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FATHER’S DAY ISSUE Dr. Chad Lowe and family

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Way Off Broadway Manta Band performs in Carnegie Hall

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Talk of the Town 4th car rally a success!

Sports Page Learn more about orienteering


SUPER TREAT CHERRY and PINEAPPLE

DANDY CONE DOODLE FUDGE

BIG DIP BAR

TWIN POPS ORANGE • CHERRY GRAPE

ICE CREAM SANDWICH

HALF GALLON Rocky Road Ube Hopscotch Chocolate Cookie’s ‘N Cream

Strawberry Vanilla Macadamia Nut Banana Susana Mango

www.coke-foremost.com

ICE CREAM CUP Mango Vanilla Chocolate Ube Strawberry


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contents

FATHER’S DAY ISSUE

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ON THE COVER Chad Lowe and family

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FEATURE Australian family sails to Saipan

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FATHER’S DAY FEATURE Fatherhood 101

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TALK OF THE TOWN 4th Car Rally A Success

14-15 CRUISIN’ ON BEACH ROAD

Dr. Chad Lowe and family

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WAY OFF BROADWAY Manta Band performs in Carnegie Hall

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TALK OF THE TOWN 4th car rally a success!

SPORTS PAGE Learn more about orienteering

ABOUT THE COVER Beach Road Magazine features for the first time a father on its cover. Dr. Chad and Noelle Lowe pose with their children at the American Memorial Park playground. PHOTOGRAPHY BY Hideo Honda www.marianas-way.com HAIR AND MAKEUP BY Serenity Salon & Spa

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TALK OF THE TOWN The 29th Flame Tree Arts Festival

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TALK OF THE TOWN EMS Open House

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WAY OFF BROADWAY Manta Ray Concert Band makes CNMI proud

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ENVIRONMENT Teachers go to camp

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HEALTH WATCH

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TIDE CHART HOROSCOPE

SPORTS PAGE Orienteering

Vol. IX No. 7

Publisher

Maureen N. Maratita

BRM Manager

Alexie Villegas Zotomayor

Contributing Writer Carmen Rojas

Graphic Artists Rudy L. Armenta Monie B. Erasga

Account Manager Susan Marchitti

Managing Director Marcos Fong

Beach Road Magazine, Vol. IX, No. 7 June 2010. Entire contents copyrighted 2009 by Glimpses of Saipan, Inc. Beach Road Magazine is published monthly by Glimpses of Saipan, Inc. P.O. Box 502080, Saipan, MP 96950 2/F Transpac Business Center Gualo Rai, Saipan Tel: (670) 235-7645 • Fax: (670) 234-1801 E-mail: saipan@glimpsesofguam.com All rights reserved. No material may be printed in part or in whole without written permission from the publisher. Printed by: Win Guide Color Printing Co., Ltd.


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BY ALEXIE VILLEGAS ZOTOMAYOR Fatherhood is the most amazing and humbling journey. So says Beach Road Magazine’s first male cover model Dr. Chad Lowe. For Dr. Lowe, he says it is maybe the hardest thing he has ever done; however, nothing makes it more worthwhile for him than coming home to hugs and kisses from his “biggest fans” –– his kids.

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“Fatherhood has been an incredible journey of self-discovery. I’ve learned more about strengths and weaknesses than at any other point in my life,” confides the physician, who’s originally from Montana. But parenthood for Dr. Lowe and his wife, Noelle, didn’t come the conventional way. Their children came into their lives through the difficult process of adoption.

As difficult as it is, adoption is a couple’s mutual decision. Having been married for 12 years, Dr. Lowe and his wife had been discussing adoption long before they got married. According to Dr. Lowe, the process requires for a home study with a social worker, psychiatric examination, complete medical examination, letters of reference,


and documents to prove they can financially provide for the children. He tells Beach Road Magazine that the process proved to be an emotional rollercoaster for them as they had to wait for 18 months for the first adoption and 30 months for the second. But it’s worth the wait. From the moment Elias and Perry came home to them, Dr. Lowe says, “Words don’t do justice to the deep feelings of love and wonderment and concern that I had from the first moment I held them in my arms.” Six months down the road after welcoming

Thijs into their home, Dr. Lowe says he feels he has always been part of their family. Meanwhile, Noelle has always believed that children can come to them in different ways. She says, “Whether adopted or biological, they are still ours.” She adds that she could not have chosen a better husband or father for their children. She admires her husband for his humility, spirituality, and honesty. She also tells Beach Road Magazine that Dr. Lowe is the kind of person who shows his love in manifold ways –– washing the dishes, doing laundry, showing up with flowers or treats,

among other things. As a father to their adopted children Elias, Perry, and Thijs, Dr. Lowe shares as much parenting of the kids as he can, according to his wife Noelle. “Thankfully, he leaves work at the door when he comes home,” says Noelle adding that her husband always comes home to big smiles and three children shouting “Papi!” She says her husband guides their children to be honest, respectful citizens and encourages them to make correct choices. Along with her husband, she feels the weight of the responsibility to raise their children as honest, respectful individuals who will show compassion and charity to others. Compassion and charity are perhaps the two virtues she sees in her husband, who as a young medical student, was a volunteer missionary for their church working with the Haitians in South Florida from 1995-1997. Having volunteered in Haiti, and knowing the culture and the language, the couple felt it was natural for them to adopt from Haiti. And adopt they did. The two children came to them medically ill which necessitated extra doctor visits and medicines. The couple nursed them to good health.

