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CONTENTS May 2017 30

Regulars 10 12 14 64

Editor’s letter Five minutes with... Corin Mellor, creative director of David Mellor Design The agenda A cultural round-up of what to read, see and do this May Blooming lovely Embrace the beautiful outdoors this summer with perennial prints, ruffles and accessories

Features 18 20

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Room for one more Emma Donoghue adapts her critically acclaimed novel Room for the stage London Craft Week The citywide celebration of craftsmanship returns to the capital

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30 Pins and needles 250 years of embroidery with Hand & Lock 52 The art of darkness Mat Collishaw’s new exhibition tackles the digital revolution and Victorian technology 60 Crowning glory The magic of millinery at London’s oldest shop, Lock & Co. 84 Natural selection A new wave of skincare harnessing the wonders of the great outdoors 98 And breathe... The allure of the spa trumps the slopes in the Italian Dolomites 102 Blazing Arizona A road tripping, rock climbing adventure in the Grand Canyon State

Jumping the Broom Product designer Lee Broom marks ten years in the industry with a Wedgwood collaboration

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35 Collection

57 Fashion

80 Health & beauty

92 Travel

45 Art

75 Interiors

89 Food & drink

109 Property


DEAD RARE F I NE J E W E L L E RY G RO U N D FLO O R, K N I G HTSB RI D G E ANNOUSHK A KOJ I S

A R A VA RTA N I A N

M A RCO B I C E G O

N I Q U ESA

O RTA E A

M OZ A FA R I A N

S EL I M M O UZ A N N A R

TA L I S M A N GA L L ERY

TASA K I

selected range available at har veynichols.com


editor’s letter

MARYLEBONE

& FITZROVIA M A Y 2 0 1 7 s iss u e 0 1 2

Editor Lauren Romano

editor

From the

INTERIORS

Assistant Editor Melissa Emerson

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Contributing Editors Hannah Lemon Camilla Apcar Kari Colmans Collection Editors Olivia Sharpe Richard Brown Acting Assistant Editor Marianne Dick Brand Consistency & Senior Designer Laddawan Juhong Production Hugo Wheatley Jamie Steele Alice Ford General Manager Fiona Smith Executive Director Sophie Roberts Managing Director Eren Ellwood

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Fabric of time What do Leonardo da Vinci, a Chinese empress and Moscow’s Kremlin all have in common? Hannah Lemon delves into the archives of Florence’s oldest silk mill to find out

egend has it that Empress Lei-tzu, the young wife of the Chinese Yellow Emperor, discovered silk while sipping a cup of tea. Sitting under the leafy bows of a mulberry tree, a silkworm’s cocoon dropped into her cup. The heat of the drink forced the silk to unfold and the young empress watched in awe as the magical thread unravelled, and she immediately determined to weave it. Sure enough, it made the perfect fabric, and soon Lei-tzu taught her ladies-in-waiting how to fashion garments from these fine fibres. Thus, she became known as the Silkworm Mother. Of course, the more likely story was that Catholic missionaries brought sericulture back from China to Europe in the 12th century. One of their final destinations was Florence, a city that would flourish in the silk trade from the 14th century onwards, bringing enormous wealth to merchants. Florentine silk continued to prosper during the Renaissance and well into the 18th century. So much so, that during the 1700s, a group of noble families clubbed together to establish a single workshop for their looms, patterns and fabrics located on Via dei Tessitori (the street of weavers). And so, Antico Setificio Fiorentino (Antique Florentine Silk Mill) was born. In recognition of the importance of this factory and to toast increased silk production, in 1780 the Grand Duke of Tuscany Leopold II donated several looms, which still work today. Thanks to acquisitions by Marquis Emilio Pucci in the 1950s and subsequently Stefano Ricci in 2010, the future of the remarkable handcrafted tradition remains alive, as do the centuries-old Florentine techniques. Today, Renaissance damasks, brocades and taffetas are woven on 12 looms – six handlooms dating from the 18th century and six semimechanical looms from the 19th century. The quality of the fabric is guaranteed by various phases of delicate workmanship: the hand dying, the preparation of the antique looms, yarns that are specially prepared for Antico Setificio Fiorentino, no chemical treatments and the lengthy weaving process. It doesn’t stop there. The Antico Setificio Fiorentino uses a unique orditoio (warping

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machine), designed by Leonardo da Vinci for embellishments; as well as a loom for silk trimmings and another for custommade fringes. As is to be expected of such meticulous creativity, the silk products are sought after by every luxury institution from royal palaces to national museums – the Amalienborg Palace in Denmark, the Royal Palace of Stockholm, Moscow’s Kremlin and Villa Medici in Rome, to name a few. You don’t have to be a royal to get a slice of the action though; bed, bath and table linens, bespoke services, and limited edition evening wear can be found on the lower ground floor at the Stefano Ricci menswear store on South Audley Street. And it’s all thanks to an imaginative empress and her cup of tea. Antico Setificio Fiorentino products and services are available through Stefano Ricci, 56 South Audley Street, W1K, stefanoricci.com OPPOSITE: THE GuICCIardInI LOOM (1786), PHOTO CrEdIT: STEFanO rICCI/aSF by bErnardO COnTI TOP rIGHT and InSET: WEaVInG THE ICOnIC brOCCaTELLO MICHELanGELO, MadE OF SILK and LInEn THrEadS. PHOTO CrEdIT: STEFanO rICCI/aSF by EGOn IPSE; TExTILES FrOM THE anTICO SETIFICIO FIOrEnTInO, PHOTO CrEdIT: STEFanO rICCI/ aSF by MarCO CuraTOLO LEFT: SPOOL CHanGInG durInG THE PrOCESSInG OF THE dOrIa FabrIC, PHOTO CrEdIT: STEFanO rICCI/aSF by rOSSanO b. ManISCaLCHI

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“Beautiful forms and compositions are not made by chance, nor can they ever, in any material, be made at small expense” Josiah Wedgwood In the age of 3D printing and fast fashion, it can be all too easy to overlook the work of the master tailor, potter or silversmith, but skilled makers are still very much part of the mix in Marylebone and Fitzrovia. To kick off our craftsmanship issue, we find out what it takes to make cutlery fit for the dining table at Number 10 with a visit to David Mellor on New Cavendish Street (p.12), and delve into the archives at Fitzroviabased embroidery house Hand & Lock, as the company celebrates 250 years in business (p.30). We also talk to product designer Lee Broom about his collaboration with Wedgwood (p.25), and round up the best of this year’s London Craft Week celebrations. Turn to page 20 to read more about the artisans bringing time-honoured skills into the 21st century.

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Lauren Romano Editor Follow us on Twitter @MandFMagazine

On the

cover

Also published by

R u nw i ld M ed i a G ro u p

WEDGWOOD BY LEE BROOM, VASE ON ORANGE SPHERE, image ©MICHAEL BODIAM. Read the interview on page 25.

luxurylondon.co.uk A website. A mindset. A lifestyle.


Regulars

5 minutes with...

My father founded David Mellor Design in 1953. He originally trained as a silversmith, but he earned a reputation for everything from teaspoons to traffic lights. He designed the system in 1966 and it’s still used today. It’s a nice daily reminder for me, unless I get stuck at a red light, of course.

Despite his street furniture, the company is still best known for its knives and forks. The

ourselves at our factory, The Round Building, in Derbyshire. It also stocks glassware and crockery that has been designed by us and items we have chosen from selected craftspeople.

first collection, Pride, (pictured, below) was designed in 1953 when I like following an my father was a student object from concept to at the Royal College of creation. I’m a real The David Mellor creative director on designing Art, and it’s still our most believer that something knives and forks for Number 10, taking up the baton popular. Over the years should work as well as from his ‘Cutlery King’ father and the company’s new we’ve designed silver look good. The interior Marylebone store plate cutlery for of the shop has all been British designed and made by us embassies and – from the staircase to politicians. The the shelves. We want to English get across the craftsmanship involved in collection was what we stock, hence why we have video originally footage of silversmiths and potters at commissioned in work playing in the background. 1992 for the Prime Minister’s ceremonial dining. At the time David Mellor is still very small and however, the design wasn’t deemed family orientated. I’ve been involved ostentatious enough by Number 10. with the business all my life. We lived at Ironically, the Camerons bought a the factory when I was growing up – similar set from us years later, so it did there was just a connecting door between make it to Downing Street eventually. the workshop and the house. I still live on site, but go back and forth to London a lot. I enjoy the change; I’ve got sheep Our first shop opened on Sloane at one end and the city at the other. Square in 1969. We’ve been trying to open a second in One of our most recent commissions Marylebone for five was a 25-foot bridge at Sheffield years. The new shop Hallam University. I don’t stray showcases our quite as far as traffic lights, but if you cutlery and kitchen can design a spoon, you should be knives, which we able to design a staircase – it’s the design and make same process.

Corin Mellor

“I’m a real believer that something should work as well as look good”

Setting the Table at David Mellor, an exhibition to celebrate London Craft Week, takes place from 3-7 May in-store at David Mellor, 14 New Cavendish Street, W1G, davidmellordesign.co.uk 12

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NE W O P ENIN G

Treasure trove Marylebone’s latest opening Labassa Woolfe, founded by Johan Labassa and his partner Joe Woolfe, is an intriguing fusion of French and English style, with antiques, gourmet specialities from the family’s farm in the South of France, tailoring (Woolfe has dressed Benedict Cumberbatch and David Gandy among others) and bespoke fragrance all in the mix. 6 Percy Street, W1T, labassawoolfe.com

The agenda Local news and events from in and around the area W O R D S : m e l i ss a e m e rso n

image courtesy of rachel oates

A dog’s life Marylebone Village’s Cabbages & Frocks Market is hosting its eight annual Dog Day this month. Dog trainer Rob Alleyne will be on hand to share tips with those inspired by the Good Boy Dog School’s displays, while novices can try their paws at free competitions including New Kid on the Block (Best Puppy) and Best Dog Trick. Free, 20 May, 11am-5pm, St Marylebone Parish Church Grounds, W1U, cabbagesandfrocks.co.uk

Home sweet home Marylebone Interiors Day returns this month, with masterclasses and special offers from local retailers including The Conran Shop, which is hosting a screen printing workshop and a window display featuring Hans Wegner’s iconic CH07 Shell Chair, on loan from Denmark’s Design Museum. 20 May, maryleboneinteriorsday.com

literary itinerary glass ceilings A collaboration between two world-class applied arts museums – MAK Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art in Vienna and Le Stanze del Vetro in Venice – this book is the second in a series exploring the art of glassmaking. It focuses on the development of the craft in Austria from 1900 to 1937, a period when a group of young architects, designers and fine arts and architecture students, such as Josef Hoffmann, Joseph Maria Olbrich and Leopold Bauer, developed a special interest in the medium. The book features more than 300 intriguing works – some are from private collections, but the majority are from the archive at the MAK – and is written by one of the museum’s glass and ceramic curators Rainald Franz. The Glass of the Architects: Vienna 1900–1937 by Rainald Franz, RRP £42, amazon.co.uk


Regulars

EXHIBI T IONS

Iron man Edel Assanti’s latest show, Sorel Etrog: Doors open from the inside only, is the first UK solo exhibition dedicated to the late Canadian artist. It focuses on his work between 1968 and 1975, particularly his use of links and hinges as motifs. 28 April – 17 June, 74a Newman Street, W1T, edelassanti.com

LEFT TO RIGHT: Screen with Yellow Bar, 2013, Andy Parkinson, acrylic and paper on hardboard, 61 x 61cm; Zippy Six, 2017, LUCY COX, acrylic on canvas, 50 x 50cm; ©THE ARTISTS

True colours The works of six British painters, including the exhibition’s curators Lucy Cox and Freya Purdue, are united in Colour: A Kind of Bliss. Held in association with artist-led organisation Contemporary British Painting, the exhibition explores changing perceptions of colour in today’s digital age. Until 30 June, The Crypt, St Marylebone Parish Church, 17 Marylebone Road, NW1

Voyager Study, 1976, Bronze, 19.1cm, ©The Estate of Sorel Etrog, Courtesy of Edel Assanti

UNTITLED, ALAN CONSTABLE, 2016, courtesy of the gallery of everything

In the picture Action, Camera! is now showing at Chiltern Street’s The Gallery of Everything. The exhibition comprises two separately curated solo shows, linked thematically by the camera and its possibilities. Alan Constable’s ceramic sculptures stem from a childhood crafting optical gadgets out of cereal boxes, while collage artist Ion Bârlādeanu’s works depict cut-out Hollywood characters inhabiting miniature sets. Until 18 June, 4 Chiltern Street, W1U, gallevery.com

The eye of the beholder

UNTITLED, ION BÂRLĀDEANU, 1980, courtesy of the gallery of everything

Ideas of Beauty: Douglas Gray and Cate Inglis, an exhibition of new paintings at Thompson’s Gallery, asks viewers to look beyond conventional conceptions of beauty and the picturesque. Gray’s use of colour and light brings fluidity and grace to the hustle and bustle of daily life in cities from Venice to New York, while Inglis captures the effects of dilapidation and vandalism on the industrial landscape of her native Glasgow, bringing a sense of romanticism to the decay. Until 13 May, 3 Seymour Place, W1H, thompsonsgallery.co.uk

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sudden rain times square, 2017, douglas gray, oil, 16 x 24in, ©Thompson’s Gallery

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Regulars

SPOTLIGHT The art of construction

in Britain. His group’s commissions included the Penguin Pool at London Zoo (interpreted by Havsteen-Mikkelsen in his 2015 painting I Will Meet You Halfway), as well as the now Grade I-listed Highpoint development in Highgate, and Finsbury Health Centre, which at the time it was built presented a utopian ideal of accessible healthcare

Fitzrovia’s FOLD gallery focuses on presenting in-depth solo exhibitions from emerging to mid-career artists, whose work challenges conventions. The title of its latest show – Tectonical – might bring to mind moving plates, boiling magma, volcanoes and other geological processes relating to earth’s structure, but tectonics is also a term used in the field of architecture. With tectonics defined by the gallery as ‘the science or art of construction, both in relation to use, and artistic design’, the exhibition showcases work by two artists, Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen and Florian Schmidt that explores how architecture is assimilated into the modern world. Havsteen-Mikkelsen’s work brings a poetic and painterly perspective to the physical realm of construction. His stark paintings are largely inspired by photography and models of real structures, as well as by the work of the Tecton Group and one of its founders, Russian émigré Berthold Lubetkin. Lubetkin was influenced by Russian Constructivism and pioneered Modernist design

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Russian émigré Berthold Lubetkin pioneered Modernist design in Britain

clockwise from top left: Keeping My Head Outside The Mud, Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen, 2016, 55 x 70cm, Oil on canvas; Matrix, Asmund HavsteenMikkelsen, 2013, 120 x 180cm, Oil on canvas; Untitled (Concurrent) 03, florian schmidt, 2015, 114 x 74 x 24cm Acrylic, lacquer, vinyl, cardboard, canvas and wood

in a pre-NHS era. Schmidt’s work on the other hand, traverses the oeuvre of art history more broadly, employing the artistic language of abstraction and realism in his two- and three-dimensional pieces. Geometric shapes, often in cardboard or wood, emerge in layers from the canvas, lending an architectural aspect to the paintings. 28 April – 3 June, 158 New Cavendish Street, W1W, foldgallery.com

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BEEF UP YOUR WEEK 23 April - 1 May

To celebrate Great British Beef Week we are showcasing the best of British beef cuts in specially designed dishes and set menus throughout our Cubitt House pubs.

cubitthouse.co.uk


Emma donoghue Šandrew bainbridge, 2010

Room

for one more Oscar-nominated for the screenplay of her critically acclaimed novel Room, author Emma Donoghue is reinterpreting the story yet again for the stage this summer, writes Kari Colmans


INTERVIEW

“P

eople move around the world so much, things get lost,” writes Ireland-born Canada-based author Emma Donoghue in her 2010 mega-hit Room. In the book, kidnapped teenager Ma’s world consists of an outhouse, where she is confined for seven years by her captor Old Nick, together with their five-year-old son, Jack. Released not long after the horrors of the Josef Fritzl case came to light, the book – and then the film – isn’t an all-out horror story, but at its core a beautiful, harrowing tale of resilience, love and childhood. Donoghue wrote the screenplay before the novel was even published (the film clocked up a handful of industry awards and nominations, as well as the Oscar for Best Actress for Brie Larson). With songs by Scottish songwriter Kathryn Joseph and Cora Bissett, who is also director, the stage version will be a surprise interpretation for some. But Donoghue insists that it won’t be as much of a departure from the book (and the film) as it sounds, and fans of both can expect the third instalment to be as powerful as its predecessors. I always had a feeling that Room was going to be more successful than my other books. It’s been printed in a number of languages so I’ve seen it resonate with people from so many different cultures, which has been an unexpected thrill. The story has a universal core. Everybody’s childhoods are smaller than their adult lives. We all start out in one place, in the family we’re born into, with no control over our circumstances, before growing up and moving out into the bigger world. While the horror of Jack and Ma’s story isn’t an everyday one, I think people can relate it to their own experiences of moving from childhood to adulthood. I was inspired by the Fritzl case but also by having two children. I had them in very good circumstances but I still found it claustrophobic at times, like any parent. I liked the idea of putting very ordinary tenets of parenthood into a dramatic storyline so that we could see how heroic it is. Room is a natural story for theatre. Not because it’s set in one place, for the most part, but because it’s about improvising. Like Jack and Ma, who, because of their circumstances, are forced to play and use their imagination, turning objects into other things. The situation itself could be described as theatre, so in many ways it’s even more natural [than a film adaption]. I had never thought of adding songs before. Cora has such a vibrant musical background, so when she suggested the

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idea of combining theatre with music I agreed that song was an amazing way for Ma and Jack to share the things they couldn’t say – the equivalent of a stream of consciousness. I go out of my way not to have a defining writing style. It must be nice for your writing to be instantly recognisable but then you run the risk of repeating yourself and all of your books blurring into one. I try to stay in the background. I like it when people say, ‘oh, did you write that too?’. I’m a big planner when it comes to actually sitting down and writing. I try to find time wherever I go and to not be precious about it. I’ll work outside my daughter’s choir class or in the car outside tennis club. I work on trains, buses, planes and in hotel rooms… I tend to be pragmatic about it. I don’t need a special pen or music or anything like that. I do a lot of writing while walking on a treadmill, it’s the only way I can incorporate a few hours of exercise. As well as adapting Room for the theatre, I’ve also released a children’s book called The Lotterys Plus One. It’s my first book for a younger audience. It’s about a big crazy family. They’re eccentric lottery winners who are very eco-friendly so they’re always scavenging in bins. I’m hoping to write quite a few books about them. I’m also doing lots of film and TV work. Being nominated for an Oscar for the Room screenplay opened up the door for me to adapt other people’s work for the screen. I’m slightly more detached when it’s not my own book but I’m sensitive to the author because I know exactly what it’s like for them. I’m always on their side. Emily Dickinson, the Brontës and Jane Austen inspired me growing up. I wanted to be a writer from the age of seven, but I always assumed I couldn’t do it full time. I thought I’d have a real job and write on the side, so I can’t believe my luck. If you love it enough, you can find the time. You could write a novel on the Tube on the way to work if you really wanted to. I’m forever reading things and wishing I’d written them. Everything I’ve ever read by Sarah Waters I think, ‘damn why wasn’t that me!’ I’ve just re-read Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch, which was even better the second time. The way she describes a tree or a moment – I could never ever do that. But my jealousy evaporates because I’m just glad somebody wrote it. Room runs from 2 May – 3 June at Theatre Royal Stratford East, stratfordeast.com; The Lotterys Plus One, published by Pan Macmillan, £10.99 hardback, is out now

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London Craft Week

As the third instalment of the citywide celebration of craftsmanship kicks off, Lauren Romano rounds up when and where to catch unknown artisans and celebrated masters alike at work

Selfridges

The Wallace Collection All that glistens is not gold, but it could be gilded bronze. Discover more about the technique and marvel at 18th century decorative objects that once furnished the mantelpieces of Marie Antoinette and George IV on a private tour of The Wallace Collection’s latest exhibition, Gilded Interiors. Free, booking essential, 5 May, 8.45-10am, Hertford House, Manchester Square, W1U, wallacecollection.org

Sunspel Textile artist Katherine May combed the Sunspel factory for discarded material scraps and offcuts to create a wall hanging, which will be displayed in the Chiltern Street store this month. May will be sharing the secrets to fashioning art forms from fabric during a Q&A held on the shop floor, while those who aren’t a dab hand with a needle and thread can shop Sunspel’s latest collection of cotton jersey basics. Free, booking essential, 4 May, 6-9pm, 13-15 Chiltern Street, W1U, sunspel.com

What makes a house a home? In a bid to find out, Selfridges has constructed a 3,000 sq ft dwelling in collaboration with The New Craftsmen named A Home for All. Guests to the in-store installation will need to take off their shoes and switch off their phones on entering the immersive environment, which celebrates domestic rituals. Pull up a chair at the kitchen table to knead sourdough bread, mill grain and, erm, peel potatoes. Happy homemaking. Free, booking essential 3-7 May, 12-6pm, 400 Oxford Street, W1A, selfridges.com; thenewcraftsmen.com

A HOME FOR ALL, A CONCEPTUAL HOUSE IN COLLABORATION WITH THE NEW CRAFTSMEN

ABOVE: ADAM ROSS CERAMICS, FROM £45; BELOW: IVA POLACHOVA VESSEL, FROM THE IN MOVEMENT COLLECTION


FEATURE

Cire Trudon Cire Trudon has been crafting the finest wicks and tallows since 1643. Its candle catalogue spans church tapers, wax busts and scented votives that come in an array of unusual fragrances. Find out if you hold a torch for the likes of Ernesto (leather and tobacco) or Solis Rex, which is meant to call to mind the scent of the wooden floors at the Palace of Versailles, during this illuminating talk with the Cire Trudon chandlers. From £15, 3 May, 6.30-9pm, 36 Chiltern Street, W1U, trudon.com

CIRE TRUDON, image credit: paul raeside

Perfumer H Perfumer Lyn Harris (above), of Perfumer H, and Tim d’Offay, founder of Postcard Teas, join forces (and noses) for an evening of olfactory memories shared over a cuppa. Speaking of tea, the pair recently collaborated to blend a scented brew, which you can sample on the evening – or throughout the week at both Perfumer H and Postcard Teas’ shop on Dering Street. Talk from £15, booking essential, 4 May, 6pm; tea tasting 3-6 May, 10am-5pm, 106a Crawford Street, W1H, perfumerh.com

RIGHT: EMILY KIDSON, BROOCH; BELOW: KAZUHITO TAKADOI, MISSING 3, BOTH COURTESY OF JAGGEDART

Jaggedart The art of craft is the subject of Jaggedart’s latest group exhibition Cabinet of Curiosities. Expect intricate papercuts from Charlotte Hodes, jewellery fashioned from layered pages of old books by Jeremy May and three-dimensional shapes by Kazuhito Takadoi (pictured, left), fashioned from grasses and twigs grown in his garden. Free, 3-5 May, 11am-6pm, 6 May, 11am-2pm, 28a Devonshire Street, W1G, jaggedart.com s l u x u ry l o n d o n . c o. u k s

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IMAGE COURTESY OF BURBERRY

THE LOEWE SALON AT LIBERTY

Burberry

Liberty

Mark the return of the mac season with a trip to Burberry, where you can initial a signature heritage trench coat in goldwork cording (for a limited time only) as an archivist talks you through 160 years of the brand’s history. If this puts you in a monogramming mood, you can also add a handwritten design to a cashmere scarf with a little help from the in-store calligrapher. 5 May, 10am-8pm, 6 May 10am-12pm, 7 May, 12-6pm, 121 Regent Street, W1B, burberry.com

Jonathan Anderson has taken over the fourth floor at Liberty with his curated display Loewe: This is Home, a range of products influenced by various disciplines. Anderson’s so-called ‘craft landscape’ includes a collection of traditional carpentry and knitted murals, as well as oak pieces made by heritage furniture maker Robert Thompson’s Craftsmen Ltd. Free, exhibition 3-6 May, 10am-8pm, 7 May, 12-6pm; demonstrations 5-6 May, 11am-1.30pm, 4.30pm-7pm, 4th Floor, Regent Street, W1B, libertylondon.com; loewe.com

Charlotte Street Hotel As anyone who has ever stayed in a Firmdale Hotel will know, co-founder and design director Kit Kemp’s whimsical motifs and riot of colour are a treat for the eyes. Now Kemp has collaborated with designer Melissa White to give the Loft Suite at the Charlotte Street Hotel a makeover. The design duo will be on hand at the launch party, so you can quiz them about the soft furnishings and wall murals over a glass of champagne. Tickets from £15, booking essential, 3 May, 6-9pm, 15-17 Charlotte Street, W1T, firmdalehotels.com; melissawhite.co.uk THE LOFT SUITE AT CHARLOTTE STREET HOTEL, image credit: simon brown


FEATURE

Skandium There’s more to throwing a dinner party Danish style than herring and hygge, as designer and ceramicist Christine Roland explains during her talk on Nordic traditions at Skandium. Guests can also get some inspiration for their table decorations thanks to her dinner service installation, named a Dark Danish Dinner, which features stoneware and porcelain ceramics. Pass the schnapps. Free, booking essential, 4 May, 6-8pm; installation 3-7 May, 10am-6pm, 86 Marylebone High Street, W1U, skandium.com

Republic of Fritz Hansen

THE COSTUME ARCHIVE AT RADA

Fife-based design studio Tom Pigeon is best known for its graphic prints and textiles, having created pieces for The Barbican, Tate Modern and the V&A in the past. This month it branches out into wood and metalwork, with Shipwreck, an exhibition of objects and artworks at Fritz Hansen that mimic the flotsam and jetsam washed up on the beaches of Scotland. Free, exhibition 3-7 May, 10.30-5pm; talk, booking essential, 3 May, 6pm, 13-14 Margaret Street, W1W, fritzhansen.com; tompigeon.com

Royal Academy of Dramatic Art One for dressing-up lovers or budding thespians, the costume department at RADA flings open its doors for a behind-thescenes guided tour, led by head of costume Diane Favell and prop master Deryk Cropper. Tickets from ÂŁ15, 3 May, 3pm, 62-64 Gower Street, WC1E, rada.ac.uk

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“THE FRENCH TOUCH IN INTERIOR DESIGN”

Email: e.s@emmanuellesirven.com Tel: +44 (0)7748 098 578

www.emmanuellesirven.com


INTERVIEW

Below: lee broom, image credit: jermaine francis; right: opticality for London design festival 2016, image credit: luke hayes

Y Jumping the

BROOM A decade after his debut collection, Lee Broom is marking the anniversary with a Wedgwood collaboration and a ten-piece anniversary showcase. The product designer reflects on the pivotal year with Kari Colmans

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ou may not necessarily know you’re a Lee Broom fan. But if you’ve been sprucing up your living room, or even just perusing Pinterest, chances are you will have fallen for one of his designs – be it a crescent chandelier or hanging hoop chair – without even knowing it. With his conceptual creations ingrained in the last decade’s interior design psyche, many will be surprised to learn that the company is only ten years young. “I wanted to create a design brand first and foremost,” says 41-year-old Broom, who is in the middle of putting the final touches to his ten-piece anniversary collection when we speak. “When I launched it, most of my peers were designing for other brands, but for me it was about opening up, creating and owning the whole experience from start to finish: from the inception of the design to it landing on someone’s doorstep. I think we have achieved it and more.” Broom is one of the country’s most high-profile product designers. Over the past decade he has released more than 100 pieces manufactured under his own label, as well as numerous products for other brands and more than 45 commercial retail, restaurant, bar and residential interiors. His smattering of accolades spans the British Designer of the Year Award in 2011, as well as four nods in three years at the same awards, including one for his renowned lighting product, the Crystal Bulb. His trophy cabinet also features a Queen’s Award for Enterprise – the UK’s

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“The idea was to focus on reinterpretations for a more modern audience�

wedgwood by lee broom, image credit: michael bodiam


INTERVIEW

lee broom at the wedgwood factory, barlaston, stoke-on-trent

highest accolade for business success – in the category of International Trade. “Receiving that award at Buckingham Palace was a very special moment,” he says. With a background in theatre and fashion, Broom previously worked under Vivienne Westwood (after winning Young Fashion Designer of the Year) and went on to study for a degree in fashion design at Central Saint Martins. He still takes inspiration from the sartorial world (The Guardian commented that “Lee Broom is to furniture what Marc Jacobs or Tom Ford are to fashion”) and has collaborated with a number of brands including Christian Louboutin, Mulberry and Matthew Williamson. “Growing up I was a huge fan of Vivienne Westwood, but also John Galliano and Jean-Paul Gaultier,” he says. “I was incredibly passionate about theatrical fashion designers and the visuals and techniques they created.” The move to products was an organic one. His first collection, Neo Neon in 2007, stemmed from advising a number of bars on interior design. Since then, including two collections in 2008, Broom is not so much pausing to take stock, but jumping back on the merry-go-round. He’s currently presiding over his anniversary collection, Time Machine: a ten-piece range of Lee Broom hero products re-imagined in an all-white palette. By the time you read this, he will have just presented them at Salone del Mobile in Milan. “I wanted to look back to pieces we

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had created over the past decade, but also to do something different,” he says. “I’m not always a fan of looking back; when I release new collections, I usually move forward. I thought if I was going to do that, then I wanted to reinvent the pieces, and to create new versions of them.” The show was staged in a derelict vault inside the Milano Centrale station, a vast concourse that hadn’t been used by the public in more than 30 years. “That really appealed to me. After seeing the space I decided to present the collection on an all-white rotating fairground carousel. It’s quite a modernist, theatrical presentation,” he adds. Broom’s favourite pieces are always his latest, but he names the solid Carrara marble grandfather clock with polished brass detailing as his most impressive, which is the only totally new product among the reimagined versions of Bright On Bistro, Carpetry Console, Crystal Bulb and Drunken Side Table. “I chose a grandfather clock because as well as marking the passing of time, people often give clocks or watches to signify a special occasion. It felt like an appropriate product to present, but it’s a totally contemporary version.” It’s been a busy year for Broom, not least because his company has expanded stateside to New York. Then there’s the small matter of his collaboration with the 250-year-old English heritage brand Wedgwood to reimagine its iconic Jasperware. He tells me he was attracted to the timeless black and white stripes of the Panther Vase for its sense of modernity, and used this as a starting point for the collection. He combined the graphic stripe with postmodern elements and introduced vibrant colours and glossy lacquered textures, which juxtapose the matte finish of the traditional Jasperware. “I think a lot of people are familiar with that product; they’ve seen it in their parents’ or grandparents’ homes,

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THIS IMAGE AND RIGHT: TIME MACHINE COLLECTION AT SALON DEL MOBILE 2017, IMAGE CREDIT: LUKE HAYES; BELOW: TIME MACHINE GRANDFATHER CLOCK, IMAGE CREDIT: ARTHUR WOODCROFT

especially the blue and white pieces with ornamentation that were invented in the 1700s. The idea was to focus on reinterpretations for a more modern audience,” he explains. “With my own experience of working with craftspeople in crystal and marble, going back to traditional techniques was a really good fit. I think the designs strike a good balance between the Wedgwood archive and my own aesthetic.” It’s clear from the way he speaks that Broom lives and breathes design. His home, a south London apartment in which he’s lived for more than 12 years, is a converted fire station that dates back to the 1800s. “It still has the tower on the top of the building where you could look out across London for fires and then ring the bell for the horse-drawn carriages below. It’s a very old industrial building, but my apartment is quite open plan with a few architectural details to it.” It’s also home to much of his work. “It almost acts as an extension of our showroom. It’s

constantly evolving. When we’ve created a new product, I take it to my apartment in the prototype stage and put it in the space and live with it for a period of time to see how it reacts. It’s important that things don’t just look good in the showroom but that they work in people’s homes.” Broom and his partner also love to collect art. He’s a big fan of Pop, Surrealist and Cubist art as well as photography and anything Art Deco. He describes his favourite piece by the artist Keith Haring, who painted the back of three leather jackets (for himself, his partner and Madonna).

“It’s important to surround yourself with things that make you feel happy and comfortable” He found Madonna’s in the I. Brewster gallery in Philadelphia many years ago and brought it back home where it hangs on the wall “very casually”, even though it’s actually very rare. “It’s important to surround yourself with things that make you feel happy and comfortable,” he says. “Your home should reflect your personality.” I ask if he could have designed one famous piece of furniture, which would it be? He names the Bentwood chair by Thonet, although he did include a reinterpretation of it in one of his first furniture collections, where he adorned the silhouette in neon lighting to accentuate the flowing lines. “I think people often take that chair for granted because they see it so often in cafés. But if you actually look at it as a piece of furniture, it’s an incredible design and the basis for a lot of modern chairs.” Pausing to celebrate the past ten years, I wonder what the next decade holds for him – a


INTERVIEW

return to fashion, perhaps? He says no, although he wouldn’t be averse to a jewellery collaboration (if you were to look inside his sketchbook, you’d find jewellery designs doodled in every margin). “The boundaries between the different types of design – art, fashion, industrial and decorative – has tended to blur a little more over the past decade, which is healthy. But

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who knows, things have a habit of developing quite organically and I have a habit of seizing opportunities as they come.” The Wedgwood by Lee Broom collection from £7,500 is available exclusively at Harrods in numbers of 15 per piece, as part of the Harrods’ Art Partners initiative. Lee Broom’s Time Machine collection is now available on a made-to-order basis, leebroom.com

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PINS & NEEDLES You might not know the name behind the needlework, but Hand & Lock has embroidered and embellished the attire of Hollywood royalty and nobility alike. Melissa Emerson visits the firm’s Fitzrovia atelier to meet the young head designer keeping its 250-year heritage alive

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lthough unassuming from the outside, the sense of history is tangible in Hand & Lock’s Fitzrovia atelier. A glass case of military badges and a signed, handwritten letter from Cecil Beaton are framed on the wall, and a towering stack of old wooden drawers with a web of loose threads spilling out stands against another. I’m greeted by youthful head designer Scott Gordon Heron. We pass through the studio of equally young embroiderers; it’s a surprise to say the least. “No little old ladies in sight,” his colleague laughs, telling me that everyone (except the chairman) is 30 and under. The Hand & Lock story began a few hundred years ago, when French Huguenot refugee and lacemaker M.Hand arrived in London in 1767, plying his trade to tailors. “He wove wire into what anyone else might recognise as metallic ribbon, but actually it’s a lace that’s used in military uniforms,” Heron explains. Having successfully mastered this, Hand began to embroider with gold wire, a specialism the house still practises today in its 250th anniversary year. Expertise in couture was added to the mix when the firm merged with S. Lock & Co in 2001. Founded by Stanley S. Lock, who took over his employer’s embroidery couture business CE Phillips & Co in the 1950s, its clients included Sir Norman Hartnell, Christian Dior and the royal family, who honoured the company with a royal warrant in 1972. It appears Heron was destined to follow in Mr Hand and Mr Lock’s enterprising footsteps. “I’ve always loved painting and drawing and expressing myself through image,” he says. “I thought I’d be a printer or a fashion designer, but all my

teachers told me I was an embroiderer. A school trip to the Première Vision textile trade show in Paris proved to be a huge eye-opener. “Everyone I meet today appreciates embroidery for its beauty and history, and how meticulous it is. It’s a skill that you can’t just learn in a day and that’s what has always fuelled my passion.” Over the last seven years, Heron has worked his way up from design assistant to head designer, although these days he doesn’t get to do quite as much embroidery as he’d like. “I love how repetitive it is. It’s like meditating in a way, doing the same thing continuously,” he says. “I enjoy working with silks and silk shading, but it’s hard to be a designer and an embroiderer at the same time in this industry.” Heron is largely responsible for producing the drawings that form a crucial part of the making process. “They’re used by the designer to help the embroiderer understand what to do,” he tells me. “The artwork needs to be really clear and concise because it’s the tool that we use to communicate. The drafts are annotated with abbreviations of what techniques and materials to use where and when.” Such precision is key when working with luxurious fabrics. “The lace we work with can be extraordinarily expensive if it has a really high gold or silver content. I’m currently working with handwoven damask silk from Italy for a commission, which costs £200 a metre. One of our most opulent commissions was a buckle for a Malaysian monarch three years ago that had goodness knows how many diamonds on it,” he adds. The drawings are also of great value and are carefully head designer scott gordon heron, image courtesy of hand & Lock


FEATURE

image courtesy of Sarah Raymond

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FEATURE

left: image courtesy of sarah raymond; above and right: images courtesy of hand & Lock; below left: image courtesy of aspinal of london

“ The ornamentation and embellishment of textiles comes naturally to the human race” archived. “All of the drafts we produce are like blueprints. Even if it’s just a monogram, we archive it because we might need to make it in exactly the same way as we did before,” Heron says, adding that this is particularly important for royal coats of arms and military insignia. “We’ve produced important work for big national events like Jubilees and royal weddings. It’s great to be a part of that – you feel very proud.” He explains that the regal and the ceremonial arm of the business, with its rules and regulations, is balanced by the creative freedom of contemporary projects across fashion, interiors, film and theatre. “One day you could be designing a coat of arms for the Queen to wear on Maundy Thursday, and the day after, you’re embroidering a swear word for an artist on a piece of sparkly fabric,” he laughs. “The principles of embroidery stay the same, it just happens to be in a different context.” As we chat about the fashion arm of the business, I learn the house has collaborated with Louis Vuitton, Mary Katrantzou and most recently Burberry for its A/W17 show. “It’s more difficult to break through the barrier into fashion because it’s such a secretive industry. Fashion designers don’t always credit the textile

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manufacturers or embroiderers they work with,” Heron says. Contemporary fashion might be helping to bring the craft back into the limelight, but Heron points to its popularity throughout history. “It’s always been there. After food, water and shelter, textiles are a necessity, and I think the ornamentation and embellishment of textiles comes naturally to the human race. I don’t think that desire will ever die out.” Part of that desire, he believes, is to do with storytelling. “What’s really wonderful about textiles is that they form a kind of dialogue of human anthropology. You can look at a piece of embroidery and recognise the era it’s from. You can document what’s gone on, and that’s really special.” Today, much of that documenting takes place on social media. “If you think about Instagram, everybody wants to tell the world who they are, and the idea of personalisation is so integral to that. A patch or a monogram is the perfect accessory to take a photo with,” he says. Increasing embroidery’s appeal to a contemporary audience is a key part of this year’s anniversary celebrations, which include a special collaboration, The Embellished Handbag: A Celebration of 250 Years of Fashion and Embroidery. Thirteen fashion brands such as House of Holland, Vivienne Westwood and Aspinal of London (left) have created an embroidered bag to be included in a Hand & Lock exhibition, which will tour Sydney and Chicago before arriving in London in July. But it’s not just the catwalk and the high street where embroidery is enjoying a resurgence. “Performance textiles and embroidered structures can be used to regulate the heart beat, open arteries, and even help skin heal,” Heron enthuses. From the high-tech to the handstitched, the art form shows no sign of dying out. And in Fitzrovia, the young and passionate team is ready to carry the Hand & Lock banner into the next 250 years. 86 Margaret Street, W1W, handembroidery.com

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ORIGINAL, LIMITED-EDITION ART DECO POSTERS

Limited to editions of 280, our newly-commissioned Art Deco posters feature glamorous holiday destinations around the world, ski resorts in the Austrian, French and Swiss Alps, and the world’s greatest historic automobiles. Over 100 designs to choose from, all printed on 100% cotton fine art paper, measuring 97 x 65 cms.

