Objectives (SIPO), consideration of the ongoing review of fund manager performance, ethical and sustainable investing consideration,” he told Rural News. “The simple fact is, to get greater returns for farmers’ money requires more time and activity by the board.” Meanwhile, Morrison concedes that the board did consider the “optics” of the move. However, it believed that farmers should be aware of the “commitment that directors make to the industry on both boards.” He also argues that there has been an increased workload for the BLNZ board – particularly relating to environmental regulation.

“Directors on the two boards are frequently called into additional workshop days on specific requirements so they can better understand and deal with emerging issues that have huge implications for our sector,” he adds. “Put simply, the board decided – backed by independent advice – that remuneration had not kept pace with the demands of the role, or with the market, and therefore recommended the increases.” Morrison also claims that both recommendations were at “the conservative end” of benchmarking for both boards. He says another reason for the controversial decision to increase director fees is to factor in the “board’s aspirations” for future director candidates. “By fairly remunerating for time and expertise, [we] will ensure the best possible candidates who can then afford to backfill in their own farming businesses,” Morrison told Rural News. “Directors’ fees are always closely scrutinised, with good reason,” he added. “There are effectively three steps before any increase. First, the board considers information about director fee benchmarks and makes its recommendations. Secondly, farmers vote on the recommendations, and finally, the board decides whether to activate any increase that’s accepted through the annual meeting process.” Morrison says the board has put the resolution to increase director fees in the notice of meeting. “It’s now for farmers to vote.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

NEWS 9

Chair defends process DAVID ANDERSON

ANDREW MORRISON, New Zealand Meat Board chair, has defended the move by Beef+Lamb NZ (BLNZ) directors to sack an independent committee established to set director remuneration. BLNZ disestablished the Directors Independent Remuneration Committee (DIRC) late last year. The DIRC was set up in 2016 as an independent body to recommend any changes in director remuneration. Morrison told Rural News the DIRC was disestablished primarily because both BLNZ and New Zealand Meat Board (NZMB) directors – basically the same people – agreed that the best approach in future was for the boards to actively take ownership of remuneration recommendations. “The board has to make a final call on this, so we felt the extra layer [the DIRC] was adding complexity to a marketinformed process,” he claims. “The recommendations will be accepted or rejected by levy payers as part of the annual meeting process.” Morrison says the board and the DIRC view or review the same market information to make a decision on director remuneration. “The board considered that as directors we should take personal responsibility for any recommendations.”

GET SOME HEAT ON THIS SUMMER & AUTUMN WITH LEADING BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM CATTLE DRENCHES

Andrew Morrison says the board considered they should take personal responsibility for any director renumeration recommendations.

“The recommendations will be accepted or rejected by levy payers as part of the annual meeting process.” When asked about not having an independent committee such as the DIRC reviewing director fees and how it put BLNZ in an opposite position to many other farmer organisations, Morrison says “different boards have different approaches”. “The board has decided to receive this information from an independent party directly and then be responsible for making its own decisions.” Christchurch-based management consultants Mitchell Notley and Associates (MNA) were hired by the BLNZ board to prepare a report on direc-

tor remuneration. Morrison refused to reveal how much the MNA report and advice cost BLNZ, saying it was “commercially sensitive”. But he claims it cost “no more” than advice received annually for fees reviews. Meanwhile, Morrison told Rural News while there was “debate” around the board table about the decision to disestablish the DIRC and increase director fees: “After all considerations, the board all supported the recommendation and agreed that transparency on director commitments is required.”

NICE EARNER! IT IS not only Beef+Lamb NZ directors who are doing well in the pay stakes, with 40% of the organisation’s staff currently earning $100,000 or more a year. BLNZ’s latest annual report (2020) shows that of its total workforce of 100 full time employees (FTE), 40 earnt at least $100,000 or more in annual salary – the same number as in 2019. However, there was a big increase in the number of BLNZ’s staff earning $180,000 or more a year – jumping from 6 in 2019 to 14 in 2020. The top annual salary at BLNZ – expected to be that of chief executive Sam McIvor – is listed in the earning band of between $330,000 and $339,000.

Boehringer Ingelheim products have been carefully developed for New Zealand cattle farms, and right now, when you purchase qualifying products you’ll receive either a Ziegler & Brown twin burner BBQ, or a Bluetooth Speaker or a BBQ Carving knife set. *QUALIFYING PRODUCTS: ZIEGLER & BROWN BBQ: ECLIPSE® Pour-On 12.5L x 1, ECLIPSE® E Injection with B12 + Se x 3L x 2, Ivomec EPRINEX® Pour-On for Cattle & Deer 25L x1. BLUETOOTH SPEAKER: ECLIPSE® Pour-On 5L x 1, MATRIX-C Hi-Mineral 10L x 1, MATRIX-C Hi-Mineral 20L x 1, SWITCH® C Hi-Mineral 10L x 2, SWITCH® C Hi-Min 20L x 1. SWITCH® FLUKE 10 x 10L x 1. BBQ STAINLESS STEEL CARVING SET: ECLIPSE® Pour-On 2.5L x 1, ECLIPSE® E Injection x 500mL x 2, ECLIPSE® E Injection with B12 + SE x 500mL x 2, EXODUS® Pour-On 5L x 1, GENESIS® Injection + B12 + SE 500mL x 2, GENESIS® POUR ON 10L x 1, GENESIS® ULTRA POUR ON 5L x1, IVOMEC® Plus Injection x 500mL x 4, SWITCH® FLUKE 10 x 5L x 1. NZ-CAP-0058-2020


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

10 NEWS

Maori business sector unrecognised – O’Connor PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

AGRICULTURE MINISTER Damien O’Connor says the Māori business sector is unrecognised, underappreciated and its potential is only now just starting to be known. O’Connor made his comments when announcing this year’s finalists in the prestigious Ahuwhenua Trophy competition for the top dairy farm at Parliament recently. More than 100 people, including three cabinet ministers, Māori dignitaries, agribusiness leaders, government officials and past winners of the trophy were present. Each of the finalists were presented with a special medal, which recognises their achievement of becoming finalists in the competition. The three finalists for 2021 are: Pouarua Farms. The farm is located near the township of Ngatea on the Hauraki Plains, close to Thames. The 2,200ha platform comprises 10 farms – nine dairy units and one drystock unit – and is the largest single dairy platform in the Hauraki region.

Rear left to Right: Hon Meka Whaitiri (Associate Minister of Agriculture), Jack Mihaere, Chairman, Tunapahore B2A Incorporation, Paki Nikora, Chair, Tataiwhetu Trust, Walter Ngamane, Kaumatua Pouarua Farms. Front L-R: Hon Damien O’Connor, Minister of Agriculture & Trustee & Hon Willie Jackson, Minister for Māori Development & Trustee.

Tataiwhetu Trust. This property is located in the Ruatoki Valley south of Whakatane. A total of 4,600 cows are milked across 1,775ha and produce approximately 1.65M kgMS. It runs 432 kiwi cross cows and carries 188 replacement stock on its two support blocks. Tataiwhetu is an organic dairy farm milking once-

a-day and the herd produces 129,140 kgMS. Tunapahore B2A Incorporation. The farm consists of 376ha located at Hawai and Torere on the famous State Highway 35, on the East Coast of the North Island. The nearest main town is Opotiki. The milking platform is 132ha, with 385 cows producing 125,940

kgMS. Representatives of the three finalists were flown to Wellington especially for the function, which was held in Parliament Building’s historic Grand Hall. It was a chance for the finalists and others to mingle and the speeches were punctuated by waiata provided by the

MPI kapa haka group. O’Connor told the gathering that the official statistics underline the potential of Maori’s participation in the agribusiness sector. He told the finalists they were shining examples of the long-standing commitment of Māori farmers to farm sustainably, developing their

whenua and te taiao – the land and the environment – for future generations. He says they are at the top of their game, providing the inspiration to others to get out and do even better to grow the country. “Being here today is no mean feat and you and your whanau should be very proud,” O’Connor

Why do we love our cows like they’re family? Because they are family Treating your animals with respect and kindness is vital. To us, it’s how we farm. In fact, we aim to be world leading in animal care. Why? Because we’re dairy farmers and we rise to the challenge. And it’s in these moments we shine.

Riseandshine.nz

Powered by

told the finalists. “You are leaders in the entire primary sector and people will look to you in the future. “Our industry does depend on leadership to be successful internationally and when we look for leaders, we will look to the finalists in the Ahuwhenua competition.” O’Connor says a number of people in Māoridom have lifted Māori agribusiness into vertical integration and producing high value products, and there needs to be more of that. He says MPI has schemes to help, and that Maori farmers and enterprises should take advantage of that to help further the dreams of their people. He says all the sectors represented in the Ahuwhenua Trophy competition are really important to the NZ economy and the country.O’Connor says in the Covid environment it should be noted that the agribusiness sector has been able to absorb thousands of workers who have been displaced. “The fact we have been able to milk cows, process meat and pick fruit is a huge credit to all the sector,” he says.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

NEWS 11

Finalists praised AHUWHENUA TROPHY Management Committee – which organises the competition – chair Kingi Smiler says, once again, there are three outstanding finalists in this year’s competition. “This is despite the fact that the country and the world is living in challenging and uncertain times,” he says. “Farmers, and Māori in particular, have come through adversity in the past and will do so again.” Smiler says he is full of praise and proud of Māori farmers for entering the competition this year and showing the determination to showcase their very successful enterprises. “This is in the true spirit and legacy of Sir Apirana Ngata and Lord Bledisloe.”

Dates for field days A KEY part of the Ahuwhenua Trophy competition are the field days held on each of the farms of the finalists. Thursday 25th March – Pouarua Farms Thursday 1st April – Tataiwhetu Trust Thursday 8th April – Tunapahore B2A Incorporation The finale of the competition is the awards dinner, which will take place in New Plymouth on Friday 14 May. Ahuwhenua Trophy Management Committee chair Kingi Smiler.

NEW INTRODUCTORY OFFER

9,990

$

EX GST RIDE AWAY

SAVE $1,000

Minister of Maori Development Willie Jackson says his role is to ensure that Maori land owners fulfil their aspirations.

SECRET TO MAORI SUCCESS MĀORI DEVELOPMENT Minister Willie Jackson, who is also an Ahuwhenua Trustee, says the rise of Māori agribusiness is impressive, especially given its unstinting commitment to all aspects of sustainability. He says people are seeing great developments in all productive sectors and a trend of Māori playing an increasingly significant role in producing higher value food and fibre products. Jackson says last year’s horticultural awards dinner was the first such occasion he had attended and says what he saw encapsulated the spirit of the event and celebrated the success that Māori are achieving. “Māori are diversifying into new areas including kiwifruit and the focus this year is dairy, and for Māori ,dairy is big business,” Jackson says. “Māori dairy farmers own an estimated 100 million shares in Fonterra, with some of the major players in the sector being large incorporations. Despite the challenges from Covid, Māori-owned farms are strong because we have got kaitiakitanga and this is more relevant than ever.” Jackson says, as the Minister of Maori Development, his role is to ensure that Maori land owners fulfil their aspirations for their whenua and to improve the sustainability of their land. He says Maori success is success for all New Zealanders and it’s a pity that many media don’t understand and value the awards. “Ahuwhenua is one of the most important kaupapa for Maori, but it’s still a bit of secret,” he says.

THE NEXT GENERATION IN CFMOTO ATVS CFMOTO NORTH ISLAND Andys Moto Services, Waiuku (027) 944 5442 Brown Brothers Bikes, Whanganui (027) 572 7696 Country Engineering, Tauranga (07) 552 0071 Country Machinery, Sanson (06) 825 6400 Gatmans Mowers, Silverdale (09) 426 5612 JC Motorcycles, Waitara (06) 754 6420 Maungaturoto Motorcycles, Maungaturoto (09) 431 8555 Motorcycle HQ, Pahiatua (06) 376 7163

Northland Powersports, Whangarei (09) 437 5451 Outdoor Power, Hastings (06) 878 2369 Peninsula Motorcycles, Thames (07) 868 6104 Powerhead Motorcycles, Manurewa (09) 297 7145 RevTech Powersports, Stratford (06) 765 7712 Rob Titter Farm Services, Kaikohe (09) 401 1774 Tahuna Motorcycles & Atvs, Tahuna (07) 887 5790

AVAILABLE FROM

$51.04 PER WEEK

CFMOTO SOUTH ISLAND Ag & Auto Direct, Balclutha (03) 418 0555 Dan’s Motor Centre, Geraldine (03) 693 8536 Ian Day Lifestyles, Alexandra (03) 448 9007

CFMOTO FINANCE

T&E Motorcycles, Gore (03) 208 8114 Tru Moto, Christchurch 0800 878 6686 Vallance Machinery, Fernside (03) 313 6465

*Ride away prices quoted exclude GST. CFORCE 625 EPS offer at $9,990 is valid until 31st March 2021 or until stocks last. See www.cfmoto.co.nz for more information. Any promotions are not to be used in conjunction with any other offer. The weekly amount of $51.04 is based on purchase price of CFMOTO CFORCE 400 EPS for $8038.50 including GST. This is calculated on a four (4) year term plus a $150 booking fee plus interest costs calculated at a rate of 12.50% per annum. Normal lending criteria apply. Offer valid until 31st March 2021.

ON SELECTED CFMOTO ATV’S & UTV’S www.cfmoto.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

12 NEWS

Bay’s roller coaster ride with drought PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

LOCHIE MACGILLIVRAY says Hawkes Bay needs more rain in the next couple of weeks or there is a risk of the region slipping back into drought conditions. A leading farm advisor in the region, MacGillivray told Rural News that the area had some good rain a couple of weeks ago and this varied between 10 and 100mm – with more in the north and less in the south around Waipukurau. He says that gave farmers a nice reprieve because up until then things were starting to look serious. McGillivray says at that point, the Rural Advisory Group (RAG), of which he is member, had met and they were going to start communicating to farmers to be aware of

potential problems and to start planning mitigation measures. “So, the rain we had was a relief to everybody but we do need follow-up rain within the next fort-

night or things will start to deteriorate.” McGillivray says, since last year’s drought, there was some rain in November, which resulted in a good spike for pastures

Lochie MacGillivray (left) says Hawkes Bay needs more rain in the next couple of weeks or there is a risk of the region slipping back into drought.

and they have come back. But he says some of the renovated pastures are taking a bit of a hit with native pastures creeping in quite quickly. “But through January there was little rain and we received 15% of normal rainfall – that’s when we started to worry again,” he told Rural

News. McGillivray says the good news is that the November rains resulted in quite a feed surplus and the contractors were flat out making hay, baleage and silage. He says feed reserves are right up where they’d want them to be. “So we are not in the

same situation as we were last year.” McGillivray believes the supplements made in November will be quite good quality, which is also good. But he says the pastures in the region, at the moment, are average at best and some has got a bit rank without much base to it.

McGillivray says if there is more rain within the next few weeks, there is a chance that some of the grass underneath this rank pasture will come away. But adds one final warning, that if this happens, facial eczema may appear and farmers should be aware of this.

MEAT SECTOR WANTS VACCINATION PRIORITY

Organic Selenium Chip also available

Need to lift your selenium levels? Apply Selenium Chip to pasture and forage crops and help protect your stock against selenium deficiency. - Increase selenium levels for up to 12 months - Fast uptake by plants - Easy to apply - No animal handling required

PWS2103

Selenium Chip is a fertiliser granule that should be applied annually at 1 kg/ha to selenium deficient soils. Selenium Chip is available from your local PGG Wrightson Rural Supplies Store and selected fertiliser outlets.

For more information contact PGG Wrightson Seeds on 0800 566 698 or visit seedtreatment.co.nz

NEW ZEALAND’S meat processing and exporting industry is calling on the Government to prioritise its workforce for Covid-19 vaccinations. Meat Industry Association (MIA) chief executive Sirma Karapeeva says the processing sector was recognised as a high-risk industry for transmission of the virus, due to the large numbers of people working closely together. She says Australia and the United States have already prioritised meat processing workers for vaccination because Covid-19 spread extremely rapidly in processing plants. “US research has found that processing plants acted as transmission vectors, accelerating the spread of the virus into the surrounding population,” she says. “The New Zealand red meat industry took decisive action to proactively develop and implement safety protocols, which provide guidance and a minimum

standard to enable our processors to continue safely operating.” Karapeeva says there is no room for complacency. She says it’s absolutely

critical that NZ fortifies its first line of defence. Both for the safety and wellbeing of its workers and communities and to safeguard the red meat sector’s significant contribution to the New Zealand economy, which is now heavily reliant on our export revenue. “Most processors have nurses on site or arrangements with local medical centres, so are well positioned to undertake large scale vaccination programmes quickly,” she says.

MIA chief executive Sirma Karapeeva is calling on the Government to prioritise the meat sector workforce for Covid-19 vaccinations.


PREVENT. PROTECT. PERFORM. A range of sheep vaccines made for New Zealand conditions.

For nearly 80 years, MSD have been developing sheep vaccines for New Zealand farmers. We have a extensive range of vaccines to help you improve flock performance. Vaccines that help protect against losses from Toxoplasma, Campylobacter, Salmonella, and that are proven to increase lamb numbers1,2,3. And we’ve developed them right here in New Zealand, specifically for our sheep and our conditions.

ASK YOUR VET FOR MSD SHEEP PERFORMANCE VACCINES

CONTROL THE RISK OF TOXOPLASMA

CONTROL THE RISK OF CAMPYLOBACTER

CONTROL THE RISK OF SALMONELLA

INCREASE LAMB NUMBERS

AVAILABLE ONLY UNDER VETERINARY AUTHORISATION ACVM No’s: A4769, A9535, A7886, A9927. Schering-Plough Animal Health Ltd. Phone: 0800 800 543. www.msd-animal-health.co.nz NZ-CVX-200900006 © 2020 Intervet International B.V. All Rights Reserved. 1. Wilkins M, O’Connell E. (1992) Vaccination of sheep against Toxoplasma abortion, Surveillance, 19:4,20-23 2. Anderson, P (2001) The implications of Campylobacter Infections in Ewe Flocks. Proc 31st Annual Seminar, Society of Sheep and Beef Cattle Veterinarians., NZVA p31-40 3. Geldard, H, Scaramuzzi, R.J., & Wilkins, J.F. (1984) Immunization against polyandroalbumin leads to increases in lambing and tailing percentages. New Zealand Veterinary Journal, 32:1-2, 2-5


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

NEWS 15

‘Living wage’ for kiwfruit pickers SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

NEW ZEALANDERS are being offered a ‘living wage’ of $22.10/hour to pick and pack kiwifruit this season. With kiwifruit picking season underway, growers need 23,000 workers for the harvest. But Covid travel restrictions means there will be a shortfall of pickers. New Zealand Kiwifruit Growers Inc (NZKGI) chief executive Nikki Johnson told Rural News she’s hopeful that enough New Zealanders will join the industry to fill seasonal positions to get the fruit picked, packed and shipped in premium condition. Johnson says pickers and packers should expect to earn at least the living wage in this year’s harvest – and that’s a great message to attract NZ workers to the industry. “Almost all packhouses have told NZKGI that they will be paying at least the living wage of $22.10/ hour. Kiwifruit picking is expected

With harvest underway, NZ kiwifruit growers will need 23,000 workers for the season.

to exceed the living wage and paid an average of $24 last year when the minimum wage was $18.90 per hour. “Workers are encouraged to consider their options and find an employer who meets their expectations around pay, hours and locations.” Kiwifruit picking wages vary. With workers with higher skill levels at picking generally paid more than those with lesser skills. Johnson says Recognised Seasonal Employer

(RSE) scheme workers who return to work in the industry for multiple seasons are generally more skilled than, for example, backpackers who may be visiting New Zealand to work for one season. “Wages for picking also vary between employer and depend on the kiwifruit variety and way that the kiwifruit are picked. For those that are paid by piece rate, those who have high productivity will earn the most,” she says. To lure more NZ fruit

pickers in to orchards, NZKGI has launched an outreach programme targeting seniors and tertiary students. Johnson says growers are working closely with the Ministry of Social Development (MSD) and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to ensure unemployed Kiwis are fully aware of what the industry can offer. “We’re thrilled to have the support of MSD and MPI behind us; they are creating some excellent initiatives, events

and marketing to get the messages around kiwifruit work opportunities to those seeking employment – and it’s not just about seasonal work. Kiwifruit offers long-term and permanent career opportunities in our leading horticultural sector.” The harvest runs through till June and is expected to produce even more than last year’s record of 157 million trays of Green and Gold. NZKGI has been working for several months to prepare for the

season opening and the significant labour requirements. “Our strategy to attract labour is to get as much information and awareness about the seasonal work available for potential workers out there through a wide range of media and channels and correct any misconceptions about kiwifruit work. We want the opportunities to be highly visible and wellunderstood,” says Johnson. Key resources pre-

pared to support the strategy include an updated, online video featuring orchard workers and growers talking about the industry and jobs, a comprehensive 14-page workers’ guide to the seasonal work – The Little Green and Gold Book, and a strong social media programme to promote available roles and answer queries from potential workers. “We want prospective workers to have access to everything they need to help them decide to come and work for us,” says Johnson. “That includes guidance on the roles available, timings, pay rates, working conditions and workers’ rights, health and safety, accommodation options and leisure possibilities in the various kiwifruit-growing regions.” NZKGI is emphasising the importance of choosing an accredited and reputable employer. “Our guide tells them exactly what they should expect of their employer,” Johnson says.

NSW TO LIFT GM CROP MORATORIUM THE NSW Government has announced that a moratorium on genetically modified (GM) food crops will be lifted in the state from 1 July 2021, ending an 18-year ban. The lifting of the ban on genetically modified crops will have immediate application for canola. Director of the Sydney Institute of Agriculture, Professor Alex McBrat-

ney, said there are pros and cons to the decision to lift the ban on GM crops in NSW, which will align now with the rest of Australia. “If we use genetic technology to improve the nutritional profile of crops, such as vitamin levels in rice, or by making crops more water-efficient, that will be a definite positive. We’ve already seen a dramatic drop in

insecticide use in GM cotton grown in Australia. “However, crops modified to be ‘Round-Up ready’ can encourage overuse of herbicides when we should be looking at alternatives, such as camera spraying and other precision agriculture methods.” McBratney says it is important to remember that the only commer-

6716-6720 ROUND BALER RANGE

• Intelligent Density 3D with new easy setting of bale density - pre-selectable from the tractor cab • Full ISOBUS • Five endless belts • PowerBind with direct net injection for fast and highly reliable netting. Easy and simple loading of net roll • 2.2 m wide pick-up with 1.6-2m diameter bale size • SuperCut-14 knife rotors for efficient cutting and tight bales • DropFloor for easy unblocking

2 LEFT IN THE COUNTRY FROM

59,900+GST

$

PF97238

Kverneland NZ |

Power Farming

Terms and conditions apply. Contact your local dealership for more information. Offer ends 31.3.21. While stocks last.

|

www.powerfarming.co.nz

cialisation of GM crops has been for canola and cotton. “Genetically modified wheat hasn’t been commercialised anywhere in the world so far, so that offers a big challenge for our researchers.” He says there are some markets, largely in Europe, that don’t want GM products – so it will be important to label GM products appropriately.

Meanwhile, Sydney Institute of Agriculture’s dean of science and soil scientist Professor Iain Young says the lifting of the moratorium on GM crops offers a host of opportunities, at a time when we have to secure our food production. “The lessons from Europe show us we must be proactive in dealing with public concerns and potential misconceptions.”

2 YEAR

WARRANTY


Reliable Trough Valves The proven success of Hansen’s Trough valves introduces a new era of design reliability that cuts valve maintenance overheads considerably. Coupled with a full range of size/flow options, it’s not difficult to see why they are the valve of choice for many farmers.

