Page 1

NEWS

AGRIBUSINESS

ARABLE

High-end woollen flooring offers opportunity. PAGE 17

The green and gold rush begins. PAGE 20

Insect pest on the verge of eradication. PAGE 19

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS MARCH 19, 2019: ISSUE 672 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Keep calm – Brexit

BANKING INQUIRY DAVID ANDERSON

PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

BREXIT IS a messy situation and how it will end is not clear, says Rabobank’s global strategist for animal protein Justin Sherrard. He was speaking last week to Rural News just as another Brexit deal vote was defeated again in the UK Parliament. “Right now I think there could possibly be a delay in the process... scheduled to run until the end of this month when the UK would exit the EU.

“I think now the likelihood of a delay has just gone up and the likelihood of getting an organised soft Brexit might have just gone down a little bit.” But from New Zealand’s point of view he sees no downside in our sheepmeat trade with the UK. “The potential downside is food price inflation and whether you see the edge come off UK demand under a hard Brexit situation. If they are able somehow to engineer a delay or a soft Brexit outcome then we won’t see any change.”

Even if there were a hard Brexit then NZ would still be well placed, he says. Its relationships with UK retailers and food service have been well developed and nurtured by meat processors and exporters from NZ. “Also, in sheepmeat it’s not like there are lots of other suppliers. There’s not a lot of exportable sheepmeat around the world, particularly the cuts British consumers want. You will see a little bit of change there but not a lot. “Beef might be different: if there is a hard Brexit outcome you prob-

ably will see increased access to the UK market for South Americans and for Australia. “The UK market will pay more for certain cuts than South East Asia, for example, so it will be an attractive market to export to. “But I don’t think there will be change during 2019 because even though there is turmoil in the market I think people will try to keep all those supply relationships intact. There will be too much to worry about to be starting to think about additional

Doctor’s orders Professor Jane Mills, pro vice-chancellor of the College of Health at Massey University, says staff shortage in rural areas is forcing many people to work extra hours beyond what is reasonable and that their work/life balance is out of sync, resulting in physical or mental health issues. Mills says Government awareness must be raised about the knock-on effects of their decisions on migration and the casual workforce. For example, challenges arise in rural regions when casual workers arrive in towns to harvest particular crops or to work during seasonal peaks on livestock properties. “It can mean that a small rural health service may have to serve a doubled population at particular times of the year. That can be hard because they often don’t have enough capital infrastructure – let alone personnel – to manage the extra flow of people coming in and through their communities.” See full story page 7

TO PAGE 3

PETITIONERS OF the New Zealand Parliament -- hoping to cash in on the successful outcome of a recent Royal Commission in Australia – are asking politicians to go deeper in their inquiry into bank behaviour in this country. A petition in the name of Lyn Berry asks for a parliamentary select committee to investigate the behaviour of banks in NZ along similar lines to the recently completed Australian Banking Commission. Berry claims that over the years many farmers and others have been treated badly by the banks, which has cost those impacted millions in costs and lost income. A select committee is now assessing the conduct and culture of the NZ banking industry. However, Berry told Rural News the committee’s remit is far too restricted as it is only considering information given to it by the Financial Markets Authority (FMA) and the Reserve Bank. “The committee is aware the material is only partially telling the story,” she says. “Hence the need for a select committee to conduct its own inquiry; this is what my petition requests.” Berry is calling on people to support her petition, now lodged with Parliament, for a select committee to inquire fully into NZ banks. “The people who support the petition are likely to have their TO PAGE 3

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

NEWS 3

Drought declared in Mainland

ISSUE 672

www.ruralnews.co.nz NIGEL MALTHUS

NEWS��������������������������������������1-19 AGRIBUSINESS��������������� 20-21 MARKETS��������������������������22-23 HOUND, EDNA���������������������� 24 CONTACTS����������������������������� 24 OPINION����������������������������24-27 MANAGEMENT��������������� 29-31 ANIMAL HEALTH������������33-34 MACHINERY AND PRODUCTS���������������������� 35-38 RURAL TRADER�������������������� 39

THE DROUGHT formally declared in the northern regions of the South Island is now extended into Marlborough, Buller and Nelson. Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced the extension of the ‘medium-scale event’, during a visit to Tasman last week, where he opened Golden Bay Fruit’s new packhouse in Motueka and met with drought-hit farmers in Takaka. “The lack of substantial rain means the drought situation in Tasman’s neighbouring regions has reached the point beyond the rural community’s ability to continue farming or growing through it,” O’Connor says. Ironically, he announced this as parts of the region received useful rain, enabling Tasman District Council to ease some water-use restrictions. Golden Bay Federated Farmers president Wayne Langford, who farms at Takaka, says rain on the day

Golden Bay FedFarmers president Wayne Langford.

of O’Connor’s visit followed a fall four days earlier. “So last night’s rain was follow-up rain, which is really important.” There was also more water in the Takaka River. “That’s the first time the rain’s hit the river.” The district had greened up and Langford hopes farmers are now man-

aging their way out of the drought. The Tasman District Council had been planning to increase irrigation restrictions to 50%, but is now able to keep them at 25%. Enough rain has fallen for most farmers to be able to turn irrigators off, Langford told Rural News. However, he adds that farmers still

Keep calm

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FROM PAGE 1

opportunities. We will just have to wait and see exactly where this ends up.” Meanwhile, Dave Harrison, Beef + Lamb NZ general manager policy and advocacy, says he has been in London to plan for a no-deal Brexit and ensure we are as prepared as we can be for the worst outcome. “The assurances we are getting from both the European Union and the UK are that New Zealand food products shouldn’t be affected too greatly even in the event of a hard Brexit,” he told Rural News. “The noises being made are they will be pragmatic and accept current

POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 Published by: Rural News Group Printed by: PMP Print CONTACTS Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz ABC audited circulation 79,599 as at 30.09.2018

certificates and the fact that we are already going into ports dealing with third-country imports should mean it will almost be business as usual,” Harrison says. “The risk is that resources could be diverted from those ports in the UK to roll-on roll-off ferries between the UK and the Continent. If they had to do divert resources from the traditional ports to there, that would be problematic.” Harrison admits there is still a huge amount of uncertainty. “As much as we are getting these reassurances it would be really nice if they could have an orderly transition.”

need support. All the dry feed cows had been living on had got wet and was rotting, but the fresh green shoots were not yet enough to graze. “So there’s this awkward little stage now for two weeks where farmers need to manage their cows and whatnot carefully to get them through.” O’Connor says farmers and growers in parts of New Zealand are no strangers to hot dry summers, but the extreme and prolonged nature of the dry spell had taken its toll. “Most notably, the water shortages and tough restrictions have meant that farmers have needed to take serious destocking measures, and horticulturists are having to choose which crops to let die off and which to water. “We’re listening and we know this is a challenging time so we [will do] all we can to help those affected. However, it would be great to get some substantial rain in these areas.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

BANKING INQUIRY FROM PAGE 1

own stories to tell about their banking experiences,” she says. “When the petition closes on May 31, MP Greg O’Connor will present it to Parliament. “Then we can ask the signees for their stories.” Berry claims that about 2009, during the global financial crisis, several NZ banks (Australian-owned) selected high-equity or freehold Kiwi farms or businesses that had borowed money for development purposes. “Just as their new developments came into production the banks foreclosed on the whole property. They

disregarded any development having greatly increased the capital value,” she explains. In the case of farms, Berry alleges banks ‘manipulated unannounced repossession right on harvest time, taking all the product and all the property’. “The outcome of the Australian Banking Commission saw Australian banks ordered to give restitution to businesses and farms they had treated unfairly,” she told Rural News. “We want the findings of the Australian commission of inquiry to be applied to New Zealand. They are the same banks.”

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

4 NEWS

Holding their breath WAIT AND see is the watchword on the possibility of a labour shortage in the kiwifruit harvest which began last week in Gisborne and western Bay of Plenty. The labour situation is not clear yet, says New Zealand Kiwifruit Growers Incorporated (NZKGI) chief executive Nikki Johnson. NZKGI has sought to mitigate the risk by outreach and promotion to potential labour sources over the first quarter of 2019. “We’ve gone all-out to tell our potential workers about the roles, pay and other important information, and to dispel some of the myths about the work,” Johnson told Rural News.  “We’ll soon know if it’s had an impact, when the major picking starts and we’ll be doing contingency planning if we have an issue in a month’s time.” A total of 18,000 seasonal workers will be needed NZ-wide to pick and pack

the 2019 crop. Last year a labour shortage was declared in Bay of Plenty by the Ministry of Social Development which allowed overseas visitors to apply to vary the conditions of their visitor visas to allow six weeks of seasonal work in kiwifruit. Gisborne last week saw the start of picking an estimated industry-wide 150 million trays this season. Western Bay of Plenty followed a couple of days later with picking starting in the Te Puke and Whakamarama regions. Johnson says Bay of Plenty has at least 80% of NZ’s total producing hectares of kiwifruit which indirectly contribute $1.8 billion to the local economy. The first run of kiwifruit is mostly the gold variety, with the green variety harvest full on in late March and the peak of picking lasting until June. – Pam Tipa

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Young, hungry and keen PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

THE KIWIFRUIT industry is crying out for workers not only for harvest but in all aspects of the industry. Cozei Milanesi (18), of Waihi, is one young person thrilled at the prospect of a long term future in the industry, having scored a cadetship with Hume Pack-NCool Ltd. He says it will help him with his studies

when he starts polytech in June, studying level 3 horticulture, and will generally help him get better qualifications so he can look at going further in the industry. He knows some cadetships will be available in orchard management in the future. He says he was already doing lab work -- testing fruit to ensure it is mature for picking – with Hume when he was shoulder-tapped for a cadetship. He worked

just loved it – being out in the field, being active.” Through family he had experience in farm work and he studied horticulture at school. He always had an interest in it and felt that one day he “would drift towards something like that career-wise”. “I was just working in a lab and I was approached by one of their bosses last year. He asked ‘do you want to do it?’ and I said ‘that would be awesome’.”

Cozei Mikanesi

there after finishing school at the end of 2017, having gone through to year 13. “My stepfather works at Hume; it sounded pretty interesting, the lab stuff, so I went in and

FAKE NEWS – BILLBOARD RULING DAVID ANDERSON

ANTI-FARMING LOBBY Greenpeace has been ordered to take down billboards it had erected around the country accusing fertiliser companies Ballance and Ravensdown of polluting rivers. The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has ruled against a series of Greenpeace billboards reading: “Ravensdown and Ballance Pollute Rivers - #TooManyCows” In its decision, the ASA says: “targeting individual companies is provocative and taking advocacy a step further than is necessary”. The Amsterdam-headquartered, international environmental lobby group erected the offending billboards on main routes NZ-wide late last year in what it said was “the first tactic” in a campaign to ban ‘synthetic nitrogen fertiliser’. Acting on three separate complaints that the billboards made a false claim, a majority of the ASA complaints board ruled that the billboards were misleading. The ruling says the billboard’s message was “over-simplified and potentially unclear”. In its deliberation the ASA compared the Greenpeace campaign to a newspaper advertising campaign

run by anti-fluoride group Fluoride Free NZ, in which it said: “Fluoride is a neurotoxin that reduces children’s IQ”. Greenpeace campaigner Gen Toop claims the ASA decision could have a “chilling effect” on environmental and social advocacy. “It is very disturbing that the ASA has taken a position that companies which pollute the environment are above criticism. Free speech is a vital part of our democratic society.” However, Federated Farmers says it pleased with the ASA ruling labelling the Greenpeace billboards misleading. “Federated Farmers believes everyone has the right to express strong views, but as the ASA complaints board ruling underlines, over-simplification of issues and targeting of two farmer-owned companies is misleading and overly provocative,” Feds environment spokesman Chris Allen says. “[Most] farmers are working hard and investing significantly to limit run-off, improve water quality and protect biodiversity.” Allen says it is not helpful when lobby groups ignore the substantial progress already achieved by farms in the environment and vilifies just one section of NZ society.

“I’d like to see Greenpeace work with Federated Farmers and encourage the continued uptake of good farm management practices across the nation.” In a cheeky jibe, Allen suggested that Feds could – in a spirit of cooperation – organise farmers to help Greenpeace take down the offending billboards. Meanwhile, a Ravensdown spokesman told Rural News that the important matter of fertiliser impacts on waterways can’t be summed up in a billboard. “Bans are not the answer. Responsible use and better nutrient management are the answer,” he said. “At Ravensdown, we call this smarter farming; our helping the food creators of New Zealand with that is the reason we exist.” A Ballance spokesman told Rural News that no one wants to see nutrient losses into waterways. “We’re proud of our role in working with New Zealand farmers and growers – providing nutrients, tools and know-how to ensure they’re using ‘just enough and no more’ so that we can all make the most from our land.” The spokesman added that the company has a meeting planned with Greenpeace later this month to talk about these opportunities.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

NEWS 5

China will be hungry for NZ meat and seafood to substitute for pork in China. Beef and sheepmeat may not be the number-one substitute, he concedes; that will likely be poultry. “But China cannot produce enough poultry to close the gap. And the world does not have enough pork to close the gap. “So there will be increased demand for all the proteins. We proba-

PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

AFRICAN SWINE fever’s huge impact on China’s pork production this year will be a huge opportunity for the New Zealand’s meat industry. Rabobank’s global strategist for animal protein Justin Sherrard believes the market hasn’t yet fully picked up on the impacts the disease will have. “This has become a major issue in China,” he told Rural News. “China’s pork production could be down by as much as 20% during 2019 and China produces and consumes about a half of the world’s total pork. You are talking about a

10% reduction in global pork meat production this year. “It is not possible to find that much more pork

meat in the world to send to China. It just doesn’t exist and it cannot be produced within the timelines – within the

course of calendar year 2019.” Sherrad is confident demand will rise for more beef, sheepmeat, poultry

TRADE UNCERTAINTIES COULD PLAY WELL TRADE COMPLEXITIES also add to uncertainties on what will happen with the African swine fever situation, Sherrard says. That includes the US-China trade war. “The US is the producer that can increase pork production faster than any other in the world but the US is facing very high tariffs to export that pork meat into China. “You have increased demand but you’ve also got increased complexity in trade so it is hard to know who will be allowed to send pork to where.” The European Union is the world’s biggest pork exporter, but may be reluctant to turn away from

good long-standing customers to focus on the strong demand and presumably price signal coming from China. “You have to pick the behaviour of traders and the relationship between President Xi Jinping of China and President Donald Trump of the US. There is a lot to get our heads around in trade markets.” Other factors include challenges in the global poultry market and the impact of African swine fever on closing ‘grey channel’ trade into China via Vietnam and Hong Kong. “There are many, many moving parts in the trade map and this is further complicating the situation

on African swine fever and what is going to happen, who exactly has the meat and how it is going to get into China.” He says NZ is well placed to take advantage of this. “NZ only has upside from some of these complications. NZ has pretty straightforward trade relationships, no particular complexities, no particular argument,” Sherrard adds. “The question then becomes more a domestic story about what is the supply outlook for this year.” Currently domestic beef production is tipped to be marginally down or flat and sheepmeat also continuing the trend of slightly down.

bly will not see that until the second half of this year. “How strong the demand signal is for sheepmeat and beef is not easy to say; there are many uncertainties about this disease. But it is important to understand this change is coming during the course of this year.” This is an opportunity for the NZ meat industry,

Sherrard says. “NZ’s beef exports to China went up markedly in the fourth quarter of 2018. “They even went higher than exports to the US. China is already well in the sights of NZ’s beef supply chains. “Here’s a signal that they might become even more important.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

6 NEWS

Continuing kiwifruit’s golden run PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

THE KIWIFRUIT variety SunGold is this season set to overtake the traditional green Haywards variety for the first time. Zespri chairman Bruce Cameron told Rural News that 79 million trays of SunGold will be sold this year versus 70 million trays of Haywards. This marks a “huge breakthrough” for the industry because it was SunGold that “rescued” it from the ravages of PSA in 2010, he says. It’s great news for New Zealand because Zespri holds the plant variety rights for SunGold but not for green kiwifruit. “Whilst we put a lot of promotion and marketing into green kiwifruit, we don’t hold the IP for Hayward green and we are competing with the Chileans and Australian’s in the northern hemisphere,” he told Rural News. On top of SunGold now dominating, Zespri expects

kiwifruit exports to be closing in on $5 billion by 2025, Cameron says. “We are sitting at about $3b now in 2019 and our growth projections based on the 700ha we will release for the next three years will produce revenue of about $4.5b.” The growth is part of a planned Zespri strategy dating back to the PSA days -- not a commodity bubble. While Zespri is reaping the financial benefits of SunGold, it is not resting on its laurels and will trial a new variety of red kiwifruit in NZ and Singapore. Red kiwifruit are relatively easy to grow but the challenge has been to develop a red variety with a sufficiently long shelf life. “It’s a different fruit to handle as opposed to SunGold, but I think the challenge we have as an industry is to overcome those. It could be three to five years before we have faith in it and understand its behaviour through the supply chain.” In Asia, where the fruit is

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likely to be exported, red is a lucky colour. “So any red kiwifruit is looked upon as a very lucky fruit.” The kiwifruit industry’s future looks good and it gets many accolades, Cameron says.

But it must remain vigilant and is constantly analysing risks onand offshore. Biosecurity and proper handling of kiwifruit on the home front can result in problems in markets. “It’s not just the trade war

between the US and China,” he says. “We are cognisant of that and other geo-political issues, but there is a full matrix of issues we are analysing and keeping our ears to the ground on.”

SINGAPORE SUCCESS HAVING ZESPRI’S chief executive Dan Mathieson based in Singapore is a huge advantage, says Bruce Cameron. It means the company doesn’t find out about important things two or three days after an event. “Having Dan there is a strong conduit for us to be in touch with our global markets 24/7, 12 months of the year and it’s where we have to be in this dynamic global environment.” Cameron says Zespri is a consumer-driven business and its strategy is not driven by the production needs of the grower. “Rather it’s what experience the consumer wants from our product. “What happens then is that growers get the benefit of that principle by only producing fruit the market wants.”


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

NEWS 7

Staff shortages impacting on rural health PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

THE HEALTH of rural business people – including farmers, orchardists and health facilities -- is being affected because they cannot get sufficient

good staff and must work longer hours to compensate. So says rural health professional Professor Jane Mills, pro vice-chancellor of the College of Health at Massey University. She was raised on a

farm in Australia and has extensively researched rural health issues. She told Rural News that the staff shortage in rural areas is forcing many people to work extra hours beyond what is reasonable and that

their work/life balance is out of sync, resulting in physical or mental health issues. “We continue short of nurses, doctors and midwives -- a big issue the government in particular is very conscious of,”

A STINT IN THE COUNTRY JANE MILLS says research shows the best way to get health professionals into rural regions is to assign student nurses and doctors to clinical placements there for an appropriate time as part of their training. Such immersion in a rural community could open their eyes to the possibilities of a career in rural health. To this end, Mills says, there is talk of setting up a national school of rural health which would place students

in rural communities, with accommodation provided and mentoring by experienced rural health professionals. While people working in rural locations require the common medical skills, some extra ones are also required. “A lot of research, including my own, shows the impact of working in a rural town: I call it ‘live my work’. People who work and live in rural areas can never get away from their

Professor Jane Mills

work. “For example, people in the supermarket will ask them questions, and the same may happen on the sideline of a football match when they are watching their children play on a Saturday. “So there is a lot of extra strain and stress which requires rural health professionals to be very resilient and to have a good insight into how they can manage a better work/life balance.”

Mills says. “And there’s a broader aspect: the impact of a shortage of a general workforce and the impact that’s having on people’s health and wellbeing.” Mills says government awareness must be raised about the knockon effects of their decisions on migration and the casual workforce. For example, challenges arise

in rural regions when casual workers arrive in towns to harvest particular crops or to work during seasonal peaks on livestock properties. “It can mean that a small rural health service may have to serve a doubled population at particular times of the year. That can be hard because they often don’t have enough capital infrastructure – let alone personnel – to manage the extra flow of people coming in and through their communities.” Growing tourist numbers add to the problem and this needs considering in an appropriate health service mix or ‘basket’ of services for a particular area.

MENTAL HEALTH MENTAL HEALTH issues are much talked about in rural regions, Mills says. But people can get exhausted talking about it, with a risk that they will ‘tune out’. “That story is alive and well, particularly among vulnerable groups such as young men. “Young men in rural areas are much more susceptible to mental health issue than other groups. We need to be focused on that and ensuring their access to good services out there to try to prevent an escalation of mental health conditions in rural areas.” A key way to approach mental health and other health issues is by having universities and industry collaborating -- a linkage that should not be underestimated.

8/03/19 9:35 AM


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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

NEWS 9

Honey sector stung by levy rejection PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

APRICULTURE NZ chairman Bruce Wills says he is sure another levy proposition will be put to the industry despite a resounding defeat in a just-completed levy vote. Wills blames the ‘no’ vote on a drop in non-manuka honey prices and he admits the board considered pulling the pin at one stage. Only 23.56% of eligible commercial beekeepers supported the introduction of a commodity levy. But Wills told Rural News much of the feedback was that the ‘right’ levy does make sense. He says it is too early to say when another levy might be proposed. “A lot of stuff is around timing and the timing wasn’t great,” Wills says. “We had this huge run-up in prices which was a great boost to the industry, but we had the manuka definition come out just over 12 months ago and that sort-of realigned some of the values for non-manuka and that is really biting at the moment. “We started the process well over 12 months ago; it takes a lot of work… a consultation round and lots of very stringent criteria with the Commodity Levy Act,” he explains. “As a board and an organisation we did consider part-way through the process whether we should pull pin and plan to do this at some other stage. “But we thought ‘no this is something we promised the industry, that we would give them the option’. We offered what we thought was a well prepared, well thought out and well debated proposition. “It was for them to make the call;

Bruce Wills, Apriculture NZ chairman.

they have made the call and we respect that and will move on,” Wills says. “We have a lot of other stuff that needs doing.” He claims the organisation has been involved in a number of initiatives over the last three years, but it has been voluntary and it hasn’t been the whole industry. “What we were hoping to achieve for the industry – just like DairyNZ, Beef + Lamb NZ or Horticulture NZ – was collectively bringing the industry together and getting a more stable plan and long term funding. This is so we can do some ‘stuff’ that we are simply not able to do at the moment with a voluntary funding model,” Wills explains. “But it was up to beekeepers; they made their call so we move on.” He said the result was only days old, “so we will sit back and look closely at the numbers and the whys and wherefors and we will take some learnings from this and use those to benefit the industry long term”.

Apriculture NZ is likely to put another levy proposition to beekeepers despite a resounding defeat in the justcompleted vote.