Priced at £395 each.

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View and buy online at w w w.pullmaneditions.com Pullman Ed-M-F.indd 1

06/04/2017 21:04


Kay & Co, together with The Montagu Kay Square Garden Trust, invite you to the & Co, together with The Montagu Square Garden Trust, invite you to the

MONTAGU SQUARE MONTAGU SQUARE

Monday 26th June | 6.30pm – 10pm Monday 26th June | 6.30pm – 10pm Feast on Feast on

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Celebrating 35 years in Marylebone Celebrating 35 years in Marylebone


COLLECTION

Flying Colours

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ware that the 21st-century woman cannot be pinned down to a single definition, Piaget chose five colours to represent the multi-faceted lives of women today. The result is an updated version of its 25-year-old Possession line, comprising malachite, lapis lazuli, onyx, turquoise and carnelian stones. Piaget called on model and entrepreneur Olivia Palermo to star in the new campaign and film. “I think women in this day and age should be more supportive of each other than ever, and give each other a great platform and stability,” she comments. From £990 to £11,200, piaget.com

Olivia Palermo, Piaget brand ambassador, wears a selection of fine jewellery from the Piaget Possession collection, piaget.com

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BASELWORLD 2017

watch wish list An industry in consolidation mode is good news for punters, says Richard brown, as watchmakers focus attention on more affordable collections

A pair of unlikely bedfellows It costs a watchmaker millions of pounds to launch a new movement. Hence why many brands that survived the quartz crisis of the 1970s grew reliant on calibres from third-party suppliers, most notably from Swatch Group-subsidiary ETA. When, in 2002, Swatch chief Nicolas Hayek Jr. announced plans to restrict the flow of movements to companies outside his own portfolio, brands were forced to invest in becoming more self-reliant. Thus the industry’s prevailing obsession with the term ‘in-house’.

Industry consensus is that it costs around £13.5 million to procure the industrial machinery needed to mill the requisite parts of a movement. At trade price, a watchmaker will need to shift a lot of units to make that money back. Since a verticalised company will be capable of manufacturing more movements than it can possibly use itself, one idea is to sell to others. Perhaps this explains the initially eyebrow-raising partnership between Tudor and Breitling. Breitling granted Tudor access to its B01 base calibre, into which Tudor has incorporated its own rotor and regulating system. The movement, the MT5813, allows Tudor to update its Black Bay collection with a COSC-certified chronograph – at a fraction of the price it would have cost to develop a similar watch by itself. Tudor, going the other way, has let Breitling use its three-hand MT5612 movement inside the second-generation Superocean Heritage – essentially an upgrade from the previously used ETA 2824. As with the first edition, the second series is available in either 42mm or 46mm, both of which now include a scratch-resistant ceramic bezel. Given that for the last two years the watch industry has been shrinking, expect to see more mutually-beneficial partnerships in the future. breitling.com, tudorwatch.com

Above: Black Bay Chrono, £3,430, Tudor Left: Superocean Héritage II Chronographe 46, £4,830, Breitling


collection

Under the sea Until the 1960s, the maximum depth to which a diver could descend was around 60 metres. Any deeper, and pressurised gas decompressed in the body could cause air bubbles to block blood vessels. Saturation diving mitigates the risk of a sudden build-up of gas within the body through acclimatisation. Divers live for up to 28 days in pressurised chambers before they are transported underwater in closed ‘bells’ set at the same pressure. In 1992, a diver from the Compagnie Maritime d’Expertises, the NASA of underwater engineering, descended to 701 metres – a record that still stands. It is considered the maximum depth to which a human body can descend before it implodes. The fact that Rolex’s new Sea-Dweller (£8,350) is waterproof to 1,220 metres, then, is a tad irrelevant. Here’s guessing you’re more likely to pair yours with a business suit than a wetsuit, anyway. To mark the watch’s 50th birthday, Rolex has enlarged the Sea-Dweller to 43mm; equipped it with the latest-generation Calibre 3235 (accurate to two seconds a day); and for the very first time, fitted it with a Cyclops lens at three o’clock. Another feature likely to excite is the red ‘SeaDweller’ inscription, a reference to the 1967 forebear. Red writing has become extremely valued among Rolex collectors. The ‘Double Red’ Sea-Dwellers produced between 1967 and 1977, with two lines on the dial, typically sell on the pre-owned market for far more than their white-text counterparts. rolex.com

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Clockwise from top left: SeaDweller 904L steel; The Bathyscaphe Trieste, ©Thomas J. Abercrombie/ National Geographic; the original 1967 Sea-Dweller (left) and Sea-Dweller 904L steel (right); James Cameron wearing a SeaDweller, ©Mark Thiessen/National Geographic;

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Three is the magic number A tie-in between horological exhibitionist Hublot, sartorial superpower Rubinacci and Lapo Elkann, grandson of Gianni Agnelli, former Fiat chief and style deity of the 21st-century, was always likely to yield something rather dapper. The result is six 45mm Classic Fusion chronographs – two in ceramic, two in titanium, two in gold – that feature dials and straps made from a selection of prints (houndstooth, squared weaves and Prince of Wales check). Handpicked from the 60,000 square metres of cloth in Rubinacci’s archive, the selected fabrics date back to the 1970s. Classic Fusion Italia Independent collection, from £12,500, hublot.com

Power play By the late 1970s, Oris had clocked up 279 in-house calibres and was one of Switzerland’s largest movement manufacturers, producing as many as 1.2 million watches and clocks a year. Following the quartz crisis, it became dependent on third-party suppliers until, in 2014, the watchmaker developed its first fully-fledged movement for almost 40 years. To celebrate the company’s 110th anniversary, the Calibre 110 boasted a then industry-beating ten-day power reserve. Just another three years later, Oris presents the Calibre 113, updated by way of a calendar that shows the day, date, week and month of the year. Again, the watch will run for ten days before it requires winding by hand. £4,780, oris.ch

Shining bright At Baselworld 1997, Patek Philippe expanded its sports watch offering with the Aquanaut. A commercially savvy way of providing access to the Nautilus, it quickly became one of Patek’s best-selling watch models. To mark its 20th anniversary, the brand has launched the Ref. 5168G in 18-carat white gold – the first Aquanaut to be delivered in this precious metal. With a diameter of 42mm, it is the largest model in the Aquanaut family, paying tribute to the original 1976 Nautilus of the same size, a timepiece that continues to go by the nickname ‘Jumbo’ among Patek collectors. The watch is water-resistant to a depth of 120 metres, while a Super-LumiNova coating ensures that Arabic numerals are visible in the dark. Inside, the self-winding

calibre 324 S C, visible through a sapphire-crystal case back, is just 3.3mm in height, making for a timepiece that is only 8.25mm thick. £27,990, patek.com


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Vintage Appeal Faced with a turbulent economic climate, watchmakers are revisiting their back catalogues and reissuing rock-steady classics

Old School Chronographs Chronomaster Heritage 146, £5,500, Zenith

Autavia, £3,900, TAG Heuer

Arriving just before Baselworld, Zenith’s Chronomaster Heritage 146 acted as a precursor to the raft of retro revivals we’d see at the show. The big news here is that the modern Heritage 146 chronograph is now equipped with Zenith’s legendary El Primero movement – the world’s first (1969), and still the most accurate series-produced automatic chronograph calibre. zenith-watches.com

Last year, digitally savvy TAG Heuer devotees voted for their favourite Autavia model from 16 first generation pieces from the 1960s. The Autavia Ref. 2446 Mark 3, won out and, so, this year makes a comeback. Today’s Autavia has been modernised with a larger 42mm case and the latest self-winding movement from TAG. tagheuer.com

Retro Dive Watches Tribute to Fifty Fathoms MIL-SPEC, £10,310, Blancpain Arriving in 1953, Blancpain’s Fifty Fathoms beat both the Rolex Submariner and the Omega Seamaster to become the world’s first bona-fide, series-produced dive watch. In 1957, the Fifty Fathoms MIL-SPEC 1 incorporated a circular water-tightness indicator that would turn from white to red should water penetrate the case. Now, it comes along with a unidirectional rotating bezel covered in scratch-resistant sapphire. blancpain.com

Hi-Beat 36000 Professional 600m Diver’s, €12,000, Grand Seiko While this watch’s hobnail dial, contrasting bezel and circular hour marks may hark back to the golden era of dive watch design, the Hi-Beat 36000 Professional 600m

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Diver’s is actually the first professional diver’s watch from Grand Seiko. It is equipped with a hi-beat automatic calibre and a valve-free helium resistant system. seiko.co.uk

Speedmaster Limited Edition, £5,360, Omega When the Speedmaster arrived in 1957, it was the first chronograph to feature a tachymeter scale on its bezel rather than on its dial. Sixty years later, it is reborn with the brand’s manual-wind 1861 movement and a black ‘tropical’ dial. Only 3,557 will be produced. omegawatches.com

HyperChrome Captain Cook, £1,430, Rado Think Rado and most likely something sleek, slim-line and ceramic will pop into your head. Back in 1962, however, it unveiled the Captain Cook, a playful yet neat 37mm diver’s watch with oversized indexes and chunky arrow-shaped hands. Playing tribute, Rado has re-launched the model, sticking with the original size. rado.com

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The Grand Phoenix ruby necklace, featuring 24 perfectly matched natural Burmese rubies totalling 59.83 carats and 100.21 carats of diamonds, POA, Faidee

BASELWORLD 2017

show

Best in

Olivia sharpe seeks out the latest jewellery trends and discovers fresh feats of craftsmanship

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t is with some trepidation that I start to write a Baselworld round-up each year. The reason is that I never quite know where to begin. With more than 2,000 stands at the eight-day event, it all becomes a bit of a blur (not simply because of the copious amounts of champagne). This year marked the 100th anniversary of the fair. However, rather than celebrating in typically ostentatious style, there was a more subdued note in the air. With last year’s falling sales in the luxury sector and predictions of an economic downturn on the horizon, this had a knock-on effect: according to Forbes, exhibitor numbers reportedly dropped 13.3 per cent, to 1,300. Following this, the organisers announced it would be reducing the number of days by two for next year’s edition.

Given such news, it is hard not to feel gloomy, but brands are simply having to rethink their strategies. Rather than using Baselworld as the moment to showcase their most record-breaking priced pieces, some exhibitors were emphasising affordability and wearability. The buzzword is millenials and by targeting them with attractive entry-level collections, brands hope to weather the storm. The emphasis was on quality, not quantity. Of course, there were still plenty of showstopping pieces, including the astronomical $35 million ruby necklace by Faidee (pictured above). Named The Grand Phoenix, it stole the show in one fell swoop. With this and other pieces to uplift visitors’ spirits, there is no reason not to feel positive. Here’s to the next 100 years.


collection

Entry point Case in point for enticing millenials with entrylevel pieces was luxury pearl jeweller Yoko London – its new pieces start from £1,000. Fabergé showcased its accessible engagement ring collection, which launched at the end of last year and allows clients to enter the world of this historic and opulent jewellery house for £5,000. Elsewhere, Lebanese jeweller Yeprem argued that it’s never too early to get hooked on diamonds, with prices starting at £1,700. Finally, Chopard gave its Happy Diamonds collection a refresh with the more affordable material malachite. chopard.com, faberge.com, yepremjewellery.com, yokolondon.com

Clockwise from left: Happy Diamonds bangle in 18-carat rose gold with malachite, £2,400 and in 18-carat rose gold with diamonds, £4,390, both Chopard; Novus South Sea pearl ring, £6,000, Yoko London; Ruby rose gold fluted ring, £8,455, Fabergé; Pendulum pearl earrings, £1,500, Yoko London; Gold bracelet with round and marquise-cut diamonds, £4,100, Yeprem

History in the making

from left: Dior VIII Grand Bal Plissé Ruban, 36mm, £16,250, Dior; Mademoiselle Privé Décor Aubazine in 18-karat white gold with brilliant- and baguette-cut diamonds on a black satin strap, POA, limited edition of five pieces, Chanel; Boy.Friend Tweed Beige Gold in 18-karat beige gold with 62 brilliant-cut diamonds, POA, Chanel

In tough times, a brand will often stress its history as sure signs of stability. This year, Chanel has commemorated its founder through its Mademoiselle Privé collection. The Décor Aubazine timepiece is inspired by the windows of the orphanage that Coco Chanel spent her childhood, while the brand’s classic tweed is used for the first time on the Boy.Friend watch strap, woven in beige gold or black steel threads. Celebrating its 70th anniversary, Dior also pays tribute to its heritage. Launched in 2011, the Dior VIII Grand Bal watch collection honours its founder’s love of couture and lavish feasts, and now includes the Grand Bal Plissé Ruban, featuring a pleated design similar to that of a petticoat. chanel.com, dior.com

Clockwise from left: 22.70-carat black opal necklace with white South Sea cultured pearls and diamonds, POA, Mikimoto; Serpenti watch with green leather strap, POA, Bulgari; Classic Butterfly emerald pendant, POA, Graff Diamonds; Mystery of Muzo cuffs, POA, Jacob & Co; Butterfly Swirl ring, POA, Sutra Jewels; Jade earrings, prices from £1,260, Marco Bicego

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Green fingers Pantone’s Colour of the Year is ‘greenery’, and many at Baselworld presented their own take on the trend. Emeralds were a common sight, but some experimented with more unconventional stones, such as Italian jeweller Marco Bicego, which showed a pair of jade earrings with visible imperfections and inclusions. Arguably the most unusual was from Jacob & Co – a rare fancy intense green radiant-cut diamond ring. Its Mystery of Muzo cuffs also featured Colombian Muzo emeralds in the same vivid shade. marcobicego.com, jacobandco.com

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collection

HIGHLIGHTS Diamonds in the rough Messika made quite a statement, having upgraded its stand and positioning itself next to players such as Hermès and Graff, with a bed of roses outside its booth. It has launched a new high jewellery collection, Paris est une Fête, which pays tribute to the city’s cultural heyday in the 1920s. It sees the designer play with different diamond cuts: the Swinging necklace includes more than 2,500 diamonds, assembled using discreet elastic threads so the stones appear to float on the wearer. Another diamond jeweller worthy of a second mention is Yeprem. Loved by the likes of Rihanna and Madonna, the edgy jeweller made its debut into watches with a high jewellery timepiece collection called Y-Memento. messika.com, yepremjewellery.com

Lydia Courteille The intrepid jeweller travelled to the Sahara and fell in love with its arid landscape. She captures its shades with Australian boulder opals and yellow sapphires. Sahara collection, POA, lydiacourteille.com from top: Swinging necklace; Swan asymmetric earrings, both POA, Messika; Y-Memento timepiece, POA, Yeprem Jewellery

High time There was a time when watchmakers got away with smattering ladies’ watches with diamonds and gemstones, covering up a lack of any proper mechanism. All this is fortunately behind us: today brands are seeking both style and substance. Chanel celebrated the 30th anniversary of its Première watch by launching the Première Camélia Skeleton. The calibre is the brand’s second stab at an in-house movement and masterfully bridges the gap between design and function. Harry Winston took us down memory lane with an update to its Avenue collection. It now arrives in Dual Time: a second time zone function designed for globetrotting women, or with a moon phase complication (one of the smallest of its kind on the market). Graff, meanwhile, brought out a new Mastergraff Floral Tourbillon for ladies. chanel.com, harrywinston.com, graffdiamonds.com Clockwise from top left: Avenue C™ Mini Moon Phase in 18-karat rose gold with 53 brilliant-cut diamonds on alligator leather strap, POA, Harry Winston; Première Camélia Skeleton in 18-karat white gold with brilliant-cut diamonds on a black satin strap, numbered edition, POA, Chanel; Mastergraff Floral Tourbillon, POA, Graff Diamonds

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Dolce & Gabbana Reminiscent of the enchanted flower in Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, the Rose high jewellery watch has enamel petals, while the leaves and stem are adorned with emeralds and tsavorite garnets. The dial is decorated with a pavé of diamonds. POA, dolcegabbana.com

Picchiotti Founder Giuseppe Picchiotti celebrated his brand’s 50th anniversary with a special ring. The 8.05-carat ruby L’Anfiteatro is inspired by an amphitheatre. “It is for the true connoisseur,” he describes, “an heirloom for an exceptional collection.” POA, picchiotti.it

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London’s most exclusive jet-set lifestyle event

11TH - 13TH MAY 2017 LONDON BIGGIN HILL AIRPORT

Tickets are limited. Book your place at www.theelitelondon.com


art

Strike up A

Aaron Kasmin, Cheers, 2016, Coloured pencil, 21 x 15cm, courtesy of Sims Reed Gallery

uthor F. Scott Fitzgerald would have surely approved of Sims Reed Gallery’s next exhibition, Up in Smoke: a collection of 28 pencil drawings by British artist Aaron Kasmin, inspired by American single matchbooks from the late 1920s to the early 1960s. The artist was inspired by his own Lion Match Company collection, made of examples originally mass produced as advertising. Each A4 or A5 sized drawing is for sale, from £850 to £2,000 – take your pick from post-prohibition era glamour to pure Americana. 17 May – 9 June, 43a Duke Street, St James’s, SW1Y, gallery.simsreed.com

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Photography by Levon Biss - www.microsculpture.net

Moooi presents a life extraordinary! Moooi London · 23 Great Titchfield Street · London, W1W 7PA Moooi Amsterdam · Westerstraat 187 · 1015 MA Amsterdam Moooi New York · 36 East 31st Street · New York, NY 10016 Moooi Tokyo · Three F 6-11-1 Minami Aoyama · Minato-ku, Tokyo www.moooi.com


ART

Jonathan Leaman Find the British artist’s latest paintings on show at Beaux Arts

Rebecca Louise Law’s site-specific floral wonderworlds have sprung up in Mayfair before, at the Royal Academy and J&M Davidson – her latest can now be found at Sake no Hana, Hakkasan’s Japanese sister restaurant. The tradition of celebrating the cherry blossom (sakura) season is known as hanami, for which Law has hung clouds of white flowers from the ceiling by copper wire. A special menu offers yuzu champagne miso salmon and a sakura-inspired mousse. A treat for all the senses. £37, until 10 June, 23 St James’s Street, SW1A, sakenohana.com

Art news

words: camilla apcar

clockwise from top: sake no hana; Jonathan Leaman, D’Adieu, 2012-2017, oil on canvas, 67 x 47 inches; Sam Francis, Evergreen Licks, 1987, acrylic on canvas, 152 x 183 cm, courtesy of Bernard Jacobson Gallery

All cherry well

Your 1995-1996 painting A Jan Steen Kitchen is part of Tate Modern’s collection. How has your work evolved since then? I’m always proud of what I’ve done, but I couldn’t do it again. I have changed a lot. I’m just older, I see the world as so much more complicated now. Where do you find inspiration? I try and look at the world and make use of it. The four pictures in this new exhibition took five years. It is a long process of creation. I’ve got pictures in my head and I just want to get them out. Why have you chosen to work in oil paint? It takes a long time, and when you go wrong you still have to wait for it to dry to correct it. I should paint much faster, but I just like to see what’s happening. What themes do your new paintings explore? They are about how the world lets you down, but is still wonderful – however you don’t understand that [at the time]. Life hurts you, but it is still extraordinary. Until 27 May, 48 Maddox Street, W1S, beauxartslondon.uk

Making a splash If your appetite for Abstract Expressionism was increased by the Royal Academy’s winter show, hone in on the late Californian artist Sam Francis at Bernard Jacobson Gallery. This retrospective takes in large s l u x u ry l o n d o n . c o. u k s

canvases and paper studies, with an inside track: the gallerist enjoyed a close friendship and worked with Francis for more than a decade. Until 27 May, 28 Duke Street, SW1Y, jacobsongallery.com 47


Elliott Erwitt, 2015

Michele De Lucchi - Giancarlo Fassina: Tolomeo


art

Prize lots Sold: £187,500

Sold: £106,250

Es t im a t e : £ 5 0 , 0 0 0 - £ 7 0 , 0 0 0

Es t im a t e : £ 5 0 , 0 0 0 - £ 8 0 , 0 0 0

Lightness of Being, Chris Levine, 2004 “Without doubt one of the most iconic images of Her Majesty, created by one of Britain’s most celebrated and progressive artists, this work came with impeccable provenance and is the largest version of the image that the photographer made. It was a real highlight, and brilliantly captured the strength and essence of British art, crafts and design over the course of the past century.” – Robin Cawdron-Stewart, head of sales and Modern British pictures specialist at Sotheby’s

UPCOMING

A lacquered brass bookcase, Geoffrey Bennison, c. 1974 The late Baron George Weidenfeld of Chelsea moved to London from his native Vienna before the outbreak of World War II, and co-founded the publishing house Weidenfeld & Nicolson. The notoriously private antiques dealer Geoffrey Bennison revamped Weidenfeld’s Chelsea apartment in the early 1970s, which Weidenfeld kept in almost exactly the same arrangement until he passed away last January – with the exception of his art and antique collection. Among his possessions that will be auctioned in May was a lacquered brass bookcase designed and supplied by Bennison himself. Estimate £2,500-£4,000, A Life of Ideals and Ideas: The Collection of the Lord Weidenfeld GBE, 18 May, christies.com s l u x u ry l o n d o n . c o. u k s

Sold, from left: Chris Levine, Lightness of Being, Unique pigment print, 128.3 x 102.3cm. Made in Britain at Sotheby’s, 5 April, sothebys.com, image courtesy of Sotheby’s Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton P.R.A., R.W.S., An Athlete Wrestling a Python, brown patina, 52.5cm high. Important Design at Bonhams New Bond Street, 5 April, bonhams.com, image courtesy of Bonhams Upcoming, from left: Geoffrey Bennison (designer and supplier), lacquered brass bookcase, c.1974, 370 x 150 x 27cm, image courtesy of Christie’s Wang Changming, Tears of the red candle, image courtesy of lyon & turnbull

An Athlete Wrestling a Python, Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton P.R.A., R.W.S. “It is unsurprising that this sculptural masterpiece achieved such a fine price. It depicts a dramatic life and death battle between two powerful forces, in a strikingly realistic way and is a one of a very limited edition of Leighton’s most iconic sculptures. The bronze has not been seen in public since 1934, having been part of the same family collection since then.” – Michael Lake, head of works of art and sculpture at Bonhams

UPCOMING

Tears of the Red Candle, Wang Changming This contemporary artist was born in Wuxi, near Shanghai, in 1964. His paintings feature juxtaposing symbols of traditional and modern China, reflecting the contradictions of the culture he grew up in. The wooden jewellery box in Tears of the Red Candle reveals a photograph of a Chinese woman in a Republic period costume; a nearly burnt out candle drips red wax; while what seems to be a drawer is in fact Lenin’s Selected Writings. Experts have related the composition to a line in a poem by Tang Dynasty poet Li Shangyin: “when the candle wax becomes ashes, tears shall stop”. Estimate £3,000-£5,000, Fine Asian Works of Art, 9 May, lyonandturnbull.com 49


In devilish detail There’s never a dull day at Ronald Phillips’ antique restoration workshop. Camilla Apcar discovers a concealed studio brimming with expertise and fine furniture

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ayfair houses hidden treasures at every turn. On Bruton Street, 18th and 19th-century English antique furniture dealer Ronald Phillips has always had a restoration workshop its premises – but only those in the know will have caught a glimpse of it. Three full-time restorers and an upholsterer – who also deals with antique coverings, needlework and tapestry – are based below its glass-fronted showroom. They might, painstakingly, work on just one piece for an entire month. While most other dealers have workshops outside London, “the fact that we have it in-house means that we keep total control”, says owner Simon Phillips, son of founder Ronald. “One can go and see the progress five times a day if necessary. If there’s something going wrong, we can catch it within a matter of seconds.” Thomas Lange is a trained cabinet maker and restorer who oversees the artistic side of the workshop. His passion started early on. As a child he collected pieces that were thrown away as rubbish,

“We have control over the restoration process, to make sure we retain the original as much as possible” repaired them as best he could, then sold a few on. He trained as a cabinet maker for four years in Germany, where he was born, and came to study furniture restoration at the London College of Furniture. Lange worked for a number of dealers and restoration companies before joining Ronald Phillips, 21 years ago. “The main thing is that we have control over the restoration process to make sure we retain the original as much as possible: not to embellish things, and to retain the colour and patination,” he says. This requires a great deal of research to begin with; Lange has an enviable library of resources on site. He gathers as much information as possible from books, the internet and the house that the piece has come from. Photographic evidence is a bonus. The workshop deals with cabinet making, woodwork and general repair. For gilding, paper or stone restoration, it employs specialists. “The benefit of having the workshop on site is that you have the expertise at hand,” says Lange, “so should something turn up that has a problem, we can deal


ART

with it straight away. We can also supervise the work here and make sure everything is done in the best possible way.” Lange’s own favourites are, perhaps unsurprisingly, rare pieces. “We worked on a desk made by Chippendale, and as a cabinet maker you could read the handwriting of the maker – you can tune into the work. We could see that three different people worked on the same desk, because there were ever so slight differences in the drawer bottoms.” Some pieces are harder to restore than others. One of the first projects Lange undertook at Ronald Phillips was a breakfast table that had gone to a good private home, but the maid decided to iron the tablecloth on the table itself. The wax finish – 250 years old – had been removed. “It had gone from a nice mahogany colour to having a dark red patch,” Lange recalls. “Trying to bring that back and blend it in with the rest was a challenge. I spent probably a week on about a square foot.” The company concentrates on dealing in fine, functional pieces. “When people buy something they have to like it, but we also want it to be used. These things are sturdy pieces of furniture... although not for abusing like ironing on top of,” he jokes. A prime example of Ronald Phillips’ broadranging expertise are a pair of George III giltwood consoles with Japanese lacquer tops from around 1650 (pictured far left and right). “They came up at a major sale in London a few years ago,” says Phillips. “Even though they hadn’t had a tough life, they were neglected and had not been touched for years.” Over centuries, the intricate bases had been regilded, meaning that by the time they came to the workshop, several layers of gesso, gilding and paint had to be carefully removed by dry stripping, layer by layer, with a very small tool. The tops, meanwhile, were cleaned and the over-painting removed, which revealed the

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the workshop. left: ronald phillips’ showroom

originals in full glory. The pair took about seven months to restore. Some projects take the workshop more than a year to complete, with a variety of skills involved. The George III tables required a gilder and lacquer specialist for the tops, carvers for the bases and a metalworker to look after missing pieces. By invitation, Lange also regularly visits certain private collections for maintenance. “We’re very proud that we have a following of serious collectors that come back to us,” he says. “My day is never the same; I’ve never had a repeat. Every piece of furniture is different, and that makes it very exciting.” 26 Bruton Street, W1J, ronaldphillipsantiques.com

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The art of

darkness From sexual selection to the menace of digital media, Mat Collishaw speaks to Camilla Apcar about his latest exhibition at Blain Southern

Mat Collishaw, The Centrifugal Soul, 2016, Courtesy of the artist and Blain Southern, Photography RĂŠmi Chauvin. opposite page: Mat Collishaw, Photography: Jake Curtis; Mat Collishaw, The Centrifugal Soul, 2016, Courtesy of the artist and Blain Southern, Photography: RĂŠmi Chauvin


ART

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at Collishaw doesn’t do things by halves. In his new exhibition at Blain Southern, the Nottingham-born artist tackles the digital revolution, Victorian technology and the human condition in one fell swoop. Collishaw started out exhibiting with his Goldsmiths and Young British Artist contemporaries, but – as we have all become used to looking at the world through images and digital media – his work has also evolved. Collishaw’s preferred mediums have stretched from photography to film, video projections or, in this latest case, virtual reality. “It is very frustrating because I’m not very technical at all. I’m interested in ideas from old paintings and books, and I just want to do them in a contemporary way,” he says. “My work is combining new technologies with old ideas.” To bring this to life, Collishaw works with a variety of teams: from the computer science department at Nottingham University to a studio developing virtual reality walkthroughs, as well as architectural and photographic historians. The star of The Centrifugal Soul exhibition is a zoetrope (a wheel of still images that, when spun, creates an animated scene). Collishaw’s huge version illustrates birds of paradise performing their elaborate mating rituals. At face value, it’s a mesmerising display of colour. But the idea behind the piece was influenced by the work of

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evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller, whose writing considers why humans show off to one another – and how. “It has to do with Darwin’s theory of sexual selection, and that our means of showing off by buying a Rolex watch or an SUV or another Gucci suit is the same as birds of paradise having exotic plumages and doing seductive dances as courtship rituals,” says Collishaw. “Although it appears very superficial that we decorate ourselves in a certain way to the people around us, it’s absolutely instrumental to our survival: if we don’t have courtship and spread our genes around, our species will die out. “I try to make those ideas come alive, using all these colours, shapes, designs and movements to draw the viewer in and attract them by using all those tricks of seduction to entertain and captivate,” he laughs. Collishaw has built his contemporary take on the Victorian optical toy by computer design, 3D printing and then hand-painting individual pieces, which are assembled on a motor with a shaft and LED lights. As it starts to furiously

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Robin Hood’s 1,000-year-old Major Oak in Sherwood Forest rotates like a lifesize ghost

spin, birds reveal their plumage, hummingbirds flap their wings on the spot and flowers bloom over and again. The exhibition is not all just technical wizardry, though. It also includes a dozen trompe l’oeil oil paintings of British garden birds chained to brightly graffitied walls, layering a 17th-century artistic tradition on top of 21st-century subculture. “The subtext is a kind of warning about this spectre of the digital revolution,” Collishaw says. “It’s a lot of fun putting on a virtual reality headset, but what are the social implications? In the background there’s something quite forboding about digital media. “It’s also about the fact that a lot of jobs in factories, clerical or routine work are going to go to computers or robots, and that the consequences might be even more dramatic than during the Industrial Revolution. I’m trying to comment on new media, as well as working with it.” Another large-scale optical illusion in the exhibition is a ‘Pepper’s ghost’, a reflective technique popular during the Victorian era when it was often used for stage productions of Hamlet when his father’s spirit enters. Today, a laser scan can collect data about an object and turn it into an image, as a teleprompter might. “It’s more like the way a bat would see an object than how the human eye would,” says the artist. “Nothing like a photograph.” His chosen subject is the Major Oak, Robin Hood’s rumoured shelter in Sherwood Forest, in the county where Collishaw was born. The 1,000-year-old tree is projected like a lifesize ghost itself, present in the room but not tangible as it slowly rotates. In reality, the tree is hollow and rotten within the trunk, but has been supported by scaffolding for more than a century.

From top: Mat Collishaw, albion, Installation view, 2017, Photography: Peter Mallet; Albion, 2017, Photography: Peter Mallet; Albion (detail), 2017, all Courtesy of the artist and Blain Southern


ART

Collishaw seems preoccupied with the dark. Viewing his installations usually involves being plunged into shadow; even his photographs shot in daylight are punched onto black surroundings like explosions of colour. “It just seems to be a method I am instinctively drawn towards,” he says. “I think it focuses attention on something quite specific, rather than going into a contemporary art exhibition where everything is white. Your eyes are drawn towards the light source, like a moth to a flame.” More wonderment in pitch black surroundings will take place from 18 May at Somerset House,

From top: Mat Collishaw, GASCONADES (Killing It); GASCONADES (The ChampIsHere); GASCONADES (The New King), all 2017, Courtesy of the artist and Blain Southern

“The subtext is a kind of warning about this spectre of the digital revolution”

where the artist will take visitors back in time to the birth of photography. Using virtual reality he will recreate the exhibition where William Henry Fox Talbot first presented his photographic prints to the public in Birmingham in the 1830s. Unlike Collishaw’s other works, which can be viewed in an instant, wandering around the eight-by-six-metre installation at Somerset House will require more time, but only a little: six minutes. “I don’t think you should make works that demand more time than people have,” he explains. His methods and mediums are intensive, but this seems to suit Collishaw down to the ground. “I get bored very quickly. If I’m resting for more than a day I get slightly irritable,” he admits. “I like to meet people about different projects, sniffing around like a detective and finding little leads for new ideas.” What’s next on his agenda is truly anyone’s guess. Until 27 May, 4 Hanover Square, W1S, blainsouthern.com

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TO READ MORE ARTICLES LIKE THIS VISIT www.luxurylondon.co.uk

@luxurylondonofficial 

@luxurylondonofficial 

@theofficialll


FASHION

A

fter a Favourbrook creation made a cameo appearance in Four Weddings and a Funeral in 1994, Oliver Spencer’s waistcoat shop in Piccadilly Arcade began to enjoy a steady stream of loyal customers. More than two decades later, it still specialises in flamboyant formalwear as well as tailored classics. With Ascot just around the corner and no doubt a few wedding invitations flying through the letterbox, now’s the time to start measuring up for the summer season. We recommend the Kristina print dinner jacket (pictured, £1,100). Wary of upstaging the bride? Opt for a patterned waistcoat beneath traditional suiting. 18-21 Piccadilly Arcade, SW1Y, favourbrook.com

Fancy

Plants

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PhotographY: Ash Reynolds

FASHION

Salon 1851 Aquascutum began as a humble tailor on Piccadilly in the mid-19th-century, before founder John Emary patented his waterproof fabric and coined his business after the Latin phrase ‘water shield’. The brand makes reference to its West End roots in a new range of trench coats launching this season. The Mayfair is a modern double-breasted cut with military-inspired epaulettes, cuff straps and horn buttons, while the classic Trafalgar features a gun flap, short collar tips and a belted waist. It is available as single or double-breasted. From £65, 106 Jermyn Street, SW1Y, aquascutum.com

Style

update WORDS: Marianne Dick

Handbag designer Nathalie Trad has turned her hand to heels in a new collaboration with Rupert Sanderson: a match made in accessory heaven £745, rupertsanderson.com and theshopatbluebird.com

Archive Print tOTE, £650; mOTO jACKET WITH wHIPSTITCH EYELET, £2,600

Feel the cinch Hells angels Coach’s utilitarian aesthetic meets Rodarte’s ethereal and feminine flair in what promises to be the most covetable collection since the former’s Rexy the dinosaur capsule. Six types of leather are hand-embroidered to resemble sequins on pieces such as the Moto jacket (left). From £100, Coach & Rodarte, uk.coach.com; rodarte.net

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La Perla’s spring collection emphasises the feminine silhouette by seamlessly integrating its expertise in shapewear into an expanded ready-to-wear line. The range aims to perfect wardrobe essentials such as the crisp white shirt and tailored jacket. It seems that its bi-stretch wool corset jacket, which has built-in underwear and is sized accordingly, has swiftly become a multi-functional wardrobe staple – Gwyneth Paltrow is already fan. £1,441, 9 Old Bond Street, W1S, laperla.com

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Crowning

glory

St James’s is home to the oldest shop in London, which has one of the few remaining on-site workshops in the area. Marianne Dick uncovers the magic of millinery at Lock & Co. Hatters

Amber light, ÂŁ1,650, by prudence for lock couture, all available from lockhatters.co.uk


FASHION

clockwise from Top: a duplicate of Admiral Lord Nelson’s bicorne hat and the original ledger displayed in Lock & co; Barbershop Boater, £1,350, lock & Co. Hatters Men’s Collection

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here’s something indescribably comforting about visiting Lock & Co. Hatters on St James’s Street. As the oldest manufacturer in the world of arguably the most definitive British accessory, this Grade II-listed, late 17th-century terrace has dressed some of history’s most prominent figures – from Sir Winston Churchill to Charlie Chaplin. The tale of Lock & Co. begins with a love story between James Lock, grandson of George, who established a coffee house at 6 St James’s Street in 1686, and Mary Davis, the daughter of hatter Robert Davis, whose shop – founded in 1676 – was just across the road. In 1747, James became an apprentice at Davis’s store and from this appointment a new family was formed. In 1759, James married Mary and his new father-in-law handed him the keys to his millinery business. “We were originally on the other side of the street but we moved over in 1765, because traditionally you do more business on the sunny side of the street than on the shaded side,” explains Roger Stephenson, deputy chairman of Lock & Co. and seventh-generation family member. This was undoubtedly a wise decision. As we chat, sunlight fills the shop from the wide thoroughfare and reflects off the Daniel Quare grandfather clock, which has been on the premises for over three centuries – since before James Lock moved in. The front counter where transactions are made is more than 200 years old and there’s the outline of a doorway that once led to apartments upstairs, one of which was rented by American actor Douglas Fairbanks Jr for a time. Such a rich history could fill a museum the size of the whole building, but instead there is a modest room of memorabilia at the back of the main floor where precious items are kept, including Her Majesty The Queen’s wooden head shape that was made by Stephenson’s grandfather to fit the crown for her coronation. One of the walls is filled with signed celebrity head measurements – from Sacha Baron Cohen to the late Princess Diana – that have been made using a Victorian contraption called a conformateur. Stephenson describes it as “a sort of steampunk top hat that makes a sixth-scale diagram

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The Queen’s wooden head shape was made by Lock & Co. to fit the crown for her coronation of the head shape”. Lock & Co. still use this device to measure customers for hard hats today. One such style is the bowler, which was actually created by the shop’s chief hatmaker Thomas Bowler in 1849 as a riding hat for gamekeepers at Holkham Hall in Norfolk. “Victorian railway workers wore them too, and that’s why you see them in the Wild West, because when we sent our workers over to build the railways in America they took the bowler hat with them,” says Stephenson. “In Bolivia, the ladies in the villages wear really small bowler hats perched on their heads. It turns out that when we built the railways in Bolivia, the people who supplied the bowler hats to the railway workers got the size wrong, so the women picked

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Clockwise from top: the workroom at Lock & co.; Sweet Disorder, £1,650, by prudence for lock couture; A Luxury Occupation, £1,650, as before

The attic workroom is just as you would imagine in a shop from a Charles Dickens novel them up and started wearing them, and now they are traditional.” While peaked caps are enduringly popular – made even more desirable recently by the television series Peaky Blinders and what Stephenson calls “the David Beckham effect” – the bowler hat was the store’s fourth biggest seller last month. “To be truthful, 20 years ago we struggled a bit, but hats are really back in now,” says Stephenson. “My pet theory is that you have to skip a generation, because nobody wants to look like their dad. We’re seeing hipsters in Shoreditch

wearing a bowler hat with a checked shirt and denim shorts and it’s great – it’s giving the hat a new lease of life,” he enthuses. Indeed, back in the main area of the shop a pair of young, well-dressed male customers are trying on traditional styles. For people who are serious about millinery, Lock & Co. is the most elite name in the industry. “People might come in because they are new to hats and they want the advice of an expert. Being a specialist business, we’ve never deviated from that: we’re hatters, we stick to making hats, and so that’s what’s made us last,” says Stephenson. While Lock & Co. is renowned for men’s hats, customers are often surprised to learn that it also caters to women. One aim of the current collaboration with high fashion milliner Prudence is to increase the number of fashion-forward clientele that Lock & Co. has built up over the past few years. Many have come through other collaborations with brands like Vivienne Westwood, Johnstons of Elgin and Carhartt. Alongside Prudence’s whimsical, English garden-inspired creations – some of the tulle is actually stained using Earl Grey tea – sits Lock & Co.’s couture collection, which can be tailored and dyed to the customer’s wishes. This range is made on the top floor of the building, accessed by one of the oldest Victorian coffin staircases in London. Even though men’s hat production has moved to Europe or elsewhere in the UK, Lock & Co. remains one of the few places in St James’s where goods are still manufactured on site. The attic workroom is just as you would imagine in a shop from a Charles Dickens novel or the Harry Potter series: colourful ribbons and threads overflow onto surfaces and intricate silk flowers lie daintily half-finished like they’ve just fallen from a tree.