Super-Flo Valve Slipper Fit Piston helps prevent stuck valves

188 L/min @ 29 PSI

Max-Flo Valve Stock proof & self cleaning

570 L/min @ 29 PSI

www.hansenproducts.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

NEWS 17

More scientific proof needed primary sectors and geophysical contexts makes this a huge challenge. “The current complexity of information or misinformation on regenerative agriculture was identified as a barrier,” the paper says. It also echoes the calls

DAVID ANDERSON

A NEW report has joined the chorus within the agricultural sector calling for proper scientific testing of the claims being made by regenerative agriculture practitioners and proponents. Some of the claims made by regenerative agriculture advocates currently include that it can improve waterways, reduce topsoil losses, offer drought resilience, add value to primary exports and improve the ‘well-being crisis’ among rural farming communities. However, a new white paper on regenerative agriculture, recently released by Our Land and Water, says there is an urgent need for clarity about what regenerative agriculture is in New Zealand and for accurate scientific testing of its claimed benefits. The research was funded by the Our Land and Water National Science Challenge, the NEXT Foundation and Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research. This follows similar calls recently from the New Zealand Institute of Agricultural and Horticultural Science (NZIAHS), with the group of mainstream New Zealand agriculture scientists criticising regenerative agriculture as an ‘ill-defined fad of dubious scientific merit’ and asking for more scientific evidence about its proponents’ claims. The paper – Regenerative Agriculture in Aotearoa New Zealand – Research

Report lead author Dr Gwen Grelet there is an urgent need for accurate scientific testing of regenerative agriculture’s claimed benefits.

“Our consultation found many areas of strong agreement between advocates and sceptics. It’s time to stop bickering and focus on identifying any true benefits regenerative agriculture might have for New Zealand.” Pathways to Build Science-Based Evidence and National Narratives – sets out a number of priority research topics and also introduces some principles for regenerative farming in New Zealand. Lead author Dr Gwen Grelet, senior researcher at Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research, says that evidence is urgently required. “Our consultation found many areas of strong agreement between advocates and sceptics,” she says. “It’s time to stop bickering and focus on identifying any true benefits regenerative agriculture might

have for New Zealand.” However, the report failed to offer a firm definition of what exactly regenerative agriculture is. It says while a succinct definition of regenerative agriculture would be useful for marketing purposes, the white paper refrained from offering a definition for two reasons: The risk of constraining an evolving concept, and the need for any New Zealand definition to be anchored in te ao Māori (the Māori world view). “Collective work by Māori experts and practitioners is currently in

progress to identify linkages between te ao Māori cultural concepts and regenerative agriculture principles,” it says. However, the paper did identify what it calls the “11 principles for regenerative farming within the farmgate in New Zealand”. These include such things as: ‘maximising photosynthesis year-round’, ‘minimising (soil) disturbance’ and ‘harnessing (plant) diversity’. Meanwhile, it also calls for the development of specific “regenerative practice” guidance. It concedes that New Zealand’s many different

by representatives of four NZ major primary sectors asking for research on how regenerative agriculture impacts on things such as freshwater outcomes, food quality and safety, long-term viability of whole systems, animal welfare and soil carbon.

In summary, the paper says “there is a pressing need for scientific testing of the limited evidence and anecdotal claims being made by regenerative agriculture practitioners and proponents”. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

MAKE SHEARING SAFE WITH

Join thousands of farmers, contractors and shearers who have switched to the world’s #1 selling and most trusted shearing plant and woolpress. Make your shearing shed a whole lot safer, without compromising on performance and reliability.

TPW Xpress Woolpress • Safety screen guard with automatic return • Presses more weight into less packs • Automatic bale pinning and bale ejection • Contamination-free short square bales • Fast pack locking system

EVO Shearing Plant • • • •

Winner of 2 Worksafe Industry Awards Unique electronic safety switch Designed to eliminate handpiece lockups Proven choice for commercial shearing contractors in Australia and New Zealand

Heiniger New Zealand | (03) 349 8282 | heiniger.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

18 NEWS

Bank closures a real headache JESSICA MARSHALL jessica@ruralnews.co.nz

RURAL WOMEN New Zealand (RWNZ) says rural communities are being ignored as Kiwibank moves to close five banks in regional areas. The news that Kiwibank was consulting with staff members and communities over the potential closure of seven branches, including branches in Balclutha, Gisborne, Matamata, Waihi and Waipukurau, was announced February 25. “Reductions in services in rural communities is causing a deeper inequity of the provision of those services, compared with urban communities, adding pressures that are just not needed in this current social and economic

“For every 1,000 transactions at Kiwibank, 977 are now digital, 15 are via ATM, five are in branch and three are through our contact centre.”

climate,” says RWNZ national president Gill Naylor. She says her organisation hopes that Kiwibank will use the agency model for other businesses to make sure banking services remain available in rural centres. “There needs to be continued support for people to transact their daily lives in dignity.” Naylor adds that an agency model would need to provide spaces for private, complex discussions. “It is not acceptable

for people to be discussing their personal banking requirements with staff, while standing in a line with others who just want to pay a bill,” she adds. “RWNZ believes that rural communities need services close to where they live – this is particularly important for those where distance and lack of internet connectivity are more sharply felt.” However, a Kiwibank spokesperson told Rural News that over-thecounter transactions in

RWNZ says rural communities are being ignored as Kiwibank moves to close five banks in regional areas.

branches have declined. “In some areas we now have half the number of customers visiting our branches as we did five years ago,” they said, adding that since Covid lockdowns came into play in 2020, visitor numbers in branches

have not recovered. “For every 1,000 transactions at Kiwibank, 977 are now digital, 15 are via ATM, five are in branch and three are through our contact centre. “We are mindful this proposal may create uncertainty for some.”

The spokesperson says the bank has informed branch staff and are contacting community groups seeking feedback. “We want to hear how our customers and community is using branches, what banking services they value, and what sup-

port they may need to be able to access banking services.” Kiwibank say feedback can be submitted by email or mail by close of business Friday 12 March. A final decision on the branch closures is expected in late March.

See us at

KIRWEE Sites 914 & 915

TR ROTOWIPER

Trailing model towed by a 4 wheel bike

FANTASTIC NEW FEATURES! CLASSIC TRACTOR FEVER NEW SEASON – MONDAYS 8:30 PM “Classic Tractor Fever” is a must-see for any tractor enthusiast. The series takes fans inside the different tractor makes and models highlighting how these machines have changed the world of agriculture and the meaning of“horsepower”. Take a look at vintage tractors, classic tractor auctions, farm shows, toy collections and more! Hear the engines and see History in motion with an inside look at the mechanical innovation of the legendary tractor with brands like Hart-Parr, Farmall, Caterpillar, Rumley, Fordson, John Deere, Oliver, Minneapolis-Moline, Massey-Harris, International Harvester, Case models and many others.

• Single height adjustment • Roller drive disengagement • Fold-up drawbar • Tank leveller adjustment

• New strong design frame • New stub axle hub arrangement • All covers now stainless steel

Rotovacuum: 350lt bin, Stihl BG86 blower motor. Great suction to clean your paddock or garden.

Rotocart: RC270, RC300 & RC500. 3 sizes, super strong rotationally moulded in our factory. *Conditions apply. Only available to SKY direct customers with at least SKY Starter and a SKY box in the home. Country TV costs $18.40 per month in addition to your standard monthly subscription and is subject to SKY’s standard terms and conditions. Prices are correct as of 1 October 2019, are payable in advance and subject to change. For full terms and conditions visit sky.co.nz/countrytv.

48 Bremners Road PO Box 333 Ashburton www.rotowiper.com P: 03-308 4497 M: 027-311 9471 E: rotowipersales1@gmail.com


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

NEWS 19

Meat sector aids students JESSICA MARSHALL jessica@ruralnews.co.nz

ELEVEN YOUNG New Zealanders have been awarded scholarships from the meat sector to help fund their tertiary education. Since 2018, the Meat Industry Association (MIA) has awarded undergraduate ($5,000 per year) and postgraduate ($10,000 per year) scholarships to students considering careers in the red meat processing and exporting sector. The 2021 scholars range from first year university students to those undertaking PhD research. Fields of study include food process engineering, agribusiness management and marketing. Sirma Karapeeva, chief executive of MIA, says the scholarship is designed to increase the awareness of the red meat processing industry to tertiary students and to make tertiary students aware of the broad career opportunities for graduates. Karapeeva says the scholars were chosen because of a number of

factors. “As well as their academic achievements, the passion and enthusiasm they have shown to the meat industry through work experience or projects that they have worked on,” she told Rural News. She says the wide range of subjects studied by the 2021 scholars demonstrate the opportunities on offer in the red meat sector. “There are a wide range of positions available including technical, engineering, production and marketing,” she says. “Attracting skilled people and supporting their development is important to us. It’s vital to our continuing success and prosperity.” Scholars will also have the opportunity to do part time or vacation work and several are already working in the sector. “The job market is very positive and over half of the graduates that have completed their studies have joined the meat industry.” More than 50 people applied for the 2021 scholarship programme.

“This shows the level of interest and excitement in the industry,” Karapeeva says. The MIA runs a mentorship programme for

its scholars, including a networking and educational event in Wellington, with presentations from people from across the industry.

The MIA says the scholarships are designed to increase the awareness of the red meat processing industry to tertiary students.

THE SCHOLARS Dominic Morrison from Queenstown, Bachelor of Commerce (Economics) and Bachelor of Laws at University of Otago. Jack Coakley from Christchurch, Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting and Finance) at University of Otago. Joe Ward from Havelock North, Bachelor of Commerce (Finance & Strategy and Marketing & Entrepreneurship) at University of Canterbury. Joelle Gatenby from Dunedin, Bachelor of Agribusiness and Food Marketing at Lincoln University. Megan Ross from Whangarei, Bachelor of Food Technology, Hons, (Food Process Engineering) at Massey University. Nelson Harper from Palmerston North, Bachelor of Engineering, Hons, (Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering) at Massey University. Tully Paterson from Invercargill, Bachelor of Laws and Bachelor of Arts (Politics and Anthropology) at University of Auckland. Haley La Franco from Hawke’s Bay, Master of Food Safety and Quality at Massey University. Grace MacDonald from Christchurch, Master of Management in Agribusiness at Lincoln University. Todd Fortune from Dunedin, Master of Design Enterprise at Otago Polytechnic. Hennie Pienaar from Invercargill, PhD through Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.

Hits weeds harder and faster Use Hammer® Force with glyphosate for better control and faster brownout of broadleaf weeds including some hard-to-kill-weeds such as mallows, nettles, willow weed, staggerweed, water pepper. Get your crop into the ground faster with Nil grazing withholding after application and Nil withholding after application for establishing a crop. Visit www.fmccrop.nz for more information.

ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS. Copyright © 2019. All rights reserved. Hammer Force® is a registered trademark of FMC Corporation or its affiliates.

FMC New Zealand Limited Phone: 0800 658 080 www.fmccrop.nz

FMC New Zealand Limited Phone: 0800 658 080 www.fmccrop.nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

20 NEWS

Fonterra’s trans-Tasman dairy trademark stoush finally over SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

A LONG-RUNNING trademark dispute between Fonterra and Australian dairy giant Bega Cheese has ended with the court last month rejecting both parties’ claims. The Victorian Supreme Court ruling means Bega Cheese can continue selling cheeses and peanut butter under the Bega brand. It rejected Fonterra’s claim to an exclusive trademark licence for the brand within Australia. The court rejected a counterclaim from Bega to terminate the trademark licence agreement with Fonterra for alleged

Ce

breaches. Fonterra and its predecessor, the New Zealand Dairy Board, have had long trading ties with Bega Cheese. The original agreement was signed in 1983. The current agreement, signed in 2001, gives Fonterra long-term licence to use the Bega trademark on butter and cheese – blocks, slices and stringers. Between 2013 and 2015, Fonterra held a 9% stake in the listed cheese maker. The stoush started in 2017 when Bega Cheese bought the Kraft branded cheese and peanut butter business from Mondelez International. Subsequently, the Austra-

Fonterra’s battle with Bega Cheese over trademark ended last month.

lian dairy manufacturer replaced the Kraft logo on these products with its own Bega logo. Fonterra initiated court action, arguing that it had exclusive rights to the Bega brand. The court disagreed.

In its counterclaim, Bega argued that Fonterra had breached a contractual obligation to market and promote the Bega brand. However, the court found there was no obligation for Fonterra to do so.

Bega also contended that Fonterra breached an agreement between the two companies by misrepresenting to consumers that all cheese in Bega products were made in the Bega Valley. That claim was also dismissed.

Fonterra Australia managing director Rene Dedoncker told Rural News that it was pleased with the decision allowing the NZ co-operative to retain the exclusive licence for the Bega cheese brand for cheese and butter. “Since the 1980s, Fonterra and its predecessor Bonlac have nurtured and built the Bega brand, and supported Bega Cheese Limited to grow and provide good returns back to its farmers, shareholders and community,” he says. “We will continue to invest in the Bega brand because we believe in it.” Dedoncker told Rural News that while disappointed with the decision

on the trademark claim, Fonterra is confident that it can work together with Bega Cheese Limited to continue to grow the value of the brand. In a statement to the Australian Stock Exchange, Bega executive chairman Barry Irvin said his company is now entitled to use the Bega trademark on products outside the scope of the agreement with Fonterra. “Since its acquisition of the Mondelez grocery business in 2017, Bega Cheese has sold Bega branded peanut butter products. “Bega Cheese is pleased that its right to use its brand on these products has been confirmed by the court.”


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

NEWS 21

Wool-only strategy paying off SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

CARPET MAKER Cavalier Corporation says its revised strategy to trade in only woollen carpets is paying dividends. The company’s halfyear result, released last month, shows a $3 million lift in business performance. Net profit jumped $4.3 million over last year’s interim results to $5.5m. Cavalier says the net profit included a $2.5m net gain on the sale and leaseback of an Auckland property. No interim dividend was declared. The Australasian business reports that revenue was down 6% year on year to $60.3m. Australian carpet sales volumes were impacted by supply chain disruption and Covid lockdowns. It says sales are, however, expected to improve as supply chain disruptions and pandemic effects reduce. Elco Direct, Cavalier’s wool buying business, was also impacted by subdued offshore demand for New Zealand wool and while volumes were up 12%, the average selling price was well down. Cavalier’s transformation strategy is to become a global leader in natural interior solutions, in part by exiting the non-wool sector and ‘right sizing’ the organisational structure to meet future manufacturing needs.

Key initiatives during the first half of the financial year included the launch of the new Bremworth brand for Cavalier’s carpet business; the rollout of the Lifestyle (affordable wool) collection ranges and other uniquely designed products, providing greater choice

Cavalier chief executive Paul Alston remains positive about future sales.

Modest plan for Cavalier • Launch of the new Bremworth marketing campaign • Continue to rollout Bremworth Lifestyle (affordable wool) collection ranges • Continue to expand retailer networks, particularly in Australia • Maintain focus on innovation and the launch of new beautifully designed carpets • Operational improvements including initiatives to reduce the cost base and mitigate supply chain disruptions.

for consumers; and an expansion of the retailer distribution networks in both New Zealand and Australia. Cavalier’s decision to drop synthetic carpet altogether is being closely watched by NZ wool farmers struggling to survive with rock bottom wool prices. Farmers only get about $1/kg for greasy wool; between $4 and $5/ kg is seen as a price that farmers could cover the cost of shearing, and the costs associated with wool.   Cavalier chief executive Paul Alston

Power Farming

Terms and conditions apply. Contact your local dealership for more information. Offer ends 31.3.21. While stocks last.

footprint and funding in place to execute our fiveyear plan to increasing value and profitability.

TORNADO RANGE

• UDOR ceramic plunger pump & gear-box • Genuine Honda petrol engine • 10 models from 1800 to 5000 psi • Made in NZ

HURRICANE WATERBLASTER/ SPRAYER

SALSUMM E N ER OW ON!

• Tough 600 litre tank, Cat 2 mounts • New Udor 3000 psi pump with massive 35 L/min flow • Blast/spray/clean drains • Made in NZ

ELECTROBLAST RANGE

FREEPHONE 0508 78 78 78

Sales & Service dealers throughout New Zealand

www.aesblasters.co.nz

WARRANTY

|

“We are excited about our future as we continue our journey towards becoming

For Higher Productivity + Lower Servicing Costs

2 YEAR

Stubble cultivation is an important factor within conservation tillage. It incorporates weeds and cereal seeds into the soil with an intensive mixing and promotes germination for a more efficient subsequent treatment. The even incorporation of the straw provides a key factor for seed germination. Kverneland designed the Qualidisc to surpass these requirements, while also providing farmers with a versatile machine that is ready for shallow and deeper cultivation.

PF97238

says it has been

an encouraging six months for the company with New Zealand trading recovering strongly post the April Covid lockdowns, and increasing sales of higher margin, more sustainable woollen carpets. “Australia offers a significant growth opportunity with a market five to six times the size of New Zealand, and it will be a primary focus for our team,” says Alston. “We have a strong pathway forward with a carefully considered strategy that takes

Qualidisc Pro

Kverneland NZ |

advantage of Cavalier’s strengths and consumer trends, zero debt, a right sized organisational

a more sustainable, design-led, wool and natural materials interior solutions business.” The company remains positive about future sales, with indications of positive economic growth in both New Zealand and Australia, which will benefit Bremworth retail sales. New Zealand woollen carpet sales volumes for FY21 are expected to be well up on prior year, with Australian woollen carpet sales volumes also expected to improve when current disruptions to the supply chain are resolved. Recent initiatives, particularly in Australia, to expand the retailer networks, are expected to help drive a lift in sales once supply improves, the company says.

www.powerfarming.co.nz

• UDOR Italian Plunger Pump • 230 or 400 Volt 1440 RPM electric motors • 8 models from 1600 to 5000 psi • Made in NZ

GET THE PERFECT CUTTING ANGLE WITH THE QUALIDISC


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

22 AGRIBUSINESS

Healthy half year for PGG Wrightson DAVID ANDERSON

RURAL SERVICES company PGG Wrightson’s (PGW) net profit leapt 41% in the first half of the current financial year to $18m – up from $12.8m for the same time last year. Chief executive Stephen Guerin told Rural News the result came on the back of “strong performances” – especially from its retail, livestock and real estate businesses. “The result reinforces the combined strength

of PGW Group that serve farmers and growers across the length and breadth of the country and the overall reset of our business since the sale of our seed division in 2019.” He says the first six months of the 2021 financial year have provided a very good start ahead of the corresponding period last year. Guerin says PGW’s rural supplies business had seen solid growth across most categories. “While the outlook for our rural supplies busi-

PGW chief executive Stephen Guerin says its rural supplies business had seen solid growth across most categories.

ness is tempered with sheep and beef farmers cautious about the meat

company schedules which are back on last year,” he warned. “However, dairy

farmers are more positive with solid pay-outs expected.”

Meanwhile, Guerin says the forecast remains very positive for its Fruitfed Supplies business with positive returns for the horticulture sector and stability in prices being obtained by growers. “The horticultural sector continues to be buoyant, experiencing good yields, profitable returns, and a positive outlook, which is driving investment and further development.” Guerin says PGW’s agency division, which includes livestock, wool and real estate, also had a good start to the year. “With many parts of the country coming out of drought conditions we saw a number of farmers rebuilding their capital stock numbers. Buoyant prices and widespread rain throughout the South Island created good conditions with plenty of feed on-farm stimulating farmer confidence.” He says the company’s on-farm hybrid auctions for on-farm/auctioneer sales, bidr® – which was launched last year – will begin livestreaming auctions at saleyards from April.

IT’S ABOUT TIME SOMEONE STARTED THINKING LIKE A FARMER. You have enough to do without worrying about the perfect drench programme. To help, we went back to basics to create the Turbo® 3-stage parasite control programme for growing cattle. With four world-first products that combine the most effective ingredients for higher potency, better safety and coverage of key parasites at the right times – including resistant strains. It’s innovative, reliable and available exclusively through leading veterinary practices nationwide.

TURBO® CATTLE DRENCH PROGRAMME

STAGE 1

First oral drench treatment for weaned calves. Protect against worm parasites and bridge the gap between removal of coccidiostat meal and natural coccidiosis immunity.

TURBO® Initial Oral Drench

STAGE 2 PROUDLY

NZ

OWNED

Available exclusively through veterinary practices nationwide. Visit www.alleva.co.nz for more information. TURBO® is a registered trademark of Alleva Animal Health Ltd. TURBO Pour-on (A011722), TURBO Injection (A011742), TURBO Initial (A011703) and TURBO Advance (A011714) are registered pursuant to the ACVM Act 1997. See www.foodsafety.govt.nz for registration conditions.

TURBO® Advance Oral Drench

STAGE 3 TURBO® Pour On or Injection

Routine treatment of growing cattle that can be drenched orally. Can be used in cattle under 120kg.

Routine treatment for growing cattle that are too big to be drenched orally. Rain resistant pour-on and injectable options with the added benefit of lice control.

All three of PGW’s real estate categories – rural, lifestyle and residential – reported the strongest six months of sales for the past six years. “The outlook for real estate for the second half of the financial year remains positive subject to the availability of listings, especially within the lifestyle and residential sectors.” Guerin says the company’s wool business, like others, “continued to work through depressed crossbred wool prices, associated international demand challenges.” Meanwhile, chairman Rodger Finlay said international markets continued to support New Zealand’s primary exports. “We are seeing reasonable confidence from our farmer and grower customers and remain optimistic about the prospects for the sector.” PGW has announced a fully imputed 12c dividend, up from 9c in the previous interim result, which will be paid out to shareholders on 24 March. The company’s share price now sits close to $3.60 compared with $2.40 a year ago.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

AGRIBUSINESS 23

Allied Farmers’ profits nosedives ing a superior service to its farmer clients to assist them to be successful in the operation of their own businesses.” The veal processing and trading profit was

SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

ALLIED FARMERS posted a better-thanexpected net profit of $531,000 for the six months ending December 31, 2020. While ahead of budget and forecast, it is less than 50% of last year’s half-year profit of $1.18 million, hit by poor veal processing returns by subsidiary New Zealand Farmers Livestock (NZFL). In a statement to NZX, Allied Famers chairman Richard Perry says the poor returns from the veal processing operations continue to have a major impact on first half year performance. “However, investors are reminded that typically Allied Farmers’ second half year profit is driven by factors distinct from the veal processing results that drive first half year profit,” he adds. “The second half is strongly influenced by livestock trading and

well behind the prior year, but in line with budgeting for a severely Covid-affected year. “This largely reflects foodservice impacts, skin pricing changes, and the

strengthening New Zealand dollar. Delivering a profit despite these conditions is a pleasing result and underlines the resilience of this business,” he says.

Allied Famers chairman Richard Perry says the poor returns from the veal processing operations continue to have a major impact on performance.

herd sale activity, much of which will occur in the later part of the second half, and therefore it is not possible to forecast full year profits based on first half performance.” Perry says despite the challenges of 2020, Allied Farmers is starting 2021 in a strong position the board is “excited about the future”. Via investments in new companies, and shareholder approval to raise up to an additional $5 million of new capital via placements, Allied Farmers is keen to expand its footprint in

the ag sector. “In particular, and as previously indicated, the intention is to invest into the growth of our finance subsidiary, Rural Funding SolutioNZ, to widen and improve our rural finance offering,” Perry says. “In addition, we continue to evaluate opportunities in the AgriTech space.” The company says the NZFL result was dominated by Covid-related impacts on veal business revenues. “However, NZFL finished the half year ahead of expectations despite the chal-

lenging conditions facing its business divisions.” Perry says its livestock agency business saw lingering drought concerns impacting trading behaviour early in the period, softer stock pricing in line with red meat schedules and pleasing market share and tallies later in the half year. Dairy stock prices have held well to date and some movement in dairy farm sales and forecast milk payouts bode well for herd sale volumes in the second half. “NZFL is committed to a strategy of provid-

FARMERS STILL WAITING DAIRYNZ IS calling on the Government to respond to an advisory group’s recommendations to improve winter grazing rules. In December, the Southland Advisory Group recommended the Government make several changes to rules under the Government’s National Environmental Standard for Freshwater. These included amendments to pugging and resowing dates. “DairyNZ supports the group’s

recommendations to the government that aim to ensure winter grazing rules are clear and achievable for farmers, and lead to better environmental outcomes,” says DairyNZ chair, Jim van der Poel. “The advisory group and the Ministry for the Environment and Ministry for Primary Industries have been working positively together to make the regulations practical and effective, and we are

• Ideal for Cattle Troughs • High Flow • Side/Bottom Mount • Detatch to Clean • Compact/Robust

keen to see a decision announced on the outcome.” Southland dairy farmer and advisory group member Paul Turner says it is important for farmers to have clarity around what they are doing for next season and beyond in terms of wintering practices. “People are holding back because they are unsure what to do from a regulatory perspective,” he says.

