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Tech Focus: PC/104 and PC/104 Family Boards Roundup

JOURNAL

The Journal of Military Electronics & Computing

Military I/O Technologies Balance Legacy and Speed Tradeoffs

Obsolescence Issues Stir up System Shipboard Displays Design Challenges and Panel PCs Enable Today's Networked Military

An RTC Group Publication

June 2014 Volume 16 Number 6

cotsjournalonline.com


Rugged Boards & Solutions We know PCIe/104. And we do it best. At RTD, designing and manufacturing rugged, top-quality boards and system solutions is our passion. As a founder of the PC/104 Consortium back in 1992, we moved desktop computing to the embedded world. Over the years, we've provided the leadership and support that brought the latest signaling and I/O technologies to the PC/104 form factor. Most recently, we've championed the latest specifications based on stackable PCI Express: PCIe/104 and PCI/104-Express.

With our focused vision, we have developed an entire suite of compatible boards and systems that serve the defense, aerospace, maritime, ground, industrial and research arenas. But don't just think about boards and systems. Think solutions. That is what we provide: high-quality, cutting-edge, concept-to-deployment, rugged, embedded solutions. Whether you need a single board, a stack of modules, or a fully enclosed system, RTD has a solution for you. Keep in mind that as an RTD customer, you're not just

working with a selection of proven, quality electronics; you're benefitting from an entire team of dedicated engineers and manufacturing personnel driven by excellence and bolstered by a 28-year track record of success in the embedded industry. If you need proven COTS-Plus solutions, give us a call. Or leverage RTD's innovative product line to design your own embedded system that is reliable, flexible, expandable, and serviceable in the field for the long run. Contact us and let us show you what we do best.

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JOURNAL

The Journal of Military Electronics & Computing

CONTENTS

COTS (kots), n. 1. Commercial off-the-shelf. Terminology popularized in 1994 within U.S. DoD by SECDEF Wm. Perry’s “Perry Memo” that changed military industry purchasing and design guidelines, making Mil-Specs acceptable only by waiver. COTS is generally defined for technology, goods and services as: a) using commercial business practices and specifications, b) not developed under government funding, c) offered for sale to the general market, d) still must meet the program ORD. 2. Commercial business practices include the accepted practice of customer-paid minor modification to standard COTS products to meet the customer’s unique requirements. —Ant. When applied to the procurement of electronics for he U.S. Military, COTS is a procurement philosophy and does not imply commercial, office environment or any other durability grade. E.g., rad-hard components designed and offered for sale to the general market are COTS if they were developed by the company and not under government funding.

June 2014 Volume 16 Number 6

FEATURED p.10 Military I/O Choices Span from 1553 to Ethernet and More SPECIAL FEATURE Military I/O: From 1553 to Ethernet and More

DEPARTMENTS

10  Military I/O Choices Span from 1553 to Ethernet and More

6 Editorial

18  RapidIO, InfiniBand and Ethernet Each Find Their Place

8

The Inside Track

44

COTS Products

50

Marching to the Numbers

Army Networks Surge Ahead

Jeff Child

Eran Strod, Curtiss-Wright Defense Solutions

TECH RECON Obsolescence Hurdles in System Design 24  Multiple Factors Play in FPGA Obsolescence Mitigation J Ryan Kenny and Alex Fong Yim Hui, Altera

30  Legacy Military Systems Can Embrace New Storage Technologies Steve Gudknecht, Elma Electronic Systems

SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT Displays and Panel PCs for Naval Systems 34 Net-Centric Push Drives Shipboard Display and Panel PC Upgrades Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

TECHNOLOGY FOCUS PC/104 and PC/104 Family Boards 38 PCI Express Makes its Presence Felt in the PC/104 World Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

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PC/104 and PC/104-Family Boards Roundup

Digital subscriptions available: cotsjournalonline.com

Coming in July See Page 48 On The Cover: Boasting a legacy of well-tested reliability, 1553 remains a staple in-flight and mission-critical systems aboard military aircraft. Despite being more than three decades old, the 1553 bus interface is even used in new aircraft designs like the F-35. Shown here, a Lockheed Martin test pilot flew this F-35B production aircraft BF-7 on its first flight in 2011.


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JOURNAL

The Journal of Military Electronics & Computing

Editorial EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jeff Child, jeffc@rtcgroup.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR Johnny Keggler, johnnyk@rtcgroup.com

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COTS Journal HOME OFFICE The RTC Group 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250 San Clemente, CA 92673 Phone: (949) 226-2000 Fax: (949) 226-2050 www.rtcgroup.com EDITORIAL OFFICE Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief 20A Northwest Blvd., PMB#137, Nashua, NH 03063 Phone: (603) 429-8301 PUBLISHED BY THE RTC GROUP Copyright 2014, The RTC Group. Printed in the United States. All rights reserved. All related graphics are trademarks of The RTC Group. All other brand and product names are the property of their holders.

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COTS Journal | June 2014


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EDITORIAL Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

Army Networks Surge Ahead

A

trend that’s always worked in favor of our industry is the fact that the electronics, embedded computing and networking slices of the U.S defense budget have always been on a steady increase—even when the budget overall has been in a downward swing. And while that’s been put to the test in recent years, it still holds true. What’s happening with Army tactical networking is a vivid example of this trend. Major new vehicle platforms like the Ground Combat Vehicle (GCV) program were cancelled, while funding is instead put toward modernization and upgrades of Current Force vehicles. And in proportion, a much greater emphasis has been focused on the vehicle-mounted C4ISR, comms and networking systems. These efforts fit nicely into the kinds of technologies and products offered by the military embedded computing industry. Taking a look at the status of some of the Army’s tactical networking programs, last month the GAO released a report that examines the Army’s progress in implementing competitive strategies for those tactical networking systems. For the past couple decades, the Army has had difficulties developing an information network—comprised of sensors, software and radios—that provides soldiers “the exact information they need, when they need it, in any environment.” Because the Army has made its tactical network its top modernization priority, investment there continues. The estimated modernization may cost up to $3 billion per year into the foreseeable future, according to the report. At present, the Army’s modernization plan intends to leverage solutions developed by private industry. In the report the GAO selected what it calls a non-generalizable sample of nine of these 25 systems that the Army indicated are critical for ensuring soldiers are able to send and receive mission-critical information between units, and that cover the breadth of warfighter operations. The acquisition strategies were then examined for evidence that the Army was seeking competition. Among the tools the Army is using in its acquisition efforts these days is the Agile Capabilities Life Cycle Process. The Agile Acquisition strategy is an approach where the Army determines the capabilities it needs and the gaps in those capabilities, and uses market research and semi-annual evaluations, among other means, to involve industry. According to the Army, this agile process provides opportunities for enhancing competition. GAO grouped the nine systems into three categories based on similarities in the competition strategy. Looking at the specifics, in two of the nine systems the GAO examined—Mid-tier Networking Vehicular Radio and Soldier Radio 6

COTS Journal | June 2014

Waveform Appliqué—the Army is beginning new programs and structuring the acquisition approaches to competitively procure nondevelopmental capabilities directly from industry. The Army competitively awarded a procurement contract for its Mid-Tier Networking Vehicular Radio, providing units for risk reduction and requirements verification. In April the Army competitively awarded contracts to four vendors to buy the Soldier Radio Waveform Appliqué. Five of the systems studied have been under development for many years. Among those, three of them—the Airborne, Maritime, and Fixed Station Radio; the Rifleman Radio; and the Manpack Radio—were part of the Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS). Now that the JTRS program is complete, it has been restructured with the name “JTRS” no longer used. The Army had been developing software-defined radios to interoperate with existing radios. But now it’s seeking non-developmental solutions through competition to provide the needed capability. For the other two systems, the Joint Battle Command–Platform and Nett Warrior, the Army reports that it plans to use full and open competition for individual subcomponents. In both those cases, the GAO report said the Army conducted market research to identify vendors or seek feedback on requirements. Meanwhile, the Army’s Warfighter Information Network-Tactical (WIN-T) program is in a rather unique situation in comparison to the other programs. WIN-T is the cornerstone for the Army’s high-speed, high-capability backbone communications network, linking warfighters in the battlefield with the Global Information Grid. For the two remaining systems in GAO’s review, the Warfighter Information Network-Tactical Increment 2 and Warfighter Information NetworkTactical Increment 3, the Army deemed competition impractical. While the idea of an an acquisition strategy with more competition was considered, the decision was made that only the incumbent contractor General Dynamics could satisfy the requirements without introducing serious schedule setbacks. All that said, according to the GAO, the Army continues using market research to identify interested contractors and has awarded several competitive contracts for subcomponents under these two systems. The scrutiny of all these technology development and procurement efforts is a good sign ultimately for our industry. As these programs are evaluated for their costs and progress, primes and the Army directly will be always on the lookout for cutting-edge boards, boxes and network gear from our military embedded computing industry.


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INSIDE TRACK Northrop Grumman Awarded Navy Contract for Next-Gen Mission Computer Northrop Grumman has been awarded a low-rate initial production contract from the U.S. Navy to deliver FlightPro Gen III mission computers in support of AH-1Z and UH-1Y Marine Corps helicopters (Figure 1). Under the $10.6 million contract, Northrop Grumman will provide mission computers for H-1 helicopter flight tests, system integration laboratories and training. The lightweight FlightPro mission computer is renowned for integrating advanced mission, weapons and video processing capabilities into a conduction-cooled, high-performance airborne computer. The latest model, FlightPro Gen III, features the newest computing technology in multiple partitioned, 8-core PowerPC-based processors. The new mission computer offers increased computing resources and an extended lifetime due to long-term product support from suppliers. The computer also is the foundation of Northrop Grumman’s proposed digital cockpit upgrade for the Army’s H-60L Black Hawk program. The computer can provide a partitioned computing environment to customers around the world and is compatible with rotary- and fixed-wing aircraft as well as unmanned aerial systems.