FASHION

Napoli Hat, £250, lock & Co. Hatters Men’s Collection; Acapulco Panama, £195, as before

Q&A with Prudence Millinery

“Our client base is so wide, we have everything from a 99-year-old Californian granny to a very fashion-forward Japanese lady,” says creative director Ruth Ravenscroft, who has been at Lock & Co. for 17 years. Even if a hat is ordered online, it is picked, steamed and prepared at 6 St James’s Street, which is quite hard to believe after manoeuvring through the tight doorways and corridors. As we descend the suitably creaky staircase, Stephenson cheerfully relays the pitfalls of such ancient architecture. Part of the company’s success, I realise, lies in the zealous attitude of custodians such as Stephenson, which is why Lock & Co.’s future will be as colourful as its past. There’s another Prudence collection in the pipeline, a new range of bespoke Panamas and an upcoming film based on Sir Winston Churchill, Darkest Hour, for which Lock & Co. has befittingly supplied the headwear. But for just how long is the business likely to remain within the same family? “I have two children and I wouldn’t want to pressure them, but at the same time I’m keeping a little bit of an eye on who could carry it on. There’s an appetite within the business, and we don’t want to sell,” says Stephenson. “I’m related to James Benning, an eccentric member of the Lock family who was the original mad hatter on which Lewis Carroll based the character in Alice in Wonderland. I’m quite proud of that.” I can understand the connection. Number 6 is St James’s very own enchanting rabbit hole and one of the only living, breathing time capsules of London now left in the West End. Hats off to Lock & Co.

Avant-garde mononymous milliner Prudence has designed headwear for fashion houses including Vivienne Westwood, Yves Saint Laurent, Gucci and Balenciaga, and her creations have graced countless magazines. This season she launches her debut collection for Lock & Co.’s progressive women’s line, Lock Couture. The nine-piece range is called The Creation of a Garden.

Where do you find inspiration for designs? I am influenced by dedication and genius, such as that of Mozart, Picasso, Balenciaga and Yves Saint Laurent. But also the beauty of hardship: the will to carry on through difficulty.

How did you go about creating the new Lock Couture spring/summer collection? I had a very large bunch of peonies delivered to my studio. The older they became, the more beautiful they looked. The petals were falling on the table making a lovely sound. At the same time I was planting a white garden at home. The days planting were stormy and cloudy with bursts of sun. The idea for the hats came from all this. Hats that are past their best, faded and stained flowers, torn tulle and colours of cloudy summers. This idea of imperfection appeals to me.

What are your fondest memories? Working on Vive la Cocotte for Vivienne Westwood and at the Saint Laurent main studio, with a large photograph of Yves Saint Laurent watching over me.

How have you seen the world of millinery change throughout your career? I find people and makers know less and less about millinery. We have been faced with the same shapes for decades and as a result, quality has suffered. But I’m changing that. prudencemillinery.com

lockhatters.co.uk

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Blooming

LOVELY How does your garden grow? Follow the magical pattern of flora and fauna with perennial prints, ruffles and accessories that whole-heartedly embrace the outdoors P h o t o g r a ph y : ph i l l i p w a t e r m a n Styling: Caroline Scianna & A n g e l a R a d c l i ff e


Regulars

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Dress, £3,075, Erdem, available from Harrods, harrods.com; necklace, £29,000, Cartier, cartier.co.uk; ring, £1,400, Stephen Webster, stephenwebster.com 65


fashion

ABOVE Dress, £2,840, Marni, marni.com; hat, £820, Victoria Grant, victoriagrant.co.uk; ring, £9,800, and bracelet, £7,800, both Stephen Webster, as before; ear cuff, £1,000, Nush Gems, nushgems.com

left Dress, £1,595, Roksanda, available from Selfridges, selfridges.com; shoes, £505, Malone Souliers, malonesouliers.com; ring, £3,450, and earrings, £22,900, all Stephen Webster, as before

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fashion

ABOVE Dress, £2,900, Dolce & Gabbana, dolcegabbana.com; bag, £1,195, Alexander McQueen, available from Harvey Nichols, harveynichols.com; ring, £3,650, Stephen Webster, as before

RIGHT Dress, £1,160, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi, available from Harvey Nichols, as before; harness, £495, Agent Provocateur, agentprovocateur.com; shoes, £525, Sophia Webster, sophiawebster.com; ring, £3,650, Stephen Webster, as before

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Regulars

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CREDITS Model: Alice Rausch at Premier Model Management Make-up: Julie Cooper at Terri Manduca Hair: Simon Maynard at Terri Manduca Photographer’s assistant: Kai Gurung Stylists’ assistant: Chloe at Terri Manduca Location: Studio House, Unit 6B, Stamford Works, 3 Gillett Street, N16


fashion

ABOVE Blouse, £195, Donna Ida, donnaida.com; skirt, £2,435, Valentino, available at Harrods, as before; belt, from a selection, Miu Miu, miumiu.com; shoes, £505, Malone Souliers, as before; ring, £21,000, necklace, £29,000, both Cartier, as before

left Top, £4,100, shorts, £580, and skirt, £8,000, all Dior, dior.com; shoes, £695, Jimmy Choo, jimmychoo.com; earrings, £7,300, bracelet, £6,950, and ring, £3,650, all Stephen Webster, as before

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fashion

Against the tide Peter Lindbergh captures the changing course of Sicily’s Mediterranean climate in Salvatore Ferragamo’s summer campaign. From serene, leafy passageways to jagged, rocky coastlines, the backdrops reflect the new hybrid collection. Light brogues are reinforced with chunky soles in bold reds and blues, while printed silk scarves are inspired by primitive sketches. Bags are equipped with multiple pockets in a nod to the season’s military trend, arming the modern man with all he needs to look refined – whether he’s in the city or beside the surf. From £130, 24 Old Bond Street, W1S, store.ferragamo.com

Style spy W ORD S : m a r i a n n e d i c k

Boys of summer This year marks the launch of Vilebrequin’s first sunglasses collection. In typical Riviera-influenced style, the devil is in the detail: even the French-made spring hinges on the 24-piece range are engraved with tiny turtles and the date 1971, the year the company was founded in Saint-Tropez. From £200, 1-2 Burlington Arcade, W1J, vilebrequin.com

Photographer: Peter Lindbergh, model: Andrés Velencoso

During your next jaunt to Savile Row and its surrounds, drop into Drake’s on Clifford Street to admire its newlyrefurbished interior and pick up a custom shirt or tie from its expanded made-to-order service 3 Clifford Street, W1S, drakes.com

Wool Sweater, £364; Water Resistant Uniform Jacket, £448

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The Green light Craig Green established his fashion house in 2012 shortly after graduating, but despite his young career, he has had a notable string of successes already – including an award for British Menswear Designer of the Year at the British Fashion Awards in December. His utilitarian pieces have become staples for the sartorially savvy, and his new core collection sees archive cuts reworked and a new lead-weighted version of his trademark string fastening. From £98, available at Dover Street Market, 18-22 Haymarket, SW1Y, london.doverstreetmarket.com 73


reader event INSPIRED 2017 INVITES YOU TO

An exclusive preview of the latest designs in luxury bespoke furniture and contemporary silverware

Wednesday 3 May 6 - 8pm Goldsmiths’ Centre 42 Britton Street London EC1M 5AD Join us for a private preview and meet world-class furniture makers and celebrated silversmiths, who will be showcasing new, never seen before works available to buy or commission. Leading experts, curators and designers will be on hand to offer astute advice and insight into these original, highly collectible pieces.

To secure your place please RSVP rsvp@festivalofsilver.com Inspired is a must-see luxury silverware and bespoke furniture selling showcase. Now in its fifth year, this exhibition is renowned for bringing together the UK’s finest and most highly skilled artisans under one unique curated platform.

More about Inspired at www.festivalofsilver.co.uk


INTERIORS

New romantic T

he New Feminine spring collection from The Sofa & Chair Company is an opulent take on some of the year’s biggest interiors trends, marrying botanical greens and plush pinks with sumptuous fabrics like crushed velvet. If this scheme doesn’t quite suit your taste however, then each piece of handmade made-to-order furniture can be customised. The Camille ottoman (pictured) can be refashioned from pink to a peacock print, or if you have something completely different in mind, the design team will transform your sketches into entirely one-off pieces. thesofaandchair.co.uk

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1817-2017. 200 YEARS DURAVIT. RE YOUR FUTUR BATHROOM.

Luv. Nordic elegance. The design of Cecilie Manz‘ bathroom series Luv combines Nordic purism and timeless, emotional elegance. Soft shapes follow a stringent geometry. The result is a new unique design language with precise, clear and ďŹ ne edges. For more information please visit www.duravit.co.uk or contact info@uk.duravit.com

UK_MayFairMagazine_Luv_001_210x297.indd 1

03.03.17 14:40


INTERIORS

Armchair revolution Earlier this year, it became illegal to replicate design classics within 70 years after the inventor’s death. But with impeccable celebratory timing and the blessing of the Eames Office, The Conran Shop has created 25 new Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman sets in white walnut and sandy leather, with the help of Vitra. Originally designed in 1956 by the husband-and-wife team, the chair encapsulates a fast-changing era that would be majorly influenced by television culture. £6,465, 55 Marylebone High Street, W1U, conranshop.co.uk

Grate shape

Interiors news WORDS: MARIANNE DICK

Selfridges celebrates home-making and craft in its Our House campaign, which debuts objets d’art from two of Mayfair’s brightest contemporary fashion houses: Roksanda and Temperley London

Visiting Alessi can feel like being a child in a toy shop, and it surprises us with another weird and wonderful contraption every time. Of the numerous thrilling pieces this season (look out for the twisted measuring jug), one stands out. The Forma cheese grater was one of the last objects designed by Zaha Hadid for Alessi. Its shape mimics a pebble and the sleek black stand can be left on the table to allow diners to grate to their heart’s – and stomach’s – content. £45, 22 Brook Street, W1K, alessi.com

ITALIAN ESCAPE If you haven’t already noticed New Bond Street’s latest addition, then bear it in mind next time the city’s rising temperature and crowds get a little too much. Italian fashion and homeware label Agnona has transformed number 124 into a cool, calming continental apartment. The concept pop-up offers scents by Laboratorio Olfattivo alongside couture-quality Murano glassware from Salviati and even biscotti from a bakery in Biella. Until the end of the year, homeware from £350, 124 New Bond Street, W1S, agnona.com

until 9 June, Temperley london backgammon set, £5,800; Linck X Roksanda ceramics, from £1,270 selfridges.com/ourhouse Image courtesy of AGNONA

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INTERIORS

Armchair revolution Earlier this year, it became illegal to replicate design classics within 70 years after the inventor’s death. But with impeccable celebratory timing and the blessing of the Eames Office, The Conran Shop has created 25 new Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman sets in white walnut and sandy leather, with the help of Vitra. Originally designed in 1956 by the husband-and-wife team, the chair encapsulates a fast-changing era that would be majorly influenced by television culture. £6,465, 55 Marylebone High Street, W1U, conranshop.co.uk

Grate shape

Interiors news WORDS: MARIANNE DICK

Selfridges celebrates home-making and craft in its Our House campaign, which debuts objets d’art from two of Mayfair’s brightest contemporary fashion houses: Roksanda and Temperley London

Visiting Alessi can feel like being a child in a toy shop, and it surprises us with another weird and wonderful contraption every time. Of the numerous thrilling pieces this season (look out for the twisted measuring jug), one stands out. The Forma cheese grater was one of the last objects designed by Zaha Hadid for Alessi. Its shape mimics a pebble and the sleek black stand can be left on the table to allow diners to grate to their heart’s – and stomach’s – content. £45, 22 Brook Street, W1K, alessi.com

ITALIAN ESCAPE If you haven’t already noticed New Bond Street’s latest addition, then bear it in mind next time the city’s rising temperature and crowds get a little too much. Italian fashion and homeware label Agnona has transformed number 124 into a cool, calming continental apartment. The concept pop-up offers scents by Laboratorio Olfattivo alongside couture-quality Murano glassware from Salviati and even biscotti from a bakery in Biella. Until the end of the year, homeware from £350, 124 New Bond Street, W1S, agnona.com

until 9 June, Temperley london backgammon set, £5,800; Linck X Roksanda ceramics, from £1,270 selfridges.com/ourhouse Image courtesy of AGNONA

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Fabric of time What do Leonardo da Vinci, a Chinese empress and Moscow’s Kremlin all have in common? Hannah Lemon delves into the archives of Florence’s oldest silk mill to find out


INTERIORS

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egend has it that Empress Lei-tzu, the young wife of the Chinese Yellow Emperor, discovered silk while sipping a cup of tea. Sitting under the leafy bows of a mulberry tree, a silkworm’s cocoon dropped into her cup. The heat of the drink forced the silk to unfold and the young empress watched in awe as the magical thread unravelled, and she immediately determined to weave it. Sure enough, it made the perfect fabric, and soon Lei-tzu taught her ladies-in-waiting how to fashion garments from these fine fibres. Thus, she became known as the Silkworm Mother. Of course, the more likely story was that Catholic missionaries brought sericulture back from China to Europe in the 12th century. One of their final destinations was Florence, a city that would flourish in the silk trade from the 14th century onwards, bringing enormous wealth to merchants. Florentine silk continued to prosper during the Renaissance and well into the 18th century. So much so, that during the 1700s, a group of noble families clubbed together to establish a single workshop for their looms, patterns and fabrics located on Via dei Tessitori (the street of weavers). And so, Antico Setificio Fiorentino (Antique Florentine Silk Mill) was born. In recognition of the importance of this factory and to toast increased silk production, in 1780 the Grand Duke of Tuscany Leopold II donated several looms, which still work today. Thanks to acquisitions by Marquis Emilio Pucci in the 1950s and subsequently Stefano Ricci in 2010, the future of the remarkable handcrafted tradition remains alive, as do the centuries-old Florentine techniques. Today, Renaissance damasks, brocades and taffetas are woven on 12 looms – six handlooms dating from the 18th century and six semimechanical looms from the 19th century. The quality of the fabric is guaranteed by various phases of delicate workmanship: the hand dying, the preparation of the antique looms, yarns that are specially prepared for Antico Setificio Fiorentino, no chemical treatments and the lengthy weaving process. It doesn’t stop there. The Antico Setificio Fiorentino uses a unique orditoio (warping

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machine), designed by Leonardo da Vinci for embellishments; as well as a loom for silk trimmings and another for custommade fringes. As is to be expected of such meticulous creativity, the silk products are sought after by every luxury institution from royal palaces to national museums – the Amalienborg Palace in Denmark, the Royal Palace of Stockholm, Moscow’s Kremlin and Villa Medici in Rome, to name a few. You don’t have to be a royal to get a slice of the action though; bed, bath and table linens, bespoke services, and limited edition evening wear can be found on the lower ground floor at the Stefano Ricci menswear store on South Audley Street. And it’s all thanks to an imaginative empress and her cup of tea. Antico Setificio Fiorentino products and services are available through Stefano Ricci, 56 South Audley Street, W1K, stefanoricci.com OPPOSITE: THE Guicciardini Loom (1786), Photo credit: Stefano Ricci/ASF by Bernardo Conti top RIGHT AND INSET: Weaving the iconic Broccatello Michelangelo, made of silk and linen threads. Photo credit: Stefano Ricci/ASF by Egon Ipse; textiles from the Antico Setificio Fiorentino, Photo credit: Stefano Ricci/ ASF by Marco Curatolo left: Spool changing during the processing of the Doria fabric, Photo credit: Stefano Ricci/ASF by Rossano B. ManiscalchI

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health & beauty

back to burberry basics British model Iris Law stars in Burberry’s new campaign for The Essentials collection, an edit of products focused on three elements: prime, contour and highlight. Pink Pearl and Rose Gold shades join the Fresh Glow Highlighter powder range, while the Lip Colour Contour is totally new. The domeshaped tip of the nude pen is inspired by backstage make-up techniques, where lips are smoothed and accentuated before before colour is applied. From £24, uk.burberry.com

fine art fragrances

Beauty news W O R D S : m e l i ss a e m e rso n

sun-kissed This limited-edition ivory and gold Soleil contouring compact from Tom Ford is blush, highlighter and bronzer combined. Blend the cream-like powders to give cheekbones new definition. £78, tomford.com

Haute hair

Inspired by its 1872 fragrance Hammam Bouquet, Penhaligon’s new Savoy Steam scent is a mist of rose, pink pepper and geranium

Jo Malone’s new Bloomsbury Set celebrates the 20th-century group of English bohemian artists, philosophers and intellectuals, including Virginia Woolf. Members were known to spend time at Woolf’s sister’s house in Sussex, and the limited-edition colognes – from Blue Hyacinth and Garden Lilies to Leather & Artemisia – reflect the scents of the country pile’s grounds, library and creaking wooden floors. The bottles are a departure from the brand’s traditional designs, with colourful abstract brush strokes replacing its logo. £46 each, jomalone.co.uk

£134, penhaligons.com

Paris-based hair stylist David Mallett is popular with fashion houses and photographers alike, and was personally invited by The Ritz in Paris to open a salon. For those hoping to emulate his stylish creations at home, his eponymous product line is now available in the UK, with vitamin-rich Japanese Nori (edible seaweed) and magnesiumrich Murray River Salt products that include serum, shampoo and salt spray. From £16, satindays.com 80

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promotion

Follow your nose James Craven, Creed fragrance expert at perfumery Les Senteurs, advises how to select the perfect scent in nine easy steps

1

Take your time

Pick an occasion

Try the skin you’re in

 ever rush: that usually ends in N disaster. As they say, it is better to travel well than to arrive, so enjoy the journey – you might even end up finding more than one prize on the way.

 ecide what you are buying the D perfume for: is it for work, a wedding, a holiday? How do you intend to use it?

Perfume and flesh must be brought together to see how they will interact. It can take hours for a fragrance to reveal its whole bag of tricks.

Lap up luxury

2

 hop only when you feel in the S mood: relaxed, patient, instinctive and curious. Don’t make perfume selection a tiresome chore: make it your delight. You are shopping for a luxury, remember.

4

Heed advice

5

3

Visit a specialist independent store for impartial guidance. Make friends with the staff and ask advice from a knowledgeable, sympathetic but objective sales assistant who knows the product – and you.

Avoid layering

8

Put it on paper

Go it alone Never take your mother, best friend or lover with you. Each of us perceives smells differently. The opinion of companions is irrelevant and will only distract and disturb you. You need to concentrate, think and feel.

7

6

 se card to make an initial U acquaintance with each scent. A paper strip will be enough to introduce the fragrance, and to discover whether you wish to explore it in greater depth. Samples are really invaluable – use them as an aid to selection.

If possible, try no more than one scent at a time. Don’t lather the body with different options: you are bound to confuse yourself. Leave the shop, take some air, and observe what is happening to you and the fragrance.

Listen to your gut

9

 on’t neglect your instinct. D Perfume is all about emotion. Be wary of overanalysing and you’ll find the bottle of your dreams. 99 Mount Street, W1K, creedfragrances.co.uk


It’s never too late...

LUXURY BODY BUTTER IN WHITE CASHMERE FROM THE BATH & BODY COLLECTION

www.lilouetloic.com


health & beauty

S PA R E V I E W all images: The Lanesborough Club & Spa

Sanctuary from the city The Lanesborough Club & Spa’s Deeper Connections treatment is so much more than a massage, writes Francesca Lee-Rogers

F

irst impressions count, and the attention to detail at The Lanesborough Club & Spa is exceptional. Inspired by the ceremonial spaces of Roman baths, interior design practice 1508 London has created an opulent wellness area with the very best of British materials and craftsmanship that spans more than 18,000 sq ft. Wood panelling and leather upholstery add to the grand ambience, while peacock blue satins, deep green silks and bronze trims complement the classical beauty of the oak, marble and stone. Each room and space has its own character, yet together the hybrid of club and spa blends effortlessly. As I await my treatment in the lounge area, a butler is on hand to cater to my every whim. There’s almost no need to move from here, as I slip into relaxation mode – the hubbub of London feels a world away.

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My therapist greets me, and we head to one of five treatment rooms (one is a double VIP spa suite) for the 90-minute Deeper Connections massage. My knots need regular untangling due to my desk-bound job, so I’m intrigued as to how this deep tissue experience will differ. A lot, as it turns out. My therapist, like all the therapists at the Club & Spa, has been trained by Beata Aleksandrowicz of Pure Massage. The massage uses a combination of eastern and western techniques including rolling and stretching to pinpoint tension. After spending 30 minutes on my back, she has opened up a whole new space between my shoulder blades. A similar pattern follows for the rest of my body, and towards the end

concentration focuses on my abdomen with a lymphatic drainage massage to bring balance to my digestive system and my body as a whole. It’s a full detox. I leave feeling truly soothed and retire to the spa where I use the hydrotherapy pool, sauna and steam room, until I can finally muster the energy to face the world again. Days later, I’m still feeling the positive effects: first impressions certainly lived up to expectations. The Deeper Connections Massage is £175 for 90 minutes or £140 for 60 minutes, The Lanesborough Club & Spa, Hyde Park Corner, SW1X 7TA, 020 7333 7064, lanesboroughclubandspa.com

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Natural selection From golden caviar pearls to the quiet power of algae, Camilla Apcar finds a new wave of skincare supercharged by the great outdoors


HEALTH & BEAUTY

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arnessing the wonders of the natural world has long been the mission of the best skin creams, serums and oils – whether for their nutrifying, illuminating or fragrant qualities. “Over the course of time, man has learned to live in harmony with nature and has harnessed it not only to nourish and care for himself, but also as a means of protecting and beautifying his skin,” says Sisley’s scientific director, José Ginestar. This summer, Mother Nature meets scientific evolution in a host of new products that stand out for their particularly innovative and sometimes unusual organic ingredients. One major motivation for mimicking the green kingdom is hydration. In April, Chanel launched its Hydra Beauty Micro Crème (£66), which uses camellia to hydrate and help skin become more resistant to environmental stress. The floral extract is captured in 5,000 jellified micro-droplets that preserve the active ingredient, plus a dash of antioxidant blue ginger. Microfluidic technology – the science behind controlling and manipulating liquids – means the droplets don’t burst when they are scooped from the jar, but only when the moisturising face cream is applied. Knowledge is power, as proven by Clarins’ Hydra-Essentiel range that hit the shelves in March. It evolved following research that showed our skin experiences up to 17 thermic shocks every day: changes in temperature and humidity that impact the skin’s water retention. Its saviour is the succulent Madagascan kalanchoe plant, the ‘leaf of life’, which retains water despite sudden fluctuations in temperature. “Clarins’ ethnobotanists were inspired by plants capable of surviving in conditions of extreme drought,” says its scientific communications director, Marie-Hélène Lair. The brand is working with local communities to cultivate the leaves in northern Madagascar. Around 500kg are harvested during the dry season from April to November. The leaves are picked by hand and left out to dry in the sun, then turned two or three times a day. The new range includes an SPF 15 cream and cooling gel (£36 each), as well as a serum (£44). At Dior, its Hydra Life range was borne of studying the skin – and, in particular, the upper layer of skin flora, with its microorganisms – as a living organ. Its key component is Haberlea

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rhodopensis, a Swiss flower that can survive several months of drought, only to be revived by a single drop of water. “With Hydra Life, we have ‘tamed’ flora. Haberlea makes it produce what the skin needs to retain its moisture,” says Édouard Mauvais-Jarvis, Dior’s environmental and scientific communication director. “The result, beyond hydration, is healthy, lastingly fresh skin that is naturally beautiful.” Hydra Life’s second star ingredient is mallow, a vibrant purple and pink bloom found in Dior’s gardens in Anjou, France. It has been cultivated on a 30-hectare estate by the same family of horticulturists for more than 30 years, and encourages water circulation within the skin. A combination of the sorbet crème (£45.50) and water essence (£49.50) promise the ultimate effect. While algae might not be the most attractive of organisms, Estée Lauder has recognised its power. Using specially cultivated, cold-processed and nutrient-dense algae, its new Nutritious MicroAlgae range (from £20, available from June) is all about ridding skin of impurities and pollution that are a by-product of urban life. Glowing skin and refined pores are to come courtesy of a triple algae blend: the emerald

Dior has captured the hydrating qualities of a Swiss flower that can survive months of drought

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

chlorella (rich in vitamin B12, protein, 18 amino acids and omega 3); bluish spirulina (known for its detoxification powers); and brown Laminaria saccharina, which controls excess oils. All three are cultivated in France, then either broken down by chemical reactions with water, washed and freeze-dried, or cold-processed in a gentle water-extraction process. The pursuit of luminosity also preoccupies the skincare realm, and such is the aim of La Prairie’s new White Caviar Illuminating Pearl Infusion (£360) – its concentrated formula includes golden caviar extract and an oil form of vitamin C. It targets dark spots on the skin, predominately caused by sun damage; the irritated or inflamed skin brought on by everyday stress; and atmospheric pollution (the shell of the caviar pearls shields the skin from harmful particles). “The Pearl Infusion ‘infuses’ the skin with light by acting at several levels,” says director of strategic innovation and science at La Prairie, Dr Jacqueline Hill. “Subtle pigments reflect light to add a soft glow to the skin, and vitamin C together with La Prairie’s cellular complex supports the collagen cycle.” Ingeniously, the caviar eggs are extracted from the Russian sturgeon species with an oily solvent, but the pearls will remain intact until the last drop of gel has been used. On a similar wavelength, the Iris florentina in YSL’s new Forever Youth Liberator Y-Shape concentrate (£66) and crème (£67) pursues a lasting glow for the face, neck and décolleté. The white flower is often used in perfumery or decongestants and its root can also be found in Bombay Sapphire gin. It’s no secret that flora and fauna can feed our skin as well as our stomachs – but some plants do this better than others. Lancôme’s Énergie de Vie range launched last April, and later this year, an eye gel, day cream, exfoliating mask and clay mask will be added. “Énergie de Vie is a recipe containing three active ingredients chosen to address the consequences of urban fatigue on the skin,” says Lancôme’s scientific director, Véronique Delvigne. Designed to boost the skin’s metabolism, it is packed with antioxidants: goji berries, lemon balm and gentian root. Sisley, meanwhile, has added a purifying mask (£80) and a rebalancing lotion to its Tropical Resins range (£59). “Hubert d’Ornano created

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La Prairie has extracted caviar eggs from Russian sturgeon, which ‘infuse’ skin with light Sisley in 1976 with an intuition that plant extracts and essential oils combined with technological innovation could be a great success in beauty products,” says Ginestar. “He thought that plants’ capacity for regeneration, protection systems and fragrances could be used for the skin’s beauty.” The mask includes burdock to balance the skin’s ‘ecosystem’ and meadowsweet to stimulate defences against bad bacteria (apply a thick layer after cleansing, once or twice a week); the lotion adds Java tea extract to unclog and soften. “Our researchers are always looking for plants with new efficiencies or that target new biological pathways, and we give a great deal of importance to the traceability and quality of our plant extracts,” Ginestar continues. “That’s why we work with the best specialists for each type of plant and have a specific interest in organic farming.” In the dead of night, wild night-scented stock awakens to release its perfume and attract nocturnal insects. In July, Elemis will introduce a Peptide Night Recovery Cream-Oil (£49) with plenty of omega 3 and vitamin E – ten times higher than many other known natural oils used in skincare – from the plant. This is the first time the pink, purple and mauve bloom has been grown on a commercial scale for skincare in England. Elemis has developed a formula that will get to work during sleep, when skin cells renew and repair – especially stepping in when sleep is disturbed and cells are otherwise compromised. From day to night, Mother Nature has us covered.

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PROMOTION

Reform your workout A new studio from Ten Health & Fitness, London’s leading Dynamic Reformer Pilates provider, has launched in the heart of Fitzrovia

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ocated on Great Titchfield Street, Ten Health & Fitness’s new studio offers its trademark Dynamic Reformer Pilates classes, along with physio-led Pilates, physiotherapy, massage therapy, rehabilitation and personal training in a light and welcoming space. Along with its Mayfair and St James’s studios, this is the third West End location for Ten, one of London’s top boutique fitness providers and twice voted ‘best Pilates studio’ by Tatler magazine. The studio’s ground floor provides a dedicated retail store for innovative activewear brand HPE Clothing (Human Performance Engineering) – the label’s first standalone outlet. One of the UK’s fastest growing sports apparel brands, HPE Clothing has a legion of high profile advocates from the worlds of fashion and sport. The new studio will additionally act as a base for TenEducation, which offers expert industryaccredited external training to fitness, exercise and therapy professionals across the UK. As well as its central London locations, Ten Health

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& Fitness also has studios in Hatton Garden, Notting Hill, Little Venice, the City and Chiswick. Ten Health & Fitness, 83 Great Titchfield Street, W1W fitzrovia@ten.co.uk, ten.co.uk

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T H E Y O G A W E L L N E S S C O M PA N Y

Don’t Step Out Of Your Life, Step Into It Upcoming workshops: - Experience Grace (23rd April) - Finding True Balance (27th - 28th May) - Movement Into Stillness (1st - 2nd July)

BOOK NOW

Luxury London Workshops and International Retreats (+44) 203 621 4388

www.theyogawellnesscompany.com

@yogawellnessco


food & drink

image credit: benjamin eagle

C

herry blossom season has sprung at Roka on Charlotte Street with the arrival of a seasonal floral installation. Blossom-adorned branches – known as sakura in Japanese – hang from the ceiling of the restaurant’s intimate basement lounge Shochu, creating a fragrant canopy under which guests can enjoy the full Roka robatayaki menu together with sakura-inspired cocktails from the specially created drinks list. Until 7 June, 37 Charlotte Street, W1T, rokarestaurant.com

Darling

buds of

May

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food & drink

Toast of the town

Food & drink news

Granted, SW1W seems a long way to go for a plate of spaghetti, but the regional Italian fare at Enoteca Turi is worth the commute. The family-run restaurant has just celebrated its first year in Belgravia, after 25 years in Putney. And what better way to reward your journey than with a visit to the Dining Cellar – a wine library-cum-private dining room for up to 28 guests. With 460 wines on offer, there’s something to match every dish on Michelin-trained head chef Francesco Sodano’s menu. Cod cheek ragout, a glass of Cortese and a few thousand extra steps on the Fitbit: perfetto! 87 Pimlico Road, SW1W, enotecaturi.com

WORDS: LAUREN ROMANO

Culinary craft Craftsmanship comes in many forms, but what good is a handmade plate without some serious nosh to decorate it? The organisers at London Craft Week agree, and to celebrate the return of the festival this month have named Seymour Place as the official dining destination. Visitors can refuel with special menus at The Portman and Sandy’s pizzeria, sit down to VEG Talks at The Gate, or take part in a hands-on supper club at The MaE Deli. From 3-7 May, Seymour Place, W1H, for full details, visit: londoncraftweek.com

All rise Brunch has many guises these days: there’s the bottomless, the antipodeaninspired, and now, thanks to Maison Kayser’s offering, the Parisian. Alongside the predictable eggs and avocado (tartine à l’avocat for the more sophisticated), the restaurant will be serving all manner of pastries and oeuf en cocotte à la bourguignonne – or baked eggs, bacon and red wine to me and you. Red wine for brunch? Pourquoi pas? 8 Baker Street, W1U, maison-kayser.com

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The bartenders at Mac & Wild are putting down their cocktail shakers with the launch of Black Watch, a readymade whisky espresso martini. Not shaken, or stirred, just poured straight from the bottle. £31.17 for 50cl, 65 Great Titchfield Street, W1W, macandwild.com

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D O G H O U S E W E T Y O U R W H I S T L E AT THE DOG HOUSE

B E R N A R D I ’ S C O C K TA I L B A R 6 2 S E Y M O U R S T. W 1 H 5 B N T U E - S AT 5 P M - L AT E BERNARDIS.CO.UK


Fit for a

queen

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obody could accuse Le Pavillon de la Reine of not living up to its regalsounding name. The boutique Parisian hotel, located in the historic Le Marais quarter, has upped the opulence with the launch of two new suites this month. The most lavish of the offerings is Suite de la Reine (pictured), which is kitted out with sumptuous fabrics and a spectacular marble bathroom, and finished with carefully sourced antiques, a handcrafted chandelier and gold leaf-adorned doors. Marie Antoinette would approve. From approx. ÂŁ1,285 a night, pavillon-de-la-reine.com IMAGE COURTESY OF LE PAVILLON DE LA REINE


travel

a stay for the senses New luxury hotel group Almanac Hotels, which focuses on how its guests experience scent, taste, light and touch, opens it first property this summer. Almanac Barcelona has 91 rooms and suites and is close to shopping thoroughfare Passeig de Gràcia. Grey, beige and gold tones with accents of oak and walnut bring warmth to the interiors and some rooms feature unusual cubic window recesses with seating. The group is also set to open hotels in Vienna and Prague in 2019. From approx. £382 a night, almanachotels.com

Travel news W O R D S : M e l iss a Em e rson

Contemporary Lake Como All-suite hotel Il Sereno is now open for its first full season on Lake Como’s eastern shore, where its design-driven interiors prove a contrast to the region’s typical classical grandeur. Michelin-star chef Andrea Berton leads the team at Ristorante Berton Al Lago, while botanist Patrick Blanc has designed the private beach with direct lake access, freshwater infinity pool and vertical gardens. Guests can also enjoy the hotel’s three custom-made Cantiere Ernesto Riva boats; the Riva family has been crafting the vessels in nearby Laglio since 1771. Suites from approx. £685 a night, ilsereno.com images courtesy of patricia parinejad

Sun, sea and sushi Spain’s five-star Puente Romano Beach Resort & Spa will soon become an all-suites hotel, in order to accommodate the Nobu Hotel and Restaurant Marbella opening at the location. The partnership sees the Nobu restaurant, which launches this month, join Puente Romano’s nine existing eateries, including the two-Michelin starred Dani Garcia restaurant. It will serve classic Japanese and Peruvian dishes as well as speciality plates inspired by the local area. The Nobu Hotel Marbella will open in 2018, when guests will be able to enjoy a private pool and priority access to the restaurant. puenteromano.com

Greek grandeur Erosantorini combines the services of a hotel with the home-from-home feel of a villa. Its five individual suites sit within a two-acre plot, boasting a three-tiered infinity pool (the largest on Santorini), a spa, chapel, open-air cinema and fruit tree-filled gardens. Each suite has its own private outdoor space, but friends and family can all gather for meals cooked by the in-house chef. From approx. £4,300 a night based on ten adults sharing on a full board basis, erosantorini.com s l u x u ry l o n d o n . c o. u k s

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WELLNESS

as an Art

Oasis gives you a moment to stop and take a breath. Feel the freedom and relaxation in your body and mind. Let your senses be inspired in a private paradise. It is all waiting for you. The art of wellbeing.

The Oasis by Don Carlos Resort · Boutique Hotel Experience · Marbella T (+34) 933 271 455 · dcreservas@expogrupo.com · www.doncarlosresort.expohotels.com/en/the-oasis · www.expohotels.com


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THE DRAWING ROOM

Park Life Kari Colmans heads to the luxurious spa retreat Coworth Park for a family-friendly weekend

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eekends away used to be so simple. My husband and I would pick a city fewer than three hours away, take the earliest flight there, the latest flight back and sandwich in as many gluttonous meals, galleries, sights and boutiques as our legs and stomachs would allow us. But if anyone’s tried doing the above with a toddler in tow, they’ll know that it needs a holiday to recover. Which is where the English escape really comes into its own, as you don’t have to sacrifice the miles-away-from-home feeling (even if you’re only ten minutes up the road).

