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Filling the financial hole left by falling meat and wool prices. page 28

Two-man team take out their first title. page 37

Rural NEWS

irrigation move Plans are afoot for drought-prone Wairarapa.

page 14

to all farmers, for all farmers

april 23, 2013: Issue 536 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

80% plus needed ga re t h g i l lat t

ANY MEGA meat industry body would need more than 80% of processing capacity to work, says Silver Fern Farms chairman Eoin Garden. The Meat Industry Excellence Group, a collective of South Island dry stock farmers, is pushing for 80% of all meat processors to amalgamate to ensure profitable processing and steady farmgate prices for producers. But Garden told a meeting of Northland sheep and beef farmers in Dargaville last week that the MIE had its sights set too low. He says while MIE wanted 20% of producers to stay independent “to keep the big buggers honest” this would do nothing but cripple the larger body. “There will be an absolute scramble for everybody to be a twenty-percenter,” he explained. “Because the twenty-percenters will actually be able to skin the cat.” In fact, Garden says loss of procurement is the biggest factor holding back a merger between Silver Fern Farms and Alliance which, if successful, would account for a large part of the industry’s processors. “The conversation got to the point where we were discussing the proportion of supply we would lose if we merged and at what level it would negate the benefits of merging. “One company said it would be 15-20% while the other thought we could be smarter and just lose 10%,” Garden said. “Price Waterhouse Cooper

“There will be an absolute scramble for everybody to be a twenty-percenter, because the twenty-percenters will actually be able to skin the cat.” said if we lost just 5% of procurement share then we would lose any benefits of consolidation.” Garden said New Zealand’s meat industry needed a strategy change more than a structure change when it came to procurement. He said a small proportion of suppliers who “shopped around” meat companies were essentially holding the rest of the sector to ransom. “About 30% of supply floats

around, and about 20% of that is with independent stock agents.” Garden says these agents get a collection of livestock and then approach

different meat companies to ask for the best price, making it difficult for meat companies to plan killing schedules. “Those of us who have a 100% committed supply now are compromised by those that don’t,” he added. “If you have assets and don’t know if they will be fully utilised, half utilised or empty that’s not a bankable model. It’s not just a Silver Fern issue, it’s an industry issue.”

a taste of things to come? Taihape farmer Fraser Gordon gets his first taste of rain for the month of April – a measly 2mm. Despite last week’s downpours over much of New Zealand, many farmers in the central North Island got very little rain and for them the drought is far from over. Gordon, who’s a member of the Rural Support Trust, says this is the worst drought in the area for 70 years. See more on page 7

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However, Garden said marketing initiatives like the Angus brand and Hereford brand would go towards working free agents out of the system. “They won’t be able to take part in MeatEQ or any of the other programmes being put into place now; that’s where you’ll start to see value.” • See more on page 3 @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


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Rural News // april 23, 2013

news 3 issue 536

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Meat reform mandate grows cessed late last week, but all bar a handful at the meeting backed a motion that andrews@ruralnews.co.nz their attendance represented a mandate ORGANISERS OF a second meeting for MIE to progress its five point plan. MIE says Silver Fern Farms’ chaircalling for reform of the meat industry say the attendance and feedback man Eoin Garden and Alliance director Murray Taggart spoke from the strengthens their mandate. Following Meat Industry Excel- floor supporting its approach. Howlence’s (MIE) March 18 Gore meet- ever, there was no representation from ing, reportedly attended by 1000, last the private meat companies. Gallagher acknowledges gaining Wednesday’s crowd at Wigram, Christsupport of one or more of them will church, was estimated at 600. “We’ve gone further than the Gore be crucial to reach MIE’s target of 80% meeting in that we asked people to sign of red meat processed by one coman attendance and commitment form,” pany, but says getting the cooperatives MIE Canterbury coordinator Blair Gal- together first would be a start. “What came out of the meeting was lagher told Rural News. Those forms were still to be pro- if we can get a [farmer] commitment to a new entity then both cooperatives see it as a no-brainer. Even if it is just the two cooperatives… at 1. Gain NZ-wide farmer mandate for least we’ve got something rationchange alised and hopefully the rest will 2. Form a “Tight 5” group to follow.” research, evaluate and short-list MIE chairman Richard structural solutions. Young says it is “really heart3. Conduct due diligence ening” that the two cooperaon solutions / industry tives are supporting the group’s rationalisation moves, as it is that the April 26 4. Gain commitment of key meeting in Feilding – called by stakeholders to new industry John McCarthy – is now part of plan the MIE movement. 5. Industry-wide adoption of plan “It will show us if they’re willing

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News������������������������������ 1-14 World������������������������������ 15 markets��������������������� 16-18 agribusiness������������18-20 Hound, Edna������������������� 22 Contacts������������������������� 22 Opinion������������������������22-24 Management����������� 25-28 Animal Health�������� 29-33 Machinery and Products������������������ 34-37 Rural Trader���������� 38-39

Head Office Top Floor, 29 Northcroft Street, Takapuna, Auckland 0622 Phone: 09-307 0399 Fax: 09-307 0122 Postal Address PO Box 3855, Shortland Street, Auckland 1140 Published by: Rural News Group Printed by: PMP Print Contacts Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz ABC audited circulation 80,767 as at 31.12.2012

MIE's 5 point plan

peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

Jeanette Maxwell

to support this in the North Island.” Details of a meeting at Gisborne in mid-May are being finalised, but if MIE gains support at that and the Feilding meeting – it will be “full steam ahead” with MIE’s plans. Gallagher stresses the need for change runs from paddock to plate. “The status quo is not an option. There’s got to be a change of culture across the industry and that includes farmers, processors and marketers. If we all sign up to this then we’ll be able to drive the structure through.” Federated Farmers Meat and Fibre chairwoman, Jeanette Maxwell, is reserving comment on MIE’s proposals until a survey of all Feds’ members assessing buying and selling behaviours, and views on the meat industry, is complete. “We need to understand our members’ behaviours, wants and desires; gather the information and go forward. If we go forward without that information there’s a danger we go off on the wrong tangent.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Have we heard all this before? The man who chaired the last farmer group to try to reform the meat industry, John Gregan, says he has a sense of deja vu watching the current campaign. “I’ve had the odd call from some of the people involved,” he admitted to Rural News. “Hopefully this time they’ll get the momentum needed and things will change.” After the Meat Industry Action Group (MIAG’s) efforts to bring Alli-

ance and Silver Fern Farms together foundered, Gregan converted his sheep and beef farm at Hunter, South Canterbury, to dairy. Several factors give John Gregan the current campaign a better chance of success, he believes. “This movement was spawned in Southland and that’s where the

Concerns over ag careers

powerhouse of Alliance is so local farmers looking for change are more likely to support this than they were a group of South Canterbury farmers as most of us were in MIAG.” “Ultimately it must happen if the [sheep and beef] industry is to survive. Who knows: maybe this time it will happen.”

LANDCORP’S OUTGOING chief executive Chris Kelly says he’s concerned at the lack of young people seeking to make a career in agriculture. Kelly is just back from Brisbane where he spoke at a farming leaders’ conference. This attracts large-scale agriculturalists from Australia and New Zealand, and farmers who have “a good story to tell”. He spoke about a lack of properly qualified young people seeking careers at all levels in farming which, he says, is growing in technological sophistication and so needs highly trained and capable people. “Nothing incenses me more than when I hear stories about career advisors at a secondary school saying because young Johnny is really bright he should be encouraged to be a doctor. Then saying that young Eric, who is not quite so bright, should do an ag degree. That happens and it gets up my nose.” Kelly says there is a mismatch between what the tertiary institutions are teaching and what the primary sector wants in practical skills. Some institutions lack appreciation of what is happening onfarm in information technology and other developments. Kelly says the number of ag students at Massey is 200-300, while the number of fine arts students is about 3000. He predicts many of the latter will graduate and won’t get jobs. “All the comment at the conference led me to believe the same problem exists in Australia, where the number of ag graduates is declining while the number of law and accountancy graduates is going up.”

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Rural News // April 23, 2013

4 news Drought over for some, but continues elsewhere PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

DESPITE HEAVY rain in many regions during the past week, the Ministry for Primary Industry (MPI) says the drought is getting worse in some areas. These include Hawkes Bay and parts of the central North Island where little or no rain fell.

Other areas such as Bay of Plenty had up to 150mm of rain and for this region and parts of Tararua and Horowhenua districts, the drought is effectively over. MPI’s Stuart Anderson says soil moisture deficits were still very high and it takes time to replenish these. “What is critical for the

remainder of the autumn is good follow-up rain while there are still milder temperatures, to enable pasture recovery and growth. The effects of any rainfall take time to work their way through farming systems. “Grass is a very resilient species, but pasture will take some time to recover. Based on previous

experience, it takes three weeks after rain for pasture to start growing well because it begins from such a low base. From there it could take another four weeks to build up decent pasture covers. So, in total about seven weeks of growing could be required before farms can start to depend on pasture for feed.”

MPI says farmers will get less income for the 2012/13 season because of lower production, and there will be higher costs of supplementary feed. This will flow through to rural service industries. The effects will be ongoing, Anderson says. “Farmers are likely to have used feed reserves during autumn that were

intended for winter and spring, and will need to buy in more feed than usual. Also, farmers may have had to destock to the extent that they have reduced capital (breeding) stock numbers and will now need to build those up again by breeding replacements, which takes several seasons.” Meanwhile, MPI says

the Government recovery support arrangements under the drought declarations are set to expire on September 30, 2013. This timing was chosen because rural communities will then be through the winter and early spring. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Trade Me defends stance Andrew Swa l low andrews@ruralnews.co.nz

ONLINE AUCTION site Trade Me has defended its refusal to ban the sale of agrichemicals as industry body Agcarm has requested (Rural News, April 9). In a lengthy written response to Rural News on Agcarm’s concerns that sales through the site pose a safety risk to couriers and purchasers, and in some cases are illegal, Trade Me trade and safety team member Jon Duffy says Trade Me has to balance the right to sell legal products against the safety risks posed. “We start from the position that our members are all over 18, can generally be trusted to comply with the law and that we don’t want to be Big Brother. We also believe competition is good for consumers as it delivers more choice and better prices.” Duffy says he considers Agcarm’s call for a ban due to occasional problem listings “the nuclear option. “We disagree with Agcarm’s request to ban all hazardous substances from Trade Me. We don’t think this is good for non-Agcarm members or Trade Me members in general. We’ve placed a lot of weight on advice from the regulators who are impartial and focused on public safety.” While Trade Me does have discretion to prohibit goods from the site, it exercises this very carefully,

adds Duffy. He stresses Trade Me’s staff are not experts on hazardous substances, or lawmakers, but if a listing would result in an illegal sale it is a breach of Trade Me’s terms and conditions. There’s also detailed advice on the sale of such products on the website. “Members selling substances illegally face having their memberships restricted or terminated in addition to any legal action that could be taken against them. “We regularly work with the Ministry of Primary Industries and the Environmental Protection Authority to produce educational material, or remove goods from the site where they are brought to our attention.”

your view

Are agchem listings on TradeMe a good way of increasing competition and/or getting rid of surplus product, or an unnecessary risk to the buyer and postie? E-mail your view, with Trade Me agchems in the subject line, to: andrews@ ruralnews.co.nz

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Rural News // april 23, 2013

Feds battling to eliminate world farming subsidies PA M TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

GETTING A break-through trade policy that recognises a commitment to eliminating export subsidies through the 50-member World Farmers Organisation (WFO) had been “a battle”, says Federated Farmers president Bruce Wills. “It was a pretty challenging discussion to get through,” he told the Rural News from Niigata in Japan shortly after the agreement was signed at the third assembly of the WFO. Wills says Federated Farmers has been involved from the start in the three-year-old WFO, the only international farmer group that exists, to have as much influence as possible on trade issues.“The vast majority of farming countries in the world don’t support free trade. Sometimes we forget this in New Zealand because we live and breathe free trade.” He said New Zealand and Australia were leading “by a country mile” the 50 members on the discussion of the free trade pact. “We’ve spent months and months circulating among the member countries a trade policy

paper which we felt aligned with our ideals of open and free trade to the benefit of farmers, and it’s been a battle. “It was a pretty challenging discussion to get it through; it wasn’t fully supported… so we are happy that a new organisation like the WFO has shown the maturity after these three years to put together a collaborative paper that was comfortable to the vast majority of members.” While they did not agree 100% on everything it was a huge step in the right direction, he said. “The WFO’s guiding principles commit the WFO to the parallel elimination of all forms of export subsidies and disciplines on all export measures with equivalent effect.  It all boils down to improved market access,” he says. “The WFO also wants a substantial reduction in trade-distorting domestic support but with special treatment for developing countries and the least developed. “The feeling from the WFO is that strengthened rules should apply to export prohibition/ restriction and export taxes too.  Also important is proper protection of geographical indications as provided for under the WTO (World

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Bruce Wills

Trade Organisation) agreement on trade in intellectual property and recognition of country-of-origin requirements that allows countries to distinguish their products without distorting trade. “The WFO strongly supports the WTO and believes that multilateral negotiations leading to a comprehensive trade agreement is the best way to pursue these objectives.”

Japan may join TPP FEDERATED FARMERS has held some high level discussions in Japan about that country entering the Trans Pacific Partnership negotiations, Wills told Rural News. They took the opportunity while he and chief executive Conor English were in Japan attending the WFO assembly. The discussions are “vital”

as Japan is our fourth largest export market, says Wills. Last year exports to Japan totalled $3.2 billion. The Japanese Prime Minister has requested that Japan enter the TPP negotiations, the 17th round of which was held in Auckland late last year. Wills said on most counts that request was “good and encouraging” and because of the

level of New Zealand exports to Japan, it was important. “There is some concern that they have entered the TPP round at a very late stage. So some of the caution I passed to the Japanese delegation yesterday was that we are looking for a comprehensive trade outcome with TPP. “We would be concerned if

Japan’s late entry slowed the group’s desire to reach a conclusion. President Obama has talked about getting this round concluded later this year. We would be very supportive of that happening. “It will be challenging for the farmers here in Japan. They are heavily supported by their government.”

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Rural News // April 23, 2013

6 news China trip crucial pa m t i pa pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

PRIME MINISTER John Key’s visit to China was crucial in building our trade with China, says Federated Farmers president Bruce Wills. “With all the attention the Prime Minister got with his delegation to China, my sense is we are making huge inroads with our trade with China,” says Wills. “John Key’s visit was crucial – the high level nature of his delegation, the very large number; and there were key agricultural people in his delegation which shows the agricultural export opportunity in China is enormous.” Wills did not travel with this delegation, but was in China five years ago when the free trade agreement was signed. “I think it was entirely appropriate that five years after we signed we took this high level delegation of this type. From a farmer’s point of view the progress we are seeing in China with agricultural trade is exciting. Currently

it is our second largest trading partner but it is only a matter of time before it becomes number one trading partner; it’s a given.” Currency is a challenge for our traditional partners. “We are really struggling when you look at Europe, Japan and US – all heavily into quantitative easing, printing money like there is no tomorrow. On a relative basis our currency is now very strong against the yen, the US dollar, the euro and the pound; the profitability of our exports to those nations has been put under the squeeze, so again it makes some of these Asian economies we are looking at, particularly China, that much more important. “ Wills says high level dairy and meat industry leaders travelled with the Prime Minister’s delegation so they would have had key meetings outside those held by the PM, building relationships. “This was a highly important delegation and it was crucial we build this trade with China.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Overseer a hammer of a tool – Feds sudesh kissun sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

MOST FARMERS have a negative perception of the nutrient management tool Overseer, says Andrew Hoggard, Federated Farmers. “They see it as a compliance hammer regional councils will use to beat them with,” he told Rural News. Hoggard agrees with PGG Wrightson technical specialist Milton Munro that Overseer is not perfect but is the best tool available to measure nutrient use on farms. But the worry among farmers is how Overseer is being used by regional councils. At a recent PGG Wrightson ‘Leading Thinking in Agriculture’ seminar at Cambridge, Munro spoke about Overseer’s potential, saying it has limitations and depends much on accurate data input by farmers. “I’m the first person to admit that, like all models, Overseer is not perfect. Like all models there is a level of uncertainty…. if you put rubbish information into it, your

answer will be rubbish,” he told the seminar. But Overseer is being updated every few months; it’s a work in progress. “The scientists behind it are continually refining and broadening the knowledge base behind Overseer. In time it will become an integral part of New Zealand farming business.” Munro says discussions continue on whether Milton Munro regional councils can use it as a monitoring tool. Some councils, including Horizons Regional Council, have rushed to use it as a regulatory tool, but others, such as Hawke’s Bay Regional council, are sensibly looking at utilising what the industry is coming up with. Overseer is jointly owned by MAF, Fert Research and AgResearch. Developed by AgResearch, it calculates the nutrient flows in a farming system and identifies potential for risk of environmental impacts through calculation of nutrient

loss as run-off and leaching. Hoggard says Overseer was designed as “a development support tool”. “It’s not a predictive tool…. it’s a looking-back tool because you have to enter all these data. Councils should not be rushing to set targets using Overseer.” Farmers must enter data for the past 12 months to get Overseer readings. Overseer also involves more work by the farmer as he must look back through files for data, Hoggard says. “Fonterra wants to how much urea you have used. And when the fertiliser rep sits down with farmer, he wants to know how much milk you have produced. The farmer says ‘why don’t you guys talk among yourselves rather than have me going through files and regurgitating data?’.” Hoggard says farmers are nervous about Overseer and he sees “huge room for improvement”.