However, he admits they were “somewhat surprised” by the extent of the ‘no’ vote. While the timing wasn’t brilliant, Wills says Apiculture NZ was hoping that people would look through the current challenges to the industry and look to the long term benefits of a levy and tick the ‘yes’ vote. New levy votes in the primary industries are always a challenge, he says. “When times are tough people find it hard to vote ‘yes’ to spending money on something they are not too certain about,” Wills says. “The result was a clear vote that commercial beekeepers weren’t ready for a commodity levy this time and we have to take that on board.”

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

10 NEWS

Fonterra hurt by credit downgrade sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FONTERRA SAYS there’s an urgent need to improve return on capital invested in the co-op by farmers and unit holders. Chief financial officer Marc Rivers says the co-op’s earnings performance is not satisfactory; “a fundamental change” in direction is needed. “We need stronger earnings to deliver a respectable return on the capital invested in the co-op and a strong balance sheet,” he says.

Rivers’ comments followed rating agency Fitch revising its rating outlook for Fonterra to negative from stable, although the co-op’s long term credit rating remains as ‘A’. The revision results from Fonterra reducing its forecast earnings for the year ending July 2019. “This indicates that the cooperative has structural issues it needs to address to retain the defensive traits that have underscored its historically strong business profile,” Fitch says.

Fonterra chief financial officer Marc Rivers.

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reducing leverage and reviewing its portfolio. “We believe asset sales are critical for Fonterra to return its metrics to a level in line with its current rating, given the impact the structural issues continue to have on its ability to organically deleverage.” Any delay in the expected $800m asset sales will put pressure on the co-op’s rating. Fitch notes Fonterra is a world leader in dairy exports representing about 15% in the global market including a 42% share in whole milk powder. And it is New Zealand’s largest dairy producer, collecting 82% of the country’s milk supply during the 2017-18 season. “The average cost of dairy production in NZ is among the world’s lowest,” the report says.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

NEWS 11

Going their separate ways? NIGEL MALTHUS

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY and AgResearch will consider separate building options as an alternative to a much-anticipated joint facility building that never got beyond a fenced site. However, both say collaboration on the Lincoln campus remains a priority. The $206 million project is dead-in-the-water following Education Minister Chris Hipkins’ rejection of another revised business case seeking Government funding. The building as currently designed cannot be built without a Crown contribution, Lincoln’s acting vice-chancellor Bruce McKenzie said in a statement. Hipkins said in December 2018 that while he remained supportive of the joint facility project he would not endorse the business case in its current form. “In the view of the minister, the implementation business case did not meet Treasury guidelines.” McKenzie says AgResearch is progressing a feasibility study for a separate building. But both parties are discussing how to work together to realise the benefits of a joint facility. “In due course the

Lincoln University council will receive a series of options to consider, including options to progress a separate build project. “As has always been a priority, Lincoln University will continue to look at ways to collaborate with partners including AgResearch to achieve the benefits of the Lincoln precinct.” McKenzie says Lincoln has the capacity to progress its own capital works projects. “Planning for campus wide capital projects, undertaken in 2018, continues and will be considered by the council at the appropriate time.” An AgResearch spokesperson told Rural News the parties are working together on new plans to construct a Lincoln education, research and innovation precinct for AgResearch staff after deciding a joint facility would not be built. “We will continue to talk to interested stakeholders about their future involvement and our strategic plans and staff relocation intentions remain unchanged.” The 27,000sq.m building was supposed to embody the Lincoln Hub concept to foster collaboration in R&D in farming. It would have housed 700 agricultural

science staff from Lincoln University, AgResearch and DairyNZ, and more tenants in future. But the building site has largely remained

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

12 NEWS

Fire-ravaged dairy farmer returns NIGEL MALTHUS

THE ONLY dairy farmer forced off his farm by the massive Tasman fire has been able to continue milking despite earlier believing the farm would be too damaged. Sharemilker Michael Shearer runs 360 cows on a property in the Teapot Valley, west of the town of Brightwater. The farm became one of the front lines in the fight against the 2300ha fire, which came up to the boundary and could have continued but for an estimated 25ha of firebreaks cut into the farm. Shearer was temporarily milking his herd at a property the other side of the Waimea River, but had expected to dry them off when he returned to the farm because be believed there was too much damage to

continue milking. However, Shearer says while it looked like that at the time, he has “managed to make things work”. “We got on and discovered the water was salvageable to half the farm, which was the main concern. “The laneways were fine and we could patch up a few fences to get the cows to and from the shed. Then we figured that if we could milk them out of one paddock at Ealams we should be able to milk them out of about 15 at home.” The herd’s temporary home was a paddock on Bruce and Cameron Ealam’s property at Brightwater. This recent conversion to hops from dairy boasted a still-workable milking shed. Shearer said things had worked out better

Tasman sharemilker Michael Shearer.

than expected. “Everything lined up nicely. We were to get out the day after Ealams started the hops [harvest], and got out of their way. “We had a couple of MPI guys who really

helped put an emergency plan in place for getting the cows back; that got us over the line to being able to get back on the farm.” Meanwhile, the state of emergency has been lifted but Shearer is still working off only about

a third of the farm, not grazing the hills and keeping behind certain firebreaks. The fire has only worsened the effects of the continuing drought. “We kind of forgot about [the drought] when

the fire kicked in but now it’s getting back to fighting on both fronts again,” said Shearer. “We’ve got our silage stack there which will last another two to three weeks and then I’ve got some baleage we’re going to get off my brother-inlaw. “After that it’ll be making more decisions so, yeah, we are kind of a bit reliant on altruism.” But he believes his cows were happy to be home. “I think they got back on the laneway and thought ‘yeah that’s right, that’s back to normal’. I know we sure appreciate it. It’s certainly nice being back on your own place and in your own shed. That’s where you feel comfortable.” Meanwhile, the drought appears to be starting to affect produc-

tion across the region. A Fonterra spokesperson says that while the company does not publish regional data, collections in the Tasman Marlborough region are tracking down on what would normally be expected at this time of year. Fonterra has lowered its forecast national milk collection for the full season, to 1530 million kgMS, down 1% from the previous forecast of 1550 million kgMS (although still up 2% on last season). “To help farmers deal with dry conditions, we delivered 7000 bales of hay from our Darfield farm to about 10 farmers in the Nelson area,” the co-op said. “We were also able to provide drinking water with our tankers to some farms.”


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

NEWS 13

World dairy outlook is looking sunny PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

THE DAIRY outlook is more rosy and positive than New Zealand producers may have been feeling about it, says US Rabobank global dairy strategist Mary Ledman. Producers here are fairly cautious, she said during a visit this month. Her message of a growing world market and a slowdown in production growth in other world regions should give Kiwi farmers an element of optimism, she says. “The outlook for milk prices for the next season are for another good solid season of milk prices here,” she told Rural News. “In contrast US milk prices were down in 2018 and the margins of milk price minus feed costs were down at least 15 % -maybe closer to 20% for some farmers – and that is a downturn that the NZ farmers have not faced.” She sees more opportunities than threats. Rabobank’s five year outlook sees the growth in demand from China, South East Asia, South America and African countries in a sense outpacing the growth in milk production. “We are not predicting any long term deficit in milk production. If market prices prevail dairy farmers around the world will respond and increase milk production to feed these growing markets. But the outlook is really quite bright,” she says. “Even China in January this year had record whole milk powder imports and the recent GlobalDairyTrade (GDT) auction has been positive. An almost 8% increase in NZ milk production in January and the following day the GDT auction still positive... is a sign. January was a good export month and I think February will be as well.” The global market is becoming well balanced largely due to the slowdown in global milk production in key producing

regions. The fourth quarter of the 2018 season in the key milk producing regions of Europe, US and Oceania saw the smallest year-onyear growth in milk production probably since 2012. “The other good news for the industry is that even a year ago – January 1, 2018 – Europe had nearly 400,000 tonnes of skim milk powder in their government stocks. Through some aggressive selling primarily in December 2018 and January 2019 they currently have less than 5000t of stock so the combination of no large overhanging stocks in the market and the slowdown in growth poises the market for recovery. “That recovery means stronger milk prices than the global market has seen in the last couple of years, although we don’t see the market being so strong that we get the prices we experienced in 2013-14. The key reason we don’t see the industry returning to those price levels is that the European community, which is the largest milk producing bloc in the world, no longer is impeded by a quota system. “Their quotas were eliminated in the spring of 2015 and since that time they have added more processing capacity particularly in milk powders. They will be in a position to produce more skim milk powder or whole milk powder if market conditions warrant it.” Europe’s production has been hit by weather. In the US the challenge has been more on the margins – milk price minus feed costs. “The margins in 2018 were about 15% or more lower than the prior year. This has had a negative impact particularly on smaller farms with fewer than 150 cows: we have seen an increase in exits by farms of that size. “Year-on-year milk production in the US in the fourth quarter of 2018 was only up a 0.5%. Typi-

cally US milk production increases 1.5% so only being up a 0.5% is like being down 1%. “We also see negative profitability in the US affecting the US dairy

herd which has dropped about 60,000 head since mid 2018. “So the dairy herd in the first half of 2019 versus the prior year will be down about 0.5%.”

US Rabobank global dairy strategist Mary Ledman.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

14 NEWS

$50m for new sheep milk dryer SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

GROWING GLOBAL demand for sheep milk products has prompted the construction of a $50 million spray dryer in Waikato. Melody Dairies, owned by a consortium of investors including state farmer Pamu (formerly Landcorp), began building the dryer at Waikato Innovation Park campus this month. Sitting alongside the existing Food Waikato dryer, it will process 1.2 tonnes of powder per hour; the dryer will be operational by February

2020, raising job numbers at the plant from 17 to 35. Pamu chief executive Steven Carden said the investment will support Pamu’s strategy of adding value within and beyond the farmgate. “For the last five years Pamu has pursued a strategic approach aimed at future-proofing the company by diversifying our earnings potential. This investment fits with this strategy, and we expect the dryer, when completed, to contribute to the growing earnings and financial resilience of Pamu in the years ahead.”  Pamu is a shareholder in Spring Sheep Milk Co,

The existing dryer at Waikato’s Innovation Park, where the new $50m sheep milk dryer will be built.

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Ingredients (35% stake), Dairy Nutraceuticals (20%) and Food Waikato (10%). Pamu holds 35%.

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Spring Sheep Milk chief executive Scottie Chapman says the global sheep milk industry is estimated to be worth US$8 billion at the farmgate and US$30b at retail. “The segment is experiencing strong growth on the back of increasing demand for alternative dairy,” says Chapman. Asia is the largest consumer of sheep milk and demand there is increasing as a high proportion of the population cannot tolerate cow milk. Sheep milk has been consumed for millennia and is popular particularly in France, Greece, Spain, Netherlands, Sardinia and the Middle East. Around the world, sheep milk is predominantly consumed as cheese. However increasingly it is evolving into other products such as yoghurt, liquid milk, butter, ice cream/gelato,

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GENETIC GAINS KEY THE OPPORTUNITY for a sustainable sheep milking industry in New Zealand has recently arisen due to the availability of high-performance genetics. Scottie Chapman says prior to imported genetics, ewes would on average produce only 100-150L each per season which made the model economically challenging for farmers. “A good return, however, is now possible using imported genetics coupled with the right farming systems,” he says. “For example, ewes on our pilot farms have set records this year, with our first generation of European ‘elites’ on target to achieve over 300L as hoggets. Once fully grown they will achieve 400L. “These results are promising for the industry. It demonstrates sheep milking is a sustainable option for cow dairy farmers looking to switch to a low environmental impact alternative.”

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

16 NEWS

Farmers can build up soil carbon Research that could help sheep and beef and dairy farmers to build up carbon in their soils to offset their farms’ greenhouse gas emissions is showing promising results at the halfway stage. Peter Burke reports. FULL INVERSION tillage is being jointly explored by Massey University and Plant & Food Research as a means of renewing pastures. Professor Mike Hedley, at a recent Massey field day, said the research was prompted by a national survey of New Zealand pasture soils showing many are nearly at capacity to store more carbon. The survey also showed that while the top soils are rich in carbon, the subsoils are devoid of carbon, so the researchers face the challenge of finding a way to use subsoil to store more carbon. But there are caveats on the research, Hedleys says. Firstly it is aimed at low to rolling country which can be easily ploughed and which a farmer would normally re-grass over time to improve the quality of the pasture. The solution suggested by Hedley and Dr Mike Beare, of Plant

Professor Mike Hedley with the plough that creates full inversion tillage.

& Food Research, is a method of ploughing called full inversion tillage. In simple terms, this is ploughing deeper than normal and bringing the subsoil to the surface while at the same time burying the topsoil. “We wanted to see if we could put that topsoil, with the carbon, deeper where it might decompose slower and create a new opportunity for carbon to be stored in the

topsoil,” Hedley said. Finding a suitable ploughing system led the team to the UK where they had used full inversion tillage to regenerate the growth of heather. He says the equipment used overseas was a bit over-the-top for what they had in mind so in typical Kiwi style he made his own. “We looked at a much simpler design that could just be clipped on any

of our ploughs,” Hedley said. “This is a disc cultivator and a skimmer to lift the topsoil layer and drop it in the furrow and a mouldboard to bring the subsoil up. “We first modified an old mouldboard plough that I had at home and it worked. Then we imported a new German plough, which is what we have today; this is specifically designed to do the job we wanted done.”

Hedley says the important message to farmers about this project is that it is directly linked to pasture renovation. He says the average farmer renovates or re-grasses about 10% of their farm each year and researchers are saying, use this method of full inversion tillage. “Inversion tillage is something that would be done about once in a generation,” he said.

BURIED DEEP DOWN IN THE DIRT MIKE BEARE said the idea is to develop a practice that allows more carbon to accumulate in the soils as a means of offsetting some of the greenhouse gas emissions from pastoral agriculture. “If we can accumulate carbon in the soils, we can offset some of the carbon losses we are getting from other parts of the pastoral farming system,” Beare said. “By burying the carbon from the topsoil at depth and bringing up subsoil material -- which is under-saturated in carbon -- we can grow new grass on it and accumulate carbon on the new Dr Mike Beare surface and create new topsoil.” Referring to full inversion tillage, Beare points out that farmers have been ploughing paddocks for years. But the researchers have slightly modified the plough to allow farmers to bury organic topsoil at depth. “We are ploughing to a slightly greater depth than most farmers do now but not too much,” he says. Beare says pasture renewal by full inversion tillage equally suits dairy farms, intensive sheep and beef farms and possibly deer farms on flat or gently rolling land. The research involves field trials in the North and South Islands. In the south the soils tend to be freerdraining, which can give slightly different results. Trials are also being done in glasshouses to simulate what happens when soil is inverted by the ploughing. Beare says these experiments in controlled conditions can allow them a better estimate of how much carbon is accumulating in the soil at depth or in the profile. The research has been funded for three years by MPI and other partners and is now about halfway through. Beare says there would be merit in continuing the work beyond this timeframe and this will be discussed with the funders.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

NEWS 17

High-end woollen flooring offers opportunity 68% on the previous first half, was at the upper end of the $1.6-2m guidance. While no interim dividend has been declared, the company says it will resume paying dividends as part of its long term financial strategy.

PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

— Matt Burke, 31 July 1941 Irish men and women came to New Zealand in the 1930s to seek thisbitter ismemories benefitting the while lower-margin syna better life, many carrying of atrocities committed by the British. With WWII came the threat of conscription, but many carpet business’ cost of thetic sales decreased in Irish refused to betray their neutral homeland to fight for New Zealand and, by default, Britain. Peter Burke’s father was one of the Sons of Éire sales, it is impacting on line with Cavalier’s new – men who risked imprisonment and deportation by standing up to the New Zealand Government and appealing the draft in a dramatic sales and margins forof strategic focus.” case that paved the way for others. Burke tells a compelling story unflinching loyalty and determination, one that crosses the globe and Cavalier’s wool buying Higher carpet earnings leads to unexpected diplomacy between two small but feisty countries with more in common than they realised. business.” were offset by reduced Cavalier’s net loss of earnings from the wool I commend Peter Burke for not only recovering the memory “May $10 for the sixof buying business Elco of his father and his comrades,million but for deepening our understanding the shared history of Ireland and of New Zealand. ” months ended December Direct. — Michael D. Higgins, Uachtarán na hÉireann / President of Ireland 2018 reflected a $12m loss “Wool prices are on the sale of the Cavabeing driven down due lier Wool Holdings scourto decreased Chinese 780995 110786 ing9business. The $1.9m demand for coarser normalised net profit, up carpet wool and while THECUBAPRESS.NZ

GROWTH IN SOFT MARKET CAVALIER CHIEF executive Paul Alston told Rural News they are seeing some growth in high end wool carpets in a generally soft market. He thinks consumers are seeing the benefits of wool and how wool carpets perform better than synthetics. The rise of environmental

issues and the move against plastics, etc is contributing, Alston says. “The world is changing; whilst things aren’t going to change overnight, the pushback on sustainability issues will become more prominent in the next few years,” he says. “We are pretty well placed for

TRUE TO IRELAND Éire’s ‘conscientious objectors’ in New Zealand in World War II

PETER BURKE

wool carpet.” Alston however reported softer market conditions overall particularly in Australia and with lower-margin synthetic carpets. “Pleasingly, demand for Cavalier’s high-end wool carpets is up year on year, with the company reporting one of its highest sales months yet for its high-end felted carpets,

❱❱ Opportunity for growth in world market ❱❱ Wool carpets are its heritage ❱❱ Most sales are to Australia and New Zealand ❱❱ Growth opportunities exist for wool carpets in other world markets, particularly North America and the UK ❱❱ US wool carpet market estimated at US$513m. ❱❱ UK wool carpet market estimated at US$498m

OUT NOW! A compelling story of unflinching loyalty and determination by Rural News reporter Peter Burke.

PETER BURKE “May I commend Peter Burke for not only recovering the memory of his father and his comrades, but for

that given we have a history in wool carpets.” It will be a continuing trend but it might be slow. “From a wool carpet perspective, you can’t really get textured loops and the style in synthetic carpets; it is more based on colour. So for a fashion item on your floor a woollen carpet will give you that.”

deepening our understanding of the shared history of Ireland and of New Zealand.” — Michael D. Higgins Uachtarán na hÉireann / President of Ireland Available from good bookstores and www.thecubapress.nz

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Cavalier chief executive Paul Alston.

I do not base my claim of conscience on anything that has arisen since war broke out in September 1939, but on what I saw, felt and experienced in 1919–21 in Éire and it is only those who have been through that can realise how the memories of those frightful days have left something on one’s mind that can never be blotted out. To ask me to now wear the uniform of a British soldier would not only be a cruelty but one against which my conscience rebels.

TRUE TO IRELAND

DEMAND FOR high-end woollen flooring is in resurgence globally, says Cavalier chief executive Paul Alston. Cavalier is well positioned to take good advantage of it, he said on the release of half year results. The company now has a strategic focus on high quality, higher margin wool carpets. “We are building on the success of our Cavalier Bremworth World of Difference positioning and have a number of exciting initiatives underway to build our market share in our home markets of Australia and New Zealand, and new opportunities offshore,” he says. “We will also be releasing a new television campaign in the coming months, further establishing ourselves as marketers of premium

The facts


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

18 NEWS

Avocado scheme going for growth PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

AN AVOCADO investment underway in the Far North will have a better productivity curve than

more southern North Island orchards, says Freshmax avocado programme manager Jim Tarawa. The production season is less acute in the Far

North, Tarawa told a MyFarm investor briefing session. In Bay of Plenty, for instance, biennial production can drop from full production to zero,

whereas in the Far North there is a much smaller variation between seasons from the peak. “We are seeing most new investment in avocados is in the Far North;

Freshmax’s Jim Tarawa.

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it is a unique part of New Zealand,” he says. Aupouri Avocados Ltd Partnership, between Freshmax and MyFarm, holds two properties totalling 32ha on the Aupouri Peninsula in the Far North. MyFarm raised $5.8 million last year from 32 investors to buy the properties. In early March this year, MyFarm raised another $3m from the existing owners and its investor database to buy two more properties for this partnership. Tarawa says Aupouri, while essentially the soil is sand, has the right mix of environment, heat and plenty of access to water. Most of the planting is going onto a rootstock variety which tolerates disease and water stress. It is all irrigated land. Because the Far North has a small population base some lateral thinking will be required about how to service the volumes that will come out of the region, he says. Freshmax will operate the orchards and pack and market the fruit into new and existing markets. The company is a vertically integrated fresh produce business and has one of the largest fresh produce marketing and

“We are seeing most new investment in avocados is in the Far North; it is a unique part of New Zealand.” distribution operations in the Pacific region. Consolidating the harvest at Whangarei where a good operation already exists is likely, Tarawa says. As the Far North is an early maturing region, labour may be brought up from Whangarei early in the season. Avocado is a sub-tropical plant which will not grow south of Taupo, except for a few parts of Nelson. Access to water for avocado growing is an issue worldwide. For instance in Chile it doesn’t rain so growers rely on taking snow melt from the ground; but now they are facing challenges about how much they can take out, says Tarawa. In California volumes are shrinking because of insufficient water, Tarawa says. “In the Far North where we are growing in sand – I think it has .01% organic matter in it – there is a huge amount of work being done on fertigation (injection of fertil-

isers into irrigation) and on where you can grow it. You must have the temperature right.” Tarawa says in New Zealand if water were managed the way the science says it should be there would be plenty of water; the difficulty is getting past the emotion. Ample water is available in the Far North and water rights are being issued but there is pressure from the rapid development, Tarawa says. The region has seen a lot of money invested in avocado in the last two years. “There will be more focus on the management of the volume of water and the monitoring.” Once harvested, after 30 days avocado fruit quality starts to decline, Tarawa says. So a longer production season may assist in preserving fruit quality for various markets. NZ has a good reputation for fruit quality based on the Hass variety, he says.

“Our place hangs on longer in the dry and comes away sooner in the spring. Optimise helped turn our place around and we’ve increased carrying capacity. It was just so easy.”