• Ideal for Small/Low Demand Troughs • Low Flow • Above/Below Water Mount • Built in Check-Valve

0800 JOBE VALVES jobevalves.com

• Ideal for Compartment Troughs/Tanks • High Flow • Top Mount • Detach to Clean • Compact/Robust


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

global agribusiness research analysts sharing market outlooks

24 MARKETS & TRENDS

Rabobank supports clients from farm to fork in

40

COUNTRIES

100 000

12630

farmers to connect Content supplied by Rabobank - Growing New Zealand Together with worldwide , a Better

Cattle prices remain strong STRONG DEMAND and limited cattle supplies saw cattle prices rise across most major cattle producing countries. Australian and Brazilian prices (in US$) in particular are currently trading 36% and 23% higher, respectively, than a year ago – see graph.

tinue to dominate the market. We expect this producer demand will remain strong through Q1 before easing into Q2.

Brazil

Europe

Australia

ONGOING FAVOURABLE seasons have supported strong domestic producer demand and sustained record cattle prices into 2021. The Eastern Young Cattle Indicator (EYCI) averaged AU$ 8.67/kg in January, 64% higher YOY. Heavy steer (300kg-400kg cwt) prices averaged AU$ 6.47/kg, 19% higher YOY. Restocking and herd rebuilding activities con-

China

but also the low supply, attributed to limited local production and delayed circulation of imported beef given strict inspection for Covid-19. China’s beef imports reached 2.12m metric tons in 2020, up 27.7% YOY, despite the disruptions (including license suspension on some exporters and strict import inspection at ports). Imports from Australia, Uruguay and New Zealand have declined, but imports from Brazil, Argentina, and the US have increased strongly.

The normal seasonal increase in cattle supply, which usually starts in January, has been delayed due to poor pasture conditions caused by delayed and below average rainfall. We don’t believe significant increases in supply will occur until March and April, and, as a result, prices should remain at high levels in the short term.

A LACK of supply has pushed live cattle prices further into record territory after reaching a temporary peak in November 2020. Prices in January 2021 (BRL 289.01/15kg) are 49.7% higher YOY.

BEEF PRICES in China continue to rise despite a new wave of Covid-19 causing lockdowns and reduced foodservice demand. Retail beef prices reached CNY 88/kg in January, up 7% YOY. Meanwhile, pork prices only rose 1.3%, and white broiler fell 8.3%. Strong beef prices reflect seasonal demand ahead of Lunar New Year

WE EXPECT EU27+UK beef production to contract by 2% in 2021. Reduced cattle inventories in main markets such as Ireland, UK, Germany and France will be a lead cause.


usiness ysts et outlooks

Rabobank supports clients from farm to fork in

40

RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

MARKETS & TRENDS 25

COUNTRIES

Content supplied by Rabobank - Growing a Better New Zealand Together

tively well. However, a stronger NZ$ is not helping NZ farmer returns despite the lift in US imported lean beef prices. The average per unit value for exports to the US fell 5% to NZ$ 7,142/ metric ton in December. Meanwhile, volumes and values of beef exports to China increased through Q4 of 2020. Rabobank expects solid returns from key export markets to see farmgate prices generally hold firm next quarter, with some potential for upward pressure.

as foodservice remains restricted across Europe.

US

Meanwhile in Poland, increasing feed costs as a result of dry weather conditions are reducing profitability and are expected to cause setbacks in production. 2020 was a challenging year for the beef sector in the EU27+UK

due to disruptions in both supply and demand as the Covid-19 pandemic unfolded. The average beef carcass price in the EU at the end of 2020 came close to 2019 levels. Downward price pressure is expected in Q1 2021,

THE STRENGTH in the futures market is sending a strong message to producers that the market will be getting better and to delay marketing or push cattle forward. Fed cattle prices have traded in a narrow price range for the year to date (US$ 109/CWT to US$ 114/CWT). Meanwhile, live cattle futures have been trading US$ 6/CWT to US$ 12/ CWT above the cash market. Active fund buying and additional stimulus money reaching consumers is fuelling this lift in futures. Beef demand did show signs of slowing during Q4 but, all indications are that demand has returned. Exports remain strong and beef cut-out values are as much as US$ 25/ CWT above a year ago in spite of the increased production.

NZ

AFTER FALLING through Q4 of 2020, cattle prices have seen a lift in the new year. The North Island bull price as of 8 February at NZ$ 5/ kg was equal to its position in 2020 and 1.3% lower than the five-year average. A very strong US market, despite all the challenges with Covid-

19 and slower economic conditions, has seen US domestic trimmings prices lift through December and January and this has flowed through to imported trimmings prices. This lift in prices is further supported by the much reduced volumes of Australian exports. Export markets continue to perform rela-

GET AHEAD OF THE GAME

PRE-ORDER FOR SPRING AND GET A BONUS POWER UPGRADE to the next horsepower model on all Magnum, Optum, Puma ST5 and Maxxum ST5 tractors*

Built to your specs 3 Years 0% Interest Free* 3 year/3,000 hour RedCover Premier Plus warranty*

Talk to your local Case IH dealer today

0800 CASE IH | caseih.co.nz

*Promotion ends 31st March 2021 and applies to factory forward orders only, for delivery by 31st December 2021. Excludes Puma and Maxxum Tier 3. Bonus Power Upgrade is available within a model range only (upgrades cannot be made between different model families). Finance offers are subject to normal lending criteria. Finance is based off 40% deposit, full GST upfront, 36 monthly principal and interest repayments. Some exclusions may apply. For full terms and conditions of this promotion, please contact your local Case IH dealer, or visit caseih.co.nz.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

26 OPINION EDITORIAL

EDNA

Scrutiny needed BEEF+LAMB NZ and the NZ Meat Board’s annual meeting, to be held in Invercargill on March 17, is likely to be a more fiery affair than the usual. Chair Andrew Morrison and his fellow directors will find themselves under the gun from levypayers over a resolution on the agenda to substantially increase director fees for both Beef+Lamb and the Meat Board. As Morrison has conceded, “directors’ fees are always closely scrutinised” and you can bet it will be a hot topic of discussion at the meeting. It can be argued, and Morrison vigorously has, that the proposed increase in director remuneration is justifiable. However, one can seriously question both the process and optics in the way the board has made its decision. The disestablishment of the Directors Independent Remuneration Committee (DIRC), an independent body that recommends any changes in director remuneration, looks selfserving. The DIRC was established under previous chair James Parsons and was a sound move bringing Beef+Lamb NZ in line with how many other farmer-owned organisations operate – including DairyNZ and Fonterra. Morrison claims the board decided to do away with the DIRC because the directors agreed that the best approach was for themselves to actively take ownership of remuneration recommendations. Really? Meanwhile, the argument that the board sought ‘independent advice’ on the fee increases also rings hollow. The board hired consultants – at what price, they refuse to say – who then proceeded to recommend a healthy pay increase for directors. It is hard to view this advice as very ‘independent’. Then we get to the actual director fee increases themselves. The Meat Board alone sees a 38% jump in the chair’s annual remuneration and a 23% increase in all the other directors’ fees. On what planet do Morrison and company reside if they think that kind of hike is appropriate? How many sheep and beef farmers are expecting an increase in income of 23% this year? For Morrison to try and justify this leap in remuneration because of the ‘increase in workload’ for directors is laughable. Directors who get voted on to organisations should know what kind the commitment they need to make. If directors on a public company claimed that ‘increased in workload’ justified them a 20%-plus pay increase, there would be blood on the floor of the annual meeting.

RURALNEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

HEAD OFFICE POSTAL ADDRESS: PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 PUBLISHER: Brian Hight ......................................... Ph 09 307 0399 GENERAL MANAGER: Adam Fricker ....................................... Ph 021-842 226 CONSULTING EDITOR: David Anderson .................................. Ph 09 307 0399 davida@ruralnews.co.nz

“Imagine how they’d scream if we ignored their bleats about carbon emissions and toxic chemicals!”

Want to share your opinion or gossip with the Hound? Send your emails to: hound@ruralnews.co.nz

THE HOUND Who’s paying?

Silly tits!

YOUR OLD mate notes that MPI was recently sued by WorkSafe in relation to the health and safety of its contractors. Apparently, the fine was as a result of contractors suffering chemical burns while carrying out disinfecting during a suspected Mycoplasma bovis outbreak on a Southland farm back in 2018. Co-offenders in the case, AsureQuality Limited (another government body) and OneStaff were sentenced last year. AsureQuality was fined $66,000 plus court costs of $2,392.93, while OneStaff had to pay $38,500 and the same amount of court costs. Last month, MPI was ordered to pay $30,000 plus prosecution costs of $3,800 and pay $1,666.66 in reparation for the five workers. Fantastic, one government department fining the other. As a mate of yours truly opined: “I wonder who paid? That’s right, you and me.

THE HOUND sees that the Australian National University in Canberra has taken ‘going woke’ to the next level. The university is encouraging its staff to use “parent-inclusive language”, such as “chest feeding” instead of “breastfeeding” and “human milk” rather than “mother’s milk”. Similarly, the terms “mother” and “father” should be replaced with “gestational” and “non-gestational” parent, according to the ANU’s ‘Gender-Inclusive Handbook’. It notes that while “many students will identify as ‘mothers’ and ‘fathers’, using these terms alone to describe parenthood…“excludes those who do not identify with gender-binaries”. Stone the crows! Or should that be: ‘Stone the ‘nonbinary, feathered, gestational and non-gestational avians’?

PRODUCTION: Dave Ferguson ...................... Ph 027 272 5372 davef@ruralnews.co.nz Becky Williams .......................Ph 021 100 4381 beckyw@ruralnews.co.nz REPORTERS: Sudesh Kissun ........................ Ph 021 963 177 sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz Peter Burke ........................... Ph 021 224 2184 peterb@ruralnews.co.nz MACHINERY EDITOR: Mark Daniel ............................. Ph 021 906 723 markd@ruralnews.co.nz

Out of touch

Bad look

THIS OLD mutt has always thought the people who inhabit the nation’s parliament are a weird bunch with very little in common with the average New Zealander. This view has been confirmed by recent research showing that 90% of MPs have a degree, but only 25% of country’s general population does. The research, carried out by Mark Blackham of Blackland PR and Geoffrey Miller of the Democracy Project, identified over 174 separate tertiary qualifications among parliament’s 120 MPs. The most popular qualifications were in the humanities (45 MPs, or 37% of all MPs) and law (25 MPs, or 20%). Your old mate reckons this probably shows why our parliamentarians are so out of touch and want to introduce totally impractical laws such as the proposed freshwater regulations.

YOUR CANINE crusader reckons something smells really iffy about the move by Beef+Lamb NZ directors to sack the independent committee set up to decide their remuneration and then award themselves a big pay rise this coming year. The move has understandably left sheep and beef farmers around the country seeing red and leaves a number of uncomfortable questions for BLNZ chair Andrew Morrison and his fellow directors to answer at the upcoming March 17 annual meeting in Invercargill. The first question would be, why? Especially when very few sheep and cattle farmers will be seeing any kind of pay increases this coming year. Morrison and Co may have some fancy answers, but the Hound suggests the optics of this move are very, very bad and show they care more about themselves than the farmers they are supposed to be representing.

AUCKLAND SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Stephen Pollard .......................... Ph 021 963 166 stephenp@ruralnews.co.nz

WELLINGTON SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Ron Mackay ................................. Ph 021 453 914 ronm@ruralnews.co.nz

WAIKATO SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Ted Darley .................................. Ph 021 832 505 ted@ruralnews.co.nz

SOUTH ISLAND SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Kaye Sutherland ....................... Ph 021 221 1994 kayes@ruralnews.co.nz

ABC audited circulation 79,553 as at 31/03/2019

DIGITAL STRATEGIST: Jessica Marshall ................ Ph 021 0232 6446

Rural News is published by Rural News Group Ltd. All editorial copy and photographs are subject to copyright and may not be reproduced without prior written permission of the publisher. Opinions or comments expressed within this publication are not necessarily those of staff, management or directors of Rural News Group Ltd.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

OPINION 27

Be aware of the facts! “Lies spread much farther than the truth, and news organisations play a powerful role in making this happen.”

COMMENT

Jacqueline Rowarth ible and qualified sources used to be the first step in ensuring news was reliable. Some of the current media reality appears to avoid that step. Craig Silverman, author of the Tow report “Lies, Damned Lies and Social Media”, suggested that online media frequently promote misinformation in an attempt to drive traffic and social engagement. “Lies spread much farther than the truth, and news organisations play a powerful role in making this happen”. Stories are designed to create emotional responses in the audience, particularly anger, anxiety, disgust, awe, excitement and humour. These are the main drivers for ‘sharing’ according to Wharton Business School researchers. By the time Professor Frizelle was interviewed, both anger and anxiety had been felt in various members of society – and possibly some of the other emotions as well. Even a single exposure to a fake headline makes it seem truer, but research just published from Harvard University reports, “surprising value of debunking fake news after exposure, with important implications for the fight against misinformation”. In 2018 an article in Harvard Business Review stated that executives must be prepared to communicate the facts quickly and to correct the fictions before they spread too far. The same applies to experts in science and other disciplines. If it is wrong, correct it. The challenge for the layman comes when they hear different stories from different scientists. The key is then identifying who has the credentials –

as Professor Frizelle has in cancer. Science communicators, who are often

trying to set new results in context, will cite the researchers that they are quoting, and will (at

least in theory) have checked the validity of the research. Fake news is the scourge of the airwaves. False news stories are 70% more likely to be retweeted than true stories and that it takes true stories about six times as

long to reach 1,500 people as it does for false stories to reach the same number of people. This is research from MIT – and the researchers urged a simple idea: think before you retweet. Sharing the good news about healthy coun-

try living is a different matter. • Dr Jacqueline Rowarth, Adjunct Professor Lincoln University, is a farmerelected director of DairyNZ and Ravensdown. The analysis and conclusions above are her own. jsrowarth@gmail.com

YOU’LL RATE IT TOO RATED 5 STARS LOWER NORTH ISLAND AND UPPER SOUTH ISLAND BY

TRACTA_SDF63612_YRIT_RN

TOWARDS THE end of February, we were hit with media coverage of a new report linking colorectal cancer and high nitrate drinking water in New Zealand. This isn’t the first time that the finger has been pointed at agriculture causing a health problem. Each time, agricultural scientists point out that the World Health Organisation report published in 2017 drew a blank on any sort of cancer linked to high nitrates. Nutrition scientists explain that nitrate is metabolised before it reaches the lower gastro-intestinal tract, which means that there is no plausible mechanism for causing cancer. And the recent New Zealand State of Cancer Report from the Cancer Control Agency did not mention drinking water or nitrate at all. What it did report was a 25% lower incidence of cancer in rural dwellers than in people living in urban areas. Further, the report was actually a survey of nitrate in drinking water that indicated if the Danish research were true, then people in NZ could be vulnerable. But the Danish research has not got traction whereas the WHO report has. None of these facts were mentioned in the media interviews. The fuss was created by a freshwater ecologist and amplified by Greenpeace, using words such as ‘robbed’ and ‘poisoning for profit’, thereby creating anger, as well as anxiety. After a couple of days, an interview with Professor Frank Frizelle, Professor of Colorectal Surgery at the University of Otago, appeared. He dispelled any notion of a link, describing it as a red herring. Professor Frizelle is an expert in the discipline of colorectal cancer. He is a medical adviser to Bowel Cancer NZ and is also Editor in Chief of the New Zealand Medical Journal. And he is easily found by a search engine. Verification from cred-

GROW SOME TALK TO YOUR SEED SPECIALIST TODAY.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

28 OPINION

Dubious politics at play FARM (Facts About Ruminant Methane) is a group of farmers and scientists who question the need for drastic cuts in ruminant methane. Owen Jennings prosecutes FARM’s argument in the second of a two part opinion piece… THE OTHER reason proponents, such as the Climate Change Commission, argue that we have to take actions is that methane is NZ’s big problem – because our live-

t Ve

stock numbers are high relative to other GHGproducing activities – so we need to pull our weight and “do something”. Answer: We are

Their grass, soil and other farm vegetation absorbs as much GHG as their cows and sheep produce. All vegetation takes in CO₂ for photosynthesis. This balanced situ-

already doing something. Our farmers are way ahead of the play. They are already offsetting all the methane they produce by sequestering huge amounts of CO₂.

ation using the age-old natural carbon cycle separates farming from other GHG emitters who have no natural offset. That is why farming should never be in the ETS or face any

ly n O

Easy Copper Deposits Demand for copper increases during late pregnancy, mating and lactation, right when the spring pasture copper levels are at their lowest.

Talk to your vet about Coppermax™ and Bayer Copper Capsules on your farm to ensure adequate copper levels and your herd's optimal performance and productivity.

WIN A 50” PANASONIC TV *

RRP

$1399.99

Ensure growth rates, production and reproduction performance are optimum. Convenient supplementation - quick to use injection or slow release capsules. Tested and proven in NZ conditions.

Only available from participating vet clinics.

*See in store for terms and conditions. Bayer Copper Capsules, Coppermax™ and Flexidine™ are Restricted Veterinary Medicines (RVM). Only available under veterinary authorisation. Face-Guard and Coppermax are trade marks of Elanco. Prolaject, Flexidine and Selovin are registered trade marks of Elanco. Bayer Copper Capsules, Coppermax™, Flexidine™, Face-Guard™, Prolaject™ and Selovin™ are registered under the ACVM Act 1997.

Pr ola jec t Fle xid ine

Ba y Ca er C ps op ule pe s r

Elanco and the diagonal bar logo are trade marks of Elanco or it’s affiliates. Elanco New Zealand, 106 Wiri Station Road, Manukau, Auckland 2104. www.elanco.com | 0800 446 121. © 2021 Elanco.

restrictions. But wait there is more. Of the one degree Celsius of warming we have recorded over the last 150 years, methane is allegedly responsible for a mere 10% -20% of this increase. Some 40%, at least, of methane emissions are natural. So, the effect of 10% reduction proposed by the Climate Change Commission makes no sense at all. It is pitiful. Hang about – it gets even worse still. And it is going to get all complicated and ‘sciencey’. GHGs operate in the electromagnetic spectrum. Figure 1 (shows the radiation transmitted by the atmosphere as UV, visible light and Infrared radiation (see the yellow band in the figure). The left-hand side of the figure (left of the red dotted line) shows the region of incoming solar radiation (0.2 to 3 micrometres wavelength span). The righthand side denotes the re-radiation from earth as long-wavelength infrared energy covering the 3 to 70 micrometre span. Each greenhouse gas is analysed separately in the lower part of the graph. The width and height of each absorption peak for each gas is clearly shown. The height of the peak denotes the maximum amount of radiant energy that each gas can possibly absorb over that range of wavelengths. The width of each absorption band shows the precise wavelengths to which that the particular greenhouse gas responds. It you examine each gas, you will see that methane, nitrous oxide, and ozone, only have a few narrow absorption bands with none absorbing 100% of any wavelength. Even CO₂ has only four peaks where absorption is over 50% and these occur in narrow bands, meaning CO₂ absorbs little energy.

Water vapour, in stark contrast, absorbs over a far wider range of wavelengths with three broad peaks of maximum 100% absorption and multiple small peaks. Above about 18 micrometres water vapour absorbs 100% of outgoing infrared energy. The published evidence shows that by far the dominant GHG absorbing solar radiation is water vapour. The absorption potential of solar radiation by the other GHGs is minuscule or absent. From a farmer’s point of view, methane and nitrous oxide can clearly be ignored as having no appreciable effect on warming. At a total only 0.012% of all the GHGs, or 0.00018% of the total atmosphere methane (and nitrous oxide) is physically incapable of impacting temperature. And we are going to beat our chests over a 0.13% reduction per year of something already unbelievably trivial and inconsequential. Time for a brain check, surely! Even decimating our entire cow herd and all our sheep will not make any impact on temperature at all – so infinitesimal it could never be measured by the most effective measuring tool. Meanwhile, the Climate Change Commission and the Government put their collective heads in the sand over Article 2 of the Paris Accord. Pretending we can cut the national herd by 15% plus other constraints, and not have a disastrous reduction in production and exports simply shows alarming ignorance. One can only further conclude that something else is going on that isn’t science – virtue signalling by NZ leaders and dubious politics at international level. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

OPINION 29

Back to the future

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

BLANKET RULES DON’T WORK!

FORMER US agriculture secretary Tom Vilsack has been confirmed to take up to his old role as the head of the US Department of Agriculture. Following a Senate vote last month, Vilsack returns to the job he held under the Obama administration in new President Joe Biden’s cabinet. His nomination met little resistance in the Senate, which only set aside 20 minutes for debate over his nomination. While farm groups welcomed the nomination of Vilsack, Biden

THE ARROGANCE of central Government in dictating that every NZ farm should run 15% less livestock! What if they are already understocked? What if our cows are carbon clean, lean and mean milk producers and other countries are left to produce the milk with their big, bad, dirty double-polluting cows? You fools will have INCREASED the world’s emissions from milk production, while trying to reduce them. Blanket rules just don’t make any sense. Tell us farmers your problem and trust us as farmers to find our own solutions that work. We can modify our own farm management to deal with our own greenhouse gasses, water pollution, erosion or nutrient loss issues. The last thing we need is an uneducated, fanatical, totalitarian, green-washed, socialist politician in Wellington trying to centrally control, regulate and dictate the management of every farm business enterprise in NZ from the Beehive. So, buzz off! Dave Stanton RD2, Geraldine

Vilsack served as USDA Secretary for nearly the entirety of the Obama administration, from 2009 until 2017. After leaving USDA, he was chief executive of the U.S. Dairy Export Council. Prior to his first stint as agriculture secretary, Vilsack was Governor of Iowa from 1999-2007.

faces some political headwinds in the US farm sector. In the first Farm Journal Pulse to gauge support for the Biden Administration, only 14% of the 1,459 farmers surveyed said they approve of the job done by the new administration. Of those surveyed, 75% said they strongly disapprove of the way Joe Biden is handling his job as President. At his confirmation hearing, Vilsack noted that while he is returning to his former job, the circumstances are very different.

Tom Vilsack has been confirmed to take up to his old role as the head of the US Department of Agriculture.

Are you hitting your target market? For advice, contact your local sales consultant Auckland

Stephen Pollard ....... Ph 021-963 166

Waikato

Ted Darley ................ Ph 021-832 505

Wellington

Ron Mackay ............ Ph 021-453 914

Christchurch Kaye Sutherland .... Ph 021-221 1994

■ BREAKING NEWS ■ AGRIBUSINESS HEADER ■ MARKETS & TRENDS

■ MACHINERY REVIEWS ■ MANAGEMENT HEADER ■ AND MUCH MORE... HEADER

Ferist et quati aut pedici te vollab imod quamet atur soleniet quiatibu. PAGE 15

Ferist et quati aut pedici te vollab imod quamet atur soleniet quiatibu. PAGE 23

Ferist et quati aut pedici te vollab imod quamet atur soleniet quiatibu.

RURALNEWS

PAGE 24

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

1000 EPS

$21,495 +

*

$1,500 FREE ACCESSORIES^^

+

DIESEL HD EPS ADC

1 2 7

3

$27,995 +

*

$2,000 FREE ACCESSORIES^^

6

4

6

+

3.99% FINANCE P.A+

7

5

1

3.99% FINANCE P.A+

NEW ZEALAND’S FASTEST GROWING SXS BRAND IS IN HIGH DEMAND#

2 4

3

5

ACCESSORY IDEAS 1. Premium Poly sports roof #2882912 2. Tip out windscreen #2889013 3. Poly rear panel #2883773 4. Steel half doors #AUST508

5. Scrub bar and side rail kid #AUST555 6. Work beacon LED light #2883265 7. Ranger snorkel kit #AUST403

ACCESSORY IDEAS 1. Glass tip out screen #2889031 2. Bull bar and side rail kit #AUST548 3. Poly half door #2882559 4. Tip down Headache rack #2881531

IT’S WORTH THE WAIT FOR A BRAND YOU CAN TRUST!