RIDING LESSONS AT COWORTH PARK

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One of the first things that attracts us to Coworth Park is the location: a drive to Ascot from north-west London takes as little as 45 minutes (although we manage one leg in half an hour). We even time the car journey with our daughter’s power nap to save on Wheels-On-The-Bus fatigue. Coworth Park is a sprawling estate set on 97 hectares of Berkshire parkland. Golf buggies are on hand to cart us from the main hotel building to the various facilities: spa, kids’ club, stables, brasserie, kids’ club… but anyone can get around easily without them, unless the weather is really playing up. Part of The Dorchester Collection, Coworth is wholly different to its sister hotel on Park Lane in everything from the décor to the clientele: it’s all understated, country beautiful, with warm heritage tones of French Grey and cream. Splashes of artwork and colour, including glass-fronted fireplaces and chic mirrored cabinets (now dotted

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THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: DOWER HOUSE, MASTER SUITE BATHROOM; THE EXTERIOR OF COWORTH PARK; THE BAR; EQUESTRIAN PURSUITS OPPOSITE PAGE: THE SHEPHEARD SUITE BEDROOM; THE SPA


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with tiny nose-shaped smudges) give it a modern twist. There’s definitely a horse theme – based on its proximity to Ascot Racecourse, I presume – but it’s miles away from your stuffy, hunting-lodge type interior. The Drawing Room and Summer Room look out onto the still frost-covered meadow, which I’m told is truly breathtaking come summer, when it’s covered in a blanket of flowers with paths swept for hazy, post-prosecco ambling. The Restaurant Coworth Park has views of the rose terrace and croquet lawn. We choose to eat more informally this weekend, but we do get a chance to enjoy the room at breakfast for hot pastries, omelettes, fruit and all the other à la carte trimmings. Other restaurants include the spa eatery (The Spatisserie) and The Barn, a relaxed brasserie adjacent to the converted stables and cottage. Here we enjoy steaks with chips and buttery vegetables, as well as a selection of cold cuts and cheeses while wearing our muddy boots. Particularly charming features include the working stone fireplace, double-storey beamed ceiling and the full wall of windows that look out across the polo fields, where you can learn to play. We are staying in the truly lovely Shepheard Suite, set inside the main Georgian-era Mansion House, which is quite honestly one of the most comfortable and inviting English hotel rooms I’ve ever stayed in. The living room, bedroom and bathroom are all tastefully Georgian minus any ‘nana-chintz’, with large windows that look out onto the parkland. Our four-poster bed is made of wrought-iron branches, complete with a perching bird; while the walls are painted in soft, calming heritage hues. The bathroom has the real wow factor, with its walk-in rain shower and freestanding copper bath, that sits majestically on a white marble floor (heated underfoot), positioned for optimum nature gazing. But one of the things I love most about the place is its attitude. Having done some research prior to booking, I’d been turned away by a number of your well-known countryside hotels once they got a whiff of our third party member. And yes, I’m sure the staff and guests wouldn’t be too impressed if I allowed her to run naked through the foyer with a nappy on her

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The living room, bedroom and bathroom are all tastefully Georgian minus any ‘nana-chintz’ head, wielding a goujon in each hand (much to madam’s displeasure), but she is met with a smile at every turn. A teddy and a book are wrapped up and left in her cosy cot and the staff can’t do enough to feed her on time and keep her happy. The equestrian centre provides whole minutes of entertainment, as does the fabulous kids’ club, which is more like a working nursery set within its own building. The super-friendly staff bake, sing and dance all afternoon, surrounded by arts and crafts, a rail of dressing up clothes and immaculate toys, before returning to babysit in the evening. The famous spa even welcomes children too at set hours (which are doable and actually childfriendly, unlike some ridiculous places that think a 7pm swim is what every toddler-mum wants). Should you want your spa time minus the kids, that’s fine too – the purple-lit pool with amethyst sculptures and underwater music is even more exquisite without them, as are the massage rooms and award-winning treatments. Sure, it’s silly to compare a like-for-like weekend in England to a whistle-stop tour of Barcelona because they serve very different people and purposes. But for an easy, family-friendly retreat that doesn’t scrimp on any of life’s luxuries, you’d be hard pushed to find better. The Shepheard Suite from £1,000 a night, standard rooms from £320 a night, dorchestercollection.com

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And breathe… There’s more to a mountain break than skiing, as Deborah Cicurel discovers when she heads to the Italian Dolomites, where the allure of the spa trumps the slopes

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he first thing you notice when you step outside is the air. It’s the sort of air you forget exists while rushing around a congested city: fresh, cool and so palatable you want to take big gulps of it. And the great thing is that you can stand there and greedily inhale it for what seems like hours. Though you might look a little strange, it’ll be a while before a car comes by and hoots at you. That’s the beauty of Ortisei, the postcard-pretty capital of Val Gardena, in the Dolomites. Unlike so many packed ski resorts, buzzing with the clomp of ski boots and exasperated calls for the bill, Ortisei is quiet and serene – the perfect place for a wellness break. If you’re part of a family where one half loves to ski from nine to five, with only a cursory break for a fleeting cappuccino, and the other wants to luxuriate in the mountain air, enjoy the scenery and give the gondolas a miss, this is the destination for you.


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In the winter months, keen skiers and boarders can experience Val Gardena’s impressive 500km of interlinked slopes with a single ski pass. If you’re used to shelling out hundreds of euros a day for a private ski guide, you can save your cash for daily rounds of hot chocolates: Ortisei’s Adler Balance Spa & Health Residenz, the hotel I’ve travelled to in an attempt to escape London’s frenetic pace for a few peaceful days, arranges ski groups daily with experienced instructors at a mere fraction of the price you’d usually pay for a lesson. Those who love travelling to the mountains for more indolent pursuits will find a good home in Adler Balance. The modern, edgier cousin of the Adler Dolomiti Spa & Sport Resort, which has been around since the early 19th century, the Balance acts as a medical competence centre where guests can do a full detox, diet, fitness or yoga programme, or even indulge in some light aesthetic medicine. The two hotels are connected by a long underground tunnel, through which endless spa offerings are promised on mysterious doors: salt grottos, panoramic saunas, blossom steam baths and more. The treatment options include everything from Dead Sea mud wraps and candle massages to Ayurveda counselling and meditative walks. In fact, there are so many different pampering options that you could stay for a month and not be able to experience each different therapeutic treatment. I have a good head start with three relaxing sessions: an anti-stress massage, which seems to cure my inability to nap during the day in seconds, an Adler Staminal Green facial treatment that leaves my skin glowing and smooth, and an arnica mud pack, during which I am slathered with fango – warm mud from Italy’s

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Endless spa offerings are promised on mysterious doors: salt grottos, panoramic saunas, blossom steam baths and more thermal springs – before being wrapped up and lowered into a warm bath to allow the mud’s soothing, regenerating and tension-relieving properties to do their magic. If being pampered is, unfathomably, not your thing, you can indulge in solitude, too: the salt grotto comprises the hotel’s underground lake, where you can weightlessly, mindlessly float in the saline water and feel the high-grade salt relieving any tension in your body; before hitting the sauna, which is enriched with crystal salt from the Himalayas. Another must-do is the Panoramic Whirlpool after sunset – the best place to enjoy the twinkling lights of Ortisei. The hotel has views covered – there’s also a panoramic relaxation area with floor-to-ceiling windows and an open fire, where you can unwind with a good book and the rare sound of silence, as well as a sauna and an open-air brine pool from which to enjoy the mountain vistas.

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Away from the spa, it feels therapeutic just sitting on a sun-drenched sofa in the hotel’s cosy lounge, basking in the rays while gazing at the dramatic surroundings of the Dolomites, recognised as a UNESCO World Heritage Site for its impressive natural beauty. The lounge is small but elegant, with cowhide poufs, chic wooden coffee tables and stuffed bookcases. If you manage to muster up the energy to wear something other than your dressing gown and venture outside the hotel, walking around the tiny

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town of Ortisei is a chance to browse its quaint, eclectic shops where you can pick up everything from carved wooden goods to homemade honey in the cabins that line the streets. Make sure you head back in time for dinner. Adler Balance attracts people from all over the world thanks to its detox and weight loss programmes, although if you hadn’t signed up for one, you’d be forgiven for never knowing these health-centric courses took place here. At breakfast, tables are heaving under countless loaves of freshly baked, fragrant bread, while dinners are a five-course affair with a different menu every night: lamb with a tuna and coffee crust, carnaroli risotto with blueberries, aubergine and tofu pie… and there’s no chance of watching the waistline and going for three courses instead, as the friendly waiters look genuinely devastated if you try to skip a course. This genre of indulgence, though, is the best sort: despite the five-course dinners, steaming hot chocolates and indulgent breakfast crêpes – and the fact I haven’t done much but eat and fall asleep in various rooms in the spa – I do feel trimmer somehow. Eating, lazing, drinking and snoozing, but still feeling healthier: how is that possible? It must be that matchless mountain air.

NEED TO KNOW A three-night, half-board stay in a Junior Suite at the Adler Balance Spa & Health Residenz from approx. £495 per person, including vitality cuisine, access to Aguana Waterworld (the largest wellness zone in the Dolomites), Adler Fit extensive indoor and outdoor sports and leisure programme. Adler Beauty Package from approx. £125, including one facial, one pedicure and entrance to the Salt Grotto; Adler Health Screening Package from approx. £285, including bioelectric check-up, food intolerance test, personalised body package, anti-stress massage and dietary supplement, adler-balance.com

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YO U M AY N E V E R M A K E I T BA C K HOME T H E SA M E .

Book your Bermuda holiday with Classic Collection Holidays on 0800 294 9329 or 01903 836643.


Blazing Arizona Melissa Emerson braves the soaring temperatures for a road tripping, rock climbing adventure in the Grand Canyon State

sanctuary resort & spa

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ollowing in the footsteps of Beyoncé is never a bad way to start a holiday. It’s not our honeymoon, but when my partner and I arrive in the scorching state of Arizona we’re headed for what was the star’s post-wedding destination. In our all-American SUV rental, it’s a short drive from Phoenix airport to Sanctuary Resort & Spa on the slopes of Camelback Mountain. After checking in, we’re whisked up to our casita in a golf buggy – walking in the so-called Valley of the Sun’s heat is definitely overrated – and are met with far-reaching views of Paradise Valley. The scene inside is equally as impressive. Our contemporary living and dining space is decorated in neutral tones to complement the dusty terrain, while the metallic-tiled feature wall and curved freestanding tub in the bathroom are inviting after our long journey. Post-soak, we surrender to an early night, keen to catch the next morning’s sunrise from our private patio, before heading out into Scottsdale’s Sonoran Desert. Juggling an early alarm – and the time difference – we arrive at Fort McDowell Adventures feeling a little sheepish at 6.30am and are greeted by the cowboy hat and spurs-

clad silhouette of our guide Troy Haviland. We’re saddled up by 7am, aiming to complete a two-hour horseback ride before the sun is too strong (it later reaches 39°C). Haviland’s stables are set in 25,000 acres of spectacular desert, on the 950-strong Native American Yavapai Nation’s reservation. During the peaceful, meandering trek through both open desert and shady tree-lined paths – one of which Haviland trims with a saw from his belt en route to clear the way (that’s desert life for you) – we spot a coyote, an eagle, wild horses and saguaro cacti that pepper every slope. Having always wanted to ride through water, splashing through the Verde River is a huge highlight of the morning – although I have difficulties persuading my horse not to lay down to cool off. It’s such a tranquil and secluded experience that we forget about everything, jetlag included. After a break in the shade, we’re ready to explore further, and head down the road to Pink Jeep Tours (its Scottsdale operation has now moved to Sedona) and climb into what looks remarkably like Barbie’s jeep for a rugged off-road experience. There’s also a chance to stop and explore short distances on foot and brush up on desert trivia; namely that the teddy bear cholla cactus is not as friendly as it sounds, and that the Sonoran Desert is the only place in

During the meandering trek through open desert, we spot a coyote, an eagle and wild horses sanctuary resort & spa


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the colorado river’s course through the grand canyon

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saguaro cacti in the sonoran desert

the boulders at night

the world where the famous saguaro cactus (pictured, right) grows in the wild. We learn that it can take up to ten years for the cactus to grow a single inch. On returning to the hotel, I’m tempted by the infinity pool but instead make a beeline for the Asian-inspired spa to scrub the dust away. It boasts indoor and outdoor treatment rooms, a Zen meditation garden and a pool where you can take a class with Olympic gold medallist Misty Hyman. Looking for something requiring a little less effort, I settle for the citrus lavender softening scrub and massage. Dinner at the in-house Elements restaurant also has an Asian twist. The restaurant, commended for its local and organic produce, presents elegant fusion cuisine and hamachi sashimi and miso-glazed salmon sit alongside bison carpaccio and lobster mac ’n’ cheese. The next day, we jump in the SUV and hit the Apache Trail. Once a stagecoach route through Superstition Mountains, the drive is not for the faint-hearted, especially when the paved section ends. To steady our nerves, we stop for refreshment – an ice cream made from the prickly pear cactus – at Tortilla Flat (population: six), which is the last surviving stop of the historic route. The rocky road’s views are worth the effort as we continue on to Apache Lake, one of four reservoirs formed by the damming of the Salt River. Driving done for the day, we later call an Uber from the hotel (that turns out to be a pickup truck) to head into downtown Scottsdale and the LDV Wine Gallery. Here we take our seats on the outdoor terrace, complete with fairy-lit cacti, and settle in to judge some of the estate’s home-grown, natural wines from south-eastern Arizona’s Chiricahua Mountains. The estate mostly produces reds, and the woody 2013 Syrah is a highlight. Dinner is a short stroll away at FnB restaurant, where local, seasonal and largely organic produce is transformed into dishes such as grilled asparagus, cauliflower cream and beet chips, and Brussels sprouts with curry, basil, lime and crispy onions. Such is the chef’s skill I turn vegetarian for the night without even realising it.

The Sonoran Desert is the only place in the world where the saguaro cactus grows in the wild We attempt to peer in some gallery windows after dinner, but the best way to enjoy the more than 70 art establishments and museums is on the weekly al fresco Scottsdale ArtWalk – an open-house night where you can wander between venues, observe artist demonstrations and enjoy drinks and nibbles. The next day we head on to northern Scottsdale and to our second hotel, The Boulders. Spread over 1,300 acres, with two championship golf courses and eight tennis courts, it has an altogether more natural feel. Its traditional Pueblo Adobe-style casitas, characterised by flat roofs, uneven


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GOLF COURSE AT THE BOULDERS

HACIENDA PATIO AT THE BOULDERS

parapets, rounded corners and earth tones, are set among the resort’s namesake granite boulder formations and a natural landscape of palo verde trees and wildflowers. We spy a covey of quail scuttling around a deer by our window and later we share the path to the main pool (one of four) with only a few lizards for company. It’s cosier too, with homely leather armchairs, shuttered windows, hand-hewn wooden beams and teal and orange accents in indigenous patterned fabrics. The rustic feel continues at the 33,000 sq ft spa. In a resort surrounded by boulders it feels appropriate to try the 75-minute Silent Stones Massage. The heated basalt stones, combined with a blue cypress and vetiver oil blend, are tension-releasing and sleep-inducing, and the spa even has a herb garden where guests can pick anything they like to have incorporated in their treatment. In the evening, we walk the short distance to the small El Pedregal complex of shops and galleries anchored by the resort, to dine at the Spotted Donkey Cantina. Down-toearth Mexican food such as hand-stuffed jalapeño peppers with bacon, cheese and coriander buttermilk sauce is served alongside dozens of different tequilas. Leaving what is said to be the best until last, we head to Arizona’s star attraction on our penultimate day, the Grand Canyon National Park. After a drive to Phoenix’s smaller Deer Valley Airport, we take off with Westwind Air Service. Flying over Tonto National Forest (the fifth largest in the US), the famed red rocks of Sedona and the Canyon itself is a breathtaking lesson in the state’s geography, and I’m torn between taking photos and simply staring out of the window and trying to remember it all. As well as an aerial tour, our excursion includes a guided three-mile round-trip hike from the North Rim, and we lunch down in the Canyon – surely the most unique picnic spot of all time. With a guide carrying the food and water and keeping us on track, we’re free to let our thoughts wander and absorb the scenery. Getting a perspective of the Canyon from above, and then a measure of its scale up close, is the perfect way to experience its arresting beauty.

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cASITAS BY THE DUCK POND AT THE BOULDERS

Now fully versed in the cowboy lifestyle, on our last night we drive a short way to Cave Creek and dine at Bryan’s Black Mountain Barbecue restaurant. Its pulled pork, Six Pack Cowboy Beans and Frog Leg Fridays are true frontier fare, and serve as the perfect introduction to the amateur bullriding at The Buffalo Chip Saloon nearby. Our last day sadly comes and we join Rico Riley of Black Mountain Adventures, who hosts rock climbing on one of the resort’s towering boulder formations, to squeeze in one final adventurous encounter. It takes some motivational chants from Riley to keep me going when I have a wobble halfway, but scaling a sheer rock face, using only its tiny cracks and irregularities for hand holds, and reaching the top might I add, is something I’ve still not finished boasting about. It proves to be the perfect feel-good activity to end on. For those needing to break free from their desks, Scottsdale’s natural wonders are worlds away from city life. Whether you’re rejuvenating in its elegant spa resorts, scaling rocks or rubbing shoulders with cowboys ringside, Arizona has far more to offer than a detour to see the Grand Canyon. Don’t forget to pack your cowboy hat. Sanctuary Resort & Spa from £214 a night, sanctuaryoncamelback.com; The Boulders from £111 a night (May-August), theboulders.com; experiencescottsdale.com

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london

20 GRAFTON STREET UK.HOLLYHUNT.COM


Property Listings See below for estate agents in your area

Aston Chase 69-71 Park Road NW1 6XU 020 7724 4724 astonchase.com

Hudsons Property 24 Charlotte Street W1T 2ND 020 7323 2277

Marsh & Parsons 94 Baker Street W1U 6FZ 020 7935 1775 marshandparsons.co.uk

hudsonproperty.com

CBRE Henrietta House 8 Henrietta Place W1G 0NB 020 7182 2000 cbre.co.uk

Chestertons 47 South Audley Street W1K 2AQ 020 7629 4513 40 Connaught Street W2 2AB 020 7298 5900 chestertons.com

Kay & Co 20a Paddington Street W1U 5QP 020 7486 6338 24-25 Albion Street W2 2AX 020 3468 0917 kayandco.com

Knight Frank 49 & 55 Baker Street W1U 8EW 020 3435 6440

Robert Irving Burns 23-24 Margaret Street W1W 8LK 020 7637 0821 rib.co.uk

Rokstone 5 Dorset Street W1U 6QJ 020 7486 3320 rokstone.com

5-7 Wellington Place NW8 7PB 020 7586 2777 knightfrank.co.uk

Sotheby’s Realty 77-79 Ebury Street SW1W 0NZ 020 3714 0749 sothebysrealty.co.uk

For estate agent listings please contact Sophie Roberts at s.roberts@runwildgroup.co.uk


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Goodge Street, Fitzrovia W1 Contemporary two bedroom apartment This well presented first floor apartment provides well planned living accommodation. Master bedroom with en suite WC, 2nd bedroom, shower room with WC, open plan living space with fitted kitchen and dining area and access on to a private balcony. Excellently located in the heart of Fitzrovia, close to the boutique shops and restaurants. EPC: D Approximately 56 sq m (603 sq ft).   Leasehold: approximately 97 years 6 months remaining

Guide price: £1,100,000

KnightFrank.co.uk/marylebone marylebone@knightfrank.com 020 3641 7938  

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KnightFrank.co.uk/MRY150070

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Upper Wimpole Street, Marylebone W1 Eight bedroom Georgian house with adjoining mews house and garage Incredible house benefiting from ample windows allowing an abundance of natural light, high ceilings and lift. 8 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms (1 en suite), 3 reception rooms, grand dining room, office and study, spacious family kitchen/breakfast room, utility room, separate WC, patio and balcony. Self contained apartment on the lower ground floor; 2 bedrooms, bathroom, reception room, kitchen, garden and patio. The mews house comprises 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, reception room, kitchen, double and single garage.   Approximately 932.74 sq m (10,040 sq ft).   Freehold

Guide price: £13,500,000

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Molyneux Street, Marylebone W1 Recently refurbished three bedroom Georgian house The house has been meticulously interior designed by designer Lesley Kingsbury. Master bedroom with dressing room and en suite bathroom, 2 further bedrooms, TV room (which could be used as 4th bedroom), 2 shower rooms, reception room, library, study, open plan kitchen/dining room, garden with vertical living plant wall and terrace. Further benefits include Sonos system and ceiling speakers throughout, air conditioning and underfloor heating in the whole of the lower ground floor and all of the bathrooms. Westminster residents parking (Zone F). EPC: D. Approximately 167.2 sq m (1,800 sq ft).   Freehold

Guide price: £3,295,000

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Introducing One Seymour Street, a spectacular collection of new 1, 2 and 3 bed apartments in Marylebone R EG I S T ER YO U R I N T ER E S T 020 7971 7637 oneseymourstreet@knightfrank.com oneseymourstreet.com

Prices from £905,000 COMPLE TION Q2 2018


Full house When it comes to Marylebone, no agency has more feet on the ground than Knight Frank. Office head Christian Lock-Necrews and lettings manager Arya Salari explain what sets their team apart

BACK ROW, L-R: SALES ASSOCIATE MITCHELL MURPHY; OFFICE MANAGER SARAH HERRING; OFFICE HEAD CHRISTIAN LOCK-NECREWS; SALES NEGOTiATOR ALI MATHEWS; LETTINGS MANAGER ARYA SALARI; SENIOR NEGOTIATOR CRAIG DRAPER FRONT ROW L-R: senior lettings negotiator ryan stokes; LETTINGS NEGOTIATOR LIZZIE NORMANDALE; LETTINGS NEGOTIATOR DAISY MUNRO; MARKETING COORDINATOR KATE BURNFORD IMAGE ©sarel jansen


property

O

rganising a photo shoot can be tricky at the best of times – arranging one for an entire office of ten is harder still. “We’re one of the biggest agencies in Marylebone,” office head Christian Lock-Necrews begins proudly, as he poses alongside his fellow Knight Frank colleagues in a light-filled, first floor and mezzanine level apartment currently for sale in The Park Crescent development. “We want our buyers, tenants and landlords to know how many team members we have dedicated to this area. Knight Frank is a truly international brand, but we are specialists in the local market.” Lock-Necrews certainly knows his stuff. He has been working in the area for 15 years, and opened the Marylebone office in 2008. His is a familiar face, but others, such as Arya Salari, might be less so. He joins the team as lettings manager this month, bringing with him a decade of experience in west London. His arrival has coincided with the lettings team announcing its strongest rental year to date. The number of new tenancies agreed was 22 per cent higher year-on-year in the six months to February. “There’s more stabilisation in the market at the moment,” Salari says. “Over the last two years vendors weren’t achieving the prices they wanted, so they turned to lettings. This pushed up stock levels and meant that prices declined because there was so much competition.” With these price declines gradually bottoming out, the team is busy building up its portfolio of rental properties in preparation for the traditionally busy summer months. Things are turning a corner for the sales team too. A remarkable 18 sales have been

agreed in the past fortnight. “It’s a case of right properties, right buyers,” Lock-Necrews explains. “Vendors who want to sell at market value will sell.” Although the figures speak for themselves, it’s the change in sentiment that Lock-Necrews and Salari believe marks a more important shift in the property market. “When you speak to buyers, they say they’ve been sitting, watching and waiting for two years now, but the world hasn’t changed – London is still a good place to invest,” he continues. A case in point is the raft of first-class developments on the Knight Frank books, from Chiltern Place and One Seymour Street, to 19 Bolsover Street and the aforementioned Park Crescent. These new, state-of-the-art offerings and sensitive refurbishment schemes have enticed international buyers, who have also been driven to invest by the weaker pound. This growing confidence at a global level is now trickling down to the domestic sales market too: the number of properties under offer was 22 per cent higher year-on-year in the three months to February and the number of exchanges was up 13 per cent during the same period. The message from the Marylebone team is clear: this year will be a better property market than most expected it to be. Factors such as stamp duty increases and the triggering of Article 50 have now happened, so it’s very much business as usual. “It’s certainly a time of change,” Lock-Necrews says. “We’ve got the strongest team we’ve ever had in place. We’re committed to this area and have real confidence, both in the future of Marylebone, and more importantly, the present day.”

“Knight Frank is a truly international brand, but we are specialists in the local market”

s l u x u ry l o n d o n . c o. u k s

55 Baker Street, W1U, 020 3641 7938, knightfrank.co.uk

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CARRINGTON HOUSE MAYFAIR W1 A ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT IN THE HEART OF MAYFAIR A spacious one bedroom apartment located on the second floor of a period mansion block within the heart of Mayfair. The flat comprises of one double bedroom, large size reception room with dining area, separate kitchen & bathroom. Located within walking distance to all the amenities of Mayfair. Accommodation: Entrance hall, reception room/dining room, kitchen, bedroom ,shower Room. Amenities: Porter, lift.

londonsales@beauchamp.com +44 (0) 20 7499 7722

www.beauchamp.com

·

24 Curzon Street, London W1J 7TF

£1,200,000 Leasehold

·

+44 (0)20 7499 7722


CHESTERFIELD HOUSE MAYFAIR W1 AN EXCLUSIVE MAYFAIR APARTMENT A desirable one bedroom flat located on the 7th floor of this portered block in the heart of Mayfair. With an abundance of natural light and in excellent condition the property also has the benefit of wood flooring throughout plus communal heating and hot water. Accommodation: Reception room, dining room, kitchen, bedroom, shower room. Amenities: 24-Hour concierge/porter, lift.

£1,700,000 Leasehold

www.beauchamp.com

londonsales@beauchamp.com +44 (0) 20 7499 7722

·

24 Curzon Street, Street , London W1J 7TF

·

+44 (0)20 7499 7722


ONE HYDE PARK KNIGHTSBRIDGE SW1 A BRIGHT, MODERN RECENTLY REFURBISHED THREE BEDROOM APARTMENT Comprising some 3,475 sqft and moments away from Knightsbridge and Hyde Park, the apartment offers the very best in luxurious living. This prestigious area has an array of high-end fine dining restaurants and bars and some of London’s leading hotels, including the Mandarin Oriental Hotel just next door. Accommodation: Entrance hall, Reception room, Kitchen, Dining room, 2 Bedrooms with ensuite bathrooms and dressing rooms, 1 Further bedroom, Guest shower room. Amenities: Terrace, 24-hour concierge, Residents only spa and leisure facilities.


£12,000 / Week

Karolina@beauchamp.com

No tenant fees

+44 (0)20 7499 7722

www.beauchamp.com www.beauchamp.com · · 24 24 Curzon Curzon Street, Street, London LondonW1J W1J 7TF 7TF · · +44 +44 (0)20 (0)20 7722 7722 9793 9793


Buckingham Gate, Westminster SW1H

ÂŁ895 per week

A stunningly located, three double bedroom lateral apartment situated within this grand red brick mansion building near to Green Park and Buckingham Palace. The property benefits from a large family kitchen, bright reception room and porter service. EPC rating B. Approximately 1,139 sq ft (106 sq m). Three bedrooms | Two bath/shower rooms (one en suite) | Reception room | Kitchen | Porter | Lift

Available furnished for a long let

77-79 Ebury Street, London SW1W 0NZ sothebysrealty.co.uk +44 20 7495 9580 | london@sothebysrealty.co.uk


sothebysrealty.co.uk

Whitehall Court, St James’s SW1A

£3,950,000

Situated on the third floor of this imposing and highly sought after period building in the heart of Westminster, the apartment has been refurbished to an extremely high standard throughout. EPC rating C. Approximately 2,180 sq ft (203 sq m). Master bedroom with en suite bathroom | Two further bedrooms | Two further bath/shower rooms | Reception room | Dining room | Kitchen| Four balconies | Lift | Porter

Leasehold: approximately 71 years remaining

© 2016 UK Sotheby’s International Realty. All rights reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty is a registered trademark licensed to UK Sotheby’s International Realty in the UK. Each offïce is independently owned and operated. All information non - contractual, approximate and subject to error, change and withdrawal without notice. Rent excludes administration fees. Please contact our offïces who can provide this information.


Prime Period Property with Town Garden Upper Wimpole Street, Marylebone, W1G

• Two Bedrooms • Two Bathrooms • Guest WC • Kitchen • Reception/Dining Room • Utility Room • Garden • Approximately 1,050 Sq. Ft • Energy Rating: E

£1,995,000 Leasehold Kay & Co Marylebone & Fitzrovia Sales

020 3394 0027

marylebone@kayandco.com kayandco.com

Penthouse Apartment with a Private Roof Terrace Great Titchfield Street, Fitzrovia, W1W

• Two Bedrooms • Two Bathrooms • Guest WC • Kitchen • Private Roof Terrace • From 700 Sq. Ft - 1,508 Sq. Ft Approximately • Energy Rating: C

From £950 - £1,800 Per Week Furnished Kay & Co Marylebone & Fitzrovia Lettings

020 3394 0027

marylebone@kayandco.com kayandco.com

Marylebone&Fitzrovia_LHMay17.indd 1

18/04/2017 14:41


Not just

Opening Doors In Marylebone & Fitzrovia Since 1982 We’ve used our in depth street-by-street local knowledge for the past 35 years to make lasting property matches. Whether you are buying, selling or renting, we know where the best lattÊ is, where to park and what the neighbours are really like. Does your agent? Let us give your next move the care and attention it deserves. KAY & CO MARYLEBONE & FITZROVIA 20a Paddington Street, London, W1U 5QP

marylebone@kayandco.com 020 3394 0027 kayandco.com

14:41


THE ART OF MOVING UK RESIDENTIAL, EUROPEAN & INTERNATIONAL REMOVALS

Abels a thoroughbred amongst movers.

• UK Residential Removals • Worldwide Relocations • Weekly European Removals • Storage Services • Car Transportation & Storage • Office & Commercial Moving • Antiques, Fine Art Packing, Storing & Moving Telephone: 020 3468 9616 E-Mail: enquiries@abels.co.uk www.abels.co.uk

Memb No: A001

Abels Rocking Horse ad 297x210mm.indd 3

FS 23942

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Clifton Gardens Maida Vale W9 • • • • • •

Existing building of approximately 16,736 sq ft (GIA), comprising 16 apartments, formerly Metropolitan Police residential accommodation. Residents benefit from private access to 3.5 acres of scenic gardens. Convenient and desirable location close to amenities and Little Venice. 2-minute walk from Warwick Avenue Underground Station and 13-minute walk from London Paddington Station. Significant residential redevelopment potential for a multiple dwelling scheme (subject to obtaining the necessary consents). Freehold sale

020 7580 2030 WWW.ROKSTONE.COM 5 Dorset Street, London, W1U 6QJ enquiries@rokstone.com

Price: £27,000,000


NEW HOMES BATEMAN STREET, SOHO, W1 BRAND NEW DEVELOPMENT

Prices from £1,490,000

SHOW APARTMENT READY FOR VIEWINGS

Four apartments work across the five levels of the building but no two are the same. One bed or two bed. Terrace or cinema room. Entering from Bateman Street or Royalty Mews. Soho breeds individuality. Our creative team devoted 2,260 hours of meticulous architectural and interior design time to this project.

BOURLET CLOSE FITZROVIA W1

Prices from £957,750 A development of six meticulously designed 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments within this attractive period conversion located in the heart of fashionable Fitzrovia.

020 7927 0616

newhomes@rib.co.uk

23-24 Margaret Street, London, W1W 8LF 6817 - RIB - Marylebone and Fitzrovia SALES Ad April 2017.indd 1

www.rib.co.uk 07/04/2017 15:36


PROPERTY

Property news PrimeResi brings you the latest news in prime property and development in London

One in a million

images courtesy of grosvenor

Watch that space Grosvenor reveals new plans for Berkeley Square

G

rosvenor is following through on its 20-year vision for Mayfair and Belgravia by publishing a suite of “bold commitments” for the public realm around Berkeley Square. Architects BDP have drawn up the £4m plans for Grosvenor, in partnership with Westminster City Council and Lancer, for public display. Plans will see the northern half of Berkeley Square, which forms part of the southern boundary of Grosvenor’s estate, transformed. Changes focus on the “notoriously busy, traffic-heavy junction” with Mount Street and Davies Street. This patch will receive upgrades including: significantly widening pavements and doubling overall pavement space; safer, more secure and attractive streets for cycling; replacing uncoordinated traffic signals and pedestrian crossings; planting new trees and installing high quality paving stones and street furniture; and creating a dedicated

PrimeQResi

place for public art installations. “We have a 20-year vision for this great estate to adapt at the heart of our global city,” says Will Bax, executive director of London estate for Grosvenor Britain and Ireland. “We want better streets with a world class public realm that put the needs of pedestrians and cyclists over motorised traffic. We want it to be more flexible and appealing to all.” “I welcome Grosvenor’s desire to improve Berkeley Square,” said Councillor Daniel Astaire, cabinet member for planning and public realm. “We encourage all proposals to enhance the public realm.”

The number of £1m+ mortgages jumped by 24 per cent last year as banks lend to owner-occupiers over property developers A peer-to-peer lending platform has worked out that the number of new seven-figure residential mortgages increased by 24 per cent last year, with banks’ behaviour indicating a preference for lending money to owner-occupiers over developers. The number of new £1m+ residential mortgages increased from 3,896 in 2015 to 4,844 in 2016, reports Lendy, while the total value rose by 18 per cent over the same period, from £7.59bn to £8.95bn. At the same time, lending to residential developers dropped by seven per cent. New and upgraded regulations are encouraging banks to be more liberal with the owner-occupier market while cutting exposure to property developers, says Lendy. Liam Brooke, co-founder of Lendy comments: “As more and more money goes to owner-occupiers, housing targets will continue to be missed unless banks allocate more money to developers who build multiple homes at rapid rates. As the balance of lending shifts, it is smaller developers that are losing out. “It is these small and medium sized developers that have found it hard to get funding from banks since the financial crisis. Peer-to-peer platforms such as ourselves are contributing more and more in getting new developments off the ground.” lendy.co.uk

primeresi.com

Journal of Luxury Property

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property

Property news Centre of gravity has shifted in PCL Land Registry statistics show huge gulf in performance between neighbourhoods as buyers seek out value and new transport links Last year marked a distinct shift in Central London’s “centre of gravity”, according to London Central Portfolio, away from the traditional luxury enclaves and into areas with gentrification potential. Using newly-released full-year statistics from the Land Registry, the investment firm has plotted the performance of all the key neighbourhoods of PCL over the 12-month period, highlighting the gulf in performance between the stalwarts and (relatively) more up-and-coming districts. Areas where prices average £2m or more have suffered in the wake of successive Stamp Duty Land Tax increases. Chelsea has been hardest hit of all, posting a 12.2 per cent fall in average prices and a 28.5 per cent fall in sales volumes. Kensington, St James’s and Mayfair were also significantly affected. Marylebone, Fitzrovia and Soho outperformed everywhere with a mighty 19.7 per cent uplift in prices, while increases were also seen in PCL’s other lower value areas including Notting Hill, Paddington and Bayswater (11 per cent), Pimlico (2.9 per cent) and Westminster and Victoria (2.6 per cent). LCP expects this kind of activity to continue in the lower value areas as long as we have the combination of weak sterling and low interest rates at play, while the market may take longer to correct in luxury areas as prices rebase themselves to factor in the higher transaction costs. londoncentralportfolio.com

PrimeQResi

Spotlight on lettings Arya Salari, head of lettings at Knight Frank’s Marylebone office, considers the importance of presentation in rental properties “As a surprise for my girlfriend, I have booked tickets for us to see a screening of Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo & Juliet. The tickets sold out surprisingly quickly, in no small part due to the fact that the film will be played inside a beautiful candle-lit church in Marylebone with an accompanying live choir. Atmosphere and visuals are hugely important in setting a scene, and nowhere does this apply more than in the property industry. Dressing a property can make a huge difference to the speed at which it gets let and at what price. A fragrant candle, some beautiful flowers

“Dressing a property can make a huge difference to the speed at which it gets let and at what price” and a pile of artfully presented books all help to set a scene. As lettings agents, we are ultimately selling a lifestyle; we want the tenant to fall in love with what that lifestyle offers and desire it for themselves. As we enter the summer’s historically busy lettings market, it is important for landlords to remember that there is always competition within the marketplace, as applicants have a large selection of properties to choose from. Remember that the ‘first impression is the last impression’.” If you would like any advice on the marketing of your property, please do not hesitate to get in touch with me at: arya.salari@knightfrank.com

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Hyde Park Sales 020 7298 5900

sales.hydepark@chestertons.com

Haselbury House, Marylebone W1

ÂŁ1,995,000 leasehold

A 2 bedroom apartment of approx. 1,036 sq ft with 24hr porterage, beautiful wood flooring throughout, working fireplaces & high ceilings. Haselbury House is centrally located with easy access to a wealth of restaurants, shops & amenities. The nearest underground stations are Marble Arch & Baker Street. EPC rating D

Mayfair Sales 020 7629 4513

Portland Place, Mayfair W1B

sales.mayfair@chestertons.com

A beautifully decorated apartment set within a very exclusive portered block. The apartment offers a bright open plan reception room with designer Italian kitchen, 2 double bedrooms (both with en-suites) & a guest cloakroom. EPC rating C

chestertons.com

ÂŁ1,100,000 leasehold


CONTENTS May 2017 30

Regulars 10 12 14 64

Editor’s letter Five minutes with... Corin Mellor, creative director of David Mellor Design The agenda A cultural round-up of what to read, see and do this May Blooming lovely Embrace the beautiful outdoors this summer with perennial prints, ruffles and accessories

Features 18 20

52

Room for one more Emma Donoghue adapts her critically acclaimed novel Room for the stage London Craft Week The citywide celebration of craftsmanship returns to the capital

12

25

102

25

30 Pins and needles 250 years of embroidery with Hand & Lock 52 The art of darkness Mat Collishaw’s new exhibition tackles the digital revolution and Victorian technology 60 Crowning glory The magic of millinery at London’s oldest shop, Lock & Co. 84 Natural selection A new wave of skincare harnessing the wonders of the great outdoors 98 And breathe... The allure of the spa trumps the slopes in the Italian Dolomites 102 Blazing Arizona A road tripping, rock climbing adventure in the Grand Canyon State

Jumping the Broom Product designer Lee Broom marks ten years in the industry with a Wedgwood collaboration

36

35 Collection

57 Fashion

80 Health & beauty

92 Travel

45 Art

75 Interiors

89 Food & drink

109 Property


DEAD RARE F I NE J E W E L L E RY G RO U N D FLO O R, K N I G HTSB RI D G E ANNOUSHK A KOJ I S

A R A VA RTA N I A N

M A RCO B I C E G O

N I Q U ESA

O RTA E A

M OZ A FA R I A N

S EL I M M O UZ A N N A R

TA L I S M A N GA L L ERY

TASA K I

selected range available at har veynichols.com


editor’s letter

MARYLEBONE

& FITZROVIA M A Y 2 0 1 7 s iss u e 0 1 2

Editor Lauren Romano

editor

From the

INTERIORS

Assistant Editor Melissa Emerson

L

Contributing Editors Hannah Lemon Camilla Apcar Kari Colmans Collection Editors Olivia Sharpe Richard Brown Acting Assistant Editor Marianne Dick Brand Consistency & Senior Designer Laddawan Juhong Production Hugo Wheatley Jamie Steele Alice Ford General Manager Fiona Smith Executive Director Sophie Roberts Managing Director Eren Ellwood

Proudly published by

Fabric of time What do Leonardo da Vinci, a Chinese empress and Moscow’s Kremlin all have in common? Hannah Lemon delves into the archives of Florence’s oldest silk mill to find out

egend has it that Empress Lei-tzu, the young wife of the Chinese Yellow Emperor, discovered silk while sipping a cup of tea. Sitting under the leafy bows of a mulberry tree, a silkworm’s cocoon dropped into her cup. The heat of the drink forced the silk to unfold and the young empress watched in awe as the magical thread unravelled, and she immediately determined to weave it. Sure enough, it made the perfect fabric, and soon Lei-tzu taught her ladies-in-waiting how to fashion garments from these fine fibres. Thus, she became known as the Silkworm Mother. Of course, the more likely story was that Catholic missionaries brought sericulture back from China to Europe in the 12th century. One of their final destinations was Florence, a city that would flourish in the silk trade from the 14th century onwards, bringing enormous wealth to merchants. Florentine silk continued to prosper during the Renaissance and well into the 18th century. So much so, that during the 1700s, a group of noble families clubbed together to establish a single workshop for their looms, patterns and fabrics located on Via dei Tessitori (the street of weavers). And so, Antico Setificio Fiorentino (Antique Florentine Silk Mill) was born. In recognition of the importance of this factory and to toast increased silk production, in 1780 the Grand Duke of Tuscany Leopold II donated several looms, which still work today. Thanks to acquisitions by Marquis Emilio Pucci in the 1950s and subsequently Stefano Ricci in 2010, the future of the remarkable handcrafted tradition remains alive, as do the centuries-old Florentine techniques. Today, Renaissance damasks, brocades and taffetas are woven on 12 looms – six handlooms dating from the 18th century and six semimechanical looms from the 19th century. The quality of the fabric is guaranteed by various phases of delicate workmanship: the hand dying, the preparation of the antique looms, yarns that are specially prepared for Antico Setificio Fiorentino, no chemical treatments and the lengthy weaving process. It doesn’t stop there. The Antico Setificio Fiorentino uses a unique orditoio (warping

s l u x u ry l o n d o n . c o. u k s

machine), designed by Leonardo da Vinci for embellishments; as well as a loom for silk trimmings and another for custommade fringes. As is to be expected of such meticulous creativity, the silk products are sought after by every luxury institution from royal palaces to national museums – the Amalienborg Palace in Denmark, the Royal Palace of Stockholm, Moscow’s Kremlin and Villa Medici in Rome, to name a few. You don’t have to be a royal to get a slice of the action though; bed, bath and table linens, bespoke services, and limited edition evening wear can be found on the lower ground floor at the Stefano Ricci menswear store on South Audley Street. And it’s all thanks to an imaginative empress and her cup of tea. Antico Setificio Fiorentino products and services are available through Stefano Ricci, 56 South Audley Street, W1K, stefanoricci.com OPPOSITE: THE GuICCIardInI LOOM (1786), PHOTO CrEdIT: STEFanO rICCI/aSF by bErnardO COnTI TOP rIGHT and InSET: WEaVInG THE ICOnIC brOCCaTELLO MICHELanGELO, MadE OF SILK and LInEn THrEadS. PHOTO CrEdIT: STEFanO rICCI/aSF by EGOn IPSE; TExTILES FrOM THE anTICO SETIFICIO FIOrEnTInO, PHOTO CrEdIT: STEFanO rICCI/ aSF by MarCO CuraTOLO LEFT: SPOOL CHanGInG durInG THE PrOCESSInG OF THE dOrIa FabrIC, PHOTO CrEdIT: STEFanO rICCI/aSF by rOSSanO b. ManISCaLCHI

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“Beautiful forms and compositions are not made by chance, nor can they ever, in any material, be made at small expense” Josiah Wedgwood In the age of 3D printing and fast fashion, it can be all too easy to overlook the work of the master tailor, potter or silversmith, but skilled makers are still very much part of the mix in Marylebone and Fitzrovia. To kick off our craftsmanship issue, we find out what it takes to make cutlery fit for the dining table at Number 10 with a visit to David Mellor on New Cavendish Street (p.12), and delve into the archives at Fitzroviabased embroidery house Hand & Lock, as the company celebrates 250 years in business (p.30). We also talk to product designer Lee Broom about his collaboration with Wedgwood (p.25), and round up the best of this year’s London Craft Week celebrations. Turn to page 20 to read more about the artisans bringing time-honoured skills into the 21st century.