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

NEWS 19

Pea weevil nearly wiped out NIGEL MALTHUS

AN INSECT pest which since mid-2016 has forced a ban on growing peas in Wairarapa is on the verge of eradication. No pea weevils have been detected in 25 trap crops planted in the 201819 season. “This is great news for growers, who took a big financial hit to eradicate this insect pest from New Zealand,” says Federated Farmers arable chair Karen Williams. However, she is keen to dispel the impression given by some media coverage that the ban is lifted. The Pea Weevil Governance Group, with representatives from MPI, Feds, growers and others will meet late March to decide on future response options. The ban may remain for at least another year. The weevil, whose larvae eat the inside of growing peas, was discovered in the district in 2016. Growing peas either commercially or by home gardeners was then banned in all Wairarapa south of Pahiatua, to eradicate the pest by denying it its habitat. Williams, who used to grow 30-40ha of peas near Carterton and originally joined the governance group as a grower representative, said some farmers were sceptical of the ban at the time. Peas, pea seed, pea straw and pea offal had gone all round the country during that harvesting season. Wairarapa growers feared they would be unfairly penalised if they were hit by a ban, which would then have proved worthless had the weevil popped up elsewhere, she explained. “As time has gone on, no pea weevil has been found anywhere else around the country, which is pretty exciting news and it reaffirmed that we made the right decision to put a regional growing ban on and take the pain for a few years,” Williams says. Traps in 25 small

pea plots around the region caught 1700 weevils in the 2017-18 season but just 15 in the 201819 season in two traps located close to each other in an acknowledged “hot spot” just east of Masterton; no weevils have been found in the current season. Williams says MPI’s technical advice was that it would like two years of “area freedom” with no weevils detected before it lifts the ban. That raises the possibility of keeping the ban around the hot spot, but lifting it for the rest of the region. That had yet to be debated, she said. “Can we keep the rules there and lift them somewhere else or does that practically not work with contractors moving in and out of zones that are and zones that aren’t?” Williams asks. “I hope to have a robust discussion with the governance group about whether a partial lifting of the controlled area notice may be practical or whether a further 12 months full regional ban is necessary.” However, farmers around the Masterton hot-spot have already told her that if the ban were lifted in the south other growers would get in first and they may miss out on future pea contracts. Williams says the eradication effort had been stressful. The group had worked very hard with MPI to get certainty about supporting growers affected by the ban, firstly in compensation, because the Biosecurity Act only allows for compensation for crops destroyed, not for crops not able to be planted. They had adopted an ex gratia payment approach but there were “a lot of conversations” on the difference in value between alternative crops and what peas would have paid. MPI had also come up with funding from the Sustainable Land Management and Climate Change (SLMACC) Research Pro-

gramme to look at alternatives such as oil crops, legumes and bee fodder crops. That had varying success but finding markets for alternative crops is a challenge.

Lon: -3445699

The group also had “limited success” in encouraging seed companies to offer growers alternatives to peas. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Fed Farmers arable chair Karen Williams.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

20 AGRIBUSINESS

Green and gold rush begins KIWIFRUIT ORCHARDS will be hives of activity over the next three months as the 2019 harvest gets underway. About 150 million trays will be picked and packed; the first orchard harvest started last week in Gisborne. New Zealand Kiwifruit Growers Inc (NZKGI) chief executive Nikki Johnson says Poverty Bay leads the charge because the crop matures

more quickly there. In March, orchards in Bay of Plenty, Northland, Counties-Manukau, Waikato, Hawke’s Bay, lower North Island and Tasman will follow suit. “It’s going to be a bumper crop,” says Johnson. The first run of kiwifruit is mostly the gold variety, with the green harvest coming into full force in late March. The last fruit is picked in

Kiwifruit facts and figures

June. Zespri chief grower and alliances officer Dave Courtney says the first fruit picking is an exciting time for the industry. “We always look forward to the start of harvest and this year we’re expecting a fantastic crop.” Johnson says labour shortage is so far an unknown; NZKGI has for three months been connecting with potential labour sources.  “We’ve gone all-out to tell our potential workers about the roles, pay and

❱❱ Kiwifruit is NZ’s largest horticultural export ❱❱ NZ kiwifruit production is expected to jump from 123 million trays in 2017 to 190 million trays in 2027 ❱❱ The industry’s global revenue is expected to jump from $2 billion in 2017 to $6b by 2030 ❱❱ Labour shortage could hinder this growth ❱❱ The industry will by 2027 need 7000 more workers than it had in 2017 ❱❱ In 2017 when the minimum hourly wage was $15.75 the average wage for picking kiwifruit was $20.95 ❱❱ The expected hourly picker’s rate in 2019 will be $23.50.

other important information, and to dispel some of the myths about the work. “We’ll soon know if it’s had an impact, when the major picking starts, and we’ll be contingency planning if we do have an issue in a month.”  Johnson says about 18,000 workers will be needed during the harvest; a recruitment campaign has targeted Kiwi students, retirees and backpackers. EastPack Ltd began picking early fruit this

year and chief executive Hamish Simson expects the season to start earlier than usual. “We’ve already packed fruit at our Edgecumbe and Opotiki sites and expect our other four sites to be in full swing by next week. “Labour supply is well and truly on our radar and we have a programme to give people an awesome experience working in the kiwifruit industry.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

The 2019 kiwifruit harvest has begun and it looks like being a bumper one.

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KEEPING AN EYE ON HONEY IN REAL TIME A HAMILTON company has developed a real-time system that enables beekeepers to see data on their hives’ weight, temperature and humidity. ModuSense founder Bruce Trevarthen says the aim is to help beekeepers better understand their hives, the site they’re on and how the bees are performing, and so produce a better yield at harvest time and reduce costs along the way. The company says that typically a beekeeper’s first opportunity to see how a hive is performing is on the day of harvesting – something that usually involves helicopters, trucks and personnel. Then it’s too costly to change the harvesting schedule if required. ModuSense beams real-time data directly back to the beekeeper for review. “Hives tend to be placed in remote, difficult-toaccess locations, making them hard to monitor,” he says. “That means it’s not until the beekeeper goes in to retrieve the hive that he can see how the hive has performed. “We wanted to provide beekeepers with a way of checking up on the hive without having to tramp to the site or fly in by helicopter -- costly in time and money.” ModuSense commercial-grade equipment can tell a beekeeper how well the hive is performing and when to go in to get the maximum yield from the hives. “We place sensors in the hive to test for temperature and humidity and put the whole thing on a purpose-built scale to measure weight. Information is sent back to the beekeeper via wireless signal or by satellite for truly remote operations.” Beekeepers can track activity at the hive and decide whether to harvest on a commercial scale without travelling to the site “We can see what times of the day the bees head out, what time of day they return, how much honey is being produced and whether the hive is active or not. “In our trials we’ve seen commercial operators make the call to keep hives working when they’re doing well and seen them intervene when a hive isn’t producing,” Trevarthen explains. “We’ve spent almost three years in pre-production, building test kit and working with our partners to thrash them about, to put them through the rigours of life a standard beehive will experience. As a result, we’ve got a solution geared to the needs of a commercial operation -- a first in New Zealand and around the world.” With phase one of the product now proven, the company is looking at additions to the gear.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

AGRIBUSINESS 21

Less milk wasted NIGEL MALTHUS

A CHRISTCHURCH startup has been recognised at a major Australian agricultural technology event for its technology aimed at minimising waste in the food processing industry. CertusBio has been formed to commercialise technology developed by Lincoln Agritech Ltd, which uses a biosensor device to monitor parameters such as fat and lactose content in industrial food processing wastewater. Operators can then make necessary adjustments in real time to minimise wastage and reduce the environmental load of wastewater. CertusBio chief executive Matt Jones says with 2-3% of all processed milk disappearing down the drain, the dairy industry globally loses NZ$12.8 billion per year in processing waste. The system has been shown to reduce processing

waste by 40%. “CertusBio is transforming industrial food production to prevent this type of waste,” he claims. “Our solution saves money for processors and helps them meet their social responsibility to safeguard the Matt Jones, of Christchurch company CertusBio, with environment for the pitch tent winner’s certificate at the inaugural future generaEvokeAg event in Melbourne in February. SUPPLIED tions.” the system at the inaugural Jones described the system as “like EvokeAg event in Melbourne, an automated laboratory on a said to be Australia’s largest agricultural technology event chip.” “The solution can be with 1100 delegates sharing installed without interruption technologies including sento existing processes,” he says. sors, artificial intelligence, “Other companies have been robotics and automation. The company won a in the market a long time, but do not provide accurate cash prize of $20,000 in the enough information to pre- Investment Ready category vent this type of food waste.” of a Pitch Tent competition Jones recently presented at the event, in which inno-

vators were invited to pitch their ideas to a panel of expert venturecapitalist judges. The system, called Milk-Guard, has already been installed at several New Zealand dairy processing plants. The company also offers a similar system called Aeration-Guard tailored to monitoring wastewater treatment plants. Jones says he developed CertusBio to combine two of his great passions – the reduction of waste and the development of great science. He is now seeking $2 million to develop the company further and met with a number of potential Australian and international investors at the event. “I’m looking for investors who care about reducing waste using validated technology in the food processing industry.”

NZ’s Brexit conundrum NEW ZEALAND faces risks to trade and its businesses established in the UK if Brexit is disorderly, says trade expert Stephen Jacobi. The Brexit deal negotiated by Prime Minister May would have allowed the current arrangements to remain in place to the end of 2020. Jacobi, executive director of the NZ International Business Forum, believes that without a departure deal or other action being taken Britain will crash out from the EU on March 29. “This risks significant disruption to supply chains, to customs clearance at British ports and quite likely a significant dent in the British economy,” he says. The British Government is interested in a future FTA with NZ. If a hard Brexit occurs on March 29, Britain is able and eager to negotiate and imple-

ment a future FTA with NZ as soon as possible, Jacobi says. Under a hard Brexit, NZ faces potentially short to mediumterm pain with the prospect of a future FTA on offer. Under a soft Brexit we face short to medium-term continuity but an extensive delay in realising our FTA ambitions. He says bets are on as to which is achieved first – complete Brexit or NZ’s FTA with the EU. Jacobi is holding his breath for an outcome to Brexit which avoids a shock to the system any more than is necessary. “Future free trade agreements with the EU and eventually with Britain, if these can be achieved, provide a means not to go back to the future, but to look forward into the 21st century and put the relationship with these old friends and partners on a new level.” – Pam Tipa


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

Rabobank supports clients from farm to fork in

40

COUNTRIES

100 000

farmers to connect Content supplied by Rabobank – Grow with the bank farmers for farmers with by worldwide , founded 12630

22 MARKETS & TRENDS

global agribusiness research analysts sharing market outlooks

Positive outlook remains Dairy NEW ZEALAND milk collections continued to steadily lift in the first month of 2019. January milk production climbed 7.7%, bringing seasonto-date milk production to 4.9% as a reflection of mild summer condi-

tions and a strong milk flow base set over the course of the season. But we anticipate the pace of full-season production growth to slow across the final months of the season and ultimately land between 3.5% and 4.5% YOY.

Dry conditions have since set in for parts of the North Island – particularly Taranaki and Waikato – as well as pockets of the South Island (with a drought declared in the Tasman District) thanks to hot air blasting across the Tasman Sea from Australia. Despite good feed reserves in most key dairying regions, the heat stress has impacted milk flows and therefore the rate of production growth is set to slow. Global commodity prices have rallied late in the season. The commodity price improvement has led to Fonterra revising their forecast for the 2018/19 season to lift by NZc 30 to NZD 6.30 to 6.60 kgMS.

Beef WE EXPECT farmgate

prices to soften slightly next month as domestic slaughter rates pick up, but any downward price movements should be limited by solid overseas market demand. US imported beef prices continued their recovery throughout February, leading to relatively firm New Zealand farmgate prices. However, an increasing domestic cow kill did cause some price softening towards the end of the month. At the

start of March, the North Island bull price was 2% lower MOM, averaging NZ$ 4.90/kg cwt (9% lower YOY), with the South Island bull price also down 2% to NZ$ 4.90/kg cwt (6% lower YOY). Drying weather is starting to impact pasture growth and will prompt many farmers to start offloading cattle in increasing numbers. With this increase coinciding with the seasonal

increase in New Zealand’s cow kill, cattle supplies will likely rise above normal levels for this time of year, putting downward pressure on prices. As of late January, New Zealand’s beef production was 9% behind last season, with favourable growing conditions in late 2018 slowing the flow of cattle to the processors at the start of the season.

Sheepmeat RABOBANK EXPECTS seasonal lamb supplies to increase. Given that the high-value Easter chilled production window is also ending, increased supplies will put further downward pressure on prices over the next month Farmgate prices came back slightly towards the end of February, as drying

weather conditions across New Zealand sped up the flow of lambs to the processors. At the start of March, the slaughter price in the North Island averaged NZ$ 7.00/kg cwt (-1% MOM), while South Island lamb averaged NZ$ 6.75/kg cwt (-4% MOM). Prices are largely consistent with where they were sitting at this stage last season, with the average slaughter price for North Island lambs up 1% YOY and South Island lambs down 1% YOY. Favourable climatic conditions towards the end of 2018 and into early 2019 have led to a general delay of New Zealand’s lamb kill. Many farmers are holding onto stock longer than normal in order to capitalise on high levels of pasture growth.


40

RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

MARKETS & TRENDS 23

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strong performance, posting the highest fob value for export receipts since 2009. With our expectation for a big New Zealand apple crop this season, the outcomes of Brexit and the US-China trade negotiations will be influential for key apple import markets in 2019. Increased production and exports led to a significant ten-year shift in key markets and

Overall, global demand for New Zealand lamb remains solid. The US and Chinese market continue to perform strongly, with Q1 2018/19 export volumes and values to both countries ahead of Q1 2017/18.

Horticulture NEW ZEALAND fresh apple exports for the year ended December 2018 showed another

met growing consumer demand. And it’s not only value that’s growing. Fresh apple production volumes have continued to increase annually since 2012, and 2018 export volumes came in at over 20m export cartons. Against this backdrop of increased production, continued value growth is positive for the sector, and it’s happening in all key off-shore markets even as volumes shifted from 2009 to 2018. Import volumes of New Zealand apples to the EU (including the UK) have shrunk by around 15% collectively since 2009. This volume, along with increased production, has found its

THE NEW 4 CYLINDER

way into growing North American and Asian markets. Consumer demand continues to grow across Asia for New Zealand apples, with import volumes into key Asian markets almost doubling, and value trebling, over the ten-year period. In 2019, Rabobank expects a big crop, so all eyes will be on the evolving Asian and European trade dynamics and the opportunities or challenges these may present for exporters.   The kiwifruit sector is also reporting continued overall strong performance, with tendering for the release of 750 ha of combined G3 and Organic Gold

6-SERIES 130-140HP

licences commencing in late March. Over the past three license releases, demand has significantly outweighed available licenses. As in 2018, increasing production in 2019 will again challenge available resources across the entire kiwifruit supply chain.

Exchange rates WE MAINTAIN our forecast that the NZ$ will fall to USc 63 within 12 months, as monetary policies in the US and New Zealand diverge. In the US, we see no further monetary policy tightening this year, with the OCR set to stay put at 2.5%. The economic expansion is showing signs of fatigue. GDP growth slowed to 2.6% YOY in Q4. The effects of tax cuts and fiscal stimulus are wearing off; we’re seeing the first cracks in the housing market and a rising trade deficit will exert a drag on the economy in 2019. Against

this backdrop, we expect inflation to subside through the year, removing the need for any further monetary policy tightening. In New Zealand, we think the next rate move is down. The Reserve Bank left the official Cash Rate unchanged at 1.75% in February. It still expects to keep the OCR at this level through 2019 and 2020, as its economy picks up, but inflation remains below target. We are less optimistic. The economic outlook for New Zealand’s key trading partner China remains worrying, despite

signs that fresh stimulus is about to start flowing. New Zealand will also likely be squeezed by either a trade war or a trade deal that locks it out and tensions with China are now clear. We expect a slowdown in China to deliver significant headwinds in New Zealand, likely leading to a rate cut next. At just below 68 USc on 6 March, the NZ$ is already below its five-year average, and likely has further to fall. A falling AU$ will add impetus to that. Rabobank forecasts the NZ$ to hit USc 63 by February 2020.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

24 OPINION EDITORIAL

EDNA

Omnishambles THE COALITION Government resembles a headless chicken in its handling – or more correctly mishandling – of the recommendations of Sir Michael Cullen’s Tax Working Group (TWG). Its line “we are ruling nothing in or nothing out” of the TWG’s recommendations is causing undue and unnecessary angst in agriculture and wider business circles. The proposals have rightly caused great concern, unease and confusion in the farming sector. The TWG’s recommendations that would impact specifically on the rural sector – note that three of its members did not agree with these – include introducing a capital gains tax (CGT) on the sale of farms, an animal emissions tax, water tax, fertiliser tax and consideration of an environmental footprint tax and a natural capital tax. National’s agriculture spokesman Nathan Guy claims that “with all these taxes combined a typical dairy farm could be paying up to $68,000 annually in new taxes if irrigated, or $25,000 without irrigation. And and average sheep and beef farm could be taxed $20,000 per year”. These are scary numbers. But we can’t verify Guy’s claims because the Government’s response has been thus far zilch, zero, zippo! Except for the aforementioned: “we are ruling nothing in or nothing out” line. The Government’s handling of the TWG recommendations has been inept, irresponsible and irrational, and ridiculous considering it had the report for three week before it was made public. The coalition partners could at least have agreed on what to rule out from the publicly announced TWG recommendations, rather than keep us waiting until “sometime in April” before making their final decision. What a mess. The Government’s answer is to roll out yesterday’s man Sir Michael Cullen – at $1000 per day care of the taxpayer – for another four months to front its CGT campaign. If Cullen, the man who once proudly told Parliament he enjoyed ripping off farmers, is the Government’s solution to all this, it must be a truly stupid problem. It is time now – not sometime in April— for the coalition Government to act like a government and tell us which of the TWG’s proposals it is considering and which it is not so we can have a reasoned, informed and serious debate on the pros and cons of each.

RURALNEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

HEAD OFFICE POSTAL ADDRESS: PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 PUBLISHER: Brian Hight ......................................... Ph 09 307 0399 GENERAL MANAGER: Adam Fricker ....................................... Ph 09 913 9632 CONSULTING EDITOR: David Anderson .................................. Ph 09 307 0399 davida@ruralnews.co.nz

“Are you sure about this Edna? – Wally’s never heard of International Women’s ‘Put Your Feet Up’ week!”

Want to share your opinion or gossip with the Hound? Send your emails to: hound@ruralnews.co.nz

THE HOUND Shocking THERE ARE many stories from ‘the impossible to believe, but believable’ files that your old mate is often told about. However, the Hound reckons this latest one has to take the cake for the most officious, bureaucratic stupidity he’s ever heard. We all know how silly some councils and their rules can be, but this one is a real doozy. Apparently, after receiving a recent tourist complaint about getting a shock from an electric fence, Canterbury Regional Council (ECan) has instructed the offending farmer to put ‘beware’ notices on his electric fences… Believe it or not, the council actually made this ruling – despite the fact the camera-ready tourist actually got a shock after he’d put his camera through the fence to photograph the livestock. Give me strength.

Feds under the bed? THE HOUND is getting concerned about the state of Fed Farmers and wonders if the creeping socialism infesting the current government is beginning to infiltrate the farmer lobby. In previous years, Feds has been the bastion of the free-market and lassiez faire market economics. However, Feds – especially the meat and wool section – has lately been growing more economically pink than your average Green Party MP. In the last month alone, Feds meat and wool have called for a compulsory wool levy to be imposed on all wool growers and for the obligatory regulation of the stock agent industry. We’ve all heard the old catch cry about: ‘Reds under the bed’ – but it may have to change: ‘Red Feds under the bed’!

PRODUCTION: Dave Ferguson ........................Ph 09 913 9633 davef@ruralnews.co.nz Becky Williams ........................Ph 09 913 9634 beckyw@ruralnews.co.nz REPORTERS: Sudesh Kissun ....................... Ph 09 913 9627 Pamela Tipa ............................ Ph 021 842 220 Peter Burke .............................Ph 06 362 6319 Nigel Malthus ...................... Ph 021 164 4258 MACHINERY EDITOR: Mark Daniel ............................. Ph 021 906 723 or 07 824 1190 SUB-EDITOR: Neil Keating ............................Ph 09 913 9628

Light reading

Smells bad

IN A follow-up to this old mutt’s piece two issues ago about Fonterra directors getting to grips with the co-op’s financial state and loudly sharing their dismay in the Koru club, another of the Hound’s spies has passed on more news in the ‘Fonterra director watch’ category. Apparently, your canine crusader’s mate was recently sharing a flight with a couple of the dairy co-op’s directors and noticed that one of the newly elected board members was engrossed in reading a fancy management book. However, the Hound’s spy reckons that although the management book might get the co-op’s board up with the latest corporate buzzwords like ‘good to great’, ‘getting on the bus’ and ‘strategic management’, Fonterra directors would be better employed learning how to read budgets and how to minimise costs and maximize profit.

YOUR OLD mate has been concerned for some time about the financial robustness of the lolly-scramble that is the $3 billion Provincial Growth Fund (PGF). It has long been suspected that NZ First is using the PGF as a taxpayer-funded tool to ‘buy’ it or its mates a seat at the next election. This suspicion has not been eased with the vast majority of PGF grants going to Northland where Shane Jones stood – and lost – in 2017. Now comes news that the Treasury argued against the Government giving Westland Milk Products a $9.9 million loan from the PGF – but this advice was ignored. The Hound wonders whether the possibility that West Coast MP Damien O’Connor -- a good mate of Jones -- could be in a bit of strife retaining his seat in 2020 had anything to do with the Treasury advice being ignored?

