Experience Rundle Guide

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RUNDLE

EXPERIENCE

RUNDLE 22/23 PROGRAM GUIDE

IMAGINE the POSSIBILITIES

K–12


EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

WELCOME

OUR MISSION Thank you for your interest in the programs we offer at Rundle. We are excited to share why we believe Rundle is one of the best educational institutions in Canada. We hope the next few pages will help you experience what it means to be part of our Rundle community and how a Rundle education will benefit your child.

To create a nurturing, engaging environment that provides an enriched, personalized education, preparing students for an ever-changing world. Rundle College will: • help students discover their potential; • challenge students to attain their best; and • celebrate with them when they do.

OUR VISION To develop inspired minds and unparalleled character.

OUR VALUES Together: Be Kind, Be Curious, Be Well Our community embraces each of these values daily — inside and outside the classroom. They are at the core of every student’s Rundle experience.

LAND ACKNOWLEDGMENT In the spirit of reconciliation, we acknowledge that Rundle schools are located in places in which we live, work and play on the traditional territories of the Blackfoot Confederacy (Siksika, Kainai, Piikani), the Tsuut’ina, the Îyâxe Nakoda Nations, the Métis Nation (Region 3), and all people who make their homes in the Treaty 7 region of Southern Alberta.

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CONTENTS EXPERIENCE RUNDLE The Rundle Experience..............................................................4 Head’s Welcome......................................................................... 6 Pluralism, Wellness & Innovation............................................ 8 Rundle’s Pathways to Learning............................................... 9 Technology .................................................................................10 The World Awaits!...................................................................... 12 Giving At Rundle........................................................................ 14

EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

Our Team.................................................................................. 100 RUNDLE ACADEMY Academy Overview.................................................................. 17 Academy 4–6 Program...........................................................22 Academy 7–9 Program...........................................................28 Academy 10–12 Program........................................................ 33 10–12 Sample Timetable......................................................... 46

ACADEMY

APPLY TODAY

RUNDLE COLLEGE College Overview..................................................................... 49 College K–6 Overview............................................................50 College K–3 Program.............................................................. 53 College 4–6 Program..............................................................60

COLLEGE

APPLY TODAY

College 7–12 Overview........................................................... 67 College 7–9 Program.............................................................. 72 College 10–12 Program............................................................77 10–12 Sample Timetable.........................................................88 RUNDLE STUDIO

STUDIO

APPLY TODAY

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Studio Overview.........................................................................91 Studio 7–9 Program................................................................. 94 Studio Sample Timetable.......................................................98

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THE RUNDLE EXPERIENCE TOGETHER: BE KIND, BE CURIOUS, BE WELL Our value statement guides our thoughts and actions. By following these simple words, we strengthen character. We truly believe one’s character is central to a life of fulfillment, happiness, and success.

EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

Throughout Rundle, you see this value statement come to life in our students’ learning and actions.

Rundle is a private, university preparatory, coeducational day school with a proven model of mentorship and guidance. Small class sizes, an enriched curriculum, and diverse co-curricular opportunities are pillars of our three distinct academic programs: the College (K–12), Academy (4–12), and virtual Studio (7–9). Our Academy and Studio programs specialize in teaching students with diagnosed learning disabilities and/or ADHD. All three schools come under the umbrella of Rundle College Society. We offer a highly sought-after, internationally acclaimed educational program that cultivates wellrounded, future-ready, global-minded graduates — confident learners, critical thinkers, and savvy world citizens who will shape tomorrow’s world. The scholars, scientists, business and community leaders, artists, musicians, and athletes of the future are in Rundle classes today. What they experience and learn alongside peers prepares them for success in every aspect of their personal lives and sets the foundation for advancement along diverse and innovative career avenues.

and demonstrate who they are as individuals. Through athletics, fine arts, travel programs, clubs, leadership opportunities, participation in research, cultural exploration, and more, Rundle enhances learning and expands students’ perspectives of the world around them — and the wealth of possibilities ahead. At Rundle, learning happens formally and informally through a multitude of channels. Small class sizes offer the ideal environment for interaction among teachers and students, and encourage students to find their voice and share their ideas. Teachers get to know their students, understand the learning style in which each thrives, and recognize what motivates students to reach higher and achieve more. The performance of Rundle students on provincial exams and the success of Rundle alumni who receive top scholarships and bursaries from leading postsecondary institutions reflect the profound impact Rundle’s environment has on students’ learning.

Rundle’s rigorous academic programs, exciting and challenging physical activities, campus and community events, and co-curricular opportunities provide students with opportunities to build their character

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RUNDLE STUDENTS

EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

PURSUE

intellectual engagement

CREATE

our vibrant school community

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INITIATE new challenges

LEAD

in our school and in their community

THRIVE

in postsecondary education

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HEAD’S WELCOME

EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

DEAR PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS AND FAMILIES,

Our current educational landscape offers many quality educational options for our children. For those of you who are considering Rundle, I hope that you find this guide a helpful part of your decisionmaking process. Finding the right school is an important decision, and we thank you for considering Rundle.

For families new to Rundle, let me share the essence of the ‘Rundle Experience’ with you and reinforce the benefits of the very important educational choice you have made. In 1985, Dr. W.J. Collett and Dr. R.C. Conklin founded Rundle and set out to create a world class educational institution where students would not fall through the cracks of a larger system and where they could reach their full potential. Their vision included small class sizes and students taught by the most talented and dedicated teachers. Our founders believed that, through this essential combination of class size and instructional excellence, students would be stewarded to achieve their very best. To this day, we have an unwavering focus on the shaping of inspired minds and unparalleled character in each and every one of our students. It is our hope that each student who attends a Rundle school will be an engaged, valued, and understood member of our school community. We aspire to see our students take full advantage of each element of our Pathways to Learning: character, academics and co-curricular pursuits.

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Character At Rundle, character comes first. Our students’ pursuit of strong character through our values, Together: Be Kind, Be Curious, Be Well, is central to their success in our program and in our world. We believe that, above all else, children who embody fine character will go forward and not only live happy and fulfilled lives; they will also have an opportunity to change the world for the better.

Academics Academics have always been the focus of our programs. The academic results of Rundle students consistently rise above the provincial averages on subject-specific diploma exams, a direct reflection of the quality of instruction our students receive and their commitment to their studies. In alignment with our values, students are supported as they embrace interests beyond academics. Rundle’s program of studies provides students with time to focus on mental and physical wellness, volunteering, athletics, co-curricular clubs, global connections, and humanitarian pursuits. TABLE OF CONTENTS


Co-Curricular Pursuits Co-curricular pursuits balance the ‘Rundle Experience.’ Admittedly, none of Rundle’s programs are community schools, so we aim to create community in our schools. We build this community by providing co-curricular opportunities in the form of clubs, activities and teams. There is a diversity of experiences for students to get involved in; from academics, to the arts, to athletics, to character pursuits, there is something for every student at Rundle.

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Through the pursuit of excellence in our Pathways to Learning, we hope that we will develop learners whose grades are impressive; however, their grades will be the least impressive thing about them. Dr. W. J. Collett and Dr. R. C. Conklin were visionaries. Every day, every member of our community continues the tradition of excellence in education that they championed. I look forward to welcoming you and your family to the Rundle community. Sincerely,

Jason Rogers Head of School, Rundle College Society

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EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

The strength and agility of our staff, students, and community is yet another facet of the ‘Rundle Experience’ that I am so proud of. In the face of adversity at the onset of the global pandemic, Rundle made the seamless shift to deliver exceptional education. During school closures, Rundle continued to rally and delivered opportunities to our students in all aspects of our Pathways to Learning. Through our REEDS program (Rundle’s Excellence in Education through Distance-Delivery System), students engaged in learning through curriculum, co-curricular activities and character initiatives. Although the challenge of

COVID has been a formative one, our response has met the adversity head on and as result, our community remains connected, positive and learning.


PLURALISM, WELLNESS & INNOVATION PLURALISM At Rundle, we have a working definition of pluralism as described by the Global Centre for Pluralism: “Diversity in society is a universal fact; how societies respond to diversity is a choice. Pluralism is a positive response to diversity. Pluralism involves taking decisions and actions, as individuals and societies, which are grounded in respect for diversity.”

EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

Rundle values the unique life experience that each person brings and we strive toward being a community where every person feels welcome and valued. Diversity enriches our school and provides a myriad of perspectives from which we can learn through our academic, co-curricular, and character programs.

WELLNESS At Rundle, we believe that wellness is dynamic, collective, and personal. In alignment with Stanford University’s BEWell Program, we believe there are ten domains of well-being: • • • • • • • • • •

social connectedness lifestyle behaviours stress and resilience emotional health physical health meaning and purpose sense of self finances spirituality or religiosity exploration and creativity

While all domains of wellness cannot be adhered to in every moment of our lives, we do believe that better understanding the domains and focusing on them at the appropriate time and stage of one’s life are essential for a lifetime of wellness. As a school, we will continue to encourage our students, teachers, and the greater community to focus on wellness.

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INNOVATION At Rundle, we believe that from curiosity comes creativity and from creativity comes innovation. Our value of “Be Curious” is the starting point for our staff and students to fully embrace innovation in their teaching and learning. A working definition of innovation can be found at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) where innovation is defined as “the process by which we take ideas from inception to impact.” At Rundle, we aspire to see our students taking their original thoughts and ideas and changing them into tangible actions that will go on to improve our school, city, country, and world. We believe the inspired minds of our students and teachers will not only bring program relevance in this ever-changing world but will also create the conditions for ongoing improvement in our greater society.

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RUNDLE’S PATHWAYS TO LEARNING Academics are at the core of our programs; however, at Rundle we aim to balance academic, co-curricular, and character programs. Students are so much more than just the grades on their papers. We encourage them to develop many talents and to choose kindness above all else.

CHARACTER

ACADEMICS

CO-CURRICULAR

Rundle’s character education program creates a kind and caring community with positive and healthy relationships for students, staff, and parents.

Rundle engages students’ minds, helping them to discover their passions and potential. Through our rigorous academic programs, students have every opportunity to become leaders of the future.

The extensive co-curricular program at Rundle is offered within and alongside the curriculum. Students participate in various artistic, athletic, character, and intellectual pursuits as part of the elevated education they receive at Rundle.

We believe that social and emotional learning is just as important as academic learning. Moreover, we want to inspire our students to practice and commit to moral and ethical behaviours.

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Rundle students' provincial exam results and the success of Rundle alumni who receive top scholarships and bursaries from leading postsecondary institutions reflect the profound impact of Rundle's learning environment.

What our students experience and learn alongside peers prepares them for success in every aspect of their personal lives and sets the foundation for careers that may not even exist today.

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EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

“Work hard to make your grades extraordinary. Work twice as hard to make sure they are the least impressive thing about you.” ­— Drew Dudley


EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

TECHNOLOGY

At Rundle, we provide our students with the required skills to help them navigate a technology-driven future.

DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP

ACADEMY

Digital citizenship at Rundle goes beyond students being mindful of their digital footprint. It includes being active citizens who look for online opportunities to dream, connect, collaborate, and create. “Digital citizenship is not so different from traditional citizenship. We still need to guide students to be kind, respectful and responsible. What’s new is teaching them how to apply these values to the realities of the digital age.” (International Society for Technology in Education, ISTE, Standards, 2021).

Rundle Academy students use a variety of apps and tools to enhance earning. Moodle is currently used for Learning Management and accessibility apps include Read & Write, IXL, Fluency Tutor and Screencastify to name a few. Notability and Flocabulary are also popular and used regularly. Plans are in place to migrate Rundle Academy students and teachers to the Canvas LMS which will provide enhanced teaching and learning opportunities.

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COLLEGE K–Grade 6 Technology, coding and robotics are integrated throughout our K-6 curriculum to strengthen students’ computational and critical thinking skills. Creativity in coding and robotics empowers students as they consume and produce digital content. The goal is for students to solve real-world challenges using design thinking.

In our junior high coding option, students explore Computer Science theory and its applications in programming and robotics. Through a computational thinking approach, students use programming languages such as Scratch and Python to develop their creative problem-solving, collaboration, and communication skills. The course also introduces students to different aspects of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, such as Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, 3-D Printing, and Big Data, as well as the ongoing effect of these on our world. Students consider the impacts of technological advances with a critical thinking lens.

STUDIO Rundle Studio is our online junior high school. Students are currently using Canvas as a learning management platform, with Google Workspace integration. They participate in daily social interaction with tools like Gather, and Zoom is used for classroom collaboration and lesson delivery. Student esports athletes use esports.org, Discord, and Twitch to communicate and live stream. Students also use IXL, ST Math, and Sora to support their daily learning.

Grades 10–12 Senior high students research technological areas that are of interest to them as they prepare for their post-secondary journeys. For example in our Technology and Innovation program, students further their understanding of the MacOS environment and cloud based computing or of creative tech areas such as digital photography, digital drawings,

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WHAT WILL YO CREATE U ?

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EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

Grades 7–9

CAD, videography, and audio mixing. GOA (Global Online Academy) courses also provide students with a range of technological courses from coding languages to network structures and programming. Students on our Robotics Team combine the theoretical knowledge learned from our Technology and Innovation program and GOA courses with the practical element of building and designing robots for competition.


THE WORLD AWAITS! Each year, our graduates and alumni gain acceptance at some of the finest educational institutions across Canada and around the world. We celebrate their hard work and extraordinary achievements in their pursuit of further education at their post-secondary institutions of choice.

EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

Our Rundle graduates continue as lifelong learners in diverse fields of study such as the arts, business, science, and education. Many graduates continue their athletic passions as student athletes. Rundle graduates have also been awarded top academic scholarships and entrance awards. Collectively, our graduates have earned hundreds of thousands of dollars from a variety of scholarships.

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We are proud of our students’ scholarly successes; however, we are equally proud of the impact our graduates are making as global citizens of strong character. Rundle aspires to maintain lifelong relationships with our alumni. We uphold the values of our mission statement and support our alumni and their families at every opportunity.

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POST-SECONDARY ACCEPTANCE This comprehensive list shows where our alumni have been inspired to continue their learning journey.

CANADA

EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

Acadia University • Alberta University of the Arts • Ambrose University • Bishop’s University • Brock University • Carleton University • Concordia University • Dalhousie University • Emily Carr University of Art & Design • Georgian College • Grant MacEwan University • Humber College • Huron University College • McGill University • McMaster University • Memorial University • Mount Allison University • Mount Royal University • Queen’s University • Quest University • Royal Military College • Ryerson University • Simon Fraser University • Southern Alberta Institute of Technology • St. Francis Xavier University • St. Mary’s University • Thompson Rivers University • Trent University • Trinity Western University • University of Alberta • University of British Columbia • University of Calgary • University of Guelph • University of King’s College • University of Lethbridge • University of Manitoba • University of New Brunswick • University of Ottawa • University of Saskatchewan • University of Toronto • University of Victoria • University of Western Ontario • Vancouver Film School • Vancouver Island University • Waterloo University • Wilfred Laurier University • York University

UNITED STATES Arizona State University • Babson College • Baylor University • Bentley University • Berklee College of Music • Boise State • Boston University • Brown University • California State University • Chapman University • Colorado School of Mines • Dartmouth University • Drexel University • Florida Southern College • Harvard University • Hawaii Pacific University • High Point University • Hofstra University • Lewis & Clark University • Loyola Marymount University • Lynn University • Montana State University • New York University • Parsons School of Design • Pomona College • Princeton University • Rollins College • San Diego State University • Scripps College • St. John’s University, New York • Stanford University • Syracuse University • Texas Christian University • Texas State University • UCLA • University of Arizona • University of California, Berkeley • University of California, Los Angeles • University of California, San Diego • University of California, Santa Cruz • University of Colorado • University of Denver • University of Hawaii • University of Indianapolis • University of Michigan • University of Nevada, Reno • University of Omaha, Nebraska • University of Southern California • University of Missouri • University of Nevada, Las Vegas • University of Oregon • University of Rochester • University of San Diego • University of Texas • University of The Pacific Western • Washington University • Wellesley College • Whitman College

INTERNATIONAL Ayub Medical College • Bond University, Queensland • Bristol University • Cardiff University • City University London • Demontfort University • Durham University • École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne • Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Germany • King’s College • The Royal College of Surgeons, Ireland • Tsinghua University, Beijing • Universidad de Los Andes, Chile • University of Alcala de Henares, Spain • University of Cambridge • University College London • University of Edinburgh • University of Exeter • University of Glasgow • University of Melbourne • University of Oxford • University of Queensland • University of South Australia • University of St. Andrews • University of Strathclyde • University of Westminster, London • University of Wollongong, Australia • Utrecht University

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EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

GIVING AT RUNDLE

OUR CULTURE OF GENEROSITY At Rundle, developing a culture of giving within our community is crucial to maintaining our leadership in education. Our goal is to provide students with a well-rounded education. In order to offer engaging and innovative educational experiences for your child, we rely on generous gifts from supporters of Rundle. It is with this support that we can help our students discover their full potential.

Tuition and grant revenue fund the operations of the school. Rundle requires additional funding from our generous donors to support • enhancements to our exceptional programs; • financial assistance for current Rundle families in need; • necessary capital to improve or expand our facilities; and • new projects. We hope that your Rundle experience will inspire you to give back and enrich the lives of current and future students. At Rundle, the opportunities are endless.

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HOW TO GIVE DONATIONS CAN BE MADE ONLINE AT rundle.ab.ca/giving Donations over $25 are eligible for a tax receipt. For more information about our giving opportunities, please contact our Director of Alumni and Advancement, Mr. Aaron Goettel 403-291-3866 | giving@rundle.ab.ca.

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GIVING OPPORTUNITIES WHAT SPEAKS TO YOU? Our Rundle families generously support programs that align with their values and passions. Whether it’s the robotics or athletics program, providing bursaries for deserving students, or contributing to our capital campaigns, our families give to enrich not only their child’s experience, but to leave their legacy at Rundle. We invite you to find what speaks to you and be part of our culture of giving at Rundle.

Annual Campus Fund supports the enrichment of

selected projects and programs at our campuses each year. Gifts to this fund are immediately used to support needs in technology, academics, athletics, professional development, facility enhancement, and clubs.

diverse programs in the areas of greatest need and adhere to Rundle’s mission and values. The fund’s initiative is determined each year by the Head of School.

Rundle Academy Redesign Capital Campaign

was launched in 2018 to support the innovative facilities enhancements at our Rundle Academy campus. We are excited to partner with IDEO and Future Design School, the world’s leading experts in design, and are excited to provide our Academy students and faculty with modern, dynamic, and flexible learning spaces.

Rundle Bursary Fund is a fund that provides tuition assistance for students who continue to make a significant positive impact on our Rundle culture but no longer have the financial means to afford a Rundle education. Contributions to this fund leave the lasting legacies of helping many more students achieve success at Rundle and of supporting their educational journeys .

35 for 35 Named Family Endowment Funds In celebration of Rundle College’s 35th Anniversary in 2020, we are happy to offer the “opportunity of a lifetime.” This year, we will continue to offer our community the opportunity to create a Named Family Endowment Fund. This is a meaningful way to contribute to a Rundle program that is especially meaningful to you, by establishing a fund that provides an on-going gift that will benefit tuition assistance or a particular program and continue your family’s legacy at Rundle. Your gift of $35,000 to create your family’s endowment fund can be pledged over a five-year period.

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EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

Annual giving is the part of any independent school. Each year, we invite our families, alumni, and faculty to support our Vision & Values Campaign. Gifts made to the annual campaign allow us to continue providing an exceptional learning environment for our students. You will have the opportunity to support the following funds that are part of our annual Vision & Values Campaign.

Head of School Fund is an annual fund to support


IMAGINE

RUNDLE

ACADEMY

IMAGINE

a school community that SUPPORTS your learning journey


ACADEMY OVERVIEW Rundle Academy is a part of Rundle College Society and provides a premier educational experience for students in Grades 4–12 who have a diagnosed learning disabilities. We help students reach their potential in this academic program.

SCHOOL UNIFORM

Rundle Academy offers Grades 4–12 education on one campus, providing seamless grade-to-grade transitions from Rundle Academy Elementary to Rundle Academy Junior/Senior High. Students move through their learning journey in a place with which they are familiar, surrounded by teachers and peers they know — and who know them. Students forge deeper relationships by being part of a student community and do not need to learn new rules or a new school culture as they progress through each grade. In the most important ways, Rundle will always be Rundle.

Rundle Academy is a “uniform school” and students wear their uniforms with pride. Each program has its own unique component to the standard uniform, from the ties to the much-anticipated black vests for our graduating class. Students are required to be in uniform each day unless specifically advised otherwise.

CAMPUS AMENITIES Rundle Academy is located in the quiet residential community of Altadore. Students have access to • a full-sized gymnasium • a performing arts space

ATHLETICS: ROCKIES PRIDE! A member of the Calgary Independent Schools’ Athletic Association, Rundle is renowned for the strength of its athletics program. Numerous athletic teams combine both Rundle Academy and Rundle College students to develop a strong program. Many graduating student athletes continue their athletic pursuits at postsecondary institutions across Canada.

SCHOOL HANDBOOK

• outdoor playground and playing field

The Rundle Academy School Handbook provides complete information about academic regulations including

• numerous brand new classrooms

• attendance

• an innovative learning commons

• homework and assignment expectations

• science lab

• academic integrity

• an outdoor classroom

• student evaluation and grading

• technology centres

For parents, one campus for a child’s Grades 4–12 schooling means deeper relationships with teachers who truly come to know their students. Many of our families have students at both Rundle Academy and Rundle College and have strong connections with the entire Rundle community.

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• exam policy • our Student Code of Conduct • inclusivity • withdrawals, course changes and transfers This publication is available through our MyRundle portal.

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RUNDLE ACADEMY

COMMUNITY


STUDENT SERVICES

RUNDLE ACADEMY

Within the Student Services departments at Rundle there is a team of qualified, knowledgeable and skilled counsellors, learning strategists, a registered nurse and student support personnel who share some roles and have specialties within their school department.

The school nurses use a comprehensive school approach to facilitate health promotion activities throughout the school community. In the case of a communicable disease outbreak, our nurses work alongside Alberta Health Services Public Health to help monitor, report, and respond to the situation.

Counsellors provide social and emotional counselling, academic support, and career and post-secondary support. They also provide short-term counseling support for students in a number of different areas, but not limited to, anxiety, depression, grief and loss, transitions, and work relationship concerns. They work closely with administration on school-related matters, such as tracking student progress, monitoring academic and personal development, and crisis intervention.

Career and Post-Secondary Support

At the Academy, students and parents have several ways to access the school nurse and counsellors. Students are able to drop in, email, phone, or book a time through their teacher. Parents can reach our nurse or counsellor by phone or email.

• self assessments

Rundle Academy learning strategists support students who require additional support with remediation, strategy development, or explicit accommodation training. Requests for this support are initiated by the teacher and the student services team determines the length of support and availability based on the student’s need. Our school health nurses provide individual health support and school wide health promotion. The nurses work with students, their families, and community healthcare providers on comprehensive nursing health assessments pertaining to concerns about physical, emotional or social well-being. Our nurses actively participate in school safety plans, school health policy, and assessing the school environment to prevent injury and to promote student well-being.

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Student Services at Rundle provide comprehensive career and post-secondary support for students from junior high through high school. Grade 9 High School Planning • goal setting and learning styles assessment • high school course plan Grade 10 Career Direction and Exploration • post-secondary and career explorations • review high school course plan Grade 11 Career Exploration and Post-Secondary Planning • Strong Interest Inventory • post-secondary research • connect high school plan with university requirements • Canadian and international admission support Grade 12 One-On-One Support with Post-Secondary Admissions • individualized support with admissions, transcripts, and scholarships • parent and student presentations • connections with post-secondary representatives

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CHARACTER & LEADERSHIP

RUNDLE GIVES BACK

Rundle’s character education program creates a kind and caring community with positive and healthy relationships for students, staff, and parents.

All Rundle Academy students from grades 4-12 volunteer throughout the year with the residents at Wentworth Manor. This program allows students to see the long-term impact of their time and effort and permits them to form ongoing connections with the residents.

We believe that social and emotional learning is just as important as academic learning. Moreover, we want to inspire our students to practice and commit to moral and ethical behaviours.

Elementary Program

Junior High Program Rundle Academy’s junior high program supports character and leadership development with our annual orientation camp, the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, Rundle Academy’s CORE Value program, 100 Steps to the Summit, Student Ambassador Program, Prefects, and Kids Helping Kids club.

Senior High Program Rundle Academy’s senior high program supports character and leadership development with our annual orientation camp, the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, Rundle Academy’s Student Ambassador Program, Prefects, Kids Helping Kids club, Grade 6/12 buddies, and Peer Support. Art 30 students also participate in an 8-week program with Opening Minds Through Art. This intergenerational art-making program pairs our students with people with dementia and other forms of neurocognitive disorders.