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As a father, Dr. Lowe is a good disciplinarian, says Noelle. Together, they allow their kids to make mistakes and learn from them. She says her husband teaches their kids to appreciate what they have taken for granted. “He wants our children to be the best they can be and gives them direction and challenges to help them grow and achieve their goals in life.” Meanwhile, Dr. Lowe acknowledges too that his family is no different from any other family – brothers and sisters still have disagreements. Fatherhood indeed has been a remarkable journey of self-discovery for Dr. Lowe. He shares with Beach Road Magazine that adopting is a fantastic way to create a family. “Empathy often drives the desire to adopt, but being a parent requires more than feeling sorry for an orphan.” He cautions those going through the adoption process that adoptive parents must be aware that there are no guarantees there’ll be no difficulties. He says adopted children carry years of scars and hurt that oftentimes surface with severe behavioral problems. He also says undiagnosed medical problems are sometimes found after adoption. “Being aware of adoptive issues prior to adoption is essential,” advises Dr. Lowe. Despite the challenges and risks of adoption, having gone through it twice, Dr. Lowe confides he’ll do it again. “It has been the most rewarding thing in my life.” BRM

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Marooned BY ALEXIE VILLEGAS ZOTOMAYOR Plan for the worst and hope for the best. This has been an Australian family’s guiding principle as they sailed from New Zealand to the islands of the South Pacific and reaching Saipan in March 2010. Richard and Bronwyn have been sailing together for more than decade. Both from Melbourne, the two met at a local yacht club where the two were racing against each other. A professional yachtman, Richard sails around the world to deliver yachts to their owners. One time, he sailed to Norway and made it to the Arctic Sea. Married for 12 years, the couple has twins born in New Zealand where they stayed for five years before setting out on a trip to South Pacific on their catamaran. They have long been planning for a trip to (Continued on page 27)

out at sea. Bronwyn James, left, and her twins Tyler and Samuel aboard their catarman.

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Fatherhood 101 BY ALEXIE VILLEGAS ZOTOMAYOR

Fatherhood is like walking on a tightrope—a father has to balance his dual role of providing for the family and giving the sense of security at home where his children can always have a father figure to look up to. In this issue of Beach Road Magazine, two fathers share their stories of coping with fatherhood and enjoying every moment they spend with their children.

ED ARRIOLA, JR. Manager, Tan Siu Lin Foundation and Corporate Affairs, Tan Holdings Corp. As a boy, he often found himself lounging in his father’s office until somebody would pick him up and take him home. Although there are a lot of things he didn’t understand then, Ed Arriola Jr. admits

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understanding and realization happened as soon as he became a father. He says, “There are certain things we don’t understand as children until we become parents, and I must say that I appreciate everything my father did for me. The bottom line is I would like to spend more time with my kids, and take advantage of every free moment I have to be with them.” True to his word, no matter how busy he gets at work, Arriola finds time — quality time — to be with his family and assure them of his comforting presence. Fatherhood beckoned to Arriola in 1998 at the age of 21. Asked by Beach Road Magazine how he felt holding his baby for the first time, he says with nostalgic affection, “I felt an

immediate connection between myself and my first daughter. I can’t explain it.” Fatherhood changed his life. For Ed, it has made him take fewer personal risks; however, it also pushed him to take more career


n planning risks to ensure his children have economic security. Fun has taken on a different meaning now for Arriola who relishes the company of his children especially his son whom he spends time with every weekend. According to the Tan Holdings executive who’s now a father of four — Shirley Ann, 11; Kristina Jane, 6; Edward, 2; and Stacy Lu, 1 — he plans on gauging his success as a father based on the memories he makes and shares with his children, memories they will hold on to 10-15 years from now. “I don’t think there’s a formula for a father to find out if he’s doing well, as long as I try to give our kids everything they need. Only time will tell.” More than a decade removed from bachelorhood, Arriola says he no longer chooses to stay out late. The dutiful father that he is, he sees to it to be home before six o’clock to help his wife, Joana, get their children settled in. Whenever he’s with his children, he says, “The most important routine after work is to burn out the children’s energy so they can go to bed on time. If not, they are up until midnight. We have a big yard with lots of outdoor toys, The entire family plays games until sundown.  On weekends the kids tear the lawn up with the Slip & Slide. Anything waterbased is always a winner.” He also shares with Beach Road Magazine how he loves the way he can put them to sleep with some bedtime stories at night. He also delights in going out with the entire family especially on Halloween when they all get to dress up and go trick or treating. Fatherhood does inspire awe and Arriola simply loves the look in his children’s faces whenever this happens. “I may be a regular guy to the world, but I’m a superhero to my children and that is the best feeling in the world!” Arriola admits that parenthood does take its toll on him and his wife as a couple as they seldom get the chance to be alone. Not to get too carried away with their parenting roles, both Arriola and Joana promised each other to keep the fire of their relationship going. He says, “Once a week, we go on a date — just the two of us. It has become one of the things I look forward to.” Arriiola fondly remembers advice his father

F ather ’ s day feature

gave him that he would like to pass on to his children: surround yourself with loyal, smart, and capable people from all walks of life. He says he had been in some sticky situations many times while growing up and his old friends were around to guide him through. “I hope that the friendships I have formed, and the loyalty and respect that I share mutually with all my friends, carry over into the future when I am not around my children. I hope my friends would be able to help my kids in my absence, as I would theirs if and when the time came.”