NATIONAL SALES MANAGER: Stephen Pollard ....Ph 09 913 9637/021 963 166 stephenp@ruralnews.co.nz

WELLINGTON SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Ron Mackay ......... Ph 04 234 6239/021 453 914 ronm@ruralnews.co.nz

WAIKATO SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Ted Darley .......... Ph 07 854 6292/021 832 505 ted@ruralnews.co.nz

SOUTH ISLAND SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Kaye Sutherland Ph 03 337 3828/021 221 1994 kayes@ruralnews.co.nz

ABC audited circulation 79,599 as at 30/09/2018

DIGITAL STRATEGIST: Jessica Wilson ........................ Ph 09 913 9621

Rural News is published by Rural News Group Ltd. All editorial copy and photographs are subject to copyright and may not be reproduced without prior written permission of the publisher. Opinions or comments expressed within this publication are not necessarily those of staff, management or directors of Rural News Group Ltd.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

OPINION 25

Sorting the wizards from the prophets ENVIRONMENTALISTS FALL into two categories: wizards and prophets, says Charles Mann, a science journalist and author who has examined the history of environmentalism from the middle of last century. Wizards focus on finding ways to do more with less, decreasing society’s footprint by applying science and technology. This means identifying and overcoming limits by finding technologies that deliver the greatest possibilities for decoupling human activity from environmental impacts. In contrast, prophets are focussed on finding ways to live within limits, living in harmony with nature as far as possible. In many developed countries, including New Zealand, the prophets are recognised as caring for the environment, whereas the wizards are overlooked. Yet wizards are looking after most of productive NZ – they are farmers and growers…. NZ wizards have an envied reputation. We know this by the number of farmers and growers from other countries who tour NZ; and there are international students, on OE, as interns or enrolled in academic programmes,

mountains and the sea, with careful calculation of the ‘fall’ seen as vital to ensure the water flowed in the right direction. Now at least 60% of the irrigation in NZ is spray or drip. Andrew Curtis (recently departed chief of IrrigationNZ and now Water Strategies) estimates $2 billion dollars has been spent upgrading irrigation systems over the last decade, and $1b has been spent in modernising

COMMENT

Jacqueline Rowarth coming from all over the world to learn about NZ production systems. Technology transfer experts in countries with agricultural subsidies know that their job is much harder than it is in NZ – unless there is a subsidy attached to the change. In NZ, wizards adopt the new technologies because they improve productivity, that is they achieve more per unit of input. Productivity gains in the agricultural sector over the past couple of decades have been greater than in any other sector; StatisticsNZ has the data. Wizards also adopt completely new activities. Anybody saying that ‘farmers are too old to change’ should look at the deer industry (which began only in the 1970s), the dairy boom (picking up in the 1990s), the

kiwifruit orchard growth this century, manuka honey this decade… there are many stories of success. There are also the not-so-good examples (ostriches, llama, cashmere goats and buffalo still have to achieve stardom) indicating that NZers are trying new things and ‘nothing ventured nothing gained’. Equally important

are the new technologies being applied within existing industries. Irrigation is a case in point: in the first half of last century, flood and border dyke irrigation was across the Canterbury Plains. The system was a triumph of technology available at the time, with the water being channelled, diverted and drained between the

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irrigation infrastructure. When wizards develop or are shown new and improved ways, they change. Another example is effluent disposal (which on some farms links to irrigation): improved storage and low-rate application methods have reduced nutrient loss and rivers in many regions are benefitting. The LAWA data released last year indicated more rivers improving in all measurements than deteriorating. The previous report had indicated improvements in all measurements other than nitrate. Prophets are concerned that the good news stories might result in wizards thinking ‘job done’. But wizards don’t rest on laurels, ever. The world is changing too fast

for resting, and the global challenges of climate variability, pest and disease pressure, increasing regulations and decreasing prices always present new opportunities to find. The biggest challenge is the increasing number of people on the planet. Prophets have yet to answer how over 9 billion people will be able to live in harmony with nature. Wizards are already researching, developing and adopting the technologies that could help. The smart money is on the wizards. • Dr Jacqueline Rowarth CNZM CRSNZ HFNZIAHS has a PhD in Soil Science and has been analysing agri-environment interaction for several decades. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

26 OPINION

Axe most of TWG’s recommendations ANDREW HOGGARD

FEDERATED FARMERS is calling on the Government to reject most of the raft of new taxes proposed by the Tax Working Group (TWG). Small business would pay the costs, large business would spend thousands avoiding the costs and tax advisors and valuers would have a field day. There is possibly an argument for a capital gains tax (CGT) aimed at rental properties if there was sound evidence it would dampen investor speculation and reduce price pressure and first home buyers being outbid. But even with that, we haven’t given the tougher ‘bright line’ test rules a chance to really kick in. Labour and their coalition partners must be

aghast at the chorus of anger from so many sections of New Zealand society about the TWG’s proposals. Feds believes they should heed the comments of the group’s chairman, Sir Michael Cullen, who publicly reminded people that he had not promoted a comprehensive capital gains tax during his nine years as Minister of Finance for the Helen Clark-led Labour coalition government. Sir Michael also said that NZ was so clever we knew a comprehensive capital gains tax was a bad idea or not clever enough to put one in place. I go for the former conclusion – that on balance a CGT is a bad idea. It’s clear that such a tax would do little extra, above what the Govern-

Landcare figures show a methane charge on sheep and beef farmers could cost as much as $120,000 per farm.

ment is already doing, for housing affordability. But it would just add an additional layer of costs

for businesses and, given it won’t even apply to the vast bulk of houses, how will it solve housing

affordability? Fairness has been mentioned a lot in this discussion: why should

the capital gain on a $2 million small farm in Eketahuna be taxed, but a similar valued house in Ponsonby not. Either everyone is in or no-one is. The National Party has been quick out of the blocks to start putting numbers on the financial implications of the TWG’s proposal. If anything, its estimates on the fallout may be a bit light. For instance, it took a midpoint view on a number of figures. For example, a 2018 Landcare report calculated that a charge on methane for a sheep and beef farm could be as high as 123% of their net profits – a nationwide cost in the order of $2 billion and a cost per sheep and beef farm of about $120,000. In our view, the envi-

ronmental taxes that have been mooted will be even worse than a CGT. A tax on nitrogen loses will require the use of the Overseer modelling programme, but it has a 20% margin of error. How many people would like IRD to apply a 20% margin of error to their taxes? Overseer is a fantastic tool for what it was developed for, but it wasn’t designed as a tax calculator. Also, nitrogen is not the issue in every catchment. Taxing every farmer and grower on nitrogen losses or imposing a tax on nitrogen fertiliser just takes away from primary producers the money they could spend on the mitigations needed for their specific catchment. • Andrew Hoggard is vicepresident of Federated Farmers of New Zealand

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

OPINION 27

Laughing gas no laughing matter BALA TIKKISETTY

CARBON DIOXIDE (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the three main greenhouse gases. Carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide are considered long lived gases because significant amounts remain in the atmosphere for a long time, even centuries. Methane is a relatively short lived gas, breaking down within a few decades. Globally, agriculture is the largest source of anthropogenic N2O emissions, accounting for an estimated 56-81% of the total. In New Zealand, agriculture accounts for an estimated 94% of the anthropogenic N2O emissions. N2O – also known as laughing gas – is one of the most potent greenhouse gases, warming the planet. When I say most potent, each molecule of N2O is about 300 times more powerful than one molecule of carbon dioxide in terms of greenhouse potentiality. N2O is both potent like methane and persistent like carbon dioxide. Similarly, one tonne of biological methane traps about 33 times more heat than a tonne of carbon dioxide over 100 years. About 80% of our country’s total N2O emissions come from urine patches on paddocks. A recent report from the Government indicated that the N2O emissions have increased by almost half since 1990. Agricultural emissions are linked to intensive farming. The transformation of N-containing compounds in soils to produce N2O emissions includes nitrification of ammonium (NH+4) – an aerobic biochemical process. Nitrification yields nitrite (NO-2), but when limited by oxygen supply, nitrite can be an electron acceptor and reduced to nitrous oxide. In other

words, the wetter they become in soils, the greater will be the rates of nitrification and N2O production. When soils become anoxic, nitrate can be sequentially reduced to N2O and inert nitrogen. This is called de-nitrification. Methane emissions are higher on farms with higher stocking rates and higher dry matter consumption. Some of the options to reduce methane are lowering replacement rates, reducing the dry matter feed per cow and lowering stocking rates. Minimising human induced erosion and maintaining good soil quality are essential for maintaining soil ecosystem services such as nutrient and water buffering, productive capacity, assimilating waste and minimising impacts of sediment and other contaminants on water bodies. Other good practices include optimum cultivation, avoiding over grazing and heavy grazing under wet weather leading to compaction, avoiding under or overfertilisation, practicing appropriate use of pesticides and other agrochemicals, managing pasture to maintain complete soil cover and careful applying farm dairy effluent to avoid saturation and to optimise organic matter. The options for reducing N2O could be reducing nitrogen inputs through judicious use of fertilisers, using low nitrogen feeds and improving pasture quality. There is every benefit in protecting the sensitive areas on farms. Wetlands give a wide range of ecosystem benefits such as improving water quality, flood regulation, coastal protection and providing recreational opportunities and fish habitat. Basically, these changes involve farm management practices rather than expensive infrastructural changes.

Climate change affects all of us, including the primary sector. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is a priority. • Bala Tikkisetty is a

sustainable agriculture advisor at Waikato Regional Council. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

MANAGEMENT 29

‘Helicropping’ could take off AERIAL APPLICATION of herbicides, fertiliser and seeds could be the answer to preventing soil erosion. ‘No-till’ heli-cropping was successfully trialled recently on a pastoral farm in Waikato; the aim is to protect soils while maintaining productivity, says the Sustainable Helicropping Group chairman, Colin Armer. “We are effectively putting away the plough,” he said. “The aerial no-till approach means we can establish crops and renew pastures without touching the ground or disturbing precious soil -- more like what happens in nature.” Armer says early results from the $1 million project show potential to stem the 192 million tonnes of soil lost every year because of erosion (according to ‘Our Land 2018’, published by the Ministry for the Environment). Of these losses, 44% are from pastoral land. He says the project to protect the soil brought together seven farmers to trial aerial no-till on their rolling hillcountry properties in the central and lower North Island. The technique involves precision use of herbicides, fertiliser and seeds

Colin Armer

applied by helicopter. While especially relevant on hill country, the practice is cost-effective on the full range of land contour types and when done correctly provides a valuable source of feed without the risk of erosion. “We know aerial no-till works and we believe it’s a potential gamechanger for any farmer wanting to grow crops and renew pasture profitably with minimal soil disturbance. “This project was the next step because we can now capture learnings

and develop a system proven profitable and sustainable across a wide range of farm and soil types – including showing where this approach is not suitable.” The potential of aerial no-till is supported by Ballance Agri-Nutrients’ fertiliser and forage specialist Murray Lane, whose work with the trial is captured in a joint paper on the technique with Bruce Willoughby of Ecometric Consulting to the NZ Grasslands Association Conference.

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Lane says aerial no-till is a far cry from the old “spray and pray” practices which had patchy results and were unlikely to achieve consistent environmental outcomes. “Today we have GPS-supported precision placement tools available for fertiliser and seed placement, and sophisticated Accuflow nozzles to confidently spray without drift. “The farmers involved have been achieving profitable returns and aerial no-till also helps them meet their obligations as environmental custodians. Their success comes from strictly following a prescribed process that reduces risks to a profitable return and to soil conservation. There are no shortcuts.” Project manager Ian Tarbotton says the priority is to figure out what constitutes best practice in both the establishment and grazing phases of the crop so that the prescribed process achieves results that are environmentally sustainable and profitable. “We will be looking at grazing intensity, plant species and the role of soil bunds, vegetative buffer strips and catch crops to minimise the risk

of soil loss. We have a lot of interest from regional councils who can see the environmental benefits of getting this right. “For example, Bay of Plenty Regional Council is interested in how forage crops and pasture can be established on the rolling country around Lake Rotorua without the usual cultivation and with minimal soil and nutrient losses.” Tarbotton says extension -- important to this project -- will be by field visits, a website, hands-on and virtual tools and a research paper and a farmer handbook. There is existing knowledge to harness, but new science is needed on measuring the effectiveness of buffers and mitigations. Armer says the long-term goal is “more profitable and resilient farms, especially rolling and hill country farms, the retention of soil, improved soil condition and matching grazing approaches to forage type and location”. The project is paid for by the Government’s Sustainable Farming Fund and has backers in various sectors in the North and South Island.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

30 MANAGEMENT

Swiss breed proves a heavy hitter IN BEEF progeny trials by Beef + Lamb NZ across NZ, initial weight-based results show Simmental are performing at the top of the breeds. The latest test results, from a 2018 trial, were again compelling, said BLNZ Genetics general manager Graham Alder. It showed superior growth rates for the Simmental breed versus Angus, Hereford and Charolais. “It confirmed what was suspected with regard to estimated breeding values (EBVs): they work. They deliver what they predict. “Simmental bulls produced progeny with a 6kg higher average weaning weight and 20kg higher yearling weight.” Adler says the actual yearling weights for Simmental were 310 340kg versus 285 - 315kg for Angus and 280 - 310kg for Hereford.

The Simmental breed originates from Switzerland and was introduced into NZ farms in 1971, with the first calves born a year later. Richard Scholefield heads up Whangara Farms on the North Island’s east coast -- a Maori-owned farming operation. Across its 8500ha Schofield and his team run 75,000 stock units including 2500 breeding cows. Of that number, 1000 are put to Simmental bulls, a breed Schofield says is contributing to the commercial success of the business. “A big driver for us, initially, was

Simmental is a cattle breed that is ticking farmers’ commercial boxes and boosting their bottom lines. Inset: Beef+Lamb NZ Genetics general manager, Graham Alder

the focus on growth rate as we wanted to move from a three-year finishing policy to an 18-month system,” he explains. “We needed fast-growing animals and Simmentals provided that. For the past decade, we’ve seen them hitting the targets we need them to hit. It’s been working well.” Schofield says an interesting development – as the testing covered the spectrum of terminal sire breeds – is

that Simmentals have “an undeniable hybrid vigour and have proven to grow faster”. He sources his Simmental bulls from Jon Knauf at Kerrah, but was introduced to them by Daniel Absolom at Rissington.  “Daniel is a driving force behind Simmental and is a great advocate of the breed. Jon Knauf is also very passionate about Simmental and is very progressive. “I think it’s important to choose

your breeder wisely and make sure you have the same objectives,” Schofield says. “Genetics is one area farmers can have 100% control over. “The bull decision you make will affect your herd performance and profitability for at least the next 8-10 years. Simmental are an important component in our farming system and their outstanding growth rate and returns make commercial sense for our business.”

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

MANAGEMENT 31

Stop slugs munching your profits four weeks later. Pasta-based Endure slug baits have been developed for the best combination of attractiveness, palatability, spreadability and durabil-

GEORGE KERSE

IN THE last few planting seasons we have seen favourable conditions for slugs. If such conditions recur this autumn, slug populations will quickly bounce back from the hot, dry summer and pose a risk to autumnsown crops and grass. We all know that slugs can be devastating to newly sown crops and pastures, so it makes sense to check paddocks before sowing to see how bad the risk of slug damage is. Paddocks should be checked for slugs before and after drilling. Walking paddocks and checking under objects like sticks, stones, cowpats or thick layers of trash can give an initial idea of slug presence. However, a slug mat can give a much more accurate assessment of slug populations, which can be crucial in ensuring the solid establishment of your crop. When conditions favour slug activity, slug mats should be left out overnight and checked for slugs the next morning. A common ‘rule of thumb’ is that three to four slugs per mat means there are enough numbers to cause damage. The mats can then be moved to new locations to monitor what is happening with slug numbers over time. Even after acting to limit slug numbers, it is imperative to monitor the crop until the risk of slug

ity for slug control in wet conditions, when slugs are more active. The active ingredient metaldehyde will not harm beneficial insects, such as carabid beetle

and earthworms. So, it is possible to use repeat applications when necessary. • George Kerse, is product manager agrochemicals at Ravensdown.

Favourable conditions can lead to slugs posing a risk to autumn-sown crops and grasses.

Some crops, such as brassicas, provide a better environment for slugs. So, managing your crop rotation and considering the sequence of crops can limit the rise of slug populations. damage has passed. This is particularly important where slug populations are high or where conditions favour slug development. There is a range of cultural techniques that can help manage the risk of slug damage. Some crops, such as brassicas, provide a better environment for slugs. So, managing your crop rotation and considering the sequence of crops can limit the rise of slug populations. Minimising residue from the previous crop, e.g. by grazing and/or spraying out the residual vegetation, will reduce

feed available to slugs and limit their options for shelter. Cultivation will also reduce slug numbers through habitat disruption and direct physical impact, whereas direct drilling poses a higher risk of slug survival. Rolling after drilling helps because slugs are not good at burrowing into the soil, so fine, firm seedbeds are better than loose cloddy ones. Depending on the circumstance, there are different baiting strategies that can be employed. Where there is a risk of slugs migrating into the drill row, applying

slug bait with the seed can be beneficial. This may help where you have shallow sowing depths or if soil conditions mean that it is not easy to close over the drill row. Even if some slugs do migrate into the drill row, a broadcast bait may still be required to control those that do not. Broadcasting bait with fertiliser after the spray-out and before or after drilling can be very effective because the bait is applied when the feed source for the slugs is disappearing and before slugs get a chance to cause damage. Remember that even if slugs are hard to find in the paddock, they can migrate in from the fence lines – making it worthwhile to broadcast bait on the outside round. With continued monitoring, you will know if a repeat application of bait treatment is required three to

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INCREASING PASTURE PRODUCTION AND STOCK PERFORMANCE With NZ Beef + Lamb predicting 2018 - 2019 lamb and beef exports to both break $3 billion for the second time1 the launch of AeroLime™ is timely for hill country farmers.

Number one was that lime – even at the low application of 1.25t/ha helped increase pasture production. The main response to the lime appeared 15 months after the initial application, increased over time, and was still present 3 years after application. Other pasture and soil related responses recorded were improved legume content, decreased pasture litter and an increase in earth worm numbers. The trial involved Romney and Border LeichesterRomney ewes, rotationally grazed at 14 ewes/ha, except during lambing, when they were set stocked. During the 3-year period the following stock performance related data was recorded.



Research carried out over a 3- year period in the Te Kuiti district has shown that low rate aerial liming can deliver significant benefits for hill country properties2. This research, which investigated the production responses to low rate applications of lime at 1.25t/ha, was published in 1981 and highlighted a number of important factors.

WOOL PRODUCTION Fleece weights of both ewes and lambs showed responses to lime with an additional 0.5 to 0.6kg of greasy wool per ewe and up to Â?   Â?   ­€ ‚ƒ‚   0.13kg per lamb Â?  being obtained      during 1978 and  1979. This effect  was attributed to  the better overall   nutritional plane of   Â?  the limed pasture. 











STOCK WEIGHTS         “Limedâ€? Lamb weights at weaning were 3kg better and   during the last year of the trial 55% of lime treated lambs     were ready for slaughter on 19 Feb, as against 38% of the   un-limed. Ewe live weights in the limed sector were also around 5kg higher. Of interest – during the 2nd year of the Hill Country study a dry autumn resulted in rainfall being 40% below normal. Despite this, the increase in pasture availability allowed ewe weights to be maintained. According to soil scientist Paddy Shannon, this is consistent with other observations suggesting lime has a strong positive effect on soils and pasture under drought conditions.

“This is because limed soils retain water better and wet up faster than un-limed soils. Lime is therefore an important weapon in helping to reduce the long-term effects of drought.� AeroLime is a minimum 92% calcium carbonate product manufactured through a specific crushing, screening and storage process. Extensive testing ensures that the product purity, particle size, moisture content and other factors consistently meet Graymont’s exacting specifications. These strict manufacturing and storage processes maximize product flowability in accordance with CAA guideline safety recommendations3 while still allowing AeroLime to achieve agronomic performance expectations.















Graymont is committed to manufacturing AeroLime to a high standard. Farmers should contact their usual approved transporters and contractors to order. For further information Freephone 0800 245 463 or visit www.onlime.co.nz 1. 2018-19 lamb and beef exports forecast to both break $3 billion for the second time (2018, September 14), NZ Beef + Lamb. Retrieved from https://beeflambnz.com/ news-views/lamb-and-beef-exports-forecast-both-break-3-billion-second-time. 2. O‘Connor, M.B.: Foskett, H.R.; Smith, A. 1981. The effect of low rate of lime on North Island hill country pasture and animal production and the economics of use. Proceedings of NZ Society of Animal Production 41:82-87. 3. Safety Guideline – Farm Airstrips and Associated Fertiliser Cartage, Storage and Application. Jointly published by the Civil Aviation Authority and Department of Labour (2005).

HERE’S A REAL LIFT FOR HILL COUNTRY FARMING Research shows that low rate liming of hill country can deliver significant benefits over time: increased pasture production, less pasture litter, increased worm activity, improved wool production PLUS faster lamb growth.*

4 READY FF TAKE-O NOW

Stock available talk to your usual contractor today. Freephone 0800 245 463 or visit www.onlime.co.nz for further information.

*Links to relevant research available on our website.

GRA 0950-01

PUTTING YOU ON TARGET FOR BETTER PASTURE PERFORMANCE


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

ANIMAL HEALTH 33

Get ewes in shape for lambing putting a condition score on a ewe is about what you are going to get from her later in the year and potentially next year.” Kenyon says farmers need to be careful

PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

FOCUS ON the ewes with a lower body condition score (BCS). That’s the message from Massey University’s professor Paul Kenyon, an internationally recognised expert in sheep fertility. As mating time looms for sheep farmers, Kenyon says if farmers have limited feed supply they should allocate this to the ewes which need feeding the most – ewes with BCS 3.0 or lower. “This is especially so in a year when there is not a lot of feed around. You want to be targeting whatever bit of extra good feed you have around to the animals that will respond the most and get you your best bang-for-buck,” he told Rural News. “Feeding good condition scored ewes extra will get very little, if any, extra reproductive response, so it’s inefficient use of feed. Whereas you will get a much better response by feeding more to poorcondition ewes.” Flushing ewes is talked

about the type of pasture they put stock on prior to mating. He says the phytoestrogens in red clover, for example, can reduce reproductive performance but a mixed sward

is probably ok because it is diluted out. Again, with lucerne the phytoestrogens are a potential problem and stock should be taken off this crop a few weeks before breeding.

Rural News

PIONEERS OF SHEARING SHED

SAFETY AND RELIABILITY Professor Paul Kenyon.

about a lot on farms and much of this work was done in the 1970s and 80s. But Kenyon says flushing ewes requires a lot of feed and he questions the worth of the practice now, especially with the level of feed required and the natural fertility of many ewes. “Some farmers think that by just opening a gate two or three weeks before breeding that is flushing, but that’s just not enough. We now know with flushing, that

a ewe in good condition doesn’t need to be flushed and the response you get from flushing in terms of extra foetuses is likely very small,” he explains. “But flushing ewes with about BCS 2.0 - 2.5 will result in a far bigger response.” Flushing done correctly means ensuring the ewe is well fed for at least three weeks pre-mating. Ideally, Kenyon says, if farmers are going to flush the low BCS ewes, this

LESS TO STRESS ABOUT IN THE SHED

needs to be done four-six weeks before mating. Using supplements to flush ewes is possible but can be expensive. Kenyon says if farmers have some quality herbages around -- herb clover mixes or lucerne -- they can be used for the poorer condition ewes. But he points out that farmers normally use that type of feed to finish lambs. “Remember, finishing lambs is about your income now; whereas

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LOOK AFTER THE BOYS TOO! WHILE MUCH of the focus is on preparing ewes for mating, Kenyon says farmers should be getting vets to check their rams to ensure they are ready for the task ahead. Any problems with a ram may take up to six weeks to remedy, he says. “A ram needs to have a BCS of 3.5 - 4.0 going into breeding so he can

produce a large amount of quality sperm. We also know that rams don’t do a lot of eating during the breeding, so they need to be in good condition.” Rams need to be mobile during mating so they need to have their feet in good condition. If they have foot problems they will have difficulty chasing and mounting the ewes.

“Also, if rams have an infection in their feet, their body temperatures will rise with that infection and that can negatively affect the viability of their sperm.” Kenyon says farmers should be aiming to have high fertility in their flocks; if they do the ewes will lamb early and produce high quality lambs.