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THE ASCENT At Rundle, we aim to inspire leaders. One path to inspired leadership is through “The Ascent: A Distinction in Leadership at Rundle.” To earn the 'Distinction in Leadership at Rundle,' Grade 12 students complete 10 modules (3 mandatory and 7 optional). We offer modules that are self-guided, direct instruction, exploratory, and include guest speakers. Each year, the module calendar is published and students are welcome to join any session they wish. Students develop their own leadership philosophy. The articulation of this philosophy is an individual pursuit. Some students may choose to write a personal leadership credo whereas others may choose to create a leadership vision board. Each student’s project is approved by a faculty advisor. Prior to receiving credit, the leadership distinction candidates are required to present their products to the ‘Distinction in Leadership at Rundle’ panel. Upon completion of the program and all of its requirements, each student receives a personalized letter of reference from Rundle’s Head of School. The letter of recognition articulates the rigor of the program and the capacity of the individual Rundle Leader of Distinction.

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RUNDLE ACADEMY

Rundle Academy’s Elementary program supports character and leadership development with our annual orientation camp and winter activities, our buddies program with grade 12s, Rundle Academy’s 100 Steps to the Summit, Student Ambassador Program, and Kids Helping Kids club.

In addition, students participating in our Kids Helping Kids club support a number of initiatives throughout the year including the Families and Schools Together program, Brown Bagging for Calgary Kids, Hull Homes Christmas Hamper Program, and Seniors Secret Service.


HEAD’S LIST

TRAVEL PROGRAM

The Head’s List celebrates the success of our students and their adherence to the mission, vision, and values of Rundle College Society. Students are acknowledged for their success in the areas of co-curricular activities, character development, and academic achievement.

Elementary Orientation Camp

RUNDLE ACADEMY

The process and requirements are unique depending on the program and the student’s division; however, the universal components include an adherence to high academic standing and evidence of the pursuit of our values: togetherness, kindness, curiosity, and wellness.

Elementary students have the opportunity to attend camp at the start of the year. The students are put into mixed grade groups to take part in many different team building activities. This two day camp is a great opportunity for everyone to come together, create friendships and allow for our community to grow.

Grade 7

Students who qualify for the Head’s List are recognized at their school’s awards day and on a special display in their school. Graduating students receive a letter of recognition from Rundle College Society detailing their accomplishment of earning the distinction of being on Rundle College Society’s Head’s List.

Grade 7 students have the opportunity to attend an overnight camp at the start of the year. Students take part and enjoy camp team building activities such as high and low ropes courses, canoeing, hiking, and horseback riding. Students stay overnight in cabins and evening activities include skits reflecting Rundle values while also enjoying the campfire and singing songs.

STUDENT CELEBRATIONS

Grade 7 competitive sports teams engage in league play within Calgary.

At Rundle, we believe that celebrating student success and achievement is fundamental to educating wellrounded citizens of good character. Every year, the Rundle community celebrates all aspects of student achievement at the Academic Awards Ceremonies. Students are also recognized for their hard work and grit at our annual Moves Mountains Breakfast. Numerous scholarships and bursaries are awarded each year to exceptional students who contribute to our school and who continue to give back to their local and global communities. Some scholarship recipients are chosen by Rundle faculty, while awards for future postsecondary study are based on student applications. Rundle prides itself on celebrating student achievement throughout the year in assemblies, rallies, and other events.

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Grade 8

Grade 11

Grade 8 students have the opportunity to attend an overnight camp at the start of the year. Students take part and enjoy camp team building activities such as high and low ropes courses, canoeing, hiking, and horseback riding. Grade 8 students stay overnight in cabins and evening activities include skits reflecting Rundle values while also enjoying the campfire and singing songs.

Students spend two nights at a camp outside of the city. They have opportunities to participate in challenging activities leading to a reflective piece on what it takes to be successful. Personal and academic goals are set for the year.

Grade 8 competitive sports teams play league games and attend tournaments.

Students spend two nights at a camp outside the city. They experience numerous team-building activities and are prompted to reflect about their leadership and personal goals heading into their final year of high school.

Each year students in grade 9 spend two days and one night camping out in the Kananaskis area. The trip is a way for students to learn some of the important skills for survival in the wilderness, hiking and trip planning, making camping meals, setting up tents, and general outdoor living skills. Even more importantly, they learn how to work as a group and build stronger relationships amongst their peers.

High School Athletics

Grade 9 competitive sports teams play league games and attend tournaments.

High School Travel Trips

Grade 9 students have the opportunity to travel to Ottawa, Quebec City, and Montreal. This trip provides countless opportunities to make real life connections to the junior high social studies curriculum. Students experience Parliament, the Senate, the Supreme Court, cultural museums, and the history and culture of New France.

Grade 10 Grade 10 students spend a day preparing at the school for an overnight backpacking trip into Kananaskis. Students hike into the Pine Grove campground using the Jumping Pound trail. Once they have set up camp, students participate in multiple activities focused on team building and goal setting.

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High school students have the opportunity to compete against other 1A/2A schools within the province for sports such as golf, football, basketball, volleyball, badminton, track and field, and ultimate frisbee. Our rugby team has gone to Victoria to train and compete and also has plans for international travel.

Europe – Students have had the opportunity to travel to many key locations related to World War I, World War II, and the French Revolution. The trip takes us through the countries of Germany, Belgium, and France to explore real world locations of historical events connected to the senior high Social Studies curriculum. Peru – This trip allowed students to experience one of the seven wonders of the world: Machu Picchu, as well as other historical sites in the region. Students taking our senior high Spanish courses had the opportunity to practice their language skills in a real-world context through making connections with local communities. Cambodia – Students immersed themselves in the local culture and history through culinary and artistic experiences. Students also visited renowned locations such as the Angkor Wat temple and the notorious killing fields from the Khmer Rouge regime. Students make global connections and explore what it means to be global citizens.

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RUNDLE ACADEMY

Grade 9

Grade 12


ACADEMY 4–6 CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAMS Below is a sampling of the co-curricular programs previously offered at Rundle Academy Elementary. Programs change each year depending on the interest level of our students. Arts: Art Club, LEGO Club

RUNDLE ACADEMY

Intellectual Pursuits: Mindfulness Club, STEAM Club Athletics: Badminton Club, Basketball Club, Intramurals (non-competitive athletics), Volleyball Club Character: Counsellor’s Corner, Kids Helping Kids

GRADE 4 FIELD TRIPS Many exciting, educational, and entertaining in-class and off-campus field trips supplement the Grade 4 subject material. To begin the year, students get to know each other during the muchanticipated overnight orientation camp. Throughout the year, students participate in winter activities, join our Academic Fair, and visit the Calgary Zoo, Clay 4 Kids, and Telus Spark. The Teachers’ Pet organization comes to our campus to enhance the Science program.

ART Art is an important part of the culture at Rundle. Grade 4 projects are often based on activities in students’ Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Science classes. Homeroom teachers collaborate with the art specialist to plan art pieces that extend students’ learning in core subjects. Students are encouraged to find the artist within while learning artistic techniques and creating imaginative pieces.

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LANGUAGE ARTS Expanding reading comprehension and writing skills is the primary focus in Grade 4. Using Barbara Mariconda’s Empowering Writers program, the year starts with a focus on narrative writing. Basic writing skills such as spelling, conventions and sentence structure are emphasized as students learn how to write interesting, descriptive and captivating stories, using the writing diamond as their guide. They then learn to apply their skills to expository writing, following the expository pillar to keep their work organized, informational, and interesting. Students also learn skills and strategies to improve their understanding of both fiction and nonfiction reading. They work on projects related to the novels and have many choices in how they would like to share their knowledge.

LITERACY PROGRAM With a primary focus on reading development, our literacy program is differentiated to support phonological processing and decoding skills, reading fluency, reading comprehension, and vocabulary development. In particular, we are proud to offer the Empower™ Reading program, an evidence based reading intervention program that teaches struggling readers effective strategies for decoding and spelling words and understanding text. Students may also receive writing and numeracy remediation in addition to support in reading.

MATHEMATICS In grade 4, students learn about numbers from 10,000 down to one hundredth. They work to understand and identify number patterns, solve problems using whole numbers and decimals, and compare and describe fractions. There is a strong focus on basic math operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. Students apply skills as they learn about measuring area, perimeter, and time. They also work to understand the characteristics of 2- and 3-dimensional shapes. TABLE OF CONTENTS


The fun and challenging online Mathletics program reinforces concepts learned in class. Also supplementing the mathematics program is the ST Math program which first teaches mathematical concepts visually then connects the ideas to symbols and language. This makes mathematical problem solving accessible to all students, regardless of skill level or language processing ability.

MUSIC

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education occurs four days a week at Rundle Academy with healthy choices and active living integrated throughout the school year. Participating in various activities, students develop an appreciation for physical education, physical fitness, and health-related topics. The aim is to enable students to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to lead active, healthy lifestyles today and throughout their lives. Grade 4 students develop skills through co-operative games, team sports, and individual activities. They gain a working knowledge of the rules and skills inherent in a variety of traditional activities including volleyball, basketball, t-ball, baseball, wrestling, badminton, fitness, rhythmic gymnastics, and kickball. Specialists are invited to Rundle to teach dance throughout the year.

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Throughout Grade 4, students learn about problemsolving, the scientific process, and how to effectively communicate in science. Students learn about Simple Machines, a program unit highlighted by Rube Goldberg projects, in which knowledge of inclined planes, levers, pulleys, wheels, axles, wedges, and screws is applied to create a complicated process to complete a simple task. Other Science units are Lights and Shadows, Waste in Our World, and Plant Growth and Changes.

SOCIAL STUDIES Grade 4 Social Studies takes students on a journey to learn all about Alberta. Students learn mapping skills, how to gather information from various resources, and how to understand ideas from different perspectives, all while learning about the province’s history, geography, and natural resources.

TECHNOLOGY Technology is intentionally integrated into daily work and across subject areas. Information, study materials, and worksheets are available through Google Classroom. Each student has their own iPad, which is loaded with various educational apps and tools. Students use Active Boards, whiteboards, Book Creator, iMovie, Green Screen, and various other apps to create interesting and interactive projects, and to share their learning with peers and teachers. Students also have access to a comprehensive digital library. Digital citizenship and internet safety are emphasized throughout the year as students learn to create and share work through Gmail and Google Docs.

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In Grade 4, students continue to work on rhythm and beat, and are introduced to metre changes within a piece. They explore intervals and melodies based on the C-major scale and learn basic chords used to accompany melodies. Musical terms are applied to concepts such as tempo, dynamics, and tone colour. Students become skilled at listening to musical selections and at identifying form. Body movements are used to represent understanding and appreciation of musical expression. Students practice their skills through singing and by playing the recorder, ukulele, non-pitched percussion instruments, and barred Orff instruments.

SCIENCE


GRADE 5 FIELD TRIPS

RUNDLE ACADEMY

Many exciting, educational, and entertaining in-class and off-campus field trips supplement the Grade 5 subject material. To begin the year, students get to know each other during the muchanticipated overnight orientation camp. Throughout the year, students participate in winter activities, the Academic Fair, and visit the Calgary Zoo, Clay 4 Kids, and Telus Spark. The Teachers’ Pet organization also comes to our campus to enhance the Science program.

ART Art is an important part of the culture at Rundle. Grade 5 projects are often based on activities in students’ Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Science classes. Homeroom teachers collaborate with the art specialist to plan art pieces that extend students’ learning in core subjects. Students are encouraged to find the artist within while learning artistic techniques and creating imaginative pieces.

LANGUAGE ARTS A wide variety of daily literacy activities are built into students’ morning routines, including reading comprehension passages, paragraph editing, and silent reading. Barbara Mariconda’s Empowering Writers program is used to focus on expository writing. Narrative writing is reviewed and practiced. Throughout the year, figurative language is taught and discussed while reading novels and writing. Poetry is read and discussed, and students present poetry to their peers. Grammar is taught throughout the year. Bi-weekly vocabulary and spelling units reinforce dictionary use and learning about synonyms and antonyms.

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LITERACY PROGRAM With a primary focus on reading development, our literacy program is differentiated to support phonological processing and decoding skills, reading fluency, reading comprehension, and vocabulary development. In particular, we are proud to offer the Empower™ Reading program, an evidence based reading intervention program that teaches struggling readers effective strategies for decoding and spelling words and understanding text. Students may also receive writing and numeracy remediation in addition to support in reading.

MATHEMATICS Grade 5 students engage in activities to show and describe numbers to 1,000,000, solve problems using whole numbers and decimals, and compare and describe fractions. Measurement is explored with a focus on perimeter, area, and volume of rectangles. Students sort shapes and describe and perform reflections, rotations and translations of 2-dimensional shapes. Basic mathematics facts are emphasized, performing two-digit by two-digit multiplication as well as long division. Students write and solve one-step equations with whole-number solutions and interpret and create double-bar graphs. Experimental probability or theoretical probability are used to solve problems. The fun and challenging online Mathletics program supplements concepts learned in class. The ST Math program first teaches mathematical concepts visually then connects the ideas to symbols and language. This makes mathematical problem solving accessible to all students, regardless of skill level or language processing ability.

MUSIC Grade 5 students expand their knowledge of rhythm and beat to include dotted notes and syncopation, and are introduced to new scales and their related minor scales. Singing in simple harmonies and with expression is a focus throughout the program thus TABLE OF CONTENTS


enabling students to improvise using their voices and various other instruments. More complex forms are introduced through listening exercises. Reading parts while singing and recognizing simple chord progressions is emphasized. Original descants are often added to songs students are already familiar with. Students continue practicing their skills through singing and by playing the recorder, ukulele, non-pitched percussion instruments, and barred Orff instruments.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Grade 5 students develop skills through co-operative games, team sports, and individual activities. They gain a working knowledge of the rules and skills inherent in traditional activities, including volleyball, basketball, t-ball, baseball, wrestling, badminton, fitness, rhythmic gymnastics, and kickball. Specialists are invited to Rundle to teach dance throughout the year.

SCIENCE Grade 5 Science starts with a unit on Chemistry as they explore physical and chemical changes and the natural world. This understanding leads into the second unit where students explore the realm of electricity by building circuits with batteries, light bulbs, and wires. Further experiments demonstrate the connection between electricity and magnetism as a simple electromagnet is built. Students continue exploring the natural world in the Weather Watch unit where they investigate and interpret various weather phenomena. The year wraps up by splashing around in Wetland Ecosystems while learning about the diverse life in this misunderstood habitat.

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Throughout the year, students explore Canada and its regions, seeing our nation’s history through the experiences of Canada’s Aboriginal, French, British, and immigrant groups. They develop a sense of belonging and awareness of how the multiple stories of Canadians contribute to citizenship and identity. Note-taking and study skills are a focus throughout the year and students are tested at the end of each unit. Mapping skills are learned with a focus on Canada, latitude and longitude, and the oceans and continents of the world.

TECHNOLOGY Technology is intentionally integrated across all subject areas. Students have their own Google Apps for Education accounts, giving access to cloud-based storage and composition tools for online collaboration. Technology features significantly in projects such as creating personal videos to explain science concepts and sharing student-created online videos. Each student has their own iPad loaded with various educational apps and tools. Students use Active Boards, whiteboards, Book Creator, iMovie, Green Screen, and various other apps to create interesting and interactive projects, and to share their learning with peers and teachers. Students also have access to a comprehensive digital library. Digital citizenship and internet safety are emphasized throughout the year as students learn to create and share work through Gmail and Google Docs.

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RUNDLE ACADEMY

Physical Education occurs four days per week at Rundle Academy with healthy choices and active living integrated throughout the school year. Participating in various activities, students develop an appreciation for physical education, physical fitness, and health-related topics. The aim is to enable students to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to lead active, healthy lifestyles today and throughout their lives.

SOCIAL STUDIES


GRADE 6 FIELD TRIPS

RUNDLE ACADEMY

Field trips enrich the learning experience and are an extension of Rundle’s academic and extracurricular programs. To begin the year, students get to know each other during the much-anticipated overnight orientation camp. Field trips vary from year to year, and some past trips for Grade 6 students have included visits to Weaselhead Flats, Telus Spark, the Calgary Zoo, and YouthLink.

ART Art is an important part of the culture at Rundle. Grade 6 projects are often based on activities in students’ Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Science classes. Homeroom teachers collaborate with the art specialist to plan art pieces that extend students’ learning in core subjects. Students are encouraged to find the artist within while learning artistic techniques and creating imaginative pieces.

LANGUAGE ARTS In Grade 6, functional and narrative writing skills are developed with a focus on sentence structure, conventions, and vocabulary. A variety of texts are studied during the year including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.

LITERACY PROGRAM With a primary focus on reading development, our literacy program is differentiated to support phonological processing and decoding skills, reading fluency, reading comprehension, and vocabulary development. In particular, we are proud to offer the EmpowerTM Reading program, an evidence based reading intervention program that teaches struggling readers effective strategies for decoding and spelling words and understanding text. Students may also receive writing and numeracy remediation in addition to support in reading.

MATHEMATICS Students continue to expand their understanding of place value, numbers (decimals, fractions and whole numbers), mathematical patterns, and geometrical shapes and transformations. Simple algebra (which will be further developed in Grade 7) is introduced. Problem-solving is explored in each unit, and basic operations are practiced throughout the year. Course Units

• Big and Small Numbers • Ratios, Fractions and Percents • Multiplication and Division of Decimal Numbers • Patterns and Relations • Data Analysis and Probability • Measurement, Shapes and Transformations Supplementing the mathematics program is the ST Math program which first teaches mathematical concepts visually then connects the ideas to symbols and language. This makes mathematical problem solving accessible to all students, regardless of skill level or language processing ability.

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MUSIC

SOCIAL STUDIES

In Grade 6, various rhythmic styles are explored in a unit on ostinatos. New scales used in different genres and styles of music are introduced. An emphasis is on phrasing throughout a song and on more complex chords that can be used to accompany songs. In addition to practicing note reading, students are exposed to musical symbols and words that appear on octavos and band sheet music.

In Grade 6, students are introduced to the principles of historical and contemporary democracy. The impact of past societies on the present form of government is explored. Geography skills are also further developed. Students are challenged to think critically and to formulate their own opinions on various issues.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Grade 6 students develop skills through co-operative games, team sports, and individual activities. They gain a working knowledge of the rules and skills inherent in traditional activities including volleyball, basketball, baseball, wrestling, badminton, fitness, rhythmic gymnastics, and kickball. Specialists are invited to Rundle to teach dance throughout the year.

SCIENCE Students in Grade 6 use the scientific method to understand the world around them, and several field trips throughout the year relate to the science curriculum. Students take part in classroom experiments and discussions as well as in large individual projects. Course Units

• Democratic Values • Provincial Government • Municipal Governments • Ancient Athens • Iroquois Confederacy • Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms • Citizen Involvement

TECHNOLOGY Technology is intentionally integrated into core subjects and across all subject areas. Students develop basic coding skills and use different programs to meet academic objectives. All students have their own iPad loaded with various educational apps and tools along with access to a class set of laptops. Students use Active Boards, whiteboards, Book Creator, iMovie, Green Screen, and various other apps to create interesting and interactive projects, and to share their learning with peers and teachers. Students also have access to a comprehensive digital library. Digital citizenship and internet safety are emphasized throughout the year as students learn to create and share work through Gmail and Google Docs.

• Trees and Forests • Solar System • Evidence and Investigation • Air and Aerodynamics • Flight

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Physical Education occurs four days per week at Rundle Academy, with healthy choices and active living integrated throughout the school year. Participating in various activities, students develop an appreciation for physical education, physical fitness, outdoor education, and health-related topics. The aim is to enable students to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to lead active, healthy lifestyles today and throughout their lives.

Course Units


ACADEMY 7–9 CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAMS Below is a sampling of the co-curricular programs offered at Rundle Academy Junior High this year. Programs change each year depending on the interest level of our students. Arts: Art Club, Music Club

RUNDLE ACADEMY

Intellectual Pursuits: Maker Club, Eastern Canada Trip Athletics: badminton, basketball, co-ed soccer, cross country, fitness club, football, golf, intramurals (non-competitive athletics), rugby, track and field, volleyball, wrestling Character: Kids Helping Kids, Rundle Ambassadors, Student Council

CODING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE Students use Scratch to create animations, games and stories. Once they learn the basics of coding (loops, sequence, functions, conditional operators, debugging, etc.) students further strengthen their skills in projects of their own choosing. Some examples of advanced projects include • using Scratch to create advanced and complex works of art, animations, games and stories; • using Javascript to create games playable through a web browser; and • using Javascript or Python to create original music using EarSketch. This is an opportunity for students to be creative problem solvers and to have fun all while learning a new language. No prior coding experience is necessary.

COURSES Required

• English Language Arts

• Science

DRAMA

• Mathematics

• Social Studies

Students learn various drama skills throughout the term. Classes are specifically designed to teach theatre arts and how they support, reinforce, and enrich one’s life. Confident public speaking, creativity, and ensemble work are skills that help students develop self awareness and influence how they are perceived by others.

• Physical Education Electives

• Art

• Information Processing

• Computer Science/ Coding

• Music

• Drama

• Outdoor Experiential Education (OEE)

• Fitness

• Photography

• Foods

• STEAM

ART The Art option focuses on exposing students to the elements and principles of art through a variety of techniques and mediums. Students are guided through a number of projects and art experiences which link to art movements, processes, and styles. Projects may include, but are not limited to, drawing in different media, acrylic and/or tempera painting, watercolour painting, printmaking, and 3-dimensional construction.

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS Students develop proficiency in reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and representing. Distinct units of study introduce students to a wide variety of texts. The close reading of these texts to understand literal and figurative meaning is a focus throughout each grade level. Students have opportunities to experiment and gain confidence with different writing and oral skills. The curriculum also offers students opportunities to reflect on their learning which encourages independent and critical thinking.

TABLE OF CONTENTS


English Language Arts 7

The course will be broken down into the following:

The basic elements of writing are emphasized with a focus on sentence and paragraph construction. Texts studied include poetry, short stories, fiction, nonfiction, drama, and film.

• Introduction to a Weight Room

English Language Arts 8

• Introduction to Strength Sports

Students are introduced to the essay form and the writing focus shifts to organizing, building, and transitioning ideas. Texts studied include poetry, short stories, fiction, nonfiction, drama, and film.

FOODS

Students work on mastering fundamental essaywriting skills in preparation for the Alberta Provincial Achievement Test as well as for senior high school. Texts studied include poetry, short stories, fiction, nonfiction, drama, and film.

Literacy Program

• Bodyweight Exercises • Speed and Power

In the Food Basics module, students begin orientation to the kitchen with emphasis on safety and sanitation, organization, and time management. Students prepare a variety of foods based on Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy Eating. Throughout the module, life skills such as decisionmaking, time management, and interpreting instructions are emphasized. Teacher and self-evaluation will be based on project work, effort, and attitude.

INFORMATION PROCESSING

Rundle Academy's Junior High literacy program supports students' reading, numeracy, and writing development. Each program is differentiated with targeted and individualized instruction. In particular, we are proud to offer the EmpowerTM Reading program, an evidence based reading intervention program that teaches struggling readers effective strategies for decoding and spelling words and understanding text.

This course is best learned through applications, activities, and hands-on projects. Students develop and apply important knowledge, skills, and attitudes to create well designed and aesthetically effective messages through graphic design, photography, stopmotion animation, videos, and multimedia projects. The course engages students in learning opportunities where they discover their interests in practical and purposeful ways.

FITNESS

Students will learn

This course is designed to introduce grade eight and nine students to the world of strength training. Resistance training benefits youths 14-16 since it improves muscular coordination, bone density, and strength. The goal of this option is to lift safely, properly, and with a focus on correct technique. With a grasp of the basics, students will learn principles that will give confidence in a weight room setting.

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• that, although technology is often complex, it is simply “a way of doing things” • about the impact of technologies in their lives and workplaces • how to determine which processes, tools and techniques to use, and when to use them • how to use and apply information and communication technologies while problem solving, decision making, and inquiring and researching in the context of other subject matter

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RUNDLE ACADEMY

English Language Arts 9

• The What, How and When to Lift


MATHEMATICS Mathematics 7 Students develop a strong number sense (working comfortably and interchangeably with whole numbers, decimals, integers and percentages). They also build a strong algebraic foundation that will be augmented further in Grades 8 and 9. Course Units

RUNDLE ACADEMY

• Number Relationships • Fractions and Decimal Numbers • Percentages and Circle Graphs • Integers • Linear Relations and Equations • 2-Dimensional Geometry • Probability and Statistics

Mathematics 8 In Grade 8, there is continued emphasis on number sense as students further hone their understanding of the relationship between fractions, percentages, decimals, ratios, and algebra (ratios, rates and proportions, linear equations and percentages). Course Units

• Integers • Fractions and Rational Numbers • Exponents, Roots, Pythagorean Theorem • Ratios, Rates and Proportions • Solving Linear Equations • Linear Relations • 3D Drawings, Surface Area, Volume • Data Analysis and Probability • Transformations

Mathematics 9 In Grade 9, there is a strong emphasis on algebra (polynomials, linear equations, inequalities and relations). Students deepen and strengthen their algebraic skills in order to be well prepared for high school. Course Units

• Rational Numbers • Powers and Exponents • Polynomials • Data Analysis • Linear Equations and Inequalities • Linear Relations • Measurement • Circle Geometry

MUSIC Have you always wanted to learn to play an instrument? Already know how and want to work on perfecting your skills? This option allows students to work on their individual and group performance skills. Students also use technology such as Garage Band to arrange and compose music.