Figure 1

Northrop Grumman Los Angeles, CA (310) 553-6262 www.northropgrumman.com

Curtiss-Wright Awarded Contract for Systems on HALE UAS Program …. and in other Northrop Grumman news: Curtiss-Wright announced that its Defense Solutions division has received a contract from Northrop Grumman to provide the integrated mission management computer (IMMC) for use in its High Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE) Enterprise IMMC upgrade program. The HALE Enterprise upgrade defines a new baseline architecture for Northrop Grumman’s HALE unmanned aircraft system (UAS) platforms to reduce maintenance and inventory costs, simplify ongoing obsolescence management, and increase operational availability for derivatives of the Global Hawk platform, including the USN Triton (Figure 2), NATO AGS, USAF Block 40 and USAF Block 20/30. FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

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COTS Journal | June 2014

An aviation boatswain’s mate guides an AH-1Z “Viper SuperCobra” landing aboard USS Makin Island.

The dual-redundant architecture IMMC provides fault-tolerant flight control for the Global Hawk aircraft and interfaces with all necessary sensors to provide safe aircraft flight to meet mission requirements. Under the agreement, efforts began in October 2013 and are scheduled to continue until December 2014. Curtiss-Wright provides two critical onboard flight subsystems used on the Triton UAS. Curtiss-Wright supplies the Integrated Mission Management Computer (IMMC) that controls the aircraft’s flight, and the Advanced Mission Management System (AMMS) that communicates with the onboard sensors and relays information to the ground station. Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions Ashburn, VA (703) 779-7800 www.cwcdefense.com

Figure 2 Shown here, the Triton unmanned aircraft system completes its first flight May 22, 2013 from the Northrop Grumman manufacturing facility in Palmdale, CA.

Boeing Taps AMD and CoreAVI for Cockpit Display Systems Boeing has selected the combined graphics technologies from AMD and Core Avionics & Industrial (CoreAVI) to enable next-generation high-performance avionics cockpit display systems. Boeing is using

AMD embedded Radeon graphics processing units (GPUs) and CoreAVI’s embedded and safety-critical drivers to enhance visual effects designed to increase situational awareness, safety and aircraft effectiveness. The AMD graphics processing technologies are supported on real-time operating systems and safety-critical platforms by CoreAVI with OpenGL drivers and complete DO-178C certification artifacts. The high-performance AMD embedded Radeon GPUs and SoCs offer highly scalable power-performance configurations to address a wide range of mil-aero display requirements ranging from primary flight


The

INSIDE TRACK MILITARY MARKET WATCH Precision Strike Capability Demand Feeds Global Navigation Satellite Systems Market

Figure 3 GD will develop a fully integrated replacement power pack, suspension, driveline, steering system and upgraded electrical components for the Marine Corps’ LAV. displays, photo realistic synthetic vision and advanced video surveillance to lower-powered electronic flight bags, enhanced 2D and moving map applications. The GPU provides up to 2 Gbytes of integrated video memory, multi-independent three dimensional display outputs and H.264/ MPEG2 Universal Video Decoders. CoreAVI Tampa, FL (813) 990-0603 www.coreavi.com

General Dynamics Wins Deal to Develop Upgrades for USMC LAVs The U.S. Army TACOM Life Cycle Management Command has awarded a $52.3 million contract modification to General Dynamics Land Systems-Canada to develop upgrades in support of the U.S. Marine Corps Light Armored Vehicle (LAV) Mobility and Obsolescence (MOB) Upgrade and Integration

Program. General Dynamics Land Systems, the Canadian company’s parent corporation, is a business unit of General Dynamics. The contract was signed through the Canadian Commercial Corporation, a Crown Agency of the Canadian Government. Under this contract, General Dynamics will develop a fully integrated replacement power pack, suspension, driveline, steering system and upgraded electrical components. The work scope includes the development and delivery of engineering and logistics data, as well as test support and delivery of prototypes. Work under this contract will continue until May 2017. General Dynamics Land Systems Sterling Heights, MI (586) 825-4000 www.gdls.com

The combination of ongoing operations, force modernization efforts, and the rising importance of precision strikes in contemporary military conflicts are driving the demand for global navigation satellite systems (GNSS), according to a report from Frost & Sullivan. Military end users are gravitating toward these solutions as a single strike of a155 mm GNSS-guided artillery can cause more impact than a dozen unguided rounds. New analysis from Frost Figure 4 & Sullivan, Military Global Frost & Sullivan A&D Industry Analyst Navigation Satellite Systems Dominik Kimla says commercial off-theMarket Assessment, finds that shelf global navigation satellite systems the market earned revenues (GNSS) will provide military users with of $1.98 billion in 2013 and mature products at low prices. estimates this to reach $2.18 billion in 2022 at a compound annual growth rate of 1.1 percent (Figure 4). The study covers receivers, data applications and services. North America is the biggest market for military GNSS while Central Asia, Asia-Pacific and the Middle East represent the fastest growing markets. The launch of major projects such as the European Galileo and Chinese Beidou/Compass as well as the introduction of two new regional navigational systems—Indian Regional Navigational Satellite System and the Japanese Quasi-Zenith Satellite System—is increasing the availability of GNSS solutions. These new developments are also intensifying competition between solution providers, in turn decreasing the cost of GNSS and attracting more end users. According to Frost & Sullivan Aerospace & Defense Industry Analyst Dominik Kimla, another initiative that is likely to aid market growth is the implementation of commercial off-the-shelf GNSS solutions. “COTS GNSS will benefit both industry players and military end users—while it gives the former a chance to implement solutions developed and verified in the civil sector in military projects,” said Kimla. “The latter as well gets access to mature and robust products at low prices.” Military Global Navigation Satellite Systems Market Assessment is part of the Aerospace (www.aerospace.frost.com) Growth Partnership Service program. For more information on this study, please email Edyta Grabowska, Corporate Communications, at edyta.grabowska@frost.com. Frost & Sullivan San Antonio, TX (210) 348-1000 www.frost.com

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

COTS Journal | June 2014

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SPECIAL FEATURE Military I/O: From 1553 to Ethernet and More

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COTS Journal | June 2014


SPECIAL FEATURE

Military I/O Choices Span from 1553 to Ethernet and More 1553 remains the king in not only legacy avionics systems but in new designs as well. And Ethernet fills higher data rate gaps. But in the age of multifunction solutions, system level approaches are worth considering. Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

A

s an avionics databus and for other military I/O purposes, the MIL-STD-1553’s longevity is truly astounding. With a huge installed base, the MIL-STD-1553 bus continues to play a role in a wide variety of systems such as tanks, ships, missiles and satellites. MILSTD-1553—often referred to as merely 1553—is particularly admired for its reliability. For more than three decades, 1553 has been a staple in flight and mission-critical systems aboard military aircraft. It’s even used on new platforms such as the F-22 and F-35 (Figure 1). With all that in mind, there is still a design decision that’s somewhat tricky for military system developers. How to support the requirements of legacy interface schemes while accommodating the performance needs of next-generation computing and electronic subsystems?

COTS Journal | June 2014

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Figure 1 For decades 1553 has been a staple in flight and mission-critical systems aboard military aircraft. It’s even used on new platforms such as the F-22.

Even today legacy I/O schemes such as 1553 and ARINC 429 are still considered good for pure control applications. But those same interfaces aren’t in the same bandwidth range as today’s modern interconnects. Several multipurpose communications protocols provide options to suit emerging needs. The question becomes one of using bridging or some other technique to get the best out of legacy military I/O schemes like 1553, while at the same time leveraging newer solutions, like us-

ing Ethernet as an I/O interconnect. Along that continuum, 1 Gbit and 10 Gbit Ethernet and Fibre Channel are all jockeying to satisfy these needs. Meanwhile, a pair of trends has changed the game somewhat. First, a number of rugged box-level solutions have emerged that include 1553 alongside several other interface technologies. And second, 1553-only boards make less sense at today’s level of integration. As a result, there are many so-called multifunction board and mezzanine products that combine 1553 with other board or box-level functions.

Multiprotocol Data Networking Exemplifying the multifunction / multiprotocol trend, last month Data Device Corp. announced Multi-Protocol Data Bus Networking XMC and PMC cards capable of supporting all avionic I/O requirements. The card’s high channel mix enables this single, compact solution to replace several individual I/O cards providing significant size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) savings. The BU-67118 XMC/PMC cards

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COTS Journal | June 2014

The BU-67118 XMC/PMC Multi-Protocol Data Bus Networking cards provide up to four dual-redundant MIL-STD-1553 channels, up to 20 programmable Tx/Rx ARINC 429 channels and up to two programmable Tx/Rx ARINC 717 channels. A variety of serial and discrete I/O channels are on board too.

deliver low power dissipation, high MTBF and high performance for rugged environments (Figure 2). Unique features include onboard DMA and 4 Kbyte address space boundaries for critical real-time applications. The cards provide up to four dual-redundant MIL-STD-1553 channels, up to 20 programmable Tx/Rx ARINC 429 channels and up to two programmable Tx/Rx ARINC 717 channels. The board sports up to eight RS-232/422/485 Serial I/O channels and two CANbus 2.0 channels. Rounding out the I/O offerings are up to 10 (+28 V) avionics discrete I/O channels. Also taking a combo approach is a PC/104-based offering from Alta Data Technologies. The PC104P-MA4 interface card for PC104-Plus systems combines popular 1553 and ARINC interface channels on a single card, providing a smaller footprint, lower power and cost savings for PC104-based systems. The card can have one or two 1553 channels (dual or full function BC, mRT and BM modes) and eight ARINC-429 channels ( four RX/TX and four RX channels). The card uses Alta’s application programming interface (AltaAPI) to provide a common, abstracted and layered development environment that is portable across the company’s entire product line.

Box-Level Integration For applications where SWaP issues don’t permit slot cards and backplanes,

www.HARTING-usa.com 06.2014 COTS DIN Final.indd 1

Figure 2

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SPECIAL FEATURE

application, they can locate the MPRES-1 Ethernet switch PMC inside the existingAB3000 box. This allows users to add an Ethernet switch within the same small physical space with nearly no weight gain— only 2.3 ounces. That’s especially important in crowded fighter or helicopter avionics bays, or for small craft such as UAVs.