RUNWILD MEDIA GROUP

6th Floor, One Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5AX 020 7987 4320 www.rwmg.co.uk Runwild Media Ltd. cannot accept responsibility for unsolicited submissions, manuscripts and photographs. While every care is taken, prices and details are subject to change and Runwild Media Ltd. takes no responsibility for omissions or errors. We reserve the right to publish and edit any letters. All rights reserved. DISTRIBUTION: The Marylebone & Fitzrovia Magazine is distributed in Marylebone, Fitzrovia and the surrounding areas

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10

Lauren Romano Editor Follow us on Twitter @MandFMagazine

On the

cover

Also published by

R u nw i ld M ed i a G ro u p

WEDGWOOD BY LEE BROOM, VASE ON ORANGE SPHERE, image ©MICHAEL BODIAM. Read the interview on page 25.

luxurylondon.co.uk A website. A mindset. A lifestyle.


Regulars

5 minutes with...

My father founded David Mellor Design in 1953. He originally trained as a silversmith, but he earned a reputation for everything from teaspoons to traffic lights. He designed the system in 1966 and it’s still used today. It’s a nice daily reminder for me, unless I get stuck at a red light, of course.

Despite his street furniture, the company is still best known for its knives and forks. The

ourselves at our factory, The Round Building, in Derbyshire. It also stocks glassware and crockery that has been designed by us and items we have chosen from selected craftspeople.

first collection, Pride, (pictured, below) was designed in 1953 when I like following an my father was a student object from concept to at the Royal College of creation. I’m a real The David Mellor creative director on designing Art, and it’s still our most believer that something knives and forks for Number 10, taking up the baton popular. Over the years should work as well as from his ‘Cutlery King’ father and the company’s new we’ve designed silver look good. The interior Marylebone store plate cutlery for of the shop has all been British designed and made by us embassies and – from the staircase to politicians. The the shelves. We want to English get across the craftsmanship involved in collection was what we stock, hence why we have video originally footage of silversmiths and potters at commissioned in work playing in the background. 1992 for the Prime Minister’s ceremonial dining. At the time David Mellor is still very small and however, the design wasn’t deemed family orientated. I’ve been involved ostentatious enough by Number 10. with the business all my life. We lived at Ironically, the Camerons bought a the factory when I was growing up – similar set from us years later, so it did there was just a connecting door between make it to Downing Street eventually. the workshop and the house. I still live on site, but go back and forth to London a lot. I enjoy the change; I’ve got sheep Our first shop opened on Sloane at one end and the city at the other. Square in 1969. We’ve been trying to open a second in One of our most recent commissions Marylebone for five was a 25-foot bridge at Sheffield years. The new shop Hallam University. I don’t stray showcases our quite as far as traffic lights, but if you cutlery and kitchen can design a spoon, you should be knives, which we able to design a staircase – it’s the design and make same process.

Corin Mellor

“I’m a real believer that something should work as well as look good”

Setting the Table at David Mellor, an exhibition to celebrate London Craft Week, takes place from 3-7 May in-store at David Mellor, 14 New Cavendish Street, W1G, davidmellordesign.co.uk 12

s l u x u ry l o n d o n . c o. u k s


NE W O P ENIN G

Treasure trove Marylebone’s latest opening Labassa Woolfe, founded by Johan Labassa and his partner Joe Woolfe, is an intriguing fusion of French and English style, with antiques, gourmet specialities from the family’s farm in the South of France, tailoring (Woolfe has dressed Benedict Cumberbatch and David Gandy among others) and bespoke fragrance all in the mix. 6 Percy Street, W1T, labassawoolfe.com

The agenda Local news and events from in and around the area W O R D S : m e l i ss a e m e rso n

image courtesy of rachel oates

A dog’s life Marylebone Village’s Cabbages & Frocks Market is hosting its eight annual Dog Day this month. Dog trainer Rob Alleyne will be on hand to share tips with those inspired by the Good Boy Dog School’s displays, while novices can try their paws at free competitions including New Kid on the Block (Best Puppy) and Best Dog Trick. Free, 20 May, 11am-5pm, St Marylebone Parish Church Grounds, W1U, cabbagesandfrocks.co.uk

Home sweet home Marylebone Interiors Day returns this month, with masterclasses and special offers from local retailers including The Conran Shop, which is hosting a screen printing workshop and a window display featuring Hans Wegner’s iconic CH07 Shell Chair, on loan from Denmark’s Design Museum. 20 May, maryleboneinteriorsday.com

literary itinerary glass ceilings A collaboration between two world-class applied arts museums – MAK Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art in Vienna and Le Stanze del Vetro in Venice – this book is the second in a series exploring the art of glassmaking. It focuses on the development of the craft in Austria from 1900 to 1937, a period when a group of young architects, designers and fine arts and architecture students, such as Josef Hoffmann, Joseph Maria Olbrich and Leopold Bauer, developed a special interest in the medium. The book features more than 300 intriguing works – some are from private collections, but the majority are from the archive at the MAK – and is written by one of the museum’s glass and ceramic curators Rainald Franz. The Glass of the Architects: Vienna 1900–1937 by Rainald Franz, RRP £42, amazon.co.uk


Regulars

EXHIBI T IONS

Iron man Edel Assanti’s latest show, Sorel Etrog: Doors open from the inside only, is the first UK solo exhibition dedicated to the late Canadian artist. It focuses on his work between 1968 and 1975, particularly his use of links and hinges as motifs. 28 April – 17 June, 74a Newman Street, W1T, edelassanti.com

LEFT TO RIGHT: Screen with Yellow Bar, 2013, Andy Parkinson, acrylic and paper on hardboard, 61 x 61cm; Zippy Six, 2017, LUCY COX, acrylic on canvas, 50 x 50cm; ©THE ARTISTS

True colours The works of six British painters, including the exhibition’s curators Lucy Cox and Freya Purdue, are united in Colour: A Kind of Bliss. Held in association with artist-led organisation Contemporary British Painting, the exhibition explores changing perceptions of colour in today’s digital age. Until 30 June, The Crypt, St Marylebone Parish Church, 17 Marylebone Road, NW1

Voyager Study, 1976, Bronze, 19.1cm, ©The Estate of Sorel Etrog, Courtesy of Edel Assanti

UNTITLED, ALAN CONSTABLE, 2016, courtesy of the gallery of everything

In the picture Action, Camera! is now showing at Chiltern Street’s The Gallery of Everything. The exhibition comprises two separately curated solo shows, linked thematically by the camera and its possibilities. Alan Constable’s ceramic sculptures stem from a childhood crafting optical gadgets out of cereal boxes, while collage artist Ion Bârlādeanu’s works depict cut-out Hollywood characters inhabiting miniature sets. Until 18 June, 4 Chiltern Street, W1U, gallevery.com

The eye of the beholder

UNTITLED, ION BÂRLĀDEANU, 1980, courtesy of the gallery of everything

Ideas of Beauty: Douglas Gray and Cate Inglis, an exhibition of new paintings at Thompson’s Gallery, asks viewers to look beyond conventional conceptions of beauty and the picturesque. Gray’s use of colour and light brings fluidity and grace to the hustle and bustle of daily life in cities from Venice to New York, while Inglis captures the effects of dilapidation and vandalism on the industrial landscape of her native Glasgow, bringing a sense of romanticism to the decay. Until 13 May, 3 Seymour Place, W1H, thompsonsgallery.co.uk

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sudden rain times square, 2017, douglas gray, oil, 16 x 24in, ©Thompson’s Gallery

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Regulars

SPOTLIGHT The art of construction

in Britain. His group’s commissions included the Penguin Pool at London Zoo (interpreted by Havsteen-Mikkelsen in his 2015 painting I Will Meet You Halfway), as well as the now Grade I-listed Highpoint development in Highgate, and Finsbury Health Centre, which at the time it was built presented a utopian ideal of accessible healthcare

Fitzrovia’s FOLD gallery focuses on presenting in-depth solo exhibitions from emerging to mid-career artists, whose work challenges conventions. The title of its latest show – Tectonical – might bring to mind moving plates, boiling magma, volcanoes and other geological processes relating to earth’s structure, but tectonics is also a term used in the field of architecture. With tectonics defined by the gallery as ‘the science or art of construction, both in relation to use, and artistic design’, the exhibition showcases work by two artists, Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen and Florian Schmidt that explores how architecture is assimilated into the modern world. Havsteen-Mikkelsen’s work brings a poetic and painterly perspective to the physical realm of construction. His stark paintings are largely inspired by photography and models of real structures, as well as by the work of the Tecton Group and one of its founders, Russian émigré Berthold Lubetkin. Lubetkin was influenced by Russian Constructivism and pioneered Modernist design

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Russian émigré Berthold Lubetkin pioneered Modernist design in Britain

clockwise from top left: Keeping My Head Outside The Mud, Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen, 2016, 55 x 70cm, Oil on canvas; Matrix, Asmund HavsteenMikkelsen, 2013, 120 x 180cm, Oil on canvas; Untitled (Concurrent) 03, florian schmidt, 2015, 114 x 74 x 24cm Acrylic, lacquer, vinyl, cardboard, canvas and wood

in a pre-NHS era. Schmidt’s work on the other hand, traverses the oeuvre of art history more broadly, employing the artistic language of abstraction and realism in his two- and three-dimensional pieces. Geometric shapes, often in cardboard or wood, emerge in layers from the canvas, lending an architectural aspect to the paintings. 28 April – 3 June, 158 New Cavendish Street, W1W, foldgallery.com

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BEEF UP YOUR WEEK 23 April - 1 May

To celebrate Great British Beef Week we are showcasing the best of British beef cuts in specially designed dishes and set menus throughout our Cubitt House pubs.

cubitthouse.co.uk


Emma donoghue Šandrew bainbridge, 2010

Room

for one more Oscar-nominated for the screenplay of her critically acclaimed novel Room, author Emma Donoghue is reinterpreting the story yet again for the stage this summer, writes Kari Colmans


INTERVIEW

“P

eople move around the world so much, things get lost,” writes Ireland-born Canada-based author Emma Donoghue in her 2010 mega-hit Room. In the book, kidnapped teenager Ma’s world consists of an outhouse, where she is confined for seven years by her captor Old Nick, together with their five-year-old son, Jack. Released not long after the horrors of the Josef Fritzl case came to light, the book – and then the film – isn’t an all-out horror story, but at its core a beautiful, harrowing tale of resilience, love and childhood. Donoghue wrote the screenplay before the novel was even published (the film clocked up a handful of industry awards and nominations, as well as the Oscar for Best Actress for Brie Larson). With songs by Scottish songwriter Kathryn Joseph and Cora Bissett, who is also director, the stage version will be a surprise interpretation for some. But Donoghue insists that it won’t be as much of a departure from the book (and the film) as it sounds, and fans of both can expect the third instalment to be as powerful as its predecessors. I always had a feeling that Room was going to be more successful than my other books. It’s been printed in a number of languages so I’ve seen it resonate with people from so many different cultures, which has been an unexpected thrill. The story has a universal core. Everybody’s childhoods are smaller than their adult lives. We all start out in one place, in the family we’re born into, with no control over our circumstances, before growing up and moving out into the bigger world. While the horror of Jack and Ma’s story isn’t an everyday one, I think people can relate it to their own experiences of moving from childhood to adulthood. I was inspired by the Fritzl case but also by having two children. I had them in very good circumstances but I still found it claustrophobic at times, like any parent. I liked the idea of putting very ordinary tenets of parenthood into a dramatic storyline so that we could see how heroic it is. Room is a natural story for theatre. Not because it’s set in one place, for the most part, but because it’s about improvising. Like Jack and Ma, who, because of their circumstances, are forced to play and use their imagination, turning objects into other things. The situation itself could be described as theatre, so in many ways it’s even more natural [than a film adaption]. I had never thought of adding songs before. Cora has such a vibrant musical background, so when she suggested the

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idea of combining theatre with music I agreed that song was an amazing way for Ma and Jack to share the things they couldn’t say – the equivalent of a stream of consciousness. I go out of my way not to have a defining writing style. It must be nice for your writing to be instantly recognisable but then you run the risk of repeating yourself and all of your books blurring into one. I try to stay in the background. I like it when people say, ‘oh, did you write that too?’. I’m a big planner when it comes to actually sitting down and writing. I try to find time wherever I go and to not be precious about it. I’ll work outside my daughter’s choir class or in the car outside tennis club. I work on trains, buses, planes and in hotel rooms… I tend to be pragmatic about it. I don’t need a special pen or music or anything like that. I do a lot of writing while walking on a treadmill, it’s the only way I can incorporate a few hours of exercise. As well as adapting Room for the theatre, I’ve also released a children’s book called The Lotterys Plus One. It’s my first book for a younger audience. It’s about a big crazy family. They’re eccentric lottery winners who are very eco-friendly so they’re always scavenging in bins. I’m hoping to write quite a few books about them. I’m also doing lots of film and TV work. Being nominated for an Oscar for the Room screenplay opened up the door for me to adapt other people’s work for the screen. I’m slightly more detached when it’s not my own book but I’m sensitive to the author because I know exactly what it’s like for them. I’m always on their side. Emily Dickinson, the Brontës and Jane Austen inspired me growing up. I wanted to be a writer from the age of seven, but I always assumed I couldn’t do it full time. I thought I’d have a real job and write on the side, so I can’t believe my luck. If you love it enough, you can find the time. You could write a novel on the Tube on the way to work if you really wanted to. I’m forever reading things and wishing I’d written them. Everything I’ve ever read by Sarah Waters I think, ‘damn why wasn’t that me!’ I’ve just re-read Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch, which was even better the second time. The way she describes a tree or a moment – I could never ever do that. But my jealousy evaporates because I’m just glad somebody wrote it. Room runs from 2 May – 3 June at Theatre Royal Stratford East, stratfordeast.com; The Lotterys Plus One, published by Pan Macmillan, £10.99 hardback, is out now

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London Craft Week

As the third instalment of the citywide celebration of craftsmanship kicks off, Lauren Romano rounds up when and where to catch unknown artisans and celebrated masters alike at work

Selfridges

The Wallace Collection All that glistens is not gold, but it could be gilded bronze. Discover more about the technique and marvel at 18th century decorative objects that once furnished the mantelpieces of Marie Antoinette and George IV on a private tour of The Wallace Collection’s latest exhibition, Gilded Interiors. Free, booking essential, 5 May, 8.45-10am, Hertford House, Manchester Square, W1U, wallacecollection.org

Sunspel Textile artist Katherine May combed the Sunspel factory for discarded material scraps and offcuts to create a wall hanging, which will be displayed in the Chiltern Street store this month. May will be sharing the secrets to fashioning art forms from fabric during a Q&A held on the shop floor, while those who aren’t a dab hand with a needle and thread can shop Sunspel’s latest collection of cotton jersey basics. Free, booking essential, 4 May, 6-9pm, 13-15 Chiltern Street, W1U, sunspel.com

What makes a house a home? In a bid to find out, Selfridges has constructed a 3,000 sq ft dwelling in collaboration with The New Craftsmen named A Home for All. Guests to the in-store installation will need to take off their shoes and switch off their phones on entering the immersive environment, which celebrates domestic rituals. Pull up a chair at the kitchen table to knead sourdough bread, mill grain and, erm, peel potatoes. Happy homemaking. Free, booking essential 3-7 May, 12-6pm, 400 Oxford Street, W1A, selfridges.com; thenewcraftsmen.com

A HOME FOR ALL, A CONCEPTUAL HOUSE IN COLLABORATION WITH THE NEW CRAFTSMEN

ABOVE: ADAM ROSS CERAMICS, FROM £45; BELOW: IVA POLACHOVA VESSEL, FROM THE IN MOVEMENT COLLECTION


FEATURE

Cire Trudon Cire Trudon has been crafting the finest wicks and tallows since 1643. Its candle catalogue spans church tapers, wax busts and scented votives that come in an array of unusual fragrances. Find out if you hold a torch for the likes of Ernesto (leather and tobacco) or Solis Rex, which is meant to call to mind the scent of the wooden floors at the Palace of Versailles, during this illuminating talk with the Cire Trudon chandlers. From £15, 3 May, 6.30-9pm, 36 Chiltern Street, W1U, trudon.com

CIRE TRUDON, image credit: paul raeside

Perfumer H Perfumer Lyn Harris (above), of Perfumer H, and Tim d’Offay, founder of Postcard Teas, join forces (and noses) for an evening of olfactory memories shared over a cuppa. Speaking of tea, the pair recently collaborated to blend a scented brew, which you can sample on the evening – or throughout the week at both Perfumer H and Postcard Teas’ shop on Dering Street. Talk from £15, booking essential, 4 May, 6pm; tea tasting 3-6 May, 10am-5pm, 106a Crawford Street, W1H, perfumerh.com

RIGHT: EMILY KIDSON, BROOCH; BELOW: KAZUHITO TAKADOI, MISSING 3, BOTH COURTESY OF JAGGEDART

Jaggedart The art of craft is the subject of Jaggedart’s latest group exhibition Cabinet of Curiosities. Expect intricate papercuts from Charlotte Hodes, jewellery fashioned from layered pages of old books by Jeremy May and three-dimensional shapes by Kazuhito Takadoi (pictured, left), fashioned from grasses and twigs grown in his garden. Free, 3-5 May, 11am-6pm, 6 May, 11am-2pm, 28a Devonshire Street, W1G, jaggedart.com s l u x u ry l o n d o n . c o. u k s

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IMAGE COURTESY OF BURBERRY

THE LOEWE SALON AT LIBERTY

Burberry

Liberty

Mark the return of the mac season with a trip to Burberry, where you can initial a signature heritage trench coat in goldwork cording (for a limited time only) as an archivist talks you through 160 years of the brand’s history. If this puts you in a monogramming mood, you can also add a handwritten design to a cashmere scarf with a little help from the in-store calligrapher. 5 May, 10am-8pm, 6 May 10am-12pm, 7 May, 12-6pm, 121 Regent Street, W1B, burberry.com

Jonathan Anderson has taken over the fourth floor at Liberty with his curated display Loewe: This is Home, a range of products influenced by various disciplines. Anderson’s so-called ‘craft landscape’ includes a collection of traditional carpentry and knitted murals, as well as oak pieces made by heritage furniture maker Robert Thompson’s Craftsmen Ltd. Free, exhibition 3-6 May, 10am-8pm, 7 May, 12-6pm; demonstrations 5-6 May, 11am-1.30pm, 4.30pm-7pm, 4th Floor, Regent Street, W1B, libertylondon.com; loewe.com

Charlotte Street Hotel As anyone who has ever stayed in a Firmdale Hotel will know, co-founder and design director Kit Kemp’s whimsical motifs and riot of colour are a treat for the eyes. Now Kemp has collaborated with designer Melissa White to give the Loft Suite at the Charlotte Street Hotel a makeover. The design duo will be on hand at the launch party, so you can quiz them about the soft furnishings and wall murals over a glass of champagne. Tickets from £15, booking essential, 3 May, 6-9pm, 15-17 Charlotte Street, W1T, firmdalehotels.com; melissawhite.co.uk THE LOFT SUITE AT CHARLOTTE STREET HOTEL, image credit: simon brown


FEATURE

Skandium There’s more to throwing a dinner party Danish style than herring and hygge, as designer and ceramicist Christine Roland explains during her talk on Nordic traditions at Skandium. Guests can also get some inspiration for their table decorations thanks to her dinner service installation, named a Dark Danish Dinner, which features stoneware and porcelain ceramics. Pass the schnapps. Free, booking essential, 4 May, 6-8pm; installation 3-7 May, 10am-6pm, 86 Marylebone High Street, W1U, skandium.com

Republic of Fritz Hansen

THE COSTUME ARCHIVE AT RADA

Fife-based design studio Tom Pigeon is best known for its graphic prints and textiles, having created pieces for The Barbican, Tate Modern and the V&A in the past. This month it branches out into wood and metalwork, with Shipwreck, an exhibition of objects and artworks at Fritz Hansen that mimic the flotsam and jetsam washed up on the beaches of Scotland. Free, exhibition 3-7 May, 10.30-5pm; talk, booking essential, 3 May, 6pm, 13-14 Margaret Street, W1W, fritzhansen.com; tompigeon.com

Royal Academy of Dramatic Art One for dressing-up lovers or budding thespians, the costume department at RADA flings open its doors for a behind-thescenes guided tour, led by head of costume Diane Favell and prop master Deryk Cropper. Tickets from ÂŁ15, 3 May, 3pm, 62-64 Gower Street, WC1E, rada.ac.uk

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“THE FRENCH TOUCH IN INTERIOR DESIGN”

Email: e.s@emmanuellesirven.com Tel: +44 (0)7748 098 578

www.emmanuellesirven.com


INTERVIEW

Below: lee broom, image credit: jermaine francis; right: opticality for London design festival 2016, image credit: luke hayes

Y Jumping the

BROOM A decade after his debut collection, Lee Broom is marking the anniversary with a Wedgwood collaboration and a ten-piece anniversary showcase. The product designer reflects on the pivotal year with Kari Colmans

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ou may not necessarily know you’re a Lee Broom fan. But if you’ve been sprucing up your living room, or even just perusing Pinterest, chances are you will have fallen for one of his designs – be it a crescent chandelier or hanging hoop chair – without even knowing it. With his conceptual creations ingrained in the last decade’s interior design psyche, many will be surprised to learn that the company is only ten years young. “I wanted to create a design brand first and foremost,” says 41-year-old Broom, who is in the middle of putting the final touches to his ten-piece anniversary collection when we speak. “When I launched it, most of my peers were designing for other brands, but for me it was about opening up, creating and owning the whole experience from start to finish: from the inception of the design to it landing on someone’s doorstep. I think we have achieved it and more.” Broom is one of the country’s most high-profile product designers. Over the past decade he has released more than 100 pieces manufactured under his own label, as well as numerous products for other brands and more than 45 commercial retail, restaurant, bar and residential interiors. His smattering of accolades spans the British Designer of the Year Award in 2011, as well as four nods in three years at the same awards, including one for his renowned lighting product, the Crystal Bulb. His trophy cabinet also features a Queen’s Award for Enterprise – the UK’s

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“The idea was to focus on reinterpretations for a more modern audience�

wedgwood by lee broom, image credit: michael bodiam


INTERVIEW

lee broom at the wedgwood factory, barlaston, stoke-on-trent

highest accolade for business success – in the category of International Trade. “Receiving that award at Buckingham Palace was a very special moment,” he says. With a background in theatre and fashion, Broom previously worked under Vivienne Westwood (after winning Young Fashion Designer of the Year) and went on to study for a degree in fashion design at Central Saint Martins. He still takes inspiration from the sartorial world (The Guardian commented that “Lee Broom is to furniture what Marc Jacobs or Tom Ford are to fashion”) and has collaborated with a number of brands including Christian Louboutin, Mulberry and Matthew Williamson. “Growing up I was a huge fan of Vivienne Westwood, but also John Galliano and Jean-Paul Gaultier,” he says. “I was incredibly passionate about theatrical fashion designers and the visuals and techniques they created.” The move to products was an organic one. His first collection, Neo Neon in 2007, stemmed from advising a number of bars on interior design. Since then, including two collections in 2008, Broom is not so much pausing to take stock, but jumping back on the merry-go-round. He’s currently presiding over his anniversary collection, Time Machine: a ten-piece range of Lee Broom hero products re-imagined in an all-white palette. By the time you read this, he will have just presented them at Salone del Mobile in Milan. “I wanted to look back to pieces we

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had created over the past decade, but also to do something different,” he says. “I’m not always a fan of looking back; when I release new collections, I usually move forward. I thought if I was going to do that, then I wanted to reinvent the pieces, and to create new versions of them.” The show was staged in a derelict vault inside the Milano Centrale station, a vast concourse that hadn’t been used by the public in more than 30 years. “That really appealed to me. After seeing the space I decided to present the collection on an all-white rotating fairground carousel. It’s quite a modernist, theatrical presentation,” he adds. Broom’s favourite pieces are always his latest, but he names the solid Carrara marble grandfather clock with polished brass detailing as his most impressive, which is the only totally new product among the reimagined versions of Bright On Bistro, Carpetry Console, Crystal Bulb and Drunken Side Table. “I chose a grandfather clock because as well as marking the passing of time, people often give clocks or watches to signify a special occasion. It felt like an appropriate product to present, but it’s a totally contemporary version.” It’s been a busy year for Broom, not least because his company has expanded stateside to New York. Then there’s the small matter of his collaboration with the 250-year-old English heritage brand Wedgwood to reimagine its iconic Jasperware. He tells me he was attracted to the timeless black and white stripes of the Panther Vase for its sense of modernity, and used this as a starting point for the collection. He combined the graphic stripe with postmodern elements and introduced vibrant colours and glossy lacquered textures, which juxtapose the matte finish of the traditional Jasperware. “I think a lot of people are familiar with that product; they’ve seen it in their parents’ or grandparents’ homes,

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THIS IMAGE AND RIGHT: TIME MACHINE COLLECTION AT SALON DEL MOBILE 2017, IMAGE CREDIT: LUKE HAYES; BELOW: TIME MACHINE GRANDFATHER CLOCK, IMAGE CREDIT: ARTHUR WOODCROFT

especially the blue and white pieces with ornamentation that were invented in the 1700s. The idea was to focus on reinterpretations for a more modern audience,” he explains. “With my own experience of working with craftspeople in crystal and marble, going back to traditional techniques was a really good fit. I think the designs strike a good balance between the Wedgwood archive and my own aesthetic.” It’s clear from the way he speaks that Broom lives and breathes design. His home, a south London apartment in which he’s lived for more than 12 years, is a converted fire station that dates back to the 1800s. “It still has the tower on the top of the building where you could look out across London for fires and then ring the bell for the horse-drawn carriages below. It’s a very old industrial building, but my apartment is quite open plan with a few architectural details to it.” It’s also home to much of his work. “It almost acts as an extension of our showroom. It’s

constantly evolving. When we’ve created a new product, I take it to my apartment in the prototype stage and put it in the space and live with it for a period of time to see how it reacts. It’s important that things don’t just look good in the showroom but that they work in people’s homes.” Broom and his partner also love to collect art. He’s a big fan of Pop, Surrealist and Cubist art as well as photography and anything Art Deco. He describes his favourite piece by the artist Keith Haring, who painted the back of three leather jackets (for himself, his partner and Madonna).

“It’s important to surround yourself with things that make you feel happy and comfortable” He found Madonna’s in the I. Brewster gallery in Philadelphia many years ago and brought it back home where it hangs on the wall “very casually”, even though it’s actually very rare. “It’s important to surround yourself with things that make you feel happy and comfortable,” he says. “Your home should reflect your personality.” I ask if he could have designed one famous piece of furniture, which would it be? He names the Bentwood chair by Thonet, although he did include a reinterpretation of it in one of his first furniture collections, where he adorned the silhouette in neon lighting to accentuate the flowing lines. “I think people often take that chair for granted because they see it so often in cafés. But if you actually look at it as a piece of furniture, it’s an incredible design and the basis for a lot of modern chairs.” Pausing to celebrate the past ten years, I wonder what the next decade holds for him – a


INTERVIEW

return to fashion, perhaps? He says no, although he wouldn’t be averse to a jewellery collaboration (if you were to look inside his sketchbook, you’d find jewellery designs doodled in every margin). “The boundaries between the different types of design – art, fashion, industrial and decorative – has tended to blur a little more over the past decade, which is healthy. But

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who knows, things have a habit of developing quite organically and I have a habit of seizing opportunities as they come.” The Wedgwood by Lee Broom collection from £7,500 is available exclusively at Harrods in numbers of 15 per piece, as part of the Harrods’ Art Partners initiative. Lee Broom’s Time Machine collection is now available on a made-to-order basis, leebroom.com

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PINS & NEEDLES You might not know the name behind the needlework, but Hand & Lock has embroidered and embellished the attire of Hollywood royalty and nobility alike. Melissa Emerson visits the firm’s Fitzrovia atelier to meet the young head designer keeping its 250-year heritage alive

A

lthough unassuming from the outside, the sense of history is tangible in Hand & Lock’s Fitzrovia atelier. A glass case of military badges and a signed, handwritten letter from Cecil Beaton are framed on the wall, and a towering stack of old wooden drawers with a web of loose threads spilling out stands against another. I’m greeted by youthful head designer Scott Gordon Heron. We pass through the studio of equally young embroiderers; it’s a surprise to say the least. “No little old ladies in sight,” his colleague laughs, telling me that everyone (except the chairman) is 30 and under. The Hand & Lock story began a few hundred years ago, when French Huguenot refugee and lacemaker M.Hand arrived in London in 1767, plying his trade to tailors. “He wove wire into what anyone else might recognise as metallic ribbon, but actually it’s a lace that’s used in military uniforms,” Heron explains. Having successfully mastered this, Hand began to embroider with gold wire, a specialism the house still practises today in its 250th anniversary year. Expertise in couture was added to the mix when the firm merged with S. Lock & Co in 2001. Founded by Stanley S. Lock, who took over his employer’s embroidery couture business CE Phillips & Co in the 1950s, its clients included Sir Norman Hartnell, Christian Dior and the royal family, who honoured the company with a royal warrant in 1972. It appears Heron was destined to follow in Mr Hand and Mr Lock’s enterprising footsteps. “I’ve always loved painting and drawing and expressing myself through image,” he says. “I thought I’d be a printer or a fashion designer, but all my

teachers told me I was an embroiderer. A school trip to the Première Vision textile trade show in Paris proved to be a huge eye-opener. “Everyone I meet today appreciates embroidery for its beauty and history, and how meticulous it is. It’s a skill that you can’t just learn in a day and that’s what has always fuelled my passion.” Over the last seven years, Heron has worked his way up from design assistant to head designer, although these days he doesn’t get to do quite as much embroidery as he’d like. “I love how repetitive it is. It’s like meditating in a way, doing the same thing continuously,” he says. “I enjoy working with silks and silk shading, but it’s hard to be a designer and an embroiderer at the same time in this industry.” Heron is largely responsible for producing the drawings that form a crucial part of the making process. “They’re used by the designer to help the embroiderer understand what to do,” he tells me. “The artwork needs to be really clear and concise because it’s the tool that we use to communicate. The drafts are annotated with abbreviations of what techniques and materials to use where and when.” Such precision is key when working with luxurious fabrics. “The lace we work with can be extraordinarily expensive if it has a really high gold or silver content. I’m currently working with handwoven damask silk from Italy for a commission, which costs £200 a metre. One of our most opulent commissions was a buckle for a Malaysian monarch three years ago that had goodness knows how many diamonds on it,” he adds. The drawings are also of great value and are carefully head designer scott gordon heron, image courtesy of hand & Lock


FEATURE

image courtesy of Sarah Raymond

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FEATURE

left: image courtesy of sarah raymond; above and right: images courtesy of hand & Lock; below left: image courtesy of aspinal of london

“ The ornamentation and embellishment of textiles comes naturally to the human race” archived. “All of the drafts we produce are like blueprints. Even if it’s just a monogram, we archive it because we might need to make it in exactly the same way as we did before,” Heron says, adding that this is particularly important for royal coats of arms and military insignia. “We’ve produced important work for big national events like Jubilees and royal weddings. It’s great to be a part of that – you feel very proud.” He explains that the regal and the ceremonial arm of the business, with its rules and regulations, is balanced by the creative freedom of contemporary projects across fashion, interiors, film and theatre. “One day you could be designing a coat of arms for the Queen to wear on Maundy Thursday, and the day after, you’re embroidering a swear word for an artist on a piece of sparkly fabric,” he laughs. “The principles of embroidery stay the same, it just happens to be in a different context.” As we chat about the fashion arm of the business, I learn the house has collaborated with Louis Vuitton, Mary Katrantzou and most recently Burberry for its A/W17 show. “It’s more difficult to break through the barrier into fashion because it’s such a secretive industry. Fashion designers don’t always credit the textile

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manufacturers or embroiderers they work with,” Heron says. Contemporary fashion might be helping to bring the craft back into the limelight, but Heron points to its popularity throughout history. “It’s always been there. After food, water and shelter, textiles are a necessity, and I think the ornamentation and embellishment of textiles comes naturally to the human race. I don’t think that desire will ever die out.” Part of that desire, he believes, is to do with storytelling. “What’s really wonderful about textiles is that they form a kind of dialogue of human anthropology. You can look at a piece of embroidery and recognise the era it’s from. You can document what’s gone on, and that’s really special.” Today, much of that documenting takes place on social media. “If you think about Instagram, everybody wants to tell the world who they are, and the idea of personalisation is so integral to that. A patch or a monogram is the perfect accessory to take a photo with,” he says. Increasing embroidery’s appeal to a contemporary audience is a key part of this year’s anniversary celebrations, which include a special collaboration, The Embellished Handbag: A Celebration of 250 Years of Fashion and Embroidery. Thirteen fashion brands such as House of Holland, Vivienne Westwood and Aspinal of London (left) have created an embroidered bag to be included in a Hand & Lock exhibition, which will tour Sydney and Chicago before arriving in London in July. But it’s not just the catwalk and the high street where embroidery is enjoying a resurgence. “Performance textiles and embroidered structures can be used to regulate the heart beat, open arteries, and even help skin heal,” Heron enthuses. From the high-tech to the handstitched, the art form shows no sign of dying out. And in Fitzrovia, the young and passionate team is ready to carry the Hand & Lock banner into the next 250 years. 86 Margaret Street, W1W, handembroidery.com

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ORIGINAL, LIMITED-EDITION ART DECO POSTERS

Limited to editions of 280, our newly-commissioned Art Deco posters feature glamorous holiday destinations around the world, ski resorts in the Austrian, French and Swiss Alps, and the world’s greatest historic automobiles. Over 100 designs to choose from, all printed on 100% cotton fine art paper, measuring 97 x 65 cms.