OUTDOOR EDUCATION In this introductory program, students learn basic outdoor living and self-care skills such as outdoor trip preparation, hazard awareness, emergency care skills, basic rope work, first aid, the benefits of active lifestyle choices, and alternative environment activities such as winter hiking, snow shelters, indoor wall climbing, kayaking and canoeing, cycling, hiking, and backpacking skills. Environmental, wildlife and wilderness conservation topics are discussed throughout the semester.

• Percentages

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Students should be physically able to partake in activities such as hiking, cycling and snowshoeing. Students are also responsible for acquiring personal outdoor clothing appropriate for both winter and spring weather.

PHOTOGRAPHY This option provides students the opportunity to explore introduction to photography with brand new Canon Rebels. Students focus on understanding composition, rule of thirds, perspectives, and photo editing using Adobe Lightroom.

Physical Education in Grades 7, 8, and 9 is integrated with health components throughout the school year. Through participation in varied activities, students develop an appreciation for physical education, physical fitness, outdoor education, and health-related topics. Students gain a working knowledge of the rules and skills inherent in various of activities including fitness testing, team handball, creative games, weight and circuit training, dance, cricket, yoga, badminton, flag football, volleyball, track and field, health education, basketball, rugby, indoor lacrosse, wrestling, outdoor education, and swimming. The values of fair play, co-operation, self-discipline, and sportsmanship are foremost. Emphasis is also placed on developing the key components of fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance and strength, flexibility, power, coordination, and agility.

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Science 7 Science 7 focuses on the natural sciences. Throughout the year, students continue developing the fundamental skills of scientific inquiry, problem solving, critical thinking, sustainability, safety, collaboration, and respect for various perspectives. Course Units

• Interactions and Ecosystems • Plants for Food and Fibre • Heat and Temperature • Structures and Forces • Planet Earth

Science 8 Students are encouraged to develop a critical sense of wonder and curiosity about scientific and technological endeavours. They are inspired to use science and technology to acquire new knowledge and to solve problems so they may improve the quality of their own lives and the lives of others. Students become more knowledgeable about the wide spectrum of careers related to science, technology, and the environment. Course Units

• Mix and Flow of Matter • Cells and Systems • Light and Optical Systems • Mechanical Systems • Fresh and Saltwater Systems

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION

SCIENCE


RUNDLE ACADEMY

Science 9

Social Studies 8

Students are encouraged to develop a critical sense of wonder and curiosity about scientific and technological endeavours. They are inspired to use science and technology to acquire new knowledge and to solve problems so they may improve the quality of their own lives and the lives of others. Students become more knowledgeable about the wide spectrum of careers related to science, technology, and the environment. Building on previous learning, several new concepts, including genetics and the periodic table, are introduced, and the integration of mathematics is increased.

Students examine issues related to contact between societies with differing worldviews. The focus is on exploring elements of worldview and how these views are expressed by people living in different times and places. Students also reflect on their own worldviews and assess the influence the past has on the present. Current events are explored throughout the year.

Course Units

• Worldviews in Conflict: The Spanish and the Aztecs

• Matter and Chemical Change • Biological Diversity • Space Exploration • Electrical Principles and Technologies • Environmental Chemistry

Course Units

• Origins of a Western Worldview: Renaissance Europe • From Isolation to Adaptation: Ancient Japan

Social Studies 9 Students explore the Canadian political and justice systems, economics, environment, and decisionmaking. Course Units

SOCIAL STUDIES

• Governance and the Justice System

Social Studies 7

• Economics, Consumerism and Decision-Making

This course is a comprehensive examination of Canadian history preceding and following Confederation. The concept of intercultural contact is introduced through an examination of migration and immigration. Social Studies 7 forms the foundation for the continued dialogue on citizenship and identity in Canada, and current events receive continual focus throughout the year. Course Units

• Diverse Peoples • Toward Confederation • After Confederation

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• Rights, Responsibilities and Immigration

STEAM Students enrolled in STEAM complete multiple building challenges such as catapults, cars and mazes to name a few. Through designing and printing their own 3D puzzles, students learned about the engineer design process while developing their critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Students also developed their technological literacy by engaging in online robotics and coding. Furthermore, Rundle Academy Alumni join our STEAM students in a panel to discuss various careers in STEAM and future pathways with our students.

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ACADEMY 10–12 OUR ACADEMIC PHILOSOPHY Our students are accepted into highly competitive post-secondary programs throughout the world on the basis of their final marks in our academic program, including the diploma exam program. The academic results of Rundle Academy students consistently rise above the Provincial averages on subject-specific diploma exams, a direct reflection of the quality of instruction our students receive and their commitment to their studies. Rundle’s decision not to offer IB or AP programs is rooted in our values and our history of success with students as we focus on the program of studies mandated by the Province of Alberta.

CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAMS

COURSES

Below is a sampling of the co-curricular programs offered at Rundle Academy Senior High. Programs change each year depending on the interest level of our students.

Required

Arts: Art Club, Music Club, Film Club

• English Language Arts

• Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics)

• Mathematics

• Social Studies

Intellectual Pursuits: Maker Club, International Travel

• Career and Life Management 20

• Physical Education (10)

Electives

Music 10/20/30

Athletics: badminton, basketball, cheer team, coed soccer, cross country, fitness club, football, golf, intramurals (non-competitive athletics), rugby, track and field, ultimate frisbee, volleyball, wrestling

• Art

Character: Kids Helping Kids, Peer Support, Rundle Ambassadors, Student Council

• Drama

• Outdoor Experiential Education 10/20

• GOA (Global Online Academy 11, 12)

• Spanish • Technology Innovation

• Financial Literacy

• Tourism

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• Career and Technology • Physical Education (11, 12) Studies • Design Studies

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We support and challenge students in the areas of their passions. Academically, this is done through our enriched programs, where students join like-minded individuals in their pursuit of excellence, tackling topics and activities that go beyond the confines of the curriculum. Teachers support academics and executive functioning starting with IPP goal setting at the start of the school year. This continues throughout the year with extra help sessions, homeroom organization along with other strategies. In alignment with our values, students are supported as they embrace interests beyond academics. Rundle’s program of studies provides students with time to focus on mental and physical wellness, volunteering, athletics, co-curricular clubs, and humanitarian pursuits.


ART

CAREER AND LIFE MANAGEMENT

Students’ art is exhibited around the school and there are opportunities for public exhibits at special events, band concerts, and the senior fine arts show.

Career and Life Management

Art 10

RUNDLE ACADEMY

Art 10 • FNA1400 • 5 credits

Students investigate the elements and design principles of art to acquire knowledge and skills in drawing, designing, painting, sculpturing, and demonstrating colour theories and principles. Techniques developed through practical application are used to solve abstract problems and result in the creation of several art projects. Prerequisite: none.

Art 20 Art 20 • FNA2400 • 5 credits

The visual arts involve expressing one’s self, feelings, experiences, and ideas through images. Students use the elements and principles of design to create purposeful effects and to make new and meaningful images. In this foundation course, students develop basic art skills by creating art images through drawing, painting, sculpting, ceramics, and design. Students are encouraged to observe, discuss, and create images. Prerequisite: Art 10.

Art 30 Art 30 • FNA3400 • 5 credits

Students create art images that communicate their own thoughts, feelings, and ideas. Students develop greater knowledge and skills in drawing, design, painting, 3-dimensional sculpture, composition, printmaking, and commercial art. Art 30 students also develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of art history. This course sets the foundation for building an art portfolio. Prerequisite: Art 20.

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Career and Life Management • PED0770 • 3 credits

Career Directions Expansion Career Directions Expansion • CTR2310 • 1 credit

Career Directions Transitions Career Directions Transitions • CTR3310 • 1 credit

Career and Life Management comprises three components, totals five credits, and is required for high school graduation in the Province of Alberta. At Rundle College, all grade 10 students are required to take Career and Life Management, Career Directions Expansion, and Career Directions Transitions. Career and Life Management equips students to make sound personal and professional decisions and develops their ability to apply effective thinking and communication skills. Students develop a positive selfconcept and an understanding of personal interests, values, aptitudes, and abilities. Independent personal management is promoted, and students develop the ability to make choices and accept challenges that consider significant others, values, responsibilities, and resources. They gain an awareness of health as a resource for everyday living and learn health maintenance’s connection with personal well-being, realizing goals, satisfying needs, and coping with change. The career-focused aspects of the course develop knowledge about career options and enable students to determine personal career strategies. Students gain an awareness of the relationships between personal economics, lifestyle, and occupational planning. Please note: Because this program encourages students to focus on how they see themselves, how they cope with life’s challenges, and how they relate to others, areas which may be considered sensitive or controversial may well arise. Rundle strives to deal with these issues appropriately. Students are encouraged to discuss sensitive issues with their parents or guardians.

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Course Themes

• Careers and the World of Work • Human Sexuality • Independent Living • Relationships • Self-Management • Well-Being

Career and Technology Studies • 3 credits Rundle Academy students may earn credits in Career and Technology Studies with modules such as Tourism Studies, Media Studies, and Design Studies. Module selections may change from semester to semester, and the course provides students with diverse nities. hands-on experiences and learning opportu

DESIGN STUDIES Design Studies • OTH1999 • 3 credits Design Studies is a CTS module-based course that promotes using the design process framework along with digital technology and manual tools to design, manipulate and fabricate functional projects. The design process involves investigating, designing, planning, creating, and evaluating their efforts. The skills explored in this course include, but are not limited to, CAD (Computer-Aided Design), Technical Drafting (2D & 3D), Simple Machines, Woodworking, Textiles, 3D printing, Laser engraving, Laser cutting and DC Electric Circuit design.

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Drama fosters students’ positive self-concept as they explore life through assuming roles and acquiring dramatic skills. This imaginative exploration involves setting up, “acting out,” and communicating within a dramatic situation. Students then reflect on the consequences. This reflection provides the platform for self-development. Students have opportunities to perform at the Remembrance Day ceremony, the Holiday Gala, and the Spring Production.

Drama 10, 20, and 30 Drama 10 • FNA1410 • 5 credits • Prerequisite: none Drama 20 • FNA2410 • 5 credits • Prerequisite: Drama 10 Drama 30 • FNA3410 • 5 credits • Prerequisite: Drama 20

Drama at the senior high level emphasizes the development of the individual as a creator, performer, historian, critic, and patron through dramatic forms of expression learned in junior high. Drama at the senior level is a combined course with 10-, 20-, and 30-level students in one class. Course Units

• Acting and Improvisation • Film Study • Movement and Speech • Orientation • Technical Theatre and Design

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RUNDLE ACADEMY

CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY STUDIES

DRAMA


ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS English Language Arts 10-1

RUNDLE ACADEMY

English Language Arts 10-1 • ELA1105 • 5 credits

Integrating the study of literature and language, this course emphasizes skill development in reading, writing, listening, speaking, representing, and viewing. Students are provided with a wide variety of challenging texts: poetry, short stories, novels, Shakespearean drama, modern drama, films, and nonfiction. Knowledge of texts is applied to writing personal responses and critical essays, where students are encouraged to think critically and creatively. Achieving the expectations of reading and writing at the senior high level is the focus, but the guiding principles are to provide a broader perspective of humanity and to inspire students to become open-minded, lifelong learners. Prerequisite: English Language Arts 9.

English Language Arts 10-2 English Language Arts 10-2 • ELA1104 • 5 credits

English Language Arts 10-2 continues to immerse students in the study of language and literature undertaken in previous grades. This course fosters students’ fundamental reading, writing, and language skills, guiding them to explore the importance of literature as well as a variety of literary contexts. Specifically, this course is geared towards students with practical and personal interest in English literature. Overall, the course challenges students to use language clearly, correctly, and efficiently in functional, persuasive, and personal situations.

English Language Arts 20-1 English Language Arts 20-1 • ELA2105 • 5 credits

Building on the foundation of English Language Arts 10-1, this course continues to integrate the study of literature and language, emphasizing skill development in reading, writing, listening, speaking, representing, and viewing. Students are provided with a wide variety of challenging texts: poetry, short stories, novels, Shakespearean drama, modern drama, films, and nonfiction. Knowledge of texts is applied

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to writing personal responses and critical essays, where students are encouraged to think critically and creatively. Preparation for Grade 12 and, ultimately, post-secondary education is the focus, but the guiding principle is to provide a broader perspective of humanity and to inspire students to become open-minded, lifelong learners. Prerequisite: English Language 10-1.

English Language Arts 20-2 English Language Arts 20-2 • ELA2104 • 5 credits

This rigorous course helps students build skills for practical application of English Language Arts in their personal or working life. Emphasis is on effective spoken and written communication, peer-to-peer communication, and critical thinking as applied to literature and the world around them. The course has been embedded with opportunities to learn and build skills in a way best suited to individual learners.

English Language Arts 30-1 English Language Arts 30-1 • ELA3105 • 5 credits

English Language Arts 30-1 continues students’ skill development in reading, writing, listening, speaking, representing, and viewing. It integrates the study of literature and language, providing students with a wide variety of challenging texts: poetry, short stories, novels, Shakespearean drama, modern drama, films, and nonfiction. Knowledge of texts is then applied to writing personal responses and critical essays, where students are encouraged to think critically and creatively. Preparation for the Diploma Examination and for post-secondary education is the focus in this culminating course, but the guiding principles are to provide a broader perspective of humanity and to inspire students to become open-minded, lifelong learners. Prerequisite: English Language Arts 20-1.

English Language Arts 30-2 English Language Arts 30-2 • ELA3104 • 5 credits

This course is an acceptable entrance subject for many college and technical programs. It includes reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and representing TABLE OF CONTENTS


but emphasizes practical skills for daily communication. Course content includes a modern or Shakespearean play, a novel or book-length nonfiction, short stories, a feature film study, and informative nonfiction.

Writing Enrichment

Course Offerings

• Advocacy • Art, Media, and Design • Architecture • Creative Nonfiction

Writing Enrichment • OTH1999 • 3 credits

• Bioethics

This course supports students in the development of their writing skills. Designed to align with both the English Language Arts and Social Studies curricula, Writing Enrichment students develop their critical thinking skills as well as their ability to communicate clearly through the written word.

• Global Health

FINANCIAL LITERACY

• Fiction Writing

GLOBAL ONLINE ACADEMY Rundle Academy is a proud member of Global Online Academy (GOA), whose programs offer students in grades 11 and 12 a way to pursue their passions, learn with peers from around the globe, and acquire and practice modern learning skills that will serve them well in post-secondary institutions, career, and life. GOA courses are Rundle's courses, taught by experienced faculty from renowned peer schools all over the world. This is a new kind of online class where relationships and connections drive students to share their perspectives and learn from those of others. Our faculty also participates in GOA's world renowned professional learning programs as teachers seek to continuously improve their practice as modern educators. GOA is what happens when inspired teachers, innovative designers, and ambitious students adapt today’s classroom to tomorrow’s world. GOA is education, unbound.

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• Comparative Politics • Computer Science and Technology

RUNDLE ACADEMY

This course teaches students how to make wise financial decisions to promote economic well-being over their lifetime. Students will be completing the CTS FIN 1010, 2060 and 3080 .

• Business

• Digital Journalism • Energy • Entrepreneurship in a Global Context • Game Theory • Computational Thinking • Introduction to Investments • Mathematics • Medical Problem Solving • Macro/Microeconomics • Multivariable Calculus • Number Theory • Neuropsychology • Positive Psychology • Social Psychology • Power: Redressing Inequity Through Data • Psychology • Science and Health • World Languages: Arabic | Japanese Students at the Academy will receive 1-5 credits depending on their selected course, and all participants can highlight GOA classes in their post-secondary applications. The GOA experience shows students’ passion for learning as well as their ability to collaborate and problem solve in non-traditional ways.

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MATHEMATICS Mathematics 10 Prep Mathematics 10 Prep • OTH1999 • 3 credits

This course bridges Math 9 and Math 10C. It allows students the opportunity to review and refine the math concepts required to be successful at the 10C level.

Mathematics 10C

RUNDLE ACADEMY

Mathematics 10C • MAT1791 • 5 credits

Mathematics 20-2 Mathematics 20-2 • MAT2792 • 5 credits

Mathematics 20-2 builds on key concepts from Mathematics 10C. Learning through problem solving is the key focus. Students develop and refine their own mathematical methods and use vocabulary to explain how they solve problems. Course Units

• Measurement

Students gain the mathematical understanding and critical-thinking skills needed for success in Mathematics 20-1. This is also an introductory course to pre-calculus mathematics.

• Geometry

Course Units

• Research Project

• Polynomials and Factoring • Real Numbers, Exponents, and Radicals • Coordinating Geometry and Linear Equations • Systems of Linear Equations • Relations and Functions • Measurement and Trigonometry

Mathematics 20-1 Mathematics 20-1 • MAT27921 • 5 credits

Mathematics 20-1 is for students who plan to enter post-secondary programs, such as engineering, mathematics, sciences, and some business studies that require advanced mathematics skills. It provides the mathematical understanding and critical thinking skills needed for Mathematics 30-1 and Mathematics 31. Prerequisite: Mathematics 10C (65%+ recommended). Course Units

• Sequences and Series • Trigonometry • Radical Expressions and Equations • Rational Expressions and Equations • Quadratic Functions and Equations • Analysis of Functions, Equations and Inequalities

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• Numbers and Logic • Relations and Functions • Statistics Students continue acquiring the mathematical processes of communication, making connections, mental mathematics, problem solving, visualization, and using technology as a tool. Mathematics 20-2 is designed for students wishing to pursue a career that does not require Calculus.

Mathematics 30-1 Mathematics 30-1 • MAT3791 • 5 credits

Mathematics 30-1 is for students planning to apply for post-secondary programs requiring calculus and advanced mathematics skills such as engineering, mathematics, sciences, and some business studies. Students transfer knowledge and make connections among various topics. The focus is on demonstrating advanced algebra skills, mathematical literacy, comprehension, and reasoning. Mathematics 30-1 may be required for post-secondary calculus courses. Prerequisite: Mathematics 20-1. Course Units

• Exponential and Logarithmic Functions • Permutations and Combinations • Relations and Functions • Trigonometric Functions • Trigonometric Equations TABLE OF CONTENTS


Mathematics 30-2

Mathematics 31

Mathematics 30-2 • MAT3792 • 5 credits

Mathematics 31 • MAT3211 • 5 credits

The Mathematics 30–2 course emphasizes the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills for daily life, direct entry into the workforce, and postsecondary studies in programs that do not require the study of calculus. In Mathematics 30–2, algebraic, numerical, and graphical methods are used to solve problems. Technology, such as graphing calculators, enable students to explore and create patterns, examine relationships, test conjectures, model, and solve problems.

Mathematics 31 emphasizes the theoretical and practical development of topics in the algebra of functions, trigonometry, differential calculus, and integral calculus. It bridges the gap between the course-numbered streams of the Mathematics 10-1, 20-1, and 30-1 level courses and the Calculus courses offered by post-secondary institutions. Prerequisite: Mathematics 20-1.

Course Units

• Limits and Rates of Change • Derivatives • Applications of Derivatives • Extreme Values and Curve Sketching • Trigonometric, Exponential, and Logarithmic Functions • Differential Equations and Area • Integrals

• Logical Reasoning and Set Theory

MUSIC

• Probability

General Music 10/20/30

• Permutations and Combinations • Relations and Functions : Rational Equations • Relations and Functions : Logarithmic Functions • Relations and Functions : Exponential Functions • Relations and Functions : Polynomial Functions • Relations and Functions : Sinusoidal Functions • Math Research Project

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Students are expected to communicate solutions clearly and effectively when solving both routine and non-routine problems. Students are also expected to apply mathematical concepts and procedures to meaningful life problems. It is important to realize that it is acceptable for students to solve problems in different ways and that solutions may vary depending upon how the problem is understood. Prerequisite: Mathematics 20-2.

Course Units

General Music 10 • FNA1424 • 3/5 credits General Music 20 • FNA2424 • 3/5 credits General Music 30 • FNA3424 • 3/5 credits

Various musical topics will be covered throughout the course such as playing instruments, performing, writing songs, and using GarageBand. There will be two performance opportunities; performance songs are chosen based on student interest.

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OUTDOOR EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION 10/20 WLD 1010//1130 • 1100 • 3 credits

RUNDLE ACADEMY

This OEE course is a combination of Curriculum and Technology Studies modules drawn predominantly from the Natural Resource and Health, Recreation and Human Services clusters of CTS. These modules blend environmental awareness, personal growth and development, and outdoor education themes. In this program, students learn basic outdoor living and self-care skills. Lifetime activity skills such as outdoor trip preparation, hazard awareness, emergency care skills, first aid, cycling, skating, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, hiking/urban trekking, survival, bushcraft, tool handling, outdoor cooking and camping skills, are all within the scope of this course. Wildlife and wilderness conservation, management, advocacy and preservation will be embedded throughout the program. Through on-campus and off-campus activities, a major goal of this outdoor program is to foster the personal hands-on development of the students, leading to increased confidence and ability to live, and lead others toward an active lifestyle. Unique outdoor activities have students working together, in the elements, to face obstacles that they may not normally face in an everyday classroom. Leadership, communication, critical thinking, reflection and teamwork are areas that will form the backbone of the program.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education 10 Physical Education 10 • PED1445 • 5 credits

Physical Education at Rundle College enables students to enhance their quality of life through active living, exposure to a wide variety and choice of activities, and developing skills and positive attitudes in both individual and team pursuits. Activities include flag football, hiking, volleyball, field hockey, basketball, wrestling, dance, yoga, track and field, rugby, soccer, team handball, fencing, badminton, kickball, and

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low-organized games. In addition to these activities, students earn their certification in CPR. Emphasis is placed on developing key components of fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance and strength, flexibility, power, coordination, and agility. Prerequisite: none.

Physical Education 20 Physical Education 20 • PED2445 • 5 credits

Building on the foundation of Physical Education 10, the course enables students to enhance their quality of life through active living, exposure to a wide variety and choice of activities, and developing skills and positive attitudes that promote engagement in lifelong recreational pursuits. Activities include fitness, handball, bowling, tae kwon do, racquetball, squash, aquatics, tennis, golf, ice hockey, kayaking, batting cages, ultimate Frisbee, yoga, badminton, curling, low-organized games, and a variety of team and individual activities. Emphasis is placed on developing key components of fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance and strength, flexibility, power, coordination, and agility. Prerequisite: Physical Education 10.

Physical Education 30 Physical Education 30 • PED3445 • 5 credits

Physical Education 30 further enables students to enhance their quality of life through active living, exposure to a wide variety and choice of activities, and developing skills and positive attitudes that promote engagement in lifelong recreational pursuits. Activities include fitness, handball, bowling, fencing, racquetball, squash, diving, tennis, golf, speed skating, sailing, rock climbing, ultimate frisbee, yoga, badminton, billiards, curling, low-organized games, and a variety of team and individual activities. Emphasis is placed on developing key components of fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance, and strength, flexibility, power, coordination, and agility. Prerequisite: Physical Education 20.

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SCIENCE Science 10 Science 10 • SCN1270 • 5 credits

This introductory science course is the basis for all other science courses at Rundle. Students continue to expand their knowledge of science and its relationship to technology and society. They further develop the broad-based skills needed to identify and analyze problems, to explore and test solutions, and to seek, interpret, and evaluate information. Prerequisite: Science 9.

Biology 30 Biology 30 • SCN3230 • 5 credits

Students study aspects of the living world from the molecular level to complex ecosystems. They continue to develop their skills in scientific inquiry, problem solving, critical thinking, sustainability, safety, collaboration, and respect for various perspectives. Prerequisite: Biology 20 (or equivalent). Course Units

• Nervous and Endocrine Systems

Course Units

• Cell Division, Genetics, and Molecular Biology

• Energy and Matter in Chemical Change

• Population and Community Dynamics

• Energy Flow in Technological Systems

Chemistry 20

• Cycling of Matting in Living Systems • Energy Flow in Global Systems

Biology 20 Biology 20 • SCN2231 • 5 credits

The world around us is explored from the perspective of ecosystem interactions, such as photosynthesis that converts light energy into chemical energy like glucose, and cellular respiration that takes glucose and turns it into the energy that drives the human systems in the form of ATP. This energy runs human systems like muscles and respiration. Students expand their knowledge of science and its relationship to technology and society. They develop the broadbased skills needed to identify and analyze problems, explore and test solutions, and seek, interpret, and evaluate information. Prerequisite: Science 10.

