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Tech Focus: Rugged Box Systems Roundup

JOURNAL

The Journal of Military Electronics & Computing

Communications Technologies Bolster Warfighter Data Sharing New Performance Levels Offered by Rugged Storage Advances MicroTCA Stakes Claim as Upgrade Path from VME and cPCI

An RTC Group Publication

October 2014 Volume 16 Number 10

cotsjournalonline.com


Intel Core i7

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SVGA COM 2 & 4

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2 USB 2.0

Intel Core i7 & Celeron Processors Single-Core, Dual-Core, Quad-Core

Gigabit Ethernet

14 Advanced Digital I/O Lines

Intel QM77 Express Chipset Utility Port 2.0 USB 2.0 Speaker Battery Reset Power

Gigabit Ethernet Stackable Type 2 PCI Express Connector 8 PCIe x1 Links LPC Bus 3 PCIe x4 Links SMBus 4 SATA Ports Power & ATX Control 4 USB 3.0 Ports RTC Battery

SATA

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–40 to +85°C Operation PCBs fabricated to IPC 6012 Class 3 Standards. Visit www.rtd.com/i7 for full datasheets.

RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc. High-performance single board computers are just part of what we do. RTD designs and manufactures an entire suite of compatible CPUs, power supplies, network modules and specialty cards. All of our products are available in rugged, modular enclosures suitable for the harshest environments. COTS or custom: we provide solutions for you. Contact our in-house engineering teams to learn more.

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COM 1 & 3


JOURNAL

The Journal of Military Electronics & Computing

CONTENTS

COTS (kots), n. 1. Commercial off-the-shelf. Terminology popularized in 1994 within U.S. DoD by SECDEF Wm. Perry’s “Perry Memo” that changed military industry purchasing and design guidelines, making Mil-Specs acceptable only by waiver. COTS is generally defined for technology, goods and services as: a) using commercial business practices and specifications, b) not developed under government funding, c) offered for sale to the general market, d) still must meet the program ORD. 2. Commercial business practices include the accepted practice of customer-paid minor modification to standard COTS products to meet the customer’s unique requirements. —Ant. When applied to the procurement of electronics for he U.S. Military, COTS is a procurement philosophy and does not imply commercial, office environment or any other durability grade. E.g., rad-hard components designed and offered for sale to the general market are COTS if they were developed by the company and not under government funding.

October 2014 Volume 16 Number 10

FEATURED p.10 Stakes Rise for Military Comms and Networking SPECIAL FEATURE Communications and Networking for a Net-centric Military

DEPARTMENTS

10  Stakes Rise for Military Comms and Networking

6 Editorial

18  Meeting Holdup Requirements in Mil-Aero Power Systems

8

The Inside Track

44

COTS Products

50

Marching to the Numbers

Eyes on Asia-Pacific

Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief Dave Berry, Vicor

TECH RECON Rugged Storage Strategies: From RAID to SSDs 26  Rugged Storage Solutions Evolve for Next-Gen Needs Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT Upgrade Paths for Legacy VME and CompactPCI Systems 30 MicroTCA Provides Valid Upgrade Choice from VME and cPCI Justin Moll, Vadatech

TECHNOLOGY FOCUS Tech Focus: Rugged Box Systems Roundup 36 Rugged Box Systems Evolve to More Complex Solutions Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

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Tech Focus: Rugged Box Systems Roundup

Digital subscriptions available: cotsjournalonline.com

Coming in November See Page 48 On The Cover: A United Launch Alliance Delta IV rocket with the Air Force’s Global Positioning System GPS IIF SV-1 satellite sits poised on its Space Launch Complex-37 launch pad ready to launch. GPS IIF will be followed by GPS III. GPS III will be fully backward compatible with legacy signals while delivering a new L1C Galileo-compatible signal (civil), L5 (safety-of-life), and a more powerful M-code (military) signal. (Photo by United Launch Alliance).


VERY COOL PRODUCTS! RUGGED DEPLOYABLE RAID DATA STORAGE

JOURNAL

The Journal of Military Electronics & Computing

Editorial EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jeff Child, jeffc@rtcgroup.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR Johnny Keggler, johnnyk@rtcgroup.com

Drive Magazine Based High Performance Multi-Protocol Fibre Channel, SAS or iSCSI System

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SENIOR EDITOR Clarence Peckham, clarencep@rtcgroup.com COPY EDITOR Rochelle Cohn

Art/Production ART DIRECTOR Jim Bell, jimb@rtcgroup.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Michael Farina, michaelf@rtcgroup.com

Advertising WESTERN REGIONAL SALES MANAGER Mike Duran, michaeld@rtcgroup.com (949) 226-2024 MIDWEST REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL SALES MANAGER Mark Dunaway, markd@rtcgroup.com (949) 226-2023

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Obsolete SCSI Devices?

PRESIDENT John Reardon, johnr@rtcgroup.com VICE PRESIDENT Aaron Foellmi, aaronf@rtcgroup.com

COTS Journal

SCSI with removable CFast replaces: • SCSI Magnetic Optical Drive • SCSI Floppy Drive • SCSI PCMCIA/PC Card Drive • SCSI Tape Drive Red Rock Technologies, Inc. www.redrocktech.com (480) 843-3777

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COTS Journal | October 2014

HOME OFFICE The RTC Group 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250 San Clemente, CA 92673 Phone: (949) 226-2000 Fax: (949) 226-2050 www.rtcgroup.com EDITORIAL OFFICE Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief 20A Northwest Blvd., PMB#137, Nashua, NH 03063 Phone: (603) 429-8301 PUBLISHED BY THE RTC GROUP Copyright 2014, The RTC Group. Printed in the United States. All rights reserved. All related graphics are trademarks of The RTC Group. All other brand and product names are the property of their holders.


Trenton’s THD8141 System Host Board

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Trenton's THD8141 is our latest system host board to feature support for systems utilizing both standard off-the-shelf PCI Express ® 3.0 and PCI plug-in cards. This new PICMG ® 1.3 SHB offers a choice of multicore Intel ® Xeon® E3-1200 v3 or an Intel® Core™ i3/i5/i7 processor. The THD8141 system host board also includes:

USB3 Ports Latest Multi-Core Processor Options Standard PCI Express 3.0 and PCI Plug-in Card Support

The THD8141 has all you need for a wide variety of embedded computing systems. Longevity and performance requirements are covered in military computing applications. THD8141 enables system design flexibility in telecom, video command & control and energy exploration. Other board advantages include:

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EDITORIAL Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

Eyes on Asia-Pacific

T

he U.S defense strategy of pivoting toward Asia-Pacific certainly isn’t in the forefront of today’s headlines. The Ebola crisis in Africa, the fighting in Iraq, Syria and on the borders of eastern Ukraine and Crimea dominate the news. So it’s easy to have the perception that the Asia-Pacific focus isn’t real. In a speech delivered last month to the Council on Foreign Relations, Deputy Secretary of Defense Bob Work made it clear that the Asia-Pacific strategy is more than talk. Work became Deputy Secretary about six months ago, and in May Secretary Hagel asked him to oversee the implementation of the United States rebalance to the Asia-Pacific region. In his speech Work talked about those plans and quite a lot of those changes involve technology and new military systems platforms. And to clarify Work said “We are not just moving to the Asia-Pacific or rebalancing our forces. It remains a true global posture, but with an emphasis in the Asia-Pacific region.” By 2020, said Work, both the Navy and the Air Force will have 60 percent of their forces in the Asia-Pacific region. “We may not have as many forces as we would like, but 60 percent of the forces will be in the Asia Pacific region.” And the Army will have more than 100,000 soldiers when all is said and done in the Asia-Pacific region, including those in Hawaii and Alaska and Japan. And at the same time, the Marines are distributing and having four powerful Marine airground task force geographically dispersed around the Pacific. According to the Deputy Secretary our Pacific-based forces will all have our best and most advanced equipment, equipped with the most advanced payloads possible. The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter going to go first to the Pacific. By 2018, the very advanced Zumwalt destroyer will be based in the Pacific, we hope. “We’re moving THAAD and Patriot batteries to key relocations,” said Work “We’re putting more Aegis ballistic missile defense ships in Japan, and we’ve put second TPY-2 missile defense radar in Japan.” It is the first new base in Japan since the end of World War II, which closes an important gap in our country’s sensor net.

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COTS Journal | October 2014

The Navy’s new P-8 maritime patrol aircraft is going to the Pacific there first and it will soon be armed with different weapons. Pacific Air Forces are going to have the DoD’s most advanced weapons, to include stealthy, long- range attack missiles and longer-range air defense missiles. And the Navy is going after a new long-range antiship missile, which will allow it to engage ships at standoff ranges. Meanwhile, the Army is making targeted investments across the board and making itself more lethal, particularly in Korea, and we’re investing heavily in electronic warfare across the board. According to Work, as they’re adding all of these capabilities they will continue to develop new and alternative approaches and rigorously test them. “We’re going to do more war games,” he said, “We’re going to do more demonstrations.” On COTS Journal we’ve come up with our own strategy to focus more on some key technology that involves the kind of signals intelligence vital to operating in large areas like Asia-Pacific. In 2015 our Tech Recon feature will deliver a series of sections that follow a sequential path hitting all the key technologies that are part of a signal chain. The series tracks the various types of processing, storage and display technologies that are critical at each point along the path. Starting in January with Signal Capture, the section hits a different phase along the chain each month, including Digital Conversion with FPGAs and ADCs, Signal Processing, FPGAs vs GPGPUs vs GPPs, Data Storage, Sorting and Exploitation and then finally and wrapping up with User Action (including Display strategies) in December. Just as shifts in defense strategy fit well into the kinds of products and technologies our military embedded computing industry is involved in, they also each fit perfectly into one—or more often several—of the topics covered in this signal chain series. We look forward to both the participation of these companies in those editorial features and to feedback from you the reader.


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The

INSIDE TRACK Lockheed Martin Tapped to Support USMC Air Operations System The battle command system used by the Marines to manage and monitor airborne platforms, including fighters, bombers, tankers, unmanned aerial vehicles, and helicopters, will be maintained by Lockheed Martin. Under a contract worth approximately $18 million, Lockheed Martin will upgrade and sustain the USMC’s Virtualized Theater Battle Management Core Systems (TBMCS), which interfaces with Joint Services and Coalition systems to enable synchronized air mission planning for all arms of the military. TBMCS enables distributed battle management, which means that the Joint community—Marine Corps, Navy, Army, Air Force—can all contribute to managing the air campaign (Figure 1). Lockheed Martin will ensure that TBMCS provides faster access to real-time operations information;

better planning and collaboration tools; and enhanced situational awareness while dramatically reducing sustainment costs. This includes providing updates for approximately 200 integrated software applications—from large planning tools to smaller “plug-in” applets that allow force status monitoring. The team will also maintain airspace deconfliction applications, which support coordination of precision engagement fires. Lockheed Martin will also update the automated tools that generate, disseminate, and execute the air tasking and airspace control orders for the USMC.

First VITA 46.11 Interoperability Workshop a Success

MA. Other participants included Elma Electronic, Extreme Engineering Solutions and Pigeon Point Systems. The VITA 46.11 specification was approved by its Working Group in November 2013 as a Draft Standard for Trial Use (DSTU), along with an explicit plan to organize a first VSM-IW as part of the effort to achieve full ANSI/VITA ratification. As preparation for the workshop, the VITA 46.11 Working Group developed a set of test plans for key functional areas of the standard and then used those plans to guide the testing. The test plans used in the VSM-IW highlighted where the DSTU can be clarified and improved to enhance interoperability for products built to the standard.

VITA has announced completion of a successful first VPX System Management Interoperability Workshop (VSM-IW) to test compliance of relevant VPX products to the VITA 46.11 System Management for VPX standard. In a VSM-IW, VITA member companies who build VPX chassis and modules that comply with VITA 46.11 come together to systematically test the interoperability of their chassis and module combinations. VITA member Mercury Systems hosted this first VSM-IW in Burlington, FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

8

COTS Journal | October 2014

Lockheed Martin Bethesda, MD. (301) 897-6000 www.lockheedmartin.com

FIGURE 1 TBMCS allows Marines to manage and monitor airborne platforms, including fighters, bombers, tankers, unmanned aerial vehicles, and helicopters.