Richard Sikkel Dive instructor It’s better late than never for Richard. He and his wife Thu moved to Saipan in 2002 and they had been trying for some time to have a child. Fatherhood happened on Sept. 17, 2007 when he was 36. Richard describes the feeling as “surreal, a little scary, and sheer wonder.” He tells Beach Road Magazine, “I think the realization that you’re actually a parent and responsible for another human being doesn’t really sink in until a couple of days after. But in the daze right after the birth, holding my daughter for the first time I remember being amazed that humans come in such small packages, with everything attached and operational.” For Richard, fatherhood changed him in more ways than one. He says, “My world

n shrunk considerably. Everything that I hold dear and that’s important to me is right here at home.” Richard now has two kids—two-anda-half-year-old Savita Mai and one year old Moshe Vien. Fatherhood comes with opportunity costs and tradeoffs. When he became a father, Richard could no longer sleep in as he used to. He says, “For some odd reason kids feel the need to wake up at the crack of dawn.” Asked by Beach Road Magazine how he’s doing so far as a father, in jest he says, “So far so good, neither has gotten in too much trouble or gotten mixed up with drugs.” He continues, “If how much they smile in a day is a measure of my success as a dad, I think I am on the right track. I am keeping my fingers crossed.” Looking back on his own childhood, Richard now appreciates how his father allowed him to make his own mistakes to learn from them. “I am blessed with a pretty cool dad, I can’t think of anything I missed out on or regret.” In raising his children, Richard would like to follow his father’s example. The only difference is that he is raising them on Saipan which he considers as a safe and ideal place for doing so. He tells Beach Road Magazine, “Saipan is like a big playground. The only drawback is that our extended family is half a world away, but right now the pros outweigh the cons.” The prospects of staying on Saipan are indeed good. As laid back as the life is on island, Richard says they spend a lot of time outdoors, hiking, swimming, and working in the garden. A stay home dad, Richard gets to watch his children grow. He says, “I can spend hours watching my kids play, smile, and grow. There is nothing better than feeling their little arms embrace you or hear the words ‘I love you papa.’”    BRM  

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KEN KRAMER Environmentalist

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ROSS GARCIA Graphic artist

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TYCE MISTER Triathlete

WILL DE WITT Educator

When was the first time you became a dad?

I became a father at the age of At the age of 26. 38. This was because my 1st wife was pregnant. I thought it was the right thing to do at the time. The story is a bit complicated and more than I want to share; however, I will always love my son, Alexander, who is 12. Now, I have a two year old son, Kyle, and a 5 year old step-daughter, River.

I first became a dad in 2001. At this point Angie (my incredible wife) and I had been married for 3 years.

On June 29, 1997 our first daughter, Emily, entered the world.

How did fatherhood change you?

It changes you in many ways. Before I used to spend more Sometimes it forces you to be a time with my friends. Now, better person, since they are great I’m stuck with my family. imitators and soak up the world like sponges. I remember when I had a bad back and Alexander would imitate me by holding his back, too. I also want to make the world a better place for them to live in. This is one reason I worked so hard to help establish the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument.

Fatherhood has definitely brought a lot of joy in my life; I wouldn’t change it for anything. My wife and I now have 3 energetic boys ages: 8, 6, and 4.

When your first child comes along, you begin to feel more vulnerable because that precious infant seems so tiny and defenseless. Fathers, I think, wonder whether they will always be able to protect their little ones from the dangers of the world. But it changed me in other ways in the sense that I realized a miracle had occurred with the birth of my daughters, and then my son. With that miracle came the privilege of nurturing and raising 3 kids to be all they can be.

If you have a choice, would you like to be a stay-home dad or a full-time working dad? Why?

The first time around this was never an option with her. Now, even if I wanted to be a stay home dad, I could not, since I am the one with health insurance. We could manage financially without my job, but the health care costs would destroy us if we had a major health problem. I have always had the feeling that I was held hostage by the health insurance companies.

If we were financially independent, sure I’d stay at home. When I can, it is fun to pick them up from school. It’s great to spend quality time with them.

If I had the choice I would be a stay at home dad with the ability to work outside the home in a carefully measured and balanced way. But hey, that’s utopia, not reality.....so I just do the best I can within the circumstances and give my kids as much time as possible.

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4th Annual BRM Car Rally

Twists and turns BY ALEXIE VILLEGAS ZOTOMAYOR PHOTOS BY RUDY ARMENTA

Although his car overheated in last year’s car rally, it didn’t discourage Glenn Policare and his girlfriend Mayuki Kebukawa from joining again and winning the race this time. Racking up 1,065 points, Glenn’s car appeared to be headed to victory early in the race as it sped to the checkpoints well ahead of the others. “This is a bitter-sweet victory. I really wanted to do well this year. We did well and I’m really excited. We had a good time,” says Glenn whose car overheated in the 3rd Annual Beach Road Magazine Car Rally and was forced to leave the competition. This year the couple more than made up for last year’s frustrating finish. As well as the prizes which include $200, gift packs and trophy, Glenn and Mayuki get bragging rights as winners of Saipan’s unique motoring event. Behind only by 20 points is Car No. 8 driven by Anna Manibusan who received $150, a trophy, and gift packs. In third place is Car No. 2 with Jan Michael Reyes as driver and Sharisse Rivera as navigator. Although it’s their first time to join the car rally, Jan and Sharisse finished the race with an impressive 1,020 points. The two received $100, trophy, and gift packs.

‘we won!’. Glenn Policare and Mayuki Kebukawa accept their prizes from Susan Marchitti and Glen Hunter.

rev up. The participating vehicles are seen leaving the Hollywood Theaters parking lot en route to Checkpoint 1.

family day. The CGD Pawnshop Family are ready to compete. 12

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LET THE RACE BEGIN. Participants and organizers of the 4th Beach Road Magazine Car Rally gather for a group photo.