5. Premium poly sport roof #2882912 6. Poly rear panel #2883773 7. Pro Armor 81cm single-row light bar #2884299

Avoid disappointment and delays

SEE YOUR POLARIS DEALER AND ORDER TODAY

*Offer ends 31/3/21 or while stocks last. Offer only available at participating Polaris Dealers. Not valid with any other offer. Excludes fleet clients. ^^Accessories offer only valid with the purchase of a new Ranger 1000 EPS and Ranger Diesel HD EPS ADC. +Finance offer is only available on selected models and excludes youth models. GST registered customers only. 24-month term contract. Fees and conditions apply (normal lending criteria applies) Finance is provided by Polaris Finance, a program operated by De Lage Landen Limited Company No 135515. **Models shown with optional extra accessories.

0800 440 290 | www.polarisnewzealand.com |

#Industry Data 2020

/PolarisNZ |

/polarisorv_nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

30 MANAGEMENT

NZ situation puts some regen ag claims to the test REGENERATIVE AGRICULTURE (RA) is presently a hot topic of discussion. RA itself is not a specific, defined system. It incorporates several components, which aim to improve soil quality and increase soil carbon. Most of these are already well-established in NZ farm systems, i.e. using pasture, rotational grazing, minimumtill cultivation, and minimising bare soil with cover crops. Let’s look at two key themes of RA in a NZ context. Organic matter & soil carbon Scientists estimate NZ soils contain 99 t/ha soil organic carbon (SOC). This is higher than many other countries, such as areas of North America, South Africa and Australia. There are several reasons for this, including our latitude and cooler climate. NZ agricultural soils are dominated by permanent pasture, rotationally grazed by sheep, cattle, and deer. This is not the case in many other countries. Some overseas farm land has been historically

heavily cultivated and cropped, which inevitably depletes soil organic matter. It is primarily in these ‘degenerated’ carbon-poor soils that RA practices have been associated with ‘regenerating’. For example, an increase of SOC of 4t/ ha/year was estimated in Michigan, USA, to 50t SOC, through changing from set stocking to rotational grazing (Stanley et al. 2018); or an increase of SOC of 8t/ ha/year was estimated in Georgia, USA, to 40t SOC, through conversion from cropping to sowing pasture and rotational grazing (Machmuller et al. 2015). At Lincoln, NZ, an increase of SOC of 5t/ha/ year was estimated, to 77t SOC, through sowing a degraded cropping soil into pasture (Francis et al. 1999). In this trial the same increase in SOC came from sowing a pasture of straight perennial ryegrass, versus a pasture mix of prairie grass, timothy, tall fescue, chicory, lucerne, white clover and red clover. Diverse seed mixes for pasture While most of

Blair Cotching says regenerative agriculture is a hot topic of discussion in farming circles.

RA focuses on the use of pasture, mintill establishment and rotational grazing, some proponents suggest sowing diverse seed mixes. For pastoral-based soils in NZ, which are typically rotationally grazed and high in SOC, there is presently no scientific evidence that sowing a very diverse pasture seed mix will increase soil carbon. Another suggestion in RA is to use a longer grazing rotation, letting

plants lose feed quality and rot down into the soil. However, a standard grazing system can grow a similar amount, returning the plant nutrients to the soil through dung and urine (rather than as plant material). Under good grazing pasture quality is higher, leading to better animal performance. Ryegrass and white clover are the two most widely sown permanent pasture species in NZ grazing systems because:

Decades of scientific research in NZ have shown ryegrass is a highly efficient photosynthesiser across most of the country. Its growth habit, productivity, and grazing tolerance allow it to thrive in a diverse range of climatic conditions and livestock systems. Likewise, research has repeatedly demonstrated white clover adds significant value to our grazed systems, improving animal nutrition and overall pasture DM growth and capturing atmospheric nitrogen. Even so, successfully managing these two different species in one grazing sward over several years is not always easy, because each has different requirements for establishment and survival. Many other plant species have found a place in NZ farm systems, including cocksfoot, meadow fescue, brome and prairie grass, timothy, phalaris, lucerne, red clover, lotus, annual clover, chicory and plantain. Within the ryegrass family, development of tetraploid and hybrid ryegrasses, as well as

on-going advancements in novel endophytes, have further broadened pasture diversity. In effect, NZ has been researching and practicing multi-species pasture mixes for many decades. We have built a great deal of practical knowledge about what species grow together, and how. But as we see with white clover in many NZ ryegrass pastures, a simple, widely used, two-species mix is in fact a highly complex relationship requiring careful management to maintain both productivity and sustainability. Every time another species is added to the pasture mix the level of complexity increases and may need very different (and in many cases incompatible) management as the grazing tolerance and persistence of species varies hugely. It’s been suggested that adding fast establishing species to a seed mix can be a ‘cover crop’, protecting slower establishing species. This concept has commonly been used on sandy soils, prone to wind erosion

to provide quick ground cover. However, in most situations results of this practice are mixed, as the fast establishing species compete for light, nutrients and water with slower establishing species, so can suppress their establishment. If the fast establishing species don’t persist, bare soil left in their wake encourages weed infestation. Conclusion The philosophy behind RA to farm with a focus on soil health and soil carbon is a good one. It is also the aim of much of our NZ pastoral system, driven through pasture use, rotational grazing, and where applicable minimum tillage and cover crops. However, the science has shown you cannot effectively combine 10, let alone 30, diverse plant species in a grazed pasture. Over time the grazing tolerant and persistent species dominate. • Blair Cotching is a pasture systems manager at Barenbrug, the largest privately owned seed company in the world and part of Royal Barenbrug Group.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

MANAGEMENT 31

Overseer helps with FEP SOUTHLAND BASED farm consultant Allison McDonald reckons using OverseerFM is a big help in developing Farm Environment Plans (FEPs). “It adds value to the farm plan,” she explains. “You see things above ground on farm and think ‘that could be important’ but using OverseerFM enables you to also ‘look’ at what is below ground and capture anything you may have missed.” McDonald, who works for Agribusiness Consultants Ltd, has recently completed a FEP for Pam Brock and her son Jason, who farm dairy cattle – mainly Friesian – over 311 ha at Wallacetown, near Invercargill. Brook says using OverseerFM has helped support decisions about changes they plan to make to the farm and will also inform future planning. “We wanted a plan to see how we are doing now and compare that with what we could do, to improve our farming practices towards a better environment,” she says. “We are alongside a river and have a major creek running through the farm. Good environmental practice has always been very important to us, but with everything that is happening in farming, there is an increased

Pam and Jason Brock say using OverseerFM has helped support decisions about changes they plan to make to the farm and will also inform future planning.

awareness.” McDonald says she uses OverseerFM with clients for a variety of reasons, including FEPs. “I’ve been using it in reports ahead of farm sales. It is now more common for potential buyers to want to know about issues such as nutrient leaching and GHG emissions. With that and with FEPs, it helps with planning. When you go around a farm, you can see mud or no mud, or grass or

no grass but you can’t see nutrient loss,” she explains. “Many of my clients want to run scenarios using OverseerFM to see where their farm system is going. For instance, Pam and Jason are changing the land use in some areas and it was useful for them to know where there would be more run off, less run off or if it wouldn’t make much difference.” Pam Brock says the process was very simple.

“Allison drove around the farm. We gave her a map, with all the hazards marked and things like the size of paddocks. She added in information such as where we have trees and drainage and we provided other details, such as what we have done and plan to do with winter crops,” she says. “She then drew up the plan and nutrient budget and that has helped us to see where we are doing well and where we could make improve-

ments. Some things we were already planning to do and it helped confirm that for us and will also help us make further decisions.” The Brocks are in the process of changing their winter cropping regime. “We have 750 cows, all wintered on the farm and have been feeding solely fodder beet for years,” she explains. “This year, we have put the heifers on kale and are looking at the possibility of a variation of winter crops or

moving away from fodder beet altogether.” McDonald says that for some farmers, the information gained through running OverseerFM scenarios is helping them make decisions now for requirements that will come into force in several years’ time. “For instance, I worked with a farm that needs to work towards a nitrogen loss limit of 30 kgN/ha. It was eye opening for them to see what that was going to

BOE1154 (A)

INTRODUCING THE LATEST TOOL IN THE TOOLBOX FOR YOUR HOGGETS…

look like for their farm system.” She says this helps farmers to plan what they will do for the future and how they can start taking steps to make their business more resilient now, rather than waiting two to five years. “For instance, if people see they are going to have to drop stock numbers, they might decide to start paying off more debt now.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

32 MANAGEMENT

Data key to benchmarking WITHOUT DATA and benchmarking, farmers are in the dark about their performance, particularly when it comes to animal health and welfare. Samantha Tennent, the new general manager for WelFarm Ltd, says data and benchmarking is needed to show what ‘good’ looks like and where opportunities to improve lie. “One tool we have available to give us that benchmarking is the WelFarm programme,” she explains. “With the increased scrutiny on our dairy sector to prove our farmers are operating sustainably, and to continue our access to export markets, it is even more important we have the evidence that we are looking after our animals

to a high standard.” She says animal health is also a big cost on-farm and good herd health is crucial to optimise performance. Tennent has a background in veterinary technology and has worked in the dairy sector across a variety of roles, recently as an animal developer for DairyNZ managing the InCalf programme. “The opportunity to help drive WelFarm intrigued me given my background and passion for dairy and I’m really excited to raise awareness across the sector and get more farmers into the programme,” she says. WelFarm is an assurance programme developed by XLVets and has been used on-farm since 2014. It is available to all farmers and veterinar-

WelFarm Ltd general manager Samantha Tennent says data and benchmarking is needed to show farmers where opportunities to improve lie.

ians and utilitises data collected throughout the season to benchmark farms nationally and regionally. This helps identify areas where farm productivity and animal wellness could be optimised

through effecting change. It also supports farmers who are making improvements towards goals, showing them whether their efforts are succeeding. “We know small shifts in in-calf rates, reduc-

ing somatic cell counts, reducing mastitis and increasing milksolids all have significant impact on performance and profitability, and how we use antibiotics and other drugs is continually under the microscope,”

Tennent explains. Greg Lindsay, of Franklin Vets, has been using the programme with farmers for several seasons. “Through the reporting at the end of the season, I was able to have a valuable discussion with one farmer [about] how they were using lower levels of antibiotics, which was great, but they were also using significantly less anti-inflammatories than others in the area.” He says since antiinflammatories are useful tools to manage pain. The discussion covered how these can be used onfarm to support animals, which can improve performance outcomes and animal welfare. “They started using it for more procedures after that conversation,” Lind-

say says. “I think that’s a great win. I had the evidence to show them where they sat, and they were receptive to discussing ideas.” He says farmers regularly come to us for advice and WelFarm reporting provides a great pathway to develop plans towards their goals. Tennent encourages farmers to discuss with their vets whether they are already offering the programme and vets to get in touch if they want more information and support to implement it in their clinic. “It’s a great initiative and the only one of its kind in New Zealand. Without the data and benchmarking we don’t know what good actually looks like and whether our efforts to improve are having an effect.”

0% FINANCE*

ZERO IN ON A GREAT TRACTOR AT A GREAT INTEREST RATE. MF GLOBAL SERIES MF 4700, MF 5700 AND MF 6700 I 74 – 132 HP Get it done with a super versatile Massey Ferguson Global Series tractor at a super low 0% interest rate.* These range of tractors are purpose built in the latest state-of-the-art facilities, combining the very best of today’s technologies with comfort, simplicity, reliability and quality. With up to 5,200 kg 3-point lift capacity, reliable AGCO Power engines and high capacity hydraulics with up to 98 l/min flow, now is the time to secure a tractor that is out of this world with the MF Global Series.

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL MASSEY FERGUSON DEALER TODAY *Offer ends 31st March 2021, while stocks last. Finance with an interest rate of 0% p.a. available on Hire Purchase agreement based on minimum 30% deposit, the GST component repaid after 4 months and monthly repayments in arrears over a 36 month term. Fees and lending conditions apply to approved GST number holders who use the equipment for business purposes. Finance is approved by AGCO Finance Limited. GST number 88-831-861.

MASSEYFERGUSON.CO.NZ | FREECALL 0800 825 914

A world of experience. Working with you.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

ANIMAL HEALTH 33

Leptospirosis is not just a dairy farming problem PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

NEW RESEARCH has shown that dry stock farmers are just as likely to be infected with leptospirosis as dairy farmers. Professor of Veterinary Public Health at Massey University Jackie Benschop, one of NZ’s leading experts in this field, says they have been working with a statistician at Warwick University in England to develop a model to identify the types of farmers who are notified with leptospirosis. She told Rural News it remains a serious disease for dairy farmers, but it is not only dairy farmers that get lepto. The lack of information about dry stock farmers having the disease arises, in part, because of the way the data is collected which often doesn’t differentiate between farming types. “By using patterns in routinely collected data, for example the season and the strain of lepto, we have been able to identify those occupations for which there was vagueness,” Benschop explains. “Either the occupation was missing or it was

Professor Jackie Benschop (inset) says while leptospirosis remains a serious disease for dairy farmers, it is not only dairy farmers who get the disease.

only recorded as farmer and didn’t have the farming type.” She says the crux of this research paper is that they have been able to use mathematical modelling to show that dry stock farmers are just as likely to be notified with lepto as dairy farmers. Benschop says the research shows that while dry stock farmers don’t see their stock every day

like dairy farmers, they are still catching lepto. “It is important to remember that nearly all dairy farmers have a lepto vaccination programme for their animals, whereas the uptake of these programmes amongst dry stock farmer is much less common.” She says often when the data is being collected, dairy farmers will say they are dairy farm-

ers, but dry stock farmers often don’t say what animals they farm. Benschop says you have to add into the mix shearers and meat workers who have no say in the vaccination status of the stock they handle. In addition to this work, the Massey team are looking at other strains of leptospirosis in NZ such as Tarassovi and Ballum, which are not

currently in vaccinations for cattle, sheep and deer. “This work provides important evidence for reassessing the current minimal use of leptospirosis vaccinations in dry stock,” she explains. “Vaccination programmes applied to dry stock should help reduce the high proportion of meatworkers and dry stock farmers being infected with the serovars

BIONIC PLUS HOGGET – HELPING TO PUT THEM RIGHT WHERE YOU WANT THEM AT MATING

in the vaccines. The effectiveness of such a vaccination programme has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of ‘dairy farm fever’ in dairy workers in the past 40 years.” Benschop says she and her researchers are fortunate to have strong relationships with industry and that includes those in health who collect the data. She says

while it would be great to improve some aspects of data collection, to differentiate between farmer types, it is important to acknowledge the busyness of the NZ public health workers and it is great to be able to use the data collected to date. From January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2019, there was an average of 140 cases of leptospirosis every year in NZ. This was an 89% increase – compared to five years prior between 2012 and 2016 where there were only 74 cases per year. Benschop says the new research has found that the patient’s occupation was only recorded fully in two thirds of cases in surveillance data taken between 1999 and 2016, when there was a total of 1557 cases. Looking ahead, she says their research will have to widen. Benschop points to advent of sheep milking, dairy goats and trials with deer milk. She says they are keen to connect with all farming endeavours to assess and advise on leptospirosis risk for example in the sheep and goat milk industries. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

This new controlled release combination capsule releases abamectin and albendazole plus selenium and cobalt continuously for 100 days. By using a combination capsule in conjunction with management techniques such as refugia, the threat of parasite resistance developing can be significantly reduced.

BOE1154 (B)

AVAILABLE FROM YOUR PARTICIPATING VETERINARY CLINIC Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health New Zealand Limited. Level 3, 2 Osterley Way, Manukau, Auckland, New Zealand. Registered pursuant to the ACVM Act 1997, No. A011826. © Copyright 2021 Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health New Zealand Limited. All rights reserved. NZ-OVI-0005-2021.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

34 ANIMAL HEALTH

M.bovis review a chance to learn PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

MINISTRY FOR Primary Industries director general Ray Smith says his

organisation absolutely supports a review into the handling of the Mycoplasma bovis outbreak. Smith says it’s the biggest biosecurity incursion

in New Zealand history and eradicating it will end up costing close to a billion dollars. Recently, the Government announced that a

special committee will review the M. bovis programme – headed by Nicola Shadbolt, professor of farm and agribusiness at Massey

University. Also on the committee are Dr Roger Paskin, a highly-regarded veterinarian from Australia, Caroline Saunders from Lincoln Univer-

sity and Tony Cleland, a South Island dairy farmer and chairman of the rural insurance company, FMG. Shadbolt says the review is not a witchhunt and the aim is to “gain learnings” and apply these to any future event like this. NZ is the first country in the world to try and

FREE TOOL BOX

the local level. You have to use local people and use local knowledge and engage them in the strategy,” he told Rural News. Smith says there are now only 10 active confirmed cases of M. bovis, all in Canterbury. He says the rest of NZ is M. bovis free and has been for the past nine months, but he

“The purpose of the review is not so much to troll through all the things that happened along the way, but actually to take a forward view about what we can take out of the journey we have been on and make sure we are much fitter for the future..”

WITH QUALIFYING ORDER

ORDER BETWEEN 1 FEBRUARY - 30 APRIL, 2021 & ASK FOR Z TAGS IN STORE! TO QUALIFY PURCHASE EITHER OF THE FOLLOWING: • 250 Cattle or Deer NAIT RFID tags • 500 Sheep or Goat RFID tag

VISIT ZTags.com

M.bovis review head Nicola Shadbolt says it is not a witch-hunt.

WANT TO PLACE AN ORDER? GET INTO YOUR RURAL RETAILER TODAY!

T’s & C’s: Only one toolbox per customer. An order must contain one of the following qualifying amounts as listed. The toolbox will be dispatched at time of tag order dispatch. While stocks last. TRACTA_DAT63454_NZ_TBB_RN

eradicate M. bovis and Smith admits it’s been a tough road. “We now need to chronicle the ‘learnings’ so that if we have to do some similar thing again, we start better and faster next time,” he told Rural News. “So, the purpose of the review is not so much to troll through all the things that happened along the way, but actually to take a forward view about what we can take out of the journey we have been on and make sure we are much fitter for the future.” Smith says the reality is that other diseases will come into the country and, actually, M. bovis is not the worst of the diseases we could have had. He says NZ would do itself a disservice if it didn’t have an independent review and look forward to see what we could take out of it. One of the big lessons Smith has taken out of this is, “if we have these big events, you have to get on board the very people you are affecting and have relationships at

warns it’s possible that, next spring, bulk milk testing may yield more cases. One of the issues that caused grief at the start of M. bovis was poor compliance with NAIT, but Smith says compliance is now high. However, he says they are still prosecuting some farmers for non-compliance. “I’d rather wish it wasn’t that way, but we have to push hard to get compliance.” Smith says one of the interesting things learned through the M. bovis operation was the nature of our farming systems and how it operates. For example, some calf rearers and traders were found to be higher biosecurity risks because of the very nature of these operations. “I’m interested to know whether we have enough controls around those sorts of those operations. It’s not that people are trying to get it wrong, but there is inherently more risk when you are trading large number of animals or mixing them,” he says.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

ANIMAL HEALTH 35

Less work, better results THE AVERAGE sheep farmer is in their late 50s and the labour-intensive task of drenching lambs becomes more physically demanding with each passing year. However, a new spoton product called Scorpius Elite is hitting the market that is claimed will save farmers both time and physical effort. “Back in 2010 when the idea sparked, a farming friend had worked out orally drenching his lambs was equivalent to an extra labour unit over summer on his farm,” says Donaghys managing director, Jeremy Silva. “He made the comment that there had to be a better way to protect his lambs from parasites and I took it back to our lab. “We discussed ideas with our formulation scientists and other farm-

ers facing similar issues, working out what was achievable, and that kicked off the development project for Scorpius Elite.” Silva says the objective was to find an easy and effective way to treat lambs for internal parasites while reducing the chances of developing drench resistance, which meant it needed to be a combination product. “We chose the skinlevel spot-on method for the application; we knew it couldn’t be a pour on as thick layers of wool could form a barrier preventing absorption of active ingredients,” he explains. “And between the shoulder blades made sense as it’s easily accessible while sheep are standing and a good target for consistency of

Field trials of the spot-on, lamb parasite treatment performed better than expected, even outperforming triple oral drenches.

application.” The product uses a normal oral drench gun nozzle to penetrate the wool so doesn’t require any new equipment to use it. The active ingredients are eprinomectin and levamisole. Eprinomectin is a macrocyclic lactone and hasn’t been

used in sheep in New Zealand before. However, Silva says extensive trial work showed its efficacy and it’s found in many pour-ons, injections and oral drenches for cattle. Levamisole has been used widely in sheep and cattle in New Zealand in oral, injectable and pour-on formulations for over 40

years. The Donaghys team tried several different formulations to help overcome the unique challenges from the woolcovered skin of sheep. They were keen to find a way to facilitate both active ingredients penetrating the skin while not harming the skin or

wool and keeping the active ingredients stable to maintain an acceptable shelf life. Silva says results from the field trials exceeded expectations, the spot-on formulation performed better than expected, even outperforming the triple oral drenches they had hoped to match.

Protect your farm and your family from Salmonella

Salmonella is widespread on New Zealand dairy farms and cases are increasing nationwide1. Striking without warning and spreading quickly, Salmonella can pass from your stock to the ones you care about most. Vaccinate today to reduce the destructive impact of an outbreak.

SALVEXIN®+B. NEW ZEALAND’S ONLY SALMONELLA VACCINE FOR SHEEP AND CATTLE AVAILABLE ONLY UNDER VETERINARY AUTHORISATION. ACVM No: A7886. Schering-Plough Animal Health Ltd. Ph: 0800 800 543. www.msd-animal-health.co.nz NZ-SAL-201200001 ©2020 Intervet International B.V. All Rights Reserved. 1. Surveillance. Vols 41-47, No. 3, September 2014-2020

“We did an early study on a farm in the Hawke’s Bay that had a variety of parasite species with severe levamisole resistance and Scorpius Elite had 100% efficacy. “This efficacy wasn’t just due to the addition of eprinomectin, a test spot-on application with levamisole only was more effective than an oral levamisole – the spot-on improved efficacy,” Silva says. It was also successfully tested in a variety of wool lengths in crossbred sheep. He says the product has a short meat withholding period of sixteen days, making it ideal for use in young, rapidly growing lambs, being regularly drafted for slaughter. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

36 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Machines reduce spreading time MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

LIQUID MANURE is a natural source of nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus, organic matter and minerals. Achieving even slurry application regardless of weather conditions, crop type and date is critical. Distributing the slurry below the crop canopy instead of on the crop foliage has significant benefits, including 91% reduction in smell and up to 90% improvement in nitrogen retention. Cutting silage removes large quantities of potassium from paddocks, so applying slurry that contains large volumes of potassium makes good agronomic sense, alongside reducing the cost of

Abbey Machinery’s 10.7 metre wide applicators are available in Trailing Shoe or DM Band Spreader formats.

inorganic fertiliser. According to a 2020 Irish Teagasc study, trailing shoe and dribble bar

applicators can reduce ammonia losses by 30% and 60% respectively. This is because the slurry

is placed in bands directly onto the soil surface just below the grass. Other benefits include reduc-

ing sward contamination from slurry, so decreasing grazing return times compared to a traditional

splash plate applicator and more nitrogen being retained by the grass sward. Abbey Machinery’s recently introduced 10.7 metre wide applicators are available in Trailing Shoe or DM Band Spreader formats, with the wider application width. These are said to reduce the infield slurry spreading time by up to 35% compared to narrower applicators, with the associated benefit of less soil compaction. The Abbey-built DM Bandspreader is chassis mounted, taking its slurry feed from the rear of the tanker. From here, a Vogelsang 42-hole distributor conveys slurry to outlets spaced at 250mm intervals across the boom.