Visit A Heiniger Stockist Call (03) 349 8282 @HeinigerShearingAusNZ

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

34 ANIMAL HEALTH

New online M.bovis tool A NEW online tool is part of the quest to eradicate the cattle disease Mycoplasma bovis. The Dairy Risk Assessment tool is an online questionnaire that helps a farmer to accurately understand the M. bovis risk on their farm. Used with their veterinarian, it can help a farmer

make informed decisions about managing M. bovis risks and reduce possible spread of the disease on or off a farm. The New Zealand Veterinary Association’s (NZVA) chief veterinary officer Helen Beattie says dairy farmers should talk soon to their veterinarian about using the tool.

“It’s a critical stage in the season when farmers may be considering buying or selling herds, sharemilkers may be considering moving to new contracts, and contract milkers and managers are considering next season’s job,” she says. “Other than feeding raw milk, the main risk

factor in M. bovis spread is stock movement. Farmers should talk to their veterinarian about a dairy risk assessment consultation before making decisions about buying a herd or moving cattle on or off their farm.” During a consultation, farm management practices known to be a

biosecurity risk are discussed with the farmer and recorded in the Dairy Risk Assessment tool by the veterinarian. The tool calculates the M. bovis risk assessment score and generates a risk rating of low, moderate or high. The result is available immediately and can be

Farmers picking up testing kits at Dunsandel during the early onset of M. bovis

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reassure a farmer that their stock, moving on or off farm, will not be exposed to greater risk,” Beattie says. “Veterinarians have the in-depth understanding of farm systems and animal diseases… required to recommend changes to a farm system that are practical and will reduce disease risk on-farm,” she says. “The DRA is informative, affordable and faster and safer to carry out than surface-swabbing individual animals, which is required for laboratory testing. “Individual negative (or not detected) test results are of limited value in understanding a herd’s true M. bovis infection status.” NZVA website.

CATTLE SALE BIOSECURITY

Identify the land you manage animals on

NAIT is an OSPRI programme

shared by the veterinarian with the farmer, with recommendations to reduce risk. Developed by NZ veterinary group XLVets and distributed by the NZVA, the tool has had almost a year of beta testing NZ-wide, and has been refined as understanding of the disease has developed. It uses known transmission risks, including findings from reports released by the Ministry for Primary Industries about the epidemiology and risk of M. bovis spreading in NZ. The tool is used by registered veterinarians during onfarm consultations with farming clients. “As a dairy farmer’s trusted onfarm biosecurity advisor, a veterinarian is the right person to

ospri.co.nz

WEANER SALES are underway and Beef + Lamb New Zealand is reminding farmers to implement good onfarm biosecurity practices to protect their businesses from imported diseases. BLNZ’s senior biosecurity advisor Will Halliday says while Mycoplasma bovis is front of most people’s minds on cattle diseases, any farm that has or is suspected of having M.bovis will be under a notice of direction (NOD). This means animals cannot be moved from the property. However, buyers should check all the cattle they are purchasing have NAIT tags and where possible ask the vendor directly about their NAIT records to ensure they are all up-to-date. When purchased cattle arrive onfarm, the purchaser needs to receive them through the NAIT system and fill out the forms accurately and in a timely manner. They also need to make sure they have received an ASD form with the animals and this should be retained in the farm records. As well as stock being moved through weaner sales, early dried-off dairy cows are often sent to grazing at this time of year and the same principles should apply, especially ensuring their records are up-to-date.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 35

Baling innovations keep on coming MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

Versatile’s new Nemesis tractor is out to make a name for the company.

No downfall for Nemesis MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE CANADIAN manufacturer Versatile is well known for building no-nonsense 4WD articulated tractors. Its D100 of 1966 was the first equal size-tyre ‘artic’ produced, then became the seed for many other manufacturers to develop machines of a similar format. Versatile had chequered ownership over the last 30 years: it was sold to Ford New Holland in 1987, then passed to John Buhler in 2000 then the Versatile name disappeared. The company is now owned by Rostselmach, of Russia, which since 2007 has brought some stability to the brand and now makes large articulated machines -wheeled and rubber tracked. The latter is called Delta Track with power outputs from 375 to 605hp. The company also builds a range of front wheel assist (FWA) tractors from 265 to 400hp. The latest model from Versatile was

recently shown to its North American dealers in the form of the new Nemesis series with models in the important 175220hp segment. Designed and built in Winnipeg, Canada, the new models, like all other Versatile, uses a 6.7L Cummins powerplant likely to be available eventually up to 250hp; this is mated with a ZF-sourced synchro/powershift transmission. That will be followed by a CVT unit in 2020. The tractor is said to have the largest cab in the sector. Loaders are supplied via a relationship with Alo, the parent company of wellknown brands Quicke and Trima. Interestingly, the Nemesis series is expected also to be re-branded and sold as a high horsepower model for Kubota, whose expansion plans include offering a wider product range. Nemesis was the name of the Greek goddess of vengeance, this name signalling Versatile’s commitment to customers after suffering the largest losses in its history in 2018.

WHILE THE German manufacturer Krone can claim a history dating back 115 years, its large square balers are much more recent. In 2018 it celebrated 25 years since launching its Big Pack baler, and has since gone for a range of different bale sizes -- 19 different models to suit applications worldwide. When it launched the Big Pack in 1993, the machine brought with it several innovations that today are used by many of its competitors. Items like tandem axles have become the norm for bigger

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into one bundle for easy handling. This proved popular with those looking to feed small groups, individual animals or stock in pens or stables. The High-Density Press (HDP) arrived in 2005, reported to pack 25% more into a bale than its standard counterpart. And in the same vein, 2007 saw the arrival of the Pre Chop, a front chopper unit that ‘guaranteed’ uniform chop lengths while also fragmenting the material being loaded. In 2011, the Big Pack High Speed was claimed to deliver 20% higher throughput than the previous model, while maintaining density. And in 2013, the HDP 2 also brought increases to throughput and density.

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machines, and a chopper unit, back then with only three blades, has become a must-have for many contractors. Likewise, the overload system on the Big Pack’s packer system moved away from a more typical shear bolt set-up to a clutch assembly that took the unit back to its previous position. Along the way, Krone introduced its Variable Fill System (VFS) in 1999 -- four packers and a feeder fork, with the latter also doubling as a packer until the bale chamber is full. The Krone Multi-Bale was claimed in 2003 to be the first baler of its kind, enabling users to make one large bale or up to nine smaller bales that can be bound

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

36 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

A real small-block bruiser ADAM FRICKER

YOU WOULDN’T credit a 6.1L Chevy small-block V8 with a fuel economy figure of 7.8L/100km but that’s the figure displayed on the screen of the bright yellow Camaro that HSV NZ loaned us for a week. Admittedly, it takes much restraint of the right boot to be that parsimonious, but incredibly it is do-able. When we first fired the car up the trip computer actually showed that the best and worst fuel economy figures over the last 100km were 7.4 and 18L/100km respectively. Expect it to average somewhere in the early to mid-teens depending on your driving style – still quite some achievement for a 339kW, 617Nm V8 capa-

ble of brutal acceleration. Cylinder deactivation on a light throttle helps, transforming the LT1 V8 into a V4 when you’re just cruising, the only real clue being a ‘V4’ indicator on the dashboard. We suspect economy won’t be top priority for buyers of this Chevrolet Camaro 2SS, re-engineered for the NZ and Australian markets by HSV, who have reinvented themselves since the demise of the Aussiebuilt Commodores. So bugger the fuel statistics, let’s bury the boot and see how she goes. Bloody hell! Fast and furious is the answer, with a beautiful V8 soundtrack and a thrilling willingness to wind out in each of its eight gears to 6000rpm where it hits peak power.

The new Chevrolet Camaro will satisfy the lovers of American muscle cars.

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big Brembo brakes gives sophisticated handling to rival more expensive European cars. It’s probably too big to call a sports car -- more a grand tourer -- but the balance and grip impress. On a long drive the firm ride you notice around town is no longer an issue, the suspension tune making more sense at speed, and the big seats remain comfortable even after a couple of hours at the wheel. It’s well equipped, with a fantastic BOSE sound system, My-Link touch screen with smartphone compatibility, wireless phone charging, climate control, a sunroof and more. It lacks some of the active safety and autonomous drive technology that’s available in

It’s probably too big to call a sports car – more a grand tourer – but the balance and grip impress. some cars these days, but we suspect the typical Camaro driver is likely to find that stuff annoying and turn it off anyway. Luckily, it’s got a rearview camera, rear crosstraffic alert, rear park assist and blind spot warning. Lucky, because rearward visibility in this narrow-windowed beast is average at best. If you do decide to take it into town to do the shopping though, you’ll find it has a fairly decent sized boot. You could also fit a couple of kids in the small back seats -- just. HSV has done a stellar

job setting the Camaro up to drive on the proper side of the road. They strip them back to the B-pillar and remake the car so everything looks and works as it should with the steering wheel on the right. It’ll cost you more than a Mustang would, but it’s impressive enough that even at $104,990 (plus $1000 for the bright yellow) it doesn’t seem overpriced. You couldn’t import and convert one of these yourself for less and it wouldn’t be engineered to HSV standard.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 37

JCB garners headlines markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE NEW JCB Series III Loadall made its international debut at the recent SIMA show in Paris, winning Machine of the Year 2019. The company spent £8 million on developing this Loadall, said to be 50% quieter, more spacious, more comfortable and with better visibility. The new Series III Loadall range scored its win in the handling equipment category; JCB

previously won the same award at the 2017 event for its AgriPro Loadall. The competition honours the most innovative agricultural products, with winners chosen by European journalists who specialise in farm machinery. The latest Series III Loadall is specifically for agricultural operators. It has an all-new Command Plus cab which is quieter, wider and longer, has an improved driving position and controls easier to locate and use. Its instru-

TANKERS MAKE THE MOST OF EFFLUENT GILTRAP ENGINEERING offers slurry tankers with capacities from 5000 to 20,000L, running on tandem or triple axle layouts depending on size, with corresponding axle sizes from 60 to 130mm and up to 10-stud commercial wheel equipment. Tank diameters vary depending on capacity, but all have high-grade, rolled steel 6mm thick walls – or 8mm in the case of the largest unit – with domed end panels for integrity. The vessel is carried on an integrated heavy-duty chassis and drawbar assembly with a large range of options to suit individual situations. These options include braking systems, various tyre equipment, sprung/steering axles, suspended drawbars or mudguards. For proof of placement information, options include flow pumps and GPS coverage maps accessed through an easy-to-use touch-screen system. At the heart of the machine is a Battioni-Pagani rotary vane vacuum pump with capacities of 6500 to 12,000L/min depending on model. The vacuum/pressure system is protected by a double moisture trap and relief valves in each circuit. It has a sight glass to monitor filing, and the use of brass and galvanised fittings throughout give effective corrosion protection. Separate filling points allow the machines to operate in situations where there might be access issues. The option of an Auto-Fill set-up allows users to fill the tank without leaving the tractor seat, helping to promote cleanliness and safety. Inspection hatches are fitted to the side and top of the tank for easy access for maintenance or cleaning, and up to three integral tank baffles prevent ‘surge’ as the tank empties or fills. The tankers are supplied with 150 or 200mm lightweight, sectional filling hoses up to 8m long. A high-quality paint finish externally and an epoxy paint coating inside the tank helps the machine look good and extends its working life. – Mark Daniel

ment display is larger and more informative than previously. In other JCB News, the UK company has been granted an injunction by a French court against its rival Manitou. The court has directed the French manufacturer to stop production, sales or hire of any

telehandlers with a JCBpatented productivity feature. Manitou was to have ceased using the feature by March 13 and must pay all court costs. The case centres on JCB’s Longitudinal Load Movement Control (LLNC) system, which uses sensors to monitor weight being carried by

the machine’s rear axle. In operation, the sensors detect that weight reducing below a pre-set threshold, progressively reducing hydraulic function to prevent weight transfer to the front axle and the machine tipping over forwards. A feature within the unit reduces the risk of

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

38 WORKSAFE

A little planning goes a long way MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

FARMERS SPEND many hours planning their lives around the farming year. Livestock farmers might plan to calve to meet the spring flush of grass, raising stock for breeding or fattening and figuring when they need to go to the works; and arable farmers typically plan the best time for cultivation and sowing, the timely application of herbicides and the best time to harvest for quality or yield. It’s strange then, that many of those same farmers still take a she’llbe-right attitude on health and safety policies on their farms, largely relying on luck for their own and their family’s safety, rather than good management. While high-risk indus-

tries such as construction and forestry are trending down in annual fatalities, farming appears static: 16 people were killed in farm accidents in 2018. The consequences are widespread in many ways, on personal and business levels. Families are devastated by the loss of loved ones and breadwinners, and businesses suffer loss of morale, loss of productivity and real damage to their reputations. We must cry ‘enough’, and act decisively to protect our families and staff. This starts with farm owners, managers and key staff leading by example in making changes that workers can embrace and act on. Being proactive about safety means planning to ensure risks are identified, then actively addressing those risks. Such planning should

Fonterra’s Lichfield plant extension under construction. While most “high risk” industries such as construction and forestry are seeing marked downward trends in annual fatalities, agriculture appears to be static, sadly with another 16 people killed in on-farm accidents in 2018.

include regularly maintaining tractors and vehicles, ensuring all safety guards are in place, setting limits to vehicle speeds and requiring the use of helmets and seat-

belts. Given that 11 of the 16 deaths in 2018 involved vehicles -- eight were rollovers and three involved machinery -- these simple points above could

make a huge difference. Research shows that the use of seatbelts alone can reduce driver and front seat passenger deaths by 45% and reduce risk of injury by 50%.

Many accidents occur because resources aren’t adequate to deal with demands. That demands planning ahead and talking to staff to see that they understand how to

do a job safely. The plan should take account of changing circumstances, such as weather that might make terrain more dangerous, and perhaps substitute an indoors job. Planning should include daily discussion of changing situations on the farm, e.g. warning fellow workers about a beast that gets more aggressive when people are nearby, a new tomo in a paddock, or a nearmiss on a quad caused by changing terrain or ground conditions. Exchanging information -- a simple task -- might save a life by raising awareness. Deciding on and reinforcing positive actions on safety can help ensure everyone gets home safe at the end of each day. Doesn’t it make sense? @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

RURAL TRADER 39 NEW BUFFALO BOOTS! introductory offer LACE UP

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South Island Agricultural Field Days

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

KIRWEE MARCH 27-29, 2019

MARCH 19, 2019: ISSUE 672  www.ruralnews.co.nz

Mainlanders promise bigger and better THE ORGANISERS say this year’s South Island Agricultural Field Days (SIAFD) will be bigger and more diverse than ever. The event is well known as an opportunity for farmers and contractors to see the latest gear. However, this year it has something for the whole community, with a greatly expanded lifestyle section and a Tractor Pull competition. SIAFD takes place March 27-29 at Kirwee. It is one of the oldest and largest agricultural events in the South Island, going back 65 years. Every two years it attracts about 30,000 members of the farming public. SIAFD organising committee chairman Rodney Hadfield says interest in this year’s event has been strong and virtually all exhibition sites have been sold. “We have done a lot of work since

last time in gravelling all the laneways and improving infrastructure, but the format will be the same as always.” He says SIAFD allows farming people to network, meet customers and view new machinery. With its focus on presenting working machines, the event reinforces the relationship between farmers, manufacturers, retailers and technical experts. “The field days get the people who want to buy to come along and look,” Hadfield says. “It is an event for people who are ready to make financial decisions and spend their money. We want them to come to our event and get their field days deals.” Power Farming Canterbury dealer principal Geoff McCabe says his company has doubled the size of its site at this year’s SIAFD. “The field days are very important to us. They are a great place to show

SMELL THE DIESEL THIS YEAR will be the first time Tractor Pull has been held at SIAFD since they moved to their new home at Kirwee. DieselTune NZ is sponsoring the event and providing prizes. Tractorpull NZ Inc general manager Vaughan Coy says the first two days of the field days will be practice days and day three will be the competition day. “We will have three classes of competitors – standard, modified and pre-1985. Already a number of people have said they will bring their modified tractors from different parts of the South Island, so it should be an exciting event.” Coy says tractors in each of the three competition categories pull a sled that weighs a percentage of its weight, which means tractors of different horsepower ratings can compete against each other.

South Island Agricultural Field Days gives farmers and contractors the chance to see the latest products and exchange ideas with machinery dealers and manufacturers.

off our machinery and we showcase our new gear that people haven’t seen before,” he says. “People come from far and wide to the field days to look at machinery. They are very important for customers because they get the chance to compare all the brands.” Trevor Goodeve is with Canterbury manufacturer Taege Engineering Limited, and he says SIAFD provides an invaluable opportunity. “Because it is in our own area, we can get feedback from our customers on the machinery that we design, build and develop. This ensures we are able

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of products – from garden sculptures and outdoor furniture to jewellery, clothing, art, plants and food products. Some of the noteworthy stalls include Vege Pods, Container Pools Canterbury and Mt Hutt Pods,” she says. “Local producers including Kirwee Bees will also be participating, and we will also have a food court in the lifestyle section with Funky Monkey Bars showcasing their jungle gyms and play equipment next door.” Tickets to SIAFD are $20 per day (children are free) and can be bought at the gate. www.siafd.co.nz

See us at SIAFD

Fi n d u s a t S i t e #

262/263 & 312/313


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

2 SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS

A warm welcome to Kirwee IT IS the pleasure of the committee and I to invite you to the 68th South Island Agricultural Field Days. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the committee for their many hours of work that they put in to make these field days a success. I would also like to thank our sponsors for their continued support. This year we have upgraded our power provisions to permanent power boxes on the poles, making the site easier to set up. We have also developed approximately 2km of shingle lanes giving us better access to sites and, in the event of wet weather, better entry to setup and dis-

$

25K

The committee and I thank you for your continued support and wish

you a productive and safe year. Rodney Hadfield

2019 Chairman of the SIAFD Organising Committee

ENJOY A QUIET ONE AT MERV’S Rodney Hadfield

mantle. We will continue to enhance the site in the years to come. Once again, we are proud to have the biggest machinery demonstration exhibits in New Zealand, displaying all the latest hi-tech and innovative ideas and methods. We invite you to enjoy taking part in these dynamic and diverse field days.

SIAFD organising chairman Rodney Hadfield catches up with committee member David James from David James Engineering, who has been busy creating a silo bar for you to have a drink and a catch up with your mates during SIAFD. The bar is named after Merv Curragh who has been involved with SIAFD since it started in 1951. Curragh has only just recently retired from being the voice over the loudspeaker at the event.

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Event programme All times are approximate and subject to change DAY 1 WEDNESDAY 27 MARCH 2019 8.00am Gates Open 9.00am Judging of the Agri-Innovation entries 9.30am Cultivation demonstrations 11.00am Drilling demonstrations 11.30am Fodder-beet lifting demonstrations 12.00pm Lunch break at the Demo area 1.00pm Maize harvesting and silage demonstrations 3.00pm Feed out equipment demonstrations 3.30pm Spraying and agricultural drone demonstrations 4.30pm Announcement of the Agri-Innovations award at the main catering marquee 5.00pm Gates close All day Diesel Tune NZ Tractor Pull practice All day NZFC fencing demonstrations

DAY 2 THURSDAY 28 MARCH 2019 8.00am Gates open 9.00am NZFC South Island doubles fencing competition (see timetable below) 9.30am Cultivation demonstrations 11.00am Drilling demonstrations 11.30am Fodder-beet lifting demonstrations 12.00pm Lunch break at the demo area 1.00pm Maize harvesting and silage demonstrations 3.00pm Feed out equipment demonstrations 3.30pm Spraying and agricultural drone demonstrations 3.30pm Presentation of the awards for best small and large sites 3.35pm Presentation of the Hamish Reid Memorial Trophy for the Best Overall Site 5.00pm Gates close All day Diesel Tune NZ Tractor Pull practice All day NZFC fencing demonstrations

DAY 3 FRIDAY 29 MARCH 2019 8.00am Gates open 9.30am Cultivation demonstrations 11.00am Drilling demonstrations 11.30am Fodder-beet lifting demonstrations 12.00pm Lunch break at the demo area 1.00pm Maize harvesting and silage demonstrations 3.00pm Feed out equipment demonstrations 3.30pm Spraying and agricultural drone demonstrations 3.30pm Honda Motorbikes draw for the Kids Honda CRF50F motorbike 3.40pm Presentation of the Phillip van De Klundert Memorial Trophy for the Best Demonstration. 5.00pm Gates close on the 2019 South Island Agricultural Field Days All day Diesel Tune NZ Tractor Pull competition followed by the prizegiving All day NZFC fencing demonstrations

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS 3

Mule new farming pack horse MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE KAWASAKI Mule (multi-use light equipment) first saw the light of day in 1988 and became the generic name for what we now know as a UTV or side x side. The latest offering from the Japanese manufacturer, is the ‘farmerfocused’ Mule Pro-MX, a mid-sized machine sitting between the threeseat PRO-FX and the compact SX. Measuring 2795mm long x 1525mm wide, with a wheelbase of 2005mm, the Pro-MX should offer good mobility and manoeuvrability in tight areas, even more so with its 4.2m turning radius. The frame has ladder-style construction in high-grade square section steel, and high stress areas such as suspension mounting points are braced with high tensile plates. The construction follows the Japanese shinari principles that allow elasticity -- objects can bend then return to their original position. This means the Pro-MX has a good balance of lateral and torsional stiffness that in turn imparts good han-

The Mule Pro-MX is a ‘farmer-focused’ mid-sized UTV.

dling and rider comfort. Power is delivered by a water-cooled single cylinder 700cc engine with fuel injection pushing out a modest 45hp and 58Nm torque. Working with a CVT transmission, speed increase is linear across the whole speed range, and good engine braking imparts confidence to riders of all abilities. Elec-

trically selectable 2WD/4WD and diff lock can be accessed easily for changing conditions. First impressions of a test machine onfarm are that it’s boxy, with a wheel planted in each corner, robust flat panels and a ROPS structure that is square, unlike other brands that taper as they rise. The manufacturer says

this design gives a bigger safety cell – better if there’s a crash. Entry and exit are easy by ‘saloon style’ doors that also keep the cockpit area clean, and high enough for users to pull electric fence standards from the seat. A comfortable bench-style seat offers good support, and a tilting steer-

ing column allows adjustment for different body shapes. Multiple stowage areas in the dash, with bins under the seat and the bonnet, are a nod to dayto-day farm use, and a 12V DC socket, cup holders and quad headlights add to practicality. A turn of the key brings the engine to life, and it settles quickly and is exceptionally quiet, even as the machine moves through the rev range. Other standout features are the slick selection of the high, low or reverse positions and the finger-light electric power steering. This allows precise placement of the machine with no effort and should allow the operator to concentrate on the terrain. The double-A arm suspension set-up at each corner and twin-tubed shocks provide a supple, comfortable ride, and 270mm ground clearance imparted by the alloy wheels shod with 25-inch tyres allows you to tackle tough terrain. A large load bed, rated to carry 317kg, has gas-assisted struts to aid tipping and a useful tie down rail around its top edge.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

4 SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS

Bigger tractor means bigger gear THE MURRAY family-owned distributor FarmChief says that as tractors get more powerful there is also an opportunity to update the machinery being used. They say that in doing so farmers and contractors can reduce costs by saving time and fuel, and preserve soil structure with fewer passes. At the South Island Agricutural Field Days the company will show high-performing implements such as the Rollmax folding trailed rollers. Offered in 4.5 to 9.5m working widths, the French manufactured machines use German steel for key components such as the 70mm section axle. These implements are said to have the strongest roller rings on the market, allowing the manufacturer to offer a six-year ring warranty. They use clever geometry to maintain even weight distribution for best consolidation and germination. The units are also said to be stable on undulating ground and in the transport position. For working the tough stuff, particularly in primary situations, FarmChief’s primary discs will be exhibited, e.g. the SOL-V 32 66 23 offset discs.