The 4th to 12th place winners are as follows: Car No. 6, 1013 points; Car No. 1, 994; Car No. 12, 989 points; Car No. 5, 968 points; Car No. 10, 967; Car No. 7, 956 points; Car No. 3, 945; Car No. 4, 909; and Car No. 11, 24 points. While stopping over at the checkpoints during the race, participants were asked to pick two cards. Although it wasn’t enough for them to finish in the top three, owing to their lucky poker hands, Cars No. 1 and 5 vaulted a level higher in the rankings. The participants agree that the car rally is an exciting event. To some, they get to discover new things about hte island like finding out there are three Alaihai Streets on Saipan. The rally that took them to nooks and crannies of the island is the longest race to date. All cars, except for No. 11 which overheated on Koblerville, finished the 49.3-mile-long race but not without complaining about how difficult it was. Braving the humid day, all participants drove around the island and received instructions at three checkpoints: San Antonio Beach, Checkpoint 1; Oleai Beach Bar, Checkpoint 2; Governor’s Office Parking Lot, Checkpoint 3. At the sight of Joeten Kagman, the participants heaved a sigh of relief like seeing the promised land. To those interested to participate in BRM’s car rally, Glenn has this advice, “Read directions, follow directions. Try not to yell at your driver and I think you’ll be okay!” Glimpses of Saipan, publisher of Beach Road Magazine, expresses its gratitude to all the supporters who made the event a success. Special mention goes to Department of Public Safety, DPH EHDI, PHI Pharmacy, Budget Rent A Car, Coca-Cola, Subway, Foremost, Scoops, Revolving Restaurant 360, T&L Get Covered, Topnotch, Pacific Islands Club, Saipan Grand Hotel, World Resort, Micronesian Brokers, Saipan Advertising, Elite Printing, and Megabyte. BRM

CHECKPOINT. A driver checks the T-shirts on sale at the checkpoint.

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cruisin’ on beach road

BOAT RIDE. Lorna, Ana, Josie, and Baby Jerby are heading to HAPPY BIRTHDAY! Liza Cruz is joined by her family for a DADDIES UNITE! Happy Father’s Day to Juan Pan and his special lunch at the Magellan Restaurant of Pacific Islands Club friends. Managaha for a weekend getaway. on the occasion of her birthday.

BEST BOOTH. Elegance Restaurant wins the coveted best booth award during the opening of the Taste of the Marianas International Food GOOD COOKING. Rose Chan and Carol Festival. Wong pose at their booth at the Taste of the Marianas festival grounds.

RECESS. Students of Saipan Southern High School enjoy the company of their friends while on recess.

I LOVE MY BIKE. Members of Matua Riders join the EMS Open House on May 22 on Capital Hill.

SCHOOL BREAK. Jovy takes his family for a lunch treat at JHEMS Restaurant.

YOUNG FIDDLERS. Students of Do Re Mi Music School rehearse before their actual performance during the 29th Flame Tree Arts Festival.

EMS OPEN HOUSE. The young members of the community pose for a picture at the EMS Open House on Capital Hill on May 22.

Beach Road Magazine is accepting photo contributions from the community for FREE. Kindly e-mail the photos with captions identifying the people in the photo from left to right position, to reporter2@glimpsesofguam.com. For photos to appear in the coming issue, due to limited slots, we encourage submissions on or before the 15th of every month.


FAMILY ORIENTATION. Officers of the Guam National Guard take a break from the daylong meeting with families of the new recruits. From left, SFC Charles D. Ferrar, MSG Rosemarie Elliot, SSG Vic D. Lugutang, SPC Jesse F. Toves, and CW1 Pedro Larribas.

FAMILY REUNION. John Xavier, Ernest Joachim and Eizen Americus pose for a picture during their family gathering.

READY TO FIGHT. Young girls prove that there is strength in numbers in the tug-of-war.

WATER FUN. Christian, Bea, and Elijah enjoy dipping in the clear waters off Managaha. PSS HEALTH CAREERS PROGRAM. Participants and chaperones pose in front of the American Memorial Park’s Visitors Center after a panel discussion.

COMPANY OUTING. Employees of Joeten Motors visit Managaha for their company outing.

NIGHT OUT. Jun Lee and his wife enjoy the visit to the festival grounds of Taste of the Marianas.

GOOD TO BE HOME. Some members of the Manta Ray Band are excited to be home and share their fond memories of New York. JUNE 2010

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TEXT AND PHOTOS BY ALEXIE VILLEGAS ZOTOMAYOR

In the two days of the 29th Flame Tree Arts Festival there was not a spare inch in the parking space and people continue to stream the festival grounds like army ants heading to a molehill. The increase in proceeds from the sale of the crafts –– according to vendors –– is a testament to the success of the festival that continues to attract people year after year. The Flame Tree Arts Festival never fails to amaze people as artists continue to put out their unique works indigenous to the islands and reflective of the heart of the community. Take for example Ernie David’s watercolor painting using sakura leaves. With his art shop closing with the shutdown of Clark Air Base in the Philippines, Ernie has now found a new audience for his sakura paintings on Saipan. There’s Greg Elliott who had to defy the limits of color blindness to produce paintings of iridescent quality. The former Ventura, Calif. resident has found on Saipan a wealth of ideas to work with. A prolific painter, Greg is at the cusp of launching a new collection at Revolving Restaurant 360 with the aegis of art collector and evaluator Ashley Moffatt Uys of Fu Dogs & Qi. Former sports reporter and now a marketing executive for IT&E, Brad Ruszala surprises even his closest friends with his woodblock prints. The art form that Paul Jacoulet learned from Japanese masters has been Brad’s passion since he arrived on Saipan. Passion too is written in all of Edward Edong Elenzano’s tattoo work. Tattoo aficionados really appreciate Edong’s worldclass tattoo work. Chris Neltner’s photographs are also a hit with festival goers. Chris, who has been on island for several years, believes the latest flame tree arts festival is more successful than the previous years. He says the crowds are bigger this year and his beads are selling well compared to his photographs due to the economic climate. Another photographer who keeps a good following is Leslie Ware. From his 16

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VARIETY. Young performers show various dances indigenous to the Pacific islands.