Data Acquisition Solution Figure 3 The AB3000 has a full complement of avionics I/O including up to four dualredundant MIL-STD-1553 channels, discrete I/O, Serial, USB, one or two Ethernet ports, ARINC channels, etc.. A PMC slot in the box lets users add additional I/O at the factory, including a managed Ethernet switch.

box-level solutions are becoming a useful alternative. For its part, Ballard Technology, a wholly owned subsidiary of Astronics, offers its Avionics BusBox 3000 (AB3000) systems. The AB3000 (is small, lightweight and loaded with capabilities for easy integration into today’s modern aircraft, UAVs and ground mobile platforms. The compact box has a full complement of avionics I/O including up to four dual-redundant MILSTD-1553 channels, discrete I/O, Serial, USB, one or two Ethernet ports, ARINC channels and so on. A PMC slot in the box lets users add additional I/O at the factory, including additional databus interfaces, Serial, CAN, Relays, etc. One such PMC I/O board Ballard offers is a managed Ethernet switch, the MPR-ES-1 (Figure 3). According to Ballard, that Ethernet expansion is used by military system developers in two different ways. The first is to expand the Ethernet output of the device. This Ethernet switch board includes a host port linked directly to the AB unit and allows the box to interface over Ethernet to more devices. The second approach is to use it as a stand-alone Ethernet switch. When the box is used for protocol interfacing or converting operations, while at the same time needed as a rugged Ethernet switch on the airframe for an unrelated

fies the software development effort. Each platform is factory tested, rated for operation from -40° to +70°C, and able to withstand 5g vibration and 100g shock. Onboard BIT (Built-in-Test) diagnostics also help ensure uptime and failsafe operation.

Intelligent I/O Approach Taking a step beyond both the box level solution approach and the multiprotocol board approach, North Atlantic Industries provides an Intelligent I/O approach to address today’s needs. NAI’s Nano Interface Unit (NIU1) provides an integrated, compact, nano-sized subsystem that connects to existing platform Ethernet networks. This makes data available to any system on the network. That means you can easily add sensor data acquisition, distribution and communication interfaces to mission computers without expensive chassis and backplane redesign, in military and aerospace embedded applications. The NIU1 supports a wide selection of different Intelligent I/O, motion simulation/measurement and communications

Another vendor with a box level solution is United Electronic Industries (UEI). In March, UEI rolled out two new militarygrade DAQ (Data Acquisition) and I/O Control platforms. The DNR-MIL and DNA-MIL are designed for MIL-STD-461/810/1275 compliance and deployment in environmentally harsh applications involving military and aerospace computing, oil drilling platforms and storage refineries, heavy machinery, outdoor test stands and other I/O applications exposed to hostile environments. Both platforms offer several technological advantages, including the ability to create a configurable COTS-based solution for virtually any analog/digital I/O sensor, interface and control application. Using an advanced modular architecture, the DNR-MIL and DNA-MIL are supported by a growing MIL-STD-1553 IP cores are the family of over 50 plugsmart alternative to traditional and-play-compatible 1553 ICs. This field-proven technology is software analog, digital and compatible with existing legacy communications I/O 1553 applications, but at a fraction of the cost and board space. boards. Specific interCompatible with any FPGA, 1553 faces are available for: IP cores are the perfect fit for your next military, avionics or ARINC-429, MIL-1553, space application. CAN, RVDT/LVDT, • Suitable for any MIL-STD-1553 BC, RT or MT implementation synchro/resolver, RS• Software compatible with existing legacy 1553 applications 232/422/485, strain • Available with simple local bus or 33/66 MHz PCI backend interface • Provided with full verification environment gauge, quadrature • 3rd party RT validation tested encoder, high-voltage • Small FPGA area utilization analog outputs, highDownload the White Paper today and find out more about drive outputs up to 50 MIL-STD-1553 IP cores, board level products, and simulation tools by visiting www.sealevel.com/cots054/1553 or by mA, analog inputs up scanning the QR code. to 300V, DIO to 150V, and other applications. All I/O boards are accessed through 38999-style connectors sealevel.com • 864.843.4343 • sales@sealevel.com using a single API layer, which greatly simpliCOTS Journal | June 2014

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SPECIAL FEATURE

functions such as: A/D, D/A, TTL, RTD; discrete I/O; differential transceiver, synchro/resolver/LVDT/RVDT measurement, simulation and excitation; strain gauge; encoder; dual channel dual redundant BC/ RT/MT MIL-STD-1553; high-speed sync/ async RS-232/422/423/485; ARINC 429/575 and CANBus. Last fall NAI announced that a key military integrator used the product when

it needed additional discrete I/O capability for an existing airborne system quickly, with minimal space to do so. The integrator used NAI’s compact NIU1 subsystem to connect to the existing Ethernet network to provide full, multichannel discrete support. The low-cost, SWaP-optimized NIU1 interfaced directly with the existing system, required no additional processor management, and easily fit into a space-constrained

environment with a limited power budget. Standard configuration 28 VDC or Power over Ethernet (PoE) input, dual Gig-E ports and continuous background Built-in Test (BIT) provided additional benefits by simplifying the integration, meeting status verifications and redundant communications interface requirements. The host processor required no special system software or I/O drivers because all of the I/O functions were supported using NAI’s platform-independent, Custom-OnStandard Architecture (COSA). The integrator downloaded the free Software Support Kit (SSK) immediately, which reduced their application software development time. In just four weeks NAI delivered a fully functional, tested NIU1-K600 discrete I/O unit. With application software ready to go, the NIU1 was quickly installed and mission-qualified.

Adapters and Test Tools Test tools for avionics interfaces like 1553 and ARINC 429 used to require large rackmount systems. Today that functionality can be offered in USB-based adapters hooked to desktop PCs. For example, the USB 1553 family of pocket-sized USB adapters from Ballard Technology enables computers to communicate with, simulate, test and monitor MIL-STD-1553 equipment and systems. These rugged USB 2.0 peripherals feature extensive 1553 functionality and are compatible with virtually all modern PC laptop, desktop and tablet computers. These versatile interfaces are suitable for a wide range of applications in the lab and in the field. They support maximum data throughput on all 1553 channels and have a large 32 Mbyte built-in memory. All power necessary for operation is provided via the single USB port. Plug-and-play and hot swap features make them easy to install and move between computers. Earlier this year, AIM introduced a smart tool set for handling ARINC 429 testing with a standard application using the latest available technology. Made up of standard AIM hardware and software solutions plus a COTS computer platform, the core component is based around AIM’s ANET429-x Ethernet-based Databus Interface. Users can operate with 4, 8 or 16 fully Untitled-1 1

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COTS Journal | June 2014

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SPECIAL FEATURE

programmable ARINC 429 channels via the wireless Ethernet interface. AIM also offers ANET solutions for MIL-STD-1553A/B and STANAG3910/EFEX users. The key advantage of such a platform is the execution of AIM’s standard PBA.pro Databus Test & Analysis Software with application-specific PBA.pro projects with panels / GUIs ( for maintenance tasks, pre-flight check out, data logger, etc). Existing panels like the

AIM PBA.pro-Light or customer created panels are also possible. AIM-USA Trevose, PA (267) 982-2600 www.aim-online.com

Alta Data Technologies Goleta, CA (505) 994-3111 www.altadt.com Ballard Technology Everett, WA (425) 339-0281 www.ballardtech.com Data Bus Products Manhasset, NY (516) 365-3946 www.databusproducts.com Data Device Corp. Bohemia, NY (631) 567-5600 www.ddc-web.com North Atlantic Industries Bohemia, NY (631) 567-1100 www.naii.com United Electronic Industries Walpole, MA (508) 921-4600 www.ueidaq.com

Untitled-18 1

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COTS Journal | June 2014

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GE Intelligent Platforms

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SPECIAL FEATURE Military I/O: From 1553 to Ethernet and More

RapidIO, InfiniBand and Ethernet Each Find Their Place Each boasting different strengths, histories and ecosystems, RapidIO, InfiniBand and Ethernet are all entrenched as valid fabric alternatives. Deciding which to use is a matter of picking the right tool for the right job. Eran Strod, System Architect, Curtiss-Wright Defense Solutions

F

or years it appeared that switch fabrics—primarily RapidIO and InfiniBand—would be duking it out with Ethernet for ubiquity in the world of defense embedded systems, until only one remained standing. Surprisingly, all three technologies remain strong today—and for good reason. Each one has unique advantages and disadvantages that make it best suited for a specific class of applications. Ethernet remains ubiquitous and broadly understood; RapidIO is still an excellent choice for FPGA integration; and InfiniBand delivers scorching performance in bleeding-edge applications. As usual, however, the devil is in the details, and it is important to understand the characteristics of each fabric in order to make the most prudent choice for a given application. With this in mind, it’s useful to take a high-level review of these technologies as they apply to defense embedded systems, and shed light on where each one is best applied. Applications like radar, for example, have a huge appetite for high-bandwidth data movement between signal processing compute engines (Figure 1).

RapidIO an Early Favorite The RapidIO fabric, designed for use in embedded systems, has excellent processor and FPGA support—Texas Instru18

COTS Journal | June 2014

Figure 1 Applications like radar have a huge appetite for high-bandwidth data movement between signal processing compute engines. Shown here, a maintenance Airman replaces the radar in the nose of a C-130 transport.

ments, Freescale, Xilinx, Altera and so on. When Serial RapidIO (SRIO) emerged several years ago, it found a stronghold in peer-to-peer digital signal processing (DSP) applications. At that time, RapidIO offered a competitive transmission rate, ro-

bust protocols, low-latency switching and low software overhead. Because RapidIO was for many years the most widely used data plane standard in aerospace and defense distributed computing, it is the most mature solution. However, in recent years


SPECIAL FEATURE

Figure 2 Testing and modeling research done by Curtiss-Wright engineers shows that it is possible to achieve robust Gen3 greater than 10 Gbaud signaling in OpenVPX systems. However, successful designs require a high degree of care and knowhow.