Chemistry 20 • SCN2796 • 5 credits

This course ties many scientific disciplines together by describing events at a molecular level. Students work through structured laboratory activities and reports, experimental design projects, and solving mathematical problems related to predicting yields. Prerequisite: Science 10. Course Units

• Diversity of Matter and Chemical Bonding • Forms of Matter: Gases • Matter as Solutions, Acids and Bases • Quantitative Relationships in Chemical Changes

Course Units

• Energy and Matter Exchange in the Biosphere • Population Change and Evolution • Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration • Human Systems 1 • Human Systems 2

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RUNDLE ACADEMY

• Reproduction and Development


Chemistry 30

Physics 30

Chemistry 30 • SCN3796 • 5 credits

Physics 30 • SCN3797 • 5 credits

Chemistry 30 deals with energy change and systems as well as organic chemistry. Students continue improving their inquiry skills by designing labs and solving mathematical problems related to predicting yields and the extent of equilibria. Students also develop awareness of social, environmental, economic, and legal issues related to chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 20.

Physics 30 is a university preparatory course for students planning to pursue further physics courses at the post-secondary level. It helps to explain much about the world in which we live. Prerequisite: Physics 20. Recommended grade of grade of 75%+ in Physics 20 and Math 20-1.

RUNDLE ACADEMY

Course Units

• Organic Chemistry • Thermochemistry • Oxidation and Reduction (Redox)

Course Units

• Momentum and Impulse • Forces and Fields • Electromagnetic Radiation • Nuclear Physics

• Equilibrium/Acids and Bases

SOCIAL STUDIES

Physics 20

Social Studies 10-1

Physics 20 • SCN2797 • 5 credits

Energy is the theme common to all units in Physics 20 with change, diversity, equilibrium, matter, and systems also playing a role. Energy in its many forms causes change and determines the kind of change matter and systems undergo. The major concepts enable connections to be drawn among the four course units. Prerequisite: Science 10. Recommended grade of 75%+ in Math 10C. Course Units

• Kinematics • Dynamics • Circular Motion and Gravitation • Mechanical Waves

Social Studies 10-1 • SST1771 • 5 credits

Globalization has significantly influenced the modern world. Students examine the origins of globalization and its impact on lands, cultures, human rights, and quality of life. They identify multiple perspectives on globalization and re-examine their roles as responsible and active citizens. Prerequisite: Social Studies 9. Concepts/Events Studied

• Historical Globalization Case Studies (slavery, Scramble for Africa, the Industrial Revolution) • Modern Responses to the Legacies of Globalization • Globalization and Economic Development (capitalism, free trade, trade agreements) • Human Rights, Democracy, and Globalization • Impact of Media and Technology • First Nations • Globalization as it Relates to Current Events

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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Social Studies 10-2 Social Studies 10-2 • SST1772 • 5 credits

Students explore historical aspects of globalization as well as the effects of globalization on lands, cultures, human rights, and quality of life. Students also explore the relationships created by globalization, citizenship, and identity. The infusion of multiple perspectives allows students to examine the effects of globalization on people, particularly on Canadians. Students develop skills to respond to issues emerging in an increasingly globalized world.

Social Studies 20-1 • SST2771 • 5 credits

Nationalism has significantly shaped the modern world. Students examine the principles of nationalism and its subsequent effects on individuals, cultures, human rights, and international relations. They identify multiple perspectives regarding nationalism and re-examine their roles and responsibilities as active citizens. Prerequisite: Social Studies 10-1. Concepts/Events Studied

• Types of Nations and their Impact on Identity

Social Studies 30-1 Social Studies 30-1 • SST3771 • 5 credits

Students explore the origins and complexities of ideologies and examine multiple perspectives regarding the principles of classical and modern liberalism. An analysis of various political and economic systems, as well as various past and current events, enable students to assess the viability of the principles of liberalism. Understanding the roles and responsibilities associated with citizenship encourages students to respond to emerging global issues. Prerequisite: Social Studies 20-1. Concepts/Events Studied

• Current Events • Democratic and Non-Democratic Systems • First Nations • Private and Public Enterprise Economic Systems • Terrorism

• Historical and Contemporary Revolutions Including the French Revolution

Social Studies 30-2

• First and Second World Wars

Students examine the origins, values, and components of competing ideologies. They explore multiple perspectives regarding relationships among individualism, liberalism, common good, and collectivism. An examination of various political and economic systems allows students to determine the viability of the values of liberalism. Developing understandings of the roles and responsibilities associated with citizenship encourages students to respond to emergent global issues.

• Genocides throughout History • Ultranationalism • Internationalism and International Organizations • Nationalism as it Relates to Current Events

Social Studies 20-2 Social Studies 20-2 • SST2772 • 5 credits

Students examine historical and contemporary understandings of nationalism in Canada and the world. They explore the origins of nationalism as well as the impacts of nationalism on individuals and communities in Canada and other locations. Examples of nationalism, ultranationalism, supranationalism,

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Social Studies 30-2 • SST3772 • 5 credits

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RUNDLE ACADEMY

Social Studies 20-1

and internationalism are examined from multiple perspectives. Students develop personal and civic responses to emergent issues related to nationalism.


SPANISH

TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION

Spanish Language and Culture 10-3Y

Students will become comfortable with various fundamentals of technology, develop the necessary skills required in today’s world, and set a solid foundation for technology use in the future.

Spanish Language and Culture 10-3Y • SPN1345 • 5 credits

RUNDLE ACADEMY

Students with little or no Spanish language background develop their reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. A balanced foundation in language learning skills, as well as an appreciation for Spanish-speaking cultures, develop while students learn to converse comfortably in Spanish. Prerequisite: none.

Spanish Language and Culture 20-3Y Spanish Language and Culture 20-3Y • SPN2345 • 5 credits

Previous language skills are reinforced and built upon enabling students to develop more sophisticated skills in reading, writing, listening, speaking, representing, and viewing in Spanish. Through studying elements of grammar, vocabulary and verbs, students’ Spanish skills are used in increasingly authentic environments. Students also explore Spanish-speaking cultures of the world. Prerequisite: Spanish 10-3Y.

Spanish Language and Culture 30-3Y Spanish Language and Culture 30-3Y • SPN3345 • 5 credits

This is the final chapter in the three-year Spanish Language and Culture route. Course content strengthens students’ ability to converse, comprehend, read, and write in Spanish, as well as to express more sophisticated ideas and arguments. High levels of grammar, vocabulary, and verbs are studied. Upon completion, students have an increased level of proficiency in Spanish and can use advanced grammatical structures, bind novel expressions, and communicate at a higher level. Prerequisite: Spanish 20-3Y.

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TOURISM In this course, students will explore meaningful ways to take part in and develop responsible tourism. The focus will be given to accommodation and transport as well as adventure and ecotourism.

TRAVERSE The Traverse Post-Secondary Transition Program (The Traverse) is a Rundle developed program that supports our students as they transition into their first year of post-secondary education. As demonstrated in academic research, students with a learning disability (LD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can be successful in transitioning into post-secondary education learning environments if they have the following skills and attributes: selfdetermination, learning strategies, and familiarity and use of accommodations. Rundle Academy focuses on the development of these skills; however, based on the research literature and feedback from our alumni, these skills may require further development in their new learning environment. Most post-secondary institutions have student accessibility services; however, the support is not individualized for the holistic needs of a first-year student. The Traverse aims to seamlessly bridge the gap between high school and post-secondary studies for our non-traditional students and bring them closer to academic autonomy while maintaining their confidence.

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RUNDLE ACADEMY

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10–12 SAMPLE TIMETABLE SAMPLE TIMETABLE FOR:

Students with a Science Focus

RUNDLE ACADEMY

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

GRADE 12

First Semester

Second Semester

First Semester

Second Semester

First Semester

Second Semester

ELA 10-1

Social 10-1

ELA 20-1

Social 20-1

ELA 30-1

Social 30-1

Science 10

Math 10C

Global Health (GOA)

Biology 30

Physics 20

Physics 30

Spanish 10

Biology 20

Spanish 20

Spanish 30

Math 30-1

Math 31

Math 20-1

Phys Ed 20

Medical Problem Solving (GOA)

Phys Ed 30

Phys Ed 10/CALM 20

SAMPLE TIMETABLE FOR:

Students with a Fine Arts Focus

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

GRADE 12

First Semester

Second Semester

First Semester

Second Semester

First Semester

Second Semester

ELA 10-1

Social 10-1

ELA 20-1

Social 20-1

ELA 30-1

Social 30-1

Science 10

Math 10C

Chemistry 20

Math 20-1

Math 30-1

Chemistry 30

Art 10

Drama 10

Drama 20

Design Studies

Drama 30

Study Period

Art Entrepreneurship (GOA)

Art 20

IOS App Design

Art 30

Phys Ed 10/CALM 20

* Mandatory Classes

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TIMETABLE WORKSHEET MANDATORY COURSES

ADDITIONAL CORE COURSES

ELECTIVE COURSES

• Career and Life Management 20

• Biology 20/30

• Art 10/20/30

• Chemistry 20/30

• Career and Technology Studies

• Mathematics 30-1

• Design Studies

• Mathematics 31 (Calculus)

• Drama 10/20/30

• Physics 20/30

• Financial Literacy

• English Language Arts 10-1/10-2 • English Language Arts 20-1/20-2 • English Language Arts 30-1/30-2

• Music 10/20/30

• Mathematics 10C

• Outdoor Experiential Education 10/20

• Physical Education 20/30

• Spanish Language 10/20/30 (3-year program)

• Physical Education 10 • Science 10

• Technology Innovation

• Social Studies 10-1/10-2

• Tourism

• Social Studies 20-1/20-2 • Social Studies 30-1/30-2

SAMPLE TIMETABLE FOR:

________________________________________________

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

GRADE 12

First Semester

Second Semester

First Semester

Second Semester

First Semester

Second Semester

ELA 10-1*

Social 10-1*

ELA 20-1*

Social 20-1*

ELA 30-1*

Social 30-1*

Science 10*

Math 10C*

Math 20-1*

Math 30-1

Phys Ed 10 (M, W, F) CALM 20 (T, R)*

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RUNDLE ACADEMY

• Mathematics 20-1/20-2


RUNDLE

COLLEGE

IMAGINE

reaching your POTENTIAL at Rundle


COLLEGE OVERVIEW Rundle College is an independent, university preparatory, co-educational day school program that uses a research-driven pedagogy of mentorship and guidance to develop well-rounded, future-ready, global-minded graduates. From Kindergarten through to graduation, the school develops students who are confident learners, critical thinkers, and global citizens.

CAMPUS AMENITIES 7–12

Rundle College offers K–12 education on one campus, allowing seamless grade-to-grade transitions from Rundle College Primary/Elementary to Rundle College Junior/Senior High. Students move through their learning journey in a place with which they are familiar, surrounded by teachers and peers they know — and who know them. Students forge deeper relationships by being part of a student community and do not need to learn new rules or a new school culture as they progress through each grade. In the most important ways, Rundle will always be Rundle.

The Rundle College Junior/Senior program (Grades 7-12) is located in the R.C. Conklin School. Built in 2005, the R..C. Conklin School is a modern facility located on 20 acres of land boasting exceptional mountain and meadow views, a park-like setting, and close proximity to high speed and bus transit. Rundle College students have access to

CAMPUS AMENITIES K–6

• technology centres

The Rundle College Kindergarten - Grade 6 program is located in the W.J. Collett School. Built in 2016, the W.J. Collett School is a modern facility with a striking balance between long corridors, breakout and community spaces, skylights, and angles. With exceptional mountain and meadow views, the architecture of the W.J. Collett School has been featured in Award magazine and considered for numerous industry awards. Students have access to

• a learning commons • technology spaces

• multiple gymnasia • performing arts spaces • outdoor classrooms • an artificial turf playing field • wrestling room • fitness centre • cafeteria

SCHOOL UNIFORM Rundle College is a “uniform school” and students wear their uniforms with pride. Each program has its own unique component to the standard uniform, from the ties to the much-anticipated black vests for our graduating class. Students are required to be in uniform each day unless specifically advised otherwise.

• performing arts spaces • outdoor classrooms • multiple gymnasia • artificial turf playing field • multiple playgrounds • tarmac play area 2 2 /23 PROGRAM GUI DE

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RUNDLE COLLEGE

COMMUNITY


COLLEGE K–6 OVERVIEW COMMUNITY

RUNDLE COLLEGE

Our community is very vibrant in the way we engage students each day. There are so many ways that the staff and parents create enriching experiences for the students throughout the year. The following are some examples of school wide events: • Welcome Back BBQ

• Spring Fling

• Terry Fox Run

• Dance Residences

• Orange Shirt Day

• Fine Arts Day

• Harvest Spootacular

• House Events

• Literacy Week

• Carnaval

• Book Fairs

• UN Week

• Winter Concert

• Pride Day

We use these opportunities to fulfill our value statement of Together: Be Kind, Be Curious, Be Well.

CHARACTER PROGRAM At the Primary/Elementary level, our character education program is called Mountains of Character. We have taken our Rundle Society values of Together: Be Kind, Be Curious, Be Well and incorporated other character traits that we feel are important to develop at the primary/elementary level. The six Mountains of Character traits are curiosity, perseverance, gratitude, wellness, kindness, and integrity. Kindergarten - Grade 3: This character program is highlighted in various ways. The teachers are encouraged to share stories and picture books on the relevant character word. At monthly school assemblies, the character trait for that particular month is highlighted with a video, song, or other visual presentation. As well, the character traits are further nurtured in our Social and Emotional Learning Program There is a Buddy Program where older and younger students get together to work on various activities. Teachers are encouraged to hold class meetings to build community, teach conflict resolution, and problem solve. The school also reaches out to the community in such ways as donations for UNICEF and Adopt a Family. The primary division recognizes ‘character climbers’ each month. Students are also recognized at monthly assemblies.

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Grade 4-6: In our Elementary Program we teach the character traits in our classrooms and encourage teachers and students to practice and model these qualities throughout the school year. The Mountains of Character traits are highlighted and discussed through literature, special speakers and in monthly assemblies by teachers, the Principal and our Teacher Librarian. Each month, we recognize students who exemplify these character qualities through our Character Climber awards that are displayed and shared and celebrated in our school community. The Elementary division participates in house events in which students are given challenges that are based around our character program.

RUNDLE GIVES BACK Our entire Rundle community is involved in volunteerism and has given back 1000s of hours of service within Calgary and around the world. Rundle College Primary/Elementary partners with many local organizations to provide volunteer and financial support. Some of these include: • Partnership buddy program with Wentworth Manor Care Home • Adopt-a-Family during the winter holiday season • Veterans Food Drive • Mustard Seed Care Packages

HEAD’S LIST The Head’s List celebrates the success of our students and their adherence to the mission, vision, and values of Rundle College Society. Students are acknowledged for their success in the areas of co-curricular activities, character development, and academic achievement. The process and requirements are unique depending on the program and the student’s division; however, the universal components include an adherence to high academic standing and evidence of the pursuit of our values: togetherness, kindness, curiosity, and wellness. Students who qualify for the Head’s List are recognized at their school’s year end assembly and on a special display in their school. Graduating students receive TABLE OF CONTENTS


a letter of recognition from Rundle College Society detailing their accomplishment of earning the distinction of being on Rundle College Society’s Head’s List.

STUDENT CELEBRATIONS At Rundle, we believe that celebrating student success and achievement is fundamental. At our assemblies and ceremonies , we recognize and celebrate student character, participation, leadership and achievement, as well as for their contributions to our community.

ATHLETICS: JUNIOR COBRA PRIDE! The success of our Rundle athletics comes from within – from within our athletes, our coaches, our alumni, and our community. The Rundle College Junior Cobras Sport Development Program was introduced in the Spring of 2016 to foster a love of sport, instil sportsmanship, and nurture the athletic talents of Rundle’s youngest athletes. Through this grassroots initiative, the Rundle College community comes together to positively influence our future stars and to build an exceptional athletic program. We believe that children should be given opportunities to participate in many different activities with team sports being one of them. Our sessions • provide a source of recreation for children • provide children with an opportunity to learn about sports and improve their athletic skills through participation and competition • give children a chance to grow socially by learning teamwork, sportsmanship and fair play • provide children with a source of fun and fitness which will enrich their lives • build community through the use of faculty, senior students and Rundle alumni coaches 2 2 /23 PROGRAM GUI DE

Within the Student Services departments at Rundle there is a team of qualified, knowledgeable and skilled counsellors, learning strategists, a registered nurse and student support personnel who share some roles and have specialties within their school department. Counsellors offer social and emotional counselling, academic support, and career and post-secondary support. Our counsellors provide short-term counseling support for students in a number of different areas, but not limited to, anxiety, depression, grief and loss, transitions, work relationship concerns. They work closely with administration on school-related matters, such as tracking student progress, monitoring academic and personal development, and crisis intervention. The K-6 Collett student support team provides early literacy intervention and targeted reading, writing, and executive functioning sessions in both one-on-one and small group settings. The team works collaboratively with staff to identify needs and support both the students and teachers by providing research-based instructional strategies and individualized programming. Students are supported as they transition from grade to grade and the length of service is based on student needs and teacher requests. The school health nurse provides individual health support and school-wide health promotion. The nurse works with students, their families, and community healthcare providers on comprehensive nursing health assessments pertaining to concerns about physical, emotional, or social well-being. Our nurse actively participates in school safety plans, school health policy and assesses the school environment to prevent injury and to promote student well-being. The school nurse uses a comprehensive school health approach to facilitate health promotion activities throughout the school community. In the case of communicable disease outbreaks, our nurse helps monitor, report, and respond to communicable disease outbreaks within the school community and work alongside AHS Public Health.

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At the end of each year, the elementary community celebrates all of our students’ accomplishments for their academic and co-curricular endeavors. Students receive a certificate of achievement. In addition, we honour a select number of students in three categories: citizenship, improvement, and academics.

STUDENT SERVICES


In Collett, teachers access services on the student’s behalf. Students have access to a school nurse, academic support staff and a school counselor as the need arises. Parents are welcome to request information or access to these services through their homeroom teacher or by contacting our Student Services team members directly.

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SECOND STEP PROGRAM Second Step is a complimentary social-emotional learning program that is introduced to students in Kindergarten and continues until the completion of grade six. The program helps to build a strong foundation for students by providing targeted lessons in the areas of growth mindset, goal setting, emotional management, empathy, kindness, and problem-solving. Focusing on these areas encourages students to build the capacity to have healthy relationships while promoting self/social awareness and learning about responsible decision-making.

OUT OF SCHOOL PROGRAMS At Rundle, we believe that a well rounded educational experience enables our students to grow and flourish. We also recognize that sometimes great learning can take place outside of school hours. To support the vision of helping students to find their passions and engage in a well-rounded pursuit of education, we are pleased to offer our Before and After Care Program along with the c.Lab (Curiosity Lab) at Rundle.

Rundle Child Care The Rundle Child Care Program offers our students in Kindergarten to Grade 6 an exemplary before and after school experience. Our carefully designed program cultivates curiosity and inspires a passion for learning, creating, making, and doing. Learn more about this program on our website at rundle.ab.ca.

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c.Lab at Rundle The c.Lab at Rundle College offers two unique mind and body programs: Curiosity sessions and Junior Cobras. Both provide a full range of enrichment opportunities in the areas of wellness, innovation, and academics. Furthermore, our programs encompass a growth mindset philosophy thus building the foundation required for a life of sustained learning, perpetual curiosity, and conscientious citizenship. Curiosity Sessions All of our Curiosity sessions are driven by cutting-edge research and best practices and have been designed by learning scientists. These innovative after school programs are designed to increase capacity and ignite passions for STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) in a holistic way that encourages mindfulness, global citizenship, and character. Junior Cobras The Rundle College Junior Cobras Sport Development Program runs after school and provides students with foundational skills in a variety of sports. It is available for students in grade 1 and upwards.

Rundle Music School We passionately believe that music has the capacity to enrich our lives and provide a creative outlet. In an effort to inspire a life-long love for music, Rundle Music School instructors strive to provide a personalized and well-rounded music experience for every student.

Mind & Body Summer Camps The c.Lab at Rundle also offers Junior Cobra and Curiosity Camps throughout the summer for children in kindergarten to grade 6 who attend Rundle or other schools in the city. Our camps are filled with unique experiences, an opportunity to learn something new, and a chance to make new friends. Learn more about this program on our at rundle.ab.ca.

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COLLEGE K–3 CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAMS

ART

Our co-curricular programs change each year depending on the interest level of our students. Below is a sampling of the co-curricular programs offered at Rundle College Primary.

Kindergarten art is a creative, cultural and environmental experience that focuses on the major components of visual learning: reflection, depiction, composition and expression.

Arts: Choir, Ukulele Club, Performance Clubs, Bird Club, Beautiful Oops Club, Craft Club, Drama Club

FRENCH

Intellectual Pursuits: LEGO® Club, Dinosaur Club, STEAM Club, Global Explorers Club, Junior First LEGO® League, Environment Club

Character: Kids 4 Kids, We Care, Reading Buddies, in-house leadership experiences

KINDERGARTEN FIELD TRIPS Children participate in multiple field trips. Visiting places such as the Bow Habitat Station and the Leighton Art Centre enhance units of study and provide opportunities to explore the community beyond the classroom. Rundle College’s full-day Kindergarten program offers three Kindergarten classes, each with a maximum of 15 students. The program adheres to Alberta curriculum standards and also embraces the value of differentiated and enriched learning for all students. An energetic and dedicated team of educators provides a dynamic and challenging program fostering the intellectual, social, and personal development of all young students.

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HEALTH Kindergarten students learn how to keep themselves healthy. Hand washing, teeth brushing, nutrition, and learning to deal with emotions are covered. To further enhance the program, our school nurse provides age appropriate learning sessions for the students on health related topics. The school nurse also provides informative parent presentations throughout the year.

LANGUAGE ARTS Introducing the phonetic alphabet through a personalized phonics program fosters a love of reading. Children learn to read books by reading the pictures, retelling a story, or actually reading the words, and our students are exposed to a wide variety of wonderful books. Following the Daily 5 program, a framework for structuring literacy time to develop lifelong habits of reading, writing, and working independently, students choose from options including Read to Self, Read to Someone, Listen to Reading, Work on Writing and Word Work. The program inspires productive, highly engaged students who are developing a true love of literacy.

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Athletics: Junior Cobras (volleyball, basketball, wrestling, rugby), Intramurals (non-competitive athletics)

In Kindergarten, children acquire the foundations of the language via thematic units that are reviewed and expanded in subsequent years. AIM (Accelerative Integrated Method) is a gesture-based approach that looks in depth at one particular story. It is used because teaching through story appeals to younger children and encourages students to make connections with the language.


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MATHEMATICS

SCIENCE

Children are naturally attracted to the science of numbers and patterns. Kindergarten mathematics progresses in difficulty, introducing children, as they are ready, to different mathematical concepts using a variety of manipulatives. Math time is structured so that students develop deep conceptual understanding and mathematical proficiency. Students work independently toward personalized goals, and the teacher meets individual needs through whole-group and small-group instruction, as well as one-on-one conferring.

Kindergarten students naturally wonder about the science around them, and teachers demonstrate energy science activities to encourage scientific inquiry and direct learning. Students pose questions, work to find the answers, and are introduced to the scientific method through numerous experiments. They are encouraged to ask “Why?” and “What would happen if?” Making predictions and using simple equipment and tools to gather data, they discuss their observations and record them using pictures and simple words. Living creatures and plants are part of the classroom environment; each classroom has a “nature table” enabling children to learn about nature through reallife experiences.

MUSIC The foundation for understanding and experiencing the fundamentals of music — rhythm, melody, harmony, expression, and movement — is set in Kindergarten. Students spend considerable time discovering their singing voices, dancing, and playing musical games. The primary goal is to get students comfortable singing and performing with their peers. Instrument use includes small percussion instruments and djembes.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education occurs on most days at Rundle with healthy choices and active living integrated throughout the school year. Participating in various activities, students develop an appreciation for physical education, physical fitness, and health-related topics. The aim is to enable students to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to lead active, healthy lifestyles today and throughout their lives. Kindergarten Physical Education focuses on developing locomotor skills, non-locomotor skills, and basic manipulative skills. The emphasis is on team building, sportsmanship, co-operation, self-discipline, and fair play. These attributes are taught through chasingand-fleeing games, invasion games, co-operation games, striking games, outdoor pursuits, and individual activities. Yoga is taught to each class once a week.