WORKS OF ART. Edong Elanzano works on a tattoo; Chris Neltner at his booth; Brad Ruszala shows the woodblock he uses to make prints.

vast collection of photographs, his framed photograph of a parrot in predominantly red and blue plumage catches attention. One other artist with a consistent audience is Tokie Mojica with her Marshallese crafts. Behind every item in her booth is Tokie –– a Marshallese woman with a passion to preserve local culture. Besides the artists selling craft, there are the performance artists who keep entertaining the crowd with their dance and music. Through their performances, the islanders are reminded

of their rich heritage. Not far from the stage are the booths displaying diversity in culinary arts. From the visual and auditory appeal of the arts and craft and the performances, everyone is swayed by the olfactory and gustatory appeal of the variety of cuisines in the islands. The festival remains a consistent crowd drawer, proof of the people’s enjoyment of a cultural experience that only happens when the islands are blanketed in red-orange blooms of the flame trees. BRM


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It’s a day for the community to mingle with the firefighters and get to know them more than as unsung heroes clad in their uniforms. At the Emergency Management Services Open House on Capital Hill on May 22, members of the community get to understand more the work of the firefighters as more than just putting out fire and helping prevent it. They are also at the helm of a lifesaving mission. The children have had the opportunity to meet and get to know the firefighters and enjoy their company in the games prepared for them. Central to the day’s activities is a tug-of-war where children are pitted against children, and against the firefighters in a game that elicited fun among the participants. It’s a day for the entire family as EMS and other government agencies provided free hotdogs and drinks to the visitors. Aside from the fun activities, families visit various booths of government agencies disseminating information on health, safety, among other things. The EMS Day succeeds in not only bringing the members of the community closer, but also

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LINE UP. Members of the community line up in one of the booths of the EMS Open House on May 22.

in informing them about what EMS can do for them and how they can all cooperate to make the islands a safe place to live in. Seeing the fun written in their children’s faces, the parents look forward to another day when EMS can hold another open house. BRM

BEST FOOT FORWARD.The girls pull the water hose in the tugof-war.

island craft. Tokie Mojica displays necklaces and other crafts from Marshall Islands.

JS Prom and Graduation Promo HAND PAINT. Joe Kani works on a flower design as the young girl looks on.

Hair and Make up - $30.00 Hair and Make up w/ manicure/pedicure - $45

Father’s Day Gift Certificate available Weekly Special Monday: Tuesday:

Signature Massage Men’s Hair Cut Ladies’ Hair Cut Wednesday: Facial Thursday: Hair Spa

$20.00 $5.00 $8.00 $20.00 $15.00 June 2010

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Manta Ray Concert Band:

Proud moment for CNMI BY ALEXIE VILLEGAS ZOTOMAYOR Photos courtesy of Saipan Southern High School It’s a long and winding road to Carnegie Hall but it’s worth the trip. Every penny chipped in to support the CNMI’s well-decorated band is money well spent as Manta Ray Concert Band gives the CNMI its proudest moment—winning silver in the competition and winning the hearts of fellow Americans who learned about Saipan and the Northern Marianas at the band’s arrival in New York. The only school band and one of only six schools in the country invited to compete and perform at Carnegie Hall, Saipan Southern High School’s band proves to all and sundry that it deserves to share the stage with the world’s best. “Un eskuela, un korason” –– a Chamorro phrase for “one school, one heart” –– could not have been better displayed by the band than on the world’s big stage. With esprit de corps, Manta Ray Concert Band represents the best the islands have to offer and through its music shows the inherent musical talent of the islanders. Truly, their hearts beat as band members give the best performance of their lives on a stage where select musicians only have been given the privilege to do so. According to William E. Dewitt, director of the Manta Ray Concert Band, “Carnegie was almost like a fantasy. It’s so hard to believe that we’re actually there. To stay on that stage was a lifetime of memories.” Carrying with them the hopes and dreams of the islanders, DeWitt says the band members have talked a lot about being ambassadors of the CNMI months leading to the trip. He says, “Were we willing to carry that burden and represent the hopes and dreams of the Commonwealth and the people? We embraced that. We talked about how we’re going to conduct ourselves in terms of our behavior and appearance and definitely, our music.” And Will could not be more than pleased 18

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KUDOS. US Congress Delegate Gregorio Kilili Sablan joins the Manta Ray Concert Band during their victorious Carnegie Hall debut.

‘we’re here.’ Members of the Manta Ray Concert Band enjoy their walk to Carnegie Hall.