VITA Fountain Hills, AZ. (480) 837-7486 www.vita.com

Raytheon Awarded $149 Million Contract for Iron Dome Components Raytheon has received a contract award from Rafael Advanced Defense Systems Ltd. valued at $149.3 million to provide products for the Tamir interceptor used in the defensive Iron Dome Weapon System. Raytheon will use its extensive technology resources and supplier network to provide a second source of supply for essential Iron Dome interceptor components. With more than 1,000 successful intercepts, Tamir is the only

Figure 2 The Tamir interceptor used in the defensive Iron Dome Weapon System is the only combat proven counter rocket, artillery, and mortar interceptor available for U.S. and coalition partners today. combat proven counter rocket, artillery, and mortar interceptor available for U.S. and coalition partners today (Figure 2). According to Raytheon, the sourcing of Tamir interceptor com-


The

INSIDE TRACK ponents in the U.S. will go a long way to ensuring sufficient volumes of available Tamir missiles for Israel’s defense. The award builds upon a co-marketing agreement the two companies have had in place for Iron Dome since 2011. Raytheon Waltham, MA (781) 522-3000 www.raytheon.com

Rockwell Collins ARC-210 is First Airborne Radio to Operate on MUOS The Rockwell Collins ARC-210 radio recently became the first airborne radio to operate over the U.S. government’s newest satellite constellation—the Mobile User Objective System (MUOS). The MUOS system is based on cellular phone technology and represents a paradigm shift for Department of Defense satellite communications. The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) conducted two weeks of MUOS ground and airborne testing. During the first week of testing, the ARC-210 was deployed in a ground environment for system operational tests that included conducting Over the Air Provisioning of the radios and passing of IP data. During the second week, airborne MUOS operations were conducted from a system installed in a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft

Figure 3 The AM General BRV-O Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) candidate has a C4ISR backbone with open-standard networked architecture and clustered super-computing power.

Figure 4 The Navy’s unmanned MQ-4C Triton prepares to land at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., Sept. 18 after completing an approximately 11-hour flight from Northrop Grumman’s Palmdale, CA facility. to a communications base station at Joint Base Lewis-McChord Air Force Base located near Tacoma, Washington. Testing also included both voice and data operations, with the ARC-210 becoming the first airborne radio to successfully transmit over the full MUOS satellite system. Rockwell Collins Cedar Rapids, IA (319) 295-1000 www.rockwellcollins.com

AM General’s BRV-O JLTV Candidate Enters User Testing Phase AM General exhibited its proven Blast Resistant Vehicle - Off road (BRV-O) Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) candidate, at the 2014 Modern Day Marine Expo, Marine Corps Base, Quantico, VA last month. Since announcing delivery of 22 BRV-Os ahead of schedule for the Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMD) phase of the JLTV program 13 months ago, the vehicles have been engaged in rugged, off-road U.S. Government testing. The vehicles have now transitioned into Limited User Testing (LUT). BRV-O’s crew capsule and

modular armor has successfully completed ballistic and blast testing. Operationally, if armor is damaged in future combat situations, its separate components can be readily replaced while remaining on scene. This will dramatically reduce the time and cost associated with higher-level repairs. BRV-O uses a new lightweight, fuel efficient and high performance diesel engine developed and manufactured by AM General. Additional features include a self-leveling suspension system; electronic braking and stability control, robust on-board power resources, and a C4ISR backbone with openstandard networked architecture and clustered super-computing power (Figure 3).

Navy’s Triton UAV Completes First CrossCountry Flight The MQ-4C Triton UAV arrived at Naval Air Station Patuxent River Sept. 18 after completing its inaugural cross-country ferry flight, bringing the Navy closer to delivering this new capability to the fleet (Figure 4). This flight marked the transition from initial flight test, which established basic safety of flight, to testing that will

demonstrate Triton’s capability to perform operational missions in the maritime domain. During the approximately 11-hour 3,290 nautical mile flight originating from Northrop Grumman’s Palmdale, California, facility, the Triton flew along the southern U.S. border, the Gulf of Mexico and across Florida via an approved instrument route. Operators navigated the aircraft up the Atlantic Coast and Chesapeake Bay at altitudes in excess of 50,000 feet to ensure there were no conflicts with civilian air traffic. Curtiss-Wright supplies the Integrated Mission Management Computer (IMMC) that controls the aircraft’s flight and the Advanced Mission Management System (AMMS) that communicates with onboard sensors and relays information to the ground station. Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions Ashburn, VA. (703) 779-7800. www.cwcdefense.com AM General South Bend, IN (574) 237-6222 www.amgeneral.com FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

COTS Journal | October 2014

9


SPECIAL FEATURE Communications and Networking for a Net-centric Military

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COTS Journal | October 2014


SPECIAL FEATURE

Stakes Rise for Military Comms and Networking Ranging from military satellites to mobile ground-based platforms, the reliance on military communications programs keeps getting stronger. Technology solutions are falling into place to feed system developer needs. Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

C

ommunications and networking remain a critical part of the technology demands of today’s U.S. military. There are a number of influences raising the stakes of those needs. On one hand there’s the reality that a reduced-sized military will need to increase its situational awareness capabilities, and that increases in collecting, sharing and displaying of information feeds into that trend. And with the shift to an Asia-Pacific defense strategy, the area to be covered is large and complex making efficient information sharing all the more vital. The “sharing” portion of that demands directly on communications and networking infrastructure in the military. This feeds into the ongoing transformation towards network-centric operations.

COTS Journal | October 2014

11


SPECIAL FEATURE

Figure 1 Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) provides jam-resistant communications that are resilient against enemy forces. A single AEHF satellite provides greater capacity than its compatible legacy fivesatellite Milstar system (artists rending).

The technologies involved in these efforts enable a growing array of capabilities enabled by an interconnected network of sensors, shooters, command, control and intelligence. The focus is on joint architectures and roadmaps for integrating joint airborne networking capabilities with the evolving ground, maritime and space networks. It encompasses the development of technologies like gateways, waveforms, network management and information assurance. Defense communications technologies such as tactical radios and military satellite and networkcentric communications are the key technologies driving this transition. Delivering the compute power for those platforms are next generation embedded solutions in the form of single board computers, box-level systems and special-function subsystems. Together they’re being used to craft compute-intensive radio and network nodes—each one designed for particular environments and warfighting platforms.

Satellite Comms Advances Efforts to build sophisticated satellitebased military communications and networking capabilities have been continuous over the past several years. Such programs typically entail groups of satellites, many already launched and operating. Generally speaking, the first two satellites of a new sys12

COTS Journal | October 2014

tem are purchased with Research, Development, Test & Evaluation (RDT&E) funding while the rest of the satellites are purchased with procurement funding. The Air Force is continuing approaches to maximize efficient satellite and launch vehicle acquisitions. These approaches include using block buys and fixed-price contracting to stabilize requirements, and promoting a stable RDT&E investment for evolutionary growth. Major program underway include Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF)-5, AEHF-6, Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO)-5 and GEO6, the Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) and the Wideband Global Satellite Communications (SATCOM) (WGS) system.

Reliable AEHF Network For its part, the Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) provides the most secure communications satellite system used by the U.S. government. Its jam-resistant communications are resilient against enemy forces, including nuclear attack, and a single AEHF satellite provides greater capacity than its compatible legacy five-satellite Milstar system (Figure 1). AEHF’s five-fold increase in data rates speed up protected communications, such as real-time video, battlefield maps and targeting data. The AEHF program is moving forward and integration of the fourth AEHF began earlier this year. The propulsion core manufactured by Lockheed Martin and payload produced by Northrop Grumman were both delivered significantly ahead of baseline schedule. AEHF-4, expected to launch in 2017, will enable the constellation to reach full operational capability. Lockheed Martin is under contract to deliver six AEHF satellites and the mission control segment. Users are testing AEHF-1, AEHF-2 and AEHF-3 on orbit, and the fourth satellite will enable the system to reach full operational capability. The fifth and sixth satellites will add to the capacity of the operational system and are being assembled at Lockheed Martin. In a key milestone, earlier this year the third Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite began transmitting using its protected communications payload, joining two other satellites undergoing system test in orbit with a suite of user terminals.


SPECIAL FEATURE

Figure 2 General Dynamics C4 Systems successfully demonstrated that the AN/PRC-155 two-channel Manpack radios closed a 2,000-mile communications gap between Arizona and Massachusetts.

MUOS: as Easy as Cell Phone Call Another key satellite system is the U.S. Navy’s Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) system. It is a next-generation narrowband tactical satellite communications system designed to significantly improve ground-to-satellite-to-ground communications for all U.S. military and government personnel located anywhere on Earth. Using a ten-digit phone number similar in function to those used by civilians with smartphones, the MUOS satellite communications network will provide a 16-fold increase in transmission throughput over the current Ultra High Frequency (UHF) satellite system. Lockheed Martin is the prime contractor on the MUOS program. This summer General Dynamics C4 Systems successfully demonstrated that the AN/PRC-155 two-channel Manpack radios closed a 2,000-mile communications gap between Phoenix, Ariz., and a second set of users in Taunton, Mass. The successful 2,000mile transmission of the PRC-155 Manpack radio channels bridged the Line of Sight Rifleman Radio and Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS) radio communications to orbiting Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellites. The demo showed that dismounted Soldiers, separated by thousands of miles, can use the PRC154A Rifleman handheld radios and connect through PRC-155 Manpack radios at the platoon level and below (Figure 2). Basically soldiers can talk to another and share data with the ease of that civilians use their cell phones.

Wideband Comms in Space For wideband networking, the DoD is developing the Wideband Global Satellite

Communications (SATCOM) (WGS) system—planned to consist of an eight satellite constellation in geosynchronous orbit providing worldwide communication coverage for tactical and fixed users. Dual-frequency WGS satellites augment, then replace the Defense Satellite Communications System (DSCS) Xband frequency service and augments the oneway Global Broadcast Service (GBS) Ka-band frequency capabilities. Additionally, the WGS

provides a new high capacity two-way Kaband frequency service. Each satellite features the following capabilities: X-band: 8 transmit/ receive spot-beams via steerable phased-array antennas; one Earth coverage beam and Kaband: 10 gimbaled dish antennas. In the summer of 2013 the sixth Boeing WGS was launched to orbit boosting communications capabilities for the U.S. military and its allies. Four additional WGS satellites

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COTS Journal | October 2014

13


A TQMa335x module with a TI AM335x can save you design time and money

SPECIAL FEATURE

Wideband Global SATCOM (WGS) Payload 8 beam Rx Phased Array

X/IF Downconvert

EC horn

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IF/Ka Upconvert

Are the smallest in the industry, without compromising quality and reliability Bring out all the processor signals to the Tyco connectors Can reduce development time by as much as 12 months

The TQMa335x Module comes with a TI AM335x (ARM® Cortex™-A8), and supports Linux and QNX operating systems. The full-function STKa3359-AA Starter Kit is an easy and inexpensive way to test and evaluate the TQMa335x module.

Legend: ACA = Area Coverage Antenna EC = Earth Coverage Antenna NCA = Narrow Coverage Antenna LNA = Low Noise Amplifier Rx = Receive Tx = Transmit

In-band commands S-band commands

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Ka-band

2/3/14 3:57 PM

T&C transponder

SV TLM

SV CMDS

X-band TLM Ka-band TLM S-band TLM (omni antennas)

Figure 3 The WGS payload can filter and route 4.875 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth. Depending on the mix of ground terminals, data rates and modulation schemes employed, each satellite can support data transmission rates ranging from 2.1 Gbps to more than 3.6 Gbps.

are in production in El Segundo under the program’s Block II follow-on contract. WGS-8 and beyond will include an upgraded digital channelizer, which will increase the satellite’s bandwidth by more than 90 percent (Figure 3). In a test Boeing successfully sent a governmentdeveloped, protected signal through the sixth Wideband Global SATCOM (WGS-6) satellite. Engineers confirmed that the signal met all targets for accuracy and strength. The demonstration follows a successful transmission of data over the ViaSat-1 commercial satellite, showing that the technology offers an affordable option for enhancing anti-jam communications using existing commercial and U.S. government satellites and terminals. The signal was sent using a commercial modem that ViaSat modified with anti-jamming features.

Ground-based Communications

Journal TQMa335x 14 1-3 PageCOTS Ad.indd 1

8 NCAs 2 ACAs

TQ embedded modules: ■

X-band

EC horn

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Getting back to the Earth-bound side of military communications, the major programs here include JTRS and WIN-T. The JTRS Program of Record(s) was transitioned to a Military Department-management program in 2013. The former Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS) was a joint Department of Defense (DoD) effort to develop, produce,

integrate, test and field a family of softwaredefined, secure, multichannel, digital radios that are be interoperable with existing radios and increase communication and networking capabilities for mobile and fixed sites. The program encompassed ground, airborne, vehicular, maritime and small form fit variants of the radio hardware; 15 waveforms for porting into the JTRS hardware; and network management applications. Now under the general category of Tactical Networking Radio Systems, FY 2015 budget funds include the Army’s Low Rate Initial Production of the Handheld, Manpack and Small Form Fit (HMS) Non-Developmental Item hardware and software, and the qualification and operational testing and sustainment of fielded radios and certified waveforms. The budget request funds the development efforts associated with Army waveforms and Joint Enterprise Network Manager (JENM), and the Small Airborne Link-16 Terminal (SALT) intended for fielding to the AH-64 Apache. Funds continue operational testing, platform integration and initial sustainment support for the Mid-Tier Networking Vehicular Radio (MNVR) program.