Ben Parkhurst has operated a set of 4500 Express Plus Speed Discs for four seasons.

With high weight-per-blade ratios these discs can incorporate crop residues easily while opening the ground

to promote more rapid aerobic breakdown. This gets paddocks back into production more quickly. An exten-

sive range is available from 2.7 to 6m working widths. For even faster turnaround, Express

Plus Speed Discs can be used for primary or secondary cultivation. These can be used for working ground after winter feed, stubble incorporation or to break-up paddocks after compaction – typically at twice the speed of conventional discs. Available in widths from 3 to 6m, the discs can operate at up to 16km/h. The optimum disc angle achieves greater precision and accuracy, and the fitment of SKF sealed bearings reduces maintenance costs. For example, Pankhurst Contracting, Greta Valley, North Canterbury cultivates about 1000ha a year on sheep and beef properties between Amberley and the Hurunui River. Ben Pankhurst has operated a set of 4500 Express Plus Speed Discs for four seasons and says the machine has done a lot of work in harsh conditions, including winter green-feed paddocks that’ve been heavily pugged by cattle. “They work well in all soil types and on steep and rocky terrain,” he says. “Their versatility has changed the way we work the ground, at much lower running costs for us and our customers.”

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS 5

Canty woman wins finals place

Georgie Lindsay in action during the fiercelycontested Tasman regional final in Culverden earlier this momth.

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A NORTH Canterbury shepherd has made history by qualifying for the FMG Young Farmer of the Year Grand Final. Georgie Lindsay (23) won the fiercely contested Tasman regional final in Culverden earlier this month, beating seven other contestants. She’s the first woman from the region to make it to the grand final in the contest’s 51-year history. “It’s a big shock,” she said, after making her way to the stage through a cheering crowd. “I’ve had a lot of support in the lead-up to this event, especially from my

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“I’ve had a lot of support in the lead-up to this event, especially from my family and my employers.” family and my employers.” The event saw finalists from Golden Bay, Westport and across Canterbury tackle gruelling stuff including a fast-paced agri-knowledge quiz. It was Lindsay’s first time competing in a regional final. “It was a challenging competition that put us all under a lot of pressure, which was awesome,” she said. Lindsay’s win netted her $12,000 of prizes, including an XR150 Honda farm bike. She also picked up the innovation award. The Amuri Basin Young Farmers member is a shepherd at Marble Point Station, south of Hanmer Springs. The property is 2400ha and runs 3600 ewes and 380 Angus breeding cows, plus heifers. She grew up on a sheep, beef and deer farm in Dipton and has a B.AgSc (Hons) from Lincoln University. Jonny Brown (28), an assistant manager on a 1000 cow dairy farm at Rakaia, came second. He was named the most tech-savvy contestant and picked up the prize for outstanding leadership. Alex Knowles (26), an agri manager for Ravensdown, won third and the award for championing environmental best practice. Lincoln University student Peter O’Connor (20), from Westport, won the award for showcasing food production. Georgie Lindsay is one of only five women nationally to ever qualify for the FMG Young Farmer of the Year Grand Final. This year’s grand final is in Hawke’s Bay in July.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

6 SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS NORTH CARPARK

DIESEL TUNE NZ TRACTOR PULL GATE D

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588

587

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TransDiesel Ltd 590

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Stuart Tarbotton Contractors Ltd

Canterbury Woodchip Supplies Ltd 491

490

Blackwells Isuzu Te Pari Products Ltd

Westpac

Containers and More Ltd

488

487

Sunshine Solar

Top Soils & Golden Bay Dolomite

583

582

581

533

532

AdvanceQuip

Welshy JEL Kennels Contracting

489

Blackwells Holden

Rangiora Toyota

Goldpine Industries Ltd 486

485

Farmquip

Silver Fern Farms

Solar Pumps/ Ruralrpm

Lincoln University

484

483

482

Laing Properties Limited Southfuels

580

531

530 Peter Munro Commercial s Ltd SEBCO Fuel Rabobank Storage Systems Ltd 481 480 Heiniger

Plumbing World

627 626 PlaceMakers Cranford St & Kaiapoi

579

578

529

528

577

440

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438

Treetech Specialist Treecare Limited Dan Cosgrove 2014 Ltd

Canterbury Stoneguard s Ltd

437 McCarthy Contracting Ltd

Bank of New Zealand

436 Property Brokers Hastings McLeod PPP Onfarm Industries Solutions/O Ltd nfarm Data

435

434

ANZ Bank

BX Foods

Mackay Bailey

433 Leech/ Tavendale

432 The Chainman Ltd

431 RX Plastics

429

Great Lakes Motor Distributors

191

190

189

188

J W Neill Holdings Limited

476

475

428

427

0

140

Bromar Feeders

139

Shelfmart 2013 Ltd

138

Parkvale Speckle Park

187

137

Optimise Pelletised

186

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Yara Crop Nutrition

185

135

DJI Ferntech NZ

511

555

Demo area - Maize (Pioneer)

510

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Duncan Ag Cochranes

Allen Custom Drills

Giltrap Engineering

Laneway

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Orion New Zealand Limited

Fire and Emergency NZ

First Aid

Toilet

Agricom

Synlait Milk Ltd

Environmen t Technology

Heartland Sheds / Darfield ITM

Premium Stock Yards Ruralco NZ Ltd

512 Cookes

556

Nevada NZ

Rainer Irrigation Limited

Frizzell Ltd

Hyundai New Zealand

Drummond & Etheridge - John Deere

Origin Agroup

Te Pirita Enterprises

FarmChief Machinery

371

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Dairy Cooling Solutions

Denis Cunningha m Ltd

253

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Lochiel Engineering 2000 Ltd

234

233

Martin Bruce

Davey Water Products

C-Dax Limited

Wallace Group LP

Fonterra Co-operative Group Ltd

SEATING

282

281

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232

231 Wrangler Ltd, The

230

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227 Calder Stewart Constructio n Ltd

Molloy Fertilizer NZ Agriculture Ltd Ltd

Landex

184

183

182

133

132

Precision Farming Ltd Ballance Agri-Nutrients

Allied Petroleum

DogMaster Trainers NZ

181

Numat Group

131

180

130

Canterbury Polythene

Irrigate NZ Ltd

275

274

0 225

179

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129

128

0

Hanham Concrete

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272

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224

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Irrimax

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172

0

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123

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Dairycool Ltd

Tru-Test Dairy

270

IXOM Farmguard

0 220

Polaris NZ PGG Wrightson

Rural Building Solutions Ltd 269

LIC

0

267

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0 121

Bay Irrigation Ltd

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118

Corkill Systems Ltd

Frank PKS NZ Ltd

Crystalyx NZ

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264

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Agri Optics NZ Ltd

0 214

0 115

CLAAS Harvest Centre

Agriline Ltd

263

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Hardi Australia FARMEC

Demo area - Barley

JJ Limited Mimico

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Tuatara Structures

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Survus Consultants

Agrilife Ltd

Landpro Limited

Hydratorq Ltd

Nilfisk Kerrick

154

Fieldmaster Ag

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Innovative Cooper Tires Technologies New Zealand

TOILETS

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Ag Leader

Balewrap NZ Ltd

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Soil Aeration Specialists Are you suffering from:

• Hay and silage being trampled into pasture and wasted? • Surface ponding of pastures?

Pre-Rippers

265

216

GATE B

Aerators

Carrfields Limited Paul Wilkins Tractors LTD

268

Demo area - Fodderbeet

Lyndon Harrows

Tulloch Farm Machines

The Feeder Veehof Agri-Tech Leader Prattley Industries Ltd TechniPharm Group Dairy Imports Ltd Services Ltd Company Limited McIntosh Morrifield James All Seasons B J Scarlett Ltd Transpread & Scannell Bros Security MyMilk Ltd Greenhous Engineering Hay Feeding Engineers Ltd Ltd. es Ltd 171 170 169 168 167 166 165 164

Milk Bar

0

124

Enerpro Feeds Ltd

Advantage Plastics

221

IS Dam Lining

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Agvance Nutrition

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Tokoroa Bailey Engineering Engineering 2014 Ltd 174 173

175 0

126

Waikato Milking Systems 271

Riverdown Steel

REL Group

176

TOILETS

CARRY-MATE

Engineering Woodstock Solutions Quarries Limited

273

0

226

Stronghold Trading Ltd

FencePro Postdrivers

Ngahiwi Farms

Bell-Booth Ltd

276

WaterForce

DeLaval Ltd

Advantage Kliptank Ltd Feeders Ltd

Ravensdown Ltd FOOD Malvern Lions Club

C-Dax Limited

Glassey Glassey Performanc Contracting Contracting e Products Ltd

134

513

Honda Motorbikes

557

0

426

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Alpaca Association

514 COMMITTE E ONLY

558

372

Rural Liquid Lysaght Fertilisers AllightSykes NZ Limited Marine Ltd and GreenMan 285 284 283

Poulfert Limited

515

OFFICE 477

0 Treetoppin g.co.nz

516

559

323

Daytech Engineering LTD

235

517

MAIN CATERING TENT AND BAR

560

373

UBB

David James BA Pumps and Sprayers engineering

518

561

324

SPM South Pacific Meats/AFF CO

236

519

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374

Gluyas Nissan

237

520

563

325

Ironman 4x4

238

521 Parents Tent

564

375

331 Wharb Ltd

239

522 Hold

565

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523 NC Rural Support

566

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333

241

524 AgriDrone Solutions

567

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334

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Hold

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Hold

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EuroAgri Imports

330

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Norwood / JGT Coombridge Industries Ltd | Agtrailer

380

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Agbits

575

Hold

Think Water Canterbury

Newlands Group Ltd

341

0

Aqua Filter

Chapman Agriculture

391

Proway Livestock Equipment 289

Varicool

Croplands Equipment

Taege Manufacturing

381

Chch Mitsubishi

430 McMullan Enterprises Ltd

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited See programme for list of subletters in the Farmlands Site

Read Milking Systems

COVERED SITES

478

0 441 Commercial Vehicle Centre Ltd

Rata Industries Group Ltd

FMG

Gilchrist Brothers Ltd

RD Petroleum 479

George Henry & Co. Ltd

Pump Systems

576

527 526 Agricultural HydroServic Consulting es (A

Avon City Ford

Corteva Agriscience

Independant Grass Trials

Forest Quip

639 WoodMizer NZ Ltd.

PUGGED PADD OCKS CAN REDUCE PASTURE GRO WTH UP TO 60%!

THE BEST OF 4X4 AND FARM TYRES, ALL ON ONE SITE!

Heavy Duty Auto Reset

Moleplough

DON’T PUT GOOD FERTILISERS ON COMPACTED SOIL WHICH CAN’T ABSORB IT If your soil can’t support 15cm root growth and good worm population check for compaction, you could need aeration. In dollar terms, what would 20% production increase mean to your yearly turnover? YOUR GREATEST ASSET IS THE SOIL YOU FARM - DON’T DESTROY IT!

BALEAGE TIPPER

SUBSOILER

Transports and stands wrapped round bales on end for storage Now available as a single or dual unit • Suitable for medium HP tractors • 3PL mounted (no front axle stress) • Bale tipped in one easy movement • No need to reposition bale before tipping

Contact us for your local dealer...

For ripping deep pans and laying alkathene pipe up to 50mm • Optional chute • Standard & heavy models

SEE US AT THE SIAFD

Maitland RD5, Gore SITE Ph/Fax: 03-207 1837 167 Mobile: 027-628 5695 www.jamesengineering.co.nz

Call in and see us at the Southern Field Days in Kirwee and find out how the right choice of tyres can make your job easier.

See us at

Site 734

Or find a dealer: Tel. 0508 140 140 www.agtyres.co.nz www.agtyres.co.nz

To Dunsandel

half sites

NORTH CARPARK


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS 7

Big discounts on spray gear TO CELEBRATE 50 years as a leader in spraying technology, European farm machinery manufacturer Amazone and its distributor Claas Harvest Centre are offering big discounts across its range during the autumn field days. All purchasers will receive a discount of $160 per metre on booms fitted with the company’s AmaSelect nozzle selection system or $80 per metre on booms fitted with AmaSwitch nozzle switching system. The company says this will allow farmers to cost-effectively upgrade to precision spraying systems. The two systems are said to help reduce spray costs by up to 10% depending on the field size, working width and the number of part-width sections used. Using the AmaSwitch alone will reduce overlap and chemical costs by 5%, with section control down to 50cm increments. AmaSelect is an electronic control system that automatically selects the best nozzle for the operating conditions. It consists of a series of ‘pods’, each holding four individually controlled nozzles positioned at 50 cm intervals along the boom. The operator enters the optimum pressure

range for each nozzle type into the Isobus terminal, from where AmaSelect automatically switches over to a smaller or bigger nozzle to best match the desired application rate and forward speed. AmaSwitch is an electronic switching system that allows individual nozzles to be opened or closed. It uses a manually actuated three-nozzle body fitted with an electric on/off valve.

See us at Site 128

➤ Work safer, smarter with a Carry-Mate ➤ Transport, deploy, retrieve and store your electric fence standards ➤ No more lost standards or broken reels ➤ Versatile, can be used and off of vehicle CONTACT

Doug Harrison

021-246 7113 e: sales@carry-mate.co.nz w: www.carry-mate.co.nz

Used in combination with Amazone GPSSwitch section control technology, it switches off individual nozzles in 50 cm part-width sections as the unit approaches headlines or obstacles. An intermediate kit enables nozzles to be fitted at 25cm intervals for high volume application or the target height to be reduced to less than 50 cm. The AmaSelect and AmaSwitch are designed to complement the

DUS high pressure recirculation system found in all Amazone sprayers. The constant pressure recirculation system means spray lines are always full, pressurised and ready to spray over the entire working width. The mixed spray solution is constantly in circulation, even when the nozzles have been switched off, preventing deposits, blockages and segregation within the spray line. – Mark Daniel

FROM THE COMPANY THAT UNDERSTANDS MEAL FEEDING ❱❱ Meal feedings systems for rotary, herringbone and robotic sheds ❱❱ Molasses systems ❱❱ PKE & Pellet Systems ❱❱ Augers ❱❱ Mills (new generation) ❱❱ Mineral dispensers ❱❱ Dust kits ❱❱ Air Fluidiser kits ❱❱ Teat sealed trailers PHILL SHAW Operation/Sales Manager Ph 03-347 3171 or 0275-702 772 phill@permbrand.co.nz

See us at SITE

720


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

8 SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS

Bold new face for Holden ADAM FRICKER

HOLDEN IS putting SUVs front and centre of its plan for the future. It’s a case of giving the people what they want and other brands have done the same over recent years. The ‘hero’ of Holden’s range of SUVs is the US-built Acadia, which starts life as a GMC. The car wears its American-ness with pride. And fair enough too – it looks great without being ostentatious. With the ZB Commodore selling in low numbers, this could be just the car to head up the Holden range in a market that traditionally favours large, six-cylinder petrol cars. It uses the same 3.6L V6 petrol and 9-speed automatic that you’ll find in the Commodore -- a smooth and powerful combination. It’s big with proper seats for seven people (not just kids). And it’s extremely quiet and comfortable. Size, power, space and comfort – all the hallmarks of the traditional big Aussie cars we all used to aspire to. Rural News drove the top-spec

LTZ-V AWD for a week and it did the job of commuter, family wagon, load hauler and open-road tourer all with total ease. Like similar large SUVs designed for the USA (Highlander and CX-9, for example), the Acadia is built for comfort rather than track days at Hampton Downs. However, it is nicely balanced and handles a windy road well, reverting to understeer only when you’re really pushing it. The LTZ-V has adaptive shocks and the ride is always plush but never wobbly and unsettled. A bit of finetuning for Australian roads has made the Acadia perfectly set up for ours. This range-topper is packed with features to make it more comfortable in the cabin and safer on the road. Plenty of active safety technology like autonomous braking and lane keep assist – all clever stuff and getting less intrusive and more effective all the time. The traffic sign recognition worked a treat, flashing the speed limit of any given stretch of road onto the dashboard. No excuses, officer. Boat owners might like the hitch

South Island Agricultural Field Days SITE 419-420

The Acadia is the ‘hero’ of Holden’s new SUV range.

guidance feature that not only uses the rear view camera to help you line up the draw-bar but also lets you check on it while driving. With power and torque of 231kW and 367Nm it has the grunt to tow, although braked towing capacity is limited to 2000kg. If you overcompensated for something and

bought a big 3-tonne boat, you’ll need a Holden Trailblazer instead. The Acadia is a big vehicle, so less suited to city car parks perhaps, but otherwise an ideal car for Kiwi families. It comes with a threeyear/100,000km warranty and threeyear free service plan.

It also comes with plenty of attitude, a rare commodity among modern family wagons. If the LTZ-V’s $71,990 price tag is out of your reach, you can still get into a 2WD LT for $49,990. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS 9

Footwear biosecurity A hand-brush can be used to shift stubborn debris while using the integrated handle in the lid for support. An integral power-spray applicator draws disinfectant from a 3L reservoir and uses a spray tip with enough pressure to shift debris.

The body contains storage for disinfectant, gloves, wipes and hand sanitiser. For set-up the unit is connected by a 13-15mm hose-tail, from where liquid is directed upwards into the brush assembly. From here it cascades over and under the

footwear, whose motion causes the brush to rotate. It’s also designed for use without a water source, by using the integral reservoir, carried in a vehicle boot; this can double as a footbath if used with an optional integral disinfectant mat.

The Jackson Cube is an all-inone boot cleaning and disenfecting system.

03-215 8558 • info@hecton.co.nz • www.hecton.co.nz •

SHEEP HANDLING EQUIPMENT

See us at South Island Ag Field Days Site 687

TRU-TEST WEIGHING

INCLUDES 2 ANTIBACKING WINGS

INCLUDES 2 ANTIBACKING WINGS

HECTON SHEEP HANDLER WITH SHORT RACE

markd@ruralnews.co.nz

FARM BIOSECURITY raises questions about rural professionals visiting farms then needing to clean their footwear. The Jacson Cube, a compact, lightweight, allin-one boot cleaning and disinfecting system folds up for the boot of a car or ute. It’s the idea of business partners Rusty Knutson and Jacqui Humm of Jacson3, developed over the last two years. The idea emerged when Knutson, collecting calves for export, saw many farmers struggling to restrict the spread of diseases such as rotavirus and cryptosporidium between mobs of animals.

Thorough cleaning and disinfecting of boots on entry and exit from each property was obviously difficult to do well with just a basic bucket, brush, and spray bottle combo. So came the Jacson Cube for cleaning and disinfecting lots of shoes. It’s made from heavy polypropylene; the three main components -- body, lid and car-boot tray/footbath -- weigh 10kg empty and 15kg when filled with water or disinfectant. It takes one minute to set up and two to pack away. A rotating brush is mounted on an aluminium spindle which is mounted to a rhino-plastic grating that keeps debris and contaminants away from the body.

MARK DANIEL

The Hecton Sheep Handler is available in both manual and air operated options and with minimal adjustments can handle a wide range of stock sizes (ewes & lambs can run together).

MOWERS MAKE THE CUT NEW CLAAS Disco Move 3600 and 3200 mowers, with mowing widths of 3.4 and 3m respectively, 1m of vertical travel and 30 degrees lateral movement, allowing them to work efficiently and safely in rough paddocks. This is a feature of their highly manoeuvrable headstock that allows the mower to move independently from the tractor front linkage. Likely to appeal to contractors, the Move has 600mm of travel upwards and 400mm down, making it ideal for uneven fields, and the ability to pivot up to 30 degrees laterally improves its ability to follow contours or swing backwards to avoid obstacles. The headstock includes several features proven on existing Disco models, including Active Float integrated hydraulic suspension and the low pivot point from the Profil range. Active Float eliminates the need for suspension spring coupling points on the tractor and suspension pressure can be adjusted during operation using a single-acting hydraulic service. Coupled directly to the tractor front linkage or by using an a-frame, the front linkage remains fixed during operation, with the mower raised and lowered via integrated hydraulics. Convenient Kennfixx hydraulic couplings are fitted as standard, on the left or right side of the headstock to suit the tractor, and the suspension pressure gauge can be mounted similarly for optimum visibility.

Stock are held in a comfortable position during operating allowing full access to the underside of the animal, no heavy lifting is required and the operation is easy on the back. The Hecton Sheep Handler is a quick, safe and efficient way of handling stock with minimal physical effort.

The fastest most versatile sheep handler on the market. The Hecton Sheep Handler is ideal for dagging, crutching (half & full belly), foot trimming, vaccinating, wool sampling, mouthing, eye wigging and more.

HECTON LEAD UP RACE

USE LEFT OR RIGHT HANDED WITH REVERSIBLE CLAMP

CHOOSE A LEFT OR RIGHT HANDED DAGGING RACE OPTION

INCLUDES: • Clamp & Draft Unit • Dagging Race • Stands

The Hecton Stock Worker is a fast and efficient way to take care of a wide range of those stock handling tasks, with proven solid construction, the Hecton Stock Worker holds your stock still while performing various tasks such as dagging, mouthing, ear tagging, capsuling, drenching, inoculating, 3 way drafting, and more With the addition of load bars and tag reading equipment the Hecton Stock Worker is a very versatile cost-effective unit which is suitable for both sheep and goats.

FLAT DECK ROAD TRAILER LOADING RAMP Hecton Products have a strong reputation for building robust trailers that can take a lot of punishment. Our flat deck road trailers are constructed from quality galvanised steel, heavy duty components and road ready. Completed with sides, front and rear tailgates, braked, jockey wheel, lights and fittings, WOF and rego. Crates available and customised to the size you want.