“I LOVE NEW YORK.” The members of the Manta Ray Concert Band in one of their practice sessions in New York.

with his students. He extols their exemplary performance and the way they conducted themselves on and off the stage. Diverse and young as they are, the members of the band make the most of their stay in New York, soaking up its ambiance and collecting as much memories as they can. Anna Deleon Guerrero remembers how she felt standing on stage at Carnegie Hall. “A wave of awe swept over all of us. I felt so regal, very much like we were meant to be on that stage.” As awe-inspiring as it is to be at Carnegie, Anna and the others could only rely also on music to calm their nerves. “Running through our music in our heads; that calmed me down, which I still can’t figure out. It was meant to be such a big moment, so we were extremely nervous. When we got onstage, I felt like we had achieved something that nobody from home had ever achieved before. And we did. I still can’t believe it’s over.” Asked by Beach Road Magazine what she remembers fondly of New York, Anna says, “Well, of course Carnegie Hall was the main event during that trip, but I think that every day we were there was unforgettable. I think seeing “Phantom of the Opera” at the Majestic Theatre was like the completion of my life as an entertainer. Apart from music, I am very set on theatre, and the fact that I got to BE in one

of the main Broadway theatres is incredible. I can’t explain how I felt sitting in that theatre. It was magical.” Another “extremely fun” experience was the day Manta Ray Band performed at Central Park. For Anna, “I had seen movies that were filmed there, so I was thrilled!” Like Anna, her fellow band members have similar fond memories to share. Joshua Roberto, who plays trumphet and is a junior at SSHS, on his first visit to New York and mainland United States, says, “It was very exciting for me.” Rebecca Lee, a sophomore who plays flute and piccolo, couldn’t agree more with Joshua. She calls her experience in NY “amazing” and “once in a lifetime.” According to Rebecca, she met other band members who don’t know where Saipan is — and were amazed. Freshman Gina Lee says awe overwhelmed them the moment they stepped on stage. “It was so nice. When we heard ourselves on stage, it was amazing.” Looking back now, Gina recalls not only her Carnegie performance but also their group’s visit to Central Park. She says, “It’s so full of trees we’ve never seen before. We were also shocked to see a squirrel.” Senior SSHS student and trumpeter Ken Alvarado delights in their band’s being the only concert band picked to perform. He says, “For

me, it feels our band has a lot of potential. We can do anything.” He too offers fond memories of Central Park, including seeing musicians who just come and play at the park for no particular reason other than sharing their music. Fellow senior student and trombone player Ilho Kim agrees with his fellow band members that Carnegie is the best place to perform. “I remember the acoustics was really good. It is the best stage for a musician to play.” Ilho agrees that it’s a proud moment for the Northern Marianas. “I guess we spelled out where Saipan is. People got to know more about Saipan.” Still in disbelief over their experiences, The Manta Ray Concert Band members have accomplished more than winning a silver medal –– they succeeded in putting out the message that there’s a chain of islands called the Northern Marianas in the Pacific and these islands are part of America too. Through their winning performance at Carnegie, they also sent a message that musical inspiration knows no bounds and that the Manta Ray Band is a band to be reckoned with in the years to come. BRM

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Having the opportunity to take my class on a field trip to Bird Island MPA was fantastic. The Teacher Camp helped me make it a reality for my students! - Teacher Camp Participant The goal of the Teacher Camp is to help raise the awareness of CNMI educators about coral reefs and the issues affecting them. In addition, the camp works to provide teachers with the tools necessary to bring this information into the classroom. As part of the camp, participating teachers were introduced to the Ridge to Reef concept and taken on three interactive field trips to help illustrate the concepts involved. While visiting a watershed, a wetland, and a marine protected area, teachers listened to experts present about the area and the role it plays in maintaining healthy reefs. All participating teachers were asked to complete the following “homework”: Two lesson plans demonstrating how participants

will incorporate ideas from Ridge to Reef into their classroom; and a third lesson detailing a field trip for each participant’s class to help “make real” the information exchanged in the two previous lesson plans. These lesson plans are made available to next year’s participants and any other teachers requesting assistance on designing coral reefrelated lesson plans. Upon completing the three lesson plans, each teacher is awarded up to $250.00 to fund a field trip for their students. So far, 11 Saipan classrooms and nearly 200 students have gone out on field trips as a result of the 2009-2010 Teacher Camp. Field trips have taken students to local marine protected areas, wetlands, watersheds and

have even included submarine trips in Saipan’s lagoon. The Teacher Camp is funded by Mariana Islands Nature Alliance (MINA) through a grant from the Department of the Interior and presented in partnership with the CNMI Coral Reef Initiative, Coastal Resources Management Office, the Division of Environmental Quality, and the Division of Fish and Wildlife. For more information about next year’s Teacher Camp, please contact Brooke Nevitt, Education and Outreach Coordinator, Coastal Resources Management Office 664-8305 or brooke. nevitt@crm.gov.mp

ders display the coral mentary School 5th gra Dandan. Dandan Ele r Camp program. che Tea KES Fieldtrip. 6th graders from Koblerville Elementary School wrapping up their fieldtrip to Managaha Marine d as part of the reef dioramas they create Protected Area.

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Do’s and Don’ts of the Upper Body BY CARMEN ROJAS This is the third of the three articles about getting your upper body into tip top condition. If you still are craving more on how to get those guns bangin’, read on! Here are some simple do’s and don’ts that anyone can use to get those arms, shoulders, and chest rockin’! Beginners Do – Make efforts to reduce your overall percent body fat. It won’t matter how many curls or pushes you do if your overall percent is too high, because it simply won’t show. Besides, it would look totally unbalanced to have a saggy mid section, a flabby rear end and ripped arms. Don’t – Waste time doing minimally effective exercises in the gym that don’t burn calories. Examples would be bicep curls, or tricep push downs. In the grand scheme of things these excercises don’t burn as much calories as a more complex exercise such as a dip, or push up. Or if you have to do them, turn them into a complex movement by adding an overhead press to a bicep curl. Trust me, standing in the corner doing countless simple bicep curls is not a good use of your time, when you