Ethernet and InfiniBand have rapidly gained acceptance. While Ethernet and InfiniBand have moved forward with 10 Gbaud signaling, RapidIO production silicon remains at Gen 2 speeds (5/6.25 Gbaud per lane). RapidIO will surely move to 10XN (10.5 Gbaud) over the next few years, but in the meantime the commercial market casts its attention forward to 25 Gbaud signaling. The 40/100 Gbit/s standards for Ethernet were approved in June 2010 by the IEEE as 802.3ba. That said, RapidIO at 5 or 6.25 Gbaud is plenty fast enough for many low-to-medium-range embedded applications. At one time, RapidIO was the only fabric with a native memory-mapped protocol. More recently, Ethernet and InfiniBand have introduced remote direct memory access (RDMA) that addresses this shortcoming. InfiniBand, and to a greater extent Ethernet, have surpassed RapidIO in terms of middleware and stack support for Linux. The amount of software written around RapidIO pales in comparison to what is available for Ethernet. So while RapidIO is generally used in embedded applications, system integrators who use it tend to write application-specific drivers and software components. One exception is a component called RIONET that is distributed under an open-source license as part of the Linux kernel. RIONET supports a standard IP/Ethernet stack but transports Ethernet frames over RapidIO. While RIONET is a great asset from a compatibility perspective, it uses RapidIO’s message-passing protocol, which incurs greater CPU overhead than a RDMA-based protocol (Logical I/O in RapidIO parlance).

CPU-FPGA Integration RapidIO’s strength today is found in CPU-FPGA integration. Every major FPGA vendor has a solid RapidIO IP core. These cores are relatively inexpensive, robust and lightweight. When RapidIO Logical I/O protocols are used with DMA chaining, the transfers COTS Journal | June 2014

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SPECIAL FEATURE

incur a modest amount of CPU overhead. RapidIO provides an excellent way to share data between CPUs from Freescale, Texas Instruments, or Intel, and the FPGAs that often serve as the front-end for a sensor in aerospace and defense realtime computing. By comparison, Ethernet fabrics might use a UDP core in the FPGA to transmit packets between CPUs and FPGAs.

This isn’t a bad choice for the FPGA, but it incurs much greater CPU overhead than Ethernet RDMA-based protocols such as RoCE. On the other hand, implementing Ethernet RDMA protocols in an FPGA requires a substantial logic footprint and an enormous amount of verification testing. InfiniBand has the same constraints as Ethernet in this regard. RapidIO is the hands-down winner when it comes to in-

tegration with FPGAs. Its primary competition in this area is actually PCI Express (PCIe), rather than Ethernet or InfiniBand. However, unlike PCIe, RapidIO is a true fabric with a distributed, scalable architecture capable of peer-to-peer computing. While RapidIO may not have the performance, rich toolset or ecosystem of its competitors, its strength as a CPUFPGA interconnect will continue to win it a place within embedding computing for some time to come.

Ethernet’s High Leverage Ethernet first became a standard in 1983 and has a three-decade record of development. It is the most widely used network standard in the world, with an annual equipment market of about $20 billion. As a result, virtually every design engineer has familiarity with Ethernet. There is very little risk in using Ethernet, and every conceivable tool required to use it is commonly available. Ethernet is so widely used that RapidIO (via RIONET) and InfiniBand (via RDMA over Converged Ethernet) offer transport for Ethernet frames or transport over Ethernet. There’s a rule of thumb that states that it takes a gigahertz of CPU speed to terminate a gigabit-per-second of Ethernet traffic. For many years, the overhead associated with Ethernet prevented it from being widely used as a fabric in military embedded computing. This situation was greatly improved with the formation of the Open Fabrics Alliance (OFA) in 2004. OFA originally grew out of the InfiniBand community but eventually became the champion of RDMA protocols over Ethernet. Ethernet silicon from different vendors is highly interoperable, but RDMA protocols are still somewhat vendor-specific.

Ethernet for HPC Ethernet has only relatively recently become practical for use in HPC environments thanks to RDMA. RDMA enables the placement of data at a specific address in a remote device. This has minimized Ethernet’s infamous overhead, allowing transfer rates of 40 Gbits/s using very little CPU capacity. The Ethernet network interface controller features a mature software architecture with hardware address lookup tables 20

COTS Journal | June 2014


SPECIAL FEATURE

that make it possible to send a packet and have it placed at a specific address in the receiving node’s memory. Once the complex setup is performed, the transfer process is simple, lightweight and fast. These attributes make Ethernet an excellent choice when an open-standard, high-performance (RDMA enabled) solution is required. Ethernet is also well suited for connecting processing elements inside a subsystem to the wider, secure network. Assuming that security policies allow it, any processing element on an Ethernet network can address any other processing element. It is also notable that Linux, Intel and Ethernet have a strong commercial affinity. This means there are hundreds of thousands of open-source projects available whose code can be directly leveraged by system integrators. These resources include numerous packet inspection applications that provide intrusion detection/ protection systems, as well as information assurance. To meet the challenges of high-speed commercial communications, Ethernet moved from 10 Gbits/s to 40 Gbits/s without an intervening speed (such as 20 Gbits/s). While 10 Gbit/s Ethernet (XAUI) was implemented in embedded applications using four lanes operating at 3.25 Gbaud, in 40 Gbit/s Ethernet (40GBaseKR4) four 10.3 Gbaud lanes are required. As anyone designing products to work at this speed can readily attest, the task is significantly more difficult than at lower speeds because electromagnetic effects encountered at microwave frequencies must be considered. Curtiss-Wright has found as a result of internal testing and modeling research that it is possible to achieve robust signaling greater than 10 Gbaud in OpenVPX systems, but that successful designs require a high degree of care and knowhow (Figure 2). It is clear that both the module designs and the backplane designs must be optimized in order to achieve robust signaling. Engineers at the company created a robust set of design rules to ensure reliable 10+ Gbaud operation for our Gen3 Fabric40 modules and backplanes (Figure 3).

InfiniBand Leads in Speed InfiniBand remains unchallenged in

Figure 3 The CHAMP-AV9 6U OpenVPX quad-core 4th generation Core-i7 DSP engine supports 40 Gbit/s fabrics such as 40 Gigabit Ethernet and InfiniBand under Curtiss-Wright’s Fabric40 Initiative.

terms of overall performance with 56 Gbit/s fabric speeds available in commercial systems. InfiniBand is strong in high-performance applications, most notably in the financial community, where every microsecond lost to latency equals a lost revenue opportunity. While vendors have done an excellent job of pushing the envelope in terms of overall throughput, latency and minimization of overhead, InfiniBand FDR running at lane speeds of 14.0625 Gbaud (56 Gbits/s) is not able to operate on current-generation OpenVPX connectors, especially across 16slot backplanes and over wide temperature ranges. InfiniBand OpenVPX systems therefore fall back to QDR and FDR10 (10 Gbaud) rates. This diminishes Infiniband’s most prominent competitive advantage versus 40 Gbit/s Ethernet.

InfiniBand was the first fabric to offer direct DMA into the memory of a general-purpose graphics processing unit (GPGPU). Recently, however, the same capabilities have been demonstrated over Ethernet and RapidIO devices that “hang off ” PCIe. Silicon is available that enables InfiniBand to work in both Ethernet and InfiniBand modes, which allows vendors to support both InfiniBand and Ethernet using the same network interface controller on a single payload card. This has significant benefits for designers who are continually challenged to produce designs that are more flexible in their functionality. Using dual-mode payload cards and switches, systems integrators can choose which of the two fabric protocols best suits their requirements.

Embedded Issues

Quality of Service

Embedded deployed systems that must support wide temperature ranges and include content from many vendors may have difficulty operating even at 10 Gbit/s speeds. It is helpful that InfiniBand has an even lower rate (DDR, 5 Gbaud) to fall back on. Like Ethernet RDMA, InfiniBand is also a fairly complex protocol that makes it difficult to implement in FPGAs. Although the ecosystem running InfiniBand in an FPGA is very limited, the community tends to innovate very aggressively in high-performance computing.

Unlike telecommunications applications that transport many traffic types, a real-time aerospace and defense sensor application is often dealing with just one traffic type. Most system integrators do not concern themselves with the sophisticated end-to-end Quality of Service (QoS) inherent in these fabrics today. While backplane bit errors are extremely rare, data loss sometimes compromises signal fidelity, so a robust protocol is preferred. Bit errors can be more of a concern at high altitudes (airborne applications) or under extreme COTS Journal | June 2014

21


SPECIAL FEATURE

environmental conditions that are not unusual in military embedded computing. Certain RapidIO physical layer protocols have hardware support for error checking and retransmission that minimizes the latency penalty for recovering from a bit error across a link. RapidIO also has logical layer support for retransmission from end-to-end. TCP offers this type of robustness but it is usually implemented in software, so there is a much greater penalty in terms of latency and CPU overhead. InfiniBand has hardware support for reliable transmission and can guarantee delivery of packets using CRCs to detect errors. Ethernet, on the other hand, is lossy by design, and the mechanisms that ensure delivery were added later. Ethernet does not have the built-in robustness that was designed from the start into RapidIO and InfiniBand.

of a specific application. RapidIO is a great, low-risk choice for medium data rates or when data plane FPGA integration is a key element of the architecture. Ethernet enjoys commercial ubiquity and has by far the largest ecosystem. With recent introductions of RDMA and the 40 Gbit/s protocol, Ethernet is poised to take significant market share as an embedded OpenVPX fabric. InfiniBand is also poised to make inroads into the OpenVPX market with its focus on HPC. Each of these offerings has strengths and weaknesses as an embedded fabric. In many ways, partnering with a vendor that supports product families around each of these fabrics could be your most important decision. Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions Ashburn, VA. (703) 779-7800 www.cwcdefense.com

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TECH RECON Obsolescence Hurdles in System Design

Multiple Factors Play in FPGA Obsolescence Mitigation While FPGAs are great devices to rely on for long-life platform designs, even they face tricky obsolescence issues. By considering all the angles of supplier selection, military system designers keep risks low. J Ryan Kenny, Strategic Marketing Manager, Altera Alex Fong Yim Hui, Product Marketing Manager, Altera

M

ilitary communication and weapons systems are now overwhelmingly composed of high-density, modern electronic components. Developing an “edge,” or competitive advantage, in the military marketplace necessarily requires taking advantage of the latest technologies, the fastest processing, and the highest integration of analog and digital processes to reduce detection and response times in intelligence systems and military equipment. These same systems, however, are often brought into service and maintained over time periods that are many multiples, or even orders of magnitude, longer than the constituent components of these systems. This inevitably creates the problem of component obsolescence, which is a primary issue in the field of logistics, and fuels entire industries of component and product emulation, reverse engineering, and code transfer and qualification.