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SPECIAL FEATURE

WIN-T Makes Production Advances On the vehicle side of comms and networking, The Army’s Warfighter Information Network-Tactical (WIN-T) forms the centerpiece for the Army’s high-speed, high-capability backbone communications network, linking Warfighters in the battlefield with the Global Information Grid. The network is intended to provide command, control, communications, computers, intelligence,

surveillance and reconnaissance. The system is developed as a network for reliable, secure and seamless video, data, imagery and voice services for the warfighters in the theater to enable decisive combat actions. The WIN-T program development consists of four increments. Increment 1 (Inc 1) provides “networking at the halt” by upgrading the Joint Network Node (JNN) satellite capability to access the Ka-band defense

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COTS Journal | October 2014

Wideband Global Satellite (WGS). Increment 2 (Inc 2) provides networking on-the-move and delivers the network to the company level. Increment 3 (Inc 3) provides Integrated Network Operations development. Increment 4 (Inc 4) provides protected satellite communications on-the-move. A lot of deployment and development activity is planned for WIN-T in FY 2015. The budget funds the upgrade of 81 WIN-T Inc 1 units with Modification kits to enhance interoperability with units fielded with WINT Inc 2. Also funded is the procurement of WIN-T Inc 2 for one Brigade Combat Team and one Division. The Army will continue fielding and support for previously procured Low Rate Initial Production equipment. Support is planned for Development Testing that leads to a Follow-on Test and Evaluation in 1st quarter FY 2015. The Budget Request also funds development of Network Operations software (Build 4) as part of WIN-T Inc 3. Integration will be supported for 179 Modification kits for the AN/TRC-190 line of sight radio systems. The plan is to also procure and field Tactical NetOps Management Systems to 48 non-WINT units, along with program management support for Single Shelter Switch (SSS), HighCapability Line of Sight, Battlefield VideoTeleconferencing Center, and Troposcatter Communications systems upgrades. Boeing Integrated Defense Systems St. Louis, MO (314) 232-0232 www.boeing.com General Dynamics C4 Systems Scottsdale, AZ. (480) 441-3033 www.gdc4s.com Lockheed Martin Bethesda, MD (301) 897-6000 www.lockheedmartin.com


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SPECIAL FEATURE Communications and Networking for a Net-centric Military

Meeting Holdup Requirements in Mil-Aero Power Systems Meeting power system holdup requirements can be challenging. Factors such as overall power architecture, placement of storage components and voltage levels must all be taken into consideration. Dave Berry, Principal Applications Engineer, Vicor

18

COTS Journal | October 2014

Regulated 36 VDC bus

Regulated Output

12 VDC @ 8 A

Source 18 – 36 VDC

1a. Brick Converter

12 VDC @ 8 A

1b. Factorized Power Architecture

Regulated Output 36 VDC

Current Multiplier

Regulated 54 VDC bus

Source 18 – 36 VDC

Current Multiplier

Source 18 – 36 VDC

Regulator

Regulated Output

Regulator

M

any power systems need to continue operating even when there is a momentary loss of the input power. In aircraft applications, for example, a momentary loss of power can occur when switching from aircraft power to ground power, whilst other applications can see a loss of power when switching from AC line power to battery backup. The length of time that a power system can operate in regulation after loss of input power is known as the power system’s hold-up time, which is a critical metric for many applications. The duration of the power loss can vary depending on the application: MILSTD-704 lists the duration of power loss as 50 milliseconds and other standards such as DO-160 have power loss durations of up to 200 milliseconds. Typically, the hold-up time is achieved by adding localized energy storage to the system. Capacitance is often used as the local energy storage when power loss is of a short duration and occurs frequently, but meeting the hold-up requirements can be challenging when the power system is in an application where space and weight are critical. Several factors must be taken into account when designing a power system that will operate during input power interruptions: the designer must consider the

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Figure 1 DC-DC power architectures can be implemented in different ways. 1a shows a Brick converter. 1b shows the Factorized Power Architecture (FPA) and 1c shows that combines a Pre-Regulator Module (PRM) to provide a non-isolated, regulated bus with a Voltage Transformation Module (VTM). 1c shows a combination of the FPA architecture with the addition of PoL regulators to address multiple outputs

overall power architecture, the placement of the energy storage components within the architecture and the voltage at which energy is stored.

Power Architecture There are several DC-DC power architectures that can be implemented when designing a system, with typical examples

shown in Figure 1. A DC-DC power system provides three basic functions: voltage regulation from a varying source; voltage conversion either from a higher voltage to a lower voltage or lower voltage to a higher voltage; and galvanic isolation from the DC input to the DC output. The popular Brick converter, where all three functions are performed in a single package, is shown


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SPECIAL FEATURE

Regulated 36 VDC bus Regulated Output

Source 18 – 36 VDC

Current Multiplier

Regulator

U1

12 VDC @ 8 A

Bulk Hold-up Capacitor

2a. Bulk capacitance switched to the input

U1

Regulated Output 36 VDC

Picor Cool-Power DC-DC Converter

5 VDC @ 10 A

Picor Cool-Power DC-DC Converter

3.3 VDC @ 15 A

Current Multiplier

Source 18 – 36 VDC

Regulator

Regulated 54 VDC bus

Bulk Hold-up Capacitor

2b. Bulk converters regulate down to 8 VDC input Figure 2 Figure 2a shows the PRM/VTM configured to address hold-up requirements. In 2b the buck regulators can have an input voltage range of 8 VDC to 36 VDC.

in Figure 1a, while Figure 1b shows the Factorized Power Architecture (FPA) that combines a Pre-Regulator Module (PRM) to provide a non-isolated, regulated bus 20

COTS Journal | October 2014

with a Voltage Transformation Module (VTM). The VTM provides an isolated fixedratio voltage transformer function, for

example, if the input is a regulated 36 VDC and the VTM’s ratio is 1/3, the output will be an isolated and regulated 12 VDC. Figure 1c shows a combination of the FPA


SPECIAL FEATURE

Regulated 48 VDC bus

C3

C2 Current Multiplier

Regulator

C1 Source 18 – 36 VDC

Regulated Output 32 VDC

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Figure 3 This design takes take advantage of the high capacitance density of the double layered capacitor.

architecture with the addition of non-isolated point-of-load regulators to address multiple outputs. The DC source voltage typically varies with a ratio of maximum to minimum ratio of 2 to 4. A system with a maximum input of 36 VDC could have a minimum input of 18 VDC, thus the maximum to minimum ratio is 2. The output voltage of the system often must be regulated within a 1-2% tolerance, so a voltage set point of 12 VDC must only vary from 11.88 VDC to 12.12 VDC if the required tolerance is 1 percent. All three architectures in Figure 1 will maintain regulation of the output voltage over the full input voltage range. If the DC source drops out, the input to the system will begin to drop, only being held up by the source impedance capacitance, which is negligible compared to what is needed for hold-up. The system will regulate the output voltage until the input voltage falls below the operating range of the system. Having a regulated voltage bus in the power architecture gives the designer a fixed voltage that can be incorporated into the hold-up circuit and, if this voltage is higher than the input and

output voltage, it allows for more flexibility in creating the initial V1 voltage across the hold-up capacitor. The regulated voltage can be easily decreased or used as the hold-up circuit voltage.

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Energy Storage Placement Adding bulk hold-up capacitance at the source is challenging because the voltage level at the time of dropout isn’t always known. Also, as the source voltage at the time of dropout approaches the minimum input voltage to the power system, the amount of hold-up capacitance to supply the power needed can become very large. If the system input range is 18 to 36 VDC and the source drops out at 19 VDC, the holdup capacitor has to provide energy from an initial voltage of 19 VDC down to 18 VDC. The hold-up capacitor can become very large, in some cases too large for the power system size allotment. One approach is to use separate modules that divert energy from the source voltage and charge bulk capacitance to the voltage maximum of the power system. This module then switches the capacitance to the input of the converter once the source

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SPECIAL FEATURE

voltage falls to a predetermined level, maximizing the difference between V1 and V2. In Figure 1a, the module would be placed at the input of the brick converter. Adding bulk capacitance to the output of the power system can also be challenging, because as the source voltage drops out the energy conversion of the system stops and the output begins to fall. The tolerance of the output voltage as mentioned

earlier is typically 1 to 2 percent, so V1 will be close to V2. Placing bulk capacitance at the output can result in capacitance values that may also be too large for the system.

A Variety of Options Placing the bulk hold-up capacitance at the input side of the regulating device in the power architecture and storing energy at a known voltage close to the maximum

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COTS Journal | October 2014

voltage of the regulating device provides good system performance when designing for hold-up requirements. The known voltage will allow the designer to calculate the amount of capacitance needed for the hold-up time, and storing energy at the maximum voltage will minimize the amount of capacitance needed. In that configuration it is best to have a regulating device that has a wide input operating range as the device will regulated down to its minimum operating range. In Figure 1b the bulk capacitance can be charged from the output voltage of the PRM to a known voltage level and then switched to the input side of the PRM once the input voltage drops to a predetermined level. The circuitry needed to switch the capacitor to the input side can be relatively simple since the PRM is non-isolated. When designing the switching circuit, it is important to note that the hold-up capacitors will have an initial voltage greater than the source voltage. The hold-up capacitance usually isn’t switched in until the input source falls to a predetermined level which is usually close to the low line limit of the system. In this case, the circuit will switch a capacitor at a higher voltage onto a capacitor at a lower voltage so the current through the switch has to be controlled to ensure the switch’s ratings are not exceeded. Figure 2a shows the PRM/VTM configured to address hold-up requirements. The bulk hold-up capacitance is trickle charged through a current limiting device, such as a resistor, to the regulated output voltage of the PRM. Once the source voltage falls to a predetermined level the bulk capacitance can be switched to the input of the PRM. In this configuration the current through the switch must be controlled to ensure it remains below the switch’s maximum current rating. In the power architecture shown in Figure 2b, the buck regulators can have an input voltage range of 8 VDC to 36 VDC and deliver 50 watts of power. Storing energy at the regulators’ input at 36 VDC will allow the device to regulate the output until the capacitor voltage reaches 8 VDC. Once the capacitor voltage reaches 8 VDC, the regulator’s input has to begin to rise to maintain regulation. However, since the VTM has a fixed voltage ratio and has a fast dy-


SPECIAL FEATURE

namic response, the hold-up capacitor can be moved to the VTM’s input, allowing energy to be stored at a higher voltage. When the input source drops out, the hold-up capacitors will gradually begin to deliver energy as the output of the PRM drops below a diode drop of its regulating voltage. When the source voltage returns, the PRM will take over delivering the system power.

Energy Storage Voltage After the architecture and placement of the energy storage is selected the designer must then decide on the voltage at which the hold-up energy is stored. Once the source voltage goes away, the system will draw energy from the hold-up capacitors that will initially be charged to a predetermined voltage. Ideally this voltage should be near the maximum voltage of the regulating device to provide maximum hold-up time from the least amount of capacitance. In many applications, system space is at a premium and having a power system that is as small as possible allows for other desirable system features, so it is best to design for the least amount of capacitance necessary. The energy stored in a capacitor is: Energy = ½ CV2 . C is the capacitance value and V is the capacitance voltage. Choosing to store energy at the largest possible value of V will result in the smallest value of C. If a system has an input voltage range of 8 VDC to 36 VDC and 75 Watts of input power is needed, it is best to store energy in the capacitor at 36 VDC so the system can draw power from the capacitor until it reaches 8 VDC. In this system, it is to the designer’s advantage to store energy at high voltage, and have a regulator with a wide input range, to minimize the requirement for capacitance.

device. One method is to use a bi-directional converter that can process energy in the forward and reverse direction. The bi-directional converter can use the regulated voltage in the system to up-convert to a higher voltage and charge the energy storage capacitor. When the source voltage drops out, the converter discharges the capacitor into the regulating device, providing the necessary hold-up time.

If the designer decides to take advantage of the high capacitance density of the double layered capacitor, which could be hundreds of Farads, the bi-directional converter can use the regulated voltage to convert energy to the lower voltage so when the source drops out, the energy can be up-converted to the input of the regulating device. Figures 3 and 4 show such a configuration and the laboratory results

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Design Flexibility Systems can be designed to store energy at much higher ( for example 380 VDC) or lower ( for example 2 VDC) voltages. The low voltage energy storage systems make use of double-layered capacitors that have a higher capacitance density than regular electrolytic capacitors. The challenge in storing energy at higher or lower voltages is getting the energy into the capacitor and then getting it out to the regulating

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COTS Journal | October 2014

23


SPECIAL FEATURE

of storing energy at 2 Volts at 400 Farads. The energy storage section of the configuration uses a double-layered capacitor and a bi-directional converter that has a combined board area of roughly 3 square inches, enabling the volume of the solution to be approximately 5 cubic inches. With a load of 60 Watts the source dropout time is 2 seconds, surpassing the requirements of MIL-STD-704 and DO-160 at this power level, using an approach that can be scaled for higher power levels. Vicor Andover, MA. (978) 470-2900 www.vicorpower.com

Figure 4 This graph shows the laboratory results of storing energy at 2 Volts at 400 Farads using the configuration in Figure 3.

Add processing capability to your Sensors Small Form Factor: Remote Interface Unit CES RIU Rugged PCOTS offers the capability to acquire/process a typical set of Aircraft Digital/Analog signals which are then exchanged with a host remote Airborne Mission Computer over Classical Avionic Interfaces. Operating in standalone mode, RIU is the ideal solution for Health Ope Monitoring, Sensor Acquisition or Data Concentrator in I/O distributed avionic systems. Modular, Qualified and Safety Certifiable (DAL), RIU can be easily adapted to your specific needs. Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, CES - Creative Electronic Systems SA has been designing and manufacturing complex high-performance avionic, defense and communication boards, subsystems and complete systems for thirty years (such as ground and flight test computers, ground station subsystems, radar subsystems, mission computers, DAL A certified computers, video platforms, as well as test and support equipment). CES is involved in the most advanced aerospace and defense programs throughout Europe and the US, with a world wide sales presence.