could be using the elliptical with the arm grips, taking a boxing class, swimming, or other high calorie burning activities instead. And at this stage, calorie burning is key. Intermediates Do – Incorporate resistance training of the upper body into your routine. At this stage we should be looking for muscle growth and development, and resistance training is the best way to do this. Personally, I like the feel of iron when I work out, but, you can also incorporate resistance bands, medicine balls, and other nonconventional elements. Find something that you like, and you can stick with and make variations when needed from this base. Don’t – Forget to make sure you are eating a balanced diet with plenty of protein. Protein we have discussed before, and getting a healthy dose right after a workout will help ensure maximum protein absorption. But don’t ignore the fruits and veggies. The minerals and vitamins found in these can help with recovery, water balance, electrolytic impulses, and can reduce the inflammation common after a hard work out. Experts Do – Vary your workouts by changing things such as reps and sets, tempo, or try out eccentrics to change things up. Overall growth in this area is prone to plateaus and slow growth periods, for a lot of anatomical reasons. To maximize the growth potential, variation cannot be ignored. Don’t – Get locked into the gym. Don’t turn your back on those cardio exercises that were so useful in the beginning. Try an advanced course rather than the beginner, or swim more laps than before. The important thing is not to forget what got you to this point in the first place. Cardio is essential to getting the lean ripped look you are looking for. See you next month when we will attack those abs! BRM

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Of compasses and maps By Alexie Villegas Zotomayor Photos courtesy of Tyce Mister What began as military training in land navigation in Sweden has grown into a competitive sport. According to online sources, orienteering is a family of sports that requires navigational skills using a map or compass to navigate from point to point in diverse and unfamiliar terrain. Orienteering sports combine significant navigation with a specific method of travel that determines needed equipment and tactic. Here are some types of orienteering: foot, mountain bike, ski, trail, radio, canoe, car, among others. Tyce Mister, a veteran triathlete, recently held an orienteering course on Saipan. According to Mister, participants are given a map, usually a specially prepared orienteering map which they use to find control points. “We learned about the different parts of a compass, how to read a topographical map, how to take bearings off the map and travel in the proper direction, and some navigational techniques,” says Mister.  He says prior to setting out on foot, they held a classroom session at Gold’s Gym. Then they set out to put the skills to the test in twomember teams. Each team is given a topographical map of one area with six checkpoints with each team given two-minute intervals to find the checkpoints. At every checkpoint, a punched orange and white marker will welcome the arriving teams. Once they see the marker, the teams will mark their punch cards and move to the next

gear up. Tyce Mister, left, rejoices with his team mates after completing the Guam Extreme Adventure Race.

next stop. Participants follow the markings on the map to find their way to the next checkpoint. .


checkpoint. Mister says, “Small clues were given for each checkpoint such as ‘the tippy tippy top’ or ‘behind the tree at 50 meters’. We practiced pacing so that the participants would know how many steps it would take to cover 50 meters.” He tells Beach Road Magazine that the participating teams would discover all the checkpoints and come back yearning to do it all again. Orienteering has had three training sessions on Saipan with Mister at the helm. These sessions are usually advertised with the Saipan Adventure Sports Club. For those interested to try this sport, Mister suggests they join NMITF in yahoo groups to get in the know about a plethora of events including but not limited to triathlon, biking (both road and mountain), running, orienteering, adventure racing, swimming, hiking and many more activities.

According to Mister, sports aficionados will find in the said yahoo group upcoming race information, training schedules, informational resources, national competition updates, and general interest announcements. One of Mister’s strong interests is adventure racing where participants are given a map with checkpoints with a variety of disciplines needed to finish the course. The Annual Guam Extreme Adventure Race (GEAR) which is in its 10th year is a fine example.  Mister himself is preparing to participate with a four-member team on May 30 in which participants will go on foot, use mountain bikes, paddle kayaks, swim with fins, and travel on foot on coastlines — with occasional short swims while orienteering from point to point. He says, “The GEAR 10 race is advertised as a 24 hour race.  Last year we placed second and finished in about 17 hours.  This will be

my ninth GEAR race.” He says he loves the training, teamwork and the competition. Although the Guam race takes about 24 hours, Mister says it is still short compared to a race in Cairns where it took three days to complete. “A necessary and important part of these events is our support crew. Every few hours we are able to meet with our support crew to restock our water and food supplies.  Boy are we happy to see our support crew!”    Mister tells Beach Road Magazine that another orienteering session is due. For as little as $5 per session, NMITF members can check out the sport that’s gaining popularity in the region. In the near future, Mister is looking at hosting a mini-adventure race on Saipan. Meanwhile, he encourages anyone interested to practice orienteering with him using fourcourse maps to send an email to tyce.mister@ gmail.com. BRM


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Have a good day!


(Continued from page 7)

sail the South Pacific seas. Bronwyn says, “We have been looking for the right yacht. It is very important to have a safe boat and living space for kids.” And they acquired a catamaran in December 2008 and sailed in May 2009. Bronwyn says it took them a year and a half to plan for the trip and especially as they were initially planning on going to Alaska. In the one year that they have been on the boat, she says they are not hurrying around the Pacific and they sail their boat “really conservatively.” As for their five-year-old twins, they are home schooled by Bronwyn with resources sent to her by her mother who’s an educator. The family reached Saipan in March this year. Just as they were en route to Japan on April Fools Day, their mast and beam broke forcing them to come back. In the face of this harrowing experience, Bronwyn says she found herself thinking calmly and her husband did well as a skipper. With Bronwyn’s parents and twin boys Samuel and Tyler on board, Bronwyn and Richard made it safely to Saipan. Bronwyn says the accident opened their eyes to the reality that they are capable of overcoming and dealing with such an emergency situation. On Saipan, the James family met strangers who gave them food and offered their parents a place to stay. It’s this warm hospitality of the people on Saipan that she will not forget. “People are generous. They just come and give me things. Incredible,” she says. In the six weeks that their boat is marooned at the Smiling Cove Marina, the family has met friends who took them to water parks and barbecue parties and welcomed them to their homes. Just after Mother’s Day, Bronwyn and the twin fly to Vancouver where she found a job while Richard fixes the boat on island. Prior to leaving, the James family has been looking for storage to keep their 30-footwide catamaran as they wait for parts. In the short time they spent on Saipan, the James family extends their gratitude to the people who made their stay memorable. It’s this unique hospitality of the islanders that the James family will not forget and one reason they will come back to renew ties and make new memories. BRM