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SOCIAL STUDIES Students explore being unique and the characteristics and interests that unite members of communities and groups. They learn to value their unique characteristics, interests, gifts, and talents, and to appreciate those of others. They examine what makes them unique individuals by exploring and reflecting upon a key question: “What are my gifts, interests and characteristics, and how do they make me a unique individual?” Children’s awareness and appreciation of the global community is nurtured, offering them and their families an opportunity to celebrate different cultures.

TECHNOLOGY Students are introduced to responsible technology use through classroom iPads. Math concepts are reinforced through Mathletics and Math Ninja programs. Each student has a Raz-Kids account where literacy skills are enhanced through various online-levelled books. Students learn how to safely log in and log out of personal accounts and to do basic research.

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GRADE 1 FIELD TRIPS Field trips in Grade 1 supplement and sometimes review the curriculum. The Teacher’s Pet organization leads several in-school field trips in which students participate at stations and have fun with parent volunteers. Out-of-school trips vary from year to year and may include visits to Heritage Park, Telus Spark, and the Calgary Tower.

Students continue to explore art and materials, engaging in both self-expression and more processbased and structured lessons. They experience choice as an artist while also seeing tried-and-tested techniques. Students are introduced to some historical or contemporary artists. In Grade 1, Art is often tied to the Science, Social Studies, or Mathematics curricula, and students also take part in some cross-curricular lessons with the Music and French programs. An annual spring exhibition (centred on a theme relevant to the school or community) showcases all Rundle primary students’ art work.

FRENCH AIM (the Accelerative Integrated Method), is a gesturebased approach that looks in depth at one particular story. This is a continuation of the Kindergarten language program and provides an engaging introduction to French. Language continues to develop through thematic units which are integrated with other subject areas and expanded on each year.

HEALTH Grade 1 students learn about expected and unexpected social behaviours through the Superflex program which promotes social thinking. They become familiar with the social hero called Superflex and learn how to combat social villains called Unthinkables. This is an engaging way to teach students about character traits and classroom expectations. 2 2 /23 PROGRAM GUI DE

A wide variety of daily literacy activities are built into Grade 1 morning routines including phonics, an individualized spelling program, writing, reading, and printing. Students challenge themselves at their individual literacy level by taking part in Daily 5 literacy blocks, practicing specific Language Arts concepts through choices including Read to Self, Read to Someone, Listen to Reading, Work on Writing, and Word Work. Students also use Raz-Kids, an online reading tool to enrich their learning.

MATHEMATICS Students learn about numbers to 100, patterns and relations, and shapes and space. Grade 1 learners are challenged through our math program which nurtures deep conceptual understanding and mathematical proficiency. There is a strong emphasis on knowledge of basic addition and subtraction.

MUSIC Students are introduced to the Solfège system of notesinging, as well as basic rhythm notations. Elements of the Orff and Kodály methods are intertwined to build a strong foundation of pitch recognition and sense of rhythm. Many singing games and basic composition skill development are incorporated into Grade 1 Music. Instruments used include Boomwhackers, djembes, and small percussion instruments.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education occurs on most days at Rundle with healthy choices and active living integrated throughout the school year. Participating in a variety of activities, students develop an appreciation for physical education, physical fitness, outdoor education, and health-related topics. The aim is to enable students to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to lead active, healthy lifestyles today and throughout their lives. Grade 1 focuses on developing locomotor skills, nonlocomotor skills, and basic manipulative skills. The emphasis is on team building, sportsmanship, co-

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ART

LANGUAGE ARTS


operation, self-discipline, and fair play. These attributes are taught through chasing-and-fleeing games, invasion games, co-operation games, striking games, outdoor pursuits, and individual activities. Students gain a working knowledge of the rules and skills inherent in traditional activities such as cross-country running, soccer, basketball, badminton, ultimate Frisbee, netball, cricket, dance, Tae Kwon Do, rhythmic gymnastics, and in some non-traditional games. Yoga is taught to each class once a week for 40 minutes.

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SCIENCE Using the framework of the four season, students learn about colours, senses, construction, and the needs of plants and animals. Inquiry-based learning centred on engaging, exploring, extending, evaluating, and explaining takes place both indoors and outdoors. To further enhance the learning experience, organizations such as Teacher’s Pet and Bricks 4 Kidz also offer in-school hands-on lessons. Basic coding skills are introduced and explored.

SOCIAL STUDIES Grade 1 students learn about changes in their communities: how they are connected to a variety of communities, how to relate the past to the present, and how their world and their families have changed over time. There are many opportunities for discussion and for students to make connections to their own lives by bringing in personal items from home. Students also experience the past by visiting a one-room school house at Heritage Park. To further enhance the learning experience, an in-school Me and My World program offers various hands-on activities.

TECHNOLOGY Technology is integrated throughout the curriculum in Grade 1 and is used intentionally to enhance programs and to further engage students in learning. Programs including Raz-Kids, Mathletics, and Google Classroom are used frequently. Students become confident users of technology and also learn how to use technology responsibly and safely. Students learn about digital citizenship and internet safety.

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WELLNESS Wellness is valued and important at Rundle. Students learn about wellness and engage in activities such as mindfulness, yoga, and active movement. Time is also provided for proper nutrition breaks.

GRADE 2 FIELD TRIPS Field trips extend and enhance the Grade 2 curriculum in all areas. Out-of-school field trips vary from year to year, and past trips have included visits to Telus Spark, the Calgary Zoo, Fort Calgary, and Heritage Park. In-school activities have also been offered by the Teacher’s Pet organization.

ART Students continue their exploration of art in Grade 2 through process-based or technical projects, with time to express themselves more freely using a variety of media. Peer-reflection and self-reflection are introduced, and students take a closer look at both contemporary and historical artists. Art projects are sometimes based on the Science and Social Studies curricula, and there are also connections with the Music, French, and Yoga programs. An annual spring exhibition (centred on a theme relevant to the school or community) showcases all Rundle primary students’ art work.

FRENCH Students begin to study the French language solely through integrated theme-based learning. Units introduced in earlier years are expanded upon, and some new and exciting units on various aspects of the students’ world begin. These units provide an introduction to language that students will continue to develop in Grade 3 and in the Elementary French program.

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LANGUAGE ARTS Grade 2 Language Arts uses the Daily 5 and CAFÉ (Comprehension, Accuracy, Fluency and Expanding Vocabulary) framework, which gives students choices within a structure to take ownership of their learning. Literacy blocks enable students to practice specific concepts through choices including Read to Self, Read to Someone, Listen to Reading, Work on Writing and Word Work. They also write complete narratives using Barbara Mariconda’s Empowering Writers program, and use their journals for writing and poetry activities throughout the year.

The Grade 2 Mathematics curriculum covers multiple units that strengthen and extend all mathematical skills as well as the ability to use math in daily life. Basic facts are taught and practiced regularly. Students explore various math strategies while creating a strong number sense. Numeracy awareness is developed as they learn to use math skills and strategies in their daily lives.

MUSIC In Grade 2, students begin reading more notes on the treble staff while still making connections to the Solfège system for singing notes. Time signatures and some dotted rhythms are introduced. Many singing and dancing games incorporate movement and play. There is more focus on pitched instruments with the introduction of xylophones and ukuleles. Students also explore creative composing by writing their own song lyrics for various projects throughout the year.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education occurs on most days at Rundle, with healthy choices and active living integrated throughout the school year. Participating in a variety of activities, students develop an appreciation for physical education, physical fitness, outdoor education, and health-related topics. The aim is to enable students to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to lead active, healthy lifestyles today and throughout their lives. 2 2 /23 PROGRAM GUI DE

SCIENCE The Grade 2 Science curriculum consists of five different units: Exploring Liquids, Buoyancy and Boats, Magnetism, Hot and Cold Temperatures, and Small Crawling and Flying Animals. With guidance, students investigate and record procedures and observations using pictures and words, making generalizations based on their observations. Students love to experiment and work with hands-on materials such as watching and recording their observations as live caterpillars go through their life cycle.

SOCIAL STUDIES Grade 2 students investigate life in three diverse communities within Canada and discover how people live in each community and reflect on the country’s diversity. Using their understanding of their own community, students explore and compare Inuit, prairie, and Acadian communities. They discuss and research each community’s geography, culture, language, heritage, economics, and resources.

TECHNOLOGY Technology is intentionally used to enhance the Grade 2 curriculum across all subject areas. Students use Google Docs, slides, email, and numerous apps to create stories, presentations, and posters and to organize and display different information. Students become confident users of Google Classroom and are introduced to Google Suite.

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MATHEMATICS

In Grade 2, the emphasis is on team building, sportsmanship, co-operation, self-discipline, and fair play. These attributes are taught through chasingand-fleeing games, invasion games, co-operation games, striking games, outdoor pursuits, and individual activities. Students gain a working knowledge of the rules and skills inherent in traditional activities such as cross-country running, soccer, basketball, badminton, ultimate Frisbee, netball, cricket, dance, Tae Kwon Do, and rhythmic gymnastics. Yoga is taught to each class once a week for 40 minutes.


GRADE 3 FIELD TRIPS Field trips align with curriculum objectives to enhance the students’ learning experience. Field trips vary from year to year, and past trips include visits to Bow Habitat Station, Telus Spark, Calgary Tower, Inglewood Bird Sanctuary, National Music Centre, and Grotto Mountain Pond.

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ART In Grade 3, students continue developing skills through free expression and more structured projects. Multi-step projects occur over several weeks, so students see a more complete piece evolve. The connections between Art and Science, Social Studies, and Mathematics are often investigated, and there are collaborative lessons with Music and French. Students take a closer look at how different areas of study strengthen one another and continue to practice self-reflection and the giving and receiving of constructive peer feedback. There is a more in-depth look at some contemporary and historical artists and the interpretation of their work. An annual spring art exhibition (showcasing all Rundle primary students’ work) centres on a theme relevant to the school or community.

FRENCH Students’ language learning continues to expand on theme-based units introduced in previous years while also learning some new units. They also begin some aspects of basic grammar. It is expected that, by the end of Grade 3, students are able to express themselves in simple language and develop strategies to better learn and communicate in French. The program develops a love and excitement for the French language and prepares students for Grade 4.

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LANGUAGE ARTS The foundation of Grade 3 Language Arts is the individualized Daily 5 and CAFE (Comprehension, Accuracy, Fluency and Expanding Vocabulary) framework. Students complete reading and writing activities such as Read to Self, Read to Someone, Listen to Reading, Word Work, and Work on writing. A more structured writing program includes both narrative and expository writing based on Barbara Mariconda’s Empowering Writers program. Learning to write a variety of sentence types and expanding on vocabulary enables students’ writing to become more complex, and spelling and grammar are integrated into daily lessons.

MATHEMATICS Grade 3 Mathematics offers a foundation in basic facts, problem-solving, and concept-based learning. Critical thinking and the importance of understanding strategies are emphasized, and Math lessons are differentiated and customized to specific classroom needs. Teacher-directed lessons, independent tasks, and co-operative games and activities are offered daily.

MUSIC Grade 3 Music focuses on note reading and playing, and more complex rhythms are introduced, including dotted notes and sixteenth notes. Students are given many opportunities to put their theory knowledge and practical skills to work as they learn to play instruments such as the djembe drums, ukuleles, and recorders. While developing musical literacy skills, students also develop their ear for recognizing harmonic combinations, accompaniments, and rhythm patterns.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education occurs on most days at Rundle, with healthy choices and active living integrated throughout the school year. Participating in a variety of activities, students develop an appreciation for physical education, physical fitness, outdoor education, and health-related topics. The aim is to enable students to

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Throughout Grade 3, the emphasis is on team building, sportsmanship, leadership, co-operation, selfdiscipline, and fair play. These attributes are taught through chasing-and-fleeing games, invasion games, co-operation games, striking games, outdoor pursuits, and individual activities. Students gain a working knowledge of the rules and skills inherent in traditional activities such as including cross-country running, soccer, basketball, badminton, ultimate Frisbee, netball, cricket, dance, Tae Kwon Do and rhythmic gymnastics. Yoga is taught to each class once a week.

SCIENCE Grade 3 Science consists of five units: Rocks and Minerals, Animal Lifecycles, Hearing and Sound, Testing Materials and Designs, and Building with a Variety of Materials. Students explore concepts through hands-on projects and activities. The scientific method is emphasized as students engage in experiments, which encourage curiosity and exploration of the world around them.

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SOCIAL STUDIES Social Studies in Grade 3 builds on learning from previous years. Students learn global awareness by studying countries around the world including Peru, Ukraine, Tunisia, and India. Making connections between their own lives and those of others is an integral part of the program. The concept of quality of life is explored to expand students’ awareness of different cultures.

TECHNOLOGY Technology is intentionally integrated across all Grade 3 subject areas. Digital citizenship is emphasized to ensure students use technology to enhance their learning in a responsible manner. Students complete online research and learn to present information in a variety of ways. They regularly use programs including Glogster, Google apps, Raz-Kids, Mathletics, and Kahoot. Students become confident users of Google Classroom and Google Suite.

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develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to lead active, healthy lifestyles today and throughout their lives.


COLLEGE 4–6 CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAMS

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Seasonally, our Elementary teachers provide opportunities for our students to participate in club options. Students are encouraged to select an activity that they are curious about or an area of continued passion. The purpose of these clubs is to help our students develop their sense of wonder and enjoyment in participation while providing them with an opportunity to build friendships with students in different grades in the Elementary division, and teachers they might not otherwise learn from.

students select and sing special songs to the grade 12 students at their graduation ceremony. It’s a lovely way for these students to build community, empathy and learning from each other, while having fun!

ART

Arts: Art , Choir, Drama , Ukulele, Photography

Art is an important part of the culture at Rundle. Grade 4 projects are often based on activities in students’ Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Science classes. Homeroom teachers collaborate with the art specialist to plan art pieces that will extend students’ learning in core subjects. Students are encouraged to find the artist within while learning artistic techniques and creating imaginative pieces.

Intellectual Pursuits: Chess, Coding, Rundle Reporters, Tinker Club

FRENCH

Athletics: Junior Cobras (volleyball, basketball, wrestling, rugby), Intramurals (non-competitive athletics), Running Club, Outdoor Education, Cycling club Character: Ascent Leadership Club (Grade 6), Eco Club, Service Club

GRADE 4 FIELD TRIPS Many exciting, educational, and entertaining inclass and off-campus field trips supplement the Grade 4 subject material. Field trips vary from year to year and past trips have included visits to WinSport, Telus Spark, and an overnight stay in Drumheller. Throughout the year, Teachers’ Pet has also come to our campus to enhance the Science program.

GRADE 4 - 12 BUDDIES A valued tradition in grade 4 is the opportunity to be buddies with a grade 12 Rundle College student. Throughout the year, students from the Elementary and Senior High divisions get together to play games, enjoy each other’s company and build friendships that will last a lifetime. At the end of the year, the grade 4

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Students expand on theme-based units using a variety of techniques and technology. The emphasis in Grade 4 is on developing oral communication skills and listening comprehension. Students expand on grammar through reading and writing activities that develop linguistic knowledge. They take part in cross-curricular lessons with other subjects, making connections with Music, Art, Physical Education, Social Studies, Science, and Mathematics. Students become aware of language learning strategies that can be used to acquire other modern languages. Every three years, the French department organizes an all-day Carnaval, celebrating French culture and developing cultural understanding and intercultural competence.

LANGUAGE ARTS Expanding reading comprehension and writing skills is the primary focus in Grade 4. Using Barbara Mariconda’s Empowering Writers program, the year starts with a focus on narrative writing. Basic writing skills such as spelling, conventions, and sentence structure are emphasized as students learn how to write interesting, descriptive, and captivating stories, using the writing diamond as their guide. They then learn to apply their skills to expository writing, following the expository pillar to keep their work organized, informational, and interesting.

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Students also learn skills and strategies to improve their understanding of both fiction and nonfiction reading. During the year’s two novel studies, students focus on comprehension questions and vocabulary development. They also work on projects related to the novels and have many choices in how they would like to share their knowledge. Homework centres on the World to Explore monthly book talk and two oral presentations. Additionally, students are expected to regularly review spelling words from the Word’s Their Way Program.

Grade 4 students learn about numbers from 10,000 down to one hundredth. They work to understand and identify number patterns, solve problems using whole numbers and decimals, and compare and describe fractions. There is a strong focus on basic math operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. These are tested weekly through “fast facts” quizzes. Students apply skills as they learn about measuring area, perimeter, and time. They also work to understand the characteristics of 2- and 3-dimensional shapes. The fun and challenging online IXL program supplements concepts learned in class.

MUSIC In Grade 4, students continue working on rhythm and beat and are introduced to metre changes within a piece. They explore intervals and melodies based on the C-major scale and learn basic chords used to accompany melodies. Musical terms are applied to concepts such as tempo, dynamics, and tone colour. Students become skilled at listening to musical selections and at identifying form. Body movements are used to represent understanding and appreciation of musical expression. Students practice their skills through singing and by playing the recorder, ukulele, non-pitched percussion instruments, and barred Orff instruments.

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Physical Education occurs every day at Rundle, with healthy choices and active living integrated throughout the school year. Participating in a variety of activities, students develop an appreciation for physical education, physical fitness, outdoor education, and health-related topics. The aim is to enable students to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to lead active, healthy lifestyles today and throughout their lives. Grade 4 students develop skills through co-operative games, team sports, and individual activities. They gain a working knowledge of the rules and skills inherent in a variety of traditional activities, including volleyball, basketball, floor hockey, field hockey, t-ball, baseball, lacrosse, wrestling, cricket, handball, netball, badminton, broomball, fitness, rhythmic gymnastics, and kickball. Specialists are invited to Rundle to teach dance, yoga, and karate throughout the year.

SCIENCE Throughout Grade 4, students learn about problemsolving, the scientific process, and how to effectively communicate in science. Students learn about Simple Machines, a program unit highlighted by Rube Goldberg projects, in which knowledge of inclined planes, levers, pulleys, wheels, axles, wedges, and screws is applied to create a complicated process to complete a simple task. Other Science units are Lights and Shadows, Waste in Our World, and Plant Growth and Changes.

SOCIAL STUDIES Grade 4 Social Studies takes students on a journey to learn all about Alberta. Students learn mapping skills, how to gather information from various resources, and how to understand ideas from different perspectives, all while learning about the province’s history, geography, and natural resources. The Social Studies curriculum is integrated in various hands-on projects throughout the year, such as building a fur trading post.

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MATHEMATICS

PHYSICAL EDUCATION


TECHNOLOGY

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Technology is intentionally integrated into daily work and across subject areas. Information, study materials, and work-sheets are available through Google Classroom Each student has their own iPad, which is loaded with various educational apps and tools. Students use Book Creator, iMovie, Green Screen, and various other apps to create interesting and interactive projects, and to share their learning with peers and teachers. Students also have access to a comprehensive digital library. Digital citizenship and internet safety are emphasized throughout the year through the delivery of Common Sense Media’s Digital Citizenship. Students develop basic coding skills through the use of block coding programs such as code.org, and Scratch. Students also have an opportunity to explore and manipulate robots through the Sphero’s. Through the use of the app, TinkerCad, an online 3D modeling program that runs as an app on the ipad, students have the opportunity to design and create 3D renderings which can then be printed using the 3D printer. Innovation is integral to our Elementary program as students are encouraged to creatively problem solve using a version of the Design Cycle during our Cross Curricular Design Week. Through this program, emphasis is placed on the soft skills which include creativity, collaboration, critical thinking, communication, global citizenship, and information management. We believe that innovation is a mindset that can be built with practice and embracing failure as an opportunity for growth.

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GRADE 5 FIELD TRIPS Field trips enrich the learning experience and are an extension of Rundle’s academic and extracurricular programs. Trips vary from year to year, and some past trips for Grade 5 students have included visits to the Bennett Centre (a unique hands-on learning environment in Edmonton), the Calgary Farmyard, Ralph Klein wetland, Heritage Park, Telus Spark, and Teacher’s Pet in school workshop.

ART Art is an important part of the culture in Rundle Elementary. Grade 5 projects are often based on activities in students’ Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies and Science classes. Homeroom teachers and the Art specialist plan art pieces that are extensions of the learning students undertake in core subjects. Students are encouraged to find the artist within while learning techniques and creating a wide variety of artistic pieces.

FRENCH Students expand on theme-based units using a variety of techniques and technology. New themes are also added. The emphasis in Grade 5 is on further developing oral communication skills and listening comprehension. Students expand on grammar through reading and writing activities to develop linguistic knowledge. They take part in cross-curricular lessons with other subjects, making connections with Music, Art, Physical Education, Social Studies, Science, and Mathematics. Students become aware of language learning strategies that can be used to acquire other modern languages. Every three years, the French department organizes an all-day Carnaval, celebrating French culture and developing cultural understanding and intercultural competence.

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LANGUAGE ARTS A wide variety of daily literacy activities are built into students’ Daily 3 time, including reading comprehension, Words their Way spelling program, paragraph editing, silent reading, writing time and cursive writing. Barbara Mariconda’s Empowering Writers program is used throughout the year with one third of the time for narrative writing and one third for expository writing.

Homework includes practicing Words their Way lists, using Kids A-Z which has many engaging activities using their specific word lists. Students are also expected and encouraged to read everyday at home.

MATHEMATICS Students engage in activities to show and describe numbers to 1,000,000, solve problems using whole numbers and decimals, and compare and describe fractions. Measurement is explored with a focus on perimeter, area, and volume of rectangles. Students sort shapes and describe and perform reflections, rotations, and translations of 2-dimensional shapes. There is a strong emphasis on basic facts and performing two-digit by two-digit multiplication, as well as long division. Students write and solve one-step equations with whole-number solutions, and interpret 2 2 /23 PROGRAM GUI DE

MUSIC In Grade 5, students expand their knowledge of rhythm and beat to include dotted notes and syncopation, and are introduced to new scales and their related minor scales. Singing in simple harmonies and with expression is a focus throughout the program, enabling students to improvise using their voices, as well as a variety of other instruments. More complex forms are introduced through listening exercises. Reading parts while singing and recognizing simple chord progressions is emphasized. Original descants are often added to songs students are already familiar with. Students continue to practice their skills through singing and by playing the recorder, ukulele, non-pitched percussion instruments, and barred Orff instruments.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education occurs every day at Rundle, with healthy choices and active living integrated throughout the school year. Participating in a variety of activities, students develop an appreciation for physical education, physical fitness, outdoor education, and health-related topics. The aim is to enable students to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to lead active, healthy lifestyles today and throughout their lives. Grade 5 students develop skills through co-operative games, team sports and individual activities. They gain a working knowledge of the rules and skills inherent in traditional activities, including volleyball, basketball, floor hockey, field hockey, t-ball, baseball, lacrosse, wrestling, cricket, handball, netball, badminton, broomball, fitness, rhythmic gymnastics, and kickball. Specialists are invited to Rundle to teach dance, yoga and, karate throughout the year.

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Students participate in a book club project, where they work in groups to read a novel and complete a number of different jobs which all contribute to their book club meetings. There is also an independent book study with a one pager assignment to share their learning with their classmates. Students have the opportunity to research someone they admire and take part in a Wax Museum put on for the rest of the school. They practice their expository writing skills to write an informative piece about the person they researched. Grammar is taught throughout the year and students have access to IXL which has a Language Arts domain to practice grammar and reading skills at home, and at school. Poetry is taught, with lessons focusing on figurative language. Students have the opportunity to write, read and present poems with a Poetry cafe at the end to showcase their hard work.

and create double-bar graphs. Experimental probability or theoretical probability is used to solve problems. The fun and challenging online Mathletics program supplements concepts learned in class.


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SCIENCE

TECHNOLOGY

Grade 5 Science starts with a unit on Chemistry and exploring physical and chemical changes and the natural world. This understanding leads into the second unit where students explore the realm of electricity by building circuits with batteries, light bulbs, and wires. Further experiments demonstrate the connection between electricity and magnetism, as a simple electromagnet is built. Students continue to explore the natural world in the Weather Watch unit, where they explore and interpret various weather phenomena. The year wraps up by splashing around in Wetland Ecosystems while learning about the diverse life in this misunderstood habitat.

Technology is intentionally integrated into daily work and across subject areas. Information, study materials, and work-sheets are available through Google Classroom

SOCIAL STUDIES Throughout the year, students explore Canada and its regions, seeing our nation’s history through the experiences of Canada’s Aboriginal, French, British, and immigrant groups. They develop a sense of belonging and awareness of how the multiple stories of Canadians contribute to citizenship and identity. After learning about all of Canada’s regions, the “How will you survive?” small-group project challenges students to become “immigrants” to Canada in the late 1800s or early 1900s. After figuring out what region they are in, they develop a plan to survive and hopefully thrive, using only what they brought and the resources available to them. Students then become presenters, sharing their experience with other immigrants coming to their region. Note-taking and study skills are a focus throughout the year and tested at the end of study on each region. Mapping skills are learned with a focus on Canada, latitude and longitude, as well as the oceans and continents of the world.