For more information: www.ces.ch 24

COTS Journal | October 2014


TECH RECON Rugged Storage Strategies: From RAID to SSDs

Rugged Storage Solutions Evolve for Next-Gen Needs As rugged storage systems push both capacity and performance barriers they’re also offering conversion features to accommodate legacy military storage interfaces. Suppliers are meeting these demands with a variety of SSDs and RAID systems. Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

T

here’s no doubt that military data storage has become more of a mission-critical function than ever. Driving that are the highbandwidth sensor platforms on UAVs, satellites and other system bringing in a deluge of data. Being tasked to manage and store massive amounts of data are memory arrays comprised of RAID module, rotating disks, SSD and sophisticated interfaces. There are three main trends in the past twelve months for rugged storage. One is toward higher-capacity, higherperformance, external storage boxes or subsystems. These tend to be physically much large and heavy, but with densities that once require an entire room of disk arrays. Meanwhile flash-based Solid State Drive (SSD) technology—combined with optimized storage controller architectures—has fueled the development of embedded storage blades that provide high levels of consistent performance, reliability and capacity. And finally, as new storage media technologies and storage interface protocols push older ones aside, legacy military systems face a problem of compatibility. Vendors are solving these challenges with robust conversion features that let systems bridge to Fibre Channel and other older interfaces. 26

COTS Journal | October 2014

Figure 1 The Fusion-Powered Flash Storage Array (FSA) product line combines Fusion ioScale flash memory products with four 128 Gbit/s OSS PCIe 3.0 server link. This creates a 100 Terabyte network attached flash array that can reach 40 Gbyte/s throughput and over 8 million IOPS.

100 Terabyte Network An example product pushing performance barriers is One Stop Systems’ Fusion-Powered Flash Storage Array (FSA) product line. Fusion ioScale flash memory products, coupled with four 128 Gbit/s OSS PCIe 3.0 server links in the FSA, provides the extreme performance. Uniting these technologies creates a 100 Terabyte network attached flash array that can reach 40 Gbyte/s

throughput and over 8 million IOPS (Figure 1). At an overall height of 3U and 24” deep, the 19” rackmount FSA packs up to 32 Fusion ioScale products into four individually removable sleds. The sleds and enclosure are made of lightweight, rugged alloys with ample redundant power and filtered air-cooling optimized to the installation environment. The small footprint, removable sleds and light weight allow easy one-person installation in data centers, airborne ISR platforms, mobile shelters and portable transit cases. Another solution aimed at high-capacity needs is the CNS4 Compact Network Storage subsystem from Curtiss-Wright. This conduction-cooled, high-performance network file server (NFS) offers scalable storage, flexible IO, and encryption options (Figure 2). This storage solution was designed for size, weight and power (SWaP) constrained military applications that require cryptography to ensure the integrity of critical “data-at-rest” in demanding military environments such as those endured by transports, helicopters, UAVs and mobile radar systems. Able to support up to 8 Terabytes of Type 1 encrypted storage, CNS4 provides Ethernet connectivity for maximum network-agility. It also supports a wide variety of industry standard protocols, including CIFS, NFS, HTTP, FTP, and PXE, making it ideal for sharing critical data in network


TECH RECON

eight SATA III ports and over 2 Terabytes of onboard capacity in a single 3U VPX slot. The Model 5335/6 is seen as a PCIe Gen2 x 8 connection to the host as it provides the link to a storage array where capacities exceed 8 TB across four slots and where data bandwidth exceeds 1 Gbytes/s. With RAID 0/1/5/10 support, the storage array system can be configured to maximize bandwidth or provide data redundancy for critical applications. The on-

board controller provides an additional six SATA III backplane ports for building a high performance, high capacity storage array using Elma’s 553x family of dual-drive storage carriers across four total slots. Also with a board-level offering is Vadatech with its upgraded line of AMC Storage Modules that offer higher transfer rate, RAID and Host Bus Adapter options. The first in the line of upgraded storage AMCs is the AMC626

Figure 2 Able to support up to 8 Terabytes of Type 1 encrypted storage, CNS4 supports a wide variety of industry standard protocols, including CIFS, NFS, HTTP, FTP, and PXE.

centric architectures. The modular CNS4 supports a variety of encryption levels and can be configured with up to four CurtissWright Flash Storage Modules (FSM-C) in a fully rugged, conduction-cooled ATR chassis, doubling the storage capacity available with the original CNS.

Board-Level Storage Advances in the SSD technology means that entire storage system can reside on slotcard boards. Exemplifying this trend is the Model 5335/6, an expansion to Elma Electronic’s 533x 3U VPX storage family (Figure 3). The system provides a high speed controller and storage module that supports up to

Figure 3 The 533x 3U VPX storage family products provide a high speed controller and storage module that supports up to eight SATA III ports and over 2 Terabytes of onboard capacity in a single 3U VPX slot.

COTS Journal | October 2014

27


TECH RECON

(Figure 4). The module meets the AMC.1 specifications for use in MicroTCA and AdvancedTCA systems. It comes in the single module, mid-size and holds a 2.5 inch drive for SATA III at a 6 Gbps transfer rate or SAS-3 for a 12 Gbps transfer rate. The AMC626 has a storage capacity of 900 Gbytes per disk and includes a Host Bus Adapter (HBA). The HBA allows the storage data to transfer across the fat pipe fabric, expanding from 2 dedicated

SAS/SATA ports to x8 lanes across PCIe Gen 3. The result is up to four times the data transfer rate across the backplane. The storage modules provide RAID 0, 1, 1E and 10 options.

Support for Legacy Interfaces The long development and deployment cycles of the defense industry mean that the storage interface products used by main-

Figure 4 The AMC626 module meets the AMC.1 specifications for use in MicroTCA and AdvancedTCA systems. It comes in the single module, mid-size and holds a 2.5 inch drive for SATA III at a 6 Gbps transfer rate or SAS-3 for a 12 Gbps transfer rate.

stream commercial markets quickly outpace those used in military systems. Rugged storage vendors help smooth this gap by providing ways to remain compatible. An example is Phoenix International Systems’ latest RAID controller technology for its RPC24 4004 Series Drive Magazine-based, rugged storage solution (Figure 5). The RPC 4004 Series is available in a variety of configurations for 2.5-inch SSDs and 2.5-inch HDDs. Each RPC24 converged interface storage array includes two four-port controllers and can be easily configured in the field with eight 16 Gbit Fibre Channel ports, eight 10 Gbit iSCSI ports, or a combination of four 16 Gbit Fibre Channel and four 10 Gbit iSCSI ports. These storage arrays are fully backward-compatible with 8 Gbit / 4 Gbit Fibre Channel and 1 Gbit

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Figure 5. Each RPC24 converged interface storage array includes two fourport controllers and can be easily configured in the field with eight 16 Gbit Fibre Channel ports, eight 10 Gbit iSCSI ports, or a combination of four 16 Gbit Fibre Channel and four 10 Gbit iSCSI ports.

28

COTS Journal | October 2014


TECH RECON

iSCSI networking solutions such as switches and host bus adapters. The RPC24 4004 12 Gbit SAS models are fully backward-compatible with 6 Gbit SAS investments. Taking a different configuration approach, Mountain Secure Systems (MSS) can extend the life of legacy systems that use Fibre Channel or SCSI interfaces with its drop-in replacement conversion sled. The conversion sled mimics a 3.5” Fibre Channel or SCSI (50, 68 and 80-pin) HD or SSD by integrating a standard, commercially-available 2.5” SATA HD or SSD into a 3.5” standard form factor package (Figure 6). Almost any drive can be selected to meet program requirements including considerations of HD vs. SSD, capacity, pricepoint, environment, speed, endurance, and Single Level Cell (SLC) vs. Multi-Level Cell (MLC) This convenient solution reduces the effort of locating replacement end-of-life (EOL) drives, which may or may not be available, and helps avoid the high cost of redesigning and re-qualifying the architecture of the system to utilize modern interfaces. In addition, MSS conversion sleds incorporate an electrical barrier that prevents anything from shorting against the PCBA or HD/SSD. PCBAs are conformal coated to withstand moisture, sand, dust and so on.

Figure 6 This system employs a conversion sled that mimics a 3.5” Fibre Channel or SCSI hard disk or SSD by integrating a standard, commerciallyavailable 2.5” SATA HD or SSD into a 3.5” standard form factor package.

Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions Ashburn, VA. (703) 779-7800. www.cwcdefense.com. Elma Electronic Systems Fremont, CA. (510) 656-3400 www.elma.com Mountain Secure Systems (303) 678-9898 Longmont, CO www.mountainsecuresystems.com One Stop Systems Escondido, CA. (877) 438-2724 www.onestopsystems.com Phoenix International Systems Orange, CA. (714) 283-4800 www.phenxint.com Vadatech Henderson, NV (702) 896-3337 www.vadatech.com Untitled-1 1

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COTS Journal | October 2014

29


SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT Upgrade Paths for Legacy VME and CompactPCI Systems

MicroTCA Provides Valid Upgrade Choice from VME and cPCI Parallel bus architectures like VME and CompactPCI lack some of the features and capabilities required for today’s advanced military systems. MicroTCA offers an upgrade path from those technologies. Justin Moll, Director of Marketing, Vadatech

M

any design engineers are looking to upgrade from their legacy parallel bus systems to a new architecture. Bus architectures such as legacy VME and CompactPCI simply do not have the bandwidth and performance for most embedded computing applications. They can still have a niche in specific designs where a busbased approach is acceptable and can tolerate less reliability and significantly lower throughput. However, most board vendors are investing their resources in the newer, more powerful architectures. MicroTCA was developed by the PICMG group, the same organization that created CompactPCI in the 1990’s—and many of the same companies that created VME in the VITA group. MicroTCA is a good fit for a wide range of applications because of its high performance-tosize ratio and versatility. The architecture has benefits over other form factors due to its robust system management, interprocessor bandwidth, and high-reliability features. In addition, the open-standard COTS architecture is typically more interoperable and lower cost than competing standards.

Driving Applications MicroTCA has some primary markets 30

COTS Journal | October 2014

MARKETS

PRODUCTS & FEATURES

MILITARY/AEROSPACE • RADAR/Jamming • Comm/Network • Security/LTE • SONAR • Video (EO) Processing • Recorders • Simulators • SDR

• High GSPS A/D & D/A Modules • Storage Modules • Video/Image Processing Modules • Graphics Modules • Networking/Processor Modules • RF Modules • DAQ Modules • FPGAs • Hardened Rugged Chassis Platforms

COMMUNICATIONS • LTE/4G/5G • Access/Edge • Networking • Network Security • Communications Test

• 100G/40G/10G Processing Modules • 100G/40G/10G FPGA Modules • Network Interface Modules • 40GbE Chassis Platforms • Packet Processor Modules

VIDEO • Video Processing • Media Transport

• Chassis Platforms with Rear I/O • Video Processing Modules • A/D & D/A Converters • High Speed Processing Modules • 40G MCH with Signal Conditioning • RF Modules

NETWORKING • Network Aggregator • Network Security

• Network Interface Modules • Storage Modules • Carrier Locators & Mgmt • Remote System Mgmt

Figure 1 Shown here are the military and military-relevant markets where MicroTCA is a good fit and some of the key products/features for those segments.


SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

MicroTCA Single Module

3U (133.35mm)

180 mm

75 mm

.8” typical

.8” typical

3U Eurocard

the 3U and 6U Eurocard form factor. A 3U (5.25 in. or 133.35mm) x 160mm or board takes up much more real-estate than a 75mm by 180mm MicroTCA single module. The same goes for the 6U size, it is 6U (10.50 in, or 266.70mm) x 160mm, much larger than 150mm x 180mm double module (Figure 2). The serial fabric approach of MicroTCA provides more inherent reliability. In the serial approach, if one serial

lane has a problem it does not affect the other traffic lanes. In a parallel bus approach (VME and CompactPCI), the data goes across a shared bus so if there is a problem, it can affect ALL of the traffic on the bus. As shown in the chart in Figure 3, the VME and CompactPCI architectures require a much larger form factor to provide far less bandwidth. MicroTCA has defined ports for vari-

160 mm

Figure 2 VME and cPCI both are based on the 3U and 6U Eurocard form factor. Even a 3U Eurocard board takes up much more real-estate than a 75mm by 180mm MicroTCA single module.

that drive the bleeding edge performance and innovation. These are mil/aero, communications, and high energy particle physics. In the mil/aero market, electronic warfare (EW) applications drive powerful DAQ, A/D & D/A converters. The Physics community needs the highest performance digitizers, with more channel options, and various RF boards for Low Level RF, beam position monitoring, and other requirements. In communications applications, the push for faster networking has driven 100G processors and FPGAs. MicroTCA also offers a wealth of high-end storage, graphics, I/O, FPGA and other boards which make the ecosystem rich and diverse. The result is a highly versatile, compact COTS architecture that is well-suited to a wide range of applications. The Figure 1 table shows the select military and military-relevant markets where MicroTCA is a good fit and some of the key products/features for those segments. Note that for simplicity sake, not every single market or product type is listed. Categories listed are ones that have relevance to the defense industry.