The extended boom tips are hydraulic folding, which has the added benefit of a break-back system should they meet with paddock boundaries or immoveable objects – if the booms are positioned too close to field or paddock boundaries. Low overall heights have been made possible. Also, the 1.5m extensions result in an overall height for transport and a compact machine. The 10.7m Trailing Shoe comes with the same Vogelsang 42-hole distributor and a 40mm hose system. The applicator follows the ground contours, while accurately placing nutrient in even lines at the base of the crop using steel wear points and rubber outlets. www.farmgard.co.nz

Strewth mate... it’s a shocker! OVER THE ditch in Australia, Toyota utes and trucks are the workhorses of the country’s economy. With an eye to reducing emissions, as we move into the future, Toyota Australia has converted a venerable Landcruiser 70 Series single-cab ute to an electric drive line. This will be trialled at a BHP Nickel West mine site in Western Australia. The conversion, carried out by Toyota Australia’s product planning and development division in Port Melbourne, sees the LC 70 equipped for underground use, where it will operate under full battery power. Toyota Australia’s president and

chief executive Matthew Callachor says the trial is another step in the Japanese manufacturer’s move towards a zero carbon emissions future. “BHP and Toyota have demonstrated a strong relationship throughout the last 20 years and this project is a testament to how we can work together in our respective industries to change the future,” Callachor said. Edgar Basto, president, of Minerals Australia, BHP, says the partnership is another step in the mining giant’s ongoing studies into how the company can reduce the emissions intensity of its light-vehicle fleet. “Reducing our reliance on diesel at our operations will help achieve

SILAGE GRABS, BUCKET GRABS, BALE GRABS, FOLDING SILAGE FORKS, TELEHANDLER BUCKETS & FORKS!

our medium-term target of reducing operational emissions by 30% by 2030,” he said. Meanwhile, looking at the broader Australian picture, Toyota has almost doubled its sales of hybrid vehicles in Australia during 2020. This saw a record of 54,335 hybrids sold, representing 26.5% of Toyota’s total sales. This was double 2019’s sales of 27,846 units. The RAV hybrid was the star for Toyota and Australia’s best-selling hybrid for 2020. On the commercial front, the Toyota Hilux (45,176 sales) was the country’s most popular commercial vehicle for the 23rd year straight and Australia’s best-selling vehicle for the fifth year in a row.

The ProDig Shear Genius is the ultimate attachment for the farmer who diet feeds.

It’s Shear Genius!

Toyota Australia is trialling a Landcruiser 70 Series single-cab ute with an electric drive line.

DIET FEEDERS

FROM

$22,900+GST

V16 SINGLE AUGER/ T27 TWIN AUGER

12 knives per auger. Molasses and mineral intake tubes for dietary requirements with front facing conveyor with side shift. Teaser rollers placed at door to break up clumps. 2 speed main gearboxes. Full chassis for strength.

SOUTH ISLAND www.cochranes.co.nz Call Alastair Robertson | 027 435 2642 AMBERLEY | LEESTON | ASHBURTON | TIMARU | OAMARU | WEST COAST

MUCK SIDE SLINGER

XCEL 1250 MUCK SPREADER

WILL SPREAD ALL TYPES OF MATERIALS!

NORTH ISLAND www.gaz.co.nz Call our Imports Specialist | 027 203 5022 CAMBRIDGE | OTOROHANGA | ROTORUA


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 37

JD picks up a swag of awards TECHNOLOGY USED by farmers to maximise harvest capacity in difficult conditions has earned John Deere’s HDR Cutterbar Draper Series a 2021 AE50 Award. It was one of six John Deere products named by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE), which each year recognises innovative productengineering designs in the food and agriculture industry. Winning products are selected for ingenuity in product development and for their ability to save farmers time, costs and labour while improving safety. The HDR Rigid Cutterbar Draper Series was recognised for its ability to maximise harvesting capacity for small grains, canola and pulse production across changing conditions and uneven or rolling terrain while cap-

turing more grain. Featuring a new hinged frame, the HDR provides terrain-following capability and uniform cut height when harvesting on curves or uneven terrain. “This reduces crop losses and increases hectares harvested per hour,” says JD’s Australia and New Zealand production system manager Ben Kelly. The HDR will be available in New Zealand in time for harvest 2022. Further 2021 AE50 Awards were picked up by the JD X9-1000 and X9-1100 Combine Harvesters. The latter offers the ability to harvest up to 12 hectares (30 acres) of wheat per hour, or 182 tonnes per hour of corn. The X Series will arrive in New Zealand in August 2021. Likewise, John Deere’s CF Folding Corn Heads

help reduce operating costs by offering fold cycle time of less than 40 seconds, when fitted to X Series harvesters. Or less than 60 seconds when connected to an S700

Series machine. The folding corn head helps reduces a farmer’s costs by eliminating the need to purchase a header trailer to transport between paddocks.

JD’s HDR Cutterbar Draper Series won a 2021 AE50 Award.

FIE L SPED DAY CIA S L NEXT LEVEL TELEHANDLER

TECHNOLOGY IS HERE!

0.99% FINANCE *

SDF AND DEUTZ TEAM UP GERMAN AND Italian tractor manufacturer SDF has entered into a long-term supply agreement with German engine builder Deutz AG. The collaboration will focus on enlarging the service business between both companies. Their association can be traced back to the last years of the 1980s. The co-operation between SDF and Deutz is based on aiming to offer its customers the best solutions both in terms of performance and reliability. Another factor in this alliance is the fit of the engines with the powertrain concepts of the existing Deutz-Fahr 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 Series, as well as a new upcoming series in the mid and high-horsepower range. Finally, the flexible after-treatment system offered by Deutz AG is ready for the EU market and other emissions regulations worldwide. As well as the ongoing supply of Deutz TCD 4.1litre, 6.1-litre and 7.8-litre engines, SDF will also be introducing a completely new tractor range equipped with the EU Stage V compliant Deutz TCD 3.6 engine later this year. “The proven historical track record, together with the investments in new technologies and services, convinced us to prolong this long-term partnership for the EU Stage V emissions regulation,” says SDF chief executive Lodovico Bussolati. “The high standards of quality and reliability, and the low operating costs of Deutz engines in combination our products, give our customers the opportunity to maximise operational efficiency, an essential requirement for the growth of their business.” – Mark Daniel

JCB SERIES III LOADALL telehandler f All-new CommandPlus cab provides the ultimate operator experience f JCB EcoMAX engine provides fuel-efficient matching of transmission and hydraulics f Smart Hydraulics package improves cycle times and reduces fuel consumption f Designed to be productive, without compromising safety or comfort f New Zealand’s #1 Telehandler

*Standard CFS lending terms, conditions and fees apply. Images are illustrative only. 0.99% pa requires minimum 30% deposit followed by monthly repayments over 36 months. Offer valid until 31/03/2021 or while stocks last.

For your local dealer go to: jcbagriculture.co.nz

AGRICULTURE


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

38 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS / /RURAL TRADER

Outback now in its 25th year Meanwhile, its EyeSight safety suite has become even more refined, adding features like a lane centring function, autonomous emergency steering, speed sign recognition and an Intelligent speed limiter. Inside the vehicle, the centre console now features a High Definition 11.6-inch head unit Centre Information Display. This centralises and simplifies many controls, with vertical orientation and operation like a smartphone. The launch drive

MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

NOW IN its 25th year, and sixth edition, the 2021 Subaru’s Outback wagon was recently launched in New Zealand. Interestingly, despite celebrating its silver anniversary, retail prices of today’s models are remarkably similar to those of 1995 – but that’s where the similarities end. Bestowed with a formidable list of new technology and refinements, the all-new model is said to be the biggest, safest, most technologically advanced and luxurious Outback ever. The three-variant range – Outback, Outback X and Outback Touring – all boast impressive features lists. All the

The all-new Subaru Outback is said to be the biggest, safest, most technologically advanced and luxurious model ever.

models offer new specifications, including a 90% new direct-injection 2.5litre Boxer engine, with 7% more power and 4.2% more torque. The 8-speed Lineartronic Continu-

ously Variable Transmission includes over 80% new parts for better driving performance, especially during take-off acceleration. It is built on Subaru’s

COMPRIMA PLUS BALER SERIES Invest in longevity and quality. Invest in the best.

and delivers the largest Outback cabin to date, and a wider opening cargo area. Additionally, braked towing capacity rises to a maximum of 2,000kg.

Global Platform, as well as a new structural frame, which provides improved occupant protection from all directions. It also gives significant dynamic, safety and efficiency gains

The Comprima Plus balers utilise stronger components to combat extreme conditions and are compact, high-capacity and all-round machines for all crops. • • • • •

Semi-variable or fully variable bale chamber Low maintenance Novogrip belt and slat elevator XCut Cutting System Massive cut/feed rotor made from Hardox steel.

Pictured: Comprima CF 155 XC Plus and Comprima CV 150 XC Plus

For more information call us on 06 370 0390 www.tulloch.nz Dealers located nationwide

more water & BUFFALO BOOTS! 175% crack resistant

175% more crack resistant

ZIP STRIP quick lacing

$20

$155

$150

STEEL TOE X (with Scuff Guard)

STEEL TOE X (with Scuff Guard)

PLAIN TOE (without Scuff Guard) Colour = Dark Brown Buffalo Leather

STEEL TOE (without Scuff Guard)

valued at $280

PLAIN TOE (without Scuff Guard)

Stitched On Soles

9am-5pm

0800 16 00 24

175% more crack resistant than normal leather

ONLINE

earthwalk.co.nz

DIRECT DEPOSIT

DYNO OFFERS BETTER RESULTS HIGH HORSEPOWER tractors, or self-propelled harvesters, bring with them a whole set of problems during breakdowns or routine servicing. Equipment needs to be bigger (maybe a larger hammer), while test equipment also needs to be sizeable enough to confirm results and help maintain peak output. In the case of tractors or prime movers, efficiency is usually measured using a dynamometer. However, these machines typically start to run out of puff at around 500hp. The latest introduction by German manufacturer KL Maschinenbau sets out to address this problem. The Eggers PT 501G+ brake dynamometer is capable of accurately measuring and verifying torque, power and performance of units up to 1000hp or 750kW. Torque and rotational speed are measured separately, using a generator to impose load on the engine. This in turn incorporates a specialised hub to measure torque, with speed sensors recording revs per minute. The machine’s electronic system then calculates engine performance against specified power profiles. Complimenting the existing PT 301 series, which are capable of measuring outputs up to 455hp under a full load curve or 800hp in a rapid test, the new system is set up to work with all Windows-based portable computers. Data transfer from the test station to the computer can be via an RS232 interface, USB portal or Bluetooth connection. Power Control is also available via app for Android tablets. All data is saved to a hard drive, so can be easily accessed for future reference or printing.

RAINWEAR! FREE SHIPPING!

SLIP ON

LACE UP

valued at $320

PHONE

involved a cross-country trip through the heart of the Otago high country. Entering the Nevis Track, just out of Cromwell, we traversed the rockstrewn route (only open in Summer), tackling dry and dusty tracks, multiple deep fords and wet/ boggy washouts. Suffice to say, the pliable suspension and symmetrical allwheel took things in its stride. Add to that 213mm ground clearance and this Outback is sure to inspire confidence for getting off the beaten track.

FLEXISKIN MAX

JACKET

$99

valued at $230

100% Waterproof

in stock ENDS 10now APRIL

BIB OVERALLS

$88

valued at $160 M, L, XL, XXL sizes arrive June

Acid Resistant Durable Seams

Fleece Collar Hood Visor Flexible

FLEXISKIN MAX

XXL, 3XL sizes arrive June

$77

valued at $140

New Zealand owned & operated

EARTHWALK 06 0746 0177988 02 (ANZ)

LEGGINGS

S, M, L, XL, XXL sizes arrive June

sizes: BOOTS 5 - 13 (NZ)

RAINWEAR XS - 4XL


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

RURAL TRADER 39 DOLOMITE

NZ’s finest BioGro certified Mg fertiliser For a delivered price call... 0800 436 566

Read us until the cows come home!

LASER FF95

DIESEL HEATER

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Get

You’ll find us at Site 480

cents

(West section) EXCLUSIVE FIELD DAY ice off DISCOUNT Pr o weekly

0 F F 3 O a Litre RST FILL!

FI R U O Y H T I W

Rubber Safety Matting • ATV Carrier Mats • Exit/Entry Areas • Calf Trailers • Horse Floats & Trucks • Weigh Platforms • Bale Mats • Comfort Mats for Wet & Dry Areas • Utility Deck Matting

THE LAST DIESEL TANK YOU’LL EVER NEED! • Bunded design - contains spills • Polyethylene construction - won’t rot or rust

ü Huge 9.5kW output. ü Made in Japan since 1991. ü Diesel is approx. 30-50% less than “on demand” Electricity or Gas. ü DIY Install or we can arrange.

NZ’s most innovative range of on-ground stations for diesel, diesel exhaust fluids (AdBlue®, GoClear®, Alliedblue®, Z DEC®), and waste oil.

• NZ WorkSafe and EPA Compliant • Kiwi made for kiwi conditions

ü No wood to cut, cart or store. ü No mess, NO indoor diesel odours.

Phone: 0800 80 8570

ü As easy to use as a light switch.

0800 379 247 www.avonheating.co.nz

www.burgessmatting.co.nz

SINGLE DOG BOX

Sebc s fuel rate

TOP DOG BOX

• In-house drainage • Tie down lugs on each side • Fits all wellside & flatdeck utes (2 models) • Raised floor for insulation

• Accommodates up to 4 dogs • 6 individual air vents • Removable centre board • 2 lockable galvanised gates

Single without tow ball mount .........................$599 Single with tow ball mount ..............................$660 Wellside ........................................................$920 Flatdeck ........................................................$920 ALL PRICES INCLUDE GST

WILTSHIRE AND SHIRE

®

Rams For Sale HARDY, LOW INPUT EASY CARE • No dagging • No shearing • No dip or drench since 1989 • Great longevity • Stud established 1987

FLY OR LICE PROBLEMS? The magic eye sheepjetter since 1989

Quality construction and options • Get the contractors choice Featuring...

• Incredible chemical economy • Amazing ease 1500+ per hour • Unique self adjusting sides • Environmentally and user friendly • Automatically activated • Proven effective on lice as well as fly • Compatible with all dip chemicals • Accurate, effective application

®

Also Tufty (polled Highland) bulls, cows and calves available SHIRE® RAM

Ph 03-225 5283

07 573 8512 | dipping@electrodip.co.nz – www.electrodip.com

www.organic-rams.co.nz • tim@organic-rams.co.nz

FREE

nationwide delivery Phone 0800 625 826 • www.mckeeplastics.co.nz

QUADBAR

595

$

+GST delivered

Proven beyo nd do ubt! “I have no doubt that if I did not have a Quadbar fitted, my accident would have been fatal!” – Rozel Farms “The Quadbar saved our employee from significant injuries.” – Colin van der Geest

Recommended by Worksafe. ACC subsidy available

For a Quadbar, call me, Stuart Davidson, owner of Quadbar NZ, on 021-182 8115. Email sales@quadbar.co.nz or for more info go to www.quadbar.co.nz

BEST QUALITY | BEST Price | BEST ADVICE BEST QUALITY | BEST Price | BEST ADVICE

CALL FOR DISCOUNTS ON| DEVON TANKS BESTNOW QUALITY | BEST Price BEST ADVICE

WATER TANKS, PUMPS & FILTRATION WATER TANKS, PUMPS & FILTRATION

600 500 400 300 200 100 0

QUADBAR 5 YEAR SURVEY

NUMBER OF QUADBARS 479

ROLLOVERS 61

ONE STOP WATER SHOP 300mm x 6 metre .......................... $410 400mm x 6 metre .......................... $515 500mm x 6 metre .......................... $690 600mm x 6 metre .......................... $925 800mm x 6 metre ........................ $1399 1000mm x 6 metre ...................... $2175 1200mm x 6 metre ...................... $3475 ALL PRICES INCLUDE G.S.T.

NUMBER OF DEATHS 0

WATER TANKS, PUMPS & FILTRATION DEVAN CALPEDA • PURETEC • OASIS CLEARWATER DEVAN •• PROMAX PROMAX • •CALPEDA • PURETEC • OASIS CLEARWATER DEVAN •TANKS, RX • CALPEDA • AQUA • OASIS CLEARWATER WATER PUMPS & FILTRATION

DEVAN • PROMAX • CALPEDA • •PURETEC • OASIS CLEARWATER P: 326 8888 www.thetankguy.co.nz P:0508 0508 326 8888 • www.thetankguy.co.nz A: A: 30 30 Turners RoadRoad – Feilding Turners – Feilding

P: 0508 326 8888 • www.thetankguy.co.nz A: 30 Turners Road – Feilding

CULVERT PIPES

New Zealand’s CHEAPEST Culvert Pipes! FREE joiners supplied on request. • Lightweight, easy to install • Made from polyethylene

Check out our NEW website www.mckeeplastics.co.nz

Phone

06 323 4181

or

0800 625 826 for your nearest stockist

Joiners supplied FREE with culvert pipes


The right tools for the job

Get full control over your farm financials with Xero, Figured and PaySauce at your fingertips. Sign up for Xero for Farming before June 30 and enjoy 50% off Xero, Figured & PaySauce for 3 months*. Ask your accountant to get you started. xero.com/farming *Terms and conditions apply


SERIOUSLY FIT FOR FENCING

ENDURANCE SHEEP NETTING

®

SHEEP NETTING 7/90/30

96

$

GREAT TO WORK WITH. QUALITY PRODUCT.

®

“The GOFENCE ENDURANCE Netting was great to work with – this is a quality product. It strained up nice and looks fantastic.”

TRADITIONAL KNOT WITH STRENGTH WIRE WITH A DIFFERENCE MADE TO LAST

EA+GST

50m

100m

$

8

90cm

30cm

LINE WIRES

HEIGHT

STAY WIDTH

179

Daniel Anderson

97

Rural Fencing Contractor St Arnaud

EA+GST

TORNADO SCREWS

• High tensile fencing wire • Long lasting smooth surface

®

QUAD CUTTER TIP

SHANK KNURL

CLASS 4 GALVANISED

Four cutting tips provide the fastest and easiest of starts

Reduces timber splitting and increases holding strength

Provides durability when used in outdoor treated timber

MINI TORNADO SCREWS 650m

2.5mm

COIL LENGTH

WIRE DIA.

$

THE GOFENCE® RANGE IS EXCLUSIVE TO

TORNADO SCREWS

®

IDEAL FOR: • Plywood • Residential fencing • Decking

8797

IDEAL FOR: • Farm rails • Retaining walls • General contracting

12G x 75mm x 100pc

SQUARE DRIVER INCLUDED

$

EA+GST

119

EA+GST

$

EA+GST

ENDURANCE GATES

Barred

4.27m x 1.0m

7997

®

$

• 5 x 6.0mm Horizontal Bars • 32mm x 2mm Tube • Hot-Dipped Galvanised • Adjustable Lugs

ENDURANCE STAPLES

134

GATE HARDWARE MADE TO LAST

ROBUST & RESILIENT

• Medium weight barred gate • Suitable for use on variety of farm types

3.66m x 1.0m

EA+GST

Chainlink

$

EA+GST

SUITABLE FOR ANY STYLE OF GATE

• 75mm x 3.15mm Chainlink • 32mm x 2mm Pre-Galvanised Tube • Welded Lugs

14G x 125mm x 100pc

HEX DRIVER INCLUDED

2837

GATES

®

®

$

®

4.27m x 1.05m

26997

EA+GST

SUPER STRONG HOLDING POWER EASY TO DRIVE

• Specifically designed for use on deer farms

MADE TO LAST

• Multiuse design • Easy & accurate tensioning • Quality construction

$

®

28 pack

94

97

EA+GST

4.27m x 1.90m

40

mm

$

x 4.0

mm

37

x 5kg

50

37 $ EA+GST

mm

x 4.0

mm

$

x 20kg

103

97

EA+GST

SOLID, HOT DIPPED GALVANISED GATE.

INSULATORS

WOOD POST CLAW INSULATOR

“We were looking for a solid, hot dipped galvanised gate that would stand up to the pressure from horses and cattle rubbing against it. We chose the Endurance Gate as it seemed to be the most suitable gate for our needs and it’s New Zealand made.”

HIGH STRAIN END INSULATOR • Reinforced glass-filled polymer • UV stabilised for long life

• UV stabilised for long life • Suitable for up to 4mm wire or Polywire Box of 20

9

$ 57

EA+GST

Roundwood and timber prices are for the North Island stores only. When Recommended Retail Prices (RRPs) vary between regions, the ‘% savings’ shown in this mailer are always based off the lowest RRPs and therefore in certain stores the RRPs and actual savings may be higher than advertised. Photographs are for illustrative purposes only.

$

Box of 80

124

EA+GST

PERMANENT WIRE STRAINER

Give us a call on 0800 2 GOLDPINE

Darryl Hutton Tasman

Jump on to www.goldpine.co.nz

31297

EA+GST


15%

W 2.7m x H 1.8m x D 1.8m Double Door Large Lockup

1,997

11

MAILER SPECIAL

997

USB CHARGING PORT

1.2 Dog Kennel W 900mm x H 800mm x D 1.2m

• H3.2 treated timber for durability

• • • •

Smart and functional Protected edges for safety Double skinned 4 x colours available

20997

$

EA+GST

11%

RRP $585

517

EA+GST

RRP $237.95

EA+GST

$

m

1.8m x 1.8m

$

2 x 240V sockets Electric start, with battery included 2.4A USB outlet to power personal devices Safe to use on the most sensitive electronics Long 14 hour runtime (50% load) Compact and easily portable

SAVE

Garden Screen

%

SAVE

SAVE

11

%

RRP $2,375 EA+GST

$

• • • • • •

2.4m Long, 2.0m Wide & 2.0m High The ecoliving® eco:house® provides an ideal climate to extend the growing season and produce bumper crops.

SIMPLE TO CONSTRUCT. LOOKS GOOD.

• Strong, durable structure lined with Alsynite® Sunline polycarbonate roofing (10 year limited warranty)

“We love our eco:house. It was simple to construct and its timber frame allows you to easily customise the inside as you want. Visitors are always commenting about how good the eco:house looks in our garden.”

• Fully enclosed with a plywood back and front wall with Alsynite® Sunline clad door

$

John & Dorothy Finch Kaitangata

FARM BUILDINGS BY GOLDPINE

RRP $1,965

1,747

EA+GST

SAVE

ecoliving® 2.7m Shed

FREE SITE VISITS! GET YOUR SHED SORTED!

3 BAY, 6M DEEP SHED FOR UNDER $7K!

AL

*VH/1.0

S H E D S ,

B A R N S

&

COLOURSTEEL ADD $1,200

SAVE UP TO

Design Meets New Consent Exemption

S T A B L E S

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

&

SAVE Design Meets New Consent Exemption

S T A B L E S

Bays: 2 x 3.6m Depth: 7.0m (2 x 3.5m) Height: 3.6 - 3.0m

SAVE Design Meets New Consent Exemption

B A R N S

2 Bay Lean-to

20%

The Taranaki

S H E D S ,

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

20%

S H E D S ,

B A R N S

&

RRP $9,175

7,297

$ *VH/1.0

COLOURSTEEL ADD $1,300 Inc l. P A

PAC K

AG E

doo r, ro ller doo r&

DE

B A R N S

&

Design Meets New Consent Exemption

S T A B L E S

2 Bay Gable

Bays: 2 x 4.5m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 3.6 - 3.0m

RRP $9,315

AL

*VH/1.0

20%

S H E D S ,

B A R N S

&

7,497

$

inte rna lw all

Design Meets New Consent Exemption

S T A B L E S

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

S H E D S ,

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

EA+GST

7,897

$

19%

&s pou tin g

RRP $9,905

Bays: 1 x 4.0m Depth: 6.0m (1 x 6.0m) Height: 3.5 - 2.8m

COLOURSTEEL ADD $1,000

20%

DE

Design Meets New Consent Exemption

S T A B L E S

1 Bay Garage

EA+GST

5,300

$

&

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

MAILER SPECIAL

Bays: 2 x 3.6m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 3.0 - 2.4m

B A R N S

AG E

SAVE

The Gissy

S H E D S ,

PAC K

Inc l. R olle r do or, flas hin gs

EA+GST

Design Meets New Consent Exemption

20%

SAVE

2 BAY, 6M DEEP SHED FOR JUST OVER $5K!

EA+GST

SAVE UP TO

We could build our Strongbuilt® Sheds lighter, but we don’t and won’t. That’s why Strongbuilt® Sheds are...