Priced at £395 each.

Private commissions are also welcome.

Pullman Editions Ltd 94 Pimlico Road Chelsea London SW1W 8PL www.pullmaneditions.com Tel: +44 (0)20 7730 0547 Email: georgina@pullmaneditions.com

Our central London gallery

All images and text copyright © Pullman Editions Ltd. 2017

View and buy online at w w w.pullmaneditions.com Pullman Ed-M-F.indd 1

06/04/2017 21:04


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COLLECTION

Flying Colours

A

ware that the 21st-century woman cannot be pinned down to a single definition, Piaget chose five colours to represent the multi-faceted lives of women today. The result is an updated version of its 25-year-old Possession line, comprising malachite, lapis lazuli, onyx, turquoise and carnelian stones. Piaget called on model and entrepreneur Olivia Palermo to star in the new campaign and film. “I think women in this day and age should be more supportive of each other than ever, and give each other a great platform and stability,” she comments. From £990 to £11,200, piaget.com

Olivia Palermo, Piaget brand ambassador, wears a selection of fine jewellery from the Piaget Possession collection, piaget.com

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BASELWORLD 2017

watch wish list An industry in consolidation mode is good news for punters, says Richard brown, as watchmakers focus attention on more affordable collections

A pair of unlikely bedfellows It costs a watchmaker millions of pounds to launch a new movement. Hence why many brands that survived the quartz crisis of the 1970s grew reliant on calibres from third-party suppliers, most notably from Swatch Group-subsidiary ETA. When, in 2002, Swatch chief Nicolas Hayek Jr. announced plans to restrict the flow of movements to companies outside his own portfolio, brands were forced to invest in becoming more self-reliant. Thus the industry’s prevailing obsession with the term ‘in-house’.

Industry consensus is that it costs around £13.5 million to procure the industrial machinery needed to mill the requisite parts of a movement. At trade price, a watchmaker will need to shift a lot of units to make that money back. Since a verticalised company will be capable of manufacturing more movements than it can possibly use itself, one idea is to sell to others. Perhaps this explains the initially eyebrow-raising partnership between Tudor and Breitling. Breitling granted Tudor access to its B01 base calibre, into which Tudor has incorporated its own rotor and regulating system. The movement, the MT5813, allows Tudor to update its Black Bay collection with a COSC-certified chronograph – at a fraction of the price it would have cost to develop a similar watch by itself. Tudor, going the other way, has let Breitling use its three-hand MT5612 movement inside the second-generation Superocean Heritage – essentially an upgrade from the previously used ETA 2824. As with the first edition, the second series is available in either 42mm or 46mm, both of which now include a scratch-resistant ceramic bezel. Given that for the last two years the watch industry has been shrinking, expect to see more mutually-beneficial partnerships in the future. breitling.com, tudorwatch.com

Above: Black Bay Chrono, £3,430, Tudor Left: Superocean Héritage II Chronographe 46, £4,830, Breitling


collection

Under the sea Until the 1960s, the maximum depth to which a diver could descend was around 60 metres. Any deeper, and pressurised gas decompressed in the body could cause air bubbles to block blood vessels. Saturation diving mitigates the risk of a sudden build-up of gas within the body through acclimatisation. Divers live for up to 28 days in pressurised chambers before they are transported underwater in closed ‘bells’ set at the same pressure. In 1992, a diver from the Compagnie Maritime d’Expertises, the NASA of underwater engineering, descended to 701 metres – a record that still stands. It is considered the maximum depth to which a human body can descend before it implodes. The fact that Rolex’s new Sea-Dweller (£8,350) is waterproof to 1,220 metres, then, is a tad irrelevant. Here’s guessing you’re more likely to pair yours with a business suit than a wetsuit, anyway. To mark the watch’s 50th birthday, Rolex has enlarged the Sea-Dweller to 43mm; equipped it with the latest-generation Calibre 3235 (accurate to two seconds a day); and for the very first time, fitted it with a Cyclops lens at three o’clock. Another feature likely to excite is the red ‘SeaDweller’ inscription, a reference to the 1967 forebear. Red writing has become extremely valued among Rolex collectors. The ‘Double Red’ Sea-Dwellers produced between 1967 and 1977, with two lines on the dial, typically sell on the pre-owned market for far more than their white-text counterparts. rolex.com

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Clockwise from top left: SeaDweller 904L steel; The Bathyscaphe Trieste, ©Thomas J. Abercrombie/ National Geographic; the original 1967 Sea-Dweller (left) and Sea-Dweller 904L steel (right); James Cameron wearing a SeaDweller, ©Mark Thiessen/National Geographic;

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Three is the magic number A tie-in between horological exhibitionist Hublot, sartorial superpower Rubinacci and Lapo Elkann, grandson of Gianni Agnelli, former Fiat chief and style deity of the 21st-century, was always likely to yield something rather dapper. The result is six 45mm Classic Fusion chronographs – two in ceramic, two in titanium, two in gold – that feature dials and straps made from a selection of prints (houndstooth, squared weaves and Prince of Wales check). Handpicked from the 60,000 square metres of cloth in Rubinacci’s archive, the selected fabrics date back to the 1970s. Classic Fusion Italia Independent collection, from £12,500, hublot.com

Power play By the late 1970s, Oris had clocked up 279 in-house calibres and was one of Switzerland’s largest movement manufacturers, producing as many as 1.2 million watches and clocks a year. Following the quartz crisis, it became dependent on third-party suppliers until, in 2014, the watchmaker developed its first fully-fledged movement for almost 40 years. To celebrate the company’s 110th anniversary, the Calibre 110 boasted a then industry-beating ten-day power reserve. Just another three years later, Oris presents the Calibre 113, updated by way of a calendar that shows the day, date, week and month of the year. Again, the watch will run for ten days before it requires winding by hand. £4,780, oris.ch

Shining bright At Baselworld 1997, Patek Philippe expanded its sports watch offering with the Aquanaut. A commercially savvy way of providing access to the Nautilus, it quickly became one of Patek’s best-selling watch models. To mark its 20th anniversary, the brand has launched the Ref. 5168G in 18-carat white gold – the first Aquanaut to be delivered in this precious metal. With a diameter of 42mm, it is the largest model in the Aquanaut family, paying tribute to the original 1976 Nautilus of the same size, a timepiece that continues to go by the nickname ‘Jumbo’ among Patek collectors. The watch is water-resistant to a depth of 120 metres, while a Super-LumiNova coating ensures that Arabic numerals are visible in the dark. Inside, the self-winding

calibre 324 S C, visible through a sapphire-crystal case back, is just 3.3mm in height, making for a timepiece that is only 8.25mm thick. £27,990, patek.com


collection

Vintage Appeal Faced with a turbulent economic climate, watchmakers are revisiting their back catalogues and reissuing rock-steady classics

Old School Chronographs Chronomaster Heritage 146, £5,500, Zenith

Autavia, £3,900, TAG Heuer

Arriving just before Baselworld, Zenith’s Chronomaster Heritage 146 acted as a precursor to the raft of retro revivals we’d see at the show. The big news here is that the modern Heritage 146 chronograph is now equipped with Zenith’s legendary El Primero movement – the world’s first (1969), and still the most accurate series-produced automatic chronograph calibre. zenith-watches.com

Last year, digitally savvy TAG Heuer devotees voted for their favourite Autavia model from 16 first generation pieces from the 1960s. The Autavia Ref. 2446 Mark 3, won out and, so, this year makes a comeback. Today’s Autavia has been modernised with a larger 42mm case and the latest self-winding movement from TAG. tagheuer.com

Retro Dive Watches Tribute to Fifty Fathoms MIL-SPEC, £10,310, Blancpain Arriving in 1953, Blancpain’s Fifty Fathoms beat both the Rolex Submariner and the Omega Seamaster to become the world’s first bona-fide, series-produced dive watch. In 1957, the Fifty Fathoms MIL-SPEC 1 incorporated a circular water-tightness indicator that would turn from white to red should water penetrate the case. Now, it comes along with a unidirectional rotating bezel covered in scratch-resistant sapphire. blancpain.com

Hi-Beat 36000 Professional 600m Diver’s, €12,000, Grand Seiko While this watch’s hobnail dial, contrasting bezel and circular hour marks may hark back to the golden era of dive watch design, the Hi-Beat 36000 Professional 600m

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Diver’s is actually the first professional diver’s watch from Grand Seiko. It is equipped with a hi-beat automatic calibre and a valve-free helium resistant system. seiko.co.uk

Speedmaster Limited Edition, £5,360, Omega When the Speedmaster arrived in 1957, it was the first chronograph to feature a tachymeter scale on its bezel rather than on its dial. Sixty years later, it is reborn with the brand’s manual-wind 1861 movement and a black ‘tropical’ dial. Only 3,557 will be produced. omegawatches.com

HyperChrome Captain Cook, £1,430, Rado Think Rado and most likely something sleek, slim-line and ceramic will pop into your head. Back in 1962, however, it unveiled the Captain Cook, a playful yet neat 37mm diver’s watch with oversized indexes and chunky arrow-shaped hands. Playing tribute, Rado has re-launched the model, sticking with the original size. rado.com

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The Grand Phoenix ruby necklace, featuring 24 perfectly matched natural Burmese rubies totalling 59.83 carats and 100.21 carats of diamonds, POA, Faidee

BASELWORLD 2017

show

Best in

Olivia sharpe seeks out the latest jewellery trends and discovers fresh feats of craftsmanship

I

t is with some trepidation that I start to write a Baselworld round-up each year. The reason is that I never quite know where to begin. With more than 2,000 stands at the eight-day event, it all becomes a bit of a blur (not simply because of the copious amounts of champagne). This year marked the 100th anniversary of the fair. However, rather than celebrating in typically ostentatious style, there was a more subdued note in the air. With last year’s falling sales in the luxury sector and predictions of an economic downturn on the horizon, this had a knock-on effect: according to Forbes, exhibitor numbers reportedly dropped 13.3 per cent, to 1,300. Following this, the organisers announced it would be reducing the number of days by two for next year’s edition.

Given such news, it is hard not to feel gloomy, but brands are simply having to rethink their strategies. Rather than using Baselworld as the moment to showcase their most record-breaking priced pieces, some exhibitors were emphasising affordability and wearability. The buzzword is millenials and by targeting them with attractive entry-level collections, brands hope to weather the storm. The emphasis was on quality, not quantity. Of course, there were still plenty of showstopping pieces, including the astronomical $35 million ruby necklace by Faidee (pictured above). Named The Grand Phoenix, it stole the show in one fell swoop. With this and other pieces to uplift visitors’ spirits, there is no reason not to feel positive. Here’s to the next 100 years.


collection

Entry point Case in point for enticing millenials with entrylevel pieces was luxury pearl jeweller Yoko London – its new pieces start from £1,000. Fabergé showcased its accessible engagement ring collection, which launched at the end of last year and allows clients to enter the world of this historic and opulent jewellery house for £5,000. Elsewhere, Lebanese jeweller Yeprem argued that it’s never too early to get hooked on diamonds, with prices starting at £1,700. Finally, Chopard gave its Happy Diamonds collection a refresh with the more affordable material malachite. chopard.com, faberge.com, yepremjewellery.com, yokolondon.com

Clockwise from left: Happy Diamonds bangle in 18-carat rose gold with malachite, £2,400 and in 18-carat rose gold with diamonds, £4,390, both Chopard; Novus South Sea pearl ring, £6,000, Yoko London; Ruby rose gold fluted ring, £8,455, Fabergé; Pendulum pearl earrings, £1,500, Yoko London; Gold bracelet with round and marquise-cut diamonds, £4,100, Yeprem

History in the making

from left: Dior VIII Grand Bal Plissé Ruban, 36mm, £16,250, Dior; Mademoiselle Privé Décor Aubazine in 18-karat white gold with brilliant- and baguette-cut diamonds on a black satin strap, POA, limited edition of five pieces, Chanel; Boy.Friend Tweed Beige Gold in 18-karat beige gold with 62 brilliant-cut diamonds, POA, Chanel

In tough times, a brand will often stress its history as sure signs of stability. This year, Chanel has commemorated its founder through its Mademoiselle Privé collection. The Décor Aubazine timepiece is inspired by the windows of the orphanage that Coco Chanel spent her childhood, while the brand’s classic tweed is used for the first time on the Boy.Friend watch strap, woven in beige gold or black steel threads. Celebrating its 70th anniversary, Dior also pays tribute to its heritage. Launched in 2011, the Dior VIII Grand Bal watch collection honours its founder’s love of couture and lavish feasts, and now includes the Grand Bal Plissé Ruban, featuring a pleated design similar to that of a petticoat. chanel.com, dior.com

Clockwise from left: 22.70-carat black opal necklace with white South Sea cultured pearls and diamonds, POA, Mikimoto; Serpenti watch with green leather strap, POA, Bulgari; Classic Butterfly emerald pendant, POA, Graff Diamonds; Mystery of Muzo cuffs, POA, Jacob & Co; Butterfly Swirl ring, POA, Sutra Jewels; Jade earrings, prices from £1,260, Marco Bicego

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Green fingers Pantone’s Colour of the Year is ‘greenery’, and many at Baselworld presented their own take on the trend. Emeralds were a common sight, but some experimented with more unconventional stones, such as Italian jeweller Marco Bicego, which showed a pair of jade earrings with visible imperfections and inclusions. Arguably the most unusual was from Jacob & Co – a rare fancy intense green radiant-cut diamond ring. Its Mystery of Muzo cuffs also featured Colombian Muzo emeralds in the same vivid shade. marcobicego.com, jacobandco.com

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collection

HIGHLIGHTS Diamonds in the rough Messika made quite a statement, having upgraded its stand and positioning itself next to players such as Hermès and Graff, with a bed of roses outside its booth. It has launched a new high jewellery collection, Paris est une Fête, which pays tribute to the city’s cultural heyday in the 1920s. It sees the designer play with different diamond cuts: the Swinging necklace includes more than 2,500 diamonds, assembled using discreet elastic threads so the stones appear to float on the wearer. Another diamond jeweller worthy of a second mention is Yeprem. Loved by the likes of Rihanna and Madonna, the edgy jeweller made its debut into watches with a high jewellery timepiece collection called Y-Memento. messika.com, yepremjewellery.com

Lydia Courteille The intrepid jeweller travelled to the Sahara and fell in love with its arid landscape. She captures its shades with Australian boulder opals and yellow sapphires. Sahara collection, POA, lydiacourteille.com from top: Swinging necklace; Swan asymmetric earrings, both POA, Messika; Y-Memento timepiece, POA, Yeprem Jewellery

High time There was a time when watchmakers got away with smattering ladies’ watches with diamonds and gemstones, covering up a lack of any proper mechanism. All this is fortunately behind us: today brands are seeking both style and substance. Chanel celebrated the 30th anniversary of its Première watch by launching the Première Camélia Skeleton. The calibre is the brand’s second stab at an in-house movement and masterfully bridges the gap between design and function. Harry Winston took us down memory lane with an update to its Avenue collection. It now arrives in Dual Time: a second time zone function designed for globetrotting women, or with a moon phase complication (one of the smallest of its kind on the market). Graff, meanwhile, brought out a new Mastergraff Floral Tourbillon for ladies. chanel.com, harrywinston.com, graffdiamonds.com Clockwise from top left: Avenue C™ Mini Moon Phase in 18-karat rose gold with 53 brilliant-cut diamonds on alligator leather strap, POA, Harry Winston; Première Camélia Skeleton in 18-karat white gold with brilliant-cut diamonds on a black satin strap, numbered edition, POA, Chanel; Mastergraff Floral Tourbillon, POA, Graff Diamonds

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Dolce & Gabbana Reminiscent of the enchanted flower in Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, the Rose high jewellery watch has enamel petals, while the leaves and stem are adorned with emeralds and tsavorite garnets. The dial is decorated with a pavé of diamonds. POA, dolcegabbana.com

Picchiotti Founder Giuseppe Picchiotti celebrated his brand’s 50th anniversary with a special ring. The 8.05-carat ruby L’Anfiteatro is inspired by an amphitheatre. “It is for the true connoisseur,” he describes, “an heirloom for an exceptional collection.” POA, picchiotti.it

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London’s most exclusive jet-set lifestyle event

11TH - 13TH MAY 2017 LONDON BIGGIN HILL AIRPORT

Tickets are limited. Book your place at www.theelitelondon.com


art

Strike up A

Aaron Kasmin, Cheers, 2016, Coloured pencil, 21 x 15cm, courtesy of Sims Reed Gallery

uthor F. Scott Fitzgerald would have surely approved of Sims Reed Gallery’s next exhibition, Up in Smoke: a collection of 28 pencil drawings by British artist Aaron Kasmin, inspired by American single matchbooks from the late 1920s to the early 1960s. The artist was inspired by his own Lion Match Company collection, made of examples originally mass produced as advertising. Each A4 or A5 sized drawing is for sale, from £850 to £2,000 – take your pick from post-prohibition era glamour to pure Americana. 17 May – 9 June, 43a Duke Street, St James’s, SW1Y, gallery.simsreed.com

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Photography by Levon Biss - www.microsculpture.net

Moooi presents a life extraordinary! Moooi London · 23 Great Titchfield Street · London, W1W 7PA Moooi Amsterdam · Westerstraat 187 · 1015 MA Amsterdam Moooi New York · 36 East 31st Street · New York, NY 10016 Moooi Tokyo · Three F 6-11-1 Minami Aoyama · Minato-ku, Tokyo www.moooi.com


ART

Jonathan Leaman Find the British artist’s latest paintings on show at Beaux Arts

Rebecca Louise Law’s site-specific floral wonderworlds have sprung up in Mayfair before, at the Royal Academy and J&M Davidson – her latest can now be found at Sake no Hana, Hakkasan’s Japanese sister restaurant. The tradition of celebrating the cherry blossom (sakura) season is known as hanami, for which Law has hung clouds of white flowers from the ceiling by copper wire. A special menu offers yuzu champagne miso salmon and a sakura-inspired mousse. A treat for all the senses. £37, until 10 June, 23 St James’s Street, SW1A, sakenohana.com

Art news

words: camilla apcar

clockwise from top: sake no hana; Jonathan Leaman, D’Adieu, 2012-2017, oil on canvas, 67 x 47 inches; Sam Francis, Evergreen Licks, 1987, acrylic on canvas, 152 x 183 cm, courtesy of Bernard Jacobson Gallery

All cherry well

Your 1995-1996 painting A Jan Steen Kitchen is part of Tate Modern’s collection. How has your work evolved since then? I’m always proud of what I’ve done, but I couldn’t do it again. I have changed a lot. I’m just older, I see the world as so much more complicated now. Where do you find inspiration? I try and look at the world and make use of it. The four pictures in this new exhibition took five years. It is a long process of creation. I’ve got pictures in my head and I just want to get them out. Why have you chosen to work in oil paint? It takes a long time, and when you go wrong you still have to wait for it to dry to correct it. I should paint much faster, but I just like to see what’s happening. What themes do your new paintings explore? They are about how the world lets you down, but is still wonderful – however you don’t understand that [at the time]. Life hurts you, but it is still extraordinary. Until 27 May, 48 Maddox Street, W1S, beauxartslondon.uk

Making a splash If your appetite for Abstract Expressionism was increased by the Royal Academy’s winter show, hone in on the late Californian artist Sam Francis at Bernard Jacobson Gallery. This retrospective takes in large s l u x u ry l o n d o n . c o. u k s

canvases and paper studies, with an inside track: the gallerist enjoyed a close friendship and worked with Francis for more than a decade. Until 27 May, 28 Duke Street, SW1Y, jacobsongallery.com 47


Elliott Erwitt, 2015

Michele De Lucchi - Giancarlo Fassina: Tolomeo


art

Prize lots Sold: £187,500

Sold: £106,250

Es t im a t e : £ 5 0 , 0 0 0 - £ 7 0 , 0 0 0

Es t im a t e : £ 5 0 , 0 0 0 - £ 8 0 , 0 0 0

Lightness of Being, Chris Levine, 2004 “Without doubt one of the most iconic images of Her Majesty, created by one of Britain’s most celebrated and progressive artists, this work came with impeccable provenance and is the largest version of the image that the photographer made. It was a real highlight, and brilliantly captured the strength and essence of British art, crafts and design over the course of the past century.” – Robin Cawdron-Stewart, head of sales and Modern British pictures specialist at Sotheby’s

UPCOMING

A lacquered brass bookcase, Geoffrey Bennison, c. 1974 The late Baron George Weidenfeld of Chelsea moved to London from his native Vienna before the outbreak of World War II, and co-founded the publishing house Weidenfeld & Nicolson. The notoriously private antiques dealer Geoffrey Bennison revamped Weidenfeld’s Chelsea apartment in the early 1970s, which Weidenfeld kept in almost exactly the same arrangement until he passed away last January – with the exception of his art and antique collection. Among his possessions that will be auctioned in May was a lacquered brass bookcase designed and supplied by Bennison himself. Estimate £2,500-£4,000, A Life of Ideals and Ideas: The Collection of the Lord Weidenfeld GBE, 18 May, christies.com s l u x u ry l o n d o n . c o. u k s

Sold, from left: Chris Levine, Lightness of Being, Unique pigment print, 128.3 x 102.3cm. Made in Britain at Sotheby’s, 5 April, sothebys.com, image courtesy of Sotheby’s Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton P.R.A., R.W.S., An Athlete Wrestling a Python, brown patina, 52.5cm high. Important Design at Bonhams New Bond Street, 5 April, bonhams.com, image courtesy of Bonhams Upcoming, from left: Geoffrey Bennison (designer and supplier), lacquered brass bookcase, c.1974, 370 x 150 x 27cm, image courtesy of Christie’s Wang Changming, Tears of the red candle, image courtesy of lyon & turnbull

An Athlete Wrestling a Python, Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton P.R.A., R.W.S. “It is unsurprising that this sculptural masterpiece achieved such a fine price. It depicts a dramatic life and death battle between two powerful forces, in a strikingly realistic way and is a one of a very limited edition of Leighton’s most iconic sculptures. The bronze has not been seen in public since 1934, having been part of the same family collection since then.” – Michael Lake, head of works of art and sculpture at Bonhams

UPCOMING

Tears of the Red Candle, Wang Changming This contemporary artist was born in Wuxi, near Shanghai, in 1964. His paintings feature juxtaposing symbols of traditional and modern China, reflecting the contradictions of the culture he grew up in. The wooden jewellery box in Tears of the Red Candle reveals a photograph of a Chinese woman in a Republic period costume; a nearly burnt out candle drips red wax; while what seems to be a drawer is in fact Lenin’s Selected Writings. Experts have related the composition to a line in a poem by Tang Dynasty poet Li Shangyin: “when the candle wax becomes ashes, tears shall stop”. Estimate £3,000-£5,000, Fine Asian Works of Art, 9 May, lyonandturnbull.com 49


In devilish detail There’s never a dull day at Ronald Phillips’ antique restoration workshop. Camilla Apcar discovers a concealed studio brimming with expertise and fine furniture

M

ayfair houses hidden treasures at every turn. On Bruton Street, 18th and 19th-century English antique furniture dealer Ronald Phillips has always had a restoration workshop its premises – but only those in the know will have caught a glimpse of it. Three full-time restorers and an upholsterer – who also deals with antique coverings, needlework and tapestry – are based below its glass-fronted showroom. They might, painstakingly, work on just one piece for an entire month. While most other dealers have workshops outside London, “the fact that we have it in-house means that we keep total control”, says owner Simon Phillips, son of founder Ronald. “One can go and see the progress five times a day if necessary. If there’s something going wrong, we can catch it within a matter of seconds.” Thomas Lange is a trained cabinet maker and restorer who oversees the artistic side of the workshop. His passion started early on. As a child he collected pieces that were thrown away as rubbish,

“We have control over the restoration process, to make sure we retain the original as much as possible” repaired them as best he could, then sold a few on. He trained as a cabinet maker for four years in Germany, where he was born, and came to study furniture restoration at the London College of Furniture. Lange worked for a number of dealers and restoration companies before joining Ronald Phillips, 21 years ago. “The main thing is that we have control over the restoration process to make sure we retain the original as much as possible: not to embellish things, and to retain the colour and patination,” he says. This requires a great deal of research to begin with; Lange has an enviable library of resources on site. He gathers as much information as possible from books, the internet and the house that the piece has come from. Photographic evidence is a bonus. The workshop deals with cabinet making, woodwork and general repair. For gilding, paper or stone restoration, it employs specialists. “The benefit of having the workshop on site is that you have the expertise at hand,” says Lange, “so should something turn up that has a problem, we can deal


ART

with it straight away. We can also supervise the work here and make sure everything is done in the best possible way.” Lange’s own favourites are, perhaps unsurprisingly, rare pieces. “We worked on a desk made by Chippendale, and as a cabinet maker you could read the handwriting of the maker – you can tune into the work. We could see that three different people worked on the same desk, because there were ever so slight differences in the drawer bottoms.” Some pieces are harder to restore than others. One of the first projects Lange undertook at Ronald Phillips was a breakfast table that had gone to a good private home, but the maid decided to iron the tablecloth on the table itself. The wax finish – 250 years old – had been removed. “It had gone from a nice mahogany colour to having a dark red patch,” Lange recalls. “Trying to bring that back and blend it in with the rest was a challenge. I spent probably a week on about a square foot.” The company concentrates on dealing in fine, functional pieces. “When people buy something they have to like it, but we also want it to be used. These things are sturdy pieces of furniture... although not for abusing like ironing on top of,” he jokes. A prime example of Ronald Phillips’ broadranging expertise are a pair of George III giltwood consoles with Japanese lacquer tops from around 1650 (pictured far left and right). “They came up at a major sale in London a few years ago,” says Phillips. “Even though they hadn’t had a tough life, they were neglected and had not been touched for years.” Over centuries, the intricate bases had been regilded, meaning that by the time they came to the workshop, several layers of gesso, gilding and paint had to be carefully removed by dry stripping, layer by layer, with a very small tool. The tops, meanwhile, were cleaned and the over-painting removed, which revealed the

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the workshop. left: ronald phillips’ showroom

originals in full glory. The pair took about seven months to restore. Some projects take the workshop more than a year to complete, with a variety of skills involved. The George III tables required a gilder and lacquer specialist for the tops, carvers for the bases and a metalworker to look after missing pieces. By invitation, Lange also regularly visits certain private collections for maintenance. “We’re very proud that we have a following of serious collectors that come back to us,” he says. “My day is never the same; I’ve never had a repeat. Every piece of furniture is different, and that makes it very exciting.” 26 Bruton Street, W1J, ronaldphillipsantiques.com

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The art of

darkness From sexual selection to the menace of digital media, Mat Collishaw speaks to Camilla Apcar about his latest exhibition at Blain Southern

Mat Collishaw, The Centrifugal Soul, 2016, Courtesy of the artist and Blain Southern, Photography RĂŠmi Chauvin. opposite page: Mat Collishaw, Photography: Jake Curtis; Mat Collishaw, The Centrifugal Soul, 2016, Courtesy of the artist and Blain Southern, Photography: RĂŠmi Chauvin


ART

M

at Collishaw doesn’t do things by halves. In his new exhibition at Blain Southern, the Nottingham-born artist tackles the digital revolution, Victorian technology and the human condition in one fell swoop. Collishaw started out exhibiting with his Goldsmiths and Young British Artist contemporaries, but – as we have all become used to looking at the world through images and digital media – his work has also evolved. Collishaw’s preferred mediums have stretched from photography to film, video projections or, in this latest case, virtual reality. “It is very frustrating because I’m not very technical at all. I’m interested in ideas from old paintings and books, and I just want to do them in a contemporary way,” he says. “My work is combining new technologies with old ideas.” To bring this to life, Collishaw works with a variety of teams: from the computer science department at Nottingham University to a studio developing virtual reality walkthroughs, as well as architectural and photographic historians. The star of The Centrifugal Soul exhibition is a zoetrope (a wheel of still images that, when spun, creates an animated scene). Collishaw’s huge version illustrates birds of paradise performing their elaborate mating rituals. At face value, it’s a mesmerising display of colour. But the idea behind the piece was influenced by the work of

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evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller, whose writing considers why humans show off to one another – and how. “It has to do with Darwin’s theory of sexual selection, and that our means of showing off by buying a Rolex watch or an SUV or another Gucci suit is the same as birds of paradise having exotic plumages and doing seductive dances as courtship rituals,” says Collishaw. “Although it appears very superficial that we decorate ourselves in a certain way to the people around us, it’s absolutely instrumental to our survival: if we don’t have courtship and spread our genes around, our species will die out. “I try to make those ideas come alive, using all these colours, shapes, designs and movements to draw the viewer in and attract them by using all those tricks of seduction to entertain and captivate,” he laughs. Collishaw has built his contemporary take on the Victorian optical toy by computer design, 3D printing and then hand-painting individual pieces, which are assembled on a motor with a shaft and LED lights. As it starts to furiously

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Robin Hood’s 1,000-year-old Major Oak in Sherwood Forest rotates like a lifesize ghost

spin, birds reveal their plumage, hummingbirds flap their wings on the spot and flowers bloom over and again. The exhibition is not all just technical wizardry, though. It also includes a dozen trompe l’oeil oil paintings of British garden birds chained to brightly graffitied walls, layering a 17th-century artistic tradition on top of 21st-century subculture. “The subtext is a kind of warning about this spectre of the digital revolution,” Collishaw says. “It’s a lot of fun putting on a virtual reality headset, but what are the social implications? In the background there’s something quite forboding about digital media. “It’s also about the fact that a lot of jobs in factories, clerical or routine work are going to go to computers or robots, and that the consequences might be even more dramatic than during the Industrial Revolution. I’m trying to comment on new media, as well as working with it.” Another large-scale optical illusion in the exhibition is a ‘Pepper’s ghost’, a reflective technique popular during the Victorian era when it was often used for stage productions of Hamlet when his father’s spirit enters. Today, a laser scan can collect data about an object and turn it into an image, as a teleprompter might. “It’s more like the way a bat would see an object than how the human eye would,” says the artist. “Nothing like a photograph.” His chosen subject is the Major Oak, Robin Hood’s rumoured shelter in Sherwood Forest, in the county where Collishaw was born. The 1,000-year-old tree is projected like a lifesize ghost itself, present in the room but not tangible as it slowly rotates. In reality, the tree is hollow and rotten within the trunk, but has been supported by scaffolding for more than a century.

From top: Mat Collishaw, albion, Installation view, 2017, Photography: Peter Mallet; Albion, 2017, Photography: Peter Mallet; Albion (detail), 2017, all Courtesy of the artist and Blain Southern


ART

Collishaw seems preoccupied with the dark. Viewing his installations usually involves being plunged into shadow; even his photographs shot in daylight are punched onto black surroundings like explosions of colour. “It just seems to be a method I am instinctively drawn towards,” he says. “I think it focuses attention on something quite specific, rather than going into a contemporary art exhibition where everything is white. Your eyes are drawn towards the light source, like a moth to a flame.” More wonderment in pitch black surroundings will take place from 18 May at Somerset House,

From top: Mat Collishaw, GASCONADES (Killing It); GASCONADES (The ChampIsHere); GASCONADES (The New King), all 2017, Courtesy of the artist and Blain Southern

“The subtext is a kind of warning about this spectre of the digital revolution”

where the artist will take visitors back in time to the birth of photography. Using virtual reality he will recreate the exhibition where William Henry Fox Talbot first presented his photographic prints to the public in Birmingham in the 1830s. Unlike Collishaw’s other works, which can be viewed in an instant, wandering around the eight-by-six-metre installation at Somerset House will require more time, but only a little: six minutes. “I don’t think you should make works that demand more time than people have,” he explains. His methods and mediums are intensive, but this seems to suit Collishaw down to the ground. “I get bored very quickly. If I’m resting for more than a day I get slightly irritable,” he admits. “I like to meet people about different projects, sniffing around like a detective and finding little leads for new ideas.” What’s next on his agenda is truly anyone’s guess. Until 27 May, 4 Hanover Square, W1S, blainsouthern.com

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TO READ MORE ARTICLES LIKE THIS VISIT www.luxurylondon.co.uk

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FASHION

A

fter a Favourbrook creation made a cameo appearance in Four Weddings and a Funeral in 1994, Oliver Spencer’s waistcoat shop in Piccadilly Arcade began to enjoy a steady stream of loyal customers. More than two decades later, it still specialises in flamboyant formalwear as well as tailored classics. With Ascot just around the corner and no doubt a few wedding invitations flying through the letterbox, now’s the time to start measuring up for the summer season. We recommend the Kristina print dinner jacket (pictured, £1,100). Wary of upstaging the bride? Opt for a patterned waistcoat beneath traditional suiting. 18-21 Piccadilly Arcade, SW1Y, favourbrook.com

Fancy

Plants

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WHITE CAVIAR ILLUMINATING PEARL INFUSION

INFUSE YOUR SKIN WITH LIQUID LIGHT TARGET THE THREE CHROMATIC BARRIERS TO A LUMINOUS COMPLEXION. UNIFY, BRIGHTEN AND CLARIFY WITH THE FIRST CONCENTRATE OF LIGHT.

AVAILABLE AT PETER JONES


PhotographY: Ash Reynolds

FASHION

Salon 1851 Aquascutum began as a humble tailor on Piccadilly in the mid-19th-century, before founder John Emary patented his waterproof fabric and coined his business after the Latin phrase ‘water shield’. The brand makes reference to its West End roots in a new range of trench coats launching this season. The Mayfair is a modern double-breasted cut with military-inspired epaulettes, cuff straps and horn buttons, while the classic Trafalgar features a gun flap, short collar tips and a belted waist. It is available as single or double-breasted. From £65, 106 Jermyn Street, SW1Y, aquascutum.com

Style

update WORDS: Marianne Dick

Handbag designer Nathalie Trad has turned her hand to heels in a new collaboration with Rupert Sanderson: a match made in accessory heaven £745, rupertsanderson.com and theshopatbluebird.com

Archive Print tOTE, £650; mOTO jACKET WITH wHIPSTITCH EYELET, £2,600

Feel the cinch Hells angels Coach’s utilitarian aesthetic meets Rodarte’s ethereal and feminine flair in what promises to be the most covetable collection since the former’s Rexy the dinosaur capsule. Six types of leather are hand-embroidered to resemble sequins on pieces such as the Moto jacket (left). From £100, Coach & Rodarte, uk.coach.com; rodarte.net

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La Perla’s spring collection emphasises the feminine silhouette by seamlessly integrating its expertise in shapewear into an expanded ready-to-wear line. The range aims to perfect wardrobe essentials such as the crisp white shirt and tailored jacket. It seems that its bi-stretch wool corset jacket, which has built-in underwear and is sized accordingly, has swiftly become a multi-functional wardrobe staple – Gwyneth Paltrow is already fan. £1,441, 9 Old Bond Street, W1S, laperla.com

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Crowning

glory

St James’s is home to the oldest shop in London, which has one of the few remaining on-site workshops in the area. Marianne Dick uncovers the magic of millinery at Lock & Co. Hatters

Amber light, ÂŁ1,650, by prudence for lock couture, all available from lockhatters.co.uk


FASHION

clockwise from Top: a duplicate of Admiral Lord Nelson’s bicorne hat and the original ledger displayed in Lock & co; Barbershop Boater, £1,350, lock & Co. Hatters Men’s Collection

T

here’s something indescribably comforting about visiting Lock & Co. Hatters on St James’s Street. As the oldest manufacturer in the world of arguably the most definitive British accessory, this Grade II-listed, late 17th-century terrace has dressed some of history’s most prominent figures – from Sir Winston Churchill to Charlie Chaplin. The tale of Lock & Co. begins with a love story between James Lock, grandson of George, who established a coffee house at 6 St James’s Street in 1686, and Mary Davis, the daughter of hatter Robert Davis, whose shop – founded in 1676 – was just across the road. In 1747, James became an apprentice at Davis’s store and from this appointment a new family was formed. In 1759, James married Mary and his new father-in-law handed him the keys to his millinery business. “We were originally on the other side of the street but we moved over in 1765, because traditionally you do more business on the sunny side of the street than on the shaded side,” explains Roger Stephenson, deputy chairman of Lock & Co. and seventh-generation family member. This was undoubtedly a wise decision. As we chat, sunlight fills the shop from the wide thoroughfare and reflects off the Daniel Quare grandfather clock, which has been on the premises for over three centuries – since before James Lock moved in. The front counter where transactions are made is more than 200 years old and there’s the outline of a doorway that once led to apartments upstairs, one of which was rented by American actor Douglas Fairbanks Jr for a time. Such a rich history could fill a museum the size of the whole building, but instead there is a modest room of memorabilia at the back of the main floor where precious items are kept, including Her Majesty The Queen’s wooden head shape that was made by Stephenson’s grandfather to fit the crown for her coronation. One of the walls is filled with signed celebrity head measurements – from Sacha Baron Cohen to the late Princess Diana – that have been made using a Victorian contraption called a conformateur. Stephenson describes it as “a sort of steampunk top hat that makes a sixth-scale diagram

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The Queen’s wooden head shape was made by Lock & Co. to fit the crown for her coronation of the head shape”. Lock & Co. still use this device to measure customers for hard hats today. One such style is the bowler, which was actually created by the shop’s chief hatmaker Thomas Bowler in 1849 as a riding hat for gamekeepers at Holkham Hall in Norfolk. “Victorian railway workers wore them too, and that’s why you see them in the Wild West, because when we sent our workers over to build the railways in America they took the bowler hat with them,” says Stephenson. “In Bolivia, the ladies in the villages wear really small bowler hats perched on their heads. It turns out that when we built the railways in Bolivia, the people who supplied the bowler hats to the railway workers got the size wrong, so the women picked

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Clockwise from top: the workroom at Lock & co.; Sweet Disorder, £1,650, by prudence for lock couture; A Luxury Occupation, £1,650, as before

The attic workroom is just as you would imagine in a shop from a Charles Dickens novel them up and started wearing them, and now they are traditional.” While peaked caps are enduringly popular – made even more desirable recently by the television series Peaky Blinders and what Stephenson calls “the David Beckham effect” – the bowler hat was the store’s fourth biggest seller last month. “To be truthful, 20 years ago we struggled a bit, but hats are really back in now,” says Stephenson. “My pet theory is that you have to skip a generation, because nobody wants to look like their dad. We’re seeing hipsters in Shoreditch

wearing a bowler hat with a checked shirt and denim shorts and it’s great – it’s giving the hat a new lease of life,” he enthuses. Indeed, back in the main area of the shop a pair of young, well-dressed male customers are trying on traditional styles. For people who are serious about millinery, Lock & Co. is the most elite name in the industry. “People might come in because they are new to hats and they want the advice of an expert. Being a specialist business, we’ve never deviated from that: we’re hatters, we stick to making hats, and so that’s what’s made us last,” says Stephenson. While Lock & Co. is renowned for men’s hats, customers are often surprised to learn that it also caters to women. One aim of the current collaboration with high fashion milliner Prudence is to increase the number of fashion-forward clientele that Lock & Co. has built up over the past few years. Many have come through other collaborations with brands like Vivienne Westwood, Johnstons of Elgin and Carhartt. Alongside Prudence’s whimsical, English garden-inspired creations – some of the tulle is actually stained using Earl Grey tea – sits Lock & Co.’s couture collection, which can be tailored and dyed to the customer’s wishes. This range is made on the top floor of the building, accessed by one of the oldest Victorian coffin staircases in London. Even though men’s hat production has moved to Europe or elsewhere in the UK, Lock & Co. remains one of the few places in St James’s where goods are still manufactured on site. The attic workroom is just as you would imagine in a shop from a Charles Dickens novel or the Harry Potter series: colourful ribbons and threads overflow onto surfaces and intricate silk flowers lie daintily half-finished like they’ve just fallen from a tree.