Eurocard vs MicroTCA VME and CompactPCI are based on

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COTS Journal | October 2014

31


SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

VME

VME64x

CompactPCI

MicroTCA

Board Height

133.25mm (3U) or 266.70mm (6U)

266.70mm (6U)

133.25mm (3U) or 266.70mm (6U)

75mm or 150mm

Board Depth

160mm

160mm

160mm

180mm

Pitch

0.8 inch

0.8 inch

0.8 inch

0.6 inch, 0.8 inch, & 1.2 inch

Bus/Fabric

Asynchronous parallel bus, 32 or 64-bit

Asynchronous parallel bus, 64-bit

Synchronous parallel bus, 32 or 64-bit

Serial fabric, 21 lanes at 10 Gbps each

Routing

Bus - single port of failure

Bus - single port of failure

Bus - single port of failure

Serial Fabric, Redundancy

Rugged

Yes

Yes

Yes, (concerns of bent pins)

MTCA.2, MCTA.3 specifications

Rear I/O

Yes

Yes

Yes

MTCA.4 specification

System/Health Management & Failover

No

No

No

Yes

Keying

Mechanical

Mechanical

Mechanical

Electronic

JTAG Integrated

No

No

No

Yes

Geographical Addressing

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Advanced Clocking with Redundancy

No

No

No

Yes

High Availability (99.99999% uptime)

No

No

No

Yes

Figure 3 Compared to MicroTCA, the 3U Eurocard (VME and cPCI) architectures require a much larger form factor to provide far less bandwidth.

ous signal types across the backplane to ensure interoperability. Serial fabrics such as PCIe (up to Gen 3), Ethernet (GbE to 40GbE), and Serial RapidIO (SRIO) can be routed across the fat pipes (ports 4-7) and extended fat pipe region (ports 8-11). There are also defined ports for Gbit Ethernet update channel (ports 0, 1) and SAS/SATA storage (ports 2, 3). 32

COTS Journal | October 2014

Finally, there are other ports from 12-15 and 17-20 (extended region for user defined I/O, clocking and so on), as well as other signals.

Less Known MicroTCA Feature MicroTCA has several features that are not widely understood, but highly valuable for many applications.

Hardware Platform Management (HPM) with E-Keying: Using IPMI-based HPM software, the MicroTCA Carrier Hub (MCH) goes through a specific process when booting. First, the MCH identifies all boards in the system (manufacturer, serial number, etc) and gets their power budget, including preventing an unknown/ wrong board from powering up.


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Combining a 384-core NVIDIA Kepler GPU with an Intel® Core™ i7 CPU on a single 6U VPX board with support for GPUDirect RDMA enables For white papers and application details, visit:

defense.ge-ip.com/gpgpu

© 2014 General Electric Company. All rights reserved. All other brands, names or trademarks are property of their respective owners.


SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

It will power up/ initialize the PSUs and fans, then turn on boards sequentially. If one board is eating up more power than its defined budget, the MCH has the ability to shut down that board and send a remote signal to be serviced. Redundancy/Failover: Redundant Power Modules (PMs) are mapped to the chassis power channels. In the event of PM failure the power to the chassis is not

interrupted. Cooling redundancy allows the chassis to operate with a single Cooling Unit (CU) and still meet the cooling requirement. The redundant MCHs provide management failover capability with a primary MCH managing the chassis. Carrier Locator: MicroTCA offers a carrier locator option which is particularly useful where multiple chassis are located a network. The locator identi-

Figure 4 The MicroTCA ecosystem is vast with hundreds of AMCs available in the market and dozens of standard chassis configurations based on a variety of MTCA profiles. fies the exact location of a chassis needing service. Imagine a remote location or data center with multiple chassis, the locator can help pinpoint the location, even in the dark. JTAG: The JTAG Switch Module ( JSM) allows dongles to be plugged for easy test and debug of all of the boards in the chassis. Since all slots/FRUs are managed and identified by the MCH, the JTAG allows the test and de-bug from one slot (instead of plugging to each individually). Further, de-bugging and software updates can be loaded via the JSM. There are also virtual JTAGs, where software and firmware updates can be done remotely. This is a significant benefit for applications where the physical chassis location is not easily accessible (satellite, vehicle/craft and so on).

Large COTS Ecosystem The MicroTCA ecosystem is vast with hundreds of AMCs available in the market and dozens of standard chassis configurations (Figure 4). This includes horizontal-mount, vertical-mount and low profile. MicroTCA also provides multiple ruggedization levels including MTCA.0 34

COTS Journal | October 2014


SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

perior in nearly every category. When it comes to performance density, versatility, reliability/high availability, and performance, MicroTCA is the best upgrade path from legacy VME and CompactPCI. As the specification was developed by many of the same people as the legacy architectures, the lessons learned were very valuable in creating MicroTCA. The result is a powerful, versatile architecture

Vadatech Henderson, NV (702) 896-3337 www.vadatech.com

The industry’s most trusted and widely used USB interfaces

Figure 5 An example AMC product is this MCH with 40G/PCIe Gen 3/SRIO Gen 2 plus IEEE1588/GPS/SyncE.

(Core specification), MTCA.1 (Rugged Air Cooled), MTCA.2 Hardened Air/Conduction Cooled Hybrid, MTCA.3 (Hardened Conduction Cooled) and MTCA.4 (With RTMs for Physics, other applications). The same AMCs can be used in all of these chassis types, including the hardened versions by adding clamshells to the standard modules. As MicroTCA is used in so many different markets, it is truly a COTS architecture. The resulting economies of scale help to keep costs significantly lower than competing high-performance architectures.

that suits a wide range of configurations. Vadatech offers the industry’s largest selection of MicroTCA products and the only complete ecosystem from chassis platforms, MCHs, JSMs, power modules, to over 250 AMCs.

Portable Avionics Databus Interfaces

Cutting Edge Performance As the MicroTCA architecture is also a key form factor of many Communications, MIL/Aero, and High Energy Physics applications, the push for cutting-edge design is prevalent. For example, there are currently solutions in the market for 40GbE (the specification is in draft). The industry’s first 100G line cards (via the front panel) were introduced by Vadatech in the MicroTCA form factor. Other products of interest include 72 core Tilera processor card, Multi-GSPS A/D and D/A converters, storage modules with SAS-3/ SATA III with host bus adapter and integrated RAID and MCH with 40G/PCIe Gen 3/SRIO Gen 2 plus IEEE1588/GPS/SyncE. When comparing MicroTCA to legacy architectures, the form factor is su-

A reliable USB interface from Astronics Ballard Technology does it all – databus test, analysis and simulation. Use it in the lab or in the field – it’s fully powered by a single USB port. Simply connect it to any available laptop, desktop or tablet PC and it’s ready to go. Add our CoPilot® interactive software for a complete easy-to-use solution.

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COTS Journal | October 2014

35


TECHNOLOGY FOCUS Tech Focus: Rugged Box Systems Roundup

Rugged Box Systems Evolve to More Complex Solutions Tasked to provide higher levels of sophistication, rugged box systems vendors are rolling out product offerings that are smaller, lighter and with faster—even HPEC—levels of functionality. Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

I

t’s clear that rugged box-level systems have become one of the most prominent product categories in the military embedded computing. It’s taken a place alongside single board computers as a cornerstone of the industry. It’s been a trying year dealing with today’s “new normal” of constrained budgets and vexing uncertainty about programs. On the demand side, military system developers continue to hunger for higher levels of system integration. That’s put rugged box-levels systems in the limelight for military decision makers. The product roundup in this section shows these systems can take a variety of forms. In the broadest terms they are defined as a set of embedded computing and I/O boards put together and delivered as a working system to provide a certain function, but they are usually intended to be used in a military customer’s larger system. Meanwhile, as more levels of integration are achieved, more of these box-level systems are used as the complete set of electronics and computing in several kinds space-constrained platforms. While the number of product offerings have grown in the last twelve months, a smaller set of vendors provided most of these new systems. A narrower group of the traditional box systems companies 36

COTS Journal | October 2014

Figure 1 The MAGIC1 box system combines Core i7 processing and an NVIDA GPU. The system will be used on the AW139 helicopter to collect date from a LIDAR system and display it to the cockpit.

had any new product offerings in the past year, while a handful of new ones joined the market. Three technology trends dominant the latest crop of rugged box systems. First, there’s a basic move toward smaller, lighter more compact systems. Second, there’s the concept of offering companion products where one system is made for development, while its companion counterpart is functionally identical but has a level of ruggedness suited for final deployment. And, finally, box-level systems are

evolving to so-called High Performance Embedded Computing (HPEC) solutions. While there are at least 7 different conflicting definitions of what HPEC is supposed to mean, the basic theme is this: to leverage technologies like VPX and PCIe to provide massive processing power for computeintensive systems. Such systems can meet immense throughput and processing requirements in space-constrained systems handling more than a teraflop of data. An example of today’s box-systems technology in use is GE Intelligent Platforms’ MAGIC1 Rugged Display Computer. In April GE announced that it had received orders from Agusta Westland of Italy for GE’s MAGIC1. The box system will be part of Agusta Westland’s OPLS (Obstacle Proximity LIDAR system) which the company will offer on helicopters destined for search and rescue (SAR) deployment. The OPLS is based on a set of laser sensors, the data from which are collected by GE’s MAGIC1 and displayed in the cockpit. OPLS, including the MAGIC1, was first installed in Agusta Westland’s AW139 helicopter, and the company plans to adapt the kit in order to be able to offer it on other helicopters used in SAR applications (Figure 1). The 3U VPX MAGIC1 Rugged Display Computer combines Intel Core i7 CPU technology with NVIDIA’s EXK107 GPU.


Why Should Researching SBCs Be More Difficult Than Car Shopping? Today’s systems combine an array of very complex elements from multiple manufactures. To assist in these complex architectures, ISS has built a simple tool that will source products from an array of companies for a side by side comparison and provide purchase support. INTELLIGENTSYSTEMSSOURCE.COM is a purchasing tool for Design Engineers looking for custom and off-the-shelf SBCs and system modules.

INTELLIGENTSYSTEMSSOURCE.COM


TECHNOLOGY FOCUS

Tech Focus: Rugged Box Systems Roundup

System Blends Data Acq, Signal Processing and Storage

Expandable Embedded PC Serves Up Atom E3845 SoC

Fanless Embedded Box PCs Powered by Core i7

4DSP’s CES720 (Compact Embedded System) is a stand-alone, small form factor embedded system designed to provide a complete and generic processing platform for data acquisition, signal processing and communication. The system is housed in an enclosure measuring five inches per side and weighing less than 1 kg. It features a low-power AMD G-Series Dual Core 1.0GHz Processor T40E coupled to a high-performance Xilinx Kintex-7 and FPGA Mezzanine Card (FMC – VITA 57.1). The Kintex-7 410T FPGA provides a flexible and powerful processing backbone for interfacing to the FMC site, CPU and external DDR3 SDRAM, with plenty of room left over for high-performance digital signal processing. 4DSP’s BSP (Board Support Package) and Stellar IP are available for the CES720. These tools allow designers to jump into development with modular reference designs that exercise the system’s capabilities and provide the high-level interfaces and driver support. Beside FMC, system I/O includes HDMI, USB, eSATA, Gigabit Ethernet and JTAG. PCI Express communication is enabled between processor and FPGA. Memory consists of 2 Gbytes of DDR3 SDRAM and 64 Gbyte SSD.

ADLINK Technology’s Matrix MXC2300 is a fanless expandable embedded computer equipped with the latest Intel Atom Quad-Core Processor E3845. Visual processing capabilities are provided by Intel Gen 7 HD graphic technology (Ivy Bridge GPU). In addition, built-in dualport isolated CAN bus with SJA1000 controller deliver bus arbitration and error detection with real-time data transmission, minimizing data loss and ensuring system reliability. The MXC-2300’s built-in dual-port isolated CAN bus accelerates inter-device communication, easily regulating function across multiple modules. Also provided are three PCI/PCIe expansion slots and one mini-PCIe socket along with one USB 3.0 and four 2.0 ports, four COM ports, and two Intel Gigabit Ethernet ports. The system has operating shock tolerance up to 50 G and extended operating range of -20 to 70 degrees C. In addition to employing HALT (Highly Accelerated Life Test) scientific testing methods to ensure maximum reliability and long-term availability, the MXC-2300 can achieve MTBF (mean time between failures) of 420,000 hours, making it indispensable for mission critical applications.