Rural News // april 23, 2013

Call of the chainsaw! p e te r bu r k e

Fraser Gordon cuts up trees for his sheep and cattle to graze on.

peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

MANY FARM animals associate food and the sound of a gate opening or a tractor or ute driving in a paddock. But on Fraser Gordon’s property east of Taihape it’s the sound of a chainsaw that excites livestock. Gordon, Federated Farmers Meat and Fibre chair in Manawatu/ Rangitikei, lives in an area badly hit by drought. Since early February he has been forced to feed out – but not baleage or supplements. His stock are in paddocks where he grows Japanese fodder willows, so the chainsaw sound signals a hearty meal in the offing. Gordon’s farm name, Wairere, means ‘flowing water’, but in seven months only 280mm rain has fallen – about half the normal annual rainfall. The trees have helped through this terrible drought. Gordon has two varieties, Tangaio and Kinulagi, acquired from AgResearch in 1994. He set up a nursery and eventually built up a stock of some 4000 trees.

“I got them for erosion control – not fodder – and planted them after the big flood in 2004,” Gordon told Rural News. “I selected these varieties because they weren’t going to grow into huge poplars, plus they could be coppiced for stock feed. “I also planted them for the deer because the Kinulagi have 10%

tannin in them and this reduces the need for drenching deer, which I had on the property at the time. Instead of drenching the deer, I just ran them through the block of trees once a month. The tannin doesn’t kill the worms but it paralyses them so they can’t breed.” Gordon is running about 700 two-tooths and 40 cattle on the

5ha of trees. He recently fattened about 20 cattle solely on the Tangaio. The daily ration of trees he cuts is equivalent to about three bales of baleage, which could cost him about $200 each. “The trees are a very cost effective feed.” Stock take a couple of days to get used to the willows; once they do they quickly recognise what the sound of the chainsaw means. Stock will also eat fallen willow leaves at this time of year. Gordon, and wife Shona, have leased 485ha to their daughter and son-in-law, retaining just 162ha. On his farm he’s running 1100 two-tooths, 80 cattle and about 20 deer. Lambs, cattle and deer have all gone to the works. He saw the drought coming in November, when there were late frosts, and sold lambs, giving priority to capital stock. The willows have enabled him to keep capital stock off some pasture, allowing it to reestablish as the rains arrive. Despite being at 762m altitude he hopes the grass, with sufficient rain, will grow until June.

news 7 Fonterra churns organic decision FONTERRA SAYS a revamp of its organics business is intended to make it sustainable. The organics business has returned to profit after the global financial crisis hit sales in its key markets in US and Europe. Now the co-op is targeting China and Asia where organic ingredients are attracting higher premiums. Managing director Fonterra Nutrition, Sarah Kennedy, updated the co-op’s 95 organic suppliers last week on its revamped organics business. Farmers currently supplying organic milk in Manawatu, Taranaki and Wairarapa, who have contracts expiring next year are offered a two-year extension. Organic farmers in Waikato and Bay of Plenty are offered a three-year renewal. Northland organic suppliers won’t have their contracts renewed. Fonterra collects 78 million litres of organic milk every year. The co-op’s organic farmers are paid a premium of $1.05/kgMS over the conventional milk payout. The co-op processes organic milk at Hautapu and Waitoa plants. Federated Farmers is cautiously optimistic about the extension of organic contracts.  “For those organic dairy farmers whose contracts were about to expire this is a lifeline,” says Gray Beagley, Federated Farmers Dairy’s organic spokesperson.  “Those farmers whose expiring contacts have been extended to 2015 will be cautiously optimistic, but a distinct lack of trust with this latest U-turn will remain.”


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Rural News // april 23, 2013

news 9

Future co-op directors hone skills ANDREW SWALLOW

THE POOL of farming and agricultural service people prepared to take on cooperative governance roles just got a bit stronger with 27 delegates completing the LEADing Board course courtesy of the Burnside Hart Co-operative Education Trust and New Zealand Cooperatives Associaton. The association has the rights to run the Wisconsin University developed course in New Zealand and Australia and the trust provides funding which keeps the cost of the twoday course at $250/head, instead of $895. Trust-funded courses have previously been

Among them was west Waikato sheep and beef farmer Sally Lee. “I found it really good,” Lee told Rural News at the conclusion of the course. “It was a relaxed atmosphere and everybody participated and shared their stories.” Having done other governance courses Lee says the main thing she gained from this one was “an awareness and understanding of cooperative thinking.” “I’ve done some Institute of Directors training but this was at a different level.” Bruce Murphy, whose family runs a multifarm dairy business in South Canterbury supplying Fonterra, says the main things he took from

Asked whether there’s a risk cooperatives abuse members’ loyalty in taking their business for granted while offering outside parties better deals, Harris

warns that boards and management doing that play a dangerous game. “You can’t take loyalty for granted. If you’re not responsive to member-

users’ needs they will take their business elsewhere. You’ve got to stick to the cooperative principles. If you don’t, you’ll lose member loyalty.”

Sally Lee

held in Invermay, Otago, reflecting the Dunedin headquarters of the meat company PPCS, which seed-funded the trust; but this year’s venue was Ashburton. “The company realised a long time ago there was a governance vacuum looming and we needed to increase the pool of people coming on to fill the governance roles in the agricultural sector in general,” says Reese Hart, a former chairman of Silver Fern Farms – or rather PPCS, as the meat processing cooperative was called before 2008. The solution was the trust, of which he and former PPCS chair Robbie Burnside are trustees. But while PPCS seedfunded the trust with “a lump sum”, the subsidised courses are kept open to all with agricultural links. “We recognise a lot of different people in the agricultural industry support a lot of different co-ops.” Nonetheless, of the 27 on this year’s course – a couple more than normal owing to over-subscription – 17 or 18 had “connections” with Silver Fern Farms, he adds.

the course were a better understanding of cooperative business structures and how to write effective policy at a board level. Murphy was on the course having won one of three CRT Farmlands sponsored places. Course facilitator Peter Harris also highlighted the importance of cooperative boards setting clear policies for management to follow and report against. But no matter how good the policies, events would sometimes expose gaps. “When something happens that exposes a gap in the policy, deal with it,” he told delegates in a closing session. Later, speaking to Rural News, he stressed the difference between cooperative and corporate governance. “There are quite significant differences. The main one is the owner directors of a cooperative have a continued interest in the service the cooperative provides… their interest is both financial and personal.” As a consequence cooperative boards would tend to be more involved or have a greater input to management matters than a corporate board.

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Rural News // April 23, 2013

10 news

Miraka’s $multi-million Chinese coup p e te r bu r k e peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

THE MAORI dairy company Miraka, Taupo, has signed a multi-million dollar joint venture deal to produce UHT milk for the new owners of the Crafar farms, Shanghai Pengxin. The signing took place in Shanghai in front of Ministers Steven Joyce and Pita Sharples, and a group of New Zea-

land business people, including representatives from Fonterra. Miraka chairman Kingi Smiler signed the deal, for his company to take milk from four of the former Crafar farms – and up to eight local suppliers. This will be turned in to high-value 1L UHT milk packs for export and distribution in China by Shanghai Pengxin. Smiler says Miraka will spend $25 million to build the new UHT plant

“The new factory will take 80 million litres a year and we hope to be delivering some of the new UHT milk to China within about 10 months.” adjacent to its existing milk powder factory, which now exports most of its product to Vietnam in another joint venture with the largest dairy company

Little impact on Landcorp THE DEAL between Shanghai Pengxin and Miraka will have little impact on Landcorp, which manages the former Crafar farms on contract to the Chinese company. Landcorp boss Chris Kelly says it means only that a different coloured tanker will pick up milk from the four farms supplying Miraka. “The contract we have is that we are paid a percentage of the Fonterra commodity milk payout regardless of where the milk goes to. Even if it went down the drain we’d still have to get that amount of money.”

Kelly says the new deal is between Miraka and Shanghai Pengxin and does not involve Landcorp in any way. They get the Fonterra price – not the Miraka price. “We deliberately wrote that into the contract so we as the sharemilker are indifferent as to where we supply the milk. That’s what we do when we sharemilk for other farmers. It basically insulates the sharemilker from any vagaries of the independent companies, so we are tied to Fonterra.” Kelly says the four farms supplying

Miraka are within that company’s catchment area. The other farms will continue to supply Fonterra. Kelly says Landcorp made a conscious decision to supply Fonterra and nothing has changed in that regard. The Shanghai Pengxin decision doesn’t surprise Kelly. He believes they’ve always had a vision of getting their own milk, developing a brand and exporting product back to China. “They were never interested in owning the Crafar farms just to run them as dairy farms.”

in that country – Vinamilk. “The new factory will take 80 million litres a year and we hope to be delivering some of the new UHT milk to China within about 10 months. The UHT milk will be for the growing liquid milk trade in China. All the packaging will be done by us at our factory.” Because of the lack of refrigeration, UHT milk is the recognised substitute for fresh milk. Fonterra also sells UHT milk in China, but the fact that Shanghai Pengxin has gone with Miraka is seen as a coup for the fledging, successful company. Smiler says the deal took about a year to complete and reflects the synergy between Miraka and Shanghai Pengxin. “This is very positive for Miraka and the trusts that form Miraka. This is part of our growth strategy of adding more

Kingi Smiler

value to milk and it’s pleasing from our point of view to achieve that in the first couple of years of start-up.” Smiler says as well as signing the deal in China, they have been talking to customers and potential customers in Vietnam, China and Singapore and won’t rule out the possibility of more deals. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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Rural News // april 23, 2013

news 11

Forum attacks ‘bach, beach, beemer’ mentality LESLEY WILSON

BEHIND CLOSED doors last week agribusiness companies discussed the successes and failures of their companies as they have tried to expand into overseas markets. The Agritech Exec Forum, a brainchild of University of Waikato’s management school, provided a one-day, case study-based programme

results. It appears that outcomes have been very predictable,” says Rowarth. Rowarth has been thrilled at the response by the companies to the students. Most interesting are the co-operatives. “We have been working with Tatua, Synlait, Ravensdown, and NZ Farming Systems Uruguay. Tatua noted that one of the highest prior-

“Take your budget: halve your profit, double the time and treble the risk.” – Bill Falconer in which participants were shown the outcomes of studies of their businesses during the summer holidays by Waikato students. Agribusiness professor Jacqueline Rowarth, presenter at the forum, outlined progress so far. “Over summer three students worked on different strategies on how New Zealand companies can go global; they looked at how companies can go beyond what Trade and Enterprise call the ‘beach, bach and BMW’ mentality of many companies. “The students had been tasked to look at the theoretical models then work with their given companies published materials and press releases, and talk to chief executives and shareholders. They then compared the theoretical model with actual

ities has been relationship building and this exactly corresponds with a paper published by NZTE in 2009 ‘Playing to Our Strengths: Creating Value for Kiwi Firms’ ”. Rowarth says Kiwis are good at saying, ‘I’ve got something to sell, where can I sell it?’, rather than building relationships to help with the whole process – identifying real opportunities and capturing more of the value in the supply chain. The NZTE report also highlights this issue stating that innovation, which Kiwis are good at, needs to be broken down into two sections: initiation and implementation. It is the implementation phase that often lets New Zealand businesses down when they go global. A key message at

the forum was the identification of how New Zealand can get small to medium enterprises to think a bit bigger and get offshore though this will be tempered, notes Rowarth, by Bill Falconer’s saying ‘Take your budget:

halve your profit, double the time and treble the risk.’ “We are at the next phase of the study now,” says Rowarth. “The chief executives have been delightfully helpful and responsive to the stu-

dents and understandably are very interested in this phase.” The results from this work will be presented at the New Zealand Grassland Conference to be held in Tauranga in November 2013.

Jacqueline Rowarth

Drought Recovery PARTICIPATING VETS AND MERIAL ANCARE HAVE TEAMED UP TO PROVIDE EXTENDED TERMS ON MERIAL ANCARE SHEEP AND CATTLE DRENCHES.

Grass seed fears played down SUGGESTIONS BY some rural retailers that grass seed will be in short supply as farms re-sow drought damaged pasture have been played down by a major supplier. “We are seeing increased demand for some product categories but nothing’s running out at this stage,” PGG Wrightson Seeds’ general manager, David Green, told Rural News. “Some lines might sell out but if they do there will be good alternatives available from ours or others’ stables.” Seed crops had yielded reasonably well, and were harvested in good order, so in general stocks are good and processing plants keeping up with demand. “Some of the dressing stores are very busy and have been doing long hours but at this point they’ve been keeping up with it. Unless there’s some unexpected, unprecedented demand I don’t see that changing.”

TALK TO YOUR LOCAL VET TODAY TO DISCUSS HOW THEY CAN HELP YOUR STOCK AND YOUR CASHFLOW. •130411 Drought Assist 187x280.indd 1

17/04/13 2:16 PM


Rural News // April 23, 2013

12 news

Kiwifruit group extends biosecurity remit

Farmers soak it up! Farmers from all over the North Island soaked up the goodwill of sponsors and put their farming woes on the back burner during the recent Drought Shout at Tui Brewery in Mangatainoka in the Wairarapa. As many as 25 buses brought around 2000 farmers from afar a field as Napier, Taihape, Wanganui and South Wairarapa to the brewery for a fun day off the farm that included a helicopter beer drop, topdressing aeroplane display, stock-whip cracking competition, mechanical bull-riding competition, giveaways, barbecues and of course free cold Tui. PGG Wrightson regional manager Duncan Fletcher, one of the Drought Shout’s organisers, says he was overwhelmed with the turnout and the support received from local, regional and national businesses. The Drought Shout was the brain child of business leaders from Tui Brewery, PGG Wrightsons and Baker & Associates and follows the successful Drought Shout held at Tui Brewery in 2008, which attracted a crowd of 2000 thirsty farmers. Local, regional and national businesses collectively donated more than $78,000 to the Drought Shout while an additional $34,000 worth of in-kind support was also gifted.

pam tipa pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

FRUIT FLY is first on the list of priorities for Kiwifruit Vine Health as it takes the wider biosecurity role for the kiwifruit industry. The organisation was given a wider role beyond Psa-V as the result of a resolution at its annual meeting last year, says chief executive Barry O’Neil.