Available as single or double, 5.7m long easily reaches third deck. Braked winch. Galvanised box section construction with Colorsteel sides. Safety rail installed on walkway. Removeable drawbar. Easily moved around the farm or between properties.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

10 SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS

Three-metre drill joins offering MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

CLEVER TECH TO HELP PROFITS WAIKATO MILKING Systems reports plenty of interest from South Island farmers looking for innovative and integrated management gear to increase efficiency and productivity. South Island sales manager Mark Craig says he expects a good farmer turnout at Kirwee, looking at systems for gathering herd information which they can translate into higher production and greater profit. Since its introduction in late 2018, the WMS NaviGate dairy management system has attracted interest from farmers globally, offering insights

which enable greater efficiency and production and easily retro-fitted into most farm dairy set-ups. Meanwhile, new milk cooling regulations require farmers to review this aspect of their dairy shed to ensure compliance. Cooling milk is said to account for up to 30% of the total energy costs of a farm dairy. For dairy upgrades, WMS will be able to discuss options including electronic cup removers, pulsation and cluster options, power saving variable speed vacuum and milk pumps drives.

THE LATEST addition to the Power Farming drill stable is the Aitchison Airpro AP 30-24T. Based on the key features of the successful 6m machine, the drill retains the same layout and drilling units as the Seedmatic range, but has a new airtransport system and e-drive metering control. Offering a 24-row layout with 5-inch row spacing, the unit also incorporates a 550mm frame stagger to allow the passage of trash or debris. Up front, a mechanically adjustable drawbar allows the machine to be

pulled level, irrespective of tractor drawbar height, with a hydraulic option if required. As with the Seedmatic range, a front gang of individually sprung

SCIMITAR EQUIPMENT Strong, durable, robust machines LANDLEVELLERS

TIP TRAILERS

RUBBER ROLLER

Contact us on 06-370 1212 www.agtec.co.nz Agtec Machinery – home of Scimitar Equipment

Come and see us at the South Island Agricultural Field Days March 27-29 SITE 725

12-inch disc openers give a lead in for the seeding tines. The layout allows the unit to cope with turf or trash and leave a clean, neat slot for seeding, using hydraulic depth control that is adjustable on the move. Seeding tines, with double-coil springs for positive penetration in difficult conditions, carry an inverted-T point. This creates a tilth and a trench into which the seed and fertiliser is placed. Tines carry seed and fertiliser tubes mounted on the same bracket to ensure accurate placement in the trench. Depth gauge wheels use threaded adjustment for accurate depth control, while oversized transport wheels allow for quick headland turns or moves between jobs. Drill hoppers use a split configuration, allowing a central access platform for safe, easy loading. The platform is accessed via steps at one

end and has a drop-down ramp to access trailers or ute beds at the other. An optional HIAB hydraulic crane can also be specified for easy loading of big bags. Air flow is produced by a hydraulically driven fan, easily adjusted for volume. This can ‘feather’ air flow to ensure small or light seeds are not blown from the seeding trench. At the rear of the machine, an ear roller system consolidates across the full working width. The Aitchison drill controller enables control of three seed boxes and calibration of all metering devices using the integral AutoCal function. The system can also memorise calibration settings for multiple seed types, offer on-the-move seed rate variation and store job data including customer, farm, field, seed type, area covered and quantity used – all downloadable to a USB drive.

We are proud to be part of SIAFD and support our South Island farmers with our New Zealand made dairy hot water cylinders. We are proud to supply our local South Island dairy farms with hot water cylinders that provide reliable and significant amounts of hot water for wash down requirements. With electricity costs a major concern, our dairy hot water cylinders are designed and built to ensure the best insulation and heat retention possible in the harshest New Zealand conditions. Using copper or stainless steel barrels and high quality insulation, our dairy cylinders will reliably heat water above 85 degrees for cleaning and wash downs in the milking sheds. We can manufacture capacities up to 1,500 litres. We provide standard sizes to fit most applications and we can also make other sizes on request. For more information, contact us on 03 389 9500 or visit our website www.superheat.co.nz for your local dairy merchant

superheat

Dairy Hot Water Specialists


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS 11

Tractors for hire MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

NORWOOD HAS opened a new division called Norwood Hire, offering short-medium term hire contracts on tractors and equipment. The service will suit contractors, farmers and anyone needing to relieve

seasonal pressures without the cost of buying more gear. And hirers will get to use the latest agricultural technology. All hire contracts include scheduled servicing costs as part of a competitive hourly rate. “The hire division is an opportunity for us

to provide our customers with the best machinery, without requiring the financial commitment of a traditional purchase,” says Norwood Hire manager Greg Moore. “Hiring also allows them to access the latest machinery and technology, letting them get the

job done.” At the conclusion of the hire contract, the machinery can be purchased from Norwood with up to 100% of hiring costs to be deducted from the selling price. See the ‘hire equipment’ page at www.norwood. co.nz

See at South Island Field Days

AUTOMATION FOR TEAT CARE HAS ARRIVED AN INTELLIGENT new Auto Mix + Spray unit from GEA’s FIL division is said to set a gold standard in teat spraying, providing farmers with an accurately mixed solution applied ‘fresh’ at every milking. Accurately mixing and using teat spray to combat seasonal differences is the critical factor in maintaining teat condition, says FIL national manager Colin May. “Farmers might be using the best products, but teat spray solutions can vary depending on who does the mixing and their understanding of what’s required to combat seasonal differences,” he says. “Most teat sprays suggest a mix ration of maybe 1:6 or 1:9; that can be confusing, and adding extra emollient adds yet another level of complexity”. May says the Auto Mix + Spray unit offers 97% accuracy, so removing the human error and guesswork inherent in manual mixing. FIL can also help farmers tailor a teat care plan including recommended mix rates to meet seasonal changes. These rates can be loaded and locked into the unit’s memory for daily use until a change of ration is required. When environmental conditions change, or a deterioration in teat condition is detected, the unit’s settings can be altered in single percentage points from 5% - 20% to counter changing patterns of teat condition. Being pressurised, the system can be retrofitted into a wet-it or wand system, an ambic system or onplatform spraying systems (such as iPUD) or installed as a standalone unit in the dairy shed.

Lightweight portability. Heavyweight performance. S200

Portable Solar Fence Energizer Convenient, fully integrated portable power. Animal control on your block of land is straight forward with Gallagher’s new simple and convenient solution - the S200 Portable Solar Fence Energizer. With no mains power required, these all-in-one, plug and play, portable Energizers give reliable stock control for up to 8ha or 20km of fence line.

0800 731 500 www.gallagher.com

Norwood Hire is now open for business.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

12 SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS

Post driving made easy MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

FENCEPRO IS well known for its range of post drivers to suit all types of operation -basic farm-spec machines to high-end units for contractors who work in the toughest environments. The latest offering from the Palmerston North company is the Mule Series V, developed from an idea to make post drivers easy to fit to a wide range of vehicles. Besides easy fitting, the design brief was to maximise the drop speed of the block, eliminate rope whip and use standard 0.5 inch QRC couples on the pressureand-return lines to make plumbing simple. This latter point brought a challenge: as the hammer block descends it needs to displace a large volume

of oil on the return side of the hydraulic circuit. This usually means that standard 0.5 inch couplers will not let oil pass quickly enough, so restricting the falling speed of the block. To overcome this issue, Fencepro has designed the Versatile Hydraulic System, an ingenious hydraulic circuit that requires only a small amount of oil to pass down the return line as the block descends. This allows the block to fall at maximum velocity, so increasing driving power. But this leads to another complication: a free-falling block suffers from rope whip, an issue that has safety implications and causes premature rope wear. Usually, a slight hydraulic restriction stops the rope from

coming loose, but this tempers the driving force of the hammer. To counter this Fencepro devised

Mule Series V ensures post driving isn’t all brute force.

Activeblock, which effectively eliminates rope whip by taking up any rope slack after the post or a rock spike has been hit, so eliminating both issues. The system can be fitted to the maker’s Mule or Ultra series drivers and is recommended for Versatile series machines because the system increases the problem of rope whip. Note that the Mule units can be ordered with or without the Versatile system. While plumbing post drivers to farm tractor hydraulic systems is a simple task, the same can’t be said for excavators or dozers. Tractors usually have a free flow return port, but excavators require a separate high-flow case drain set-up that can be costly.

PUSHING BOUNDARIES HEINIGER NEW Zealand released its Icon FX shearing handpiece late February to catch the regional field days and the Golden Shears event in Masterton. R&D and testing will see the FX pushing the boundaries of shearing, thanks to the Swiss quality, precision and reliability in its Icon brand, the company says. The Icon FX stands out with its bright orange colour, flock and back-joint cover. It will sit alongside the current Icon Cyclone to offer shearers more choice in a new handpiece. A redesigned, slimmer barrel provides better handpiece balance and offers increased comfort and ergonomics to reduce strain. It also has superior manoeuvrability, control and grip. Heiniger says the lighter FX requires less effort and time to start and stop each blow, helping users to shear more efficiently and maximise their tallies. www.heiniger. co.nz

SUB SURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION INCREASE YIELD IMPROVE QUALITY GREAT WATER USE EFFICIENCY REDUCED NITROGEN LEACHING

MEET US AT SIAFD SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD

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26/02/2019 3:08:54 PM


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS 13

Fire tractor a hit ALTHOUGH IT’S painted like any fire truck and has flashing lights and a siren, a Case IH Farmall tractor named Kahu isn’t fighting fires. Instead, its Fire and Emergency New Zealand’s (FENZ) way of starting conversations about fire safety, developing greater resilience, fire prevention and volunteer sustainability in rural

industries. National risk reduction manager Rob Saunders says the tractor signals FENZ’s intention to reduce the risk of fire in rural homes, buildings and vegetation. “It’s a tool to help engage with the community in a fun and unique way. Kahu has been traveling the country to appear at numerous com-

munity events.” Unveiled at National Fieldays 2018 at the FENZ site, the tractor got a great response from children and adults alike. The site also had a burntout tractor, and the two machines led to discussions about maintenance, spotting bird nests and

accessibility and water availability for firefighters. Kahu was at lots of events last year including the Poverty Bay A&P show in Gisborne, Omokoroa School where it was used to help educate children about fire safety, and Turangi for the annual Christmas parade.

T H G I R T DO I ’LL BE RIGHT’ NOT ‘Sg SoHlutiEons has the milk cooling equipment tions. Dairy Coolin with the new regula y pl m co u yo lp he to

WHY A DCS MILK COOLING SYSTEM IS THE BEST INVESTMENT IN YOUR FARM European design and quality - Over 50 years experience in developing milk cooling tanks and one of Europe’s leading Dairy Cooling Systems producers for the needs of farmers around the world – from Mexico to Japan, from Russia to South Africa, Australia and New Zealand.

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Horizontal Milk Cooling Tanks with Iced Water Cooling – 50% more effective in cooling the milk compared to standard direct expansion systems without any risk of freezing the milk due to the water temperature of +0.5 > 1.0degC. Highly suitable for AMS (Robotic Farming Systems) with low milk flows – no risk of freezing the milk.

Making dirty jobs simple THE UNPLEASANT job of dagging sheep got a whole lot easier four years ago with the launch of the cordless Handypiece. Despite primarily for sheep work, it’s also working for cattle farmers in trail trimming and branding preparation, plus work with goats, alpaca and deer. Four years later there comes the Handypiece Pro, weighing about 100 grams less than a standard handpiece. It has a brushless motor that limits heat build-up and variable speed control adjustable between 2400 and 3500 rpm. The new motor now means the battery lasts even longer, crutching 300-400 sheep with one charge. Dagging, crutching and trimming cows’ tails goes well at a mid-point speed of 2700 rpm, and for a superior finish while shearing you can dial up the maximum speed to improve quality. To alpaca shearers this means a traditional handpiece that is slim to hold, with speed control that can be reduced to that of a clipper. Supplied ready to go to work in a carry bag, the kit includes a lithium battery and charger, belt, a holster and pouch made from HD leather, plus a 5m cord. Handypiece servicing and repairs support purchasers. – Mark Daniel

Energy Saving with Packo Ice Builders (PIB’s) – thanks to the ice energy store build-up during night time hours, a smaller refrigeration unit can be installed, plus the potential savings of off-peak power rates. Water Saving with PIB’s – bore water pre-cooling is not necessary with the correctly sized PIB. This is ideal for drought prone regions or where water supplies are restricted.

PIB 230 - 370

Improved Milk quality through Snap Chilling = potentially a higher return adding PROFITS to the farm. For 30yrs Eurotec has been supplying the NZ Refrigeration Industry with leading Global Brands. The only NZ supplier of this technology providing nationwide coverage and After Sales Support with branches in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch with over 30 Approved Refrigeration Installers throughout the country. Check out the DCS website www.dairycoolingsolutions.nz, talk to your refrigeration contractor, and come and see DCS/Packo milk cooling technologies operating at the South Island Agricultural Field Days 2019.

PIB 25-160

ND H ISLA DAYS SOUTURAL FIELD LT

U AGRIC

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

14 SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS

Innovation, sound advice on offer MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

STRONG COMMODITY prices, good grass growth and the opportunity to buy the latest farm gear means Gallagher staff are expecting a strong turnout to their stand at the South Island Agricultural Field Days. “Our fencing technology is what we are best known for, delivering simple, affordable solutions to fencing challenges,” explains Gallagher national sales manager Darrell Jones.

“As an example, the Insulated Line Post fence system offers a lightweight, durable fencing option, enhanced over longer runs with the Electric Fence Dropper that will be available for the first time. “Suitable for multiwire sheep, goat and cattle fences – including the Insulated Line Post and any wood or steel post system – the Electric Fence Droppers enable post spacing to be extended, lowering fence costs.” Farmers seeking

remote solar power for their electric fence

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energiser will get to see the company’s entire solar energiser range, including the re-launched S200 Portable Solar Energiser. “With the S200, we have made a clever piece of kit even smarter, reengineering the system to enhance battery life and provide an effective power delivery regard-

It is simple and compact, combining the EID reader hardware into the scales themselves. The M.bovis outbreak is said to have prompted more farmers to buy Gallagher’s hand held readers and couple them to the scales, providing valuable management data on weight gains and stock performance.

Mower speeds up cutting time ZANE WYATT farms 240ha effective at Hari Hari with his wife Tania, milking 500 Jersey Friesian-cross cows. The arrival of a new Pottinger NovaCat Alpha Motion 301 front mower will slash his mowing times, a bonus given the changeable weather conditions in the region. Wyatt bought his first Pottinger mower – a NovaDisc 305 rear mower -- in April 2018.

“I chose it for its good reputation and price,” he says. “And the machine has been faultless, bulletproof and easy to put on and take off the tractor.” Because of the performance of the rear mower, Wyatt added a NovaCat Alpha Motion 301 front mower, taking delivery in October and having it installed by the dealer. He says it’s “really

KEEP YOUR DOG SAFE

See us at South Island Field Days SITE L42

less of daylight conditions and battery status,” Jones says. With sheep and livestock prices at near record highs, the Gallagher TWR weigh scale range will appeal to farmers: it has an easy-to-use, intuitive menu which is easily followed on the smart-phone like display screen.

with

0800 100 091

Hari-Hari dairy farmer Zane Harris says the arrival of the new Pottinger NovaCat Alpha Motion 301 front mower will slash his mowing times.

quick” and easy to use. “I knocked over 20 acres in two hours yesterday without pushing too hard,” he said. “A tractor and rear mower would take me nearer six hours to get 20 acres done. With this being our first frontmower we are amazed at how well it travels. Output is huge with no blockages, even in a very thick crop.” The NovaCat Alpha Motion 301 has 3m working width and can mow up to 3ha/hour. Its suspension has 500mm of vertical travel and inclination angles of 12 degrees upwards and 9 degrees downwards

to prevent the cutter bar from damaging the sward. The design allows the guide arms to respond actively to changes in terrain and to the mounting frame itself, resulting in the cutter bar tilting upwards over bumps and downwards into hollows. A rounded, low profile front edge lets the cutter bar move smoothly over the ground and separate the crop from the sward. At the same time, the mower uses the rounded conical surfaces of the mower discs to let the crop flow smoothly and uniformly, for maximum capacity regardless of conditions.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS 15

Tackles the toughest beasts MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

WAYNE COFFEY designed the original Combi Clamp sheep handler 16 years ago while managing a hill country sheep property east of Taihape. Combi Clamp’s cattle handling history began with the import of the Ritchie Auto head yoke, from the same Scottish company that manufactures the sheep handling equipment. Unlike anything else on offer in the New Zealand market, it solved many cattle handling issues. However, long lead times from the UK resulted in obtaining a licence to manufacture the head yokes in Palmerston North. Today, the business is still owned and operated by the original family, who manufacture all products in Manawatu. With cattle weighing becoming the norm and the need to improve general health and safety for cattle handling, the need for a quality cattle crush featured strongly in Combi Clamp’s plans. Bringing together practical ideas from farmers with clever engi-

neering, the Combi Clamp is designed to be user-friendly. It has automatic catching, controlled forward and rearward release of the animal, automatic resetting to catch the next animal and safe access to all areas of the animal. Made in NZ to high standards using quality materials, units are hotdipped galvanised. Standard units have a 75 x 50 x 5mm main frame, a Corten steel floor and rubber flooring for a long life and quiet operation to reduce noise and keep cattle calm. They also have an auto catch/auto reset head bail, heavy-duty hinges to resist sagging, heavy-duty slam catches on gates and easy access for lubrication. Top-access gates on both sides of the crush allow access to the animal’s upper body and back; these work with split gates on both sides of the unit. Options include a rear remote for the head bail and an offside gate opener for drafting out of the opposite side from the operator. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Combi Clamp cattle handler.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

16 SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS

50 years of experience PPP INDUSTRIES Ltd, New Zealand-owned company, has been designing, manufacturing and installing innovative agricultural equipment for at least 50 years. It installed NZ’s first in-shed dairy feed system in 1967 and has since been improving its products with new features and the latest technology. The systems made by PPP are commissioned NZ-wide by dedicated installers, with sales support from dealers from Kaitaia to Invercargill. Standard herring bone (HB) feed systems are equipped with the new Evolution dispenser or the Experto Feeder. Both systems can be optioned with mineral or molasses add-ons. And the Experto system also allows for the integration of EID readings in HB sheds. Rotary systems come with highback, stainless feed trays with antirobbing bars and tray supports. These can also be fitted with platform dispensers for feed and mineral add-ons. PPP offers a wide range of gen-

An Evolution Dispenser set up in a shed.

eral spare parts for most feed systems, off the shelf and at competitive prices. Whether you’re milling for small-scale farming operations or commercially, the Skiold disc mill system can be configured for any size operation. A key advantage is the ability to mill grain to a higher standard than other systems, and

less maintenance than on traditional roller mills. To dispense minerals to stock accurately and effectively, an inline or platform mineral dispenser system can replace drenching and paddock dusting, saving time and money. PPP systems are available to handle powders or pellets; addi-

FARM MACHINERY STRENGTH / QUALITY / PERFORMANCE SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS SEE US AT SITE

169

tion rates are from 30g to 140g/ kg of feed, and powders are kept moving by in-built vibrators PPP press screw separators remove solids from liquids or slurry type waste. The company first imported separators in 2001 and has extensive knowledge of system design and operation.

AGCO HITTING ITS STRAPS A GROWING share of the world market for tractor giant AGCO looks to be paying dividends. Net sales in 2018 rose by 12.6% to US$9.4 billion. North America had a 16% surge to US$2.2b with growth in sprayers, grass and grain handling/storage. Sales decreased slightly in western Europe, but the company’s Europe and Middle East region increased 17% to US$5.4b. For 2019, the company expects the upward trend to continue, forecasting net sales of US$9.6b. AGCO says it is planning a big extension in France at its Beauvais plant, regarded as the home of the Massey Ferguson brand. It has already enlarged the site by the 8ha with a 30,000sq.m. logistics department; and it has since bought an adjoining 15.7ha including 4.5ha of buildings. Newly completed the site will be 54ha, employ 2500 people and make 18,000 more units per annum. In the last six years, the company spent €300m on the Beauvais Centre of Excellence, has launched 14 tractor ranges since 2015 and plans to make 14 more ranges by 2023.

PIONEERS OF SHEARING SHED

SAFETY AND RELIABILITY VISIT US AT SOUTH ISLAND FIELD DAYS Site 531

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Put safety first with the world’s no.1 selling shearing plant, demanded by shearers, contractors and farmers. Winner of multiple WorkSafe awards, the Evo’s electronic safety switch helps prevent handpiece lock-ups and the isolated downtube reduces the risk of electric shocks to keep you and your workers safe.

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Eliminate risk in the shed with the no.1 selling woolpress in the world. The TPW Xpress is fully compliant with rigorous WorkSafe safety standards and features the fastest locking system on the market to press more wool into fewer bales. Tick all the boxes when it comes to shearing shed safety, reliability and performance with the TPW Xpress.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS 17

High-tech spraying for orchards MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

FMR GROUP ten years ago launched its V-Series vineyard sprayers that improve canopy penetration and chemical application, and reduce spray drift. The 2010 release of its R-Series recycling sprayer raised the bar even higher, allowing vineyards to reduce costs further by recycling spray that would otherwise have been lost as spray drift. Using the technology in this design FMR has now turned its attention to the orchard industry. Working with Richard and Tristram Hoddy, Vailima Orchards, Tasman district, the company has adapted the same base technology as found in the V-Series to design and build a 3-row sprayer specifically for orchard spraying. The O-Series uses key technologies common to all FMR sprayers, including a tangential fan system from Weber, Germany, and Arag valves and electronic control

equipment from Italy. Air-blast or air-shear systems have traditionally relied on high pressure/ low volume jets to deliver spray, but high levels of off-target drift and potentially uneven application to target surfaces risks low efficiency in such setups. Spray drift increasingly bothers rural operators -- especially growers -- as they are pressured to clean up their acts, chiefly by adopting new technology or techniques. The Weber tangential fan works differently, producing a full length ‘curtain’ of low velocity, high-volume air which is uniform from top to bottom of a tree. This air curtain emerges from the tangential fan with a turbulent twisting action that creates leaf movement and facilitates canopy penetration and even application to target plant surfaces. The even air curtain of high volume/low pressure air allows the sprayer to be set up quickly to suit specific canopy styles and to minimise off-tar-

FRONTLOADER MAKER SETS UP IN CHINA A WORLD-LEADING manufacturer of frontloaders and associated implements -- Alo AB -- has set up a factory in China. The plant is said to be running smoothly as planned. Located at Ningbo, it has the space and capacity needed for this maker of 30% of the world’s loaders for tractors 50hp and bigger. Alo now has factories in four countries, sales companies in 11 regions and customers in 50 countries. About 90% of its output is exported. The Chinese plant has 22,172m2 of production area and 1750m2 of office area, twice that of its old factory. The plant is reckoned the most advanced implement factory in the world. It is located four hours by truck from the port of Shanghai, and one hour from the port of Nighbo – the fourth largest in the world. Alo says it will double production of implements and subframes and hugely increase the production of loaders. Most welding is done in one of 10 automated robot cells; an automated powder coating line has twice the capacity of the firm’s previously biggest line and the products are reckoned better-finished than those of the car industry. – Mark Daniel

get drift. Operator comfort and safety are notable in all FMR sprayers, so the tangential fan system is quiet – even when run at full speed -- so improving operator comfort. The hydraulically driven fan can be run at

speeds easily adjusted to suit conditions. Meanwhile, the Arag Bravo electronic control system allows full control from the cabin, using a GPS speed sensor on the sprayer to automatically control system pressure and flow to achieve the

FMR orchard sprayer.

chosen application rate. The sprayers’ tanks are made from fibreglass

water tank for system purging and operator handwashing.

in capacities 2300, 3000 and 4000L. All units have a fresh

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

18 SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS

Forage harvester in a league of its own RURAL CONTRACTOR Steve Murray, who runs the family business BA Murray Ltd, Rangiora, has run New Holland selfpropelled forage harvesters for 20 years. However, Murray reckons his newest machine, an FR650, is in a league of its own. “We’ve used New Holland FR harvesters, and

Canterbury-based rural contractor Steve Murray reckons his newest New Holland, self-propelled, forage havester – a FR650 – is in a league of its own.