FPGA: Solution and Problem In modern military systems development, obsolescence strategies are a part of doing business—both for ensuring the lifecycle requirements of the device, and for mitigating the cost risk associated with obsolescence events. FPGAs are a primary technology in dealing with obsolescence events in 24

COTS Journal | June 2014

Figure 1 The Air Force’s Joint Strike Fighter program faced a huge obsolescence issue that forced the Last Time Buy (LTB) of over 80,000 FPGAs that were discontinued by their manufacturer.

their ability to be programmed and emulate functions of obsolete digital and sometimes discrete electronics. However, eventually even the FPGAs themselves become obsolete and incur additional redesigns and requalification of military equipment. With all that in mind, it’s useful to look at a short history of FPGA obsolescence,

what factors are involved in an obsolescence decision on the part of FPGA vendors, and how FPGA users can use this knowledge to craft Obsolescence Risk Mitigation Plans. It also introduces the idea of exercising Past Performance Assessments on component vendors themselves to take advantage of this data.


TECH RECON

Cost Data on Obsolescence

EOL Mitigation Strategies and Planning

There have been several events in 2013 that provide data for some of the cost impacts of unscheduled or unplanned obsolescence events. One military application impacting Army Communication-Electronics Command (CECOM), using FPGAs to process infrared images, spent between $1.4 and $2.6 million on a Last Time Buy (LTB) where the cost had to be transferred from elsewhere in the program. The same product EOL announcement generated several other LTB notices on the Federal Business Opportunities website, including Army and Navy customers. These LTBs were all dwarfed by a single unscheduled expense of the Air Force’s Joint Strike Fighter program, which spent $105 million on over 80,000 FPGAs that were discontinued by their manufacturer (Figure 1). These numbers consider only a subset of the costs of a single product obsolescence event, but they should be enough to attract the attention of taxpayers and defense acquisition officials.

DMSMS (Diminishing Manufacturing Sources and Material Shortages) and logistics teams commonly target obsolescence reactively. That leaves critical systems vulnerable to Last Time Buys and End-of-Life events. Obsolescence costs, especially for unscheduled product discontinuation or vendor dissolution due to bankruptcy or acquisition, cannot be avoided completely. However, dual-sourcing and a few other strategies identified below have many precedents and examples of both success and failure. Signing a contract with a minimum support period is a common, but often costly, approach to ensuring a minimum time period and quantity of components for a program. Component vendors often only consider such commitments when a certain volume of business is guaranteed, or at a price premium to cover their risk in continuing the support of devices with rising support costs. For very high assurance systems, this can include a Federal Acqui-

sition Regulation (FAR)-directed DX rating if procured directly from the Government. Such support commitments naturally don’t mitigate risks that impact business factors out of the vendor’s control, such as supplier obsolescence market shifts that substantially threaten the vendor’s business model. It is the practice of most vendors to provide significant notification in advance of a product’s obsolescence, and provide the opportunity for a final order or LTB. This typically represents an unscheduled expense for the Government, to include component costs, storage costs, and little pricing leverage or contingency. The problem is that a Last Time Buy (LTB) brings a false sense of security and doesn’t account for the follow-on sales or the logistics challenges of stocking and storing parts for the length of a program. This strategy also assumes a high level of knowledge or nearly perfect forecast of the supportable lifetime of a defense system, which has historically extended far beyond the original architectural level planning for many systems.

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COTS Journal | June 2014

25


TECH RECON

Selecting the Lowest Risk Vendor Arguably, that strategy is not used widely enough in defense acquisitions. Traditional supplier profiles of past performance do look at a vendor’s history, financial stability, and risk of the supplier as an on-going concern. However, these profiles don’t necessarily look at the business structure, decisions and factors that lead to product support and supportability decisions of their components in the long term. Figure 1 shows a flowchart for the steps of selecting a supplier that is low risk. Articles have been published for years on the occurrence of obsolescence events and how to manage their risks, but few have examined the real decision factors that go into a vendor’s decision to obsolete a product. It is assumed to be a “business decision,” driven by demand and aggregated product business, and the general market requirement for technology companies to advance to the next technology. However, there are several factors that lead to obsolescence decisions relating to semiconductor manufacturing. Among these are markets addressed by a product, and the obsolescence of components or processes that are themselves elements of the component (including packaging, substrates, testers and machining). But one that is rarely addressed openly in such discussions is economic benefit. It may be in the financial interests of the company to issue an obsolescence notice or order to generate Last Time Buys to pull future revenue forward into the current year. Not every FPGA vendor may have the same market and supplier factors that go into obsolescence decisions. For more on those two decision factors, see the Web-only sidebar “Accessing Suppliers Based on Markets and Foundries” in the online version of this article.

Vendor’s Past Performance on EOL If market demand, and diversity of supplier and foundry, were the only two factors used in making financial or strategic decisions about product support and discontinuation, then obsolescence factors could be monitored fairly accurately by acquisition personnel and risk managers. However, another unfortunate factor needs to be added: obsolescence decisions for financial advantage. Knowing that 26

COTS Journal | June 2014

Supplier Selection – basic flowchart Gather suppliers list Screen potential suppliers Solicit supplier’s Information (bids) Conduct thorough evaluation Negotiate

Enter the contract Monitor performance - Feedback Figure 2 The flowchart illustrates the steps of selecting a supplier that is low risk for defense applications.

customers have a small set of choices for obsolescence mitigation (essentially just support contracts/commitments and Last Time Buys), a vendor may knowingly obsolete devices with the purpose of initiating a Last Time Buy, and pull future year revenue streams into the current fiscal cycle. This can be done to boost current quarter revenue when a vendor is under pressure to meet revenue goals and estimates generated by the financial community. As discussed earlier, there are real cost impacts to military and other customers from such product obsolescence decisions. The only real incentives for a vendor to avoid passing these costs on to customers is a Past Performance Assessment and Obsolescence Risk Assessments done at the time of component vendor selection. Each of the major FPGA vendors used


TECH RECON

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ASIC 10 years (typical) Altera PLD +15 years (typical)

TQ embedded modules: Low TCO, Off-the-Shelf, Very Wide Customer Base, Used by Many Market Segments

Figure 3 Component types vary in their typical product life spans, but FPGA products like Altera’s PLDs have both long life spans and low total cost of ownership (TCO).

most widely in military systems has been in business and shipping components in excess of 25 years. With new product cycles every 2-3 years in conjunction with new silicon process technology, the list of programmable logic products and variants has grown quite large. In addition, this 25-year history of product shipments is now long enough to generate some data on the number of products/SKUs developed, how many of those products are still supported versus obsoleted, and what the average lifespan of a programmable logic device is likely to be given its addressed market, foundry source and packaging supplier (Figure 3).

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Extending Performance Assessments Past Performance Assessments have historically been used only for systems developers and integrators because of the complexity and impact of their role in the cost and schedule of systems. However, with the miniaturization, integration and convergence of systems functions into components like modern FPGAs, cost and schedule risk are not limited to those primes. Past performance of these compo-

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TECH RECON Obsolescence Hurdles in System Design

Legacy Military Systems Can Embrace New Storage Technologies Long life cycles of many military platforms mean that storage technologies become outdated fast. Converting over to more modern storage media and interfaces brings many rewards. Steve Gudknecht, Product Marketing Manager, Elma Electronic Systems

F

or defense contractors who deal with ever-shrinking DoD spending, it’s important to creatively manage end-of-life issues and ever-changing electronic component technology. Doing so enables a program to march forward seamlessly with only minor disruptions and little impact to cost. Being proactive and seeking alternative solutions when these changes come about can mean the difference between blowing the budget and staying within it. This is particularly true when it comes to countless aging storage subsystems and their related interconnects, as evidenced in SCSI-based interface and drive technology, which is not only very reliable, but still widely in use today.

Bridging SCSI to Modern Technology Critical data-centric systems from shipboard weapons systems and engine control systems to mission data repositories that were designed years ago are still in operation today—using legacy SCSI hard drives in their storage subsystems—and will continue to operate for the foreseeable future. But with more and more hard drive manufacturers dropping out of the business, SCSI drive supplies are in short supply, so the availability horizon is uncertain. In the defense business, not seeing over the horizon is a problem in more ways than one. 30

COTS Journal | June 2014

Evolving Storage Technology – Upgrade Advantages Consider solid stage drives – Reduction in size and weight

• Higher initial cost but lower life time support costs • Improved environment performance • Lower power consumption when going from 3.5-inch SCSI to 2.5-inch SATA SSD • Improved MTBF

Add security options • Secure erasure • Write protection • Encryption

Figure 1 There are many advantages when upgrading to more advanced storage system technology. Unlike previous eras, defense spending today is heavily scrutinized as budgets either shrink or stagnate. With that in mind, finding economical ways to upgrade, rather than replace, equipment has become a larger percentage of every dollar spent. Upgrading equipment has always been the less expensive route, but now the added emphasis of budgetary restrictions makes avoiding—or at least managing—unforeseen and costly end-of-life situations even more critical. The SCSI standard defines the physical

and electrical characteristics for a parallelattached, multi-drop computer-to-computer or computer-to-peripheral interface. Though originally intended for connecting many types of peripheral devices, including printers and scanners, the interface has evolved over time to be almost exclusively applied to storage devices. With the architectural shift from parallel to serial I/O in embedded military systems, any device natively connected via parallel interface is at a disadvantage for long-term availability.