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“At the moment we are looking at fruit fly and the risks of fruit fly from Australia which are significant with the wider distribution of fruit fly in Australia and the amount of trade that is involved,” O’Neil told Rural News. “We are currently working with government to develop a partnership agreement under GIA (government industry agreements). We are preparing a draft we hope we will have in place by July which we believe will give the industry greater protection and result in better biosecurity overall.” Other substantial risks included Verticillium Wilt, a soil-borne pathogen which has caused substantial damage in the gold crop in some areas in Chile. “There are other varieties of Psa that are causing problems in Korea and Japan which we don’t have here, but there is a long list of pest and diseases that we believe are a potential risk to the industry,” O’Neil says. The wider biosecurity role now given to KVH includes monitoring

Barry O’Neil

and identifying biosecurity risks to the kiwifruit industry, arranging biosecurity surveillance, preparing for responses to biosecurity risks and, in the event of an incursion, leading the response in liaison with government, industry groups and agencies. It will also promote research and disseminate information regarding biosecurity risk. Its list of 13 organisms that could potentially ruin the kiwifruit industry include three types of fruit fly: the Queensland fruit fly, which the horticultural industry in general believes is one of the top risks to New Zealand; the Mediterranean fruit fly, which is one of the world worst pests; and Oriental fruit fly.

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Rural News // april 23, 2013

news 13

Lower bags likely this duck season david m c do n a l d

DUCK SHOOTERS are being asked to show patience in the face of a shorter season in some regions, prompted by lower numbers of birds. Summer banding by Fish and Game NZ’s eastern region office reveals lower numbers of Mallard, Grey and hybrid Greylard species. Banding gives information to compare bird numbers with the previous breeding season, which helps in setting bag limits. In some regions this will make the season shorter. Auckland/Waikato is one of the regions; the season will last only four weeks, two weeks down on last year. The game bird manager at Auckland/ Waikato Fish and Game, David Klee, told Rural News, “We have restrictive

conditions in place this season. The main species are down, particularly Mallard, which is why we have had to reduce the season in order to manage harvests and create sustainability. “In previous years we have had sufficient summer rainfall to provide birds with more options to move around to many ponds and dams, however this season birds will have limited choice of habitat.” He suggests that, “hunters be flexible and look around for larger water areas such as rivers and lakes. Those fortunate enough to have permanent water will do fine.

Safety first FIREARMS EXPERTS are urging duck shooters to curb their excitement and take care. John Greenwood, a firearms instructor for the Mountain Safety Council warns, “Unless you take care this shooting season you too could become a statistic, and the subject of numerous news headlines. “Accidental death or injury from careless or foolish use of firearms is almost at an all-time low, but every hunter needs to do his/her bit to ensure it stays that way.” Basic rules for safe firearm handling: ■■ Treat every firearm as loaded ■■ Always point firearms in a safe direction ■■ Load a firearm only when ready to fire ■■ Identify your target beyond all doubt ■■ Check your firing zone ■■ Store firearms and ammunition safely ■■ Avoid alcohol and drugs when handling firearms.

“Hunting enthusiasts shouldn’t get too gloomy about the forecasts; there are birds around, and there have been positive duck breeding patterns heading into May. A high proportion of juvenile ducks were present in the banding

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experiments done by Fish and Game, which is very positive.” Without speculating about other regions, Klee guesses most areas will likely be experiencing similar issues, mainly in the North Island, because of the drought. But the season looks promising in the South Island. Andrew Currie, South Island communications advisor at Fish and Game told Rural News, “The forecast for next week is looking great with plenty of rain which should see this situation eased. “Bird numbers are looking good too, many regions are conducting bird counts this week but early indications

are there will be plenty of birds come opening weekend. Southland is even reporting there should be more birds than last season. “Canterbury has had a good number of parries recorded over the summer, and Mallard numbers appear higher than previous years.” Fish and Game eastern region officer John Meikle insists preparation in the weeks prior increases the chance of success. “Good preparation may not guarantee a limit bag but will definitely enhance the chance of success.” Fish and Game is also reminding hunters to get their licences and ensure they are complying with rangers’ and local regulations. The game bird hunting season begins Saturday May 4.

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Rural News // April 23, 2013

14 news BE IN TO

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FEDERATED FARMERS is supporting plans to further investigate a major irrigation scheme for drought-prone Wairarapa. Local president Jamie Falloon says the federation is one of 19 stakeholders in the group working with Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) to further the project. The proposal is to irrigate 60,000ha. A study of the viability of such a scheme by consulting engineers Tonkin Taylor has presented nine options for dam sites. They include two south of Martinborough and seven north of Masterton, near the settlement of Mauriceville Falloon says he’s pleased with GWRC’s running of the project and getting stakeholders involved early rather than keeping the process secret. He says such a scheme could have huge benefits for the region, hence their support. “But we understand this has impacts on people and their properties and all we can do is to encour-

“We’ve got members whose land could be affected. We just hope the process works well with those people so they really understand what the implications are and the opportunity comes to a solution because the project will benefit the whole community.”

age them to remain in the process. That’s the way they can be heard and understand a lot better what the impacts are from the different dam sites. “We’ve got members whose land could be affected. We just hope the process works well with those people so they really understand what the implications are and the opportunity comes to a solution because the project will benefit the whole community.” GWRC chairwoman Fran Wilde says an irrigation scheme would be ‘transformational’ for Wairarapa and the greater Wellington region. She says the irrigation scheme

will not solve all of Wairarapa’s drought problems, given that much of the region is steep hill country. Wilde says she’s been looking at Canterbury and says while there is significant dairying in that region, there are other major users of irrigation who are growing crops, general arable farming and export seeds. She says these same possibilities arise in the Wairarapa. Environmental groups are also involved in the project and are part of the governance group, Wilde adds. “They understand that we are putting a lot of science into our water inves-

Fran Wilde

Fed’s back plan THE DROUGHT has highlighted the huge importance of irrigation to the dairy industry in Wairarapa, says Federated Farmers Dairy provincial chair,Chris Engel. He was able to keep irrigating his dairy farm from three bores on the property, but says others who relied on water from the rivers were out of luck. He says once the river reached its minimum flow level, restrictions kicked in. “You could have had the best irrigation system in the world but they were restricted and couldn’t use it because of the low flows.” Fran Wilde says quite by chance Greater Wellington is in the process of reviewing its regional plan at the same time as central government is developing its own water management and RMA reforms. She says by the time any irrigation scheme is in place, the new rules will also be place and that should make it easier for everyone. The scheme could take another five to eight years to complete – all going well, Wilde says.

tigations on this project. There will be strict rules on the users of this water. We won’t be tolerating any environmental misbehavior. We’ll expect people

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GOOD JOB WE DON’T MAKE ANY


Rural News // april 23, 2013

world 15

UK farmers want help to dispose of carcases SNOW-HIT SHEEP farmers in England and Wales have government permission – but no financial help – to bury and burn carcases onfarm. The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) will not help pay for the clean-up. The English and Welsh farmers say the clean-up will cost thousands of dollars. Most are not keen on burning or burying stock; they want cash to truck the carcases to knackers. The Northern Ireland and Scotland governments are helping financially. Carcasses are piling up on farms as more dead animals are recovered from the snow that fell during the coldest March for 51 years. At least 25,000 sheep, lambs and cattle are believed dead. NFU livestock board chairman Charles Sercombe says in some regions individual farmers had incurred huge losses. “No-one wants to see piles of burning animals in the countryside; it is not practical or desirable to dig pits to bury large numbers on-farm. It also flies

of the snow to deal with the clean up entirely by themselves. We are not ungrateful for the measures government has announced but they are requiring farmers to do things which are simply not practical in the situation they face.” NFU points out farmers are not asking for compensation for their loss.

But it is urging Defra and the National Fallen Stock Company (NFSC) to try to help with the real costs of removing and transporting the carcases. The NFSC is a not-for-profit organisation facilitating the removal of fallen stock from farms. Defra says it has asked NFSC to consider charging less for multiple collections of stock

from the same farm. NFSC chairman Michael Seals expects a big rise in the number of animals needing to be dealt with this month because most of those collected so far had died during bad weather before the heaviest snow falls. “It’s a disaster and as in all disasters the impact is never immediate,” he says.

18% average rise in deaths SHEEP CARCASES removed from UK farms rose 16% during the first three months of this year. National Fallen Stock Company says 148,000 dead sheep were removed this year compared to 128,000 last year. The biggest jump was in Scotland, where 33,600 carcasses were removed, 21% more than last year. In England the NFSC picked up 62,000 bodies, a jump of 18%.

in the face of [advice] over the past few years from government about dealing with dead livestock responsibly.” Farmers other options are to pay for collection of dead sheep, or load car-

cases onto their farm trailers and drive miles to knackers. “This is yet another pressure for farmers brought to their knees by a year in which upland livestock farm incomes have

halved, topped by the worst spring snow in living memory. “It is not fair or reasonable for government to expect families who have spent the past week digging their animals out

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Rural News // April 23, 2013

beef market trends

Market snapshot Meat c/kgCWT

North Island

South Island

Change c/kg

Change c/kg

Last Week

Last Week

BEEF PRICES

LAMB PRICES Change

c/kgCWT NI

lamb market trends

+2

P2 Steer - 300kg

Last Week

2 Wks Ago

Last Year

4.02

4.00

4.00

M2 Bull - 300kg

+2

3.97

3.95

4.10

NI Lamb

Last Week

Change

c/kgCWT

+5

YM - 13.5kg

2 Wks Ago

Last Year

4.36

4.31

5.58

PM - 16.0kg

+5

4.38

4.33

5.60

Lamb - PM 16.0kg

+5

4.38

n/c

4.38

P2 Cow - 230kg

+5

3.05

3.00

3.15

PX - 19.0kg

+5

4.40

4.35

5.62

Steer - P2 300kg

+2

4.02

n/c

3.70

M Cow - 200kg

+5

2.95

2.90

3.05

PH - 22.0kg

+5

4.41

4.36

5.63

Local Trade - 230kg

+5

4.05

4.00

4.05

Mutton

MX1 - 21kg

+5

2.60

2.55

3.20

P2 Steer - 300kg

n/c

3.70

3.70

3.85

SI Lamb

YM - 13.5kg

n/c

4.38

4.38

5.58

M2 Bull - 300kg

n/c

3.60

3.60

3.80

PM - 16.0kg

n/c

4.38

4.38

5.60

P2 Cow - 230kg

n/c

2.70

2.70

3.10

PX - 19.0kg

n/c

4.38

4.38

5.62

M Cow - 200kg

n/c

2.55

2.55

3.00

PH - 22.0kg

n/c

4.38

4.38

5.63

Local Trade - 230kg

n/c

3.78

3.78

3.90

n/c

2.38

2.38

3.10

Bull - M2 300kg

+2

3.97

n/c

3.60

Venison - AP 60kg

n/c

6.20

n/c

6.45

SI

North Island 16.0kg M Lamb Price $8.5

5yr Ave Last Year This Year

$7.5 $6.5

NZ Slaughter Change

3 Wks Ago

Cattle NI

-16%

34.4

40.9

38.1

50.0

Cattle SI

+9%

18.4

16.9

13.8

16.7

Cattle NZ

-9%

52.8

57.8

51.9

66.7

Bull NI

-37%

3.6

5.7

6.1

8.3

Bull SI

0%

1.5

1.5

1.6

2.2

Str & Hfr NI

-8%

10.2

11.1

13.8

17.0

Str & Hfr SI

-5%

5.5

5.8

5.3

7.0

1000s

$4.5 $3.5 Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

South Island 16.0kg M Lamb Price $8.5

5yr Ave Last Year This Year

$7.5

Cows NI

-15%

20.6

24.1

18.2

24.7

$5.5

Cows SI

+19%

11.4

9.6

6.9

7.6

NZ Weekly Beef Kill

80

$3.5 Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

40

5yr Ave Last Year This Year

$4.5

3 Wks Ago

Lamb NI

-33%

148

221

182

235

Lamb SI

+25%

383

307

307

414

Lamb NZ

+0%

531

528

490

649

Mutton NZ

-5%

73

77

44

69

NZ Weekly Lamb Kill

900 750 600 450 300 150 0

Last Year This Year

Feb

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Change

$3.5 $3.0 Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

2 Wks Ago

n/c

2.20

2.20

2.19

1.78

NZ$/kg

-14

5.62

5.76

5.82

5.28

Demand Indicator - US 95CL Beef

Jun

Last Week

2 Wks Ago

Last Year 5yr Ave

n/c

1.50

1.50

1.72

1.79

NZ$/kg

-9

5.89

5.98

7.29

8.69

£2.50

Last Year This Year

£2.00 £1.50 £1.00 Jan

Last Year

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

This Year

$2.20

$4.0

May

Demand Indicator - UK Leg Price Last Year 5yr Ave

95CL US$/lb

South Island 300kg Steer Price

$4.5

Last Week

Apr

UK Leg £/lb

Export Market Demand

$4.0

Mar

Change

This Year

0

Last Year 5yr Ave

Export Market Demand

Last Year

20

North Island 300kg Bull Price

$5.0

2Wks Ago

1000s

Jan

60

Estimated Weekly Kill Change

Last Year 5yr Ave

$6.5

$4.5

MX1 - 21kg

NZ Slaughter

Estimated Weekly Kill 2Wks Ago

$5.5

Mutton

Procurement Indicator $3.5

Change

2Wks Ago

3 Wks Ago

% Returned NI

+2%

75.6%

73.6%

78.9%

60.8%

% Returned SI

+1%

74.7%

73.6%

78.5%

57.7%

5yr Ave Last Year

$2.00 Jan

This Year

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

$3.0 Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Procurement Indicator

5yr Ave Last Year This Year

$8.0 $7.5

Change

3 Wks Ago

% Returned NI

+3%

70.3%

67.2%

70.44%

70.1%

80%

% Returned SI

+1%

64.1%

63.4%

65.3%

65.2%

70%

Last Year 5yr Ave

Procurement Indicator - North I.

90%

$7.0

Procurement Indicator - North I.

Last Year

90%

Last Year

60%

This Year

50% Jan

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

South Island 60kg Stag Price

$8.5

60% Jan

Mar

May

5yr Ave Last Year

$8.0

This Year

Procurement Indicator - South I.

90%

Last Year This Year

$7.5

80%

$7.0 $6.5

70%

$6.0 Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Procurement Indicator - South I.

70%

$6.0

Feb

This Year

80%

$6.5

100%

2Wks Ago

North Island 60kg Stag Price

$8.5

Last Year 5yr Ave

105% 95% 85% 75% 65% 55% 45%

Last Year This Year

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Venison Prices

60% Jan

Mar

Change

May

Beef & venison prices are reported as gross (before normal levies & charges are deducted). Lamb & mutton prices are reported nett (after levies & charges are deducted). Note: Freight is paid in the North Island but not by all companies in the South Island.

Last Week

2 Wks Ago

Last Year 5yr Ave

NI Stag - 60kg

n/c

6.20

6.20

7.15

7.17

SI Stag - 60kg

n/c

6.45

6.45

7.20

7.45

M re people on the ground,


Rural News // april 23, 2013

news BEEF

price watch WOOL PRICE WATCH Change

11-Apr

04-Apr

Coarse Xbred Indic.

-7

3.89

3.96

4.58

Fine Xbred Indicator

-14

4.75

4.89

5.32

Lamb Indicator

-15

5.11

5.26

5.10

-

-

-

-

Procurement competition heating up

Indicators in NZ$

Farmgate prices lifted in the North Island last week with procurement competition heating up as the kill continues to fall. The North Island cattle kill dipped a further 16% week on week. Dry conditions have meant the kill peaked earlier and higher than usual. Meat companies are reducing capacity fairly quickly and are keen to fill as many hooks as they can in the meantime. It’s a different story in the South Island as kill rates there are still on the up with cull dairy cows now coming out in force. The cow kill in the south lifted 20% week on week and is now 50% higher than 5yr average levels for this time. There is less competition to fill capacity as a result and prices there continue to hold steady. The rampant NZ dollar is cutting into overseas market returns at present and is acting to limit both meat company and farmgate returns. If the dollar stays at high levels, the industry will need to lower their sights on expected returns through the autumn and winter. Meanwhile US imported beef prices continue to hold despite limited trading and subdued consumer demand.