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Each student has their own iPad, which is loaded with various educational apps and tools. Students use Book Creator, iMovie, Green Screen, and various other apps to create interesting and interactive projects, and to share their learning with peers and teachers. Students also have access to a comprehensive digital library. Digital citizenship and internet safety are emphasized throughout the year through the delivery of Common Sense Media’s Digital Citizenship. Students develop basic coding skills through the use of block coding programs such as code.org, and Scratch. Students also have an opportunity to explore and manipulate robots through the Sphero’s. Through the use of the app, TinkerCad, an online 3D modeling program that runs as an app on the ipad, students have the opportunity to design and create 3D renderings which can then be printed using the 3D printer. Innovation is integral to our Elementary program as students are encouraged to creatively problem solve using a version of the Design Cycle during our Cross Curricular Design Week. Through this program, emphasis is placed on the soft skills which include creativity, collaboration, critical thinking, communication, global citizenship, and information management. We believe that innovation is a mindset that can be built with practice and embracing failure as an opportunity for growth.

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GRADE 6 FIELD TRIPS Field trips enrich the learning experience and are an extension of Rundle’s academic and extracurricular programs. Field trips vary from year to year, and some past trips for Grade 6 students have included visits to the Edmonton Legislature, Jubilee Auditorium, and Telus Spark. Overnight trips to Edmonton and Ottawa.

Art is an important part of the culture in Rundle Elementary. Grade 6 projects are often based on activities in students’ Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Science classes. Homeroom teachers and the Art specialist plan art pieces that will be extensions of the learning students undertake in core subjects. Students are encouraged to find the artist within while learning techniques creating a wide variety of artistic pieces.

FRENCH Students expand on theme-based units using various techniques and technology. New themes are added. In Grade 6, students develop oral communication skills and listening comprehension, and there is an increased emphasis on reading and writing skills. They take part in cross-curricular lessons with other subjects, making connections with Music, Art, Physical Education, Social Studies, Science, and Mathematics. Reference to language learning strategies that can be used to acquire other modern languages continues throughout the year. Every three years, the French department organizes an all-day Carnaval, celebrating French culture and developing cultural understanding and intercultural competence.

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In Grade 6, functional and narrative writing skills are developed with a focus on sentence structure, conventions, and vocabulary. A variety of texts are studied during the year including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.

MATHEMATICS Students continue to expand their understanding of place value, numbers (decimals, fractions and whole numbers), mathematical patterns, and geometrical shapes and transformations. Simple algebra (which will be further developed in Grade 7) is introduced. Problem-solving is explored in each unit, and basic operations are practiced throughout the year. Course Units

• Big and Small Numbers • Ratios, Fractions and Percents • Multiplication and Division of Decimal Numbers • Patterns and Relations • Data Analysis and Probability • Measurement, Shapes and Transformations

MUSIC In Grade 6, various rhythmic styles are explored in a unit on ostinatos. New scales used in different genres and styles of music are introduced. An emphasis is on phrasing throughout a song and on more-complex chords that can be used to accompany songs. In addition to practicing note reading, students are exposed to musical symbols and words that appear on octavos and band sheet music.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education occurs every day at Rundle, with healthy choices and active living integrated throughout the school year. Participating in a variety of activities, students develop an appreciation for physical education, physical fitness, outdoor education, and health-related topics. The aim is to enable students to

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ART

LANGUAGE ARTS


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develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to lead active, healthy lifestyles today and throughout their lives.

Course Units

Grade 6 students develop skills through co-operative games, team sports, and individual activities. They gain a working knowledge of the rules and skills inherent in traditional activities including volleyball, basketball, floor hockey, field hockey, t-ball, baseball, lacrosse, wrestling, cricket, handball, netball, badminton, broomball, fitness, rhythmic gymnastics, and kickball. Specialists are invited to Rundle to teach dance, yoga, and karate throughout the year.

• Municipal Governments

As an integral part of our Physical Education program, the Grade 6 students have the opportunity to participate in three Outdoor Education experiences including Survival Camp in September, Rock Climbing in December and Hiking in May. In addition, there are numerous OE experiences on weekends which include Dog Sledding, Cross Country Skiing, Hiking, and Horseback Riding.

SCIENCE Students in Grade 6 use the scientific method to understand the world around them, and several field trips throughout the year relate to the science curriculum. Students take part in classroom experiments and discussions as well as in large individual projects. Course Units

• Trees and Forests • Solar System • Evidence and Investigation • Air and Aerodynamics • Flight

SOCIAL STUDIES In Grade 6, students are introduced to the principles of historical and contemporary democracy. The impact of past societies on the present form of government is explored. Geography skills are also further developed. Students are challenged to think critically and to formulate their own opinions on various issues.

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• Democratic Values

• Iroquois Confederacy

• Provincial Government

• Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms • Citizen Involvement

• Ancient Athens

TECHNOLOGY Technology is intentionally integrated into daily work and across subject areas. Information, study materials, and work-sheets are available through Google Classroom Each student has their own iPad, which is loaded with various educational apps and tools. Students use Book Creator, iMovie, Green Screen, and various other apps to create interesting and interactive projects, and to share their learning with peers and teachers. Students also have access to a comprehensive digital library. Digital citizenship and internet safety are emphasized throughout the year through the delivery of Common Sense Media’s Digital Citizenship. Students develop basic coding skills through the use of block coding programs such as code.org, and Scratch. Students also have an opportunity to explore and manipulate robots through the Sphero’s. Through the use of the app, TinkerCad, an online 3D modeling program that runs as an app on the ipad, students have the opportunity to design and create 3D renderings which can then be printed using the 3D printer. Innovation is integral to our Elementary program as students are encouraged to creatively problem solve using a version of the Design Cycle during our Cross Curricular Design Week. Through this program, emphasis is placed on the soft skills which include creativity, collaboration, critical thinking, communication, global citizenship, and information management. We believe that innovation is a mindset that can be built with practice and embracing failure as an opportunity for growth.

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COLLEGE 7–12 OVERVIEW CHARACTER PROGRAM The purpose of our character education program at Rundle is to create a kind and caring community organized around developing positive and healthy relationships among and between students, staff, and parents. We believe that social and emotional learning is just as important as academic learning. Moreover, we strive to inspire our students to become committed to moral and ethical behaviours and to give them opportunities to practice these desired skills.

Grades 7-9: STARters (Succeed Together at Rundle)

is a group of 24 multi-grade students who take on a leadership role in our school’s STAR character program. They organize and lead challenges, activities, and messages that inspire our students to further develop their own character strengths. STARter commitments include participating in monthly community volunteer experiences outside of school time. The L.E.A.D.E.R.S Council (Leadership, Experience, Activities and Development for Every Rundle Student) is a student council program providing leadership experience, activities, and development opportunities for every Rundle College student. The goal of the program is to add value to the students’ academic endeavors by providing a variety of social, school spirit, and philanthropic experiences that challenge them to be well-rounded students and positive citizens within their school community. WEB (Where Everybody Belongs) is a leadership opportunity for grade 9 students at Rundle College. Students apply to be a member of the group and work on several initiatives throughout the year. WEB Ambassador are responsible for welcoming and touring guests around the campus as well as helping incoming grade 7 students feel comfortable with their transition into junior high school.

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CAUSE, our service learning group, exposes members to a range of volunteering opportunities so they may better understand the needs of the community, learn what they are passionate about, and develop skills to contribute to both their local and global communities. Peer Support is a group of students committed to fostering Rundle College’s just and caring culture. An extension of Peer Support is our Peer Tutoring program for our junior high students. Senior high students are paired with students to assist with academics, study skills, and test taking strategies. The Duke of Edinburgh Award challenges students to discover hidden talents, develop untapped leadership potential, make a difference in the community, and explore the wonders of the great outdoors. The Duke of Ed program facilitates the students’ personal journey to achieve this award. Our entire Rundle community is involved in volunteerism and has given back 1000s of hours of service within Calgary and around the world. All Grades 7-11 students participate in Rundle Volunteer Days, and many students continue to give their time to community service projects as members of Rundle’s CAUSE Club and as part of Rundle’s International Service Learning Service Travel program. Our grade 12 students are involved with a mentoring program with our grade 4 students.

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At the high school level, there are many opportunities for students to further develop their character and leadership skills.

Grades 10-12: Rundle College Prefects are ambassadors of Rundle College. They are elected Grade 10, 11 and 12 students who aim to create a positive, inclusive, and inspired school community by working closely and directly with the administration, faculty, and students of Rundle College. Prefects assist in the organization of school events and the fostering of school spirit.


RUNDLE GIVES BACK Rundle partners our students, staff, and Rundle families with many local organizations to provide volunteer support: • Brenda’s House • Calgary Drop-In-Centre • Calgary Food Bank • Calgary Pathways Cleanup • Calgary Zoo

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• Children’s Cottage Volunteering • Community Kitchen - Good Food Box Program • Feed the Hungry • Food Bank • Grow Calgary • Kerby Centre • Mustard Seed • Salvation Army Toy Angels

THE ASCENT At Rundle, we aim to inspire leaders. One path to inspired leadership is through “The Ascent: A Distinction in Leadership at Rundle.” To earn the “Distinction in Leadership at Rundle,” Grade 12 students complete 10 modules (3 mandatory and 7 optional). We offer modules that are self-guided, direct instruction, exploratory, and include guest speakers. Each year, the module calendar is published and students are welcome to join any session they wish. Students develop their own leadership philosophy. The articulation of this philosophy is an individual pursuit. Some students may choose to write a personal leadership credo whereas others may choose to create a leadership vision board. Each student’s project is approved by a faculty advisor. Prior to receiving credit, the leadership distinction candidates are required to present their products to the ‘Distinction in Leadership at Rundle’ panel.

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Upon completion of the program and all of its requirements, each student receives a personalized letter of reference from the Head of School of Rundle College Society. The letter of recognition articulates the rigor of the program and the capacity of the individual Rundle Leader of Distinction.

HEAD’S LIST The Head’s List celebrates the success of our students and their adherence to the mission, vision, and values of Rundle College Society. Students are acknowledged for their success in the areas of co-curricular activities, character development, and academic achievement. The process and requirements are unique depending on the program and the student’s division; however, the universal components include an adherence to high academic standing and evidence of the pursuit of our values: togetherness, kindness, curiosity, and wellness. Students who qualify for the Head’s List are recognized at their school’s awards day and on a special display in their school. Graduating students receive a letter of recognition from Rundle College Society detailing their accomplishment of earning the distinction of being on Rundle College Society’s Head’s List.

STUDENT CELEBRATIONS At Rundle, we believe that celebrating student success and achievement is fundamental to educating well-rounded citizens of good character. These celebrations may be ongoing, such as our recognition of Students of the Month at each assembly, or specific to accomplishments in and out of the classroom that demonstrate our students’ character and achievements. Every year, the Rundle community celebrates all aspects of student achievement at the Academic and Athletic Awards Ceremonies. Numerous scholarships and bursaries are awarded each year to exceptional students who contribute to our school and who continue to give back to their local and global communities. Some scholarship recipients are chosen by Rundle faculty, while awards for future post-secondary study are based on student applications. TABLE OF CONTENTS


SCHOOL HANDBOOK The Rundle College School Handbook provides complete information about academic regulations including • attendance • homework/assignment expectations • academic integrity • student evaluation and grading • exam policy • Student Code of Conduct • withdrawals, course changes, and transfers This publication is available through our MyRundle portal.

STUDENT SERVICES Within the Student Services departments at Rundle there is a team of qualified, knowledgeable and skilled counsellors, learning strategists, a registered nurse and student support personnel who share some roles and have specialties within their school department.

Role of Student Services

Our school nurses promote a healthy school environment by initiating directives from Alberta Health Services and health related education in an effort to ensure students remain safe and well at school. Liaising between school personnel, families, and community healthcare providers, our nurses actively participate in school safety plans, coordinate referrals to private healthcare providers, and assess the school environment as to prevent injury and to promote student well-being.

Post-Secondary Planning In addition, the department provides comprehensive career and post-secondary support for students from junior high through high school. Grade 9 High School Planning

• goal setting and learning styles assessment • high school course plan

Counsellors provide social and emotional counselling, academic support, and career and post-secondary support. They also provide short-term counseling support for students in a number of different areas, but not limited to, anxiety, depression, grief and loss, transitions, and work relationship concerns. They work closely with administration on school-related matters, such as tracking student progress, monitoring academic and personal development, and crisis intervention.

Grade 10 Career Direction and Exploration

Academic support is offered to students through homeroom teachers, subject teachers and/or individual sessions. There is also significant support offered to teachers to aid students’ academic development in the classroom. Parent support and resources are offered to support parents in helping their child reach their full potential.

• connect high school plan with university requirements

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• self assessments • post-secondary and career explorations • review high school course plan Grade 11 Career Exploration and Post-Secondary Planning

• Strong Interest Inventory • post-secondary research

• Canadian and international admission support

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• inclusivity

Students and parents have several ways to access services. Students are able to drop in during office hours, email, or phone a member of the team. Students can also use the self-referral form that is housed on the Student Service Google Classroom. Grade 12 students have access to an online booking system to schedule sessions with a team member.


Grade 12 One-On-One Support with Post-Secondary Admissions

and rainforest studies, outdoor pursuits, and cultural studies of the Squamish people’s traditions.

• individualized support with admissions, transcripts, and scholarships

Grade 9 – Japan

• parent and student presentations • connections with post-secondary representatives

TRAVERSE

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The Traverse Post-Secondary Transition Program (The Traverse) is a Rundle-developed program that supports our graduating students as they transition into their first year of post-secondary education. As demonstrated in academic research, students are most successful in transitioning into post-secondary education learning environments if they have the following skills and attributes: self-determination, learning strategies, and the ability to self-advocate. Rundle focuses on the development of these skills; however, based on the research literature and feedback from our alumni, these skills may require further development in their new learning environment. Most post-secondary institutions have student support services and even some week-long transition courses; however, the support is not individualized for the holistic needs of a first-year student. The Traverse aims to seamlessly bridge the gap between high school and post-secondary studies for our students and bring them closer to academic autonomy while maintaining their confidence.

TRAVEL PROGRAM Grades 7-8 – Band Junior high band students travel annually to Camp Caroline and on a rotational basis to Moose Jaw, Edmonton, and Nelson to participate in music festivals.

Grade 8 – Cheakamus Cheakamus Center is an environmental education facility near Squamish, British Columbia. This four-night enrichment and leadership travel elevation links with Social Studies and Science. Activities include aquatic

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Our Japan trip itinerary includes Tokyo, Osaka, Kanazawa, Shirakawago, and the historical cultural centres of Nara and Kyoto. While visiting places studied in the Social Studies curriculum, travel highlights range from ancient temples to modern electronics, and include taiko drumming, sushi making, and a tea ceremony. This trip will be relaunched in the fall of 2023.

Grade 9 – Leadership Camp Students travel to Columbia Outdoor School in Canal Flats, B.C. in September for three nights. This is a fantastic opportunity for our grade 9 leaders to bond and set the tone for their final year of junior high.

Grade 9 – WEB Ambassadors WEB (Where Everyone Belongs) Ambassadors travel to Banff or Kananaskis for an overnight retreat to learn about leadership and team building.

Grades 9-12 – Band Annual senior high band trips include international travel. Previous trips have been to Chicago, New York, New Orleans (to march in a Mardi Gras parade), Los Angeles, and San Francisco. On these trips, Rundle students pair with local high schools, participate in cultural events, and perform concerts for a wide range of audiences. Grade 9 students who participate in senior band throughout the year are also eligible to travel with the group.

Grade 10 – Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre provides an ideal setting for this four-day immersion learning experience. Temperate rainforests, rocky shores, open coastlines, sandy beaches, sheltered inlets, mudflats, and estuaries provide a dynamic learning environment for students and the scientists they work alongside.

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Grade 10 – New Mexico Grade 10 students travel to New México, visiting Albuquerque, Santa Fé, and several sights of interest in the area. Students enjoy cross curricular activities focussing on fine arts, science, social studies and the Hispanic culture of the southern United States.

Grade 10 – Outdoor Education

Grade 11 – Leadership Conference Grade 11 student leaders can apply to represent Rundle at the CAIS Student Leadership Conference: "The Student Leadership Conference is designed for students by students. Every spring, approximately 130 Canadian independent school student leaders come together to develop their leadership skills, complete a service project, and get to know other like-minded leaders from Canada's top schools. With direction from a staff advisor, students from a host school develop programming, schedule speakers and organize trips to showcase their area of the country for the week of the Conference."

Grades 11-12 – Service Learning

A member of the Calgary Independent Schools’ Athletic Association, and the Alberta Schools Athletic Association, Rundle is widely known for the strength of its Cobra athletics program. Showing strong results locally within the CISAA for both junior and senior athletics, Rundle College Senior High is also highly regarded provincially, capturing numerous ASAA Provincial titles in all sports. Many of our graduating student athletes have continued their athletic pursuits at post-secondary institutions across Canada and abroad.

Grade 7 Grade 7 competitive sports teams engage in league play within Calgary.

Grade 8 Grade 8 competitive sports teams play league games and attend tournaments both within Calgary and the immediate area.

Grade 9 Grade 9 teams play league games and attend overnight tournaments throughout the province.

Grades 10-12 Grades 10-12 competitive teams play league games in the Calgary area. Overnight trips can be expected as Rundle students compete in tournaments throughout Western Canada. Some of our senior high teams travel internationally as well. For example, our rugby team has travelled to the Bahamas, Hong Kong, and Argentina.

Rundle’s service learning trips hone students’ understanding of global citizenship. Our students have traveled to Cambodia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Kenya, Vietnam and, more recently, Peru where they installed solar electric systems for two preschools in the Peruvian Andes. Although the itinerary included hiking the Sun Gate on the Inca Trail and visiting Machu Picchu, the highlight for many Rundle students was interacting with the local children and seeing the impact their work had on the greater community. 2 2 /23 PROGRAM GUI DE

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Rundle College’s Outdoor Education program combines formal instruction with outdoor experiences. Students earn school credits while building their winter travel and navigation skills, developing an understanding of winter ecosystems, and honing leadership skills in a context of critical thinking about wilderness preparedness and stewardship. After participating in two short outdoor adventures, students embark on a multi-day trip combining snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, and downhill skiing.

ATHLETICS: COBRA PRIDE!


COLLEGE 7–9 CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAMS Below is a sampling of the co-curricular programs offered at Rundle College Junior High. Programs change each year depending on the interest level of our students. Arts: Jazz Band, Art Club, Drama Production, Yearbook Club, Vocal Ensemble

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Intellectual Pursuits: Speech and Debate, Reach for the Top, Spanish Club, Can you Dig it?, Science Olympics, Cardboard Boats, Chess Club, International Puzzles and Games, Science Show Athletics: Intramurals (non-competitive athletics), cross country, volleyball, golf, football, basketball, badminton, wrestling, rugby, co-ed soccer, track and field, athletic travel teams, Esports Character: WEB Ambassadors, L.E.A.D.E.R.S. Council, STARters Service, Eco/Enviro Club

COURSES Required

• English Language Arts

• Science

• Mathematics

• Social Studies

• Physical Education Electives

• Art

• French

• Coding

• Instrumental Music

• Drama

• Spanish

ART In Grades 7, 8, and 9 Art, students explore three major components of visual learning: drawings, compositions and encounters. These integrated components provide a framework from which students participate in the visual search for meaning and for a unified visual statement. Students explore art as a means of communication for a community through time and across cultures.

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CODING This course equips all learners with foundational knowledge of computer science and coding. It also explores the societal impact of technology and computing on our world. Using a computational thinking lens, learners will have fun developing their knowledge of a variety of programming languages and applications through hands-on projects and robotics. Learners are expected to gain practical knowledge as well as critical thinking and problem-solving skills as part of their journey as lifelong learners and contributing members of our community.

DRAMA Junior high drama introduces basic theatre concepts, skills and history. Students explore multiple dramatic mediums such as movement, speech, improvisation, acting, technical theatre, and theatre history. There is a focus on group projects and presentations and students are encouraged to use their imagination in a variety of ways.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS Students develop proficiency in reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and representing. Distinct units of study introduce students to a wide variety of texts. The close reading of these texts to understand literal and figurative meaning is a focus throughout each grade level. Students have opportunities to experiment and gain confidence with different writing and oral skills. The curriculum also offers students opportunities to reflect on their learning which encourages independent and critical thinking.

English Language Arts 7 The basic elements of writing are emphasized with a focus on sentence and paragraph construction. Texts studied include poetry, short stories, fiction, nonfiction, drama, and film.

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English Language Arts 8 Students are introduced to the essay form and the writing focus shifts to organizing, building, and transitioning ideas. Texts studied include poetry, short stories, fiction, nonfiction, drama, and film.

English Language Arts 9 Students work on mastering fundamental essaywriting skills in preparation for the Alberta Provincial Achievement Test as well as for senior high school. Texts studied include poetry, short stories, fiction, nonfiction, drama, and film.

French as a Second Language This course is for students who have little or no background in the French language. Students develop skills in reading, writing, listening, speaking, representing, and viewing. Students are evaluated in each of these strands. Elements of grammar, vocabulary, and verbs are included. The ultimate goal is to reinforce and build language skills that can be used in increasingly varied situations.

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC Instrumental Music offers a sequential and developmental approach to music instruction. Each level builds on previous learning and experiences. By completing all three years, students achieve the expected competency for entry into Instrumental Music 10 at the senior high level. Band — At the Grade 7 level, students are introduced to wind and percussion instruments. In this beginner course, students learn how to assemble, play, and care for their instrument of choice. In Grades 8 and 9, students continue to practice and improve on the skills learned and the musical concepts taught. Wind and Percussion Instruments — Students develop aural, technical, theoretical, interpretive, and synthesis skills. This is done in three progressive levels corresponding with Grades 7, 8 and 9. 2 2 /23 PROGRAM GUI DE

Mathematics 7 Students develop a strong number sense (working comfortably and interchangeably with whole numbers, decimals, integers, and percentages). They also build a strong algebraic foundation that will be augmented further in Grades 8 and 9. Course Units

• Number Relationships • Fractions and Decimal Numbers • Percentages and Circle Graphs • Integers • Linear Relations and Equations • 2-Dimensional Geometry • Probability and Statistics

Mathematics 8 In Grade 8, there is continued emphasis on number sense as students further hone their understanding of the relationship between fractions, percentages, decimals, ratios, as well as algebra (ratios, rates and proportions, linear equations and percentages). Course Units

• Integers • Fractions and Rational Numbers • Exponents, Roots, Pythagorean Theorem • Ratios, Rates and Proportions • Solving Linear Equations • Linear Relations • 3D Drawings, Surface Area, Volume • Data Analysis and Probability • Transformations • Percentages

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FRENCH

MATHEMATICS


Mathematics 9

Physical Education 7

In Grade 9, there is a strong emphasis on algebra (polynomials, linear equations, inequalities and relations). Students deepen and strengthen their algebraic skills in order to be well prepared for high school.

In addition to participating in core activities, students in Physical Education 7 take part in a canoe and kayak day at the Calgary Canoe Club. In the fall, students engage in the Positive Playgrounds day. Here, Grade 7 students are mentored by our Grade 10 students who lead them in a series of organized games throughout the day. Additionally, swimming at Glenmore Pool takes place in early winter.

Course Units

• Rational Numbers • Powers and Exponents

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• Polynomials

Physical Education 8

• Circle Geometry

In addition to participating in core activities, students in Physical Education 8 travel to Cheakamus, a 420acre ecological reserve in the Paradise Valley outside of Squamish, B.C. The program includes nature-based and outdoor activities, youth leadership, recreation, and other hands-on experiences intended to instill respect and appreciation for the natural world.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Physical Education 9

• Data Analysis • Linear Equations and Inequalities • Linear Relations • Measurement

Physical Education in Grades 7, 8, and 9 is integrated with health components throughout the school year. Through participation in varied activities, students develop an appreciation for physical education, physical fitness, outdoor education, and health-related topics.

In addition to participating in core activities, students in Physical Education 9 take an autumn Outdoor Education school trip to Kananaskis Country. In the spring, students spend a morning at the Olympic Hall of Fame at WinSport as part of the Canada Olympic School unit.

Students gain a working knowledge of the rules and skills inherent in various activities including fitness testing, team handball, creative games, weight/circuit training, dance, cricket, yoga, badminton, flag football, volleyball, track and field, health education, basketball, rugby, indoor lacrosse, wrestling, outdoor education, and swimming. The values of fair play, co-operation, self-discipline, and sportsmanship are foremost.

SCIENCE

Emphasis is placed on developing the key components of fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance and strength, flexibility, power, coordination, and agility.