printer’s ad 3.625 x 3.25

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Cancer (June 22 - July 22): Now is a good time to start to straighten and tidy up around the house, and you might see this effect spill over into other areas of your life, too.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 - Dec 21): Even if it just means turning off your phone while you spend the day hanging out in the garden, make it a priority now.

Leo (July 23 - Aug 22): Try to avoid consuming too much of anything –– and yes, there is such a thing as too much of a good thing. Your energy this month is warning you to guard against overindulgence.

Capricorn (Dec 22 - Jan 19): Sherlock Holmes has nothing on you right now. Whether you’re solving a locked-room mystery (check with the butler) or leading your friends on toward a rousing, if puzzling, adventure, you can outfox any fictional detective with ease. Clues are everywhere, and you have the discerning eye needed to spot them. Your powers of investigation are unparalleled for now, and you can solve just about any conundrum that comes your way.

Virgo (Aug 23 - Sept 22): Shying away from all this attention is just not an option! Enjoy your time in the limelight, and smile pretty for all your fans! Libra (Sept 23 - Oct 23): Try to keep as busy as possible. What you need more than anything else is some serious downtime, with no interruptions from anyone.

Aquarius (Jan 20 - Feb 18): You need to adopt the tricks and tools of a master spy today -- if you want to get anything done, that is! While your situation isn’t as dramatic as the Cold War, there’s still some essential info that you can’t just come out and ask for openly right now. Remember to exercise caution and to have a Plan B -- something that can give you plausible deniability should the worst come to pass.

Scorpio (Oct 24 - Nov 21): Your lips are sealed, so you can safely ignore all the pleas to spill the beans that are sure to come your way this month.

F E E T

1

New Moon

6

First Quarter

6

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6

3

Gemini (May 21 - June 21 ): You need to send a clear, firm message about what you can tolerate in your relationships. You may be redefining limits or setting boundaries these days, but some of the most important people in your life are sure to be a little slower to get the message.

Moonrise 23:38 Moonset 10:57 6

N

6

4

Moonrise None Moonset 11:43 6

N

6

5

Rise 00:14 Set 12:29 6

N

08:14

6

0

Moonrise 00:49 Moonset 13:15 N

6

Moonrise 23:01 Moonset 10:10

Taurus (Apr. 20 - May 20): You’re ready to take off on a flight to a very new, very hot (in one way or another) destination, but on this trip, you’re not allowed to carry any baggage -- emotional or otherwise.

1

Last Quarter

6

N

2

Aries (Mar. 21 - Apr. 19): Though you can picture yourself in someone else’s shoes, you need to do a bit more in order to get a full understanding of what’s going on with them.

2

Full Moon

6

Moonrise 22:22 Moonset 09:20

Pisces (Feb 19 - Mar 20): Give people the kind of opinions and advice you would want to hear from them in the same situation. Use your considerable sensitivity and intelligence to figure out a kind way to tell them what, if anything, needs to be fixed.

6

7

Moonrise 01:25 Moonset 14:02 6

N

6

8

Moonrise 02:04 Moonset 14:51 6

N

6

9

Moonrise 02:45 Moonset 15:44 6

N

6

03:31 Moonrise 04:21 10 Moonrise Moonset 16:40 11 Moonset 17:39 12 6

N

6

6

N

6

6

Rise 05:18 Set 18:39 N

21:16

6

2 1 0 –1

13 6

Moonrise 06:18 Moonset 19:39 N

6

14 6

Moonrise 07:21 Moonset 20:36 N

6

15 6

Moonrise 08:24 Moonset 21:29 N

6

16 6

Moonrise 09:25 Moonset 22:18 N

6

10:24 Moonrise 11:20 Rise 12:16 17 Moonrise Moonset 23:03 18 Moonset 23:46 19 Set None 6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

14:31

6

2 1 0 –1

20 6

Moonrise 13:10 Moonset 00:29 N

6

21 6

Moonrise 14:06 Moonset 01:13 N

6

22 6

Moonrise 15:02 Moonset 01:58 N

6

23 6

Moonrise 15:59 Moonset 02:46 N

6

16:56 Moonrise 17:51 Rise 18:44 24 Moonrise Moonset 03:37 25 Moonset 04:30 26 Set 05:24 6

N

6

6

N

6

6

N

2 1 0 –1

27 6

Moonrise 19:32 Moonset 06:19 N

6

28 6

2

N

6

29 6

Moonrise 20:58 Moonset 08:03 N

6

30 6

Moonrise 21:36 Moonset 08:51 N

6

Daily Tide Predictions

June 2010

Copyright © 2010 University of Guam Marine Laboratory and its licensees. All rights reserved.

1 0 –1

28

Moonrise 20:17 Moonset 07:12

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21:31


BRM June 2010  

Local Entertainment Magazine in Saipan, Nothern Mariana Islands