Mid Micron Indic.

The North Island weekly lamb kill dropped 50% in the space of two week as the availability of killable lambs plummets. The North Island kill is already well advanced this season due to drought conditions and the expected shortage has become apparent very quickly. Farmgate prices began to lift in the North Island last week as procurement pressure ramps up. There has been a wide variety of prices on offer for works lambs. Export lamb prices ranged from $4.35-$4.50/kg (gross incl. pelt/presentation etc) last week. Local trade prices were around $4.60/kg and up to $4.65/kg on an ‘all weights & grades’ basis. Some supply contract prices also kicked in at around $4.80/kg. South Island farmgate prices remain flat with better numbers of lamb coming forward for kill there.

Store lamb prices still under pressure After rallying strongly a couple of weeks ago store lamb prices, particularly in the North Island, faced further downward pressure last week. The number of store lambs hitting the market has lifted as the autumn progresses and many regions are still very short of feed. Feed conditions are also limiting demand. Big yardings of lambs at Feilding (64,000 head in 2 weeks) and other yards were too much for the level of buyer interest and prices have slipped back to around $1.70/kg for 30-35kg males lambs in the North Island.

DAIRY

Skim Milk Powder Whole Milk Powder Cheddar

Last 2 Wks

Prev. 2 Wks

Last Year 4461

+133

5241

5108

+1,558

6443

4884

3797

+455

6370

5915

4114

-102

5096

5198

4521

SMP But.

6,000

WMP Ched.

5,000

400

4,000

350 300 Apr

Jun

Aug

Oct

Dec

3,000 Apr

Feb

Coarse Xbred Indicator

600

Jun

Aug

Oct

Dec

Feb

Whole Milk Powder Price (NZ$)

7,500 Last Year This Year

Last Year

6,500

This Year

5,500 4,500

300

3,500 Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Overseas Price Indicators Indicators in US$/kg Coarse Xbred Indicator

11-Apr

Last Year

04-Apr

+1

3.34

3.33

3.74

-4

4.08

4.12

4.34

-4

4.39

4.43

4.17

-

-

-

-

Lamb Indicator Mid Micron Indicator

Jan

Feb

Indicators in US$/T Butter Skim Milk Powder Whole Milk Powder Cheddar

Wool Indicator in US$

550

CXI

500

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Overseas Price Indicators

Change

Fine Xbred Indicator

Change

Last 2 Wks

Prev. 2 Wks

Last Year 3700

+250

4525

4275

+1,475

5563

4088

3150

+550

5500

4950

3413

+50

4400

4350

3750

Dairy Prices in US$/Tonne

FXI

LI

SMP .But

5,500

450

WMP .Ched

4,500

400 350

3,500

300 250 Apr

Jun

Aug

Oct

Dec

2,500 Apr

Feb

Coarse Xbred Indictor in US$ 550 Last Year This Year

500 450 400 350 300 250 Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

vs. NZ Dollar

Last Week 2 Wks Ago 4 Wks Ago Last Year 0.821

0.830

Euro

0.659

0.651

0.631

0.630

UK pound

0.561

0.553

0.544

0.520

0.75

Aus dollar

0.819

0.807

0.791

0.798

0.70

Japan yen

86.09

81.12

78.79

67.27

This Year

0.62 0.58

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

, here and overseas.

May

Jun

Dec

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

US Dollar

Feb

Jun

Last Year

0.85

0.842

0.66

Oct

This Year

0.90

0.863

Last Year

Aug

Last Year

Jan

US dollar

Euro

Jun

Whole Milk Powder Price in US$/T

6,000 5,500 5,000 4,500 4,000 3,500 3,000 2,500

CURRENCY WATCH

Dairy prices surge as production drops Oceanic dairy prices continue to surge following trends in recent gDT auctions. Milk production continues to be impacted by dry conditions in both NZ and Australia. The condition of pastures, cows and availability of feed are all major concerns for farmers and cows continue to be dried-off. Milk powder prices are lifting sharply and the market tone is very strong with limited supply resulting in unfilled demand. Some buyers are now being priced out of the market at these levels.

LI

450

400

Butter

Change

Dairy Prices Trends

FXI

500

The severe US weather conditions are again taking their toll on the US beef herd with indications further liquidation is occurring as a result of the prolonged winter and drought. This will hamper US beef supply in the years to come and will likely boost the need for imported product. Beef cow slaughter is only 6% behind 2012 levels so far this year and according to experts it needs to be double that figure to suggest herd stabilisation. To add insult to injury, drought stress over the past two years is seeing reduced reproductive performance and dry cows are being ousted in the face of limited feed supplies. Storms have added to calf losses and cold weather in the central and northern plains has exhausted hay supplies and is also forcing more cattle to kill.

North Island lamb kill halves in 2 weeks

CXI

550

500

Indicators in NZ$/T

Wool Indicator Trends

600

US beef numbers may still be falling

LAMB

DAIRY PRICE WATCH Last Year

This Year

0.80

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

UK Pound

0.58 0.56 0.54 0.52 0.50 0.48 0.46

Last Year This Year

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun


Rural News // April 23, 2013

18 agribusiness

Drought to bite Landcorp’s full year result PA M TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

THE DROUGHT looks likely to have wiped out Landcorp’s projected profits for the 2012/13 year ending in June. The company made a net operating profit of $2.5 million for the half year ending December 31, 2012 and was projecting a

full-year result of $6-$8m. But because of “the worst drought in many years” it now says it is unlikely to return a profit or pay a full-year dividend. The $2.5m first-half profit was down from $11m in the first half of 2011/12 due to softer farm product prices, “but production increased, operat-

ing expenses were tightly controlled and major redevelopments remained on track,” the company says. “Dairy and meat producers will generally have lower returns in 2012/13 due to softer international market prices and the relatively high New Zealand dollar,” the directors said in the half-year

report. “We have foreseen these developments and focused on what Landcorp can manage – operating expenditure and continued improvement in our farming systems with knowledge, technology and skilled people.” However, since the impact of the drought, chief executive Chris Kelly

says Landcorp is now actively managing its 119 farms to ensure stock welfare is not compromised. With destocking where necessary, judicious use of supplements and careful pasture management, they hope to minimise the impact of the drought on next season’s production. Total revenues to

Chris Kelly

December 31 were down 7.4% to $95.4 million reflecting the general easing in dairy, meat and wool prices. Milk revenue fell 10.7% to $47.3 million despite production growth, while livestock revenue was down 5.3% to $43.8 million. Wool, forestry and other revenues also eased. While growing conditions in the first half before the drought were generally favourable, lamb production was impacted by spring snow in part of Otago and Southland. Overall the South Island lambing rate fell to 131%, with production almost 15,000 lambs lower than budget. In contrast North Island lambing rose to 145%. Landcorp’s milk production continued to increase in the first half – up 6% on the corresponding period in 2011/12.

The partnership with Chinese company Shanghai Pengxin for the operation and development of 16 former Crafar farms began on November 30. Landcorp has now spent about $21.4m on livestock for the farms in the central North Island and Manawatu. Plans for the farms, totalling 5689ha, include further spending by Shanghai Pengxin to lift productivity and starting a Landcorp-led training programme from 2014/15. Landcorp is also working with Wairakei Pastoral Ltd on further development of the six-dairy-unit Wairakei Estate near Taupo which currently carries 7000 cows. Landcorp also expects its lamb supply to Tesco in the UK will be up 20% this year – from early December it was supplying 5000 lambs to specification each week.

Lincoln bounces back post-quake A n d r ew Swa l low andrews@ruralnews.co.nz

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY vice chancellor Andy West is hopeful the institution has turned the corner in enrolment numbers which were down 30% after the 2011 earthquake. “We’ve seen an increase in overseas enrolments for the first time since the earthquake. Now we’re waiting to see what amount the Government will give us to help us rebuild,” he told Rural News. About 40% of the university’s academic space is still empty. Besides the rebuild money, he says the Government is “listening” on the long-standing problem of inadequate funding for primary industry qualifications. “Every agriculture and horticulture student we take on, we lose money on. They’ve been under-priced for 25 years.” This year’s seen a 39% increase in enrolments for undergraduate agricultural science degrees. “The total’s still under 100 but that’s one of our flagship courses so it’s a really encouraging sign that people believe in the future of farming. Hopefully there will be an even more significant boost in enrolment next year.” A trend in enrolments the university could do without, he adds, is students signing up for the first-term only. “In 2007, 85% of enrolments in February were for the full year. This year 55% were for the first term only, presumably to save some money. It means the stats aren’t comparable anymore and we don’t really know how many we’ve got [for the year] until August.”


Rural News // april 23, 2013

agribusiness 19

francis wolfgram Finance Matters

NZ Dairy Market 1 Mth Ago

3 Mths Change in Ago 2013

NZD/Tonne

Whole Milk Powder(WMP)

6,187

6,035

3,879

64.2%

Skim Milk Powder(SMP)

5,612

4,778

4,191

42.8%

Butter Milk Powder(BMP)

4,698

4,606

4,017

27.4%

CHEESE

5,608

5,090

4,125

32.7%

new zealand agri shares Company

Prices as at 15/04/2013

Divdend Yield

LIC

Livestock Improvement Corporation Limited (NS)

$5.80

9.38%

SAN

Sanford Limited

$4.50

7.30%

SKL

Skellerup Holdings

$1.44

7.77%

HNZ

Heartland New Zealand

$0.76

6.40%

HBY

Hellaby Holdings

$3.10

5.92%

SEK

Seeka Kiwifruit Industries Limited

$1.64

5.23%

DGL

Delegat’s Group Limited

$3.74

3.44%

FSF

Fonterra Units

$7.38

2.10%

2013

12-15 June

NZX Code

Livestock Improvement shares held steady at $5.80 with no major news since the last issue. Sanford had a choppy ride over the last two weeks, with a high of $4.55 per share and a low of $4.44 as of April 17. In addition, a press release on April 17 states that Sanford backs NZ-US Ross Sea protection for tougher rules put on fishing vessels. Skellerup Holdings have had no major news to report and the share price remains stable at $1.43. Heartland continues its strong run – up to 78 cents per share. Hellaby Holdings announced a dividend reinvestment plan, this is when the company gives shareholders the option of receiving a cash dividend or more shares in the company. Seeka Kiwifruit share price has come off slightly and is down to $1.64 from $1.70 on April 5. Delegat’s Group continues its good run holding steady at $3.78, but is up from $2.94 since the start of 2013. The Fonterra units have had a choppy ride over the last two weeks, but have settled to be about even at $7.19 from $7.23 on April 5. It paid its half year dividend of 16 cents per unit on April 10 giving it a year-on-year yield of 4.2%.

US Agricultural Commodity Prices Price This Price Last Change Issue Issue

Commodity

Units

Live Cattle

USD/Kg

$2.662

$2.713

-$0.051

Feeder Cattle

USD/Kg

$3.107

$3.241

-$0.134

Lean Hogs

USD/Kg

$1.982

$2.025

-$0.043

Greasy Wool

USD/Kg

$11.300

$12.300

-$1.000

Corn

USD/ Bushel

$6.315

$6.405

-$0.090

Wheat

USD/ Bushel

$7.100

$6.708

$0.393

US wheat ending stocks for 2012/13 are projected 15 million bushels higher this month, with a small increase in seed use more than offset by lower expected feed and residual disappearance. Global wheat supplies for 2012/13 have risen 2.9 million tons and global wheat trade is projected higher for 2012/13, with exports up 2.6 million tons. Corn feed and residual disappearance is down by 150 million bushels, this reduction in corn feed and residual use is partly offset by a combined 20-million-bushel increase in projected feed and residual use for the other feed grains. US domestic corn use for 2012/13 is projected 100 million bushels lower –with a 50-millionbushel increase in corn used to produce ethanol partly offsetting the lower projection for feed and residual disappearance. The 2013 forecast of total red meat and poultry production is lowered from last month. Beef production is forecast down as lower expected fed cattle and bull slaughter more than offset greater cow slaughter. The pork production forecast is raised, with the March 28 quarterly hogs and pigs report indicating a slightly higher than expected first-quarter pig crop. Hog carcass prices are also raised as feed prices are forecast lower. This table and information is in no way a recommendation to buy or sell any share but a list of New Zealand agrishares that have the highest dividends. Please consult your financial advisor before entering into any sharemarket investment.

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Product

The latest GDT auction on April 16 showed only a modest rise of 0.6% in the GDT Trade Weighted Index (TWI), which measures the basket of dairy goods we trade. This doesn’t impact on the overall picture for New Zealand’s dairy commodity prices for 2013 as the commodities we cover of whole milk power, skim milk powder, butter milk powder and cheese are up an average of 41.8%. In response to these rises, Westpac has further revised up its forecast total dairy payout (for a 100% share-backed farmer) to $6.60/kg for the 2012/13 season and says it could go as high as $6.90/kg. New Zealand’s production of whole milk powder has nearly doubled over the last five years, by about 600,000 tonnes roughly equivalent to Europe’s total annual output of whole milk powder. Much of this has gone to meet rising Chinese demand, which is still growing at a rapid pace. As a result, New Zealand is now a much bigger player in a tight market and local production shortfalls are having a bigger impact on price. Another thing that’s changed in recent years is that growth in dairy production has increasingly taken place in the South Island, where irrigation is more prevalent – making farms more resilient to drought.