“Besides being much stronger the FR650 is more fuel-efficient,” he says. “Despite it being more powerful (653hp) it’s burning less fuel.” Fitted with the new 6-cyl Cursor 16 engine, specifically for forage harvesting, the unit has an “almost instantaneous” transient response.

FX series before them, going back to 1998,” he says. “We like New Holland for their reliability, strength and manufacturing quality so we’ve stayed with them.” Murray bought the FR650 last season and says it is a huge improvement on previously owned FR600, FR 9060 and FR 9050 models.

See Site us at W3 36

TRAILERS • Built strong • Quality running gear • Over rated suspension

BALE FEEDERS • Feeds any size bale • Self loading • Feeds bailage, haw, straw

Compared to a similar FR9060 (fuel consumption 100L/h) the FR600 burns about 80L/h. “They say you can get a 20% fuel saving with it and we would have done that at least over again, burning just under half what we used to burn,” Murray says. “Even when running in Eco mode, the engine will still deliver its full horsepower. Although when harvesting grass silage it isn’t working as

hard as it would in maize; we used it on maize last year and the increase in productivity was outstanding.” The FR650 has many technology improvements, particularly in the feed rollers and cutterhead areas. The cutterhead is available in three configurations to match chopping requirements, with 2 x 8, 2 x 10 and 2 x 12 knives for a length of cut range of 6-33mm, 5-27mm and 4-22mm,

SHEEP CONVEYORS

respectively. The Hydroloc feed roll drive system enables the operator to adjust the length of cut to match crop conditions on the go. The autoload function sees to filling trailers or trucks to 75% of capacity before the operator needs to take over manually. Other useful features include yield mapping with GPS data, crop moisture readings and an efficient metal detection

system. Murray says fuel saving is one of the FR650’s major benefits. “We can’t charge more [for fuel] for the work we are doing, because the farmers aren’t getting paid any more,” he says. “We have to find efficiencies in our operation, so we give the harvester a bigger feed to make fewer runs in the paddock with reduced fuel usage.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

SERIOUS ABOUT FENCING!

• Low power draw • Variable speed • Ask about different trailer options

WOOD SPLITTERS • Built strong with double skinned main beam • 50mm back plate and dished wedge • 2-stage hydraulic pump coupled to a 9.5hp Kola motor

Ph Sean Blenkin 027-250 2440 or 0800 785 399 124 Lincoln Road, Masterton E: daytech@wise.net.nz W: www.daytech.co.nz LEADERS ON FARM MACHINERY DESIGN

QUALITY • TESTED • PROVEN VISIT VISIT USUS AT AT NORTHLAND CENTRAL VISIT US AT SIAFD DISTRICTS FIELD FIELD DAYS DAYS FARMLANDS CO-OP SITE & FENCING AREA GATE C

SITE K19 254

New Zealand manufacturer of quality fencing tools & equipment


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS 19

Load up, drive away for less The Farm Master 435S Agri wheeled loaders are purpose-built for high peformance.

MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

CLAAS HARVEST Centre network is celebrating 25 years of marketing JCB agricultural machinery in New Zealand with a great offer on the JCB Loadall 526-56 telescopic loader at the South Island Agricultural Field Days. All 2019 machines will carry a special anniversary logo and be specially discounted. First released in 1977, the Loadall has revolutionised materials handling with its ability to reach forwards and upwards, and its

manoeuvrability in tight spaces. A popular model is the

Loadall 526-56, which can lift up to 2.6 tonnes to a maximum height of 5.6m.

It has a turbocharged, 100hp JCB Dieselmax four-cylinder engine,

SPRAY VARIABILITY ALL SORTED APPLYING CHEMICALS to arable or grassland crops has many variables -- differing chemical formats and target volumes, and forward speeds that vary with undulating terrain. The latest innovation from John Deere -- its ExactApply spray nozzle -- is said to increase flexibility and improve accuracy. It has six nozzles mounted on a rotating turret, working with two electronically operated liquid control valves. The system can manually switch between two nozzles and independently adjust spray pressure and flow rates. Flow rate is controlled by pulse wave modulation that enables a much wider range of spraying speeds and application rates, with

speed from 10 to 30km/h at a constant pressure, or application rates of 100 to 300 litres/ha at constant forward speeds. Interestingly, the system can also adjust flow and pressure to

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four-speed powershift transmission and hydraulic capacity of 80 L/minute. Implements include a 2.5m bucket, pallet forks, bale feeders and scraper. Also on display this year will be the Fastrac 4220 high performance tractor and Farm Master 435S Agri wheeled loader. The Fastrac 4220 (235 hp) has continuously variable transmission, all-round self-levelling suspension and optional four-wheel steering. It has four equal-sized tyres, 50/50 weight distri-

SEE US THE SIAFD FIELD DAYS – SITE 168

create a droplet size that is resistant to drift, which will prove useful in sensitive areas or changing weather. Greater accuracy is achieved by adjusting flow rates to individual nozzles across the boom; this means greater flow is delivered to the end of the boom that is travelling faster on the outside of a curve, while a reduced flow is delivered to nozzles at the inside of the radius. For long working days during ideal conditions, each nozzle is equipped with LED lighting for night-time spraying and a blockage detection system that advises operators of any interruption of liquid flows.

• Easy assembly • Strong and durable

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• NZ made since 1980 • Grow all year round T/F 03 214 4262 E info@morrifield.com

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SPECIAL OFFER! ation of 50 years of Continuing our celebr Corkill Systems Danfoss VLT, 25 years nfoss VLT Division partnerships with Da into 2019 • Trade in any variable speed drive 10 years +, any make, used in the rural sector. • Upgrade your speed controllers on your vacuum pump, milk pump, irrigators, gates sludge pump, etc. • Not restricted to the dairy industry. See us at • 20% discount and 5 year warranty. SITE • Trade in model to be returned for green recycling. M120 • Some conditions apply

www.ruralnews.co.nz

stress-free operation in such tasks as silage rolling. Says product manager Steve Gorman, “High capacity forage harvesters are capable of processing tonnes of silage every minute, so you need a high capacity machine that can stack and roll the forage quickly to maintain its nutritional value. “A 435S Agri fitted with a 4m buck rake can clear a trailer load in one pass, which gives you plenty of time to roll and seal the heap before the next trailer arrives.”

Quality Greenhouses

COMPETITIONS AND MUCH MORE...

bution and all wheel disc braking allowing operating speeds of up to 60 km/h The 4000 series, a mid-range category machine, has improved rear linkage capacity to 8000kg and front linkage with 3500kg capacity. Its new chassis and suspension layout allow for a maximum vehicle weight of up to 14 tonnes, including a load of 4t on the rear deck. The Farm Master 435S Agri wheeled loaders are purpose-built for high performance and easy,

0800 10 7006 www.corkillsystems.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

20 SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS

Many benefits in using fluid applicator MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

MATTHEW ZONDEROP farms 140ha in a 50:50 partnership at Te Poi, near Matamata, running a herd of 420 cross-bred dairy cows. Having previously used conventional fertiliser, Zonderop saw a friend using the Tow and Fert system with success, so took the plunge about three years ago and, in his own words, “never looked back”. In essence the unit is a heavy-duty spraying rig, with an integral mixing and agitation component. Zonderop’s Multi 1200 linkage mounted machine comprises a 1200L moulded tank carried in a heavy-duty galvanised frame, pipework with extensive use of stainless steel and attachment via snap-lok fittings. The design offers the ability to dissolve and mix urea, lime, gibberellic acid, weed sprays, trace elements, humates and seeds – using dairy

effluent or water as the medium for application. Manufacturer Metalform says foliar application of nutrients leads to quicker uptake, reduced losses to the atmosphere and leaching. An added benefit of this spraying rig is that it is able to combine several products in a single mix to help reduce labour and operating costs. Zonderop runs a grassbased system that typically sees paddocks being grown to 2900 to 3100 kgDM/ha prior and 1500kgDM post-grazing. The sprayer moves onto the paddocks about five days after grazing to apply sulphate of ammonia, Pro-Gib and, if required, Baton herbicide. “Application is very uniform and up to 10m width depending on wind conditions,” he says. “Interestingly, paddocks show a noticeable response within 4 or 5 days – probably 2 or 3 times quicker than conventional methods.”

The process sees 500kg of fertiliser dissolved and carried in 900L of water, a process that takes about 15 minutes, with agitation/circulation continuing as the unit moves to a job. Zonderop believes the rapid uptake of nutrients by plants allows him to reduce application rates, saving about 25% over conventional application methods. Operation is said to be easy with a in-built weigh system, a distinct lack of electronics and the only real choice being nozzle selection to alter application rates. Beyond the fertiliser application, the machine is also used to apply magnesium sulphate in spring, as a blanket coverage said to last for up to 90 days before grazing. This saves the daily chore of application by ATV and spreader. The same principle is also used for the application of zinc sulphate for facial eczema prevention, although a half dose

Matamata farmer Matthew Zonderup says he’s never looked back since he started using a Tow and Fert unit about three years aog.

is still used in the water supply as an insurance policy. The rig can also apply chicory seed in suspen-

sion, with the occasional application of grass seeds in rougher areas. Interestingly, last season saw an extended

See us at the South Island Agricultural Field Days Site 862

SPECIALS SERIES 2 WITH ROCK SPIKE Includes

❱ 4 bank valve hydraulic top link and angle adjustment ❱ 4.25m 150UC beam ❱ 270kg hammer ❱ Adjustable legs ❱ Rock Spike kit with 90mm spike

16,750 + GST

$

Normal RRP $19,030

DAIRY DONGER

17,500 + GST

$

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applying effluent diluted 50:50 with water. Zonderop concedes this was a time-consuming job but it broke the drought.

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dry period when crops of turnips or chicory were being established, so the Multi 1200 was brought into action for irrigation,

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WHEN THE South Island Agricultural Field Days (SIAFD) opens in Kirwee on March 27, volunteers will play a big part in making the event run smoothly, just as they have in organising it over the past year. SIAFD is the oldest and among the largest agricultural events in the South Island. It shows machines at work on the demonstration paddocks, and reinforces the relationship between farmers, contractors, service providers, technical experts and the community. Publicity officer Daniel Schat says many volunteers put in a huge amount of their own time into organising and running the event every two years. “There is a core team and everyone puts in countless hours of unpaid time to put the event together,” he says. “We have organising and executive committees that oversee spending for larger financial decisions. There are 25 people on the organising committee, some there for many years.” Schat has helped organise the last six field days along with working fulltime as a dairy farmer, milking 385 cows at Darfield. “Most of us take time off work during the week of the field days. Some people use annual leave to do it and others rely on the support of employers, staff and their families. It means time away from family to put the event together,” he says. “I do it because I like seeing a successful event run in the local community. The event wouldn’t happen if it wasn’t for all the volunteers.” Many community groups and schools help run various aspects of the field days. These include Young Farmers, who do the car parking, led by committee members Robin Hornblow and Martin Bates Schat says many people who attend don’t realise how many people are volunteers. “Being such a big event with more than 600 exhibitors, there will always be logistical challenges, but most exhibitors and public appreciate that the committee members are all volunteers.” SIAFD is heavily focused on servicing the wider community. It donates two $2500 scholarships each year to Lincoln University students. This year’s recipients are Amy Wells and Callum Woodhouse. It also supports other community groups and last year donated $5000 to the Kirwee Volunteer Fire Brigade to help it buy a new vehicle.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS 21

Upgraded quads on debut MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

Joule Shield wooden post claw insulator.

Modernday insulators STRAINRITE FENCING Systems says it has developed the Joule Shield wooden post claw insulator to address the limitations inherent in older insulators. The new insulators are said to cope with modern energisers that deliver much greater voltage than older units, while also giving more effective stock control. Strainrite says that while existing design insulators were effective with older, lower-output energisers, higher currents can result in power loss, lack of fence efficiency and increased running costs. Tests show the Joule Shield insulators withstand 50% more voltage in a dry-conditions test and up to 100% more voltage in simulated rain. The insulators are designed with low profile, heavy-duty jaws for extreme load endurance and multiple shield plates. The latter increases the surface area and tracking distance, helping reduce potential power leakage. The multi-shield design is inspired by the insulators seen on high voltage power lines; they have structural webbing and thicker walls for strength and durability, using UV stabilised polymers. www.strainrite.co.nz

KEEP AN eye out at the South Island Agricultural Field Days for the new range of Suzuki KingQuads. Major upgrades are seen in both the 500 and 750 models following months of onfarm testing in New Zealand. This is on top of evaluations made by technical staff from Japan visiting NZ to test prototypes. Suzuki NZ has also commissioned two test units for ongoing use on Kiwi farms for extended monitoring. Other than changes to the machines’ physical appearance, the biggest changes to the new KingQuad are the way they ride. Revised suspension and gas filled shock absorbers are connected to a chassis with greater rigidity, achieved by using thicker wall section for the main frame rails. The rear sway bar set-up has also been redesigned for a more stable ride but still retains the smooth ride all Suzuki ATV’s are renowned for. Improvements to the electric power steering system makes for less rider fatigue and raises comfort for long days out working.

FANTASTIC FIELD DAYS SPECIALS TARAGATE - the ORIGINAL Multi Strand Electric Gate Systems

Great savings across the entire range GRAZING PACKAGES • Geared Reels • Reel Posts • Solar Energisers • Pigtails • Tapes, braids and more

Visit us at site C4 (in the covered marquee) to scoop up these specials... and more

TARAGATE™ LTD RD2 Hamilton Phone 07 843 3859 • Fax 07 843 3952 info@taragate.co.nz • www.taragate.co.nz

Suzuki KingQuads have undergone upgrades based on onfarm testing in NZ.

The fuel injected, liquid-cooled, fourstroke engine remains unchanged on the 500 and 750; the only

differences are in the CVT transmission on the 750. Engine-braking is reckoned class-lead-

ing on all Suzuki ATVs, whether towing a trailer or descending a hill. Towing capacity has increased to 600kg on

the 500cc and 750cc – up 150kg from the previous models. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

We’re heading to South Island Field Days VISIT US AT SITE 883 TO SEE OUR RUGGED RANGE. 27TH-29TH MAR. RUGGEDVALLEY.co.nz | 0800 4 RUGGED

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FIELD DAYS SPECIAL receive an extra lithium battery

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email: dave@handypiece.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

22 SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS

New cultivators and drills on show at Kirwee MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

POWER FARMING at SIAFD will show products from the Jean du Bru cultivation range -- a new roller drill and the MonoLiner range of disc harrows. The MegaPack RS roller drills are available in 5.3 or 6.3m working widths. These have a heavyduty 150 x 150mm drawbar attached to the 100 x 100mm frame that supports the roller assemblies. Roller gangs are centrally pivoted to

achieve good contour following, while a clever C-spring damping system will prove useful for uneven or stony ground. Using a Cambridge roller and cracker ring set-up mounted on 70mm diameter shafts, the machines have operating weights of up to four tonnes depending on model. An APV seeder unit with 16 outlets is fully integrated into the overall design, mounted on a factory-installed platform at the rear of the machine. This is easily and safely accessed via a

MonoLiner VRV disc harros are offered in 4, 4.5 and 5m working widths.

ladder equipped with a handrail.

The MonoLiner VRV disc harrows build on the

success of the established 3m DVL discs, but now

offered in 4, 4.5 and 5m working widths for operators with more power available or larger workloads. This is built around an oversized central beam (300 x 300 x 10mm) and the intermediate frames are 160 x 80 x 10mm to carry the disc gangs. All models have a 51mm swivel hitch offering 360 degrees of oscillation and fold vertically for safe road transport and easy access into paddocks. Standard equipment includes full hydraulic depth control that

incorporates an automated hydraulic floating weight transfer system for excellent contour following. The range features notched discs throughout, with these mounted on a 40mm shaft that uses doubleconical bearings for an extended service life. Other features include hydraulic drawbar offsetting, an integrated braking system, lighting kit, hydro-pneumatic transport system and a rear drawbar assembly. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Methane power wins an award NEW HOLLAND Agriculture has won the Good Design Award for its methanepowered concept tractor from the Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design and The European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies. The concept tractor, unveiled in 2017, was recognised for its design features and alternative fuel technology. CNH Industrial’s design team developed a fully-integrated design where the hood, front and rear fenders and the fuel tank create a flowing, stylish look. Wraparound glazing provides 360-degree visibility with 20% more glazed area than a standard tractor.

The floating glass domed roof with integrated precision land management receiver is ‘panoramic’. The 6-cylinder NEF methane engine delivers the same power and torque as its standard diesel equivalent, plus 30% running cost savings and a 50% reduction in drive-by noise. In field conditions the tractor produces at least 10% lower CO2 emissions and reduces overall emissions by 80% compared to a standard diesel tractor. Its environmental performance further improves when fuelled by biomethane produced from crop residues and waste from farm-grown energy crops, which results in virtually zero CO2 emissions. P

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NH Agriculture has picked up an award for its methane-powered concept tractor.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS 23

‘Going genomic’ breeding is gaining favour with NZ dairy farmers, claims World Wide Sires.

Genomics key to smaller, efficient herds THE CALL for dairy farmers to prepare now for a future with a smaller herd of higher producing cows depends on access to dairy sires superior to their contemporaries of even a year ago. This is the message World Wide Sires will be giving farmers at the South Island Agricultural Field Days at Kirwee from March 27 to 29. Hank Lina, World Wide Sires’ general manager for New Zealand, said “in the US and around the world, farmers are recognising that genomic sires are light years ahead of daughterproven sires because they have been selected for the traits farmers need today and tomorrow – not yesterday. “Demand for genomically proven bulls in the US is now greater than for daughter-proven: 70% of all semen sold in the US is genomic. This gives farmers the advantage of a level of genetic gain never before possible. The genetic superiority of today’s genomic bulls is light-years ahead of traditionally proven bulls.” Lina said World Wide Sires “began genomically proving bulls in 2009 based on one of the largest base populations in

the world comprising at least 2 million genotyped animals”. “The size and depth of that data set provides a very high level of accuracy in genomic prediction, and that has led to the confidence we are now seeing amongst American farmers. “The NZ experience with genomics is at odds with the rest of the world largely because this country simply doesn’t have the large data set of genotyped animals needed to generate strong reliabilities consistent with daughter performance. “The Productivity Commission’s report, highlighting the need for the herds of the future to be smaller and more productive, reinforces that farmers need to be using sires selected for that purpose. “Three or four years ago, when many of the NZ-bred daughter proven sires on offer to Kiwi farmers today were selected, the breeding imperative was different: we were still in a growth phase. “A quick look at the latest dairy statistics confirms the productivity of the NZ national herd is increasing slowly: e.g. 20

years ago average kgMS/ cow was 301, ten years ago it was 330kgMS and today it is ‘only’ 380kgMS. “Contrast that with the genetics that World Wide Sires’ parent AB cooperative Select Sires has generated: upwards of 550 kgMS/cow per year. And those cows are bred to last.” The figures speak for themselves, Lina said. Milk 414 (average NZ

herd size) cows doing (the average) 381kgMS or fully feed and milk 286 cows and produce 550kgMS. “Both scenarios deliver the same end-result, confirming that it is possible for farmers to cut back on numbers without negatively impacting on the profitability of the farm – with less cost, stress and impact on the environment.”

See Us at Southland Field Days Site: 862 SINCE 1928

ECO HARROWS 3 ROWS WITH SPIKE LINKS 2 ROWS WITH STANDARD LINKS CAN BE REVERSED

SINCE 1928

sales@fairbrother.co.nz 0800 476 868 www.kinghitter.com


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 19, 2019

24 SOUTH ISLAND AGRICULTURAL FIELD DAYS

It all happens in threes! MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

DO THINGS really happen in threes? It seems so for the motor industry’s off-road favourite Subaru. At the recent petrolhead heaven -- the Leadfoot Festival at Hahei, Coromandel Peninsula (Rural News attended only to report the facts) – Alistair McRae, of the Scottish McRae rallying dynasty, made it three in a row by consecutively winning the dash up the 1.6km hill climb course in a blistering 47.99 seconds. More mundane -though equally exciting for your reporter -- was a look at another threesome in the shape of the Outback, XV and Forester model ranges. These were all driven over an off-road course recently devel-

The Subaru XV (above) and Forester (right) being put through their paces.

oped by Leadfoot owners Rod and Shelley Millen. These ranged from flat grass paddock to climbs over dirt mounds and descents into blind hollows. Nearly always the adverse cambers had drivers and passengers sitting too close to each other (where were the Subaru stunners when you needed them?) but

the clever trio traversed the course with ease. They were enjoying technology such as the Symmetrical All Wheel Drive System that shares power to all four wheels to maintain traction – even in tough conditions; or X-Mode which cleverly manipulates engine, transmission, AWD and brakes to optimise travel

in difficult conditions at speeds of up to 40km/h. The X-Mode came into its own during the steep downhill sections, tackled with aplomb. Subaru marketing manager Daile Stephens said 2018 would be a year to remember. “We were stoked to scoop the Car of The Year title with the new

Forester,” said Stephens. “And being presented with the award on Seven Sharp was the cream on a great year for us.” More importantly, 2018 was Subaru NZ’s record year for sales – 3632 vehicles.

“And that upward trend is building: in January 2019 we delivered 380 new vehicles – our best month ever.” Subaru is hitting the mark with its AWD and outdoor image appealing to ‘Let’s Do It’-minded

Kiwis. The revitalised mid-sized Forester SUV tripled sales since its launch in September. And the Outback and XV – large, compact SUVs – had monthly sales of 100 and 140 units respectively.

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Come and see us on site for SHOW SPECIALS Call in to see us at South Island Field Days, Kirwee Site 282

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Efficient

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Profile for Rural News Group

Rural News 19 March 2019  

Rural News 19 March 2019

Rural News 19 March 2019  

Rural News 19 March 2019