Science 7 Science 7 focuses on the natural sciences. Throughout the year, students continue developing the fundamental skills of scientific inquiry, problem solving, critical thinking, sustainability, safety, collaboration, and respect for various perspectives. Course Units

• Interactions and Ecosystems • Plants for Food and Fibre • Heat and Temperature • Structures and Forces • Planet Earth

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Science 8 Students are encouraged to develop a critical sense of wonder and curiosity about scientific and technological endeavours. They are inspired to use science and technology to acquire new knowledge and to solve problems so they may improve the quality of their own lives and the lives of others. Students become more knowledgeable about the wide spectrum of careers related to science, technology, and the environment. Course Units

• Mix and Flow of Matter • Light and Optical Systems • Mechanical Systems • Fresh and Saltwater Systems

Science 9 Students are encouraged to develop a critical sense of wonder and curiosity about scientific and technological endeavours. They are inspired to use science and technology to acquire new knowledge and to solve problems so they may improve the quality of their own lives and the lives of others. Students become more knowledgeable about the wide spectrum of careers related to science, technology and the environment. Building on previous learning, several new concepts, including genetics and the periodic table, are introduced, and the integration of mathematics is increased. Course Units

• Matter and Chemical Change • Biological Diversity • Space Exploration • Electrical Principles and Technologies • Environmental Chemistry

Social Studies 7 This course is a comprehensive examination of Canadian history preceding and following Confederation. The concept of intercultural contact is introduced through an examination of migration and immigration. Social Studies 7 forms the foundation for the continued dialogue on citizenship and identity in Canada, and current events receive continual focus throughout the year. Course Units

• Diverse Peoples — Students learn how the diversity of peoples played a role in the origins of Canada, including First Nations, Inuit, French, and British peoples. • Toward Confederation — Students explore key events that affected relationships among the early peoples and which shaped Confederation, the agreement that eventually founded Canada. • After Confederation — Students explore the ideas of citizenship that shaped Confederation and consider how events and policies since 1867 have shaped Canadian society.

Social Studies 8 Students examine issues related to contact between societies with differing worldviews. The focus is on exploring elements of worldview and how these views are expressed by people living in different times and places. Students also reflect on their own worldviews and assess the influence the past has on the present. Current events are explored throughout the year. Course Units

• Origins of a Western Worldview: Renaissance Europe • From Isolation to Adaptation: Ancient Japan • Worldviews in Conflict: The Spanish and the Aztecs

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• Cells and Systems

SOCIAL STUDIES


Social Studies 9 Students explore the Canadian political and justice systems, economics, environment, and decision-making. Course Units

• Governance and the Justice System • Rights, Responsibilities and Immigration

Spanish as a Second Language This course is for students who have little or no background in the Spanish language. In class, students develop skills in reading, writing, listening, speaking, representing and viewing. Students are evaluated in all these strands. The primary goals are to develop a balanced foundation in language learning skills, an appreciation for the Spanish-speaking cultures of the world, and acquiring solid, basic language skills that will enable students to converse comfortably in Spanish.

RUNDLE COLLEGE

• Economics, Consumerism and Decision

SPANISH

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COLLEGE 10–12 OUR ACADEMIC PHILOSOPHY Our students are accepted into highly competitive post- secondary programs throughout the world on the basis of their final marks in our academic program, including the diploma exam program. The academic results of Rundle College students consistently rise above the Provincial averages on subject-specific diploma exams, a direct reflection of the quality of instruction our students receive and their commitment to their studies. Rundle College’s decision not to offer IB or AP programs is rooted in our values and our history of success with students as we focus on the program of studies mandated by the Province of Alberta.

ELEVATIONS PROGRAM Our students’ post-secondary success is largely the result of being taught the Alberta curriculum to an exceptionally high standard. In addition, our Elevations Program offers various opportunities for students to elevate their learning and to explore an area of personal interest linked to their post-secondary and career aspirations. Elevations may be included as a component of a course, additional coursework that allows study at an advanced level, or excursions and activities that lay outside the typical timetabled day. Our Elevations Program allows us the flexibility to respond to the ever-changing educational, societal, and scientific environments in which our students dwell. Students are immersed in areas of study that are both authentic and relevant. Alberta Education credits are offered in some, but not all, of these elevations. Regardless of whether or not credits are offered, evidence of completion of work that goes above the standards can serve as significant differentiators in a competitive, post-secondary environment.

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CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAMS Below is a sampling of the co-curricular programs offered at Rundle College Senior High. Program offerings may change each year depending on the interest level of our students and student driven initiatives. Through involvement in the co-curricular program, students can elevate their Rundle College experience. Arts: Art Club, Drama Production, Jazz Band, Photography Club, Yearbook Club Intellectual Pursuits: Bamfield Trip, Business Club, Competitive Speech, International Travel, Reach for the Top, Robotics, University Ambassadors Athletics: badminton, basketball, cheer team, coed soccer, cross country, football, golf, Intramurals (non-competitive athletics), rugby, track and field, volleyball, wrestling. Most teams have the opportunity to travel during their respective season. Character: C.A.U.S.E Club, Duke of Edinburgh, Grad Committee, International Travel Trips, Junior Cobras, Prefects, Peer Support, Peer Tutoring, Student Ambassadors

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We support and challenge students in the areas of their passions. Academically, this is done through our enriched programs, where students join like-minded individuals in their pursuit of excellence, tackling topics and activities that go beyond the confines of the curriculum. In alignment with our values, students are supported as they embrace interests beyond academics. Rundle College’s program of studies provides students with time to focus on mental and physical wellness, volunteering, athletics, co-curricular clubs, and humanitarian pursuits.


COURSES Required

• Career and Life Management 20

• Physical Education 10

• English Language Arts

• Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics)

• Mathematics

• Social Studies

Electives

• Art

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• Drama • French as a Second Language • Instrumental Music • Music

• Physical Education 20/30 • Spanish Language and Culture • Sports Medicine • Tech Innovation

ART Students’ art is exhibited throughout the school, and there are opportunities for public exhibits at special events, band concerts, and the fine arts show.

Art 10 Art 10 • FNA1400 • 5 credits

Students investigate the elements and design principles of art to acquire knowledge and working skills in drawing, designing, painting, sculpting, and demonstrating colour theories and principles. Techniques developed through practical application are applied to solve abstract problems, resulting in the creation of several art projects. Prerequisite: none.

Art 20 Art 20 • FNA2400 • 5 credits

The visual arts involve expressing one’s self, feelings, experiences, and ideas through images. Students use the elements and principles of design to create purposeful effects and to make new and meaningful images. In this foundation course, students develop basic art skills by creating art images through drawing, painting, sculpting, ceramics, and design. Students are encouraged to observe, discuss, and create images. Prerequisite: Art 10.

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Art 30 Art 30 • FNA3400 • 5 credits

Students create art images that communicate their own thoughts, feelings, and ideas. Students develop greater knowledge and skills in drawing, design, painting, 3-dimensional sculpture, composition, printmaking, and commercial art. Art 30 students also develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of art history. This course sets the foundation for building an art portfolio. Prerequisite: Art 20.

Art 31 Art 31 • FNA3405 • 5 credits

Art 31 provides an opportunity for all students to gain knowledge in the discipline of art. Further developing their skill and understanding of art technique, students examine the impact of international influences and modern technology on modern art. Art 31 sets the foundation for an art portfolio. Prerequisite: Art 30.

CAREER AND LIFE MANAGEMENT Career and Life Management Career and Life Management • PED0770 • 3 credits

Career Directions Expansion Career Directions Expansion • CTR2310 • 1 credit

Career Directions Transitions Career Directions Transitions • CTR3310 • 1 credit

Completing Career and Life Management comprises three components, totals five credits, and is required for high school graduation in the Province of Alberta. At Rundle College, all students are required to take Career and Life Management, Career Directions Expansion, and Career Directions Transitions. Career and Life Management equips students to make sound personal and professional decisions and also develops their ability to apply effective thinking and communication skills. Students develop a positive selfconcept and an understanding of personal interests, TABLE OF CONTENTS


values, aptitudes, and abilities. Independent personal management is promoted, and students develop the ability to make choices and accept challenges that consider significant others, values, responsibilities, and resources. They gain an awareness of health as a resource for everyday living, and learn health maintenance’s connection with personal well-being, realizing goals, satisfying needs, and coping with change.

Please note: Because this program encourages students to focus on how they see themselves, how they cope with life’s challenges, and how they relate to others, areas which may be considered sensitive or controversial may well arise. Rundle College strives to deal with these issues appropriately. Students are encouraged to discuss sensitive issues with their parents or guardians. Course Themes

Drama fosters students’ positive self-concept as they explore life through assuming roles and acquiring dramatic skills. This imaginative exploration involves setting, “acting out”, and communicating within a dramatic situation. Students then reflect on the consequences. This reflection provides the platform for self-development. Students have opportunities to perform at the Remembrance Day ceremony, various holiday events, and the Spring Production.

Drama 10 Drama 10 • FNA1410 • 5 credits

Drama at the senior high level emphasizes the development of the individual as a creator, performer, historian, critic, and patron through dramatic forms of expression learned in junior high. Drama at the senior level is a combined course with 10-, 20-, and 30-level students in one class. Prerequisite: none. Course Units

• Improvisation

• Orientation

• Film Study

• Technical Theatre and Design

• Movement and Speech

• Careers and the World of Work

• Financial Literacy

• Human Sexuality

• Self-Management

Drama 20

• Well-Being

Drama 20 • FNA2410 • 5 credits

• Independent Living

• Relationships

• Theatre Studies

Drama 20 continues students’ development as a creator, performer, historian, critic, and patron through dramatic forms of expression learned in junior high and in Drama 10. Drama at the senior level is a combined course with 10-, 20- and 30-level students in one class. Prerequisite: Drama 10. Course Units

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• Acting and Improvisation

• Playwriting

• Directing • Film Study

• Technical Theatre and Design

• Orientation

• Theatre Studies

• Speech

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The career-focused aspects of the course develop knowledge about career options and enable students to determine personal career strategies. Students gain an awareness of the relationships between personal economics, lifestyle, and occupational planning.

DRAMA


Drama 30 Drama 30 • FNA3410 • 5 credits

Drama 30 extends students’ development as a creator, performer, historian, critic, and patron through dramatic forms of expression learned in junior high and subsequently in Drama 10 and Drama 20. Drama at the senior level is a combined course with 10-, 20- and 30-level students in one class. Prerequisite: Drama 20. Course Units

RUNDLE COLLEGE

• Acting and Improvisation

• Speech

• Film Study

• Technical Theatre and Design

• Orientation

• Theatre Studies

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS English Language Arts 10-1 English Language Arts 10-1 • ELA1105 • 5 credits

Integrating the study of literature and language, this course emphasizes skill development in reading, writing, listening, speaking, representing, and viewing. Students are provided with a wide variety of challenging texts: poetry, short stories, novels, Shakespearean drama, modern drama, films, and nonfiction. Knowledge of texts is applied to writing personal responses and critical essays, where students are encouraged to think critically and creatively. Achieving the expectations of reading and writing at the senior high level is the focus, but the guiding principles are to provide a broader perspective of humanity and to inspire students to become open-minded, lifelong learners. Prerequisite: English Language Arts 9.

English Language Arts 20-1 English Language Arts 20-1 • ELA2105 • 5 credits

Building on the foundation of English Language Arts 10-1, this course continues to integrate the study of literature and language, emphasizing skill development in reading, writing, listening, speaking, representing, and viewing. Students are provided with a wide variety of challenging texts: poetry, short

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stories, novels, Shakespearean drama, modern drama, films, and nonfiction. Knowledge of texts is applied to writing of personal responses and critical essays, where students are encouraged to think critically and creatively. Preparation for Grade 12 and, ultimately, post-secondary education is the focus, but the guiding principle is to provide a broader perspective of humanity and to inspire students to become open-minded, lifelong learners. Prerequisite: English Language Arts 10-1.

English Language Arts 30-1 English Language Arts 30-1 • ELA3105 • 5 credits

English Language Arts 30-1 continues students’ skill development in reading, writing, listening, speaking, representing, and viewing. It integrates the study of literature and language, providing students with a wide variety of challenging texts: poetry, short stories, novels, Shakespearean drama, modern drama, films, and nonfiction. Knowledge of texts is then applied to writing personal responses and critical essays, where students are encouraged to think critically and creatively. Preparation for the Diploma Examination and for post-secondary education is the focus in this culminating course, but the guiding principles are to provide a broader perspective of humanity and to inspire students to become open-minded, lifelong learners. Prerequisite: English Language Arts 20-1.

FRENCH The “9Y” route builds on skills developed in grades 4-9 and is structured as a sequential nine-year program, culminating with French 30-9Y.

French as a Second Language 10-3Y, 20-3Y and 30-3Y This French program focuses on developing a balanced foundation in the language skills of comprehension and production. Students are guided toward activating these skills to apply them in communicative environments. The main goal is for our students to have a functional ability to communicate in French in basic situations, based on familiar topics and

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structures, using cultural and strategic knowledge they have gained to sustain their communication.

French as a Second Language 10-9Y, 20-9Y, 30-9Y French as a Second Language 10-9Y • FSL1099 • 5 credits

French as a Second Language 20-9Y • FSL2099 • 5 credits

Building on the framework established in French as a Second Language 10-9y and preparing students for the next part of their language journey, students expand their communication skills and explore Francophone culture. The program stresses the importance of successful communication enabling students to use French in increasingly diverse situations. Prerequisite: French as a Second Language 10-9y or equivalent. French as a Second Language 30-9Y • FSL3099 • 5 credits

The final chapter of our French as a Second Language program aims to not only strengthen fluency skills and functional ability to communicate in the target language, but to explore the personal and career opportunities that can be enhanced with the acquisition of a second language. Previous accomplishments function as the foundation from which students put to use new grammatical structures, bind novel expressions, and carry forth linguistic ability to new heights. Prerequisite: French as a Second Language 20-9y or equivalent.

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Rundle College is a proud member of Global Online Academy (GOA), whose programs offer students in grades 11 and 12 a way to pursue their passions, learn with peers from around the globe, and acquire and practice modern learning skills that will serve them well in post-secondary institutions, career, and life. Students fit GOA courses into their Rundle timetable, and are taught by experienced faculty from renowned peer schools all over the world. GOA are online classes where relationships and connections drive students to share their perspectives and learn from those of others. Rundle’s faculty also participates in GOA's world renowned professional learning programs as teachers seek to continuously improve their practice as modern educators. Course offerings include

• Advocacy • Art, Media, and Design • Architecture • Bioethics • Business Problem Solving

• Introduction to Investments • Medical Problem Solving • Macro/Microeconomics • Multivariable Calculus

• Comparative Politics

• Neuropsychology

• Creative Nonfiction

• Psychology

• Entrepreneurship in a Global Context

• Problem Solving with Engineering and Design

• Computer Science and • Number Theory Technology • Positive Psychology

• Fiction Writing • Game Theory • Global Health

• World Languages: Arabic | Japanese

Some courses receive credit, and all participants can highlight GOA classes in their post-secondary applications. The GOA experience shows students’ passion for learning as well as their ability to collaborate and problem solve in non-traditional ways.

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RUNDLE COLLEGE

Building on previous French language expertise, students continue to develop a balanced foundation of language comprehension skills through reading and listening as well as language production skills through speaking and writing in both interpersonal and presentational contexts. Students become more capable, independent language learners in order to have a functional ability to communicate in the target language. Prerequisite: French as a Second Language 7-9 or equivalent.

GLOBAL ONLINE ACADEMY


INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC Music students have the opportunity to take part in formal concerts in December and June. There are also a variety of other performance opportunities throughout the year including, but not limited to, Remembrance Day, athletic events, and graduation.

Instrumental Music 10

RUNDLE COLLEGE

Instrumental Music 10 • FNA1425 • 5 credits

Instrumental Music 10, 20, and 30 is a sequential and developmental approach to music instruction while appreciating and supporting the various abilities and achievements of participating students. Each course level builds on the previous. In Instrumental Music 10, students are immersed in a playing environment that challenges skills and knowledge learned at the junior high school level. Students become comfortable with performing at a higher level and with peers who have more experience. Students develop competencies and strive for excellence in performing, listening, creating, researching, and valuing music. Instrumental Music at the senior level is a combined course with 10-, 20- and 30-level students in one class. Prerequisite: ability to read music. Some junior high band and/or music experience is preferred.

Instrumental Music 30 Instrumental Music 30 • FNA3425 • 5 credits

Further building on the sequential and developmental approach to music instruction, Instrumental Music 30 expects students to continue to improve their leadership skills as they learn to lead their peers within their section and within the band as a whole. Students demonstrate a solid understanding of the inner workings of a concert band and of their instrument. Students develop competencies and strive for excellence in performing, listening, creating, researching, and valuing music. Instrumental Music at the senior level is a combined course with 10-, 20-, and 30-level students in one class. Prerequisite: Instrumental Music 20.

MATHEMATICS Mathematics 10C Mathematics 10C • MAT1791 • 5 credits

Students gain the mathematical understanding and critical-thinking skills needed for success in Mathematics 20-1. This is also an introductory course to pre-calculus mathematics. Course Units

Instrumental Music 20

• Polynomials and Factoring

Instrumental Music 20 • FNA2425 • 5 credits

• Real Numbers, Exponents, and Radicals

Continuing with the sequential and developmental approach to music instruction, Instrumental Music 20 prepares young musicians to be the future leaders of their section, focussing on leadership and musicality. Students continue to improve their technical abilities and their general knowledge of music, while increasing their level of responsibility within their section. Students develop competencies and strive for excellence in performing, listening, creating, researching, and valuing music. Instrumental Music at the senior level is a combined course with 10-, 20-, and 30-level students in one class. Prerequisite: Instrumental Music 10.

• Coordinating Geometry and Linear Equations

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• Systems of Linear Equations • Relations and Functions • Measurement and Trigonometry

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Mathematics 20-1

Mathematics 31

Mathematics 20-1 • MAT2791 • 5 credits

Mathematics 31 • MAT3211 • 5 credits

Mathematics 20-1 is for students who plan to enter post-secondary programs, such as engineering, mathematics, sciences, and some business studies that require advanced mathematics skills. It provides the mathematical understanding and critical thinking skills needed for Mathematics 30-1 and Mathematics 31. Prerequisite: Mathematics 10C (65%+ recommended).

Mathematics 31 emphasizes the theoretical and practical development of topics in the algebra of functions, trigonometry, differential calculus, and integral calculus. It bridges the gap between the course-numbered streams of the Mathematics 10-1, 20-1, and 30-1 level courses and the Calculus courses offered by post-secondary institutions. Prerequisite or co-requisite of Math 30-1.

Course Units

• Analysis of Functions, Equations, and Inequalities • Radical Expressions and Equations • Rational Expressions and Equations • Sequences and Series • Trigonometry

Mathematics 30-1 Mathematics 30-1 • MAT3791 • 5 credits

Mathematics 30-1 is for students planning to apply for post-secondary programs requiring calculus and advanced mathematics skills, such as engineering, mathematics, sciences, and some business studies. Students transfer knowledge and make connections among various topics. The focus is on demonstrating advanced algebra skills, mathematical literacy, comprehension, and reasoning. Mathematics 30-1 may be required for post-secondary calculus courses. Prerequisite: Mathematics 20-1 (grade of 70%+ recommended) and teacher recommendation. Course Units

• Exponential and Logarithmic Functions • Permutations and Combinations • Relations and Functions • Transformations • Trigonometric Equations

• • • • • • •

Applications of Derivatives Derivatives Differential Equations and Area Extreme Values and Curve Sketching Integrals Limits and Rates of Change Trigonometric, Exponential, and Logarithmic Functions

RUNDLE COLLEGE

• Quadratic Functions and Equations

Course Units

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education 10 Physical Education 10 • PED1445 • 5 credits

Physical Education at Rundle College enables students to enhance their quality of life through active living, exposure to a wide variety and choice of activities, and developing skills and positive attitudes in both individual and team pursuits. Activities include flag football, hiking, volleyball, field hockey, basketball, wrestling, dance, yoga, track and field, rugby, soccer, team handball, fencing, badminton, kickball, and low-organized games. In addition to these activities, students earn their certification in CPR. Emphasis is placed on developing key components of fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance and strength, flexibility, power, coordination, and agility. Prerequisite: none.

• Trigonometric Functions

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Physical Education 20

RUNDLE COLLEGE

Physical Education 20 • PED2445 • 5 credits

Building on the foundation of Physical Education 10, the course enables students to enhance their quality of life through active living, exposure to a wide variety and choice of activities, and developing skills and positive attitudes that promote engagement in lifelong recreational pursuits. Activities include fitness, handball, bowling, tae kwon do, racquetball, squash, aquatics, tennis, golf, ice hockey, kayaking, batting cages, ultimate Frisbee, yoga, badminton, curling, low-organized games, and a variety of team and individual activities. Emphasis is placed on developing key components of fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance and strength, flexibility, power, coordination, and agility. Prerequisite: Physical Education 10.

Physical Education 30 Physical Education 30 • PED3445 • 5 credits

Physical Education 30 further enables students to enhance their quality of life through active living, exposure to a wide variety and choice of activities, and developing skills and positive attitudes that promote engagement in lifelong recreational pursuits. Activities include fitness, handball, bowling, fencing, racquetball, squash, diving, tennis, golf, speed skating, sailing, rock climbing, ultimate frisbee, yoga, badminton, billiards, curling, low-organized games, and a variety of team and individual activities. Emphasis is placed on developing key components of fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance, and strength, flexibility, power, coordination, and agility. Prerequisite: Physical Education 20.

SPORTS MEDICINE Sports Medicine • See modules for course numbers • 5 x 1 credit

Sports Medicine is offered to high school students and consists of five modules focusing on the fundamentals of health services and what this means to “client” and athlete care. Students learn how body systems operate and how to properly care for each system during recreational and sport-related activities, including a

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focus on the technical side of injury management. This consists of acquiring skills such as taping, wrapping, assessing potential injuries, exploring the role of the athletic therapist, injury treatment, and rehabilitation procedures. Course Units

• Caring for Body Systems (CCS1030) • Health Services Fundamentals (HSS1010) • Injury Management (REC1020) • Musculoskeletal System (HCS1050) • Technical Foundations of Injury Management (REC1030)

SCIENCE Science 10

Science 10 • SCN1270 • 5 credits

This introductory science course is the basis for all other science courses at Rundle. Students continue to expand their knowledge of science and its relationship to technology and society. They further develop the broad-based skills needed to identify and analyze problems, to explore and test solutions, and to seek, interpret, and evaluate information. Prerequisite: Science 9. Course Units

• Cycling of Matting in Living Systems • Energy and Matter in Chemical Change • Energy Flow in Technical Systems

Biology 20 Biology 20 • SCN2231 • 5 credits

The world around us is explored from the perspective of ecosystem interactions, such as photosynthesis that converts light energy into chemical energy like glucose, and cellular respiration that takes glucose and turns it into the energy that drives the human systems in the form of ATP. This energy runs human systems like muscles and respiration. Students expand their knowledge of science and its relationship to technology and society. They develop the broad-based TABLE OF CONTENTS


skills needed to identify and analyze problems, explore and test solutions, and seek, interpret, and evaluate information. Prerequisite: Science 10. Course Units

• Energy and Matter Exchange • Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration • Population Change and Evolution • Human Systems 1 • Human Systems 2

Biology 30 Students study aspects of the living world from the molecular level to complex ecosystems. They continue to develop their skills in scientific inquiry, problem solving, critical thinking, sustainability, safety, collaboration, and respect for various perspectives. Prerequisite: Biology 20.

Chemistry 30 • SCN3796 • 5 credits

Chemistry 30 deals with energy change and systems as well as organic chemistry. Students continue improving their inquiry skills by designing labs and solving mathematical problems related to predicting yields and the extent of equilibria. Students also develop an awareness of social, environmental, economic, and legal issues related to chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 20. Course Units

• Equilibrium/Acids and Bases • Organic Chemistry • Oxidation and Reduction • Thermochemistry

Physics 20 Physics 20 • SCN2797 • 5 credits

Chemistry 20

Energy is the theme common to all units in Physics 20 with change, diversity, equilibrium, matter, and systems also playing a role. Energy in its many forms causes change and determines the kind of change matter and systems undergo. The major concepts enable connections to be drawn among the four course units. Prerequisite: Science 10. Recommended grade of 75%+ in Science 10 and Math 10C.

Chemistry 20 • SCN2796 • 5 credits

Course Units

Course Units

• Cell Division, Genetics and Molecular Biology • Nervous and Endocrine Systems • Population and Community Dynamics • Reproduction and Development

This course ties many scientific disciplines together by describing events at a molecular level. Students work through structured laboratory activities and reports, experimental design projects, and solving mathematical problems related to predicting yields. Prerequisite: Science 10.