Rural News // April 23, 2013

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20 agribusiness

Chinese strategy needs harder edge – bank PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

OUR CHINA export story needs to “get a harder edge”, moving from talk to execution, says ANZ’s chief economist Cameron Bagrie. New Zealand needs to “get fixated on how we are going to win”, says Bagrie, as current conversations in the primary sector are too much dominated by the ‘opportunity’ story. ““It’s a subtle shift away from opportunity – towards execution. It needs to have that harder edge,” Bagrie told a recent DairyNZ Farmers Forum in Whangarei. “The time for talk in New Zealand is done. If you see presentations from the likes of Fonterra or other suppliers or entities that are talking about those markets, get them focused away from the opportunities – ask them why and what are they doing to win,” Bagrie advised farmers. “You need a sustainable answer to that to drive confidence in your businesses.” Bagrie says everyone is talking the upside of China and the opportunities are real, but he has concerns. New Zealand’s exports into China have grown 18% per year for the past six years – but Chinese imports into New Zealand have grown 20% per year. “Right here and now we are talking a big gain – but we are actually losing market share,” he said. With a free market agreement in place we should be making much bigger gains. Bagrie said when he listens to presentations by New Zealand’s top exporters, including Fonterra, he is “amazed” at how much talk there is about China. They put up “wonder-

“Right here and now we are talking a big gain – but we are actually losing market share.”

ful slides” on lots of mouths to feed, that they will eventually relax the onechild policy and it looks a great story. “I put up my hand and say ‘that’s great – how are you going to execute’? What’s the strategy?” said Bagrie. “A lot of countries around the globe recognise China is there too and they are starting to milk a lot more cows. “It is not just across the dairy sector; I am seeing this across other pockets of the rural scene. I am looking at the meat industry and whether we will get consolidation there. “I am looking at the composition of New Zealand’s boards. How many of New Zealand’s food exporters have a person of Asian descent on their board? If you can name one please let me know. At the moment I can’t find one. I can find one for manufacturing but I can’t find one in the food related area.” To be fair, Bagrie says he believes

ANZ national chief economist Cameron Bagrie told the Farmers Forum in Whangarei the time for talk on China is over.

there is “good stuff” going on behind the scenes, citing a recent Fonterra presentation with an impressive page on strategy. “What I would like to see was that sort of stuff getting out there more and more.” He told the farmers as suppliers to these entities they needed to be asking questions. “If you have got confidence in their strategy, that’s going to drive confidence in your own strategy. But it needs to start at the top. We need to be taking that debate to the conversation more and more across New Zealand today.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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Rural News // April 23, 2013

22 opinion editorial

edna

Heat on fert co-ops THE BLOWTORCH of farmer shareholder action is firmly on meat cooperatives Alliance and Silver Fern Farms at present, but there’s a strong case for it also being applied to Ballance and Ravensdown. Ask any farmer/shareholder of the fertiliser cooperatives what they see as the cooperative’s core function and most would answer it’s ensuring key soil nutrient products are available when they need them at an appropriate quality and the best possible price – not livestock feed, sprays, drenches, data storage, or pasture measurement systems; not even top-dressing services. So it’s little wonder some of the fertiliser cooperative shareholders are questioning the direction of their companies, given the plethora of activities other than fertiliser these firms are engaged in. Recent talk about shareholders importing fertiliser for themselves – because they can get a better price and/or product than that offered by their cooperative – will only add to these questions. Farmer shareholders do not invest in cooperatives because they are looking for capital growth and a financial yield on investment; they do so because they want to ensure they get the best possible deal on inputs and services, and best possible return for product. Any dividend, or rebate, is just a bonus. The near-duopoly structure of the fertiliser market ensures competition, we’re told, but competition in what? Most efficient fertiliser supply or building the biggest sales support network and diversified business? Our fertiliser cooperatives have become behemoths, making lean, mean management hard to deliver. Of course, the cooperatives argue environmental regulation – impending or already implemented – means they need more people on the road to help shareholders meet these rules. But is that service best delivered by the fertiliser cooperative? Cries of “conflict of interest” have already been heard. The boards of Ballance and Ravensdown have, presumably, long since answered these questions, which is why a game changer is needed. Let’s call it “Fert Direct”, a company focussed purely on supplying core bulk fertiliser products at the best possible price. Preferably a member-owned cooperative, it will only take orders online or by phone, with no reps, cars, laptops or branded clothes out on the road; no capital invested in spin-off businesses irrelevant to shareholders’ farms.

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“Psst! – when you’ve thanked him for making the rain fall, ask him if he can do the same for the dollar!”

the hound Fonterra’s $300K man? YOUR OLD mate hears that while All Black captain Richie McCaw may currently be on sabbatical from playing the national game, he’s still on the meter at Fonterra. Captain Fantastic recently took a short break from his non-rugby playing jaunt around the world to turn up in Sri Lanka for a photo–op with Fonterra and promote the dairy co-op’s operations in that country. At least Fonterra is making McCaw do some work for the supposed $300k-a-year retainer they are paying him!

Want to share your opinion or gossip with the Hound? Send your emails to: hound@ruralnews.co.nz

Protest too much! THE HOUND notes that the Feds were lightning fast to distance themselves from the recent tour of New Zealand by well-known climatechange sceptic Lord Monckton. The farmer lobby was quick to issue a media release denying it was supporting the controversial peer’s anticlimate change tour after Monckton said in a television interview that his tour was organised and supported by Federated Farmers of New Zealand. “This is incorrect,” vice president William Rolleston was quoted as saying.

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Anti-farming?

Eckhoff is off

Oh well!

YOUR CANINE crusader mate notes that the united front of the Meat Industry Excellence (MIE) group is looking decidedly less united these days. MIE burst on the scene a month or so back with big plans and demands for industry reform and attracted 1000 farmers to a meeting in Gore. This meeting was chaired by former ACT MP Gerry Eckhoff who was a leading light in the group. However, he now has resigned from MIE. It appears dysfunction, infighting, big egos and personality clashes are not just confined to the meat companies.

THE HOUND is intrigued by the deafening silence from the Green Party over recent news that London-based company Craigmore Sustainables has been granted Overseas Investment Office approval to acquire up to 95% of the securities of five New Zealand farms. Does this lack of noise from the Greens – who are only too quick to jump up and down about other overseas companies buying New Zealand farms – due to the fact that Craigmore Sustainables. Forbes Elworthy, was listed as one of the party’s major donors at the last election?

IT APPEARS to the Hound that his favourite (yeah, right) academic, Massey University’s Mike Joy(less) is not happy unless he is putting the boot into New Zealand farmers in some way. So your old mate was not surprised to see the omnipresent Dr Joy(less) pop up on a recent Campbell Live programme trying to whip up public hysteria about ‘dangerous’ cadmium levels on New Zealand farms and how they are producing toxic meat and vegetables. The question for farmers thinking of sending their kids to Massey; why bother when it is so antifarming?

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Rural News is published by Rural News Group Ltd. All editorial copy and photographs are subject to copyright and may not be reproduced without prior written permission of the publisher. Opinions or comments expressed within this publication are not necessarily those of staff, management or directors of Rural News Group Ltd.


Rural News // april 23, 2013

opinion 23

Is it deja vu all over again? PERSUADING ARCH rivals Silver Fern Farms and Alliance to join together is a vision that could be set to music. Down in the Deep South, where the two meat cooperatives originally evolved, in these difficult times some sort of merger should be easily put into effect. The latest effort to bring the parties together has a certain youthful feel about it – as if those driving the endeavour are learning as they go. This merger mission, known as Meat Industry Excellence (MIE), has been similarly promoted many times before and after several close calls is quietly put back on the shelf. (Have

all rewarded appropriately. Basically they want efficiencies from the farm gate through to the consumers’ plate. These are noble and not unreasonable requests, but would take a huge effort and cost to implement. They are not exactly brand-spanking new ideas. The MIE’s first meeting in Gore attracted an estimated 1000, exceeding expectations. The success of that meeting may have prompted some of the bloodletting that followed and the resignations of some of the initial founding leaders. The main area of disagreement appears to be the timing of meetings with the processors. The

munities have had a chance to assess their abilities in some real life action. Most of our present leaders are reaching the end of their careers. It’s inevitable the coming decade will see many new faces taking over top ruralrelated positions. The MIE will give them

a great chance to be ready

when the call comes. The opportunities will escalate when the ‘baby boomer’ bulge hits retirement. As one of my mate’s, who has climbed the producer board ladder, said, there were few soap boxes left for aspiring leaders. In his day the electoral college was a brilliant tool to

identify up and coming talent. The electoral college had elected members throughout the country who came together several times a year to select directors for the meat and wool boards. Without something like an electoral college, there were few

opportunities to become well known. Even if MIE fails initially, its day will come and along the way several farming leaders will have made their mark. • John Stirling is a south Otago farmer who formerly was agricultural editor of the Otago Daily Times.

Former ACT MP Gerry Eckhoff was suddenly dumped from MIE and is no longer part of the group.

you ever wondered what happened to the red meat strategy?) This exercise has all the familiar hall-marks of those that have gone on before. There is little that is new. However there is no doubting the sincerity of the promoters. I know all of them well, just as I know well the chairmen and chief executives of Silver Fern Farms and Alliance. I’m sure all parties want the best outcome for the New Zealand meat industry, especially with the dairy industry breathing down their necks. The Meat Industry Excellence group says they want a meat industry working together to maximise returns for farmers and allow industry profitability. They want an industry that follows bestpractice, efficient processing and strong marketing

chairmen from Silver Fern Farms and Alliance were at the meeting and sat together. It was emphasised the cost of closing a works was about $250 million. Any merger would mean closures and a likely total bill of about $600 million. The SFF and Alliance chairmen asked the audience who was going to pay. They emphasised discussions between both their cooperatives and other industry players were ongoing. These had considered all aspects of potential mergers. One of the positives of the gathering was the relative youth of those running the campaign. Those leading MIE have the potential to be leaders of the future. This exercise may well struggle – especially with some of their leaders moving on. But the farming com-

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Rural News // April 23, 2013

24 opinion Demand for meat industry change! RECENTLY I attended a meeting in Gore where a clear and unequivocal message was given to the directors and executives of the meat companies that their owners and suppliers demand a change. The response at the meeting, and in the media since, from the boards and executives is that it is not a simple solution and will be very difficult to achieve.

No one could dispute this. It then becomes a simple case of “don’t bring me problems, bring me solutions.” If the current boards and executives cannot achieve the outcomes their suppliers and owners are demanding they should step aside, while people who have the skill sets required are recruited and employed.

For many years the industry has treated farmers with a level of contempt suggesting that the complexities and problems plaguing the industry were beyond the understanding of farmers. I would like to point out that, to date, these farmers have been astute enough business people to establish, maintain and survive in an extremely hostile busi-

ness environment, as well as prop up the businesses these experts are currently running into the ground. It would seem the complexities are actually beyond their ability so again maybe it is time for them to step aside. Most people in and around the industry are wondering how the architects of a $100 million loss to the industry actually still

have jobs – knowing full well if they had comparable losses within their own operations they would not have a business or a job on Monday. The directors and executives of these farmerowned businesses have been told directly to put aside the personal agendas and animosities they have allowed to become institutionalised.

To continue to ignore these implicit instructions should put their future employment in peril.

James Russell Gorge Creek Station RD2 Alexandra

farmers need to clean up their act THE REPORT in Rural News (April 9, page 27) on a photo and story in the New Zealand Herald made me think about how the public react to farming practices and how [farmers produce the products consumers eat]. If they get upset seeing how a downed cow is dispatched, how do you think they would react to a photo of a new born dairy calf having its head smashed in with a sledge hammer in front of its dam? As if this is not harrowing enough, what about a pile of dead calves piled up for the slinky man to collect with some of the animals still barely alive (still twitching and although not detected in the photo, calling out in distress)? If you don’t believe this, go and ask any ‘slinky’ man; they find it unpleasant too. I pulled in at a service station in Culverden one August to see a truck with a trailer piled high with carcases. I couldn’t make out what they were for a minute before I realised they were dead Jersey calves.  No attempt had been made to cover the carcases and it made me think how callous production had become.  Were even the general public and children in a rural environment comfortable with such a sight? The scale of dairy farming in New Zealand is unprecedented: with a herd of 1000 cows, how can 1000 calves be humanely dealt with during the course of calving?  It is a practice that needs to be cleaned up before a potentially devastating exposure.   Even the giant Fonterra should be putting some careful thought into an acceptable practice by their milk suppliers. If we expect to be able to export dairy products into the UK/EU then standards need to be the same.  I appreciate that any changes introduced would result in additional costs, but as experienced in the pork industry, the public were prepared to pay as the changes made were acceptable. Jean Court RD1 Darfield (Abridged)

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Rural News // april 23, 2013

management 25

Rust risk from farm travel

This month’s round of Foundation of Arable Research autumn trial results meetings held the usual smorgasbord of agronomic tips plus a briefing from a world authority on cereal rusts. Andrew Swallow reports. NEXT TIME you return from a busman’s holiday overseas, change your clothes and footwear before checking on the farm, warns a global authority on cereal diseases.

Prof Robert Park

If you don’t, you might introduce a new strain of rust or other disease, Professor Robert Park, the director of Australia’s cereal rust programme warned growers at the Foundation of Arable Research’s recent round of autumn trial results meetings.

“If you’ve been in a wheat field [overseas] and come home and walk about in your own wheat crops and don’t wash your clothing first you could inadvertently be inoculating your wheat crop with a novel pathogen,” he told the Timaru meeting. Park is in New Zealand to shed light on the strains of rust circulating in our cereal crops after a decade-long biosecurity-driven ban on sending samples from New Zealand to Australia for analysis. “We haven’t been able to test for ten years,” explained FAR’s Nick Poole. In contrast, Australia, the US, and other major cereal producing nations keep close tabs on the strains, races and pathotypes of the disease in their crops, enabling them to trace where outbreaks originate and alert growers to the emergence of to page 26

Break the green-bridge RUSTS REQUIRE green material to live on and spores are only viable for a week or two, which is why non-crop phases can be used to good effect to reduce infection risk, says the director of Australia’s cereal rust programme, Robert Park (see main story). The key is to remove “the green bridge” of host material such as volunteers. “You want to have the volunteers removed four weeks before the [following cereal] crop is coming out of the ground,” he advises. Grazing with stock, spraying, and/or cultivation can all work. Breeding resistance into cereal cultivars

is another key tool, but the rusts may mutate to produce new strains, and old strains may resurface if a new cultivar with a gap in its armoury becomes popular. Cultivar resistance may either be “all stage” resistance, meaning the plant is able to fight off the pathogen from the day it germinates, or “adult plant resistance” (APR), meaning the plant becomes resistant to the pathogen(s) at some point in its development. All stage resistance tends to have a major effect, preventing any disease development but the problem is it tends to be overcome by the pathogen over time, such that the resis-

tance breaks down completely, explained Park. In contrast, APR effects are generally more minor, but by stacking genes conferring such resistance in a cultivar, high levels of resistance can be achieved. “It’s like one plus one equalling five, instead of two. This resistance has a tendency to be more durable. The pathogen finds it more difficult to overcome the effect.” Exactly when APR kicks-in varies depending on the strain of resistance, from as early as growth stage 30 (pseudo-stem erect), to as late as growth stage 59 (ear fully emerged).

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Rural News // April 23, 2013

26 management

UK-NZ tandem trial a first THE FOUNDATION of Arable Research is going to new lengths in its quest to push wheat yields to 20t by 2020 – literally. It has set up a trial at Leeston which is being replicated 19,000km away in England. The UK arm of the work is being run by NIAB TAG but is using exactly the same cultivar, fungicide and nitrogen rate combinations. The aim is to keep the crop green and photosyn-

thesising longer so it accumulates more yield, by using later ripening cultivars, sowing earlier and using more nitrogen and fungicide. While last year’s late harvest meant the first year’s plots weren’t sown until March 30, they’ve produced some impressive yields. “We’re knocking on the door of 17t/ha,” commented FAR’s Nick Poole, referring to the 16.95t/ha

Nick Poole

produced by a high input plot of Conqueror. “Okay, this is in a trial situation but we’ve got to

push the boundaries with these trials to see what the potential is in a commercial situation.” A four fungicide programme was used across all plots, but for two of the programmes new SDHI products were added. Similarly nitrogen was applied either at 140kg/ha or 240kg/ha. Poole noted there were some marked contrasts in how the seven cultivars responded to those input

levels. For example, with Conqueror, extra nitrogen was no benefit unless the SDHI fungicides were included to keep it clean. Wakanui, a more disease resistance cultivar, responded more to nitrogen than fungicides, while Claire’s output was driven by both. Across all cultivars, there was “a significant advantage to the strob/ SDHI fungicide programme once at 240kg of

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$/ha margin over inputs Cultivar

Extra 100kg N/ha only

Extra 100kg N+ extra fungicide

Wakanui

29

152

Conqueror

-87

291

Claire

115

231

Kingdom

138

306

Empress

41

84

Stigg

206

309

Phoenix

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174

Mean

71

221

nitrogen,” he pointed out. When aiming for such high yields growers may need to rethink their target numbers of ears per square metre in wheats, he added. “For a 15t/ha plus crop, 450 ears just doesn’t cut it… When we’re aiming for 15t plus, we need to

review that ear number a little.” Analysis of the components of yield in the trial – ears per square metre; grains per ear; thousand grain weight – revealed the highest yielding plot of Conqueror had 610 ears/ sq m.

Rust risk from page 25

any new strain capable of overcoming a cultivar’s resistance. “It’s the reason Professor Park is here: to fill that knowledge void because we don’t know what we’ve got,” added Poole. Understanding what strains of rust are present will help plant breeders select cultivars resistant to those strains, and aid agronomists and growers in assessing the risk of the disease to their crops. It can also help pathologists determine the source of an outbreak. For example, Australia’s first case of stripe rust, in 1979, was later identified as a strain originating from southern Europe. Given the distance and global airflows, contaminated clothing is thought to have been the likely vector, says Park. A second strain, first found in Australia in 2002, appears to have come from North America. As a result, Australian growers now make hundreds of thousands of applications of fungicides which previously weren’t needed. Similarly, leaf rust was first found in Victoria in 1984 and within 10 years had spread to Western Australia and New Zealand. New Zealand is downwind of Victoria so spores may have blown here, but Western Australia is upwind, so contaminated clothing or other material was again the likely vector for the disease spread, says Park.