FASHION

Napoli Hat, £250, lock & Co. Hatters Men’s Collection; Acapulco Panama, £195, as before

Q&A with Prudence Millinery

“Our client base is so wide, we have everything from a 99-year-old Californian granny to a very fashion-forward Japanese lady,” says creative director Ruth Ravenscroft, who has been at Lock & Co. for 17 years. Even if a hat is ordered online, it is picked, steamed and prepared at 6 St James’s Street, which is quite hard to believe after manoeuvring through the tight doorways and corridors. As we descend the suitably creaky staircase, Stephenson cheerfully relays the pitfalls of such ancient architecture. Part of the company’s success, I realise, lies in the zealous attitude of custodians such as Stephenson, which is why Lock & Co.’s future will be as colourful as its past. There’s another Prudence collection in the pipeline, a new range of bespoke Panamas and an upcoming film based on Sir Winston Churchill, Darkest Hour, for which Lock & Co. has befittingly supplied the headwear. But for just how long is the business likely to remain within the same family? “I have two children and I wouldn’t want to pressure them, but at the same time I’m keeping a little bit of an eye on who could carry it on. There’s an appetite within the business, and we don’t want to sell,” says Stephenson. “I’m related to James Benning, an eccentric member of the Lock family who was the original mad hatter on which Lewis Carroll based the character in Alice in Wonderland. I’m quite proud of that.” I can understand the connection. Number 6 is St James’s very own enchanting rabbit hole and one of the only living, breathing time capsules of London now left in the West End. Hats off to Lock & Co.

Avant-garde mononymous milliner Prudence has designed headwear for fashion houses including Vivienne Westwood, Yves Saint Laurent, Gucci and Balenciaga, and her creations have graced countless magazines. This season she launches her debut collection for Lock & Co.’s progressive women’s line, Lock Couture. The nine-piece range is called The Creation of a Garden.

Where do you find inspiration for designs? I am influenced by dedication and genius, such as that of Mozart, Picasso, Balenciaga and Yves Saint Laurent. But also the beauty of hardship: the will to carry on through difficulty.

How did you go about creating the new Lock Couture spring/summer collection? I had a very large bunch of peonies delivered to my studio. The older they became, the more beautiful they looked. The petals were falling on the table making a lovely sound. At the same time I was planting a white garden at home. The days planting were stormy and cloudy with bursts of sun. The idea for the hats came from all this. Hats that are past their best, faded and stained flowers, torn tulle and colours of cloudy summers. This idea of imperfection appeals to me.

What are your fondest memories? Working on Vive la Cocotte for Vivienne Westwood and at the Saint Laurent main studio, with a large photograph of Yves Saint Laurent watching over me.

How have you seen the world of millinery change throughout your career? I find people and makers know less and less about millinery. We have been faced with the same shapes for decades and as a result, quality has suffered. But I’m changing that. prudencemillinery.com

lockhatters.co.uk

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Blooming

LOVELY How does your garden grow? Follow the magical pattern of flora and fauna with perennial prints, ruffles and accessories that whole-heartedly embrace the outdoors P h o t o g r a ph y : ph i l l i p w a t e r m a n Styling: Caroline Scianna & A n g e l a R a d c l i ff e


Regulars

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Dress, £3,075, Erdem, available from Harrods, harrods.com; necklace, £29,000, Cartier, cartier.co.uk; ring, £1,400, Stephen Webster, stephenwebster.com 65


fashion

ABOVE Dress, £2,840, Marni, marni.com; hat, £820, Victoria Grant, victoriagrant.co.uk; ring, £9,800, and bracelet, £7,800, both Stephen Webster, as before; ear cuff, £1,000, Nush Gems, nushgems.com

left Dress, £1,595, Roksanda, available from Selfridges, selfridges.com; shoes, £505, Malone Souliers, malonesouliers.com; ring, £3,450, and earrings, £22,900, all Stephen Webster, as before

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fashion

ABOVE Dress, £2,900, Dolce & Gabbana, dolcegabbana.com; bag, £1,195, Alexander McQueen, available from Harvey Nichols, harveynichols.com; ring, £3,650, Stephen Webster, as before

RIGHT Dress, £1,160, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi, available from Harvey Nichols, as before; harness, £495, Agent Provocateur, agentprovocateur.com; shoes, £525, Sophia Webster, sophiawebster.com; ring, £3,650, Stephen Webster, as before

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Regulars

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CREDITS Model: Alice Rausch at Premier Model Management Make-up: Julie Cooper at Terri Manduca Hair: Simon Maynard at Terri Manduca Photographer’s assistant: Kai Gurung Stylists’ assistant: Chloe at Terri Manduca Location: Studio House, Unit 6B, Stamford Works, 3 Gillett Street, N16


fashion

ABOVE Blouse, £195, Donna Ida, donnaida.com; skirt, £2,435, Valentino, available at Harrods, as before; belt, from a selection, Miu Miu, miumiu.com; shoes, £505, Malone Souliers, as before; ring, £21,000, necklace, £29,000, both Cartier, as before

left Top, £4,100, shorts, £580, and skirt, £8,000, all Dior, dior.com; shoes, £695, Jimmy Choo, jimmychoo.com; earrings, £7,300, bracelet, £6,950, and ring, £3,650, all Stephen Webster, as before

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fashion

Against the tide Peter Lindbergh captures the changing course of Sicily’s Mediterranean climate in Salvatore Ferragamo’s summer campaign. From serene, leafy passageways to jagged, rocky coastlines, the backdrops reflect the new hybrid collection. Light brogues are reinforced with chunky soles in bold reds and blues, while printed silk scarves are inspired by primitive sketches. Bags are equipped with multiple pockets in a nod to the season’s military trend, arming the modern man with all he needs to look refined – whether he’s in the city or beside the surf. From £130, 24 Old Bond Street, W1S, store.ferragamo.com

Style spy W ORD S : m a r i a n n e d i c k

Boys of summer This year marks the launch of Vilebrequin’s first sunglasses collection. In typical Riviera-influenced style, the devil is in the detail: even the French-made spring hinges on the 24-piece range are engraved with tiny turtles and the date 1971, the year the company was founded in Saint-Tropez. From £200, 1-2 Burlington Arcade, W1J, vilebrequin.com

Photographer: Peter Lindbergh, model: Andrés Velencoso

During your next jaunt to Savile Row and its surrounds, drop into Drake’s on Clifford Street to admire its newlyrefurbished interior and pick up a custom shirt or tie from its expanded made-to-order service 3 Clifford Street, W1S, drakes.com

Wool Sweater, £364; Water Resistant Uniform Jacket, £448

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The Green light Craig Green established his fashion house in 2012 shortly after graduating, but despite his young career, he has had a notable string of successes already – including an award for British Menswear Designer of the Year at the British Fashion Awards in December. His utilitarian pieces have become staples for the sartorially savvy, and his new core collection sees archive cuts reworked and a new lead-weighted version of his trademark string fastening. From £98, available at Dover Street Market, 18-22 Haymarket, SW1Y, london.doverstreetmarket.com 73


reader event INSPIRED 2017 INVITES YOU TO

An exclusive preview of the latest designs in luxury bespoke furniture and contemporary silverware

Wednesday 3 May 6 - 8pm Goldsmiths’ Centre 42 Britton Street London EC1M 5AD Join us for a private preview and meet world-class furniture makers and celebrated silversmiths, who will be showcasing new, never seen before works available to buy or commission. Leading experts, curators and designers will be on hand to offer astute advice and insight into these original, highly collectible pieces.

To secure your place please RSVP rsvp@festivalofsilver.com Inspired is a must-see luxury silverware and bespoke furniture selling showcase. Now in its fifth year, this exhibition is renowned for bringing together the UK’s finest and most highly skilled artisans under one unique curated platform.

More about Inspired at www.festivalofsilver.co.uk


INTERIORS

New romantic T

he New Feminine spring collection from The Sofa & Chair Company is an opulent take on some of the year’s biggest interiors trends, marrying botanical greens and plush pinks with sumptuous fabrics like crushed velvet. If this scheme doesn’t quite suit your taste however, then each piece of handmade made-to-order furniture can be customised. The Camille ottoman (pictured) can be refashioned from pink to a peacock print, or if you have something completely different in mind, the design team will transform your sketches into entirely one-off pieces. thesofaandchair.co.uk

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1817-2017. 200 YEARS DURAVIT. RE YOUR FUTUR BATHROOM.

Luv. Nordic elegance. The design of Cecilie Manz‘ bathroom series Luv combines Nordic purism and timeless, emotional elegance. Soft shapes follow a stringent geometry. The result is a new unique design language with precise, clear and ďŹ ne edges. For more information please visit www.duravit.co.uk or contact info@uk.duravit.com

UK_MayFairMagazine_Luv_001_210x297.indd 1

03.03.17 14:40


INTERIORS

Armchair revolution Earlier this year, it became illegal to replicate design classics within 70 years after the inventor’s death. But with impeccable celebratory timing and the blessing of the Eames Office, The Conran Shop has created 25 new Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman sets in white walnut and sandy leather, with the help of Vitra. Originally designed in 1956 by the husband-and-wife team, the chair encapsulates a fast-changing era that would be majorly influenced by television culture. £6,465, 55 Marylebone High Street, W1U, conranshop.co.uk

Grate shape

Interiors news WORDS: MARIANNE DICK

Selfridges celebrates home-making and craft in its Our House campaign, which debuts objets d’art from two of Mayfair’s brightest contemporary fashion houses: Roksanda and Temperley London

Visiting Alessi can feel like being a child in a toy shop, and it surprises us with another weird and wonderful contraption every time. Of the numerous thrilling pieces this season (look out for the twisted measuring jug), one stands out. The Forma cheese grater was one of the last objects designed by Zaha Hadid for Alessi. Its shape mimics a pebble and the sleek black stand can be left on the table to allow diners to grate to their heart’s – and stomach’s – content. £45, 22 Brook Street, W1K, alessi.com

ITALIAN ESCAPE If you haven’t already noticed New Bond Street’s latest addition, then bear it in mind next time the city’s rising temperature and crowds get a little too much. Italian fashion and homeware label Agnona has transformed number 124 into a cool, calming continental apartment. The concept pop-up offers scents by Laboratorio Olfattivo alongside couture-quality Murano glassware from Salviati and even biscotti from a bakery in Biella. Until the end of the year, homeware from £350, 124 New Bond Street, W1S, agnona.com

until 9 June, Temperley london backgammon set, £5,800; Linck X Roksanda ceramics, from £1,270 selfridges.com/ourhouse Image courtesy of AGNONA

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INTERIORS

Armchair revolution Earlier this year, it became illegal to replicate design classics within 70 years after the inventor’s death. But with impeccable celebratory timing and the blessing of the Eames Office, The Conran Shop has created 25 new Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman sets in white walnut and sandy leather, with the help of Vitra. Originally designed in 1956 by the husband-and-wife team, the chair encapsulates a fast-changing era that would be majorly influenced by television culture. £6,465, 55 Marylebone High Street, W1U, conranshop.co.uk

Grate shape

Interiors news WORDS: MARIANNE DICK

Selfridges celebrates home-making and craft in its Our House campaign, which debuts objets d’art from two of Mayfair’s brightest contemporary fashion houses: Roksanda and Temperley London

Visiting Alessi can feel like being a child in a toy shop, and it surprises us with another weird and wonderful contraption every time. Of the numerous thrilling pieces this season (look out for the twisted measuring jug), one stands out. The Forma cheese grater was one of the last objects designed by Zaha Hadid for Alessi. Its shape mimics a pebble and the sleek black stand can be left on the table to allow diners to grate to their heart’s – and stomach’s – content. £45, 22 Brook Street, W1K, alessi.com

ITALIAN ESCAPE If you haven’t already noticed New Bond Street’s latest addition, then bear it in mind next time the city’s rising temperature and crowds get a little too much. Italian fashion and homeware label Agnona has transformed number 124 into a cool, calming continental apartment. The concept pop-up offers scents by Laboratorio Olfattivo alongside couture-quality Murano glassware from Salviati and even biscotti from a bakery in Biella. Until the end of the year, homeware from £350, 124 New Bond Street, W1S, agnona.com

until 9 June, Temperley london backgammon set, £5,800; Linck X Roksanda ceramics, from £1,270 selfridges.com/ourhouse Image courtesy of AGNONA

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Fabric of time What do Leonardo da Vinci, a Chinese empress and Moscow’s Kremlin all have in common? Hannah Lemon delves into the archives of Florence’s oldest silk mill to find out


INTERIORS

L

egend has it that Empress Lei-tzu, the young wife of the Chinese Yellow Emperor, discovered silk while sipping a cup of tea. Sitting under the leafy bows of a mulberry tree, a silkworm’s cocoon dropped into her cup. The heat of the drink forced the silk to unfold and the young empress watched in awe as the magical thread unravelled, and she immediately determined to weave it. Sure enough, it made the perfect fabric, and soon Lei-tzu taught her ladies-in-waiting how to fashion garments from these fine fibres. Thus, she became known as the Silkworm Mother. Of course, the more likely story was that Catholic missionaries brought sericulture back from China to Europe in the 12th century. One of their final destinations was Florence, a city that would flourish in the silk trade from the 14th century onwards, bringing enormous wealth to merchants. Florentine silk continued to prosper during the Renaissance and well into the 18th century. So much so, that during the 1700s, a group of noble families clubbed together to establish a single workshop for their looms, patterns and fabrics located on Via dei Tessitori (the street of weavers). And so, Antico Setificio Fiorentino (Antique Florentine Silk Mill) was born. In recognition of the importance of this factory and to toast increased silk production, in 1780 the Grand Duke of Tuscany Leopold II donated several looms, which still work today. Thanks to acquisitions by Marquis Emilio Pucci in the 1950s and subsequently Stefano Ricci in 2010, the future of the remarkable handcrafted tradition remains alive, as do the centuries-old Florentine techniques. Today, Renaissance damasks, brocades and taffetas are woven on 12 looms – six handlooms dating from the 18th century and six semimechanical looms from the 19th century. The quality of the fabric is guaranteed by various phases of delicate workmanship: the hand dying, the preparation of the antique looms, yarns that are specially prepared for Antico Setificio Fiorentino, no chemical treatments and the lengthy weaving process. It doesn’t stop there. The Antico Setificio Fiorentino uses a unique orditoio (warping

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machine), designed by Leonardo da Vinci for embellishments; as well as a loom for silk trimmings and another for custommade fringes. As is to be expected of such meticulous creativity, the silk products are sought after by every luxury institution from royal palaces to national museums – the Amalienborg Palace in Denmark, the Royal Palace of Stockholm, Moscow’s Kremlin and Villa Medici in Rome, to name a few. You don’t have to be a royal to get a slice of the action though; bed, bath and table linens, bespoke services, and limited edition evening wear can be found on the lower ground floor at the Stefano Ricci menswear store on South Audley Street. And it’s all thanks to an imaginative empress and her cup of tea. Antico Setificio Fiorentino products and services are available through Stefano Ricci, 56 South Audley Street, W1K, stefanoricci.com OPPOSITE: THE Guicciardini Loom (1786), Photo credit: Stefano Ricci/ASF by Bernardo Conti top RIGHT AND INSET: Weaving the iconic Broccatello Michelangelo, made of silk and linen threads. Photo credit: Stefano Ricci/ASF by Egon Ipse; textiles from the Antico Setificio Fiorentino, Photo credit: Stefano Ricci/ ASF by Marco Curatolo left: Spool changing during the processing of the Doria fabric, Photo credit: Stefano Ricci/ASF by Rossano B. ManiscalchI

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health & beauty

back to burberry basics British model Iris Law stars in Burberry’s new campaign for The Essentials collection, an edit of products focused on three elements: prime, contour and highlight. Pink Pearl and Rose Gold shades join the Fresh Glow Highlighter powder range, while the Lip Colour Contour is totally new. The domeshaped tip of the nude pen is inspired by backstage make-up techniques, where lips are smoothed and accentuated before before colour is applied. From £24, uk.burberry.com

fine art fragrances

Beauty news W O R D S : m e l i ss a e m e rso n

sun-kissed This limited-edition ivory and gold Soleil contouring compact from Tom Ford is blush, highlighter and bronzer combined. Blend the cream-like powders to give cheekbones new definition. £78, tomford.com

Haute hair

Inspired by its 1872 fragrance Hammam Bouquet, Penhaligon’s new Savoy Steam scent is a mist of rose, pink pepper and geranium

Jo Malone’s new Bloomsbury Set celebrates the 20th-century group of English bohemian artists, philosophers and intellectuals, including Virginia Woolf. Members were known to spend time at Woolf’s sister’s house in Sussex, and the limited-edition colognes – from Blue Hyacinth and Garden Lilies to Leather & Artemisia – reflect the scents of the country pile’s grounds, library and creaking wooden floors. The bottles are a departure from the brand’s traditional designs, with colourful abstract brush strokes replacing its logo. £46 each, jomalone.co.uk

£134, penhaligons.com

Paris-based hair stylist David Mallett is popular with fashion houses and photographers alike, and was personally invited by The Ritz in Paris to open a salon. For those hoping to emulate his stylish creations at home, his eponymous product line is now available in the UK, with vitamin-rich Japanese Nori (edible seaweed) and magnesiumrich Murray River Salt products that include serum, shampoo and salt spray. From £16, satindays.com 80

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promotion

Follow your nose James Craven, Creed fragrance expert at perfumery Les Senteurs, advises how to select the perfect scent in nine easy steps

1

Take your time

Pick an occasion

Try the skin you’re in

 ever rush: that usually ends in N disaster. As they say, it is better to travel well than to arrive, so enjoy the journey – you might even end up finding more than one prize on the way.

 ecide what you are buying the D perfume for: is it for work, a wedding, a holiday? How do you intend to use it?

Perfume and flesh must be brought together to see how they will interact. It can take hours for a fragrance to reveal its whole bag of tricks.

Lap up luxury

2

 hop only when you feel in the S mood: relaxed, patient, instinctive and curious. Don’t make perfume selection a tiresome chore: make it your delight. You are shopping for a luxury, remember.

4

Heed advice

5

3

Visit a specialist independent store for impartial guidance. Make friends with the staff and ask advice from a knowledgeable, sympathetic but objective sales assistant who knows the product – and you.

Avoid layering

8

Put it on paper

Go it alone Never take your mother, best friend or lover with you. Each of us perceives smells differently. The opinion of companions is irrelevant and will only distract and disturb you. You need to concentrate, think and feel.

7

6

 se card to make an initial U acquaintance with each scent. A paper strip will be enough to introduce the fragrance, and to discover whether you wish to explore it in greater depth. Samples are really invaluable – use them as an aid to selection.

If possible, try no more than one scent at a time. Don’t lather the body with different options: you are bound to confuse yourself. Leave the shop, take some air, and observe what is happening to you and the fragrance.

Listen to your gut

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 on’t neglect your instinct. D Perfume is all about emotion. Be wary of overanalysing and you’ll find the bottle of your dreams. 99 Mount Street, W1K, creedfragrances.co.uk


It’s never too late...

LUXURY BODY BUTTER IN WHITE CASHMERE FROM THE BATH & BODY COLLECTION

www.lilouetloic.com


health & beauty

S PA R E V I E W all images: The Lanesborough Club & Spa

Sanctuary from the city The Lanesborough Club & Spa’s Deeper Connections treatment is so much more than a massage, writes Francesca Lee-Rogers

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irst impressions count, and the attention to detail at The Lanesborough Club & Spa is exceptional. Inspired by the ceremonial spaces of Roman baths, interior design practice 1508 London has created an opulent wellness area with the very best of British materials and craftsmanship that spans more than 18,000 sq ft. Wood panelling and leather upholstery add to the grand ambience, while peacock blue satins, deep green silks and bronze trims complement the classical beauty of the oak, marble and stone. Each room and space has its own character, yet together the hybrid of club and spa blends effortlessly. As I await my treatment in the lounge area, a butler is on hand to cater to my every whim. There’s almost no need to move from here, as I slip into relaxation mode – the hubbub of London feels a world away.

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My therapist greets me, and we head to one of five treatment rooms (one is a double VIP spa suite) for the 90-minute Deeper Connections massage. My knots need regular untangling due to my desk-bound job, so I’m intrigued as to how this deep tissue experience will differ. A lot, as it turns out. My therapist, like all the therapists at the Club & Spa, has been trained by Beata Aleksandrowicz of Pure Massage. The massage uses a combination of eastern and western techniques including rolling and stretching to pinpoint tension. After spending 30 minutes on my back, she has opened up a whole new space between my shoulder blades. A similar pattern follows for the rest of my body, and towards the end

concentration focuses on my abdomen with a lymphatic drainage massage to bring balance to my digestive system and my body as a whole. It’s a full detox. I leave feeling truly soothed and retire to the spa where I use the hydrotherapy pool, sauna and steam room, until I can finally muster the energy to face the world again. Days later, I’m still feeling the positive effects: first impressions certainly lived up to expectations. The Deeper Connections Massage is £175 for 90 minutes or £140 for 60 minutes, The Lanesborough Club & Spa, Hyde Park Corner, SW1X 7TA, 020 7333 7064, lanesboroughclubandspa.com

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Natural selection From golden caviar pearls to the quiet power of algae, Camilla Apcar finds a new wave of skincare supercharged by the great outdoors


HEALTH & BEAUTY

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arnessing the wonders of the natural world has long been the mission of the best skin creams, serums and oils – whether for their nutrifying, illuminating or fragrant qualities. “Over the course of time, man has learned to live in harmony with nature and has harnessed it not only to nourish and care for himself, but also as a means of protecting and beautifying his skin,” says Sisley’s scientific director, José Ginestar. This summer, Mother Nature meets scientific evolution in a host of new products that stand out for their particularly innovative and sometimes unusual organic ingredients. One major motivation for mimicking the green kingdom is hydration. In April, Chanel launched its Hydra Beauty Micro Crème (£66), which uses camellia to hydrate and help skin become more resistant to environmental stress. The floral extract is captured in 5,000 jellified micro-droplets that preserve the active ingredient, plus a dash of antioxidant blue ginger. Microfluidic technology – the science behind controlling and manipulating liquids – means the droplets don’t burst when they are scooped from the jar, but only when the moisturising face cream is applied. Knowledge is power, as proven by Clarins’ Hydra-Essentiel range that hit the shelves in March. It evolved following research that showed our skin experiences up to 17 thermic shocks every day: changes in temperature and humidity that impact the skin’s water retention. Its saviour is the succulent Madagascan kalanchoe plant, the ‘leaf of life’, which retains water despite sudden fluctuations in temperature. “Clarins’ ethnobotanists were inspired by plants capable of surviving in conditions of extreme drought,” says its scientific communications director, Marie-Hélène Lair. The brand is working with local communities to cultivate the leaves in northern Madagascar. Around 500kg are harvested during the dry season from April to November. The leaves are picked by hand and left out to dry in the sun, then turned two or three times a day. The new range includes an SPF 15 cream and cooling gel (£36 each), as well as a serum (£44). At Dior, its Hydra Life range was borne of studying the skin – and, in particular, the upper layer of skin flora, with its microorganisms – as a living organ. Its key component is Haberlea

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rhodopensis, a Swiss flower that can survive several months of drought, only to be revived by a single drop of water. “With Hydra Life, we have ‘tamed’ flora. Haberlea makes it produce what the skin needs to retain its moisture,” says Édouard Mauvais-Jarvis, Dior’s environmental and scientific communication director. “The result, beyond hydration, is healthy, lastingly fresh skin that is naturally beautiful.” Hydra Life’s second star ingredient is mallow, a vibrant purple and pink bloom found in Dior’s gardens in Anjou, France. It has been cultivated on a 30-hectare estate by the same family of horticulturists for more than 30 years, and encourages water circulation within the skin. A combination of the sorbet crème (£45.50) and water essence (£49.50) promise the ultimate effect. While algae might not be the most attractive of organisms, Estée Lauder has recognised its power. Using specially cultivated, cold-processed and nutrient-dense algae, its new Nutritious MicroAlgae range (from £20, available from June) is all about ridding skin of impurities and pollution that are a by-product of urban life. Glowing skin and refined pores are to come courtesy of a triple algae blend: the emerald

Dior has captured the hydrating qualities of a Swiss flower that can survive months of drought

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

chlorella (rich in vitamin B12, protein, 18 amino acids and omega 3); bluish spirulina (known for its detoxification powers); and brown Laminaria saccharina, which controls excess oils. All three are cultivated in France, then either broken down by chemical reactions with water, washed and freeze-dried, or cold-processed in a gentle water-extraction process. The pursuit of luminosity also preoccupies the skincare realm, and such is the aim of La Prairie’s new White Caviar Illuminating Pearl Infusion (£360) – its concentrated formula includes golden caviar extract and an oil form of vitamin C. It targets dark spots on the skin, predominately caused by sun damage; the irritated or inflamed skin brought on by everyday stress; and atmospheric pollution (the shell of the caviar pearls shields the skin from harmful particles). “The Pearl Infusion ‘infuses’ the skin with light by acting at several levels,” says director of strategic innovation and science at La Prairie, Dr Jacqueline Hill. “Subtle pigments reflect light to add a soft glow to the skin, and vitamin C together with La Prairie’s cellular complex supports the collagen cycle.” Ingeniously, the caviar eggs are extracted from the Russian sturgeon species with an oily solvent, but the pearls will remain intact until the last drop of gel has been used. On a similar wavelength, the Iris florentina in YSL’s new Forever Youth Liberator Y-Shape concentrate (£66) and crème (£67) pursues a lasting glow for the face, neck and décolleté. The white flower is often used in perfumery or decongestants and its root can also be found in Bombay Sapphire gin. It’s no secret that flora and fauna can feed our skin as well as our stomachs – but some plants do this better than others. Lancôme’s Énergie de Vie range launched last April, and later this year, an eye gel, day cream, exfoliating mask and clay mask will be added. “Énergie de Vie is a recipe containing three active ingredients chosen to address the consequences of urban fatigue on the skin,” says Lancôme’s scientific director, Véronique Delvigne. Designed to boost the skin’s metabolism, it is packed with antioxidants: goji berries, lemon balm and gentian root. Sisley, meanwhile, has added a purifying mask (£80) and a rebalancing lotion to its Tropical Resins range (£59). “Hubert d’Ornano created

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La Prairie has extracted caviar eggs from Russian sturgeon, which ‘infuse’ skin with light Sisley in 1976 with an intuition that plant extracts and essential oils combined with technological innovation could be a great success in beauty products,” says Ginestar. “He thought that plants’ capacity for regeneration, protection systems and fragrances could be used for the skin’s beauty.” The mask includes burdock to balance the skin’s ‘ecosystem’ and meadowsweet to stimulate defences against bad bacteria (apply a thick layer after cleansing, once or twice a week); the lotion adds Java tea extract to unclog and soften. “Our researchers are always looking for plants with new efficiencies or that target new biological pathways, and we give a great deal of importance to the traceability and quality of our plant extracts,” Ginestar continues. “That’s why we work with the best specialists for each type of plant and have a specific interest in organic farming.” In the dead of night, wild night-scented stock awakens to release its perfume and attract nocturnal insects. In July, Elemis will introduce a Peptide Night Recovery Cream-Oil (£49) with plenty of omega 3 and vitamin E – ten times higher than many other known natural oils used in skincare – from the plant. This is the first time the pink, purple and mauve bloom has been grown on a commercial scale for skincare in England. Elemis has developed a formula that will get to work during sleep, when skin cells renew and repair – especially stepping in when sleep is disturbed and cells are otherwise compromised. From day to night, Mother Nature has us covered.

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PROMOTION

Reform your workout A new studio from Ten Health & Fitness, London’s leading Dynamic Reformer Pilates provider, has launched in the heart of Fitzrovia

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ocated on Great Titchfield Street, Ten Health & Fitness’s new studio offers its trademark Dynamic Reformer Pilates classes, along with physio-led Pilates, physiotherapy, massage therapy, rehabilitation and personal training in a light and welcoming space. Along with its Mayfair and St James’s studios, this is the third West End location for Ten, one of London’s top boutique fitness providers and twice voted ‘best Pilates studio’ by Tatler magazine. The studio’s ground floor provides a dedicated retail store for innovative activewear brand HPE Clothing (Human Performance Engineering) – the label’s first standalone outlet. One of the UK’s fastest growing sports apparel brands, HPE Clothing has a legion of high profile advocates from the worlds of fashion and sport. The new studio will additionally act as a base for TenEducation, which offers expert industryaccredited external training to fitness, exercise and therapy professionals across the UK. As well as its central London locations, Ten Health

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& Fitness also has studios in Hatton Garden, Notting Hill, Little Venice, the City and Chiswick. Ten Health & Fitness, 83 Great Titchfield Street, W1W fitzrovia@ten.co.uk, ten.co.uk

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T H E Y O G A W E L L N E S S C O M PA N Y

Don’t Step Out Of Your Life, Step Into It Upcoming workshops: - Experience Grace (23rd April) - Finding True Balance (27th - 28th May) - Movement Into Stillness (1st - 2nd July)

BOOK NOW

Luxury London Workshops and International Retreats (+44) 203 621 4388

www.theyogawellnesscompany.com

@yogawellnessco


food & drink

image credit: benjamin eagle

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herry blossom season has sprung at Roka on Charlotte Street with the arrival of a seasonal floral installation. Blossom-adorned branches – known as sakura in Japanese – hang from the ceiling of the restaurant’s intimate basement lounge Shochu, creating a fragrant canopy under which guests can enjoy the full Roka robatayaki menu together with sakura-inspired cocktails from the specially created drinks list. Until 7 June, 37 Charlotte Street, W1T, rokarestaurant.com

Darling

buds of

May

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food & drink

Toast of the town

Food & drink news

Granted, SW1W seems a long way to go for a plate of spaghetti, but the regional Italian fare at Enoteca Turi is worth the commute. The family-run restaurant has just celebrated its first year in Belgravia, after 25 years in Putney. And what better way to reward your journey than with a visit to the Dining Cellar – a wine library-cum-private dining room for up to 28 guests. With 460 wines on offer, there’s something to match every dish on Michelin-trained head chef Francesco Sodano’s menu. Cod cheek ragout, a glass of Cortese and a few thousand extra steps on the Fitbit: perfetto! 87 Pimlico Road, SW1W, enotecaturi.com

WORDS: LAUREN ROMANO

Culinary craft Craftsmanship comes in many forms, but what good is a handmade plate without some serious nosh to decorate it? The organisers at London Craft Week agree, and to celebrate the return of the festival this month have named Seymour Place as the official dining destination. Visitors can refuel with special menus at The Portman and Sandy’s pizzeria, sit down to VEG Talks at The Gate, or take part in a hands-on supper club at The MaE Deli. From 3-7 May, Seymour Place, W1H, for full details, visit: londoncraftweek.com

All rise Brunch has many guises these days: there’s the bottomless, the antipodeaninspired, and now, thanks to Maison Kayser’s offering, the Parisian. Alongside the predictable eggs and avocado (tartine à l’avocat for the more sophisticated), the restaurant will be serving all manner of pastries and oeuf en cocotte à la bourguignonne – or baked eggs, bacon and red wine to me and you. Red wine for brunch? Pourquoi pas? 8 Baker Street, W1U, maison-kayser.com

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The bartenders at Mac & Wild are putting down their cocktail shakers with the launch of Black Watch, a readymade whisky espresso martini. Not shaken, or stirred, just poured straight from the bottle. £31.17 for 50cl, 65 Great Titchfield Street, W1W, macandwild.com

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D O G H O U S E W E T Y O U R W H I S T L E AT THE DOG HOUSE

B E R N A R D I ’ S C O C K TA I L B A R 6 2 S E Y M O U R S T. W 1 H 5 B N T U E - S AT 5 P M - L AT E BERNARDIS.CO.UK


Fit for a

queen

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obody could accuse Le Pavillon de la Reine of not living up to its regalsounding name. The boutique Parisian hotel, located in the historic Le Marais quarter, has upped the opulence with the launch of two new suites this month. The most lavish of the offerings is Suite de la Reine (pictured), which is kitted out with sumptuous fabrics and a spectacular marble bathroom, and finished with carefully sourced antiques, a handcrafted chandelier and gold leaf-adorned doors. Marie Antoinette would approve. From approx. ÂŁ1,285 a night, pavillon-de-la-reine.com IMAGE COURTESY OF LE PAVILLON DE LA REINE


travel

a stay for the senses New luxury hotel group Almanac Hotels, which focuses on how its guests experience scent, taste, light and touch, opens it first property this summer. Almanac Barcelona has 91 rooms and suites and is close to shopping thoroughfare Passeig de Gràcia. Grey, beige and gold tones with accents of oak and walnut bring warmth to the interiors and some rooms feature unusual cubic window recesses with seating. The group is also set to open hotels in Vienna and Prague in 2019. From approx. £382 a night, almanachotels.com

Travel news W O R D S : M e l iss a Em e rson

Contemporary Lake Como All-suite hotel Il Sereno is now open for its first full season on Lake Como’s eastern shore, where its design-driven interiors prove a contrast to the region’s typical classical grandeur. Michelin-star chef Andrea Berton leads the team at Ristorante Berton Al Lago, while botanist Patrick Blanc has designed the private beach with direct lake access, freshwater infinity pool and vertical gardens. Guests can also enjoy the hotel’s three custom-made Cantiere Ernesto Riva boats; the Riva family has been crafting the vessels in nearby Laglio since 1771. Suites from approx. £685 a night, ilsereno.com images courtesy of patricia parinejad

Sun, sea and sushi Spain’s five-star Puente Romano Beach Resort & Spa will soon become an all-suites hotel, in order to accommodate the Nobu Hotel and Restaurant Marbella opening at the location. The partnership sees the Nobu restaurant, which launches this month, join Puente Romano’s nine existing eateries, including the two-Michelin starred Dani Garcia restaurant. It will serve classic Japanese and Peruvian dishes as well as speciality plates inspired by the local area. The Nobu Hotel Marbella will open in 2018, when guests will be able to enjoy a private pool and priority access to the restaurant. puenteromano.com

Greek grandeur Erosantorini combines the services of a hotel with the home-from-home feel of a villa. Its five individual suites sit within a two-acre plot, boasting a three-tiered infinity pool (the largest on Santorini), a spa, chapel, open-air cinema and fruit tree-filled gardens. Each suite has its own private outdoor space, but friends and family can all gather for meals cooked by the in-house chef. From approx. £4,300 a night based on ten adults sharing on a full board basis, erosantorini.com s l u x u ry l o n d o n . c o. u k s

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WELLNESS

as an Art

Oasis gives you a moment to stop and take a breath. Feel the freedom and relaxation in your body and mind. Let your senses be inspired in a private paradise. It is all waiting for you. The art of wellbeing.

The Oasis by Don Carlos Resort · Boutique Hotel Experience · Marbella T (+34) 933 271 455 · dcreservas@expogrupo.com · www.doncarlosresort.expohotels.com/en/the-oasis · www.expohotels.com


TRAVEL

THE DRAWING ROOM

Park Life Kari Colmans heads to the luxurious spa retreat Coworth Park for a family-friendly weekend

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eekends away used to be so simple. My husband and I would pick a city fewer than three hours away, take the earliest flight there, the latest flight back and sandwich in as many gluttonous meals, galleries, sights and boutiques as our legs and stomachs would allow us. But if anyone’s tried doing the above with a toddler in tow, they’ll know that it needs a holiday to recover. Which is where the English escape really comes into its own, as you don’t have to sacrifice the miles-away-from-home feeling (even if you’re only ten minutes up the road).