TECH RECON

Adapting to Change Upgrade solutions that maximize purchasing power and performance are highly sought after with the continued reduction in defense budgets coupled with the growing expectations for greater system performance and reduced downtime. Shifting from SCSI to SATA, or even PATA drives entails hardware redesign to accommodate the new interface and its accompanying connector and form factor types. SCSI connector pin counts range from 50 to 80, while SATA connectors contain just seven pins, forcing board design changes to accommodate the new connector. Many currently deployed SCSI drives are 3.5 inches, while SATA drives with few exceptions are 2.5 inches or smaller. Buying up the needed legacy parts before they become obsolete has several downfalls, including tying up financial resources to purchase the parts and the required physical storage space of the parts themselves. In this age of cost-consciousness, stockpiling is not a viable solution. Considerations must also be made for changes to the operating system and the device drivers necessary to support the new host interface, because new hardware often times means new software. This introduces a whole different level of system-wide implications to maintaining legacy storage products, as software changes affect other processes and communication subsystems. Many defense programs continue to run ancient real-time operating systems (RTOS) and versions that are no longer readily supported or easily upgradable, so new, OS-agnostic hardware solutions are priceless. Older military systems are in need of cost-effective, seamless methods that bridge legacy systems to new storage technologies, while maintaining what isn’t broken.

Linking Old and New Fortunately for today’s military system designer, bridging solutions can be applied to any board size, and modular systems make it even easier to adapt storage bridges mechanically and electrically for fast development cycles. Modern storage drives can be connected via the legacy host storage interface using form, fit and functional board level replacement products designed to insert into specific applications. SCSI-to-SATA bridges cleverly present the legacy interface to the host, while

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Figure 2 Newer solid state drives offer multiple levels of secure erasure plus write protection and data encryption, and can conform to a variety of sanitization protocols. masking any indication of the underlying SATA technology and thereby eliminating the need for software changes. A large portion of legacy systems in defense applications are Eurocard based—more specifically VME or its derivatives (with the exception of VPX) with some cPCI systems in the mix. Solutions using current devices such as SSDs, Compact Flash and CFAST media have replaced large rotating hard drives and tape drives that support removable cartridges. Over and above identifying suitable SATA drives to replace the old PATA or SCSI drives, board level storage product suppliers must consider a small, but critical, list of issues when implementing legacy storage bridging. First they must retain the legacy interface to the host system. They also must preserve the

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TECH RECON

legacy board form factor—VME, cPCI and so on—upon which the drives are mounted. Then there are the issues of maintaining the legacy operating system and supporting removability where necessary.

Enhanced Security and More There are additional benefits to just avoiding obsolescence when upgrading to the latest storage drive technology. By continuing to use older drive technology, embedded systems designers can hinder opportunities to take advantage of the side benefits that come along with newer drives and interfaces. Manufacturers don’t tend to make investments to improve drive reliability, performance and features—improvements that would be beneficial even in older systems—when the technology is widely viewed as past its prime. Figure 1 shows the advantages of upgrading to more advanced storage system technology. The majority of older systems use rotating hard drives, which are known as being the least reliable and the most delicate component in the system, accounting for most of the failures and repair costs in deployed

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Figure 3 Shown here is the path of storage interface technology evolution and the typical conversions needed to bridge from legacy systems.

systems. Given the chance to move to more rugged solid state drives (SSDs) to increase overall system MTBF, long-term repair costs and environmental toughness is undoubtedly high on a system designer’s wish list. Even though low-cost MLC solid state drives are up to eight times more expensive than rotat-

ing hard drives on a per gigabyte basis, total cost of ownership evens the playing field when considering equipment up time and reduced replacement costs. Rotating hard drives take hours to fully erase and offer no guarantee that a resourceful adversary would be unable to retrieve data. In systems that handle sensitive intelligence for military programs, data security is a critical characteristic of a system’s storage component. Newer solid state drives offer multiple levels of secure erasure plus write protection and data encryption that can easily be accommodated when designing replacement boards. With the push of a button, solid state drives can be fully and irretrievably erased in a matter of seconds, a desirable feature in hostile breach situations (Figure 2). In addition, power-hungry rotating hard drives dissipate roughly three times the wattage as SSDs and weigh up to eight times more—severe detriments to airborne and inthe-field military applications. Since many legacy SCSI systems use 3.5” drives, another way to reduce weight results from transitioning to 2.5” drives—either rotating or solid state. In


TECH RECON

this case a complete solution would consider any mechanical mounting changes necessary to support the smaller drive form factor as it is nested on the board.

Simplifying the Move Embedded board designs aimed at solving these legacy storage challenges use advanced bridging devices to create custom form, fit and function compatible solutions that address the upgrade issues in several ways. Relatively simple designs consist of dual SCSI interfaces with non-removable drives, such as a board supporting one wide SCSI-to-SATA and one Ultra320 SCSIto-SATA II connection captured on a VME board, where the original design consists of dual straight SCSI connectivity. Figure 3 illustrates the path of storage interface technology evolution and the typical conversions needed to bridge from legacy systems. Many older deployed systems will remain unchanged throughout their usable life, so a fixed bridging solution will do the trick in many cases. But in situations where a transition period to a new host system is planned, it may be beneficial and cost-effective to address the needs of both the old and the new systems in a single configurable manner. A simple switching device embedded on the doorstep of the drive is one innovative method embedded designers can use to enable either a pass through of the SCSI command set or the SATA command set. The dual purpose board may be deployed as part of either the legacy system or the new system, reducing spares requirements with support for both interface options. In this case, front or rear panels would include I/O connectors for both the legacy interface and for the new SATA interface, allowing the single design to be applicable to both systems. Custom transition modules can be designed to support rear I/O where the need arises. Beyond all the issues discussed so far, there are a number of advanced issues that may also require consideration. For more details on those, please see the Web-only sidebar “Handling Advanced Requirements” in the online version of this article.

tional interruption, and today’s storage technologies enable upgrades that can be easily achieved while maintaining backward compatibility with older operating systems commonly found on military platforms. Implementing a storage bridging strategy, and replacing SCSI and PATA drives with cutting-edge SATA drives, can extend the lifetime of the storage system interface by more than five years. And some side benefits of

implementing SATA drives include moving to more reliable solid state versions and adding security features, while optimizing SWaP—all key considerations in defense applications. Elma Electronic Systems Fremont, CA (510) 656-3400 www.elma.com

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SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT Displays and Panel PCs for Naval Systems

Net-Centric Push Drives Shipboard Display and Panel PC Upgrades As naval systems upgrade their networking and EW capabilities, display system upgrades are going along for the ride. A variety of new technologies and products feed those needs. Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

D

isplays and panel PCs are the key human interface points that are part of major ongoing modernization efforts on U.S. Navy ships. There are a couple factors driving that. First there’s a fundamental shift in technology network-centric operations. For naval systems, that’s translating as complete consolidation of shipboard networking and computing systems. At the same time there’s an acknowledgement that a reduced military will need to increase its situational awareness capabilities, and that increases in collecting, sharing and displaying of information feeds into that trend (Figure 1). It’s often on these large, rugged highresolution displays and panel PCs, that the naval warfighter gets the complex situational awareness data—maps, video, images and text—interfaced directly to military weapons platforms on networks. On the panel PC side, there’s a growing base of product solutions— some designed for industrial use—that provide military system integrators a complete PC embedded within a flat panel. These can be simply connected to a keyboard or used as touchpad panels if that feature is available.

Replacing Legacy Systems Because of hardware obsolescence issues in legacy systems, integrating new electronics technologies to aid Navy electronic warfare has been an ongoing challenge. COTS-based 34

COTS Journal | June 2014

to increase capability and affordability across the fleet. Consolidation through CANES will eliminate many legacy, stand-alone networks and provide a common computing environment infrastructure for dozens of command, control, intelligence and logistics applications. Displays, of course, make up the user interface part of those systems.

Figure 1 At a recent trade show, Chief Editor Jeff Child is briefed on a custom configured military rackmount LCD display from Core Systems. approaches have come to the rescue as the Navy replaces closed systems with scalable, upgradable architectures. The stakes are high when it comes to improving ship defense, especially as advanced anti-ship missiles have become a threat. And with the shift to an AsiaPacific defense, Navy modernization in general will be a priority. One of the most sweeping changes in shipboard systems is the Consolidated Afloat Networks and Enterprise Services (CANES) program. CANES consolidates and modernizes shipboard, submarine and shore-based command, control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) network systems

EW Upgrades Also Drive Display Tech Meanwhile, the Navy’s Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP) replaces the AN/SLQ-32, the legacy surface ship EW detection and countermeasures system initially installed in the fleet during the late ʼ70s. This spiral-block development program has numerous phases, but among them Block 1A includes 18 installs completed and 103 additional installs planned. It incorporates the updated Improved Control and Display (ICAD) Human Machine Interface and the Electronic Surveillance Enhancements (ESE) upgrades that provide COTS-based technology refresh for the obsolete AN/SLQ-32 display and pulse processing. On the technology supplier side, over the past 12 months there’s been a steady roll out of a variety of display and panel PC products suited for shipboard systems. These range from highly rugged products designed specifically for military use to those made


A43_COTSJrnl-1-3V_2-25x9-875_Layout 1 5/27/14

SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

Bigger and Better

Figure 2 The SV-2600W-PM is a 26-inch Panel Mount LCD monitor, featuring a high definition widescreen 16:9 format with 1080p resolution (1920 x 1080).

for industrial control markets where a lot of the environment specs overlap. A lot of military video display technologies these days are replacing older systems that had quite different mechanical footprints. Large, bulky CRT-style monitors took up a lot more space than today’s thin HD flat screen displays. Sabtech took advantage of that in their Sabtech Data Display Computer (SDDC) product. The SDDC is a rugged, general-purpose computer that could fit in the volume of a CRT monitor, but features a large flat screen 19” (diagonal) display for optimal viewing. It has a backlit 102key keyboard with tactile feedback and a threebutton HULA pointing device. The keyboard and pointing device are environmentally sealed and can be operated with gloves on. It comes with one BD-DVD drive and can have up to two removable solid state hard drives. A rear-mounted USB port provides connectivity to any compatible peripheral device. Audio communications are supported with microphone and headphone jacks, and an integrated speaker provides for audible alarms. Dual copper Gigabit Ethernet ports provide LAN connectivity through locking sealed connectors. In addition to industrial and general military applications, the SDDC is a direct replacement for the OJ-454(V)/UYK Data Display Console and ORTSNET workstation used in the Aegis Operational Readiness Test System (ORTS). In this configuration, the SDDC runs ORTS Network Emulation Terminal (ORTSNET) software, providing status, maintenance direction, fault reporting, indication and display, and readiness assessment of the Aegis Weapon System.