Rural News // april 23, 2013

Cell grazing boosts beef profit ga re t h g i l lat t

INTENSIVE GRAZING beef can boost returns by $480/ha, delegates at a recent Beef + Lamb New Zealand field day heard. About 30 farmers attended the “practical and profitable cattle systems” day on Daniel and Nicola Berger’s farm at Ahuroa, Northland where speakers explained how a tightly subdivided 10ha block could generate twice the income it would under a traditional grazing system. The subdivision allows at least twice the number of stock to be carried, typically in grazing “cells” as small as 0.1ha, up to 0.8ha. Stock graze a cell for no longer than two days before moving on. Northland AgFirst consultant Gareth Baynham says the result is 6001000kg/ha/year liveweight gain were previously 300400kg/ha/year would have been produced. What’s more, it’s without heavy use of fertiliser or any other soil fertility boosters. Nutrients passing through the animal are better recycled in the pasture, so more grass grows, and the rotational grazing allows ryegrass to grow at or very close to its maximum potential. Baynham explains that’s achieved when ryegrass has at least three leaves. Non-intensive stock rotation won’t always allow pasture to achieve that optimum growth stage, especially

in winter when it can take 50-70 days to completely recover from a previous grazing. Subdivision and cell grazing, or using the TechnoGrazing system, allows stock to be rotated at a pace that enables good grass growth. With Techno’ systems, paddocks are divided into corridors and stock work along corridors then cross into the next and work their way back, and so on. Northland Ballance Farm Environment Awards supreme winners in 2009, Peter and Pam Kelly, from Omamari Beach, relayed to the BLNZ field day how they had increased stock numbers and productivity by 50% with the Techno’ system. Lower Northland monitor farmers Daniel and Nicola Berger achieved a similar gain when they trialled a cell system across 5ha. Despite running twice as many stock units on the area, they maintained liveweight gains, which ranged from 0.75kg/day to 1.23kg/day. That result’s seen them subdivide another 5ha paddock into cells this year. Baynham says initial infrastructure costs are not high and can be recovered in a year. “Generally systems cost between $100 and $300 to set up and normally farmers get 50% more production off those systems.” Including a reticulated water system may add

$100-$200/ha, but brings its own benefits, especially in a drought, he adds. Baynham says time constraints are often the main reason farms give for not using such subdivision systems, fearing they’ll be spending all day shifting

driven over without stopping, and stock shifted swiftly without gates. It means he’s able to do all the stockwork on his farm within a couple of hours. “I drive through 40-50 fences a day and don’t even really think about it.”

stock. However, Kaipara farmer and Kiwitech sales representative Ron McCloy told the field day technology like the Kiwtech’s temporary and semi-permanent fencing means fences can be

management 27

Gareth Baynham crunches the numbers at the field day.

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Rural News // April 23, 2013

28 management

Strategic grain leads to gains a n d rew swa llow

WHAT WOULD 283% lambing do to fill the financial hole left by tumbling meat and wool

Admittedly, the mob of 1400 were those ewes scanned as triplet-bearing but nonetheless the survival to slaughter is impressive.

prices? That’s what Matt Wyeth, Masterton, achieved this year with 1400 ewes of his 6500 Highlander flock.

It was achieved with short-term housing of ewes, and strategic grain feeding, a system he saw on a trip to the UK last year.

Proof of the pudding: Matt Wyeth’s Highlander ewes at the feeder.

“There are a lot of things in farming that are beyond our control, but this was something achievable – making the best of exceptionally fertile ewes.” He thought 250% might be achievable, well above 1000ha farm’s five-year paddock average of 180% for ewes scanned with triplets, but the result beat even that expectation. His original plan was to build his own grain feeding equipment but an internet search led him to Australian company Advantage Feeders. “Their Next Generation Feeders have adjustable slides with large capacity bins. “They looked like they would fit the bill so we ordered three.” A high-protein, grainbased, custom-made pellet was offered to the triplet bearing ewes from about three weeks before lambing at about a kilo a day. Intake is limited by stock having to lick the feed through the adjustable slide mechanism: they can only eat so much

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before their tongue dries out. Ewes were housed five days prior to lambing with continued access to the feeder, and lucerne hay. Once lambed they were returned to the paddock where lambs quickly learnt to use the feeders, eating about 130g/day. “The lambs grew noticeably faster with the early rumen development.” Weaning was at just 50 days compared to the traditional 90-100 days. “The weaned lambs went ahead really well on grass with an average weight gain of about 280g/ day. We also achieved significant labour savings only having to handle the lambs once.” Weaning earlier meant more high quality feed available for lamb finishing as ewes went back onto harder hill country immediately after weaning but the ewes also benefited because of the shorter lactation. Consequently he’s “confident of a very good result” from this year’s mating.

Feeder finds other uses Matt Wyeth says he’s had pleasing results when using the grain feeders in yards with weaner calves. A ration of 1kg/day/head of crushed barley was introduced over a week and an average weight gain of 0.88kg/day achieved at a time when they are normally “going backwards.” Having familiarised the young cattle with a grain ration it gives the option of strategic use during winter, he adds. “We’ve certainly learned a lot this year with the feeder results exceeding all expectations. It’s all about realising the potential to get more kilos of product out the farm gate and improve our bottom line.”

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Rural News // april 23, 2013

animal health 29

Johne’s breakthrough not for NZ a n d rew swa llow

US RESEARCHERS are claiming a breakthrough in Johne’s disease testing but a New Zealand expert believes it will make little difference here. Researchers at the US National Animal Disease Center (NADC), Ames, Iowa, have found an antibody that’s 100% specific in detecting Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, aka MAP, the cause of Johne’s disease. “No one else in the world has been able to find such a specific antibody that binds only to MAP strains, until now,” says USDA Agricultural Research Service microbiologist John Bannantine, of the NADC. A test based on the newly identified antibody should eliminate the problem of false positives when testing for Johne’s, says Bannantine. Under current tests producers and vets “may think cattle are infected, based on a positive antibody test result, but they may simply have been exposed to nonpathogenic mycobacteria that’s ubiquitously present in the environment.” But Hinrich Voges, an LIC vet and member of the Johnes Research Consortium’s expert working group, says current

Deer work update A STUDY by AbacusBio, with Johne’s Management Ltd, is looking at how well commonly used diagnostic tests identify highly infectious animals in New Zealand’s deer herds for subsequent removal. A validation of the national database of JD-suspect lesions identified in deer at processing is also underway. “This work will examine the strength of the link between the JD-suspect lesion rate for a farm and the actual impact of Johne’s disease on that farm,” says JML’s Kaylene Larking. “We are currently looking for farms to be included in this trial and are seeking contact from farmers who believe Johne’s disease is a current or emerging issue in their deer herd. As part of the study we can offer a supportive investigation including free diagnostic testing of some animals and would also provide a tailor-made risk management plan to suit the farming operation.” Interested farmers should contact JML project manager Solis Norton on 0800 456453 or info@ johnes.org.nz

It’s a risk-ranking and mitigation exercise and in such a situation fine-tuning an alreadyexcellent specificity is unlikely to have much benefit, he concludes. Hard to spot: the problem is Johne’s test sensitivity, not specificity, says LIC vet Hinrich Voges (inset).

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SINGLE BALE FEEDER ELISA tests are already highly specific, 99% or more, and only very occasionally does a false-positive occur. For example, a TB cow could potentially test positive on a Johne’s ELISA test. Under New Zealand’s testing regimes these occasional false positives are of little consequence, but in more intensive testand-cull programmes the case for 100% specificity is stronger. “Some of the overseas programmes test up to four times a year for instance, and at that point the false positives become an issue,” Voges told Rural News.

in brief Vaccine focus for vet day IF YOUR vet seems particularly keen to talk vaccines this week it could be because he or she is building up to World Veterinary Day, which this year falls on April 27 and is focussed on vaccinations. “World Veterinary Day is an ideal opportunity for us all to show our communities the value and protection vaccinations provide against the spread of disease,” says the New Zealand Veterinary Association on its website.

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What’s really needed is increased sensitivity in the test, and as Voges understands it, the ‘new’ antibody identified by NADC will not deliver that. A more sensitive test could be a game changer but “therein lies the problem” with tests for Johne’s because mycobacterial infections do not elicit a strong or consistent antibody response until disease is advanced, he explains. “Perfecting specificity [as Bannantine et al have done] only really becomes relevant in an intensive test-and-cull situation. So there might be some benefits in deer herds that currently undertake repeated screening, assuming it delivers equivalent power of detection (as current ELISA tests). “In dairy, with the slower progression of the disease, we tend to use ELISA screening in New Zealand to identify advanced MAP infection, and the likely shedders/ preclinicals.”

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Rural News // April 23, 2013

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30 animal health

Tough calls have to be made There are two reasons why I no longer want to breed pups. I recently mentioned the anguish I felt at the prospect of bringing pups into a world of possible neglect and abuse, but I didn’t talk about my heartache when something goes wrong. I’ve always struggled putting pups and dogs down but sometimes you have no other choice. It hasn’t got easier with age in fact it is probably worse. The exploitation of animals, their suffering and death seems to affect me more now than ever. Most people will agree with this article but there will be others who don’t. Some may think ‘I jumped the gun’. Please don’t bother the editor or me if you disagree. For those of you living in the clouds, breeding a litter of pups is a responsibility and sometimes you have to be cruel to be kind. I wrote an article about Faith, the pup who pulled through a Parvo virus attack. Faith’s litter was not only a mission to produce but also very expensive, so I was thrilled that all finally went well. I reared my two favourite bitch pups until I could decide on the one that was going to remain forever. Several weeks ago I decided to keep Bridget because she reminded me so much of her grandmother Beatrice and great grandmother

Bride. I offered Faith to a friend who had previously had these bloodlines. Janette is an excellent dog-woman so I knew she’d be in great hands. I informed her, prior to getting Faith, that she was devoted to me but standoffish with strangers and sensitive when training. I didn’t think to mention that if one of my dogs had something she wanted, that she would go over and intimidate the dog. She didn’t fight but she had an aura - they gave up immediately. It wasn’t bad enough for me to step in but in hindsight perhaps I should have taken whatever it was off her, and given it back to the other dog. I might add here that Faith had some very good bloodlines, she’d grown into a stunning looking bitch with beautiful conformation, and she

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had lovely noise on sheep. Faith quickly became devoted to Janette but hated her husband, and everyone else. She would hide in her kennel and growl at strangers, and keep her distance from everyone if she was loose. She attacked the other dogs and fought, even though she was the new kid on the block. I was happy to take her back; we were both disappointed in her behaviour. Actually, I was gutted. My hopes, dreams, time and money were all for nothing. I knew what had to be done. I could have asked for it to be taken care of, saving myself a trip, but I wanted her home and to do it myself; and she needed to be buried here with us (I cry as I write). It wasn’t anyone’s fault and nothing had ever happened to her, she was just wired a bit wrong. We can’t do a lot about bad people but at least we can break the cycle if an animal is aggressive. Faith wanted her own way with other dogs and was looking decidedly dicey with strangers. I have seen programmes on TV where problem dogs have supposedly been turned around; I wouldn’t trust them. Why risk it? Because she had known only me and my rather secluded lifestyle, and grown up with my dogs, I had no idea the extent of her turmoil, but when she went somewhere new it became apparent very quickly. I’m sorry Faith, RIP. • Anna Holland is teaching people dog training. For more information www. annaholland.co.nz or Ph 07) 217 0101 or annaholland@ xtra.co.nz Wired right? Only time will tell sometimes.


Rural News // april 23, 2013

animal health 31

Promotion winner pleased as punch A SHEEP and beef farm manager from the Wellington region’s west coast has landed the top prize in Cooper’s Bumper Season promotion. Callum Watson, who manages Papanui Station for the Belfast Partnership, was stoked to be presented with the keys to the Honda MUV Big Red earlier this month but credits the win to his wife Siobahn. “The competition sticker was on the drum of Alliance (drench) so she thought she’d enter… It’s the first time we’ve ever won anything in our lives so it came as a bit of a shock.” Watson told Rural News he uses a lot of the abamectin, levamisole and

oxfendazole combination drench in the station’s 10,000 lamb finishing operation. “When you’re importing a lot of lambs I think it’s wise to use the best drench out there.” Now he’s looking forward to putting the 675cc Big Red to work. “It’s a brilliant machine. We’ll use it like a farm truck come quadbike; anything from a tractor to a farmbike.” Cooper’s Bumper Season promotion ran November to March, and featured four draws for a suite of top prizes, including Gallagher weigh scales and data collectors, Honda farm bikes and water pumps, and Stihl chainsaws. The last draw, held late last month, was for

Year to drench adults?

one big prize with the winner choosing between a Gallagher Sheep Auto Drafter with TSi Weigh Scale G01900 and Electronic Tag Reader G0330, or the Honda side-by-side MUV700

To be eligible entrants had to have purchased any specially labelled participating product during the promotion period and submitted a valid entry form within that period.

Callum and Siobahn Watson with children (left to right) Rory, Flynn and Niamh with the Honda MUV they won through Cooper’s Bumper Season promotion.

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SOARING WORM burdens in the wet following the long dry mean if there’s a year to drench adult sheep, this may well be it, says an independent expert. “Everything is going through the roof at the moment,” Greg Mirams of Techion Group told Rural News last week. “Facial eczema spore counts are really high and faecal egg counts are really high too.” The challenge is so high some lambs have died within weeks of their last drench and even adult sheep, particularly those not in the best condition as a result of the dry, are succumbing. While many farmers, rightly, do not reckon to drench adult ewes as a rule, this will be the year to break that rule on many farms, he says. “If you choose not to drench because of that principle it could prove terribly expensive next spring…. The impact of a drought on fertility quite often is an indirect one in that the ensuing worm challenge causes a major reduction in fecundity.” With remaining lambs and hoggets every attempt should be made to offer them less contaminated feed, because even the most effective drenches only clear the gut of worms for a matter of days. Within a week or two, high intakes of fresh larvae will lead to a renewed challenge and consequent drag on productivity.