4DSP Austin, TX. (800) 816-1751 www.4dsp.com

ADLINK Technology San Jose, CA (408) 360-0200 www.adlinktech.com

Advantech has announced the new ARK-3500 and ARK-3510 series of fanless embedded box PCs. They are powered by 3rd generation Intel mobile QM77, and support up to a Core i7 quad core processor. ARK-3500 series boasts versatile expansions-2 PCI, PCIe x1, PCIe x4, MIOe module and 2 MiniPCIe to fulfill diverse applications. Complete storage options include 2 hard drives or SSD/ 2 mSATA/ Cfast, and there is also optional wireless communication Wi-Fi / 3G / GPS support. As for rugged design, ARK-35 series supports wide-range power input: 9~34V/ 12V DC, and wide operating temperature from -10° to 60°C with SSD. These new series provide complete EMC & Safety Certifications (CE/ FCC/ UL/ CCC/ CB/ BSMI). These ARK units support 2 x DDR3 / DDR3L SODIMM memory slots up to 16 Gbytes. With lockable connectors on power, DVI, HDMI, COM, DIO, HDD bays, and expansion slots, the reliable mechanical design of ARK-3500 and ARK-3510 can support 3G vibration and 50G shock during operation with SSD. Advantech’s SUSIAccess software provides a smart, easy, remote management API so users can monitor, configure, and control a large number of terminals with centralized, realtime maintenance capability.

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

38

COTS Journal | October 2014

Advantech Irvine, CA. (949) 420-2500. www.advantech.com


A48_COTS_A19.qxd 8/28/14 12:03 PM Page 1

TECHNOLOGY FOCUS | Tech Focus: Rugged Box Systems Roundup

Transformers & Inductors SURFACE MOUNT (and thru-hole)

Mission Computer Family Supports Safety Critical Standards

Core i7 Rugged Mission Computer Boasts Compact Size

CES’ Mission Computer is a fully configurable (sub)system based on CES’ Rugged COTS building blocks. It covers a wide range of airborne or ground based applications. Built with safety critical design constraints, the product has reached up to the highest Design Assurance Level (see DO-178 and/or DO-254). It is, therefore, the right choice when it comes to mission and safety critical solutions for the C4ISR market. With a long track of record, CES’ Mission Computer has been integrated in various applications such as UAV Payload Systems, ISR Subsystems, Tactical Mission Computers, Command & Control Computers and Ground Station Subsystems. Features of the system include SBCs, PMCs/XMCs, FPGAs, carriers, avionic interfaces, network interfaces, graphic and video interfaces, storage devices. Prequalified solutions meet DO-160, DO-178, DO-254, MIL-STD 810, MIL-STD 704 and MIL-STD 461. Long term obsolescence management support for the system meets the need of defense platform designs. Support is provided for multiple OSs including VxWorks, Integrity and Linux.

Curtiss-Wright Defense Solutions division has introduced the Parvus DuraCOR 80-41, the lightest, highest performance small form factor rugged mission computer that the company has released to-date. Powered by a multi-core 4th Gen Intel Core i7 (“Haswell”) processor, the system boasts 2x the processor cores (quad versus dual), 2x the memory capacity (16 Gbytes versus 8 Gbytes), adds builtin support for Mini PCIe I/O expansion modules, and uses high capacity mSATA SSDs to further improve its overall SWAP-C envelope. The DuraCOR 80-41 is a dual-use (EAR controlled) non-ITAR restricted product. Like other DuraCOR models, the DuraCOR 80-41 will be pre-qualified to MIL-STD environmental and EMI standards. This small form factor mission computer provides expansion via modular stackable PCIe104 and Mini PCI Express (PCIe) Cards to enhance flexibility for supporting application-specific I/O requirements such as high-speed I/O or graphics card expansion. The Mini PCIe format offers exceptional I/O flexibility and can be used to add optional avionics databus interfaces (MIL-STD-1553 / ARINC429) or other COM/ DIO/Analog/Network/Video modules. One of the Mini PCIe slots can alternatively support mSATA flash storage.

Creative Electronic Systems Geneva, Switzerland. +41 (0)22 884 51 00. www.ces.ch

Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions Ashburn, VA. (703) 779-7800. www.cwcdefense.com

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Delivery - Stock to one week

COTS Journal | October 2014

39


TECHNOLOGY FOCUS | Tech Focus: Rugged Box Systems Roundup

Intel Core i7-Based System Is Flight-Qualified Extreme Engineering Solutions has announced another flight-qualified Intel Core i7-based multiprocessor system. The XPand4208 includes two Intel Core i7-based 3U VPX modules, an XPm2120 VITA 62 3U VPX power supply, and two XPort6193 removable SSDs that allow for quick, tool-less insertion and extraction. The system utilizes an XChange3013 3U VPX Gigabit Ethernet switch mated with the XPedite5205 Cisco IOS-based router XMC to provide its backplane fabric and secure networking capabilities. This system also simplifies future upgrades and additional configurations with two 3U VPX expansion slots for additional I/O or processing capabilities and an open architecture based on the use of 3U OpenVPX (VITA

65)-compatible modules. The SWaP-optimized XPand4200 Series systems utilize a compact, lightweight and extremely rugged forced-air heat exchanger design to maximize high-temperature performance. They also integrate a dynamic fan controller, allowing them to run nearly silent in controlled environments. For this deployment, the XPand4208 LRU was qualified to comply with MIL-STD-810F and DO-160F environmental specifications for temperature, altitude, vibration, shock, humidity, sand and dust, waterproofness, magnetic effects, explosive atmosphere, fluid susceptibility, fungus resistance, and salt fog. It was also qualified for EMI compliance according to MIL-STD-461F for conducted, as well as radiated, emissions and susceptibility. Extreme Engineering Solutions Middleton, WI. (608) 833-1155 www.xes-inc.com

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

Visit our website to see our newest APPLICATION-READY TRAX-5 with Intel 速Quad-core

40

COTS Journal | October 2014

www.intelligentsystemssource.com


TECHNOLOGY FOCUS | Tech Focus: Rugged Box Systems Roundup

Rugged Platform Provides Integrated HPEC Solution

Rugged System Blends Secure Virtual Machines, Ethernet and RAID

Embedded Computer Marries Kintex-7 FPGA and FMC I/O

GE Intelligent Platforms’ CRS 48.5 High Performance Embedded Computing (HPEC) Rugged Subsystem is a complete, integrated, pre-tested, ready-to-run subsystem enabling faster development/ deployment at lower cost and risk, it uses the most advanced VITA 48.5 compliant air-flow through-cooling to allow the integration of up to eight quad core Intel Core i7 processing nodes. The subsystem features the GE DSP280 multiprocessor with two quad core Intel Core i7 processors. The DSP280 is capable of more than 260 gigaflops peak performance and delivers main memory bandwidth of up to 21 Gbytes/second per CPU node. The CRS 48.5 can be upgraded to take advantage of the even more powerful DSP281 multiprocessor which is based on 4th generation Intel Core i7 (‘Haswell’) technology. The subsystem takes advantage of GE’s switch fabric module (SFM) family such as the GBX460 fully managed 10 Gigabit Ethernet data plane switch or the IBX400 InfiniBand SFM for increased data plane bandwidth with lower latency. Sensor data input is supported via up to four 10 Gigabit BASE-SR fiber channels via the external connectors. For storage-intensive applications, up to 8 Terabytes of solid state drive memory is available. Thermal management is enhanced on the CRS 48.5 via its air-flow through-cooling capability which can handle up to 1,200 W.

General Micro Systems (GMS) provides the industry’s first conduction-cooled, fully ruggedized, Secure Virtual Machine (SVM) server with six hardware independent I/O modules. Designed to replace multiple workstations using virtual machine technology, Tarantula (SO302 4-in-1) incorporates an enterprise-level Layer 2 or Layer 3 intelligent switch for high-speed connectivity. Intel’s Xeon processor, the Ivy-BridgeEP, is the host CPU driver and features 10 physical cores each operating up to 2.4 GHz, with the ability to TurboBoost to 3.0 GHz. Support for hyperthreading expands its capability to 20 logical cores. Tarantula dynamically allocates these cores in real time as needed by each of up to six virtual machines and their individual application requirements. The host CPU supports one 4-lane PCIe XMC site, one 10 Gigabit Ethernet port, four USB 3.0 and two USB 2.0 ports with power, two serial ports with RS-232/422/485 buffers, full HD-Audio, and eight general purpose I/O lines. The CPU is loaded with up to 128 Gbytes of RAM. In addition to many standard and unique host system I/O features like USB 3.0, serial ports and XMC site, Tarantula incorporates one storage RAID controller and one Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). It is available in quantity starting at $28,000.

Innovative Integration has announced the ePC-K7, a user-customizable, turnkey embedded instrument that includes a full Windows/Linux PC and supports a wide assortment of ultimateperformance FMC modules. With its modular I/O, scalable performance and easy-to-use PC architecture, the ePC-K7 reduces time-to-market while providing real-time performance. Applications include embedded instrumentation, remote sensing, autonomous I/O, mobile instrumentation and distributed data acquisition. The system combines an industry-standard COM Express CPU Type 6 module with dual FMC I/O modules in a compact, stand-alone design. Included are a programmable Kintex-7 325T/410T FPGA and Spartan 6 FPGAs. This small form factor, 5 x 8 x 11-inch system features a conduction-cooled design using fins or cold-plate. The system is able to operate “headless”, booting from the SSD. The dual VITA 57 FMC IO module sites let users add anything from RF receivers to industrial control modules. Supports both Innovative and third-party FMC modules for private data channels, triggering and timing features. The I/O sites deliver greater than 3000 Mbytes/s to CPU memory. Integrated timing and triggering support for I/O includes GPS, IEEE1588 or IRIG -disciplined clock.

GE Intelligent Platforms Charlottesville, VA. (800) 368-2738 defense.ge-ip.com

General Micro Systems Rancho Cucamonga, CA. (909) 980-4863 www.gms4sbc.com

Innovative Integration Simi Valley, CA (805) 578-4260 www.innovative-dsp.com FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

COTS Journal | October 2014

41


TECHNOLOGY FOCUS | Tech Focus: Rugged Box Systems Roundup

COM Express-Based System Features Rich I/O Options

Ethernet-Based Subsystems Leverages OpenVPX Technology

Intelligent I/O System Embeds ARM Cortex-A9 Processor

Kontron’s next-generation COBALT offers a complete, rugged small form factor system that leverages the company’s hardened COM Express Computer-onModules (COMs) and optimizes the latest Intel x86 architecture. The Kontron COBALT provides additional tightlycoupled mezzanine features, a ruggedized compact carrier board and System Interface Board (SIB) that give customers increased I/O options to meet specific edge application requirements. Powering the Kontron COBALT base system is a 3rd generation Intel dual corebased COM Express Type 6 module that features ECC, rapid shutdown design, and 100% extended temp screening with the option of removable or fixed SSDs and/ or fixed mSATA storage. The carrier board design maximizes the system’s capabilities while minimizing its overall size and meeting higher temperature and shock and vibration conditions. The Kontron COBALT is a fanless, fully enclosed system that provides efficient thermal management in a small 5.5 x 8.5 x 3.5-inch (139.7 x 215.89 x 88.89 mm) form factor weighing less than 5.5 pounds (2.5 kg).

Mercury Systems has dramatically improved the affordability and processing power by leveraging Ethernet protocols for switched fabrics, cluster computing and sensor I/O used in sophisticated OpenVPX-based high performance embedded computing (HPEC) subsystems. The company’s Ensemble OpenVPX subsystems, combined with an Ethernet switched fabric, may be the ultimate open systems architecture (OSA). By using TCP/ IP and sockets, the de facto standard for networking and communications, the systems are affordable and well supported. The ubiquity of Ethernet means that users can take advantage of countless software applications, productivity tools, installed applications and support from multiple vendors. Programs scheduled to be re-competed or identified as a “must-win” will especially benefit from OpenVPX/Ethernet compute platforms that leverage commercial technology to enhance affordability, compress schedules and maximize performance and features. The system advances this winning combination by packaging, protecting and cooling Intel Xeon server-class processing and wideband interconnects to deliver peak performance and affordability.

North Atlantic Industries has expanded the functionality of its Nano Interface Unit (NIU1) to include embedded computing capability. The advanced NIU1A with added SoC dual ARM Cortex-A9 processor, delivers smaller size, lower power, higher bandwidth, shared memory and lower latency in a small package. The compact, nano-sized subsystem with unprecedented I/O capability connects to existing platform Ethernet networks, making data available to any system on the network. The Nano Interface Unit (NIU1A) easily adds sensor data acquisition, distribution and communication interfaces to mission computers without expensive chassis and backplane redesign, for use in military and aerospace embedded applications. Built on NAI’s Custom-On-Standard Architecture (COSA), the NIU1A offers a choice of more than 40 intelligent I/O and communications functions. These pre-existing, fully-tested functions can be selected quickly and easily to meet system requirements. Available functions include A/D, D/A, TTL, RTD, discrete I/O, differential transceiver, synchro/resolver, LVDT/RVDT measurement, simulation and excitation, strain gage, quad channel redundant BC/RT/MT MIL-STD-1553, high-speed sync/async RS232/422/423/485, ARINC 429/575 and CANBus.