Large size and high resolution are other requirements important to some shipboard systems. Stealth Computer offers a 26-inch Panel Mount LCD monitor, featuring a high definition widescreen 16:9 format with 1080p resolution (1920 x 1080) (Figure 2). The Stealth model SV-2600W-PM is Stealth’s largest rugged industrial monitor to date. The LCD is environmentally sealed to NEMA 4/IP65 specifications providing maximum protection from dirty, wet and hostile operating environments. The SV-2600W-PM 26-inch panel mount monitor was designed utilizing LED backlight technology for optimal energy efficiency while delivering up to 350 Nits (Cd/m2) of brightness, a contrast ratio of 1000:1, and wide viewing angles of 178°. The SV-2600W-PM is well equipped with Capacitive Touch Screen, VGA and DVI-D video input connectors. The SV-2600W-PM panel mount LCD installs easily into new and existing panels, cabinets and consoles without having to drill multiple stud holes. Simply drop the LCD into place and secure with the attached steel brackets. Also pushing the size vector, IEE offers a rugged, 25.5-inch WUXGA display with 1980 x 1200 resolution offering 10% more height than a standard full HD monitor. This display has been designed within IEE’s enhance lifecycle management program to ensure its availability for a minimum of seven years, a key benefit for IEE’s industrial and military/aerospace system integrators. The front-facing, sealed OSD switches withstand harsh environmental elements while providing full control of display parameters, including brightness, contrast, size and position. In one application, full HD content can run concurrently and unobstructed with 12 lines of “banner text” along the bottom of the screen.

Multi-Display Systems For rackmount display subsystems, the push has been for larger displays but also for multiple displays in the same rugged systems. Pushing those barriers, Display Integration Technologies (DIT) recently announced its PDD3 family of multi-display rack drawer products by introducing the Hydra Series, which represents the industry’s first 21.5-inch Quad-Head rackmount display platform. The Hydra platform offers scalable configurations from 1 to 4 screens, each providing full HD (1920 x 1080) widescreen support (Figure 3).

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SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

The Hydra accommodates 1, 2 and 3 screen variants within a 3U 26-inch deep form factor for use in a standard 19” rack, while the 4U accommodates the new Quad display. According to DIT, the drive behind this new development was primarily to meet military requirements for larger displays with increased ruggedness but still within a small rackmount form factor. The Hydra display’s outer frame and drawer platform is constructed out

of 5052-H32 Aluminum. The drawer extends from the frame by the use of rigid steel friction slides. The display support structure is constructed out of 6061-T6 Aluminum, which utilizes gas springs and torque hinges for support. The Hydra also provides concealed cable management and an integrated monitor shutoff switch that engages when closed. Among those making displays specifically for military use is Argon Displays. An example

Figure 3 The Hydra Series is the industry’s first 21.5-inch Quad-Head rackmount display platform. The Hydra platform offers scalable configurations from 1 to 4 screens, each providing full HD (1920 x 1080) widescreen support.

shipboard product from them is the Argon ARD15. The 15-inch versatile rugged display is tailored for use in rugged C4ISR environments, including naval systems. The ARD15 provides a large viewable area within a very small package, making it one of the most versatile display monitors on the market. The ARD15 is a COTS product designed to meet all applicable MIL standards for environmental performance, and leverages common modern commercial technologies to provide a path for long-term availability and sustainability. The ARD15 provides a 15” diagonal display surface with 1024 x 768 XGA resolution, and delivers an affordable, lightweight solution for your mobile command and control, naval, or airborne application where you need configuration flexibility. Argon Alpharetta, GA (678) 608-4480 www.argoncorp.com Core Systems Poway, CA (858) 391-1006 www.coresystemsusa.com Display Integration Technologies Vista, CA (760) 599-9225 www.dithd.com IEE Van Nuys, CA (818) 787-0311 www.ieeinc.com Sabtech Industries Yorba Linda, CA (714) 692-3800 www.sabtech.com

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TECHNOLOGY FOCUS PC/104 and PC/104 Family Boards

PCI Express Makes its Presence Felt in the PC/104 World PC/104 shines as a solution for the needs of space-constrained military systems. And with PCI Express now solidly in the PC/104 pantheon, system developers can meet high-performance interface requirements too. Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

T

he PC/104 form factor and all of its follow-on variants continue to hold an established position in military embedded systems. PC/104—and its wider family of form factors including PC/104-Plus, PCI-104, PCIe/104, PCI/104Express and EPIC—has a clear success story in leveraging many technologies from the PC infrastructure. Boasting more than two decades of history, the well-established PC/104 standard is remarkable for opening the door to the embedded stackable computing concept. It began with the ISA bus and over the years has grown to include the latest innovations in desktop computing technologies with PCI and PCI Express. The PC/104 Consortium’s most recent efforts have revolved around crafting a detailed, consolidated and consistent stackable PCI Express roadmap, starting with the adoption of the PCI/104-Express and PCIe/104 specifications. Early last year, the PC/104 Consortium membership approved the PCI/104-Express and PCIe/104 specification with provisions for PCI Express Generation 2 and Generation 3. The purpose of the additions and enhancements to the specification was to align it with performance improvements to PCI Express 3.0. Transfer rates of up to 2 Gbytes/s, 8 Gbytes/s, 16 Gbytes/s and 32 Gbytes/s are now possible on its x1, x4, x8 and x16 links. The connector technol38

COTS Journal | June 2014

Figure 1 Using a PC/104-Plus SBC as its control computer, the Black-I Robotics’ LandShark unmanned ground vehicle (UGA) is a fully electric UGV. It is an IP-based system, which allows for maximum scalability of external payloads, sensors and computing power.

ogy and footprint are preserved in the specification. Layout examples for the different PCI Express links, USB 3.0 and SATA were added to assist developers. Over the last couple years, products based on this revision of the specification were already rolling out as PC/104 vendors took advantage of the higher performance interconnect capability with PCI Express Gen 2 or Gen 3. It opened up new opportunities for data-intensive applications with fewer

required PCI Express links. The Roundup on the following pages showcases some representative examples of PC/104, PC/104-Plus, PCIe/104 and PCI/104-Express board products. This year PCIe/104 and PCI/104-Express boards dominate the back, while new PC/104 designs upgraded to sport the latest process technology are well represented too. The inclusion of boards with Mini PCIe sockets makes for a sort of small mezzanine function, leveraging the emerging wealth of Mini PCIe peripheral cards as they become available. PC/104-Plus is used as the form factor for the computer powering Black-I Robotics’ LandShark unmanned ground vehicle (UGA) (Figure 1). This fully electric UGV is an IP-based system, which allows for maximum scalability of external payloads, sensors and computing power. It uses the JAUS Protocol (OpenJAUS V3.3.0b) for communications. The LandShark has a runtime of 2 to 60 hrs depending on use, terrain and attached payloads. The LandShark is generally tele-operated by an operator from a remote location. It may also have various onboard third-party payloads that provide full or semi-autonomous command behaviors. In 2012 Black-I Robotics won a contract from the Air Force Research Laboratory in Rome, NY to supply unmanned ground vehicles and related consulting services. The program had a goal of making unmanned vehicles and automobiles more secure from cyber hackers.


TECHNOLOGY FOCUS

PC/104 and PC/104-Family Boards Roundup

PC/104 SBC Sports Vortex86DX2 SoC and Provides Full ISA Support

E3800 Series Atom Processor Rides PCIe/104 SBC

AMD G-Series-Based PC/104 SBC Has Extended Legacy Support

ADLINK Technology provides a PC/104 form factor SBC, the CM1-86DX2, featuring an extensive I/O feature set and full ISA bus support. The CM1-86DX2 is ideal for control applications that require power efficiency, small form factor, longevity and industrial grade ruggedness. Based on DMP’s Vortex86DX2 single chip solution, which integrates a powerful yet efficient CPU with graphics controller, audio controller and many other functionalities, the CM186DX2 provides all the standard peripheral connections of an embedded PC on a printed circuit board with dimensions of 96 mm x 90 mm (3.775” x 3.550”). The CM1-86DX2’s rich I/O includes two Ethernet ports, four serial ports, three USB ports, eight A/D inputs, eight GPIOs and PS/2 connectors for keyboard and mouse. A SATA 1.5 Gbit/s interface is also provided to allow for connection with disk or optical drive. Taking full advantage of ADLINK’s market-proven “Rugged by Design” methodology, the CM1-86DX2 is able to withstand 11.95 Grms vibration and 40G shock (MIL-STD-202G Method 214A/213B), and operate over an extreme temperature range of -40° to +85°C. The CM1-86DX2 is targeted at applications such as transportation, automated manufacturing and aviation.

ADL Embedded Solutions has announced its ADLE3800PC, PCIe/104 SBC. The ADLE3800PC is based on Intel’s first System-on-Chip (SoC) E3800 Atom product family, which is built using Intel’s 22nm 3D Tri-gate process. Improved power management capabilities result in standby power measured in mW and standby time measured in days. The ADLE3800PC touts a wide thermal junction temperature (-40° to +85°C) making it ideal for small, rugged, extended temperature embedded applications. Its compact 90 mm x 96 mm PCIe/104 form factor is well suited for optimizing size, weight and power (SWaP) on a variety of small form factor (SFF) embedded systems. The ADLE3800PC graphics engine is capable of decoding 10 or more streams of 1080p video, and has integrated hardware acceleration for video decode of H.264, MVC, VPG8, VC1/WMV9 and others standards. It also supports DirectX 11, Open GL 4.0, full HD video playback, and a maximum resolution of 2560 x 1600 at 60 Hz with dualdisplay support. Intel E3800 series quad and dual core processor options make it a truly exceptional platform. The ADLE3800PC is particularly suited for extreme environments such as industrial control and automation (especially when HMI is required), or commercial and military vehicle intelligent systems with stringent SWaP requirements.