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Cattle Internal Parasites Treatment 2013 Concentration

Ingredient Dose Rate

Formulated Dose Rate

Withdrawal Meat

Milk

Safety Margin

BAYMEC INJECTION

Bayer NZ Ltd

CRT & Farmlands

Abamectin

10mg/mL

0.2mg/kg

1mL/50kg live-weight 49 days

49 days

3x dose rate

BAYMEC POUR-ON

Bayer NZ Ltd

CRT & Farmlands

Abamectin

10mg/mL

0.5mg/kg

1mL/20kg bwt

Nil

3x dose rate

CONCUR CATTLE HIMIN

Bayer NZ Ltd

CRT & Farmlands

3x dose rate

CRT & Farmlands

4.53mg/kg 8mg/kg 10mg/kg 7.5mg/kg

6 days

Bayer NZ Ltd

90.6g/L 160g/L 100 g/L 75 g/L

1mL/20kg bwt

DUELL CATTLE

Oxfendazole Levamisole Albendazole Levamisole

Cattle: 35 Bobby calves: 16 10 days

1mL/10kg bwt

14 days

35 days

3x dose rate

EON POUR-ON

Bayer NZ Ltd

ATS, CRT, Farmlands, PGG Wrightson, RD1

Eprinomectin

5mg/mL

500µg/kg

1mL/10kg bwt

Nil

Nil

5x dose rate

IPLUS INJECTION

Bayer NZ Ltd

CRT & Farmlands

14 days

1mL/20kg bwt

42 days

42 days

3-5x dose rate 3x dose rate

SATURN POUR-ON

Bayer NZ Ltd

1mL/20kg bwt

42 days

42 days

3x dose rate

BOMATAK.C

Bayer NZ Ltd

0.2mg/kg 2mg/kg 0.5mg/kg 10mg/kg 0.5mg/kg 10mg/kg 4.5mg/kg bwt

28 days

Bayer NZ Ltd

10mg/mL 100mg/mL 10mg/mL 200mg/mL 10mg/mL 200mg/mL 90.6/L

1mL/50kg bwt

OUTLAW POUR-ON

Ivermectin Clorsulon ATS, PGG Wrightson, Abamectin RD1 Levamisole CRT & Farmlands Abamectin Levamisole All sellers Oxfendazole

1mL/20kg bwt

10 days

72 hours

BOMATAK.C MINERALISED Bayer NZ Ltd

All sellers

Oxfendazole

90.6/L

4.5mg/kg

1mL/20kg bwt

10 days

72 hours

BOMECTIN GOLD POUR-ON EDGE INJECTION

Bayer NZ Ltd

RD1

Abamectin

10mg/mL 1% w/v

0.5mg/kg

1mL/ 20kg bwt

35 days

Nil

Bayer NZ Ltd

All sellers

Doramectin, Levamisole

4mg/mL doramectin, 200mg/mL levamisole phosphate

0.2mg doramectin 1mL/20kg bwt and 10mg levamisole phosphate/kg bwt

21 days

21 days

4-5 x dose rate 2-3 times dose rate 3 x label dose rate 2x

ALLIANCE

COOPERS

All outlets

10 days

35 days

3x dose rate

COOPERS

All outlets

10 days

35 days

3 x dose rate

COOPERS

All outlets

1mL/10kg bwt

10 days

144 hours

3 x dose rate

SCANDA SELENISED

COOPERS

All outlets

1mL/10kg bwt

10 days

144 hours

3 x dose rate

ALBENDAZOLE C

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

80g/L 2g/L 45.3g/L 80g/L 45.3g/L 80g/L 150g/L

1mL/10kg bwt

SCANDA

Levamisole Abamectin Oxfendazole Levamisole Oxfendazole Levamisole Albendazole

4.53mg/kg 8mg/kg, 0.2mg/kg 8mg/kg 0.2mg/kg 4.53mg/kg 8mg/kg 4.53mg/kg 8mg/kg 10mg/kg

1ml/10kg bwt

CONVERGE

Oxfendazole 45.3g/L Levamisole, Abamectin 80g/L, 2gL

1mL/15kg bwt

14 days

35 days

ECLIPSE POUR-ON

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Abamectin Levamisole

10mg/mL 200mg/mL

0.5mg/kg 10mg/kg

1mL/20kg bwt

35 days

35 days

10 x dose rate 3 x dose rate

GENESIS ULTRA POUR-ON

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

91 days

3 x dose rate

Veterinary outlets

1mL/10kg bwt

14 days

35 days

3 x dose rate

OXFEN C PLUS

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

1mL/20kg bwt

10 days

35 days

3 x dose rate

OXFEN C HI MINERAL

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

0.5mg/kg 30mg/kg 10mg/kg 7.5mg/kg 4.5mg/kg 7.5mg/kg 4.5mg/kgmg/kg

91 days

Merial Ancare

5mg/mL 300mg/mL 100g/L 75g/L 90.6g/L 150g/L 90.6g/L

1mL/10kg bwt

ARREST C

Abamectin Triclabendazole Albendazole Levamisole Oxfendazole Levamisole Oxfendazole

1mL/20kg bwt

10 days

5 days

5 x dose rate

DOUBLE STRENGTH OXFEN Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Oxfendazole

45.3g/L

4.5mg/kgmg/kg

1mL/10kg bwt

10 days

5 days

GENESIS POUR-ON

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Abamectin

10mg/mL

0.5mg/kg

1mL/20kg bwt

35 days

Nil

10 x dose rate 3 x dose rate

GENESIS INJECTION

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Abamectin

10mg/mL

0.2mg/kg

1mL/50kg bwt

49 days

49 days

3 x dose rate

IVOMEC PLUS INJECTION FOR CATTLE IVOMEC INJECTION FOR CATTLE AND PIGS EPRINEX POUR-ON

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

0.2mg/kg 2.0mg/kg 0.2mg/kg

28 days

14 days

Veterinary outlets

1% 10% 1.0% w/v

1mL/50kg bwt

Merial Ancare

Ivermectin Clorsulon Ivermectin

1mL/50kg bwt

28 days

35 days

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Eprinomectin

0.5% w/v

500mcg

1mL/10kg bwt

Nil

EXODUS POUR-ON

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Moxidectin

0.5% w/v

500mcg

1mL/10kg bwt

Nil cattle 7 days deer Nil

MATRIX C

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

Abamectin, Levamisole 4g/L 0.2mg/kg 1mL/20kg Oxfendazole 160g/L, 90.8g/L 8mg/kg, 4.5mg/kg bodyweight

14 days

35 days

20 x dose rate 20 x dose rate 5-10 x dose rate 10 x dose rate 3x

SWITCH C HI-MINERAL

Merial Ancare

Veterinary outlets

21 days

35 days

3x

NOROMECTIN INJECTION

Norbrook NZ Ltd

49 days

NOROMECTIN POUR-ON

Norbrook NZ Ltd

Ivermectin

0.5% w/v

0.5mg/kg

1mL/10kg bwt

21 days

Not allowed (note 1) 11 milkings

PARAFEND LV

Norbrook NZ Ltd

Oxfendazole

90.6g/L

4.53mg/kg

1mL/20kg bwt

10 days

72 hours

20 x dose rate 10 x dose rate 5 x dose rate

ALBENDAZOLE CATTLE

Ravensdown

Vets, Agmax, some OTC Vets, Agmax, some OTC Vets, Agmax, some OTC Ravensdown

1mL/20kg bodyweight 1mL/35kg bodyweight 1mL/50kg bwt

3x

Veterinary outlets

0.2g/kg 8mg/kg 0.2mg/kg 6.37mg/kg 0.2mg/kg

35 days

Merial Ancare

4g/L 160g/L 7g/L 223g/L 1.0% w/v

14 days

ECLIPSE E INJECTION

Abamectin/ Levamisole Eprinomectin/ Levamisole Ivermectin

Albendazole

150 g/L

7.5 mg/kg

1mL/20kg live-weight 10 days

10 days

10x dose rate

COMBO LOW DOSE

Ravensdown

Ravensdown

3x dose rate

Ravensdown

4.53 mg/kg & 8 mg/kg 500 mcg/kg

35 days

Ravensdown

45.3 g/L & 80 g/L 10 g/L

1mL/10kg live-weight 10 days

ABAMECTIN POUR-ON

Oxfendazole & Levamisole Abamectin

1mL/20kg live-weight 35 days

NIL

3x dose rate

ABAMECTIN INJECTION

Ravensdown

Ravensdown

Abamectin

10 g/L

200 mcg/kg

1mL50kg live-weight

49 days

49 days

3x dose rate

CYDECTIN INJECTION FOR CATTLE AND SHEEP CYDECTIN POUR-ON FOR CATTLE AND DEER CYDECTIN PLUS FLUKE POUR ON FOR CATTLE DECTOMAX INJECTABLE

Zoetis

OTC/Vet

Moxidectin

1% w/v

0.2mg/kg

1mL/50kg

cattle 35 days

35 days

5 x dose rate

Zoetis

OTC/Vet

Moxidectin

0.5% w/v

0.5mg/kg

1mL/10kg

Nil

Nil

Zoetis

OTC/Vet

0.5mg/kg 20mg/kg 0.2mg/kg

84 days

84 days

Veterinary outlets

0.5% w/v 20% w/v 1% w/v

1mL/10kg

Zoetis

Moxidectin, Triclabendazole Doramectin

10 x dose rate 5 x dose rate

1mL/50kg bwt

35 days

35 days

DECTOMAX POUR-ON

Zoetis

Veterinary outlets

Doramectin

0.5% w/v

0.5mg/kg

1mL/10kg bwt

35 days

VALBAZEN MINERALISED CATTLE

Zoetis

All outlets

Albendazole

150g/L

7.5mg/kg

1mL per 20kg bwt 1mL per 15kg* bwt

7 days

Parasite Maturity

Tric. Axei

Active Ingredient

Ostertagia Type II

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20 x dose rate

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Nil

25 x dose rate

mature immature

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48 hours

10x dose rate

★★★ mature ★★★ ★★★ immature ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

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★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★

★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★

★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★


★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

ND

Flukes Fasciola

Tapeworms Monezia

L/worms Dictyocaulus

Trichuris

Lge Intestine

Chabertia

Oesphagostomum

Trichostrongylus

Bunostomum

Cooperia

Nematodirus

Small Intestine

This survey will give a ready and easy-to-follow reference to the efficacy and spectrum of the many cattle anthelmintics available. It is compiled from information supplied by animal health companies. While the information has been verified by our animal health advisor, Rural News cannot accept responsibility for any inaccuracies.

Controls sucking lice .Has persistent activity against cooperia ,Ostertagia,Oesphagostomum and Dictyocaulus vivparus. Must be administered subcutaneously.

★★★ ★★★

Also for the control of internal and external parasites in deer. Also for the treatment and control of biting and sucking lice. Extended activity 14 days Cooperia, Ostertagia in cattle. Rainfast.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ Low dose formulation ideal for cattle. ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ Ideal for calves, bulls and non-milking cows. ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

ND

★★★ ★★★

ND

★★★ ★★★

ND

ND

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

ND

★★★ ★★★

ND

★★★ ★★★

ND

ND

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Contains eprinomectin. Nil milk, meat and bobby calf withholding period. Suitable for beef and dairy cattle. Also for the treatment and control of sucking lice. ★★★ Also for the control of sucking lice, Chorioptes spp. and Psoroptes spp. mites and biting lice. Persistent activity – up to 14 days Ostertagia ostertagi, up to 7 days Cooperia spp, up to 21days Dictyocaulus viviparus.

Outlaw Pour-on is also highly effective in the treatment and control of mature and immature strains of Cooperia spp resistant to the endectocides (including eprinomectin and doramectin). Levamisole is also very active against benzimidazole-resistant strains. Also for the treatment and control of sucking lice in cattle. Saturn Pour-on is also highly effective in the treatment and control of mature and immature strains of Cooperia spp resistant to the endectocides (including eprinomectin and doramectin). Levamisole is also very active against benzimidazole-resistant strains. Also for the treatment and control of sucking lice in cattle. Ovicidal.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Contains selenium, copper, cobalt, zinc and iodine. Ovicidal.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Also controls sucking and biting lice and mange mites. Persistent activity 14 days for Cooperia, 14 days for Ostertagia. Rain resistant.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

ALLIANCE is a triple combination oral drench for cattle and sheep. ALLIANCE contains: 25mg Cobalt and 5mg Selenium per 5mL dose.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

CONVERGE is a dual combination oral drench for cattle and sheep. CONVERGE contains: 25mg Colbalt and 5mg Selenium per 5mL.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

SCANDA is a dual combination oral drench for cattle and sheep.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

SCANDA SELENISED is a dual combination oral drench for cattle and sheep. SCANDA SELENISED contains: Colbalt 0.4mg/mL and Selenium 1mg/mL.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

ND

ND

ND

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ Selenium added - 1.5mg/ml. ★★★

★★★ ★★★

ND

★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

ND

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Eclipse Pour-on is also highly effective in the treatment and control of mature and immature strains of Cooperia spp resistant to the endectocides (including eprinomectin and doramectin). Levamisole is also very active against benzimidazole-resistant strains. Also controls sucking-biting lice.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ Also controls sucking-biting lice. ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Effective against mature and immature strains of Cooperia resistant to the endectocides. Ovicidal. Contains Selenium.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

"Ovicidal". Each 10ml contains 20mg of selenium and 97mg of copper. Also in plain form. Can be used in deer.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

"Ovicidal". Each 5ml dose contains minerals iodine, selenium, cobalt, copper and zinc. Can be used in deer.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

ND

Also for the control of internal and external parasites in deer. Also for the treatment and control of biting and sucking lice. Extended activity 14 days Cooperia, Ostertagia. Rainfast.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★

★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★

★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★

Controls sucking lice. Has extended activity for 28 days against Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia L4, Haemonchus spp and 21 days against Oesophagostomum and Ostertagia spp and 14 days against Cooperia. Must be administered subcutaneously. Also available with B12. Contains 2mg/ml Vitamin B12. No sting formulation. ★★★ Also for the simultaneous control of sucking lice, psoroptes sp mites and aids in control of biting lice and chorioptes mites. Label claim for persistent activity – product continues to control certain worms for 7-21 days after treatment. (Lungworm and hookworm 21 days, Ostertagia 14 days, Cooperia spp. Up to at least 7 days.) NZ studies show product is effective (>95%) against adults. Simultaneous control of external parasites including sucking lice and aids in control of biting lice. Label claim for persistent activity product continues to control certain worms for 7-21 days after treatment. (Lungworm and hookworm 21 days; Ostertagia 14 days, Cooperia spp. up to at least 7 days.) Weatherproof including rainfast. Bobby calves from treated cows have no withholding period. Controls roundworms and lungworm. Approved for use in all ages and classes of deer at same dose volume and rate as for cattle. For control of sucking and biting lice and manage mites (sarcoptes and chorioptes). Has label claim for increased milk production.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Low sting formula, persistent activity Ostertagia 14 days, Cooperia 7 days, Dictyocaulus Oesophagostomum 21 days. Also for use in pigs.

★★★ ★★★

Also controls sucking, biting and mange mites. Ovicidal.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ Also contains selenium and copper. ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Also contains selenium, copper, cobalt, iodine and zinc.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Also controls biting and sucking lice.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Persistent activity: Oesophagostomum 7 days, Ostertagia, Cooperia, Trichostrongylus 14 days, Lungworm 21 days. Do not treat calves under 16 weeks of age. Also controls lice.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Persistent activity against reinfection of Ostertagia ostertagi and lungworm for 28 days.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★

★★★ Treats and controls biting and sucking lice and mange mites. ★★★ Rainfast. Persistent activity against reinfection of Ostertagia ostertagi for 35 days, Haemonchus spp and Trichostrongylus spp for 28 days, lungworm, Oesphagostomum and Bunostomum for 42 days.

★★★ ★★★

Also registered for use in sheep and pigs. Persistent activity up to 28 days Ostertagia, Dictyocaulus. Up to 21 Days Cooperia, Trichostrongylus, Oesophagostomum. Up to 15 days Bunostomum.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★

Treats and controls biting and sucking lice and mange mites. Rainfast. Persistent activity against reinfection of Ostertagia ostertagi for 35 days, Haemonchus spp and Trichostrongylus spp for 28 days, lungworm, Oesophagostomum and Bunostomum for 42 days.

Rainfast. Not adversely affected if applied when the hide is wet or if rain falls shortly after treatment. Also controls sucking and biting lice, mange mites. Persistent activity against re-infection up to 28 days for Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus axei and Dictyocaulus and up to 21 days against Cooperia, Oesophagostomum and Bunostomum.