• Circular Motion and Gravitation • Dynamics • Kinematics • Mechanical Waves

Course Units

• Diversity of Matter and Chemical Bonding • Forms of Matter: Gases • Matter as Solutions, Acids and Bases • Quantitative Relationships in Chemical Changes

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Biology 30 • SCN3230 • 5 credits

Chemistry 30


Physics 30

Social Studies 20-1

Physics 30 • SCN3797 • 5 credits

Social Studies 20-1 • SST2771 • 5 credits

Physics 30 is a university preparatory course for students planning to pursue further physics courses at the post-secondary level. It helps to explain much about the world in which we live. Prerequisite: Physics 20. Recommended grade of 75%+ in Physics 20. Course Units

Nationalism has significantly shaped the modern world. Students examine the principles of nationalism and its subsequent effects on individuals, cultures, human rights, and international relations. They identify multiple perspectives regarding nationalism and re-examine their roles and responsibilities as active citizens. Prerequisite: Social Studies 10-1.

• Electromagnetic Radiation

Concepts/Events Studied

• Forces and Fields

RUNDLE COLLEGE

• Momentum and Impulse • Nuclear Physics

SOCIAL STUDIES Social Studies 10-1

• Types of Nations and their Impact on Identity • Historical and Contemporary Revolutions Including the French Revolution • First and Second World Wars • Genocides Throughout History • Ultranationalism

Social Studies 10-1 • SST1771 • 5 credits

• Internationalism and International Organizations

Globalization has significantly influenced the modern world. Students examine the origins of globalization and its impact on lands, cultures, human rights, and quality of life. They identify multiple perspectives on globalization and re-examine their roles as responsible and active citizens. Prerequisite: Social Studies 9.

• Nationalism as it Relates to Current Events

Social Studies 30-1 Social Studies 30-1 • SST3771 • 5 credits

• Globalization and Economic Development (capitalism, free trade, trade agreements)

Students explore the origins and complexities of ideologies and examine multiple perspectives regarding the principles of classical and modern liberalism. An analysis of various political and economic systems, as well as various past and current events enable students to assess the viability of the principles of liberalism. Understanding the roles and responsibilities associated with citizenship encourages students to respond to emerging global issues. Prerequisite: Social Studies 20-1.

• Human Rights, Democracy, and Globalization

Concepts/Events Studied

• Impact of Media and Technology

• Current Events

• The Impact of Globalization on Indigenous Peoples

• Democratic and Non-Democratic Systems

• Globalization as it Relates to Current Events

• Perspectives regarding Illiberalism and the Imposition of Liberalism (terrorism, impact on indigenous peoples)

Concepts/Events Studied

• Historical Globalization Case Studies (slavery, Scramble for Africa, the Industrial Revolution) • Modern Responses to the Legacies of Globalization

• Private and Public Enterprise Economic Systems • Terrorism • The Cold War and Competing Ideologies

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SPANISH

Spanish IV

Spanish I

Spanish Language and Culture 30-6Y • SPN349 • 5 credits

Spanish Language and Culture 10-3Y • SPN1345 • 5 credits

This Spanish course is designed for students with little to no Spanish language background. The primary goal of the program is to develop a balanced foundation in language learning skills, an appreciation for the Spanish-speaking cultures of the world and to acquire solid basic language skills that will enable them to converse comfortably in Spanish. Prerequisite: none

Spanish Language and Culture 20-3Y • SPN2345 • 5 credits

This course reflects a continuation of study from the previously built framework of Spanish I or Spanish Language and Culture 7-9. Students continue to develop a balanced foundation of language comprehension skills through reading and listening as well as language production skills through speaking and writing in both interpersonal and presentational contexts. Students explore various aspects of Spanishspeaking cultures while reinforcing previous language skills enabling them to communicate comfortably in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish I (Spanish Language and Culture 10-3Y or Spanish Language and Culture 7-9).

Spanish III Spanish Language and Culture 30-3Y • SPN3345 • 5 credits

Building on previous Spanish language expertise, students continue to develop a balanced foundation of language comprehension skills through reading and listening as well as language production skills through speaking and writing in both interpersonal and presentational contexts. Students are guided in becoming more capable, independent language learners in order to have a functional ability to communicate in the target language. Prerequisite: Spanish II (Spanish Language and Culture 20-3Y). 2 2 /23 PROGRAM GUI DE

and functional ability to communicate in the target language, but to explore the personal and career opportunities that can be enhanced with the acquisition of a second language. Previous accomplishments function as the foundation from which students put to use new grammatical structures, bind novel expressions, and carry forth linguistic ability to new heights. Prerequisite: Spanish III (Spanish Language and Culture 30-3Y).

TECH INNOVATION Career and Technology Studies • CTS2013 • 5 credits

Computing and technology are major forces of change in today’s world; however, simply having access to iPhones and computers does not make students tech literate. In our Tech Integration course, students become comfortable with various fundamentals of technology, develop the necessary skills required in today’s world, and set a solid foundation for technology use in the future. Moving beyond fundamentals, our leveled course allows students to further explore their passions in the area of technology. Tech Innovation Level I – In this introductory course, students build overall technology competencies in computer security, file management, basic audio-visual, graphic and web design, 3D CAD, and various business topics including an introduction to spreadsheets. Tech Innovation Levels II and III – These next levels enable students to explore areas of interest while participating in the design thinking process. Students push boundaries, develop critical thinking skills, and hone presentation and teamwork skills.

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RUNDLE COLLEGE

Spanish II

The final chapter of our Spanish Language and Culture program aims to not only strengthen fluency skills


10-12 SAMPLE TIMETABLE SAMPLE TIMETABLE FOR:

Students with a Science Focus

RUNDLE COLLEGE

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

GRADE 12

First Semester

Second Semester

First Semester

Second Semester

First Semester

Second Semester

ELA 10-1

Social 10-1

ELA 20-1

Social 20-1

ELA 30-1

Social 30-1

Science 10

Math 10C

Chemistry 20

Biology 30

Drama 10

Drama 20

Tech Innovation I

Biology 20

Medical Problem Solving (GOA)

Study Period

Math 30-1

Math 31

Math 20-1

Phys Ed 20

Chemistry 30

Study Period

Phys Ed 10/CALM 20

SAMPLE TIMETABLE FOR:

Students with a Fine Arts/Second Language Focus

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

GRADE 12

First Semester

Second Semester

First Semester

Second Semester

First Semester

Second Semester

ELA 10-1

Social 10-1

ELA 20-1

Social 20-1

ELA 30-1

Social 30-1

Science 10

Math 10C

Art 20

Bio 20

Biology 30

Art 31

French 10

Art 10

French 20

French 30

Art 30

Math 30-1

Math 20-1

Drama 10

Graphic Design (GOA)

Study Period

Phys Ed 10/CALM 20

Instrumental Music

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TIMETABLE WORKSHEET MANDATORY COURSES

ADDITIONAL CORE COURSES

ELECTIVE COURSES

• Career and Life Management 20 (CALM)

• Biology 20/30

• Art 10/20/30/31

• English Language

• Chemistry 20/30

• Drama 10/20/30

• Mathematics 30-1/30-2

• French Language 10/20/30

• Mathematics 31 (Calculus)

• Courses offered through GOA (Global Online Academy Grades 11 ,12)

• Arts 10-1/20-1/30-1 • Mathematics 10C/20-1

• Physics 20/30

• Physical Education 10

• Instrumental Music 10/20/30

• Science 10

• Physical Education 20/30

• Social Studies 10-1/20-1/30-1

• Spanish Language I, II, III, IV

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• Sports Medicine • Tech Innovation I, II, III

SAMPLE TIMETABLE FOR:

________________________________________________

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

GRADE 12

First Semester

Second Semester

First Semester

Second Semester

First Semester

Second Semester

ELA 10-1*

Social 10-1*

ELA 20-1*

Social 20-1*

ELA 30-1*

Social 30-1*

Science 10*

Math 10C*

Math 20-1*

Math 30-1

Phys Ed 10 (M, W, F) CALM 20 (T, R)*

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RUNDLE

STUDIO

IMAGINE

a school where you truly BELONG


STUDIO OVERVIEW VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT Rundle Studio is a part of Rundle College Society and provides a premier educational experience for students in Grades 7–9 with diagnosed learning disabilities. We help students reach their potential in this academic program.

SCHOOL UNIFORM

Rundle Studio currently offers Grades 7-9 education online and will add grades 10-12 as the school continues to expand. Students move through their learning journey supported by teachers and peers they know — and who know them. Students forge deeper relationships by being part of a student community and do not need to learn new rules or a new school culture as they progress through each grade. In the most important ways, Rundle will always be Rundle.

Rundle College is a “uniform school” and students wear their uniforms with pride. Each program has its own unique component to the standard uniform. Students are required to be in uniform each day unless specifically advised otherwise. Rundle Studio’s main uniform is a collared golf shirt with the Studio logo.

ATHLETICS

Rundle Studio students engage in an online environment through a variety of online and in-person experiences. Students have monthly opportunities to be on our Rundle College campus where they have access to our campus amenities.

Rundle Studio does not have any athletic teams. However, as members of Rundle Studio, students who live within the Calgary area can participate on the Rundle College rugby team. Studio students are also eligible to participate on most of the Rundle Academy athletic teams such as basketball, volleyball, golf, and cross country running. Rundle Studio does have an esports team that competes in a variety of virtual games against teams from across the country.

CAMPUS AMENITIES

SCHOOL HANDBOOK

MORE THAN AN ONLINE EXPERIENCE

• a full-sized gymnasium • a performing arts space • a technology centre • numerous brand new classrooms • an innovative learning commons • athletic field • wrestling room • fitness centre

The Rundle School Handbook provides complete information about academic regulations including • attendance • homework and assignment expectations • academic integrity • student evaluation and grading • exam policy • Student Code of Conduct • inclusivity • withdrawals, course changes, and transfers This publication is available through Canvas and our online parent portal.

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RUNDLE STUDIO

COMMUNITY


STUDENT SERVICES

RUNDLE STUDIO

The mission of Student Services at Rundle is to provide academic guidance and social emotional counselling. This mission aligns with the goal of Rundle to help students discover their potential and prepare them for an ever-changing world.

Grade 11 Career Exploration and Post-Secondary Planning

• strong Interest Inventory • post-secondary research • connect high school plan with university requirements

Role of Student Services

• Canadian and international admission support

Within the Student Services department at Rundle Studio, a school counsellor is available to virtually meet with students on a weekly basis or as required by request from the student or parents. Our counsellors assist with

Grade 12 One-On-One Support with Post-Secondary Admissions

• social and emotional counselling • academic support • peer counselling • parent consultation • connections to external resources Student Services also works closely with faculty and administration on school-related matters such as tracking student progress, monitoring academic and personal development, and crisis intervention.

Career and Post-Secondary Support Student Services at Rundle provide comprehensive career and post-secondary support for students from junior high through high school. Grade 9 High School Planning

• goal setting and learning styles assessment • high school course plan Grade 10 Career Direction and Exploration

• self assessments • post-secondary and career explorations • review high school course plan

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• individualized support with admissions, transcripts, and scholarships • parent and student presentations • connections with post-secondary representatives

CHARACTER & LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS Rundle’s character education program creates a kind and caring community with positive and healthy relationships for students, staff, and parents. We believe that social and emotional learning is just as important as academic learning. Moreover, we want to inspire our students to practice and commit to moral and ethical behaviours. Rundle Studio’s junior high program supports character and leadership development. With support and guidance, the student council creates engaging opportunities to build community. Students are also involved in developing and creating programs and clubs to reflect our core values: togetherness, kindness, curiosity, and wellness.

RUNDLE GIVES BACK All Rundle Studio students are encouraged to seek opportunities to give back to their communities. Throughout the year, students are involved in activities and lessons highlighting the importance of giving. In addition, students participate in character development programs.

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RUNDLE STUDIO

STUDENT CELEBRATIONS

HEAD’S LIST

At Rundle, we believe that celebrating student success and achievement is fundamental to educating wellrounded citizens of good character. Every year, the Rundle community celebrates all aspects of student achievement at the Academic and Athletic Awards Ceremonies. Numerous scholarships and bursaries are awarded each year to exceptional students who contribute to our school and who continue to give back to their local and global communities. Some scholarship recipients are chosen by Rundle faculty, while awards for future post-secondary study are based on student applications.

The Head’s List celebrates the success of our students and their adherence to the mission, vision, and values of Rundle. Students are acknowledged for their success in the areas of co-curricular activities, character development, and academic achievement.

Rundle prides itself on celebrating student achievement throughout the year in virtual and in-person assemblies, rallies, and events.

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The process and requirements are unique depending on the program and the student’s division; however, the universal components include an adherence to high academic standing and evidence of the pursuit of our values: togetherness, kindness, curiosity, and wellness. Students who qualify for the Head’s List are recognized at their school’s awards day and on a special display in their school. Graduating students receive a letter of recognition from Rundle College Society detailing their accomplishment and earning the distinction of being on the Head’s List.

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STUDIO 7–9 CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAMS Below is a sampling of the co-curricular programs offered at Rundle Studio. Programs change each year depending on the interest level of our students. Arts: Art Club, Cooking Club, Gardening Club, Music Club

RUNDLE STUDIO

Intellectual Pursuits: Maker Club, TedX Rundle Studio, Eastern Canada Trip esports: Students are invited to join our esports program to compete against teams from across the country. Character: Kids Helping Kids, Rundle Ambassadors, Student Council

Students use Scratch to create animations, games and stories. Once they learn the basics of coding (loops, sequence, functions, conditional operators, debugging, etc.) students further strengthen their skills in projects of their own choosing. Some examples of advanced projects include • using Scratch to create advanced and complex works of art, animations, games, and stories • using Javascript to create games playable through a web browser • using Javascript or Python to create original music

DRAMA

COURSES Required Courses

• English Language Arts

• Science

• Mathematics

• Social Studies

• Physical Education Available options vary with teacher skill sets and student interests. Some possible options include

• Art

• Fitness

• Computer Science and Coding

• Information Processing

• Digital Literacy (Grade 7/8)

• Photography

• Music

• Drama

ART In Grades 7, 8, and 9 Art, students explore three major components of visual learning: drawings, compositions and encounters. These integrated components provide a framework from which students participate in the visual search for meaning and for a unified visual statement. Students explore art as a means of communication for a community through time and across cultures.

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CODING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

Students learn various drama skills throughout the term. Classes are specifically designed to teach theatre arts and how they support, reinforce, and enrich one’s life. Confident public speaking, creativity, and ensemble work are skills that help students develop self-awareness and influence how one is perceived by others.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS Students develop proficiency in reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and representing. Distinct units of study introduce students to a wide variety of texts. The close reading of these texts to understand literal and figurative meaning is a focus throughout each grade level. Students have opportunities to experiment and gain confidence with different writing and oral skills. The curriculum also offers students opportunities to reflect on their learning which encourage independent and critical thinking.

English Language Arts 7 The basic elements of writing are emphasized with a focus on sentence and paragraph construction. Texts studied include poetry, short stories, fiction, nonfiction, drama, and film.

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English Language Arts 8 Students are introduced to the essay form and the writing focus shifts to organizing, building, and transitioning ideas. Texts studied include poetry, short stories, fiction, nonfiction, drama, and film.

English Language Arts 9 Students work on mastering fundamental essaywriting skills in preparation for the Alberta Provincial Achievement Test as well as for senior high school. Texts studied include poetry, short stories, fiction, nonfiction, drama, and film.

With a primary focus on reading development, our literacy program is differentiated to support phonological processing and decoding skills, reading fluency, reading comprehension, and vocabulary development. In particular, we are proud to offer the EmpowerTM Reading program, an evidence based reading intervention program that teaches struggling readers effective strategies for decoding and spelling words and understanding text. Students may also receive writing and numeracy remediation in addition to support in reading.

CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY FOUNDATIONS This course is best learned through applications, activities, and hands-on projects. Students develop and apply important knowledge, skills, and attitudes to create well designed and aesthetically effective messages through graphic design, photography, stop- motion animation, videos, and multimedia projects. The course engages students in learning opportunities where they discover their interests in practical and purposeful ways. This course is taught in grades 7 and 8. Students Learn

• that, although technology is often complex, it is simply “a way of doing things” • about the impact of technologies in their lives and workplaces 2 2 /23 PROGRAM GUI DE

• how to use and apply information and communication technologies to problem solving, decision making, inquiring, and researching in the context of other subject matter

MATHEMATICS Mathematics 7

Students develop a strong number sense (working comfortably and interchangeably with whole numbers, decimals, integers and percentages). They also build a strong algebraic foundation that will be augmented further in Grades 8 and 9. Course Units

• Number Relationships • Fractions and Decimal Numbers

• Linear Relations and Equations

• 2-Dimensional Geometry • Percentages and Circle Graphs • Probability and Statistics • Integers

Mathematics 8 In Grade 8, there is continued emphasis on number sense as students further hone their understanding of the relationship between fractions, percentages, decimals, and ratios, as well as algebra (ratios, rates and proportions, linear equations and percentages). Course Units

• Integers

• Linear Relations

• Fractions and Rational Numbers

• 3-Dimensional Drawings, Surface Area, and Volume

• Exponents, Roots, Pythagorean Theorem • Ratios, Rates and Proportions • Solving Linear Equations

• Data Analysis and Probability • Transformations • Percentages

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Literacy Program

• how to determine which processes, tools and techniques to use, and when to use them


Mathematics 9 In Grade 9, there is a strong emphasis on algebra (polynomials, linear equations, inequalities and relations). Students deepen and strengthen their algebraic skills in order to be well prepared for high school. Course Units

• Rational Numbers

Inequalities

RUNDLE STUDIO

• Powers and Exponents • LinearRelations • Polynomials

• Measurement

• Data Analysis

• Circle Geometry

• Linear Equations and

MUSIC Have you always wanted to learn to play and compose music? Do you already play and want to work on perfecting your skills? This option allows students to work on their individual and group performance skills. Students have access to technology such as Garage Band to arrange and compose music.

PHOTOGRAPHY This option provides students the opportunity to explore photography with their personal and school devices. Students focus on understanding composition, rule of thirds, perspectives, and digital photo editing software.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Students at Rundle Studio are guided through daily choice activities and log their participation for teacher review. Physical Education in Grades 7, 8, and 9 is integrated with health components throughout the school year. Through active participation, students develop an appreciation for physical education and fitness. Students gain a working knowledge of the rules and skills inherent in various physical activities. The values of fair play, cooperation, self-discipline, and sportsmanship are foremost. Emphasis is placed on developing the key components of fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance, strength, flexibility, power, coordination, and agility.

SCIENCE Students in Rundle Studio participate in online science labs which include virtual apps and guided at-home experiments. Students receive necessary materials to conduct their learning experiences at our monthly meet-ups.

Science 7 Science 7 focuses on the natural sciences. Throughout the year, students develop the fundamental skills of scientific inquiry, problem solving, critical thinking, sustainability, safety, collaboration, and respect for various perspectives. Course Units

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• Interactions and Ecosystems

• Heat and Temperature

• Plants for Food and Fibre

• Planet Earth

• Structures and Forces

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Science 8 Students are encouraged to develop a critical sense of wonder and curiosity about scientific and technological endeavours. They are inspired to use science and technology to acquire new knowledge and to solve problems so they may improve the quality of their own lives and the lives of others. Students become more knowledgeable about the wide spectrum of careers related to science, technology, and the environment. Course Units

Mix and Flow of Matter

SOCIAL STUDIES Social Studies 7 This course is a comprehensive examination of Canadian history preceding and following Confederation. The concept of intercultural contact is introduced through an examination of migration and immigration. Social Studies 7 forms the foundation for the continued dialogue on citizenship and identity in Canada, and current events receive continual focus throughout the year.

• Mechanical Systems

Course Units

• Light and Optical Systems

• Fresh and Saltwater Systems

• Toward Confederation

• Diverse Peoples • After Confederation

Science 9 Students are encouraged to develop a critical sense of wonder and curiosity about scientific and technological endeavours. They are inspired to use science and technology to acquire new knowledge and to solve problems so they may improve the quality of their own lives and the lives of others. Students become more knowledgeable about the wide spectrum of careers related to science, technology, and the environment. Building on previous learning, several new concepts, including genetics and the periodic table, are introduced, and the integration of mathematics is increased.

Social Studies 8

Course Units

• From Isolation to Adaptation: Ancient Japan

• Matter and Chemical Change

• Electrical Principles and Technologies

• Biological Diversity

• Environmental Chemistry

• Space Exploration

Students examine issues related to contact between societies with differing worldviews. The focus is on exploring elements of worldview and how these views are expressed by people living in different times and places. Students also reflect on their own worldviews and assess the influence the past has on the present. Current events are explored throughout the year. Course Units

• Origins of a Western Worldview: Renaissance Europe • Worldviews in Conflict: The Spanish and the Aztecs

Social Studies 9 Students explore the Canadian political and justice systems, economics, environment, and decisionmaking. Course Units

• Governance and the Justice System • Rights, Responsibilities and Immigration • Economics, Consumerism and Decision-Making

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RUNDLE STUDIO

• Cells and Systems


STUDIO SAMPLE TIMETABLE A typical school day at the Studio may follow this schedule.

RUNDLE STUDIO

TIME

ACTIVITY

8:45 am – 8:55 am

Teacher Advisor (TA) Check-in Time: Meet with teacher to review announcements, take attendance, discuss upcoming events

9:00 am – 9:50 am

ELA Lead Lesson: Synchronous

9:00 am – 9:50 am

ELA TA Activity: Asynchronous

9:55 am – 10:50 am

Math Lead Lesson: Synchronous

9:55 am – 10:50 am

Math TA Activity: Asynchronous

10:50 am – 11:00 am

Break

11:00 am – 11:50 am

Science Lead Lesson: Synchronous

11:00 am – 11:50 am

Science TA Activity: Synchronous

11:55 am – 12:45 pm

Social Studies Lead Lessons: Synchronous

11:55 am – 12:45 pm

Social Studies TA Activity: Synchronous

12:45 pm – 1:15 pm

Lunch / Early Check-Out on Fridays

1:15 pm – 2:05 pm

Literacy/Numeracy

2:05 pm – 2:55 pm

CORE / Options

2:55 pm – 3:45 pm

PE/Health

3:45 pm

TA Check-Out: Students complete agenda

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OUR TEAM

EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

LEADERSHIP TEAM JASON ROGERS Head of School Rundle College Society

CLAIRE ALLEN Principal Rundle College | 7–9 Program

GARY SYLVEN Assistant Head of School Rundle College Society

ALLISON BELT Principal Rundle College | 10–12 Program

LISA DANIS Principal Rundle College | K–3 Program

JAMIE BURLA Principal Rundle Academy | 4–12 Program

KIRSTEN KLINGVALL Principal Rundle College | 4–6 Program

JOHN WOLF Principal Rundle Studio | 7–8 Program

ENROLMENT SERVICES TEAM

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NICOLA SPENCER Director of Enrolment Rundle Academy, College & Studio

PAM COOK Enrolment Officer Rundle College | Kindergarten

GREIG EWING Associate Director of Enrolment Rundle Academy, College & Studio

ANDRIA SLIPP Enrolment Officer Rundle Academy

LYNN SCOTT Enrolment Coordinator Rundle College

REBECCA ROBINSON Enrolment Assistant Rundle Academy, College & Studio

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STUDENT SERVICES TEAM MELISSA MANN Traverse Coach Rundle College | 10–12 Program

KIMBERLY TREMBLAY Counsellor Rundle College | 7–9 Program

NEIL DOMSTAD PEAC Lead & Coach Rundle College | 7–12 Program

WENDY SOBEY Head of Student Learning & Support Rundle College | 1–6 Program

CARLA CARNOVALE Learning Strategist Rundle Academy | 4–9 Program

SHANNON HARTE Teacher-Librarian & Student Support Rundle College | K–6 Program

AMY DEFOY Learning Strategist Rundle Academy | 6–9 Program

AMIE STANILOFF Head of Student Services Rundle Academy | 4–12 Program Rundle Studio | 7–9 Program

MICHELLE CAWTHORPE Learning Strategist & Alumni Relations Officer Rundle Academy | 7, 10–12 Program

NICOLE JORDAN Assistant Principal, Student Services Coordinator, Traverse Lead & Coach Rundle Academy | 4–12 Program

EXPERIENCE RUNDLE

SARAH DUNSFORD Head of Student Services Rundle College | 7–12 Program

BRAD MELLOR Counsellor & Traverse Coach Rundle Academy | 4-12 Program HAYLEY BOBYE-MAGNUSSON School Nurse Rundle Academy, College, and Studio

PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS & PARTNERSHIPS

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EXPERIENCE

RUNDLE Academy

Grades 4–12 In-person Learning

College

Grades K–12 In-person Learning

Studio

Grades 7–9 Virtual Learning

7379 17 Avenue SW, Calgary, AB T3H 3W5

RUNDLE

admissions@rundle.ab.ca | 403.291.3866

@rundlecollege

rundle.ab.ca