COLOURSTEEL ADD $1,300

PAC K

Inc l. P Ad oor, flas hin gs, spo utin g,

AG E

DE

3x

AL

roll er d oor s

S T A B L E S

BUILT TOUGH. STAND TOUGH.

MAILER SPECIAL

NED’S SHEDS® TERMS & CONDITIONS: $500 deposit is required. Freight is not included, prices are ex nearest Goldpine store. Prices based on high wind zone, 0.6 kPa snow loading (*unless otherwise stated) and 300 kPa soil loading. Neds’ Sheds® come in easy to construct kitset form.

RRP $10,755

8,597

$ *VH/1.0

COLOURSTEEL ADD $1,500

3 Bay Lean-to

Bays: 3 x 4.5m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 3.6 - 3.0m

In a rural zone

Located in a high wind zone

Some Goldpine single-storey pole sheds and hay barns in rural zones will no longer require consent. Head to www.goldpine. co.nz to find out what this means for your new farm building.

Give us a call on 0800 2 GOLDPINE Jump on to www.goldpine.co.nz

RRP $26,355

20,997

$

COLOURSTEEL ADD $3,600

All prices, both RRP and promotional, are exclusive of GST and are for 1-31 March 2021 only and whilst stocks last. Photographs are for illustrative purposes only.

GOOD, STRONG SHED. PERFECT FOR CALVING. “Great shed, keeps everything dry. The process was easy and straight forward and now I have a good, strong shed which is perfect for calving, implements and a workshop. Great result.”

If you ticked these boxes, you may not require consent!

Goldpine Stores

COLOURSTEEL ADD $2,200

Bays: 3 x 4.0m Depth: 8.0m (2 x 4.0m) Height: 3.0 - 4.6 - 3.0m

These prices include plans, PS1, H5 treated poles, SG8 verified timber (rafters, purlins and girts), cladding as specified and all fixings required. Spouting, clearlight, flashings and gates etc are at extra cost unless stated. Photographs are for illustrative purposes only. Sheds come in easy to construct kitset form.

Does your new farm building need consent? 110m2 floor area or less

12,597

$

Angus Lifestyle Barn

STRONGBUILT® TERMS & CONDITIONS: 10% deposit is required. Freight included is within a 30km radius of any Goldpine store. Prices based on high wind zone, 0.75 kPa snow loading (*unless otherwise stated) and 300 kPa soil loading. STRONGBUILT® Sheds come in easy to construct kitset form.

Terms and Conditions: All prices exclusive of GST and are from 1-31 March 2021 only, while stocks last. Sheds must be delivered prior to 30 April 2021. Sheds are compliant to the 1170 building code requirements. Offer valid on these Standard Kitset Sheds only and for payments made via a Goldpine account. These shed offers are not available in conjunction with any other shed offer. Prices are for North Island stores only. Photographs are for illustrative purposes only. Recommended Retail Prices (RRPs) and savings vary between regions in the North Island.

Single storey

RRP $15,735

EA+GST

Bays: 3 x 3.6m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 3.6 - 3.0m

EA+GST

3 Bay Gable

COLOURSTEEL ADD $1,100

EA+GST

$

EA+GST

6,800

Bays: 3 x 3.6m Depth: 6.0m (2 x 3.0m) Height: 3.0 - 2.4m

Design Meets New Consent Exemption

Look out for this icon on Goldpine Farm Building deals. It indicates which sheds could fall under the no consent required category.

Ron Vincent Nelson

WAIHI 2 Dean Crescent Ph: (07) 863 9167

MORRINSVILLE 4 Marshall St Ph: (07) 889 5553

TE AWAMUTU 520 Ohaupo Rd Ph: (07) 870 5158

PUTARURU 100 Taupo St Ph: (07) 883 8334

OTOROHANGA 1 Phillips Ave Ph: (07) 873 8183

STRATFORD Cnr Monmouth & SH3 Ph: (06) 765 4256

HASTINGS 1412 Omahu Rd Ph: (06) 879 5580

DANNEVIRKE Cnr SH2 & Laws Rd Ph: (06) 374 4101

FEILDING 39 Kawakawa Rd Ph: (06) 323 2718

MASTERTON 89 Ngaumutawa Rd Ph: (06) 377 7425

FARM BUILDINGS PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY


South Island Field Days TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS MARCH 9, 2021: ISSUE 721 

MARCH 24-26 KIRWEE

www.ruralnews.co.nz

A record crowd? NIGEL MALTHUS

ORGANISERS OF the South Island Agricultural Field Days (SIAFD) are hoping a new marketing initiative will see record numbers at this year’s event, in spite of lingering uncertainty over the Covid pandemic. Organising committee chair Michaela McLeod says the core focus of the event has always been machinery demonstrations and the area allowed for them has been expanded this year. “I feel this is quite a unique function of our field days over others across the country. You can see everything working and operating,” she told Rural News. The biennial event takes place at the SIAFD’s dedicated site, near Kirwee, on March 24, 25 and 26. A big innovation this year is a new marketing push, involving a rural mail drop including a map of the site, which the committee hopes will persuade more people that it’s a great day or two out. “In a normal year we might have around 30,000 public come and I’m expecting a bit more simply because we’re doing much wider marketing,” says McLeod. “We are sending out our programme to rural delivery mailboxes with the aim of getting the map out to people ahead of the event so that they can plan where they need to go.” McLeod says the event is so big now that you can get around it in a day, but “it’s a lot of walking”. “Best if you can come for two days and do it at a slower pace, but if you know you need to go somewhere you can plan your

route by getting that programme in the mailbox, a fortnight beforehand.” Other innovations – again with a view to making the site more visitor-friendly – are improved toilet facilities and more seating. Also new for this year is the Country Women Competition, a series of ruralthemed challenges pitting entrants against each other and the clock. McLeod, who runs an independent agronomy research business, near Lincoln with her husband Ben, has been on the SIAFD committee since 2010. Having worked her way up through various roles she says she jumped at the chance to take on the chair. McLeod is the first woman to do so, but she downplays any significance to that. “I think any woman would be quite competent to take on the role on.” Meanwhile, McLeod says the Covid pandemic hasn’t affected demand from stall holders – although she has heard that some machinery vendors are having trouble getting new machines shipped into the country. With over 500 display sites, the show is sold out and is running a waiting list, she says. “So, we have more sites than we’ve ever had before.” McLeod says she has been pleasantly surprised by the demand. “I had thought after the lockdown we might be looking at running at 75% of normal.” However, Covid travel restrictions have discouraged any overseas exhibitors. TO PAGE 5

Michaela McLeod is the chair of the SIAFD organising committee for 2021. SIAFD

Preapproval is now a lot easier with online tools that can give a definitive answer within a few minutes.

SEE US AT KIRWEE SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS! SITE 750/751 & 800/801

FINANCE OFFER Interest rate of only 2.95% with a winter payment holiday. $0 payments in June - September inclusive each year*. 25% deposit of the financed sum including GST.

For more information call us on 06 370 0390 www.tulloch.nz Dealers located nationwide

Preapproval can also be granted by answering a few simple questions over the phone, which makes the process simple and straightforward. These Krone finance offers apply to all new imported products so be in quick to ensure your order is made by the end of March 2021. The interest rate for the loan is 2.95% and is based on a schedule of 36 monthly payments. This loan also consists of a $375 documentation fee and $20 Personal Property Securities Register (PPSR). Any documentation relating to either package needs to be preapproved and supplied prior to the end of March 2021 to ensure the order is met. Lending and credit criteria apply.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

2 SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS

All set to celebrate the ag sector ORGANISERS OF the 2021 South Island Agricultural Field Days are looking forward to celebrating the agricultural sector. SIAFD chair Michaela McLeod says as a result of Covid-19, the sector, like so many others, has struggled. “Not just from a financial perspective but from a social perspective as well,” she says. “There have been a number of A&P Shows and other events cancelled around the country. They are such important events for farmers and traders, and I know it’s been very hard on a lot of people not having them.” McLeod reckons the South Island Agricultural Field Days, being held from March 24-26, at Kirwee, will be a big opportunity for the agricultural industry to get together. The event will celebrate its 70th year in 2021 and is now one of the largest and longest running field days in New

Zealand. McLeod says it will offer something to interest everyone – not just those in the agricultural sector. “I’d say the technology sector has continued to advance this year, even with Covid-19. “There are some exciting new innovations which people may have read about, but at the field days they will have a chance to see them, not only on display but in action. The working demonstration area has definitely expanded and we have made them more accessible to people.” The event attracts between 20,000 and 25,000 visitors over the course of three days to the Kirwee site on the outskirts of Christchurch. McLeod estimates if someone was to walk around and visit every single attraction it would be about 10km of walking. “That’s why we encourage people to come over at least a couple of days and take

The three-day SIAFD usually attracts between 20,000 and 25,000 visitors over the course of three days of the event to its Kirwee site on the outskirts of Christchurch.

it easy. It is, however, doable in just a day.” This is McLeod’s first year in the role as chair and it’s a position she has worked towards after more than 10 years on the organising committee, in a number of different duties. “I really enjoy working with the fantastic bunch of people on the organ-

ising committee. I have got to know a lot of them well over the years in my various roles and they are some of the hardest working people you could ever meet.” McLeod is a mother to two young children and along with her husband Ben runs an agricultural research business which conducts indepen-

dent trials. She says when she took the helm of the event for 2021 there wasn’t anything that needed changing. “It’s already a very successful formula; I think the fact it’s been running for 70 years is testament to that. We had a social function earlier this year with past

members from organising committees and stalwarts of the event. It was wonderful listening to their stories about what it was like in the earlier years of the event and just how much it has grown over the years.” McLeod says a key component of the events success is the support from the local Selwyn

Community. “We love all the support we get and it’s really important for us to be able to outsource jobs to community groups. We always need help with things such as car parking so if anyone wants to get involved, we would love to hear from them.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Pioneers in the Field Norwood has been a trusted name in rural communities for over 70 years. We’re New Zealand’s leading supplier of a wide range of new and used farm machinery, and offer the service and support to ensure you get the most out of it. Our experienced and dedicated professionals are ready to help you with all your farming and lifestyle needs. Come meet our team and take advantage of on-site offers at South Island Agricultural Field Days, 24 - 26 March.

norwood.co.nz

0800 66 79 663 CBN0640


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS 3

Girls can do anything! “There’s no better [venue] than the field days, so we’ve been very kindly donated a site by the field days team – a very large site, which is cool.”

NIGEL MALTHUS

A RURAL skills competition for women which debuted last year is coming, bigger and better, to the South Island Agricultural Field Days at Kirwee. The Country Women Competition is the brainchild of the Dairy Women’s Network, which first rolled it out at the Amuri A&P Show at Rotheram, North Canterbury, in March last year. DWN volunteer regional leader Bex Green organised the original event as “a series of challenges that give rural women a chance to prove their mettle and demonstrate their talent in the farming sector.” Twenty women took part, with North Canterbury local Fran Gunn

The Country Woman competition debuted at last year’s Amuri A&P Show. SUPPLIED

named as the inaugural Dairy Women’s Network Country Woman of the Year. Organiser of the Kirwee event, DWN vol-

unteer regional leader Jourdain Adams, says the first content was a great success, but on a reasonably small scale. So, they’re promising

to make a much bigger splash at Kirwee. “There’s no better [venue] than the field days, so we’ve been very kindly donated a site by

the field days team – a very large site, which is cool,” she says. “We’ve just grown the idea from there and it’s going to be great.” Adams says the event will include challenges such as milking Daisy the fake cow, backing a trailer, a haybale run and, potentially, some fencing. The full programme was still being finalised when Adams spoke to Rural News a few weeks out from the event. An age limit has to apply for health and

safety reasons, but Adams hopes “anyone from far and wide” will enter. “We would love people who aren’t necessarily from the country to come and have a go,” she says. “Just because of the title it doesn’t mean you need to be a hard-out farmer or anything like that. It would be good to get a few townies involved.” The competition will be run in two sessions, 10am and 2pm, on each of the three days, with a

daily winner decided by the fastest time. “We’ve got some awesome sponsorship and some really fun weekends-away prizes, vouchers, hampers – so we’ve got some excellent prizes up for grabs.” Adams is confident the event will be a success and hopes the format will take off nationally. “It’s the Canterbury regional leaders for Dairy Women’s Network who are organising this event, but it would be great to see it at other shows throughout the country,” she told Rural News. “We’ve got regional leaders all over the country, right from Southland to Northland, so it’ll be really cool if they could grab our idea and maybe use it at other field days or A&P shows.”

K R O W READY __ F_O_R

RANCHER TRX420FME1

C OHV ENGIN E • ENGINE: 420C D WITH REVERS : MANUAL 5-SPEE N O SI IS SM AN • TR : 2WD / 4WD • DRIVE MODES ISHBONE SION: DOUBLE W • FRONT SUSPEN LE SWINGARM SION: SOLID AX • REAR SUSPEN RANCE: 181MM • GROUND CLEA 9L RESERVE) .7 LITRES (INC 4. 14 : TY CI PA CA • FUEL KG REAR : 30KG FRONT. 60 • RACK CAPACITY G • TOWING: 385K

E X GST

$11,995

ONLY

Great range of Genuine Honda Power Equipment available at your local Honda Motorbikes dealer

EU22 $2,521 EX GST

• • • • •

Portable Generator Silent Inverter AC/DC Series Recoil Start GX120R Engine Superior durability & performance

hondamotorbikes.co.nz

Prices exclude GST and is for the TRX420FM1 and EU22. Available while stocks last at participating Honda dealers.

South Island Field Days Preview 420FM1.indd 1

3/03/21 2:49 PM


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

4 SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS

NH picks up two gongs MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

TWO NEW Holland innovations were winners of the 2020 AE50 awards, recognising innovation, engineering advancement and impact on the agricultural, food and biological systems markets. The awards were given out by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE). The first was for NH’s SideWinder Ultra armrest, which groups the tractor’s key controls ergonomically and logically in a single location. These include engine and transmission, including speed and end-of row functions, three-pointhitch limits, media and climate control. The SideWinder Ultra

is a fully customisable operator interface that works in conjunction with the IntelliView 12 touch monitor. The other function to win an award was the Ground Speed Management II system that adds features to the New Holland Dynamic Comman tractor, increases efficiency. A vehicle operating interface and speed control system, like that of the Auto Command CVT, interacts with key gearbox and engine loadings to maintain the speed requested by the driver. This serves to reduce fuel consumption and improving operating efficiency with minimal operator input. Meanwhile, in other news from the New Holland and Case IH camps,

NH’s SideWinder Ultra armrest, which groups the tractor’s key controls ergonomically in a single location, picked up an ASABE award.

CNH Industrial N.V. has agreed to acquire ATI Inc, a global manufacturer of rubber track systems for

high horsepower tractors and combine harvesters. The company says this will provide CNH Indus-

trial’s customers of global agricultural brands with access to factory-fit track technology, enabling

See us at South Island Field Days - Site 769 & 770

Cnr Robinson & McNally Sts, Ashburton • Ph 03 307 9049 • Email admin@rainer.co.nz • www.rainer.co.nz

them to tailor their choice of specific floatation, suspension and traction requirements.

CNH Industrial has had a long-standing commercial supply agreement with ATI Track Systems dating back to 2012. The tracks come as an option for the New Holland T9 articulated tractor range. The new track systems will be available on all Case IH and New Holland combines produced at the Company’s Grand Island, Nebraska, U.S.A. facility starting in 2021, and will also be available for retrofit. Headquartered in Mount Vernon, Indiana, ATI Inc. was established in 1997, initially specialising in rubber tracks used for exploration in Alaska. CNH Industrial’s acquisition includes ATI Track Systems’ engineering and manufacturing plants. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS 5

New boss settles in WESTLAND DAIRY Company Limited’s new chief executive Richard Wyeth says he’s looking forward to the opportunities that lie ahead for the West Coast dairy processor. Wyeth’s took up the leadership of the company in late February, which saw resident director of Westland Shiqing Jian step down as interim CEO. Jian served

as interim chief executive following the resignation of former Westland chief Toni Brendish in August last year. Wyeth says Westland holds a unique place within the New Zealand dairy landscape and now, with the backing of Yili, the company is uniquely placed to leverage the advantages of its strong dairy heritage and culture. “I am especially aware

part of that naturally brings huge advantages for Westland.” Wyeth says there has never been a more exciting time for the dairy industry in New Zealand. “I look forward to embracing all the challenges, opportunities and responsibilities that brings in my new role.’’

of the important role Westland plays, not only within the New Zealand dairy industry, but also as part of the West Coast and Canterbury communities,” he says. “Yili is an enormously innovative company dedicated to quality and serving the consumer above everything else. Being

Westland Milk Products new chief executive Richard Wyeth.

RECORD CROWD? FROM PAGE 1

“We just don’t give them enough credit.” While there have been a few in previous years, McLeod says just one had shown an interest this year, but it had to pull out. She concedes that a serious Covid outbreak could still put a spanner in the works. “We can only operate in Level 1 and we will comply with all of the regulations of Level 1,” McLeod told Rural News. “We will have more hand-washing facilities around to accommodate for people. I think people are used to washing their hands more often now.” The committee is determined to postpone rather than cancel, and postpone again if need be, if alert levels go to 2 or beyond. “We can’t really run getting too close to winter, because of the weather problems that we would run into, but we’re very committed to making it happen,” she explains. McLeod says spending in the planning phase has been minimal “just in case we do have to refund everyone.” “I just feel like the whole agricultural industry is really wanting the event to go ahead,” she adds. “Farmers need to be celebrated and recognised for the hard work they have done during lockdown and over the last year.

YAMAHA

WOLVERINE X2 “IT’S TIME TO GO YAMAHA”

LOW COST OF ENTRY

ZERO TO PAY

FOR 12 MONTHS 4.95% P.A FIXED RATE

*

BULLET PROOF ENGINE

PROVEN RELIABILITY

847CC

3 YEAR

PARALLEL TWIN LIQUID COOLED, 4-STROKE, DOHC

GENUINE FULL FACTORY WARRANTY

FIELDAYS SPECIAL

GET FREE

YAMAHA ACCESSORIES WORTH

1000*

$

EX GST

36 MONTH LOAN TERM

ON ATV & ROV

LIMITED TIME ONLY

COMMERCIAL APPLICANTS ONLY ANNUAL REPAYMENTS ONLY

Are you hitting your target market? Contact your local sales representative for more information Auckland Stephen Pollard ....... Ph 021-963 166 Waikato

Ted Darley ................ Ph 021-832 505

Wellington

Ron Mackay ............ Ph 021-453 914

Christchurch Kaye Sutherland .... Ph 021-221 1994 ■ BREAKING NEWS ■ MACHINERY REVIEWS ■ MANAGEMENT STORIES ■ AND MUCH MORE...

RURAL NEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

www.ruralnews.co.nz

WOLVERINE X2 NOW ONLY

$

19,999 + GST

FIND YOUR LOCAL DEALER AT:

www.yamaha-motor.co.nz

*Promotion available between 1/03/21 to 30/04/21 on new Wolverine X2 units (YXE850PB) through participating authorised Yamaha dealers while stocks last. Each eligible unit sold will receive a $1,000 ex GST Yamaha accessories credit, on units warranty registered on or before 30/04/21. See your participating authorised Yamaha dealership for details. *FINANCE DISCLAIMER: Promotion available between 1/01/21 to 31/03/21 on new farm vehicles (AG125, AG200, TTR230/A, TW200, XT250, YFM350FA, YFM450FB, YFM450FB/P, YFM700FA, YFM700FB/P, YXC700P, YXE850PBL, YXE850PK, YXF850, YXM700, YXE1000PSEM, YXF1000PSEM), through participating authorised Yamaha dealers while stocks last. Offer available for specified models, and warranty registered on or before 31/03/21. Zero deposit; zero repayments for the first 12 months and 4.95% p.a. fixed interest rate on a 36 month loan term. Asset backed commercial applicants only with NZBN registered for minimum of 1 year. Maximum amount financed is $35,000 and applies to AG125, AG200, TTR230/A, TW200, XT250, YFM350FA, YFM450FB, YFM450FB/P, YFM700FA, YFM700FB/P, YXC700P, YXE850PBL, YXE850PK, YXF850, YXM700, YXE1000PSEM, YXF1000PSEM. Offer available from January 1, 2021 to March 31, 2021 with final settlement date of April 30, 2021. Credit criteria, fees, charges and conditions apply including an application fee of $325, $10 PPSR fee and a dealer administration fee. Finance to approved applicants by Yamaha Motor Finance New Zealand Ltd. (YMF) NZBN 9429036270798 FSP 9622. At participating Yamaha dealerships while stocks last. Information provided is general only and does not take into account your particular objectives, financial situation and needs.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

6 SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS

Demos a family affair NIGEL MALTHUS

THE MACHINERY demonstrations are a major part of the biennial South Island Agricultural Field Days. They are also a family tag-team affair for brothers Andrew and Nathan Stewart. Andrew, who runs a family dairy farm at Waikuku, and Nathan, who has a contracting busi-

the interest in demonstrations with about 17 different companies expected to take part and around 50 demonstrations happening daily. Because of Covid, it had been a “bit of a struggle” for some machinery suppliers to get new machines into the country, but people were working hard to put on a good show, he says. “We’ve got Norwood,

ness, have been on the organising committee for SIAFD since 2013, Andrew has been running the machinery demonstrations since the 2017 event. This year, Nathan will step up to help manage the demonstrations over the three days, while Andrew has been busy preparing for the event. Andrew told Rural News he is pleased with

Team members Henry Williams, left, Andrew Stewart and Tim Wilson with the fodder beet that has been used for machinery demonstrations in previous years, but has been dropped for 2021. SUPPLIED

Superior, longer-lasting fuel storage

Contact us for more info on 0800 800 221 or visit our website www.ensol.co.nz See us at Kirwee – Site 279

who started back demoing last year – after a lengthy break. They’ve really decided they’re going to up the ante and bring a bit more gear.” Andrew says a big change for this year is the crops planted for the demonstrations – a decision made after having “a bit of a yarn” with the 2019 exhibitors around what they wanted for this year. “We decided that we weren’t going to put in the fodder beet or the maize, just because it was time for a bit of a change,” he explains. With the uncertainties around Covid they didn’t want anything too unconventional but chose crops that should be pretty ‘user-friendly’ for everyone, he adds. “There’s lucerne, grass, oats and barley stubble ... it can all be reasonably easily utilised and grown.”

Andrew says the crops chosen give exhibitors a chance to show off a wide range of machines from ploughs, grubbers, speed discs, rollers and drills through to mowers, rakes and balers. Ashburton-based New Zealand Tractors are expected to show an intercrop cultivator for vegetable crops, which weeds between rows and is designed to replace hand weeding. Andrew says they have transplanted broccoli on the site especially for the demonstration. “They’ve seen a big market for that in New Zealand,” he says. Also on site are some trial strips to show the results of various fertiliser regimes, while a helicopter is lined up to conduct some spraying demonstrations. “We are always trying to do a little bit of something different.”

Livestock Management? Just call Shearwell Data! Industry leading Electronic & Visual tags. • • • •

99.5% retention rates Multiple colour & layout options FREE printing FREE applicator - for 1st time Shearwell customers ordering 200 + tags Extra sharp pin

EID scanning equipment designed to assist livestock management systems. Stick readers, panel readers, weigh crates, automatic drafters, etc.

Room for growth

1 piece tag

Lightweight

0800 79 99 89

sales@shearwell.co.nz

Order Shearwell today! Contact our professionally trained, dedicated staff, for a hassle-free, friendly service, with ordering options to suit your operation.