Kontron Poway, CA. (888) 294-4558 www.kontron.com

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

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COTS Journal | October 2014

Mercury Systems Chelmsford, MA. (978) 967-1401 www.mrcy.com

North Atlantic Industries Bohemia, NY (631) 567-1100 www.naii.com


TECHNOLOGY FOCUS | Tech Focus: Rugged Box Systems Roundup

Rugged Box-Level System Has PC/104, Mini PCI Expansion

RTD Rugged Systems Meet Cisco’s Embedded Router

Small Form Factor System Features Core i7 Processor

Octagon Systems offers the MOBL-D2, a low-power, rugged computing platform that excels in demanding mobile applications where the cost of failure is unacceptably high. The MOBL-D2 incorporates the field-proven, Octagon Hedgehog power supply technology providing superior protection with noisy in unstable mobile applications. The versatility, reliability and processing power of the MOBL-D2 make it ideally suited for size, weight and power constrained applications. The total integrated thermal design provides fanless operation over a -30° to 70°C temperature range. The MOBL-D4 is exceeds shock and vibration specifications of MIL–STD–810F. Standard I/O includes Ethernet, USB, Serial, VGA with resolutions to 1280 x 1024 and digital I/O with protection. An onboard GPS is a 50 channel, fast lock, high sensitivity unit. Ignition switch input ensures smart shutdown of the OS. Internal card slots provide PC/104 and Mini PCI expansion.

The HiDAN HDC5915-5 from RTD Embedded Technologies is a 5-port Fast Ethernet router system based on the Cisco 5915 ruggedized embedded router. This system enables the deployment of Cisco Mobile Ready Net capabilities in mobile, air, ground and unmanned applications. RTD’s waterproof, milled aluminum packaging and cylindrical connectors create an ideal chassis for this advanced Cisco 5915 system. This compact system pairs the ruggedness of RTD products and enclosure technology with the robust quality and performance of Cisco’s 5915 Router. The HiDAN HDC5915-5 offers reliable operation in extreme temperatures of -40° to +85°C and under high shock and vibration conditions.

Themis Computer’s NanoPAK is a small form factor computer, the newest member of the Themis Tactical Systems product family. The NanoPAK i7 computer integrates an Intel 3rd generation Core i7 (Ivy Bridge) processor with flash storage in a small, light footprint that optimizes size, weight, power, and cooling. NanoPAK i7 computers are complete, stand-alone systems designed for unmanned vehicles, ground vehicles, man-wearable, shipboard, and other extreme environments, where space, weight, power, and cost (SWAP-C) are critical. The Intel Core i7 NanoPAK Small Form Factor Computer boasts a hardenedaluminum air-cooled chassis that ensures survivability in harsh environmental conditions. All standard PC interfaces are available. Additional interfaces include discrete data I/O lines. All I/O and power is connected through the 100 pin Micro D-Sub connector on the front of the module and two USB 3.0 connectors on the rear of the module. The system provides Linux or Microsoft Windows support. It can do local or Network PXE booting and includes up to 8 Gbytes of system memory.

Octagon Systems Westminster, CO (303) 430-1500 www.octagonsystems.com

RTD Embedded Technologies State College, PA (814) 234-8087 www.rtd.com

Themis Computer Fremont, CA. (510) 252-0870 www.themis.com

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

COTS Journal | October 2014

43


COTS

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

PRODUCTS

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

System Blends COM Express CPU, Ethernet and XMC I/O Innovative Integration has announced the ePC-Duo. It is a user-customizable, turnkey embedded instrument that includes a full Windows/Linux PC and supports a wide assortment of XMC modules. The ePC-Duo raises the bar by offering powerful solutions within the embedded instrumentation market as well as mobile instrumentation and distributed data acquisition. Up to four 4 Terabyte HDDs are provided for data logging. Dual XMC sites allow for I/O, user programmable Xilinx FPGA for I/O interfaces, triggering and timing control, USB ports. The system’s analog I/O ranges from complex 4 Gsample/s IF receivers down to 12-channel, 200 ksample/s servo controllers. Continuous data streaming can be done at up to 2,000 Mbytes/s using quad local SSDs or dual 10 GbE LAN. Optional, stand-alone, autonomous operation can be done with GPS or network -synchronized sampling. The system’s 8-36V DC-Only operation make it perfect for portable wireless surveillance, radar/lidar, high-speed data loggers or waveform generators. Integrated timing and triggering support is provided for IO includes optional GPS, IEEE-1588 or IRIG -disciplined clock. Innovative Integration, Simi Valley, CA. (805) 578-4260. www.innovative-dsp.com

ATCA Processor Blade Serves up Dual 12-core Xeon Processors ADLINK Technology has announced its newest ATCA carriergrade product, the aTCA-9710, which features the dual 12-core Intel Xeon processor E5-2600 v3 ( formerly codenamed “Haswell-EP”) paired with the Intel Communications Chipset 8920 series ( formerly codenamed “Grantley”). The aTCA-9710 offers 16 channels of DDR4-2133 VLP RDIMMS, enabling higher clock and data transfer rates than those seen in previous generation memory. The aTCA-9710 gains additional performance from the ADLINK PacketManager, a software suite that includes support for the Intel Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK), a set of libraries and drivers for improved packet processing on x86 platforms running Linux, as well as a management API for implementing network connections between server and client. ADLINK Technology, San Jose, CA. (408) 360-0200. www.adlinktech.com

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COTS PRODUCTS

Backplane Family Includes VME, VPX, VSX, Hybrid, cPCI and Power Supplies The Orbit Electronics Group has announced that its VMEVPX portal, www.vmevpx. com, provides 11 different COTS models in 6U and 3U form factors. Two to 21 slots are standard, and virtually any custom performance configuration can be provided. For example, Orbit VITA 67 VPX 3U highdensity backplanes are used for the latest embedded computing applications. The VITA 67 architecture enables coaxial/RF interconnects directly to the backplane and to the cards that interface the backplane. As with all Orbit VPX backplanes, the VITA 67 backplane enables the use of high-speed serial switch fabric technologies such as Ethernet PCI Express, Serial RapidIO and others. It can be produced in 3U, 6U, or virtually any other configuration needed. Features of the Orbit VITA 67 VPX backplane include: VITA 46.0 baseline; supports VITA 46.4 Full Mesh X4 PCI Express and VITA 46.10 with RTM connectors; 3U, 5-slot, full mesh configuration with 6U variants available; M3 Power Taps, PCB size 128.7 mm x 145.41 mm x 3.92 mm; 14 PCB Layers; 5 HP from slot to slot (25.4 mm); backplane connectors with MULTI-GIGRT-2J; flexible keying and alignment mechanism; JTAG connector on all slots; geographical address pins; battery backup option set by Jumper J106; VBAT external or connected to 3.3 AUX; power is VS1 = 12V, VS2 = 3.3V, VS3 = 5V; operating temperatures of -40° to +185°F (-40° to +85°C); and storage temperatures of -40° to +185°F (-40° to +85°C). More than 135 different standard and customized VMEVPX components, products and options can be seen at www. vmevpx.com. These include backplanes, system health monitors, components, air transport racks, rear transition modules, sensors and the industry-leading Behlman VPXtra and VME power supplies. All are easily sorted via this website’s advanced database, searchable by product type, form factors, interfaces, rack units, number of slots, series and more. VME-VPX, Orbit Electronics Group, Louisville, KY. (866) 319-8085. www.vmevpx.com

Amazingly compact and designed to run completely fanless, the Relio R2 is perfect for applications requiring high reliability, small footprint, scalable processing, and long product life cycle. Relio R2 systems offer: • Intel Dual-Core i7, i3 or Atom Processor • Dual Gigabit Ethernet • Optional 802.11 a/g/n Wireless Interface • 2 RS-232, 1 RS-485 and 4 USB Ports • Video and Audio Interfaces • Versatile Mounting Options Visit www.sealevel.com/cots104/r2 or scan the QR code.

sealevel.com • 864.843.4343 • sales@sealevel.com

PCIe dual digitizer Custom FPGA-based DSP design, development, integration services available

DRX16 board includes:

• Xilinx Virtex 6 240T FPGA • Dual 16-bit A/D - 10 to 130 Msps with 300 MHz input bandwidth • 10 MHz timebase with timestamping capability

DSP services include: • Wideband radio • Real-time signal acquisition and analysis / test and measurement • Adaptive signal processing • High-speed

info@edt.com www.edt.com FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

SEE MORE

COTS Journal | October 2014

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COTS PRODUCTS

VPX Graphics Module Supports Safety Certifiability Standards Curtiss-Wright announced that its Defense Solutions division has introduced the VPX3-718, a new rugged commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) graphics display and video capture engine that supports DO-254 DAL C and DO-178C DAL C safety certifiability. The VPX3-718 graphics module significantly speeds and reduces the cost of developing critical aviation applications on any platform that requires high performance graphics and video processing. Designed for use in military and civil aviation applications, the VPX3-718, along with the VPX3-150 SBC, are the first members of Curtiss-Wright’s new family of Safety Certifiable COTS Module solutions. These modules feature the standard DO-254/DO-178 design artifact packages required to support successful certification of the customer’s system. The VPX3-718 is powered by an AMD Radeon E4690 GPU. It is the first Curtiss-Wright graphics module to support full stream video capture and 1.485 Gbps HD-SDI (SMPTE-292M) output to support the transfer of uncompressed high-definition video. It eases and speeds the integration of dual independent channels of 2D/3D graphics display into deployed airborne systems that require optimal performance, even in the most harsh environments. The VPX3-150 and the other products in the Safety Certifiable COTS Module family are designed using a development process that results in DO-254 and DO-178 Design Assurance Level (DAL) C certifiable product and supporting artifacts. Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions, Ashburn, VA. (703) 779-7800. www.cwcdefense.com

CUBE

The

expansion enclosures

Choose from a variety of options: ExpressCard, PCIe, or Thunderbolt connectivity package

1, 2, 3, 5, or 8 slots

Full-length (13.25”), mid-length (9.5” ), or short card (7.5” )

Half-height or full-height cards

36W, 180W, 400W, 550W or 1100W power supply

Flexible and Versatile: Supports any combination of Flash drives, video, lm editing, GPU’s, and other PCIe I/O cards. The CUBE, The mCUBE, and The nanoCUBE are trademarks of One Stop Systems, Inc. Maxexpansion.com and the Maxexpansion.com logo are trademarks of One Stop Systems, Inc. Thunderbolt and the Thunderbolt logo are trademarks of the Intel Corporation in the U.S. and other countries.

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COTS Journal | October 2014

ORDER TODAY!


COTS PRODUCTS

Intelligent I/O Systems Integrates ARM Cortex-A9 Processor

North Atlantic Industries has expanded the functionality of its Nano Interface Unit (NIU1) to include embedded computing capability. The advanced NIU1A with added SoC dual ARM Cortex-A9 processor, delivers smaller size, lower power, higher bandwidth, shared memory and lower latency in a small package. In addition, the NIU1A offers comprehensive processor software programming support for Wind River Linux, VxWorks and Xilinx PetaLinux. The compact, nano-sized subsystem with unprecedented I/O capability connects to existing platform Ethernet networks, making data available to any system on the network. The Nano Interface Unit (NIU1A) easily adds sensor data acquisition, distribution and communication interfaces to mission computers without expensive chassis and backplane redesign, for use in military and aerospace embedded applications. Built on NAI’s Custom-On-Standard Architecture (COSA), the NIU1A offers a choice of more than 40 intelligent I/O and communications functions. These pre-existing, fully-tested functions can be selected quickly and easily to meet system requirements. Available functions include A/D, D/A, TTL, RTD, discrete I/O, differential transceiver, synchro/resolver, LVDT/RVDT measurement, simulation and excitation, strain gage, quad channel redundant BC/RT/MT MIL-STD-1553, high-speed sync/async RS232/422/423/485, ARINC 429/575 and CANBus. North Atlantic Industries, Bohemia, NY. (631) 567-1100. www.naii.com

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

COTS Journal | October 2014

47


COTS

ADVERTISERS INDEX GET CONNECTED WITH INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS SOURCE AND PURCHASABLE SOLUTIONS NOW Intelligent Systems Source is a new resource that gives you the power to compare, review and even purchase embedded computing products intelligently. To help you research SBCs, SOMs, COMs, Systems, or I/O boards, the Intelligent Systems Source website provides products, articles, and whitepapers from industry leading manufacturers---and it's even connected to the top 5 distributors. Go to Intelligent Systems Source now so you can start to locate, compare, and purchase the correct product for your needs.