RIDING LESSONS AT COWORTH PARK

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One of the first things that attracts us to Coworth Park is the location: a drive to Ascot from north-west London takes as little as 45 minutes (although we manage one leg in half an hour). We even time the car journey with our daughter’s power nap to save on Wheels-On-The-Bus fatigue. Coworth Park is a sprawling estate set on 97 hectares of Berkshire parkland. Golf buggies are on hand to cart us from the main hotel building to the various facilities: spa, kids’ club, stables, brasserie, kids’ club… but anyone can get around easily without them, unless the weather is really playing up. Part of The Dorchester Collection, Coworth is wholly different to its sister hotel on Park Lane in everything from the décor to the clientele: it’s all understated, country beautiful, with warm heritage tones of French Grey and cream. Splashes of artwork and colour, including glass-fronted fireplaces and chic mirrored cabinets (now dotted

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THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: DOWER HOUSE, MASTER SUITE BATHROOM; THE EXTERIOR OF COWORTH PARK; THE BAR; EQUESTRIAN PURSUITS OPPOSITE PAGE: THE SHEPHEARD SUITE BEDROOM; THE SPA


TRAVEL

with tiny nose-shaped smudges) give it a modern twist. There’s definitely a horse theme – based on its proximity to Ascot Racecourse, I presume – but it’s miles away from your stuffy, hunting-lodge type interior. The Drawing Room and Summer Room look out onto the still frost-covered meadow, which I’m told is truly breathtaking come summer, when it’s covered in a blanket of flowers with paths swept for hazy, post-prosecco ambling. The Restaurant Coworth Park has views of the rose terrace and croquet lawn. We choose to eat more informally this weekend, but we do get a chance to enjoy the room at breakfast for hot pastries, omelettes, fruit and all the other à la carte trimmings. Other restaurants include the spa eatery (The Spatisserie) and The Barn, a relaxed brasserie adjacent to the converted stables and cottage. Here we enjoy steaks with chips and buttery vegetables, as well as a selection of cold cuts and cheeses while wearing our muddy boots. Particularly charming features include the working stone fireplace, double-storey beamed ceiling and the full wall of windows that look out across the polo fields, where you can learn to play. We are staying in the truly lovely Shepheard Suite, set inside the main Georgian-era Mansion House, which is quite honestly one of the most comfortable and inviting English hotel rooms I’ve ever stayed in. The living room, bedroom and bathroom are all tastefully Georgian minus any ‘nana-chintz’, with large windows that look out onto the parkland. Our four-poster bed is made of wrought-iron branches, complete with a perching bird; while the walls are painted in soft, calming heritage hues. The bathroom has the real wow factor, with its walk-in rain shower and freestanding copper bath, that sits majestically on a white marble floor (heated underfoot), positioned for optimum nature gazing. But one of the things I love most about the place is its attitude. Having done some research prior to booking, I’d been turned away by a number of your well-known countryside hotels once they got a whiff of our third party member. And yes, I’m sure the staff and guests wouldn’t be too impressed if I allowed her to run naked through the foyer with a nappy on her

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The living room, bedroom and bathroom are all tastefully Georgian minus any ‘nana-chintz’ head, wielding a goujon in each hand (much to madam’s displeasure), but she is met with a smile at every turn. A teddy and a book are wrapped up and left in her cosy cot and the staff can’t do enough to feed her on time and keep her happy. The equestrian centre provides whole minutes of entertainment, as does the fabulous kids’ club, which is more like a working nursery set within its own building. The super-friendly staff bake, sing and dance all afternoon, surrounded by arts and crafts, a rail of dressing up clothes and immaculate toys, before returning to babysit in the evening. The famous spa even welcomes children too at set hours (which are doable and actually childfriendly, unlike some ridiculous places that think a 7pm swim is what every toddler-mum wants). Should you want your spa time minus the kids, that’s fine too – the purple-lit pool with amethyst sculptures and underwater music is even more exquisite without them, as are the massage rooms and award-winning treatments. Sure, it’s silly to compare a like-for-like weekend in England to a whistle-stop tour of Barcelona because they serve very different people and purposes. But for an easy, family-friendly retreat that doesn’t scrimp on any of life’s luxuries, you’d be hard pushed to find better. The Shepheard Suite from £1,000 a night, standard rooms from £320 a night, dorchestercollection.com

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And breathe… There’s more to a mountain break than skiing, as Deborah Cicurel discovers when she heads to the Italian Dolomites, where the allure of the spa trumps the slopes

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he first thing you notice when you step outside is the air. It’s the sort of air you forget exists while rushing around a congested city: fresh, cool and so palatable you want to take big gulps of it. And the great thing is that you can stand there and greedily inhale it for what seems like hours. Though you might look a little strange, it’ll be a while before a car comes by and hoots at you. That’s the beauty of Ortisei, the postcard-pretty capital of Val Gardena, in the Dolomites. Unlike so many packed ski resorts, buzzing with the clomp of ski boots and exasperated calls for the bill, Ortisei is quiet and serene – the perfect place for a wellness break. If you’re part of a family where one half loves to ski from nine to five, with only a cursory break for a fleeting cappuccino, and the other wants to luxuriate in the mountain air, enjoy the scenery and give the gondolas a miss, this is the destination for you.


TRAVEL

In the winter months, keen skiers and boarders can experience Val Gardena’s impressive 500km of interlinked slopes with a single ski pass. If you’re used to shelling out hundreds of euros a day for a private ski guide, you can save your cash for daily rounds of hot chocolates: Ortisei’s Adler Balance Spa & Health Residenz, the hotel I’ve travelled to in an attempt to escape London’s frenetic pace for a few peaceful days, arranges ski groups daily with experienced instructors at a mere fraction of the price you’d usually pay for a lesson. Those who love travelling to the mountains for more indolent pursuits will find a good home in Adler Balance. The modern, edgier cousin of the Adler Dolomiti Spa & Sport Resort, which has been around since the early 19th century, the Balance acts as a medical competence centre where guests can do a full detox, diet, fitness or yoga programme, or even indulge in some light aesthetic medicine. The two hotels are connected by a long underground tunnel, through which endless spa offerings are promised on mysterious doors: salt grottos, panoramic saunas, blossom steam baths and more. The treatment options include everything from Dead Sea mud wraps and candle massages to Ayurveda counselling and meditative walks. In fact, there are so many different pampering options that you could stay for a month and not be able to experience each different therapeutic treatment. I have a good head start with three relaxing sessions: an anti-stress massage, which seems to cure my inability to nap during the day in seconds, an Adler Staminal Green facial treatment that leaves my skin glowing and smooth, and an arnica mud pack, during which I am slathered with fango – warm mud from Italy’s

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Endless spa offerings are promised on mysterious doors: salt grottos, panoramic saunas, blossom steam baths and more thermal springs – before being wrapped up and lowered into a warm bath to allow the mud’s soothing, regenerating and tension-relieving properties to do their magic. If being pampered is, unfathomably, not your thing, you can indulge in solitude, too: the salt grotto comprises the hotel’s underground lake, where you can weightlessly, mindlessly float in the saline water and feel the high-grade salt relieving any tension in your body; before hitting the sauna, which is enriched with crystal salt from the Himalayas. Another must-do is the Panoramic Whirlpool after sunset – the best place to enjoy the twinkling lights of Ortisei. The hotel has views covered – there’s also a panoramic relaxation area with floor-to-ceiling windows and an open fire, where you can unwind with a good book and the rare sound of silence, as well as a sauna and an open-air brine pool from which to enjoy the mountain vistas.

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TRAVEL

Away from the spa, it feels therapeutic just sitting on a sun-drenched sofa in the hotel’s cosy lounge, basking in the rays while gazing at the dramatic surroundings of the Dolomites, recognised as a UNESCO World Heritage Site for its impressive natural beauty. The lounge is small but elegant, with cowhide poufs, chic wooden coffee tables and stuffed bookcases. If you manage to muster up the energy to wear something other than your dressing gown and venture outside the hotel, walking around the tiny

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town of Ortisei is a chance to browse its quaint, eclectic shops where you can pick up everything from carved wooden goods to homemade honey in the cabins that line the streets. Make sure you head back in time for dinner. Adler Balance attracts people from all over the world thanks to its detox and weight loss programmes, although if you hadn’t signed up for one, you’d be forgiven for never knowing these health-centric courses took place here. At breakfast, tables are heaving under countless loaves of freshly baked, fragrant bread, while dinners are a five-course affair with a different menu every night: lamb with a tuna and coffee crust, carnaroli risotto with blueberries, aubergine and tofu pie… and there’s no chance of watching the waistline and going for three courses instead, as the friendly waiters look genuinely devastated if you try to skip a course. This genre of indulgence, though, is the best sort: despite the five-course dinners, steaming hot chocolates and indulgent breakfast crêpes – and the fact I haven’t done much but eat and fall asleep in various rooms in the spa – I do feel trimmer somehow. Eating, lazing, drinking and snoozing, but still feeling healthier: how is that possible? It must be that matchless mountain air.

NEED TO KNOW A three-night, half-board stay in a Junior Suite at the Adler Balance Spa & Health Residenz from approx. £495 per person, including vitality cuisine, access to Aguana Waterworld (the largest wellness zone in the Dolomites), Adler Fit extensive indoor and outdoor sports and leisure programme. Adler Beauty Package from approx. £125, including one facial, one pedicure and entrance to the Salt Grotto; Adler Health Screening Package from approx. £285, including bioelectric check-up, food intolerance test, personalised body package, anti-stress massage and dietary supplement, adler-balance.com

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Blazing Arizona Melissa Emerson braves the soaring temperatures for a road tripping, rock climbing adventure in the Grand Canyon State

sanctuary resort & spa

F

ollowing in the footsteps of Beyoncé is never a bad way to start a holiday. It’s not our honeymoon, but when my partner and I arrive in the scorching state of Arizona we’re headed for what was the star’s post-wedding destination. In our all-American SUV rental, it’s a short drive from Phoenix airport to Sanctuary Resort & Spa on the slopes of Camelback Mountain. After checking in, we’re whisked up to our casita in a golf buggy – walking in the so-called Valley of the Sun’s heat is definitely overrated – and are met with far-reaching views of Paradise Valley. The scene inside is equally as impressive. Our contemporary living and dining space is decorated in neutral tones to complement the dusty terrain, while the metallic-tiled feature wall and curved freestanding tub in the bathroom are inviting after our long journey. Post-soak, we surrender to an early night, keen to catch the next morning’s sunrise from our private patio, before heading out into Scottsdale’s Sonoran Desert. Juggling an early alarm – and the time difference – we arrive at Fort McDowell Adventures feeling a little sheepish at 6.30am and are greeted by the cowboy hat and spurs-

clad silhouette of our guide Troy Haviland. We’re saddled up by 7am, aiming to complete a two-hour horseback ride before the sun is too strong (it later reaches 39°C). Haviland’s stables are set in 25,000 acres of spectacular desert, on the 950-strong Native American Yavapai Nation’s reservation. During the peaceful, meandering trek through both open desert and shady tree-lined paths – one of which Haviland trims with a saw from his belt en route to clear the way (that’s desert life for you) – we spot a coyote, an eagle, wild horses and saguaro cacti that pepper every slope. Having always wanted to ride through water, splashing through the Verde River is a huge highlight of the morning – although I have difficulties persuading my horse not to lay down to cool off. It’s such a tranquil and secluded experience that we forget about everything, jetlag included. After a break in the shade, we’re ready to explore further, and head down the road to Pink Jeep Tours (its Scottsdale operation has now moved to Sedona) and climb into what looks remarkably like Barbie’s jeep for a rugged off-road experience. There’s also a chance to stop and explore short distances on foot and brush up on desert trivia; namely that the teddy bear cholla cactus is not as friendly as it sounds, and that the Sonoran Desert is the only place in

During the meandering trek through open desert, we spot a coyote, an eagle and wild horses sanctuary resort & spa


TRAVEL

the colorado river’s course through the grand canyon

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saguaro cacti in the sonoran desert

the boulders at night

the world where the famous saguaro cactus (pictured, right) grows in the wild. We learn that it can take up to ten years for the cactus to grow a single inch. On returning to the hotel, I’m tempted by the infinity pool but instead make a beeline for the Asian-inspired spa to scrub the dust away. It boasts indoor and outdoor treatment rooms, a Zen meditation garden and a pool where you can take a class with Olympic gold medallist Misty Hyman. Looking for something requiring a little less effort, I settle for the citrus lavender softening scrub and massage. Dinner at the in-house Elements restaurant also has an Asian twist. The restaurant, commended for its local and organic produce, presents elegant fusion cuisine and hamachi sashimi and miso-glazed salmon sit alongside bison carpaccio and lobster mac ’n’ cheese. The next day, we jump in the SUV and hit the Apache Trail. Once a stagecoach route through Superstition Mountains, the drive is not for the faint-hearted, especially when the paved section ends. To steady our nerves, we stop for refreshment – an ice cream made from the prickly pear cactus – at Tortilla Flat (population: six), which is the last surviving stop of the historic route. The rocky road’s views are worth the effort as we continue on to Apache Lake, one of four reservoirs formed by the damming of the Salt River. Driving done for the day, we later call an Uber from the hotel (that turns out to be a pickup truck) to head into downtown Scottsdale and the LDV Wine Gallery. Here we take our seats on the outdoor terrace, complete with fairy-lit cacti, and settle in to judge some of the estate’s home-grown, natural wines from south-eastern Arizona’s Chiricahua Mountains. The estate mostly produces reds, and the woody 2013 Syrah is a highlight. Dinner is a short stroll away at FnB restaurant, where local, seasonal and largely organic produce is transformed into dishes such as grilled asparagus, cauliflower cream and beet chips, and Brussels sprouts with curry, basil, lime and crispy onions. Such is the chef’s skill I turn vegetarian for the night without even realising it.

The Sonoran Desert is the only place in the world where the saguaro cactus grows in the wild We attempt to peer in some gallery windows after dinner, but the best way to enjoy the more than 70 art establishments and museums is on the weekly al fresco Scottsdale ArtWalk – an open-house night where you can wander between venues, observe artist demonstrations and enjoy drinks and nibbles. The next day we head on to northern Scottsdale and to our second hotel, The Boulders. Spread over 1,300 acres, with two championship golf courses and eight tennis courts, it has an altogether more natural feel. Its traditional Pueblo Adobe-style casitas, characterised by flat roofs, uneven


TRAVEL

GOLF COURSE AT THE BOULDERS

HACIENDA PATIO AT THE BOULDERS

parapets, rounded corners and earth tones, are set among the resort’s namesake granite boulder formations and a natural landscape of palo verde trees and wildflowers. We spy a covey of quail scuttling around a deer by our window and later we share the path to the main pool (one of four) with only a few lizards for company. It’s cosier too, with homely leather armchairs, shuttered windows, hand-hewn wooden beams and teal and orange accents in indigenous patterned fabrics. The rustic feel continues at the 33,000 sq ft spa. In a resort surrounded by boulders it feels appropriate to try the 75-minute Silent Stones Massage. The heated basalt stones, combined with a blue cypress and vetiver oil blend, are tension-releasing and sleep-inducing, and the spa even has a herb garden where guests can pick anything they like to have incorporated in their treatment. In the evening, we walk the short distance to the small El Pedregal complex of shops and galleries anchored by the resort, to dine at the Spotted Donkey Cantina. Down-toearth Mexican food such as hand-stuffed jalapeño peppers with bacon, cheese and coriander buttermilk sauce is served alongside dozens of different tequilas. Leaving what is said to be the best until last, we head to Arizona’s star attraction on our penultimate day, the Grand Canyon National Park. After a drive to Phoenix’s smaller Deer Valley Airport, we take off with Westwind Air Service. Flying over Tonto National Forest (the fifth largest in the US), the famed red rocks of Sedona and the Canyon itself is a breathtaking lesson in the state’s geography, and I’m torn between taking photos and simply staring out of the window and trying to remember it all. As well as an aerial tour, our excursion includes a guided three-mile round-trip hike from the North Rim, and we lunch down in the Canyon – surely the most unique picnic spot of all time. With a guide carrying the food and water and keeping us on track, we’re free to let our thoughts wander and absorb the scenery. Getting a perspective of the Canyon from above, and then a measure of its scale up close, is the perfect way to experience its arresting beauty.

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cASITAS BY THE DUCK POND AT THE BOULDERS

Now fully versed in the cowboy lifestyle, on our last night we drive a short way to Cave Creek and dine at Bryan’s Black Mountain Barbecue restaurant. Its pulled pork, Six Pack Cowboy Beans and Frog Leg Fridays are true frontier fare, and serve as the perfect introduction to the amateur bullriding at The Buffalo Chip Saloon nearby. Our last day sadly comes and we join Rico Riley of Black Mountain Adventures, who hosts rock climbing on one of the resort’s towering boulder formations, to squeeze in one final adventurous encounter. It takes some motivational chants from Riley to keep me going when I have a wobble halfway, but scaling a sheer rock face, using only its tiny cracks and irregularities for hand holds, and reaching the top might I add, is something I’ve still not finished boasting about. It proves to be the perfect feel-good activity to end on. For those needing to break free from their desks, Scottsdale’s natural wonders are worlds away from city life. Whether you’re rejuvenating in its elegant spa resorts, scaling rocks or rubbing shoulders with cowboys ringside, Arizona has far more to offer than a detour to see the Grand Canyon. Don’t forget to pack your cowboy hat. Sanctuary Resort & Spa from £214 a night, sanctuaryoncamelback.com; The Boulders from £111 a night (May-August), theboulders.com; experiencescottsdale.com

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london

20 GRAFTON STREET UK.HOLLYHUNT.COM


Property Listings See below for estate agents in your area

Aston Chase 69-71 Park Road NW1 6XU 020 7724 4724 astonchase.com

Hudsons Property 24 Charlotte Street W1T 2ND 020 7323 2277

Marsh & Parsons 94 Baker Street W1U 6FZ 020 7935 1775 marshandparsons.co.uk

hudsonproperty.com

CBRE Henrietta House 8 Henrietta Place W1G 0NB 020 7182 2000 cbre.co.uk

Chestertons 47 South Audley Street W1K 2AQ 020 7629 4513 40 Connaught Street W2 2AB 020 7298 5900 chestertons.com

Kay & Co 20a Paddington Street W1U 5QP 020 7486 6338 24-25 Albion Street W2 2AX 020 3468 0917 kayandco.com

Knight Frank 49 & 55 Baker Street W1U 8EW 020 3435 6440

Robert Irving Burns 23-24 Margaret Street W1W 8LK 020 7637 0821 rib.co.uk

Rokstone 5 Dorset Street W1U 6QJ 020 7486 3320 rokstone.com

5-7 Wellington Place NW8 7PB 020 7586 2777 knightfrank.co.uk

Sotheby’s Realty 77-79 Ebury Street SW1W 0NZ 020 3714 0749 sothebysrealty.co.uk

For estate agent listings please contact Sophie Roberts at s.roberts@runwildgroup.co.uk


Aristocrats,Artists, Artists, Ballerinas Aristocrats, Ballerinas, Bankers,CFOs, CFOs, CEOs, CEOs Bankers, Entrepreneurs, Generals, Generals, Gurus Entrepreneurs, Gurus, InteriorDesigners, Designers, Lawyers Interior Lawyers, Lecturers,Media Media Moguls, Moguls Movie Lecturers, Movie Stars, Oligarchs Stars, Oligarchs, Philanthropists, Philanthropists, Politicians Politicians, Presidents, Presidents, Rappers Rappers, Rock-Stars, Royalty… Rock-Stars, Royalty… to name but a few to name but a few

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HOMES showcasing the

finest HOMES & PROPERTY from the best estate agents

Elegant & exclusive

The latest prime properties

Image courtesy of Chestertons


Goodge Street, Fitzrovia W1 Contemporary two bedroom apartment This well presented first floor apartment provides well planned living accommodation. Master bedroom with en suite WC, 2nd bedroom, shower room with WC, open plan living space with fitted kitchen and dining area and access on to a private balcony. Excellently located in the heart of Fitzrovia, close to the boutique shops and restaurants. EPC: D Approximately 56 sq m (603 sq ft).   Leasehold: approximately 97 years 6 months remaining

Guide price: £1,100,000

KnightFrank.co.uk/marylebone marylebone@knightfrank.com 020 3641 7938  

@KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

KnightFrank.co.uk/MRY150070

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Upper Wimpole Street, Marylebone W1 Eight bedroom Georgian house with adjoining mews house and garage Incredible house benefiting from ample windows allowing an abundance of natural light, high ceilings and lift. 8 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms (1 en suite), 3 reception rooms, grand dining room, office and study, spacious family kitchen/breakfast room, utility room, separate WC, patio and balcony. Self contained apartment on the lower ground floor; 2 bedrooms, bathroom, reception room, kitchen, garden and patio. The mews house comprises 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, reception room, kitchen, double and single garage.   Approximately 932.74 sq m (10,040 sq ft).   Freehold

Guide price: £13,500,000

KnightFrank.co.uk/marylebone marylebone@knightfrank.com 020 3641 7938  

@KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

KnightFrank.co.uk/WER060063

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Molyneux Street, Marylebone W1 Recently refurbished three bedroom Georgian house The house has been meticulously interior designed by designer Lesley Kingsbury. Master bedroom with dressing room and en suite bathroom, 2 further bedrooms, TV room (which could be used as 4th bedroom), 2 shower rooms, reception room, library, study, open plan kitchen/dining room, garden with vertical living plant wall and terrace. Further benefits include Sonos system and ceiling speakers throughout, air conditioning and underfloor heating in the whole of the lower ground floor and all of the bathrooms. Westminster residents parking (Zone F). EPC: D. Approximately 167.2 sq m (1,800 sq ft).   Freehold

Guide price: £3,295,000

KnightFrank.co.uk/marylebone marylebone@knightfrank.com 020 3641 7938  

@KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

KnightFrank.co.uk/MRY160150

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Introducing One Seymour Street, a spectacular collection of new 1, 2 and 3 bed apartments in Marylebone R EG I S T ER YO U R I N T ER E S T 020 7971 7637 oneseymourstreet@knightfrank.com oneseymourstreet.com

Prices from £905,000 COMPLE TION Q2 2018


Full house When it comes to Marylebone, no agency has more feet on the ground than Knight Frank. Office head Christian Lock-Necrews and lettings manager Arya Salari explain what sets their team apart

BACK ROW, L-R: SALES ASSOCIATE MITCHELL MURPHY; OFFICE MANAGER SARAH HERRING; OFFICE HEAD CHRISTIAN LOCK-NECREWS; SALES NEGOTiATOR ALI MATHEWS; LETTINGS MANAGER ARYA SALARI; SENIOR NEGOTIATOR CRAIG DRAPER FRONT ROW L-R: senior lettings negotiator ryan stokes; LETTINGS NEGOTIATOR LIZZIE NORMANDALE; LETTINGS NEGOTIATOR DAISY MUNRO; MARKETING COORDINATOR KATE BURNFORD IMAGE ©sarel jansen


property

O

rganising a photo shoot can be tricky at the best of times – arranging one for an entire office of ten is harder still. “We’re one of the biggest agencies in Marylebone,” office head Christian Lock-Necrews begins proudly, as he poses alongside his fellow Knight Frank colleagues in a light-filled, first floor and mezzanine level apartment currently for sale in The Park Crescent development. “We want our buyers, tenants and landlords to know how many team members we have dedicated to this area. Knight Frank is a truly international brand, but we are specialists in the local market.” Lock-Necrews certainly knows his stuff. He has been working in the area for 15 years, and opened the Marylebone office in 2008. His is a familiar face, but others, such as Arya Salari, might be less so. He joins the team as lettings manager this month, bringing with him a decade of experience in west London. His arrival has coincided with the lettings team announcing its strongest rental year to date. The number of new tenancies agreed was 22 per cent higher year-on-year in the six months to February. “There’s more stabilisation in the market at the moment,” Salari says. “Over the last two years vendors weren’t achieving the prices they wanted, so they turned to lettings. This pushed up stock levels and meant that prices declined because there was so much competition.” With these price declines gradually bottoming out, the team is busy building up its portfolio of rental properties in preparation for the traditionally busy summer months. Things are turning a corner for the sales team too. A remarkable 18 sales have been

agreed in the past fortnight. “It’s a case of right properties, right buyers,” Lock-Necrews explains. “Vendors who want to sell at market value will sell.” Although the figures speak for themselves, it’s the change in sentiment that Lock-Necrews and Salari believe marks a more important shift in the property market. “When you speak to buyers, they say they’ve been sitting, watching and waiting for two years now, but the world hasn’t changed – London is still a good place to invest,” he continues. A case in point is the raft of first-class developments on the Knight Frank books, from Chiltern Place and One Seymour Street, to 19 Bolsover Street and the aforementioned Park Crescent. These new, state-of-the-art offerings and sensitive refurbishment schemes have enticed international buyers, who have also been driven to invest by the weaker pound. This growing confidence at a global level is now trickling down to the domestic sales market too: the number of properties under offer was 22 per cent higher year-on-year in the three months to February and the number of exchanges was up 13 per cent during the same period. The message from the Marylebone team is clear: this year will be a better property market than most expected it to be. Factors such as stamp duty increases and the triggering of Article 50 have now happened, so it’s very much business as usual. “It’s certainly a time of change,” Lock-Necrews says. “We’ve got the strongest team we’ve ever had in place. We’re committed to this area and have real confidence, both in the future of Marylebone, and more importantly, the present day.”

“Knight Frank is a truly international brand, but we are specialists in the local market”

s l u x u ry l o n d o n . c o. u k s

55 Baker Street, W1U, 020 3641 7938, knightfrank.co.uk

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CARRINGTON HOUSE MAYFAIR W1 A ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT IN THE HEART OF MAYFAIR A spacious one bedroom apartment located on the second floor of a period mansion block within the heart of Mayfair. The flat comprises of one double bedroom, large size reception room with dining area, separate kitchen & bathroom. Located within walking distance to all the amenities of Mayfair. Accommodation: Entrance hall, reception room/dining room, kitchen, bedroom ,shower Room. Amenities: Porter, lift.

londonsales@beauchamp.com +44 (0) 20 7499 7722

www.beauchamp.com

·

24 Curzon Street, London W1J 7TF

£1,200,000 Leasehold

·

+44 (0)20 7499 7722


CHESTERFIELD HOUSE MAYFAIR W1 AN EXCLUSIVE MAYFAIR APARTMENT A desirable one bedroom flat located on the 7th floor of this portered block in the heart of Mayfair. With an abundance of natural light and in excellent condition the property also has the benefit of wood flooring throughout plus communal heating and hot water. Accommodation: Reception room, dining room, kitchen, bedroom, shower room. Amenities: 24-Hour concierge/porter, lift.

£1,700,000 Leasehold

www.beauchamp.com

londonsales@beauchamp.com +44 (0) 20 7499 7722

·

24 Curzon Street, Street , London W1J 7TF

·

+44 (0)20 7499 7722


ONE HYDE PARK KNIGHTSBRIDGE SW1 A BRIGHT, MODERN RECENTLY REFURBISHED THREE BEDROOM APARTMENT Comprising some 3,475 sqft and moments away from Knightsbridge and Hyde Park, the apartment offers the very best in luxurious living. This prestigious area has an array of high-end fine dining restaurants and bars and some of London’s leading hotels, including the Mandarin Oriental Hotel just next door. Accommodation: Entrance hall, Reception room, Kitchen, Dining room, 2 Bedrooms with ensuite bathrooms and dressing rooms, 1 Further bedroom, Guest shower room. Amenities: Terrace, 24-hour concierge, Residents only spa and leisure facilities.


£12,000 / Week

Karolina@beauchamp.com

No tenant fees

+44 (0)20 7499 7722

www.beauchamp.com www.beauchamp.com · · 24 24 Curzon Curzon Street, Street, London LondonW1J W1J 7TF 7TF · · +44 +44 (0)20 (0)20 7722 7722 9793 9793


Buckingham Gate, Westminster SW1H

ÂŁ895 per week

A stunningly located, three double bedroom lateral apartment situated within this grand red brick mansion building near to Green Park and Buckingham Palace. The property benefits from a large family kitchen, bright reception room and porter service. EPC rating B. Approximately 1,139 sq ft (106 sq m). Three bedrooms | Two bath/shower rooms (one en suite) | Reception room | Kitchen | Porter | Lift

Available furnished for a long let

77-79 Ebury Street, London SW1W 0NZ sothebysrealty.co.uk +44 20 7495 9580 | london@sothebysrealty.co.uk


sothebysrealty.co.uk

Whitehall Court, St James’s SW1A

£3,950,000

Situated on the third floor of this imposing and highly sought after period building in the heart of Westminster, the apartment has been refurbished to an extremely high standard throughout. EPC rating C. Approximately 2,180 sq ft (203 sq m). Master bedroom with en suite bathroom | Two further bedrooms | Two further bath/shower rooms | Reception room | Dining room | Kitchen| Four balconies | Lift | Porter

Leasehold: approximately 71 years remaining

© 2016 UK Sotheby’s International Realty. All rights reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty is a registered trademark licensed to UK Sotheby’s International Realty in the UK. Each offïce is independently owned and operated. All information non - contractual, approximate and subject to error, change and withdrawal without notice. Rent excludes administration fees. Please contact our offïces who can provide this information.


Prime Period Property with Town Garden Upper Wimpole Street, Marylebone, W1G

• Two Bedrooms • Two Bathrooms • Guest WC • Kitchen • Reception/Dining Room • Utility Room • Garden • Approximately 1,050 Sq. Ft • Energy Rating: E

£1,995,000 Leasehold Kay & Co Marylebone & Fitzrovia Sales

020 3394 0027

marylebone@kayandco.com kayandco.com

Penthouse Apartment with a Private Roof Terrace Great Titchfield Street, Fitzrovia, W1W

• Two Bedrooms • Two Bathrooms • Guest WC • Kitchen • Private Roof Terrace • From 700 Sq. Ft - 1,508 Sq. Ft Approximately • Energy Rating: C

From £950 - £1,800 Per Week Furnished Kay & Co Marylebone & Fitzrovia Lettings

020 3394 0027

marylebone@kayandco.com kayandco.com

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Not just

Opening Doors In Marylebone & Fitzrovia Since 1982 We’ve used our in depth street-by-street local knowledge for the past 35 years to make lasting property matches. Whether you are buying, selling or renting, we know where the best lattÊ is, where to park and what the neighbours are really like. Does your agent? Let us give your next move the care and attention it deserves. KAY & CO MARYLEBONE & FITZROVIA 20a Paddington Street, London, W1U 5QP

marylebone@kayandco.com 020 3394 0027 kayandco.com

14:41


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Clifton Gardens Maida Vale W9 • • • • • •

Existing building of approximately 16,736 sq ft (GIA), comprising 16 apartments, formerly Metropolitan Police residential accommodation. Residents benefit from private access to 3.5 acres of scenic gardens. Convenient and desirable location close to amenities and Little Venice. 2-minute walk from Warwick Avenue Underground Station and 13-minute walk from London Paddington Station. Significant residential redevelopment potential for a multiple dwelling scheme (subject to obtaining the necessary consents). Freehold sale

020 7580 2030 WWW.ROKSTONE.COM 5 Dorset Street, London, W1U 6QJ enquiries@rokstone.com

Price: £27,000,000


NEW HOMES BATEMAN STREET, SOHO, W1 BRAND NEW DEVELOPMENT

Prices from £1,490,000

SHOW APARTMENT READY FOR VIEWINGS

Four apartments work across the five levels of the building but no two are the same. One bed or two bed. Terrace or cinema room. Entering from Bateman Street or Royalty Mews. Soho breeds individuality. Our creative team devoted 2,260 hours of meticulous architectural and interior design time to this project.

BOURLET CLOSE FITZROVIA W1

Prices from £957,750 A development of six meticulously designed 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments within this attractive period conversion located in the heart of fashionable Fitzrovia.

020 7927 0616

newhomes@rib.co.uk

23-24 Margaret Street, London, W1W 8LF 6817 - RIB - Marylebone and Fitzrovia SALES Ad April 2017.indd 1

www.rib.co.uk 07/04/2017 15:36


PROPERTY

Property news PrimeResi brings you the latest news in prime property and development in London

One in a million

images courtesy of grosvenor

Watch that space Grosvenor reveals new plans for Berkeley Square

G

rosvenor is following through on its 20-year vision for Mayfair and Belgravia by publishing a suite of “bold commitments” for the public realm around Berkeley Square. Architects BDP have drawn up the £4m plans for Grosvenor, in partnership with Westminster City Council and Lancer, for public display. Plans will see the northern half of Berkeley Square, which forms part of the southern boundary of Grosvenor’s estate, transformed. Changes focus on the “notoriously busy, traffic-heavy junction” with Mount Street and Davies Street. This patch will receive upgrades including: significantly widening pavements and doubling overall pavement space; safer, more secure and attractive streets for cycling; replacing uncoordinated traffic signals and pedestrian crossings; planting new trees and installing high quality paving stones and street furniture; and creating a dedicated

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place for public art installations. “We have a 20-year vision for this great estate to adapt at the heart of our global city,” says Will Bax, executive director of London estate for Grosvenor Britain and Ireland. “We want better streets with a world class public realm that put the needs of pedestrians and cyclists over motorised traffic. We want it to be more flexible and appealing to all.” “I welcome Grosvenor’s desire to improve Berkeley Square,” said Councillor Daniel Astaire, cabinet member for planning and public realm. “We encourage all proposals to enhance the public realm.”

The number of £1m+ mortgages jumped by 24 per cent last year as banks lend to owner-occupiers over property developers A peer-to-peer lending platform has worked out that the number of new seven-figure residential mortgages increased by 24 per cent last year, with banks’ behaviour indicating a preference for lending money to owner-occupiers over developers. The number of new £1m+ residential mortgages increased from 3,896 in 2015 to 4,844 in 2016, reports Lendy, while the total value rose by 18 per cent over the same period, from £7.59bn to £8.95bn. At the same time, lending to residential developers dropped by seven per cent. New and upgraded regulations are encouraging banks to be more liberal with the owner-occupier market while cutting exposure to property developers, says Lendy. Liam Brooke, co-founder of Lendy comments: “As more and more money goes to owner-occupiers, housing targets will continue to be missed unless banks allocate more money to developers who build multiple homes at rapid rates. As the balance of lending shifts, it is smaller developers that are losing out. “It is these small and medium sized developers that have found it hard to get funding from banks since the financial crisis. Peer-to-peer platforms such as ourselves are contributing more and more in getting new developments off the ground.” lendy.co.uk

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Property news Centre of gravity has shifted in PCL Land Registry statistics show huge gulf in performance between neighbourhoods as buyers seek out value and new transport links Last year marked a distinct shift in Central London’s “centre of gravity”, according to London Central Portfolio, away from the traditional luxury enclaves and into areas with gentrification potential. Using newly-released full-year statistics from the Land Registry, the investment firm has plotted the performance of all the key neighbourhoods of PCL over the 12-month period, highlighting the gulf in performance between the stalwarts and (relatively) more up-and-coming districts. Areas where prices average £2m or more have suffered in the wake of successive Stamp Duty Land Tax increases. Chelsea has been hardest hit of all, posting a 12.2 per cent fall in average prices and a 28.5 per cent fall in sales volumes. Kensington, St James’s and Mayfair were also significantly affected. Marylebone, Fitzrovia and Soho outperformed everywhere with a mighty 19.7 per cent uplift in prices, while increases were also seen in PCL’s other lower value areas including Notting Hill, Paddington and Bayswater (11 per cent), Pimlico (2.9 per cent) and Westminster and Victoria (2.6 per cent). LCP expects this kind of activity to continue in the lower value areas as long as we have the combination of weak sterling and low interest rates at play, while the market may take longer to correct in luxury areas as prices rebase themselves to factor in the higher transaction costs. londoncentralportfolio.com

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Spotlight on lettings Arya Salari, head of lettings at Knight Frank’s Marylebone office, considers the importance of presentation in rental properties “As a surprise for my girlfriend, I have booked tickets for us to see a screening of Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo & Juliet. The tickets sold out surprisingly quickly, in no small part due to the fact that the film will be played inside a beautiful candle-lit church in Marylebone with an accompanying live choir. Atmosphere and visuals are hugely important in setting a scene, and nowhere does this apply more than in the property industry. Dressing a property can make a huge difference to the speed at which it gets let and at what price. A fragrant candle, some beautiful flowers

“Dressing a property can make a huge difference to the speed at which it gets let and at what price” and a pile of artfully presented books all help to set a scene. As lettings agents, we are ultimately selling a lifestyle; we want the tenant to fall in love with what that lifestyle offers and desire it for themselves. As we enter the summer’s historically busy lettings market, it is important for landlords to remember that there is always competition within the marketplace, as applicants have a large selection of properties to choose from. Remember that the ‘first impression is the last impression’.” If you would like any advice on the marketing of your property, please do not hesitate to get in touch with me at: arya.salari@knightfrank.com

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Hyde Park Sales 020 7298 5900

sales.hydepark@chestertons.com

Haselbury House, Marylebone W1

ÂŁ1,995,000 leasehold

A 2 bedroom apartment of approx. 1,036 sq ft with 24hr porterage, beautiful wood flooring throughout, working fireplaces & high ceilings. Haselbury House is centrally located with easy access to a wealth of restaurants, shops & amenities. The nearest underground stations are Marble Arch & Baker Street. EPC rating D

Mayfair Sales 020 7629 4513

Portland Place, Mayfair W1B

sales.mayfair@chestertons.com

A beautifully decorated apartment set within a very exclusive portered block. The apartment offers a bright open plan reception room with designer Italian kitchen, 2 double bedrooms (both with en-suites) & a guest cloakroom. EPC rating C

chestertons.com

ÂŁ1,100,000 leasehold


Hyde Park Lettings 020 7298 5950

Clifton Place, Hyde Park W2

lettings.hydepark@chestertons.com

£1,100 per week / £4,767 per month

A fantastic interior designed Gabsdan Developments apartment within a portered block on the Hyde Park Estate, featuring a large reception room & 3 double bedrooms. Located within easy reach of Paddington & Lancaster Gate stations & Hyde Park. EPC rating D

Marylebone Lettings 020 7368 3048

Mandeville Place, Marylebone W1U

An immaculate, newly renovated 3 bedroom lateral apartment in Marylebone superbly located for all the amenities of Oxford Street & the West End. The property is finished to a very high standard throughout & benefits from generous proportions. EPC rating D

Additional tenant charges apply: Tenancy agreement fee: £222 (inc. VAT) References per tenant including credit check: £60 (inc. VAT) References per guarantor including credit check: £60 (inc. VAT) Inventory check (approx. £100 – £250 inc. VAT dependent on property size) chestertons.com/property-to-rent/applicable-fees

lettings.marylebone@chestertons.com

£1,800 per week / £7,800 per month


Marylebone & Fitzrovia Magazine May 2017  

Welcome to the latest edition of Marylebone & Fitzrovia magazine, celebrating the dynamism of the area and bringing you the latest features,...

Marylebone & Fitzrovia Magazine May 2017  

Welcome to the latest edition of Marylebone & Fitzrovia magazine, celebrating the dynamism of the area and bringing you the latest features,...

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