EID tags

Visual tags

$1.55 + GST

From $0.32 + GST

www.shearwell.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS 7

New science facility for Lincoln A NEW flagship science facility for Lincoln University is further proof of its growing world reputation, claims acting vice chancellor Professor Bruce McKenzie. He says Lincoln’s significant growth in domestic student numbers, clear government support and a raised awareness of the importance of the agritech industry to New Zealand’s economic development have all factored into its increased profile as a world-ranked land-based university. Late last month, a ceremony was held to break the first ground of Lincoln’s new science facility. McKenzie says this capped off a tenyear journey for Lincoln, beginning with the Canterbury earthquakes in 2010/11 and concluding with formal Government approval for the construction of the new facility. “Lincoln University has been producing primary sector graduates for more than 140 years and we remain dedicated to equipping coming generations with the knowledge and skills needed to grow a better future,” he explained. “It’s only appropriate that we deliver our worldleading education and research from a science

Lincoln University acting vicechancellor Professor Bruce McKenzie speaking at the sod turning ceremony

facility built for the ages.” McKenzie says the official government approval, confirmed by Education Minister Hon Chris Hipkins and Finance Minister Hon Grant Robertson in September 2020, reflected the government’s support for Lincoln University and signalled the important role it continues to play in shaping a more productive and sustainable future for New Zealand. “Our university has always been a chief driver

of innovation in the agritech sector, particularly in the food and fibre industries,” he says. “Our new facilities will position us to take an even more prominent role in developing solutions for the world’s most pressing environmental challenges.” McKenzie said the fundamental change brought by COVID-19 across many sectors of New Zealand’s agriculture industry in the last 12 months has triggered a steeply rising demand for tertiary

FOOTWEAR LTD

education in the landbased sciences.

“Lincoln University, as a globally-ranked land-based university, is strategically placed to capitalise on increased demand for agricultural qualifications from both students and employers,” he added. “While our international enrolments have predictably declined due to the pandemic, our domestic student numbers have grown significantly. McKenzie says new domestic undergraduate student enrolments are up 33% on the same time last year, with a record 344% increase for new domestic postgraduate students. Construction on the new building begins this month and is expected to be completed in mid2023. The fit-for-future science facility will fea-

ture state-of-the-art teaching, research and collaboration spaces complemented by multi-use adjustable workstations and social zones, all set within a regenerative and bio-diverse park-like environment. The new flagship science building will have a minimal environmental impact, incorporating roof-mounted and wallmounted solar arrays, a ground-sourced air conditioning system and a rainwater-fed bathroom flushing system in its design. Lincoln University is the only New Zealand university to achieve a ranking on the UI Green Metric World University Rankings, currently ranked 51 out of 912 universities. The new science facilities are part of a wider

campus development programme for Lincoln that has already seen the launch of a new student hub and outdoor events space featuring native plantings and a cultural heritage-inspired paved pathway. The redeveloped LU Gym will offer significantly enhanced fitness, training and wellbeing support to the Lincoln community on its completion within the next several weeks. Further campus projects including a decarbonisation programme and to cease the combustion of coal by 2024, the restoration of Ivey West and Memorial Hall and an overarching landscaping masterplan, which are all in various stages of development. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

FARM MACHINERY STRENGTH / QUALITY / PERFORMANCE

See us at South Island Field Days SITE M820

Bale Feeders

Forage Wagons

NZ MADE BOOTS

Visit www.lastrite.co.nz for more quality products

HUNTER BOOTS Comfortable, durable and stylish.

The heavy duty sole construction makes this a robust boot designed for climbing over rugged ground. This boot has a soft toe and is made from a thick Mad Dog Nubuck Leather, stitched and screwed construction with a rubber, replaceable sole, that is glued and screwed. Soft padding for ankle support and D-Rings for your laces are an added advantage. Great fitting boots full of comfort, ideal for those long hunting and tramping trips.

FARMER BOOTS Lastrite’s Farmer boots are made for comfort. Constructed from Reverse kip leather they are an ideal farmers, fencers and builders boot. Very sturdy and made to last this boot is robust with a heavy duty construction. It has a leather insole and midsole that is stitched and screwed construction with a rubber, replaceable sole, that is glued and screwed. Update your old boots now and you will never look back.

10 HALL ROAD, RD5, WHANGAREI Phone 09-436 2794 or 027-436 2793

Manure Spreaders

Tip Trailers

www.mcintosh.net.nz FREEPHONE: 0800 622 276


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

8 SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS

Wiping out weeds made easier MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

ROTOWIPER MAKES a comprehensive range of weed wipers. From 1.8m to 12m, in several configurations, the company has the ability to custom build to individual configurations – such as a 500mm wide unit for use under grape vines. Machine formats include linkage mounted (LMU), fold-up (FU) and trailed (TR) versions. Working with a spray line mounted above a reverse-rotating, carpeted roller, the sprayer moistens the roller with herbicide and this in turn ‘wipes’ against the targeted weeds. The company claims

this targeted approach offers substantial cost savings over the traditional approach of blanket spraying and the ongoing use of the existing crop. Rotowiper’s TR series, which has replaced the well-known WCF series, consists of five key models designated as TR18 (1.8m), TR24 (2.4m), TR28 (2.8m), TR32 (3.2m) and TR45 (4.5m). Developed with users in mind, the TR has a single ratchet, height adjuster and a spring-loaded roller to drive the engagement system, which all helps to speed up the transition from transport to work. A correct work-

Rotowiper’s comprehensive range of weed wipers will be on display at Kirwee.

ing height allows maximum contact with the weeds, without damage to the crop underneath. Tank levelling keeps the chemical reservoir level

when working at different heights or when connected to different towing vehicles. In the same vein, storage and ease of transport

Soil Aeration Specialists Are you suffering from:

• Hay and silage being trampled into pasture and wasted? • Surface ponding of pastures?

Aerators

Pre-Rippers

PUGGED PADD OCKS CAN REDUCE PASTURE GRO WTH UP TO 60%!

is addressed with fold-up drawbars on the complete range. General construction uses a double frame to handle tough high-country conditions.

Strong, RHS single wheel legs, and solid stub axles, fitted with high-speed wheel bearings are part of the standard build. Purchasers can also choose

an option of a high-quality paint or zinc finish to the frame, with the latter preventing corrosion and extending the working life of the unit. For those looking to cover larger areas, the 12m heavy-duty trailed model is a good fit. Made up of a single 2m central unit and four 2.5m outer sections that are driven hydraulically. The unit also features hydraulically-adjustable depth control legs. A heavy-duty frame carries a 400 litre spray tank, which is said to offer the ability to cover 20 to 40 hectares per fill. This model has a transport width of just 3.1 metres. www.rotorwiper.co.nz

THE BEST OF 4X4 AND FARM TYRES, ALL ON ONE SITE!

Heavy Duty Auto Reset

Moleplough

DON’T PUT GOOD FERTILISERS ON COMPACTED SOIL WHICH CAN’T ABSORB IT If your soil can’t support 15cm root growth and good worm population check for compaction, you could need aeration. In dollar terms, what would 20% production increase mean to your yearly turnover? YOUR GREATEST ASSET IS THE SOIL YOU FARM - DON’T DESTROY IT!

BALEAGE TIPPER

SUBSOILER

Transports and stands wrapped round bales on end for storage Now available as a single or dual unit • Suitable for medium HP tractors • 3PL mounted (no front axle stress) • Bale tipped in one easy movement • No need to reposition bale before tipping

Contact us for your local dealer...

For ripping deep pans and laying alkathene pipe up to 50mm • Optional chute • Standard & heavy models

SEE US AT THE SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS SITE M819

Maitland RD5, Gore Ph/Fax: 03-207 1837 Mobile: 027-628 5695 www.jamesengineering.co.nz

Call in and see us at the South Island Field Days and find out how the right choice of tyres can make your job easier.

SITE #

734

Or find a dealer:

0800 275 897

www.agtyres.co.nz www.agtyres.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS 9

Showcasing Europe’s best MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

JCB AND Amazone will be on show at the CLAAS Harvest Centre display at the South Island Agricultural Field Days. JCB’s new Series III range comprises six models with lift capacities from 3.2 to 5.6 tonnes, a maximum reach of six to nine metres, a new cab and improvements to enhance performance, efficiency, safety, comfort and serviceability, CLAAS Harvest Centre national sales manager – NZ, Roger Nehoff, notes the new cab features the same adjustable steering column, control layout and function-grouped switches found in JCB Fastrac tractors and wheeled loaders. “Making it easier for operators to switch from one type of JCB machine to another,” he says. A seat-mounted joy-

stick and control pod configuration is standard in the Agri Torque Lock4, Agri Super and Agri Pro, while overall the cab is 12% larger and 50% quieter than the previous model. All models feature the 4.4L JCB EcoMAX engine delivering 109hp or 125hp, while high-spec models are a 4.8L version, delivering 145hp. A range of transmissions includes a four-speed manual, fourspeed automatic, torque lock and a combined dual hydrostatic/powershift model. The Auto Smoothride System engages at speeds over 4km/h, improving load retention and comfort when travelling at speed. Meanwhile, its boom end damping system improves material retention and makes for a smoother work cycle. The high-capacity hydraulic system delivers a flow rate of 140 L/minute for

rapid boom operation with hydraulic auxiliary venting activated in-cab or at the headstock for quick and safe attachment changeover. On the machinery front, AMAZONE Ceus combines a compact disc harrow with a tined cultivator for performance and versatility in all operating conditions. Available in four working widths from four to seven metres, the new series can perform several processes in a single pass at operating speeds of up to 15 km/h. Nehoff, says the new Ceus series is a true ‘all-in-one’ cultivator. “Ceus is ideal for farms that need to cultivate at a range of depths, incorporate stubble and prepare seedbeds with just one implement,” he says. “The front disc section intensively cuts, mixes and incorporates crop

residues, as well as creating a finely crumbled soil profile from 5cm to 14cm. The tine section then loosens the deeper soil layers down to 30cm, while importantly, both sections can be adjusted independently.” The disc section can be raised out of work completely – even with the tines at maximum working depth – reducing pulling power and saving fuel. Likewise, the tine section can be raised out of work to allow shallow stubble cultivation or set to run just beneath the working depth of the disc harrow when working in heavy conditions.

JCB’s new Series III range comprises six models with lift capacities from 3.2 to 5.6 tonnes.

Individually suspended 510mm serrated discs with the shanks are mounted to the frame via solid rubber mountings. A 17-degree profile and 12.5cm stagger on the front row of discs and 14-degree profile on the rear row is said to produce a perfect cutting and tilling action. The working depth of the front disc segment is

adjusted using the parallelogram guidance, while the penetration intensity can be changed by twisting the disc segment. During operation, the penetration force of the tined section increases the cutting effect of the front discs, helping to achieve the optimum pre-conditions for straw decomposition, germination and crop emergence.

The C-Mix Super tines, set on a 40cm spacing, have a 600kg release force for stone protection, with both the disc and tine sections are followed by a levelling system comprising either smooth or serrated discs or spring tines and a choice of 10 different rollers to suit different operating conditions and soil types.

SOUT SEE US A T H DAYS ISLAND – SIT FIELD E M8 21

IT’S IN OUR HANDS Kai roto i ō tātou rikarika

Also see us at the Wanaka Show March 12-13

#toitūWaitaha #ourCanterbury

• Grow vegetables all year round and extend your growing season. • Very affordable and easy to install. • Strong construction that resists all weather conditions. t/f

03 214 4262 |

e

info@morrifield.com

• Over 10,00 happy customers • 100% New Zealand made. • Range of models 2m to 8m long. • Nationwide delivery available.

www.morrifield.com

Stepping up for the future of our region now… means asking more from all of us. Environment Canterbury needs your input into the draft Long-Term Plan 2021-31, which outlines the proposed actions that will help shape our region’s future. Make a submission at haveyoursay.ecan.govt.nz/LTP.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

10 SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS

SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS SITE MAP 2021 SITE MAP

North Car Park Gate D DWN "Country Woman Fencing demonstrations of the and competition Year"

Gate C

1077 1076 1075 1074 1073 1072 1071 1070 1069 1068 1067 1066 1065 1064 1027 1026 1025 1024 1023 1022 1021 1020 1019 1018 1017 1016 1015 1014

977 976 975 974 973 972 971 970 969 968 967 966 965 964

891 890 889 888 887 886 885 884 883 882 881 880 879 FOOD

ATV Demo

Demo area - Lucerne

922 921 920 919 918 917 916 915 914

877 876 875 874 873 872 871 870 869 868 867 866 865 864

To Kirwee

927 926 925

Demo area - Grass

863

841 840 839 838 837 836 835 834 833 832 831 830 829 828

827 826 825 824 823 822 821 820 819 818 817 816 815 814

813 812 811 810 809 808 807 806 805 804 803 802 801 800

791 790 789 788 787 786 785 784 783 782 781 780 779 778

777 776 775 774 773 772 771 770 769 768 767 766 765 764

763 762 761 760 759 758 757 756 755 754 753 752 751 750

741 740 739 738 737 736 735 734 733 732 731 730 729 728

727 726 725 724 723 722 721 720 719 718 717 716 715 714

FOOD 712 711 710 709 708 707 706 705 704 703 702 701 700

691 690 689 688 687 686 685 684 683 682 681 680 679 678

677 676 675 674 673 672 671 670 669 668 667 666 665 664

663 662 661 660 659 658 657 656 655 654 653 652 651 650

FOOD

525 524

522 521

613 612 611 610 609 608 607 606 605 604 603 602 601 600

Main Food Court

519 518 517 516

563 562 561 560 559 558 557 556 555 554 553 552 551 550

441 440 439 438 437 436 435 434 433 432 431 430 429 428

427 426 425 424 423 422 421 420 419 418 417 416 415 414

413 412 411 410 409 408 407 406 405 404 403 402 401 400

391 390 389 388 387 386 385 384 383 382 381 380 379 378

377 376 375 374 373 372 371 370 369 368 367 366 365 364

363 362 361 360 359 358 357 356 355 354 353 352 351 350

341 340 339 338 337 336 335 334 333 332 331 330 329 328

327 326 325 324 323 322 321 320 319 318 317 316 315 314

313 312 311 310 309 308 307 306 305 304 303 302 301 300

291 290 289 288 287 286 285 284 283 282 281 280 279 278

277 276 275 274 273 272 271 270 269 268 267 266 265 264

263 262 261 260 259 258 257 256 255 254 253 252 251 250

232 231 230 229 228

227 226 225 224 223 222 221 220 219 218 217 216 215 214

213 212 211 210 209 208 207 206 205 204 203 202 201 200

182 181 180 179 178

177 176 175 174 173 172 171 170 169 168 167 166 165 164

163 162 161 160 159 158 157 156 155 154 153 152 151 150

141 140 139 138 137 136 135 134 133 132 131 130 129 128

126 125 124 123 122 121 120 119 118 117 116 115 114

112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101 100

Lifestyle Section

Food Trucks

Lifestyle Section

Gate B

Demo area - Oats

513 512 511 510 509 508 507 506 505 504 503 502 501 500

OFFICE

491 490 489 488 487 486 485 484 483 482 481 480 479 478

Covered sites 477 476 475 474 473 472 471

469 468 467 X

Courtenay Road

527 526

541 540 539 538 537 536 535 534 533 532 531 530 529 528

570 569 PT

463 462 461 460 459 458 457 456 455 454 453 452 451 450

Demo area - Barley

Gate A South Car Park

Sheep Handler “I have recently purchased a Combi Clamp. I can honestly say that at the end of each session I find myself thinking the same thing – BRILLIANT!”

FREE FREIGHT ON ALL PURCHASES OVER $7000 + GST TO YOUR NEAREST MAIN CENTRE

• Versatile and practical • Cost-effective • Simple and easy to use • Safe for animal and operator

Full Cattle Crush Range Vet, Vetless and Squeeze options available All Cattle Crushes come standard with

For further information and videos go to

combiclamp.co.nz or contact us on

0800 227 228

• Rubber Floors • Split gates and top acess gates on both sides • Anti-backing ratchets • Auto Head Bail + many more features

To Dunsandel

620 619 618

Farmlands

Independant Grass Trials

641 640 639 638 637 636 635 634 633 632 631 630 629 628 591 590 589 588 587 586 585 584 583 582 581 580 579 578


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS 11

Attitude minimises agri sector’s Covid losses A NEW study has found a strong ‘can do’ attitude and cooperative spirit in the agricultural sector were significant factors in minimising losses and uncertainties during the Covid restrictions last year. The report, coauthored by Lincoln University’s Dr Lei Cong – with contributors from AgResearch, The University of Queensland, NZ Institute of Economic Research, and Plant and Food Research – measured the immediate impacts of Covid-19 restrictions to June 2020 on the Australian and New Zealand agri-food systems and how resilient these systems were. It found the effects on both countries were broadly similar, with relatively minor economic impacts across the surveyed agri-sector industries. The report says the high level of ingenuity in the rural communities, both in Australia and New Zealand, was likely

a key element to their resilience and capacity to overcome movement restrictions and the disruption of value chains. “Restrictions and new rules of engagement and interaction were adopted rapidly as ‘people accepted a new reality and adapted to it’.” According to the report, the agricultural sectors in both countries “assimilated the many ‘unmanageable disruptions’, such as the loss or disruption to export markets and short supply of inputs. This created impetus for diversifying markets and strengthened business cases for valueadding and local manufacturing.” It also suggests that this resilience emerged from a combination of the agri-sector industries having relatively high technology, being well connected/networked and having some experience of prior shocks – as well as being well supported, primarily logistically, by their governments.

“Agricultural producers in Australia and New Zealand are well organised and business-oriented, and thus had the right structures and sufficient financial backing to manage through a pandemic,” the report states. “Product demand was maintained domestically

due to income support, while export markets remained fairly constant.” It also noted that some important lessons – such as the need to upskill young people in rural areas and control or reverse the negative rural migration, the need to diversify export markets.

The report found that the high level of ingenuity in the rural communities was a key element to their resilience and capacity to overcome movement restrictions and the disruption caused by Covid. PHOTO: KIEREN SCOTT

FEED SYSTEMS SINCE 1962

DAIRY FEED SYSTEMS

INNOVATIVE AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT

• Supreme quality stainless steel feed trays • Exceptional back-up support • Easy to use and maintain first class installations • Robust construction • Skiold Disc Mills • Grain holding siolos • Utility augers / Mobile auger

SHEEP JETTER

Innovative Agriculture Equipment

Sheep dipping... made easier! Serving NZ Farmers since 1962

• Manufactured from stainless steel • Electric eye • 800-1000 sheep per hour • Fantastic penetration • Get one now before price increase

7685

$

+ GST

SEE US AT KIRWEE - SITE 324

Serving NZ farmers since 1962 INNOVATIVE AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT

www.pppindustries.co.nz sales@pppindustries.co.nz

0800 901 902


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

12 SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS

Designed by farmers for farmers Sheep handling system is most commonly used for dagging, weighing, drenching and

MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE COMBI Clamp

vaccinating, but it is also well suited for foot paring and mouthing. The manual operation

Combi Clamp stock handling systems can be tailored to suit a variety of farming operations.

Investing Beyond the Farm? Come and see us at the South Island Field Days 24- 26 March 2021 (Site 432 alongside Leech & Partners Limited) We can help you identify a suitable investment strategy based on your personal investment needs. It’s a long-term partnership and it all starts with a conversation. Craigs Investment Partners Limited is a NZX Participant Firm. Adviser Disclosure Statements are available on request and free of charge. Please visit craigsip.com

gives the user greater control over slight adjustments and creates a quiet operation for improved stock flow. A bonus is its affordability and durability, offering years of maintenancefree use. The Combi Clamp can also be tailored to suit many farming operations, with a wide variety of optional extras – including three-way drafting, wheel and weigh gear attachments. “I’m very pleased with the Combi Clamp set up,” says user Les Scott. “Since August, we have been drenching, dagging,

Your Dairy Refrigeration Specialists - servicing North Canterbury to Oamaru See us at the SIAFD Site 130

local agents for VARICOOL systems • vat wraps snap chilling • DX units • free consultations FOR TOTAL MILK COOLING COMPLIANCE TALK TO OUR FRIENDLY TEAM TODAY!

www.dairycool.co.nz

24 HOUR FAULTS SERVICE: 0 3 FRIDGE 7 sales: 027 33 44 365 or lee@dairycool.co.nz

“I’m very pleased with the Combi Clamp set up.” tagging and doing pre lamb work with ewes. We no longer seem to need the contractor with the conveyor, so – in that short time – we have come close to paying for it.” Scott says the system is great for a variety of jobs and he finds the three-way drafting a great addition. Meanwhile, the company’s cattle handling equipment is user friendly. The system comes with an auto catch head bail, with a durable range that suits all types of New Zealand beef cattle. The basic crush comes standard with practical features for safety and ease of access to the animal. There’s also a choice of vet and vetless models with parallel squeeze option, which all feature the auto head yoke. This can also be alternatively purchased

as a standalone unit to be incorporated into existing systems. During product development, the company put a significant effort into reducing rattling noise, making the crush pleasant to use for operators and keeping cattle calm and relaxed. It says this results in the most common feedback, that the product is clearly designed by a farmer who understands livestock. Combi Clamp will be attending all three regional field day events. The ongoing success of the company’s product range sees two new faces joining the sales team. Scott Hassall will oversee sales throughout the South Island, with Claudia Fraser looking after the North Island. www.combiclamps.co.nz @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

FEEDING THE WORLD’S

ULTIMATE INNOVATION 6 YEARS IN THE MAKING GINORMOUS CAPACITY 17 TONNE PAYLOAD

HUNGRIEST HERDs

INTRODUCING THE WORLD’S MOST EFFICIENT COMBINATION FEED WAGON YET.

Visit hustlerequipment.com for more details

STARRING

TRIPLE-AXLE DESIGN GENTLE ON PASTURE MASSIVE 21m3 COMBINATION FEEDER

“A GAME CHANGER FOR LARGESCALE FARMS & HERDS”

COMBI RX218

Massive capacity Massive efficiency Higher profitability

Visit us March 24-26 at SIAFD FarmChief’s booth - site 350-354/400-404


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS 13

Cane family on the ‘Case’ ALL BLACK captain Sam Cane has a reputation for tenacity and getting the hard work done. It’s a trait that must run in the family genes when you look at the farming career of his parents, who farm at Reporoa on the Central Plateau. Malcolm and Kathy Cane farm 390ha – of which 146ha is leased to a dairy farmer – running about 1000 deer stags and 500 hinds, plus about 500 mixed-sex weaners. Starting out as teenager, Malcolm began a hay-carting business, moving about 100,000 bales each season, contract fencing in the off-season and doing an 18-month stint working for a local dairy farmer. After seven seasons of hay-carting and fencing, then age 22, he was able to make a down-payment on an 80ha block in the area. Back then, bankers were pessimistic about farming and there was little to spare. “We had fifty grand and 50 deer and still had to go to about three banks because interest rates were about 19%,” says Malcolm. Even 10 years later, the Canes had not fully stocked their 80ha, so alongside their own stock, they grazed animals for others, while still

Sam Cane (centre) is pictured with his deer farming parents Kathy and Malcolm in front of their Case Puma 165.

maintaining the off-farm fencing business to keep ahead of the struggle. Now, around 30 years on, having experienced the ups and downs of the venison meat and velvet markets and keen to spread risk, the Canes went into partnership in a hunting block in the Paeroa mountain range known as Broadview Hunting estate. As a side-line to the trophy hunting and selling velvet to New Zealand agents, Kathy also produces and distributes Canes Deer Velvet, a business built up gradually over the past

20 years, producing about ‘make hay when the sun five tonnes a year, as shines’. Producing 1500 capsules and raw product. baleage wraps a year with Malcolm’s father, Laurie – a Reporoa dairy farmer – only ever had Case Internationals, so he got started with the brand too, using a small International with a hay sweep. After about 15 years of running a tight ship, Malcolm bought two Case IHs: a 115 and a Puma 165 from Giltrap. Malcolm Cane prizes his tractors because they offer a degree of farming independence, like his own hay-baling gear, that literally allows him to

Email: info@hecton.co.nz Visit our website www.hecton.co.nz for a full list of products CALL IN & SEE US | 73 PRESTON STREET INVERCARGILL PHONE: 03 215 8558

a Kuhn baler, the ability to cut hay on demand – usually up to five times a

year – is priceless for the deer, as they tend to be picky eaters.