Index

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

Company Page# Website

Company Page# Website

Acces I/O Products, Inc.......................27.................................. http://acces.io Acromag..............................................28........................... www.acromag.com Ballard Technology, Inc........................35....................... www.ballardtech.com CM Computer......................................52......................www.cmcomputer.com Creative Electronic Systems................24...................................... www.ces.ch Cots Product Gallery............................49......................................................... Data Bus Products..............................29.............. www.databusproducts.com Data Device Corporation.....................47........................... www.ddc-web.com edt......................................................45....................................www.edt.com Equipto Electronics Corp.....................23.......................www.equiptoelec.com Extreme Engineering Solutions............51..............................www.xes-inc.com Gaia....................................................22.................. www.gaia-converter.com GE Intelligent Platforms......................33............................ defense.ge-ip.com Innovative Integration.........................34..................www.innovative-dsp.com Intelligent Systems Source..................37.. www.intelligentsystemssource.com Interface Concept................................12.............. www.interfaceconcept.com Mercury Systems, Inc. ........................15................................. www.mrcy.com Mobile Pathways.................................31................www.mobilepathways.com

MPL AG................................................44......................................www.mpl.ch North Atlantic Industries..................19, 21................................ www.naii.com Octagon Systems................................40................www.octagonsystems.com One Stop Systems, Inc. ....................25, 46.............www.onestopsystems.com Orbit Electronics Group and Orbit Power Group........................13......................................vmevpx.com Pentek, Inc...........................................7............................... www.pentek.com Phoenix International Systems, Inc. .....4............................ www.phenxint.com Pico Electronics, Inc............................39................. www.picoelectronics.com Red Rock Technologies, Inc..................4....................... www.redrocktech.com RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc. .......2..................................... www.rtd.com Sealevel..............................................45............................ www.sealevel.com SynQor, Inc..........................................17...............................www.synqor.com Trenton Systems, Inc. ..........................5..................www.trentonsystems.com TQ-USA...............................................14...............................www.tq-usa.com Vadatech.............................................16...........................www.vadatech.com

COTS Journal (ISSN#1526-4653) is published monthly at 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250, San Clemente, CA 92673. Periodicals Class postage paid at San Clemente and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to COTS Journal, 905 Calle Amanecer, Ste. 250, San Clemente, CA 92673.

COMING NEXT MONTH Special Feature: Evolving VITA Small Form Factor Box Systems and Standards

Rugged box pre-integrated systems have become a staple in today’s military embedded computing market. But there’s been little or no standardization on the format or I/O configurations between vendors these products. On the standard-based side, three VITA draft specification efforts have been in the works in the past year or more: VITA 73, VITA 74 and VITA 75. But a number of non-standard solutions continue to roll out as well. This section looks at the how these technology choices attempt to fill military system developer needs.

Tech Recon: GPGPUs vs. FPGAs for Signal Processing Systems

The concept of putting high-performance graphics processors to work on general-purpose processing tasks is beginning to gain traction. But GPGPUs are not expected to supplant FPGAs overnight. GPUs have potential in application areas including target tracking, image stabilization and SAR (synthetic aperture radar) simulation. Sensor processing and software defined radio are also well suited for this kind of processing. Board-level products have emerged specifically for GPGPU computing in a number of form factors including OpenVPX. 48

COTS Journal | October 2014

System Development: Weighing Costs and Capabilities in Training and Simulation Systems With defense budgets tighter than ever, training systems are under a lot of pressure to be delivered under stricter cost constraints. And military simulation and training systems have taken on a whole different character as PC-based platforms take center stage. Articles in this section analyze the technologies behind that trend. Also featured is a look at some of the products and papers to be showcased at the Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference (I/ITSEC).

Tech Focus: High Reliability Power Supplies

Selecting power supplies and power conversion electronics rank as make or break technical choices in embedded military computer systems. With more and more computing stuffed into smaller spaces, power has direct implications on the size, cooling and mobility of a board or box-level system. Articles in this section examine technology trends affecting DC/ DC converters, power supply module bricks and slot-card power supplies (VME, VPX, cPCI and others).


COTS

PRODUCT GALLERY

PC/104-Plus Watchdog Board

USB-104-HUB

• Software selectable timeout from 4 µsec • Watchdog open collector reset outputs • Temperature measurement, monitor, and alarm • Light sensor for enclosure security • Fan status and speed control • Extended temperature (-40°C to +85°C) • PCI/104 power monitor / limit alarm interrupt • Opto-isolated input to trigger reset

• Rugged, industrialized, four-port USB hub • Extended temperature operation (-40°C to +85°C) • Supports bus powered and self-powered modes • Three power input connectors (power jack, screw terminals, or 3.5” drive Berg power connector) • USB/104 form-factor for OEM embedded applications • OEM version (board only) features PC/104 module size and mounting compatibility

ACCES I/O Products, Inc.

Phone: (858) 550-9559 Email: contactus@accesio.com Web: www.accesio.com

Phone: (858) 550-9559 Email: contactus@accesio.com Web: www.accesio.com

ACCES I/O Products, Inc.

Raptor Rugged COTS System

64PPC1 – 6U VME P2041 SBC

Diamond’s Raptor COTS computer system features a rugged SBC with the 2.1GHz Intel Core i7-3612QE CPU housed in a sealed aluminum enclosure. A full suite of I/O, including on-board data acquisition, provides the connectivity for most applications. A wide operating temperature, high resistance to shock and vibration, and wide voltage input enables Raptor to excel in vehicles or harsh environments.

• Freescale™ QorIQ P2041 Quad-Core e500mc Processor • Classic Double Precision FPU • < 25 W MB power dissipation • User can specify 6 I/O or Communications functions • Up to 8 GB DDR3 SDRAM • Up to 32 GB SATA II NAND Flash • Dual 10/100/1000Base-T Ethernet ports • Wind River® VxWorks® or Linux OS Support

Diamond Systems Phone: (650) 810-2500 Web: http://www.diamondsystems.com/products/raptorvega

North Atlantic Industries, Inc. Phone: (631) 567-1100 Web: www.naii.com

COTS Journal | October 2014

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COTS Journal’s

MARCHING TO THE NUMBERS

EIGHT

The number of new-build MH-47G configured Chinook helicopter that Boeing is to deliver to the U.S. Army Special Operations Aviation Command through 2015. The first was delivered Sept. 29, 2014—a full month ahead of schedule. The new build MH-47G configuration incorporates a number of production improvements to include the digital advanced flight control system, more robust, improved monolithic machined-frames, and improved air transportability. The entire program is valued at approximately $300 million.

$19.5 MILLION The value of the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center’s (LCMC) Theater Battle Control Division awarded a contract to the Raytheon Company for the service’s next generation of long-range radars. The fixed-price incentive firm contract covers the engineering, manufacturing and development of three three-dimensional expeditionary long-range radar (3DELRR ) systems. The system will serve as the service’s primary long-range, ground-based sensor for detecting, identifying, tracking and reporting aerial targets—replacing the legacy TPS-75 system.

12 MONTHS The time in which Northrop Grumman successfully concluded all engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) design reviews for the AN/APG-83 Scalable Agile Beam Radar (SABR). The system is a direct replacement for legacy F-16 radars and includes fifth-generation radar capabilities, the largest synthetic aperture radar map available for the F-16 and robust electronic protection. SABR was competitively selected by Lockheed Martin for the U.S. and Taiwan Air Force F-16 upgrade programs. Northrop Grumman’s unique allows for ease of retrofit, without aircraft structural modifications or changes to the existing power and cooling provisions in the F-16. 50

COTS Journal | October 2014

24 HOURS

Number of hours per day that the long endurance tactical UAV ATLANTE can operate in any in any meteorological condition. Wind River has announced that Airbus Defense and Space, an Airbus Group company, relies on Wind River VxWorks 653 Platform the UAV. ATLANTE was designed to carry out target identification, shoot correction, and damage evaluation operations, among other ISTAR missions (intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition and reconnaissance). It does not require take-off/landing strips. VxWorks 653 powers the mission computer, ground communications and control station critical computers in the ATLANTE.

$10.2 BILLION The worth that the global electronic warfare systems market is expected to value at by the end of 2014. It is estimated to increase to US$13.2 billion by 2024, representing a CAGR of 2.68% during the forecast period. The global market is expected to achieve a cumulative value of US$125.7 billion during the forecast period. Demand for such systems is anticipated to be driven by rapid technological advancements in the domain and the growing need for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities in militaries globally.


Module and System-Level Solutions from Intel® and Freescale™ Single Board Computers

XPedite7570

4th Gen Intel® Core™ i7-based 3U VPX SBC with XMC/PMC

XCalibur1840

Freescale QorIQ T4240-based 6U VPX SBC with dual XMC/PMC

Secure Ethernet Switches and IP Routers

XPedite5205

Secure Gigabit Ethernet router XMC utilizing Cisco™ IOS®

XChange3018

3U VPX 10 Gigabit Ethernet managed switch and router

High-Performance FPGA and I/O Modules

XPedite2400

Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA-based XMC with high-throughput DAC

High-Capacity Power Supplies

XPm2220

3U VPX 300W power supply with EMI filtering for MIL-STD-704 & 1275

Rugged, SWaP-Optimized, COTS-Based Systems

XPand4200

Sub-½ ATR, 6x 3U VPX slot system with removable SSDs

XPand6200

SFF 2x 3U VPX system with removable SSD and integrated power supply

XPand6000

SFF Intel® Core™ i7 or Freescale QorIQ-based system with XMC/PMC

Extreme Engineering Solutions 608.833.1155 www.xes-inc.com

Designed, manufactured, and supported in the USA


x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x FOR x xIMMEDIATE x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x DEPLOYMENT x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x3UxATR x HIGHLIGHTS x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x xenclosure x x(S+HES x x x x20°Cxlessxthanx x x 3UxATRsx x x Contaminant-free x x x x x x xModels) x x x x x Conventional x x x x x x x COTS: cPCI x readyx (1” Pitch) service xVPX,xVME64 x &x x x xMaintenance x x free x Operation x xin x x x x x xConduction x x& Air-cooled x x 3UxModules x x Extensive x x setxof Front x Panel x user x Indicators x x x x Accepts x x x xI/O wiring x x x x x x xRearxfansx x x x x x Flexible x xTop &xBottom x x x x x x Integrated x x x x Finger x Guards x x x x x xEMI/EMC x xMIL-STD-461E x x x xalone xLowxWeight x solution x x x x x In-line Filterx x x Stand x x Temperature x x x x tox+85ºC x x x xCard-cage x x x recirculation x x x x x Operating x x x x -40ºC x x x x xInternal x x x airflow x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Up to +85 Watts per slot Independent Fan & Power Supply x input x voltage x x x x Supervisory x x Unit x x xCustomizable x x toxspecific x requirements x x x x x Integrated Temperature x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Dramatically MTBFx by 4x Profile quickx release x x increases x xPayload x x x xLowx xMounting x xTrayxwithx x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

MILITARY W W W. C M C O M P U T E R . C O M

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x �

CM MILITARY ATR CHASSIS ARE DELIVERED FULLY TESTED & CERTIFIED PER

MIL-STD-461F & MIL-STD-810F

-TO GUARANTEE IMMEDIATE FAULT FREE OPERATION-

� �

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

90

170

160

160

140

120

80

140

100

70

120

RE101-2 7cm Navy

60

40

100

200 300

500

1k

2k

3k

5k

10k

20

30

50

0 30

100k

Frequency in Hz

50

100

200 300

500

1k

2k

3k

5k

10k

20

30

50

90

70

70

60

60

Level in dBµV/m

Level in dBµV/m

100M

200M

300M

400

500

800

50 40 30

RE102-3 space system and aircraft(External)

40

20

20

100

200

300

500

800 1k

2k

3k

4k

8 10k

Frequency in Hz

*CE101. CONDUCTED EMISSIONS, 30 Hz - 10 KHz.

100

80

RE102-3 space system and aircraft(External)

50 40

EC CE102-1 28V

60

40

30

20

20 10

0

10

0 30

50

1G

80

120

Level in dBpT

80

90

80

60

60

*RE102. RADIATED ELECTRIC FIELD, 30 MHz - 1 GHz.

140

RE101-2 7cm Navy

10 30

50

Frequency in Hz

160

80

20

0 30M

100k

*RE101. RADIATED MAGNETIC FIELD POS.F, 30 Hz - 100 KHz.

100

60

40

10

Frequency in Hz

*RE101. RADIATED MAGNETIC FIELD POS.B, 30 Hz - 100 KHz.

80

20

20

50

RE102-3 space system and aircraft(External)

40 30

40

20

0 30

80

50

Level in dBµA

RE101-2 7cm Navy

60

100

Level in dBµV

80

EC CE101-4 above 28V

60

Level in dBµV/m

100

Level in dBpT

Level in dBpT

120

50

100

200 300

500

1k

2k

3k

5k

10k

20

30

50

100k

0 10k

Frequency in Hz

0 1G

20

30

50

100k

200 300

500

1M

2M

3M

5M

10M

20

Frequency in Hz

RE TU D I

THE EU

COMPO

M

Y

IDE US NS

*RE102. RADIATED ELECTRIC FIELD, 10 KHz - 30 MHz.

N

MILITAR

ANUFAC

*RE101. RADIATED MAGNETIC FIELD POS.C, 30 Hz - 100 KHz.

30M

2G

3G

4G

5G

6

8

10G

Frequency in Hz

*RE102. RADIATED ELECTRIC FIELD, 1 GHz - 18 GHz.

* Figures achieved by CM-ATR-3U chassis in MIL-STD-461F testing procedures conducted by Independent Authorised Labs. CS101, CS116, RS101 & RS103 certificates also available.

18G

-10 10k

20

30

50

100k

200 300

500

1M

2M

3M

5M

Frequency in Hz

*CE102. CONDUCTED EMISSIONS, 10 KHz - 10 MHz.

CM Computer

True Military COTS Products

10M

NT NE S I

COTS Journal  

COTS Journal October 2014

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