★★★ ★★★ ★★★ Contains 6.8g/L Copper, 1.5g/L Selenium. *1mL per 15kg for Liver fluke. Ovicidal to worm and fluke eggs of cattle. ★★★


Rural News // April 23, 2013

34 machinery & products

Fencing technology brings maximum profits for a low investment GARETH GILLAt T

FENCE technology company Kiwitech systems could bring in $480/ha in extra income in areas as small as 10ha, claims Northland agent Ron McCloy. Drystock subdivision involves dividing a section of the property into smaller blocks and running smaller groups of stock on them which are shifted every one to two days. Studies show even 10ha of subdivided land will generate $40,000 a year in profits from pastures due to higher stocking rates and better control over stock rotation. However, there hasn’t been a big movement toward drystock intensification and McCloy blames initial capital livestock costs and the time needed to shift stock daily onto new pastures. McCloy

the basis of two 5ha paddocks with a pumped water supply. This was divided into 16 cells with three single-wire fiberglass rod fences and two 2-wire fiberglass rod fences. Water was provided in eight microtroughs. The fencing for the set-up cost $2037, the water an extra $1,294, bringing the total cost to $3,331 including GST before stock are put in. McCloy says setting up fence lines requires only driving in paint-coated fiberglass rods along fence lines, before attaching a plastic insulator and then running out steel wires. Wires are tensioned with a spring, which provides the fence with the ability to flex without breaking or stretching. High stress

“I was going to all the field days and raving about this gear to the point where my wife Chrissy told me to see if Kiwitech would take me on as a rep, as I was already promoting their products”. believes a Kiwitech fencing system can markedly reduce stock handling times. He runs 1000 bulls on 300ha and says he has all the stock work done in three hours. “The system has been set up to work as efficiently as it can with the least amount of input or infrastructure.” The simplicity of the system attracted and enabled him to keep at it, he says. “The creator of Kiwitech, Harry Weir, has developed hardware that is robust and durable and has been proven to withstand the test of time. If a system takes a long time to manage during winter then a farmer is most

likely to throw it away.” McCloy has used Kiwitech gear on his property since 1999 and has sold it since late 2012. His wife Chrissy suggested it after he had been talking about it at local field days. “I was going to all the field days and raving about this gear to the point where my wife Chrissy told me to see if Kiwitech would take me on as a rep, as I was already promoting their products”. He is still attending field days and was asked at a recent lower Northland Beef and Lamb field day focusing on subdivision to do a costing to subdivide 10ha. McCloy worked on

FARM

Ron and Chrissy McCloy showing off the Kiwitech system at a recent Northland field day.

points are reinforced with arrow posts, which strengthen the fence. When farmers need to shift stock from one cell to another they just need to pin down the fence, then get stock to walk over it. Getting to stock on a quad is even easier thanks to a specially-designed fender that allows the bikes to just drive over

fences without stopping. “I drive over about 50 fences a day and don’t even think about it.” Gear breakages are unusual. “You will periodically get an animal that gets spooked and goes through a fence, but it bounces back after them. So when you move the animals you don’t have the added job of repairing a

fence they have destroyed. The fiberglass rods are coated with a thick UVresistant paint coating, I have standards I bought when I started using the system 13 years ago that I can comfortably grab today and not have to worry about fiberglass splinters.” Tel. 0800 800 787 www.kiwitech.co.nz

THE HEAVYWEIGHT IN POSTDRIVERS

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Stronger tine and the parallel linkage to give more floatation.

DOUBLE SKINNED BEAM

VARIABLE RANGE WEIGHTS Hooked tine at work rejuvenating existing pasture. Tine pressure can be adjusted hydraulically.

Simple calibration and accurate seeding from central seeding unit.

Dealers Nationwide

For technology that works!

0800 88 55 624 ✆ W! O N G RIN www.tulloch.co.nz

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Rural News // april 23, 2013

machinery & products 35

More power helps grows business NELSON DIRECT drilling contractor Keryn Rowe says his new Massey Ferguson 8680 tractor is helping him grow his direct drilling business out of Richmond. He trades as Nelson No Tillage. Rowe, who runs a Cross Slot direct drill, bought the MF 8680 in August, encouraged by a “good run with Massey Ferguson,” says supplier AGCO New Zealand. He traded in a MF 8480 to buy the new tractor. He had previously had a Massey Ferguson 7485. The new machine is more powerful than he first wanted but the price was good and “I was happy with the Massey Ferguson brand… and their fuel economy, only one of the things that stood out. They are economic to run and the new one is even more so using SCR Adblue technology. Initially I had reservations about buying a tractor with Adblue; however it has proved to be easy to use and it gives us excellent fuel economy.” Rowe’s previous two tractors were 160-320hp; the new MF 8680 is 350hp.

“When they put the deal together and said it was 350hp, I wasn’t worried. There’s no substitute for power… it couldn’t be better for getting the power to the ground in my application, or for straight lugging. The economy is awesome.” Rowe has done 700 hours in the MF 8680 since September. The tractor pulls his Cross Slot direct drill with ease. “I’m taking on work that I never would’ve been able to do with the other tractors. We’re doing more work on the hills and the MF 8680 is easier and safer. It will drill up hills I couldn’t go before. This tractor just puts power to the ground and has allowed me to grow my business.” Rowe says the MF 8680 is comfortable. “I’m not getting any younger and you need comfort when you’re doing big days. The cab is nice and quiet with easy to use controls that are well laid out.” The Dyna-VT transmission gives the MF 8680 the highest possible power and productivity, while reducing physical strain on the operator and achieving

optimum fuel efficiency at all times. “I wouldn’t go back to another tractor without the Dyna-VT transmission on it now. The DTM system organises the engine and transmission and what it needs to make it economical to run. You get in, start it and you

don’t touch the throttle.” Rowe says. Rowe bought the Massey Ferguson 8680 from John Mehrtens at Tractor Repairs and Spares in Richmond. He says John has excellent knowledge of the tractor and operating system and his company provides top service.

S E N I H C A M T U O D FEE S R E D A E R P S D E L I TRA RIOR E P U S Y L P M SI

SUPER COMBY EX • Feeds pit silage • Round bales • Square bales • Electric Joy-Stick • Extension Bin

Now available – the NEW Mega Comby XL

Machinery seller going direct 4 SEASONS Agriculture, Foxton, has changed its name to 4AG and will from now on sell its cultivation and tillage equipment direct to farmers rather than through dealers,” says spokesman Darren Raikes. The firm discovered that equipment used by farmers and contractors was getting bigger and more specialised and to sell direct suited the market better. Raikes says they studied European cultivation trends, which New Zealand follows closely. The company imports primary and secondary tillage gear, roller drills and seeders. The biggest piece of machinery it had on display at the recent at the South Island Field Days was the 4AG Super Grubber NG400. It has a working width of 4 metres, hydraulically folding to 2.6m for travelling and needs tractors 280-380hp. It is also available in 3m and 4m working widths mounted, and as 4m, 5m and 6m trailed models. Tel. 06 363 7193

Keryn Rowe says his MF 8680 is the ideal tractor to operate his Cross Slot direct drill.

• • • •

Flotation tyres 400/60x15.5 Optional tilting elevator Self loading forks Extra capacity

• Level capacity 13cu/m • Loaded capacity 14.5 - 15cu/m • Extended capacity 15 - 17cu/m

Transpread • Uniquely shaped hydraulic twin spinner discs provide controlled accurate spread • Digital tachometer accurately reads spinner speed from tractor • Chain feed provides reliable constant feed to spinners • Stainless steel Hoppers, single and tandem wheel options available, floatation tyres, Hydraulic wheel drive and 3 speed gearboxes • Bin extensions & roll top covers

Are You Running Low? For your free catalogue please contact • • • •

Highly visible float Double Bracing Bracket Stainless Steel Construction Fits Plastic & Concrete Tanks www.jobevalves.com/wli

Don 027 433 2212

Robertson Manufacturing PO Box 6 Hinds, Mid Canterbury Ph 03 303 7228 A/hrs 027 433 2212


Rural News // April 23, 2013

36 machinery & products - nz ploughing championships

Practice makes perfect for champ to n y h o p k i nso n

MARK DILLON, winner of the Case IH Silver Plough, goes to as many matches as possible because competing makes him concentrate better. Dillon, and wife Sonia, farm at Riversdale Southland and after some years managing have now bought the family farm, a 350 ha sheep, beef and grain property. “I started ploughing when I was 12 in the vintage class and this is my 13th final with a conventional plough. My previous best was a fourth at Cambridge last year,” he told Rural News. Dillon has also been chairman for five years of the Southern Field Days committee running the bi-annual event held at Waimumu, near Gore.

He went to this year’s final with a different attitude aiming to concentrate more. “I left the stubble plot on the Saturday pretty happy and just did more work on the grass plot on the Sunday.” Dillon used a Massey-Ferguson tractor with a Kverneland plough. Winning the title has earned him the right to represent New Zealand at the World Ploughing Championships in France in September 2014. “I am stoked at what I have done and Sonia and I are excited about going to France.” He has previously represented New Zealand in Australia in 2012 as an exchange ploughman in a programme where two ploughmen from each country have reciprocal visits to gain experience.

2013 champion Mark Dillon, and wife Sonia, pictured with the Silver Plough trophy.

Place your indent order now!

Real buzz for young ploughman HAYDEN ALLISON says it was a “real buzz” winning this year’s Evan Fairhall Memorial Trophy. This trophy is only ever presented to any competitor once. The aim is to encourage Hayden Allison younger ploughmen, who have to have finished in the top six of either the conventional or reversible section of the New Zealand Ploughing Championships annual finals. Allison, from Milton, South Otago, works on his family farm and does seasonal work driving a baler for a local contractor. “I have been ploughing for six years and won a qualifying event at Milton to enter the New Zealand final.” he told Rural News. His tractor was a Ford 4600 with a Kverneland plough. This was Allison’s fourth final. He practices in stubble ground on the home property.

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Rural News // april 23, 2013

machinery & products - nz ploughing championships 37

Five-time winner’s ploughed everywhere MALCOLM TAYLOR, who earlier this month won the reversible plough section of the New Zealand Ploughing Association championships at Lincoln, near Christchurch, has now won the title five times. This has seen Taylor represent New Zealand at the world championships in Slovenia, Sweden (where he got fourth overall) and Croatia. In July, he will go to Alberta, Canada to represent New Zealand again. Meanwhile, the win at Lincoln gains him the

honour of ploughing for New Zealand in France in 2014. “I believe I can win a world championship; it’s just being a case of getting my head in the right place at the right time.” Taylor was aiming for the top three in Croatia, but believes the ground and among other things the heat took its toll. This was not helped by 125mm rain falling the night before ploughing started, noticeably changing conditions. Taylor says while the

stubble ground at Lincoln ploughed well, he realised after doing his opening split on the grass on the second day that the soil in the competition plot was different from the practice plots. So he changed

Malcolm Taylor

Kverneland) by container to Canada. The equipment will get a thorough steam clean on arrival and he intends to remove some of the panels and have them painted in traditional Kiwi black and white colours.

his shares, skimmers and coulters. “My design of my plough enables me to do this faster.” Taylor is presently preparing to send his tractor (McCormick 95 SCX) and plough (modified

R

PUTTING THE ‘TOTAL’ INTO TMR

TM

Winners of the Rural News Group trophy for horse ploughing and best turned out entrants Doc Wilson (left) and Snow Cleaver.

Jaylor improves overall animal health and increases milk production

Horse ploughing a life-long passion THE HORSE ploughing section of the New Zealand Ploughing Association Championships, sponsored by Rural News Group, was won by the two-man team of Snow Cleaver and Doc Wilson with horses Duke and Tommy. They also picked up the Lincoln Town and Country Fair prize for the best presented competitors and horses presented by Quality Presentation. When asked how long he had been ploughing Snow Cleaver’s reply was: “Bloody years.” “I started ploughing helping my father when I was 10 years old and I am now 57, so you do the maths.” Cleaver and wife Michelle have a 100ha property running 400 head of dairy grazers through the summer and 500 head through the winter. They plant 25ha of crop for winter feed. With his lifelong interest in horses all work on the farm, including all the ground preparation for the crop and drilling, is done with horses because “that’s the way we do things around here.” Their farm and its use of horses will be the feature of a Country Calendar programme on June 15. Cleaver has previously won a New Zealand ploughing title with David Murdock when the championships were held at Timaru in 2009. Doc Wilson and his wife Janice live in Gore and he works as a carpenter. “I have had a lifetime interest in horses and I own a couple of standardbreds going on treks, cavalcades and the like.” He started ploughing eight years ago and was in the New Zealand finals at Cambridge last year. This year’s win is his first New Zealand title.

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Rural News // April 23, 2013

38 rural trader Happy Birthday

FLY OR LICE PROBLEM? ALL PRODUCTS HAVE 3YR WARRANTY

To mark a birthday, retirement or any milestone, give that special someone, something special - a personal cartoon portrait by Edna cartoonist Malcolm Evans - $200 plus GST

DOLOMITE

NZ’s finest BioGro certified Mg fertiliser For a delivered price call... 0800 436 566

Send no money - just email a few up-to-date photos of subject, with a note of details you’d like included, to; malcolm@evanscartoons.com

• The magic eye sheepjetter since 1989 Unique • Quality construction and options self adjusting • Get the contractors choice sides • Direct from the manufacturer • Efficient application and unequalled cost savings

.

Or post your inquiries to; M. Evans, 39J Cape Horn Road, Hillsborough, Auckland 1041 . and don’t forget to include your return address.

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AVOID ROLL-OVERS

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FLEXISKIN RAINWEAR SALE! 40% OFF OFFER AVAILABLE 2 WEEKS ONLY! NEW! WATERPROOF, BREATHABLE & LIGHTWEIGHT $80 valued at $200 $70 valued at $140 Please add $10 Freight per order

$60 valued at $120

$80

valued at $190


Rural News // april 23, 2013

rural trader 39 Your advert here For details contact: stephen pollard Ph 09-913 9637 021-963 166 stephenp@ruralnews.co.nz

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See you at National Fieldays at site O16 12-15 June

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Visit www.lastrite.co.nz for more quality products

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FARMER BOOTS Lastrite’s Farmer boots are made

for comfort. Constructed from Reverse kip leather they are an ideal farmers, fencers and builders boot. Very sturdy and made to last this boot is robust with a heavy duty construction. It has a leather insole and midsole that is stitched and screwed construction with a rubber, replaceable sole, that is glued and screwed. Update your old boots now and you will never look back.

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Culvert Pipes New Zealand’s CHEAPEST Culvert Pipes! FREE joiners supplied on request.

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Phone

0800 625 826

for your nearest stockist

Joiners supplied FREE with culvert pipes


0800 SUZUKI | WWW.SUZUKI.CO.NZ

It’s SUZUKI’S…

FIELDAYS FORECAST

MASSIVE LOWS ACROSS NEW ZEALAND

10,999

LT-A500XL3

$

EXCLUDING GST

$1,346

KingQuad 500 4X4 AUTO

• Liquid cooled fuel injected 4-stroke • CVT transmission with Hi/Lo Ratio and reverse • Push button 2WD/4WD select with diff-lock option • Independent front and rear suspension • Fully sealed oil-bathed multi-plate disc rear brake • 24 Month/15,000km warranty

Suzuki Fieldays™ has arrived again, bringing some much-needed relief with it! Take the pressure off with the exceptional quality and low prices of the best value farm vehicles in New Zealand.

12,495

LT-A750XL3

$

4,795

DR200SE

$

EXCLUDING GST

EXCLUDING GST

$1,625

$280

KingQuad 750 4X4 AUTO

Trojan FARMBIKE

• Liquid cooled fuel injected 4-stroke • CVT transmission with Hi/Lo Ratio and reverse • Push button 2WD/4WD select with diff-lock option • Independent front and rear suspension

• • • • • • •

• Fully sealed oil-bathed multi-plate disc rear brake • 24 Month/15,000km warranty

These offers are valid until 30 June 2012 or while stocks last, and only available at Fieldays or participating Suzuki dealers. Prices are recommended retail, excluding GST. Models shown are indicative only and may differ to the actual sale stock. Some models may not be available at all participating dealers. Savings shown include GST. Offers not available in conjunction with any other promotions. promotus 4930RN FULLPAGE

Quality made in Japan Dual side-stands 200cc electric start 4-stroke 5-speed Comfortable seat Handlebar-mounted carrier Large mudflaps


Rural News 23 April 2013