“Deer are that fussy that we cut the lucerne every 30 days. If it’s left any longer it’s not very palatable for them,” he says. Case IH and Giltrap Agrizone recently loaned the Canes a new Puma 165 CVT in a sponsorship arrangement in conjunction with their All Black son Sam, who remains a farm boy at heart despite being a professional rugby player. Malcolm says while he probably won’t use all the electronic features in his new Puma cab, he’s enjoying many of its features and it’s a nice smooth ride. “Put it this way, you don’t really feel like you’re working when you’re sitting in it.” www.caseih.co.nz @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Intelligent, dependable Intelligent, dependable irrigation systems that last irrigation systems that last

See us at Kirwee Creek Pavilion. SitePA10 115 Site

National Fieldays 2019 Find us in the Mystery

SHEEP HANDLER AND LEAD UP RACE

• Fastest handler on the market • Ideal for dagging, crutching & foot trimming

Specialist suppliers of irrigation equipment • Pivots and Laterals

CRUTCHING TRAILER

• VRI for pivots and Laterals • Variable Rate Irrigation • Hoses & Accessories

Hecton Contractors – Tandem covered crutching trailer

• Couplings & Fittings • Hard Hose Irrigators

0800 65 55 45 www.bayirrigation.co.nz 1420 Omahu Road, Hastings

• Pumps and Motor Pumps • Generator Sets

• Engine Protection

• Rain Guns and Booms


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

14 SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS

Small steps boost farm’s biodiversity FARMERS DISCOVERED that there are many ways to protect and enhance mahinga kai and biodiversity values while visiting Waimak Farm in Eyreton recently. The 612-hectare farm includes the largest remaining kanuka stand in North Canterbury. Due to its important biodiversity values this area is being protected by farm managers Richard and Susan Pearse. Richard Pearse says the kanuka stand provides an important seed source and seedlings have been taken from the area to try and recreate a similar ecosystem in other dryland areas. He is aiming to plant approximately 1000 native trees

per year throughout the entire farm. “It’s important for us to protect this area as there are hardly any of these dryland areas left. It is easier to protect what you already have on farm than starting from scratch.” The event which was hosted by Environment Canterbury cultural land management and biodiversity advisors Makarini Rupene and Zipporah Ploeg, who provided a practical insight into changes landowners can make to protect special areas on their farms. Ploeg says while dryland ecosystems may not look as visually appealing as wetlands or stream planting, they serve a

Planting around the edge of the irrigation lake is part of a long-term biodiversity vision for the farm.

“We’ve taken a practical approach. We can’t do it all at once, but we have our plan in place and we are working towards it.”

AVFIN AI AN LA CE BL E

Proud distributor of Strautmann machinery in New Zealand for 37 years and counting • • • •

We welcome the NEW Magnon CFS forage wagon to NZ, the first of its kind. The Magnon will be on show and demonstrators will be touring the country in 2021. Various muck spreaders including the NEW TS series Full range of Mixer wagons from 4m3 to 45m3 Quality new and second hand machines available

Email: enquiries@strautmann.co.nz Sales: John Pio

027 640 3582

Come and visit us at the Southland FIELD DAYS SITE 809/810

www.strautmann.co.nz www.strautmann.co.nz Strautmann StrautmannHopkins Hopkins @StrautmannNZ @StrautmannNZ

vital purpose for preserving indigenous biodiversity. “Kanuka stands and other dryland ecosystems play an important role in the land corridor from the mountains to the sea. Once you look closer you can see a thriving ecosystem of moss, herb fields, orchids, lizards, and mycorrhizal fungi. The fungi interact with the roots of the kanuka trees and help increase water and nutrients, while the trees provide the fungus with carbohydrates from photosynthesis.” Farmers attending the event learned that mahinga kai encompasses much than just food gathering and waterways. Rupene described the concept as the connections between resources and places. “Mahinga kai relates to every natural resource and the places these are found. It’s about the connections between the two and looks at the land and water as a much broader network than just what you find on one piece of land.” The Pearses have

always been passionate about enhancing the biodiversity values of the farm and believe that the key to environmental improvement is having a plan and tackling the simple changes first. “You can’t do everything at once but if you have a long-term vision and break it down into smaller steps, you’ll make progress. “We have focused on the low-hanging fruit first and are leaving the larger projects for further down the track.” The couple are trialling different options, including tree lucerne for fence line plantings along an irrigated stretch of land. “It’s late flowering so it’s good for attracting bees. It’s also safe for stock so the cows can graze it. We’ve got some seeds germinating now and we’ll wait until they’ve grown to a decent height before we plant them.” They are also working on enhancing the land surrounding the effluent ponds. They have started preparation work and

hope to plant around the edge of the ponds later this year. “In this area we knew we needed plants with a high water tolerance. We have made a start by spraying out the grass and weeds, laying bark chip, and the next step is to add flaxes and hebes which we’ll source from local plant nurseries to make sure they suit our soil and conditions.” Another area which the couple will work on in the future is planting the edge of their irrigation pond. Having a biodiversity plan has helped them to prioritise their enhancement projects. “We’ve taken a practical approach. We can’t do it all at once, but we have our plan in place and we are working towards it. The key is to not feel like you have to do everything at once but to start small and make progress towards improving the environment.” Environment Canterbury provides advice and in some cases funding to assist farmers to protect biodiversity and mahinga kai.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS 15

Handy in all situations MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

The Handypiece Pro features variable speeds from 2400 – 3500rpm.

www.handypiece.co.nz @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

bapumpsandsprayers.com 0800 833 538

Founding director Bill McIntosh.

markets. The McIntosh brothers got started in the farm machinery market by making sheep showers and stock crates for trucks. The stock crates necessitated a crane, so the brothers built their own on a Commer TS3 truck, then a second and a third –the beginnings of the crane part of the McIntosh cranes business. In 1973, they displayed the first

forage wagon at the national field days, generating great interest among farmers. Those were early days in the development of feeder wagons in New Zealand, but they are now a core product line for McIntosh Farm Machinery and a common sight on NZ farms. Before Bill passed away early this year, he was the oldest of three generations of the McIntosh clan working in the business, which has grown substantially since 1951. Possessing an incredible work ethic, Bill didn’t retire until health issues forced him to in his late eighties. He was 90 years old when he died – a milestone he had set himself, according to family members, saying “I’ll get to 90, then I’ll reassess.”

South Island Agricultural Field Days Site: 888 INCLUDES SERIES 2 TERMINATOR • • • • • •

Terminator Base 950mm Side Shift 4.3m (150UC) Beam 270kg Hammer 6 Bank Valve Hydraulic Hinge 300mm Mast Shift

SERIES 1 400 INCLUDES

N

LA

ND

• 230 Kg hammer • 4.0M Mast • 3 Bank Hydraulic Valve

EW

ZE

A

IN

making it suitable for use by right and left-handed users. The Handypiece Pro features variable speeds from 2400 – 3500rpm, typically carrying out dagging, crutching and trimming cows’ tails at a mid-speed of 2700 rpm. Meanwhile, it offers a superior finish when shearing by running at the maximum speed. Equipped with a brushless motor, the Pro units can crutch between 300 to 400 sheep from a single charge, while also weighing in at 100 grams lighter than a standard handpiece and developing less heat build-up. Handypiece kits, supplied in a purpose-built carry bag, includes a 12 amp/hr lithium battery, charger, belt, holster and pouch, along with a 5-metre extension cord.

FOUNDING DIRECTOR of a top local farm machinery manufacturer has died, leaving behind a legacy based on strength and reliability – personal traits that live on in his company and the products it builds. Bill McIntosh and his brother Bryant founded McIntosh Brothers in 1951, starting as jobbing engineers around Palmerston North. In the ensuing years, the company grew into a leading manufacturer and exporter of farm machinery and the Manawatu’s largest crane hire company. The well-known McIntosh Farm Machinery range of farm gear, in blue livery, is among the strongest in the market and is now exported to various offshore

MA DE

LISTENING TO customers across all sectors of agriculture helps the Handypiece team design and engineer options to make its unit better suited for each application. Inventor Dave Short says as part of the development process, any trial modifications are tested by experienced users, meaning if a perfectionist shearer is happy with the performance of the machine under load and at a selected speed, then farmers and farm workers will also be happy. The standard Handypiece Pro, with the purple curly cord, remains the most popular style. It’s suitable for users of all abilities, on sheep, cattle, goats, deer, large dogs, horses, grass and plants. A shearing style Handypiece, with a long straight cord, is designed for experienced users and shearers, with the extra cord length offering longer blows when shearing. It also allows a longer reach when TB testing deer, or when being used on animals held in a sheep handler. The machines can be customised for lefthanded users, or with the power cord exiting from the middle of the motor,

BILL’S LEGACY LIVES ON!

www.kinghitter.com 0800 476 868


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

16 SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS

New generation large square balers MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE NEW generation Kuhn SB series large square balers are said to deliver high capacity and high bale weights combined with more driver convenience. At its heart, driveline upgrades makes the balers extremely robust and durable. Meanwhile, a choice of four double-knotter models and three bale sizes offer a solution for every producer in all crop conditions. The SB series consists of four models: SB 890, SB 1270 X, SB 1290, and SB 1290 iD, producing 80 x 90cm, 120 x 70cm, and 120 x 90cm bales, respectively. The SB 890, SB 1270 X and SB 1290 perform in all crop conditions. The SB 1290 iD provides high bale den-

sities and is particularly suited to efficient logistics in shipping situations. The SB series balers feature an improved crop intake system, starting with a newly-designed crop guard, a torque increase on the rotor and feeder fork driveline to ensure up to 15% higher intake capacity. The KUHN patented torque regulation system on all models keeps the balance between capacity and density. This uses a crank angle position sensor and plunger rod load pins to measure the total machine load, throughout the complete plunger cycle. The new design offers good accessibility for daily inspection and maintenance. While on the safety front, the knotter deck is equipped with

The new generation Kuhn SB series large square balers are said to deliver high capacity and high bale weights combined with more driver convenience.

solid stairs and a safety railing. Other characteristics of the SB series include the integral rotor for con-

sistent crop flow, featuring bolted-up Hardox rotor tines for durability and easy exchange. An active pre-chamber fill-

ing mechanism (‘POWER DENSITY’) with a newly designed mechanical feeder fork steering system is said to help

produce evenly shaped bales. It also comes with a double knotter binding system and standard electronic monitoring

adapted for extremely dense bales. All SB models are fully ISOBUS compatible with an intuitive user interface, easy to control via the ISOBUS terminal of the tractor or via KUHN’s CCI 50 / CCI 1200 terminals. The machines also feature a load-sensing hydraulic system that is used for axle locking, knife steering and roller control. For operator looking to achieve extremely high dense bales, the SB 1290 iD model produces square bales with up to 25% higher density than conventional 120 x 90 format balers. The Kuhn TWINPACT, double plunger system ensures efficient bale compaction, while avoiding high peak loads on the machine. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

MAKE SHEARING SAFE WITH

See us at Kirwee SITE 422

Join thousands of farmers, contractors and shearers who have switched to the world’s #1 selling and most trusted shearing plant and woolpress. Make your shearing shed a whole lot safer, without compromising on performance and reliability.

TPW Xpress Woolpress

“Designed by a Farmer for Farmers”

SEE US AT KIRWEE

SITE 334

PHONE 0800 4 AGBITS | 0800 4 242 487 WEBSITE www.agbits.co.nz

• Safety screen guard with automatic return • Presses more weight into less packs • Automatic bale pinning and bale ejection • Contamination-free short square bales • Fast pack locking system

EVO Shearing Plant • • • •

Winner of 2 Worksafe Industry Awards Unique electronic safety switch Designed to eliminate handpiece lockups Proven choice for commercial shearing contractors in Australia and New Zealand

Heiniger New Zealand | (03) 349 8282 | heiniger.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS 17

Film binding now available MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE KUHN VBP 3100 series variable chamber baler-wrapper combination can now be equipped with the patented Kuhn Twin-reel film binding system. The manufacturer claims this increases the baler’s versatility in silage production. The process has already been a proven concept on Kuhn fixed chamber baler-wrappers since its introduction in 2015. The patented film binding system uses two regular 750mm stretchfilm rolls, which offers several advantages compared to other film binding systems available on the market that are using wide mantle film. Using regular, freely available wrapping film enables customers to benefit from a lower purchase price and use a much higher prestretch ratio compared to conventional wide film binding systems. This is said to reduce film binding costs by up

Kuhn’s VBP 3100 series baler-wrappers can now be equipped with film binding systems.

to 37% and extends the intervals for changing film reels by around 30%. Additionally, the customer’s inventory management is simplified by using regular stretchfilm. Thanks to lower roll weights, the film is easy to handle. Combined with the low lifting height and the user-friendly film

roll holding system, this makes the exchange of film rolls on the VBP 3100 series an easy job. The film and net binding systems are two separate systems, which enables the operator to switch between the two without the need for tools. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

WHY FILM? WHEN PRODUCING round silage bales, more and more often film binding is preferred over traditional net binding. Film binding provides tighter, more compactly wrapped bales with better protection around the circumference of the bale. The additional oxygen barrier guarantees better silage quality, and the improved bale shape enables more effi-

cient storage. There are also many practical benefits for the farmer. A film bound bale means easy unwrapping, even during frost periods. There is no collection of silage in between the wrap so no feed is lost. Film-wrapped bales make waste management more efficient; there is no net and film to be separated, so all the plastic film can be recycled together.

handypiece ■ Ideal for shearing sheep, alpacas, goats and cow tails. ■ Variable speed from 2400-3500 rpm. ■ Latest brushless motor technology means minimal heat build up ■ 1400gms means 100-200gms lighter than standard handpiece. ■ At 2700 rpm the 12-volt lithium battery will crutch up to 300400 sheep, 400-500 cow tails. ■ Tough alloy switch box with auto rest fuse for overload or lockup – clips to belt.

Worl d’s m o spee st powe r d cli pper ful varia ble is he re!

FIELD DAYS SPECIAL a FREE box of 10 cutters

H FASTER H LIGHTER H VARIABLE SPEED

See us at Kirwee – Agbits Site 334

MAKE DIRTY JOBS EASY View in action go to www.handypiece.co.nz

Freephone 0800 474 327

email: dave@handypiece.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

18 SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS

Turbo-charged cultivators with a capital T! MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

INTRODUCED IN 2020, the Kverneland Turbo T cultivator comes in 6.5 and 8 metre working widths. Both trailed machines carry five banks of tines and fold to a manageable 3m transport width. Aimed at cropping farmers and vegetable growers, the Turbo T is said to be particularly useful for dealing with maize stubbles or fodder beet residues. The machine provides 725mm of under-frame clearance, combined with a 190mm leg spacing. Carrying 31 or 44 tines respectively, the 6500

and 8000 machines are equipped with the well known Kverneland Triflex 400 tines – with its instantly-recognisable green, maintenance-free, leaf spring configuration. Offering up to 400kg resistance, the layout can operate at working depths of 3-20cm. For the 2021 season, purchasers can also specify the Reflex tine assembly, aimed particularly at users in the North Island where there is more ploughing, to give the option of either ripping into stubble or working with wider points on ploughed land. Distributor, Power Farming, reports that the machine is highly versa-

FENCING PRODUCTS TO SEE! SEE US AT C9 & 10 (COVERED SITES) TARAGATE – the ORIGINAL Multi Strand Electric Gate The preferred choice for over 20 years! – Taragate 4 Strand – Taragate 2 Strand – Taragate 4 Strand ‘Lifestyler’

Kverneland’s Turbo T cultivator is aimed at cropping farmers and vegetable growers.

tile in the spring ahead of maize planting, going deeper to help promote root growth. Likewise, post cereal harvesting, it can be used at high speed at shallower depths to promote weed and volunteer germination – with high work rates. The machine gives a “full cut” across the whole working width,

with a combination of forward speed and resonance within the leg delivers good mixing of trash and organic matter. It also has the added benefit of a level finish. Power requirement is low at around 35-40hp per working metre, with routine maintenance also kept low by the use of high-grade steel and

See us at SITE 873

OUTSTANDING OUTRIGGERS SmartRigger™ – the outrigger that does it all

• Fits wood, concrete and metal posts • Entire body is live – nothing to snap, crack or pop off • Flexible – withstands impact from animals and machinery • Available in 150mm and 230mm lengths

sealed bearing assemblies. For high daily outputs, the machines have a maximum horsepower rating of 450hp. The standard point, a 60mm knock-on fitting, is suitable for working at depth to ensure full soil movement through the profile, while also offering time saving during replacement.

For shallower operations or lighter soil types, the machine’s options include a 150mm point or the “Tiger” point – specifically designed for stony soils. Rear of the tines, a levelling element consists of a revolving disc configuration. This is suited to all conditions, particularly heavy land and high straw volumes, before final consolidation and finishing is carried out by the rearmounted, 565mm diame-

ter Actipacker. Ease of use is taken care of with hydraulic cylinders and spacers for depth control. The cultivator also comes with a separate, manually-adjusted crank handle for the levelling element. When the working depth is adjusted, a parallelogram linkage ensures the levelling system is also adjusted to maintain the quality of work. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

VETMARKER

New models have arrived for the smaller lawn with a smaller price!

®

DOCKING LAMBS IS EASY WITH THE VETMARKER

See us on SITE 385A

SPACE-LINK The proven performer • Easy fit, stable and solid anchor • Attaches directly to Taragate insulators • Fits wood and concrete posts • Holds wire 80mm out from post • Vaccination • Earmarking & tagging • Castration • Drenching

COME AND TALK TO US ABOUT ALL YOUR FENCING NEEDS Taragate Ltd

RD2 Hamilton, New Zealand Phone 07 843 3859 or 0800 TARAGATE (82 72 42) Email info@taragate.co.nz Web www.taragate.co.nz

0800 38 44 50

• Automatic flystrike application • Releases lambs onto their feet

FREEPHONE 0800 DOCKER 0800 362 537 www.vetmarker.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS 19

VISIT

We‘ve got

Saving backs and manpower milking for over 40 years bundled

AT SITE

120

SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL

FIELD DAYS 2021

MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

HECTON PRODUCTS have been in the sheep handling business for more than 40 years now. In fact, the company’s Sheep Handler and Weigh Crate products are common sights all around the country. Hecton’s Sheep Handler has a reputation for speed and versatility. Built for strength, it is the perfect unit for dagging, crutching, bellying, foot trimming, vaccinating, wool sampling, mouthing, eye wigging, loading of AI cradles – or any task requiring a sheep or goat to be mobilised on its side. Stock are held in a comfortable position during operation allowing full access to the underside of the animal, so no heavy lifting is required and operation is easy on the back. The Hecton Sheep Handler is available in both air-operated and manual (no air required) versions. The company is offering – for a limited time –

Purchase

Purchase

iCR+

CowScout heat & health collars

intelligent cluster removers

20% OFF*

Get every 10th collar

iPUD rotary post-teat sprayers

FREE

*^

The Hecton Sheep Handler is available in both air-operated and manual (no air required) versions.

a promotional price for its Weigh Crate. Having multiple jobs to do on your flock does not necessarily mean you need more staff or help to do it. The Weigh Crate is a low cost, quality-build solution that can be simply added into your yards. The crate can

be hard mounted into an existing sheep race in the woolshed or it can be mobile and added into temporary yards. Hecton says the multipurpose product is ideal to use for tagging, drenching, mouthing, vaccinating and drafting. By adding load bars,

Purchase you can also weigh your stock. The product is modular, additional components can be added at any stage to include dagging and ring crutching capability.

iNTELSPRAY 2 auto teat sprayer

Purchase

OR

Get a

www.hecton.co.nz

any GEA clusters^

FREE

@rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

*

100L drum FIL Active Teat Conditioner

SERIOUS ABOUT FENCING!

*Terms & conditions apply. Installation is not included in any of these offers and will be quoted separately by a GEA Service Partner. A full inspection must be carried out prior to a final quote being presented. ^Minimum CowScout tag quantity is 300. Minimum cluster quantity is 20. Promotion valid until 30 May 2021.

QUALITY • TESTED • PROVEN VISIT VISIT USUS ATAT AT NORTHLAND CENTRAL VISIT US THE SOUTH DISTRICTS FIELD FIELD DAYS DAYS ISLAND FIELD DAYS

SITEK19 F4 SITE SITE H7

gea.com New Zealand manufacturer of quality fencing tools & equipment

Driving dairy efficiencies? We can help.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 9, 2021

20 SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS

NZ tractor industry remains Available now: The eco-friendly fert you can apply any time! optimistic Quinfert PhoS-eco ‘88’ for 2021 Protecting Kiwi Waterways

Dr Bert Quin

8.0% P (< 0.2% P in leachable form), plus 8.0% S and 30% Ca

MARK DANIEL

• 89%ident lessKyle P inBaxter leachable form than Surephos. All sustained-release P becomes available says

while 2020 posed challenges for the industry, no Boucraa slimes or manufacturing rock is present! - absolutely NEW ZEALAND tractor the current mood of the organisation’s members is sales finished 2020 on a 11  ppm cadmium (140 mgCd/kg P). Fine form for best coverage. Low dust. positive. strong note, with Decem- • Only Overall, tractor sales ber sales up 18.4 % on for 2020 were down 15.3% 2019. • Excellent value! Waharoa $278 ; MaungaTapere $299 ; Dannevirke $299 ; 375 HP and above were a drop of 25% on the preTractor and Machinery compared with 2019. However, some segparticularly affected with vious year. Association (TAMA) pres- Sales of machines in the ments remained stronger • Timaru $329 ; Otautau $362. Prices excl. GST than others during 2020, particularly lifestyle trac• Also available (limited supply): PhoS-eco ‘Triple8’ 8-8-8 NPS $399 + GST where tors (20-30HP), sales volumes were very similar to 2019. Meanwhile, tractors sold in the Dr Bert Quin viticulture and horticultural sectors, typically 80 to 100HP, saw a reduction of about 5% comReactive Phosphate Rock pared to 2019’s record 12.5% P*, 34% Ca, 1.3% S, 0.6 Mg breaking year. Hardest hit was the (*slightly reduced because of ‘CM’ controlled-moisture anti-dust addition) 140-375Hp range, traScores very well in the Watkinson Dissolution Test ditionally sold into the arable and dry stock Low cadmium level of 18ppm (140 mg Cg/kg P) – half the industry maximum farming sector, with a Fine (but low-dust) particle size means maximum neutralisation of soil acid 20% reduction compared Optimise production’ minimise P run-off and leaching to 2019.    “This HP segment $358/t + GST ex Waharoa • $398/t + GST ex Rolleston accounts for a lot of the Blends with sulphur90 and other nutrients available tractors sold to contractors and hire fleets, which were affected by the genmarkd@ruralnews.co.nz

Dr Bert Quin

CALL NOW: 0800 633 or Dr Bert Quin 021 427 572 Protecting Kiwi 784 Waterways

Available now: The eco-friendly fert you can apply any time!

Quinfert PhoS-eco ‘88’

8.0% P (< 0.2% P in leachable form), plus 8.0% S and 30% Ca

• 89% less P in leachable form than Surephos. All sustained-release P becomes available

- absolutely no Boucraa slimes or manufacturing rock is present!

• Only 11 ppm cadmium (140 mgCd/kg P). Fine form for best coverage. Low dust.

• Excellent value! Waharoa $278 ; MaungaTapere $299 ; Dannevirke $299 ;

• Timaru $329 ; Otautau $362. Prices excl. GST

• Also available (limited supply): PhoS-eco ‘Triple8’ 8-8-8 NPS $399 + GST

CALL NOW: 0800 784 633 or Dr Bert Quin 021 427 572

QUINFERT ALGERIAN RPR V2

0800 QUINFERT or Bert Quin 021 427 572

HORTICULTURE

eral uncertainties around the pandemic,” Baxter explained. “These guys also experienced further uncertainty in obtaining sufficient workers through the spring and summer season to operate their machines, with a consequential reduction in the yearly sales volumes of larger tractors.”  Looking forward, he says TAMA members are reporting demand for tractors and equipment steadily building, with customers securing machines for Spring/ Summer 2021.   “However, the pandemic is continuing to disrupt the overseas supply chain across Europe, America and

Tractor and Machinery Association (TAMA) president Kyle Baxter says while 2020 posed challenges for the industry, the current mood is positive.

Asia,” Baxter adds. “Our members are doing everything they can to ensure machines arrive on time for the season ahead. However, there will be potential delays in global manufacturing and international shipping routes that may be felt during the first half of the year.” He says TAMA is advising its members to stay well informed of any shipping logistics and to liaise with their customers who may be affected by these delays.

SHEEP HANDLING

SHEEP HANDLING 0800 269 776

Profile for Rural News Group

Rural News March 9 2021  

Rural News March 9 2021

Rural News March 9 2021  

Rural News March 9 2021