Advantech has unveiled the PCM-9376—a 3.5-inch Single Board Computer (146 x 102 mm) form factor powered by the AMD G-Series T16R with A55E chipset, which offers an upgrade path for legacy applications. PCM-9376’s ruggedized construction was designed with carefully considered material selections, mechanical design and critical test criteria. PCM-9376 supports either soldered DDRIII SDRAM for high vibration resistance, or SODIMM socket for flexible memory module choices. PCM-9376 is equipped with Advantech’s iManager intelligent selfmanagement firmware agent to simplify system integration. Some customers still use current PC/104 modules without considering replacement, so keeping legacy PC/104(ISA) support can make system integrators reduce migration costs. Legacy ISA expansion demand is still high for customers needing longer longevity and better performance, so PCM-9376 was designed with the AMD G-Series chipset for full ISA connectivity (including DMA support). The TDP of the AMD G-Series T16R chipset is 4.5 watts only. It averages only 2.3W, yet delivers 3 x CPU performance over the last generation AMD Geode LX800 processor with much better 3D graphic performance. PCM-9376 is designed with a fanless lowprofile heatsink solution only 23.9 mm total in height to meet embedded space limited environments. It also incorporates an mSATA slot instead of CF card slots, which improves SATA transmission rates.

ADLINK Technology San Jose, CA. (408) 360-0200 www.adlinktech.com

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

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COTS Journal | June 2014

ADL Embedded Solutions San Diego, CA. (858) 490-0597 www.adl-usa.com.

Advantech Irvine, CA. (800) 866-6008 www.advantech.com


TECHNOLOGY FOCUS | PC/104 and PC/104-Family Boards Roundup

Fully Managed Network Switch on PCI/104-Express

Rugged PCI/104-Express SBCs Sport Interchangeable QSeven COMs

PCIe/104 Board Serves up PCI Express Video Control

Curtiss-Wright has announced that its Defense Solutions division has introduced the new Parvus SWI-22-10, the industry’s first 20-port Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) Switch PCI/104-Express card. With 2x the ports previously provided by earlier designs, this fully managed COTS GbE switch reduces slotcount while adding advanced Layer 2 network management features. With significantly reduced power and cost-per-port, the SWI22-10 is ideal for use in rugged deployed manned and unmanned military and civilian sensitive mobile, tactical, airborne and vehicle platforms for situational awareness and network-centric operations. Designed to meet MIL-STD-810G environmental requirements, the SWI22-10 delivers optimal performance in extended temperature (-40° to +85°C) and high shock and vibration airborne and ground vehicle applications. The SWI-22-10 is an ideal solution for connecting a large number of IP-enabled embedded devices, including computers, cameras, sensors and command-and-control equipment, deployed in manned and unmanned system platforms at the network edge. The SWI-2210 is a fully managed Layer 2 switch card and supports IPv4 and IPv6 multicast traffic, Virtual Local Area Networks, port control, Quality of Service traffic prioritization, Link Aggregation, SNMPv/1/v2/v3 management, secure authentication, redundancy, precision timing, port monitoring, IGMP Snooping and data zeroization.

Diamond Systems offers the Quantum, a conduction-cooled PCI/104-Express SBC family with interchangeable, full-size QSeven COMs processors and a highly integrated I/O baseboard. The processors available on the new Quantum SBCs include the 1 GHz AMD Fusion G-T40E CPU, the 1 GHz AMD G-Series eKabini GX-210HA SOC and ARM A9 i.MX6 single/dual/quad cores up to 1.2 GHz. The SBCs fully utilize the latest serial high-speed buses available with QSeven for extended product viability as well as the concept’s modular plug and play function that enhances performance scalability. The new PCI/104-Express-based family offers a wide range of onboard I/O including data acquisition with A/D, digital I/O, counter/ timers and pulse width modulators. Standard PC I/O includes USB 2.0, RS-232/422/485, Gigabit Ethernet, SATA and digital I/O. Quantum SBCs feature a bottom-side heat spreader that mounts directly to the baseboard, relieving stress on the Qseven module and enhancing durability. Most I/O is provided on latching connectors for increased ruggedness. The boards also incorporate a 6V to 34V wide voltage power input. Quantum SBCs support I/O expansion with PCI-104, PCIe/104 and PCI/104-Express I/O modules. The Quantum SBC was designed with rugged applications in mind from its extended operating temperature of -40° to +85°C on most models and the onboard DDR3 SDRAM to the latching I/O connectors.

RTD Embedded Technologies offers the VID31460, a PCIe/104 video controller that uses the AMD E6460 GPU. This powerful 3D graphics and HD multimedia video controller offers 5 video outputs, up to 4 of which may be used simultaneously. By supporting DisplayPort++, the video outputs can interface with almost any standard monitor (analog or digital). The VID31460 provides an excellent power to performance ratio with the use of AMD PowerPlay technology. By utilizing the PCIe x16 link, this video card ensures maximum performance with the CPU. The board combines the PC/104 form factor with stackable bus structure. Entrylevel desktop graphics, multimedia and computing capabilities are provided, include 160 shader processors, 64-bit memory interface with 512 Mbytes of GDDR5 and Microsoft DirectX 11 support. The card provides third generation unified video decoder functionality with support for H.264 VC-1, MPEG-2/4 decode and for dual HD decode, Blu-ray, and stereo 3D. Up to 4 displays can be driven with AMD Eyefinity technology. The processor does parallel processing too thanks to AMD’s Accelerated Parallel Processing (APP) technology. And an optimized-profile heat sink ensures ideal thermal conditions.

Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions Ashburn, VA. (703) 779-7800 www.cwcdefense.com

Diamond Systems Mountain View, CA. (650) 810-2500 www.diamondsystems.com

RTD Embedded Technologies State College, PA. (814) 234-8087 www.rtd.com

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

COTS Journal | June 2014

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TECHNOLOGY FOCUS | PC/104 and PC/104-Family Boards Roundup

Rugged A/V Codec Rides PCIe/104 Form Factor

Bay Trail SoC-Based PC/104 SBC Boast Security Features

PC/104-Plus Gbit Ethernet Card Supports Power-Over-Ethernet

Sensoray has introduced the ultra-lowlatency, high-performance Model 953ET: PCIe/104 Form Factor A/V Codec. It simultaneously captures four channels of analog video and four channels of stereo/ mono audio. Each video channel captures at the full frame rate (30 fps for NTSC or 25 fps for PAL), which results in an aggregate frame rate of 120 fps for NTSC or 100 fps for PAL. The Model 953-ET compresses the A/V streams into MJPEG, MPEG-4, H.264, or MPEG-TS format for video, and with G.711 or AAC format for audio. The powerful encoding engine supports ultra-low-latency, full frame rate encoding of two video streams from its single composite video input and sends the streams out over the PCI-Express x1 link. The video streams can be displayed on a monitor, saved on a storage device like HD/SSD, or streamed over an IP network. The Model 953-ET can also perform as a 4-channel decoder, converting a compressed A/V stream into standard analog video and audio signals. Seven transparency levels of overlay images can be displayed on top of the composite video output, as well as up to 160 characters of text overlay for each channel prior to compression. OEM quantity 2-9 pricing starts at $905.

VersaLogic has announced Bengal—a rugged new PCIe/104 SBC. Based on Intel’s highly anticipated “Bay Trail” System-onChip (SoC), Bengal is available in single, dual and quad core models. The Bengal’s onboard Trusted Platform Module (TPM) security chip can lock out unauthorized hardware and software access. Additional security is provided through built-in AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) instructions. Intel’s advanced Gen 7 HD graphics engine provides outstanding graphics performance and is capable of supporting up to two 1080p video streams simultaneously. Onboard hardware acceleration is available for encode/decode of H.264, MVC, VP8, VC1/ WMV9 and other standards. Bengal’s I/O connectivity includes dual Gigabit Ethernet ports with network boot capability, one USB 3.0 port, four USB 2.0 ports, two serial ports (RS-232/422/485), sixteen digital I/O lines, I2C, PWM and Intel High-Definition Audio (HDA). A SATA 3 Gbit/s interface supports high-capacity rotating or solid-state drives. A Mini PCIe socket with mSATA capability provides flexible SSD options. Bengal’s Mini PCIe socket allows easy onboard expansion with plug-in Wi-Fi modems, GPS receivers, and other mini cards such as MIL-STD-1553, Ethernet and Analog. The board is designed and tested for industrial temperature (-40° to +85°C) operation and meets MIL-STD-202G specifications to withstand high impact and vibration. The Bengal single board computer (EPMe-30) will be available Q4 2014. Pricing starts at $769 in OEM quantities.

WinSystems has introduced the PPMGIGE-2-POE, a PC/104-Plus module that integrates two independent Gigabit Ethernet ports with Power Sourcing Equipment (PSE) circuits. It is ideal to source two remote tethered 802.3af/at compliant POE devices supporting up to 25W each from an external DC source. Implemented as a PC/104-Plus add-in I/O module, the PPM-GIGE-2-POE can manage power to remotely located POE devices or board stacks. Both POE interfaces can use separate external DC supplies or share a single external power source. The POE controller for each channel goes through a detection, discovery and classification process each time a network cable is attached or removed. The PPM-GIGE-2-POE is based on two Realtek RTL8110s Gigabit Ethernet controllers. These controllers combine triple-speed, IEEE 802.3-compliant Media Access Controller with an Ethernet transceiver, 32-bit PCI bus controller and embedded memory. The Ethernet controllers are compliant with the IEEE 802.3at specification for 10/100 Mbit/s Ethernet and the IEEE 802.3ab specification for 1000 Mbit/s Ethernet. This module uses RJ-45 connectors to plug into 10/100/1000 Mbit/s networks using standard Category 5 (CAT5) unshielded twisted pair (UTP) copper cables. This module operates over the industrial temperature range of -40° to +85°C without a fan. It measures 3.6 x 3.8 inches (90 mm x 96 mm). The dual channel PPM-GIGE-2-POE’s pricing is $249. The single channel PPMGIGE-1-POE’s pricing is $199.

VersaLogic Tualatin, OR. (503) 747-2261 www.versalogic.com

WinSystems Arlington, TX. (817) 274-7553 www.winsystems.com

Sensoray Tigard, OR. (503) 684-8005 www.sensoray.com

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

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COTS Journal | June 2014


COTS

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

PRODUCTS

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

3U VPX Card Provides Comprehensive GSM Monitoring Technology Pentek has introduced a new member of its Cobalt family, the Model 52663, the industry’s first full spectrum GSM channelizer 3U VPX module. Using a highly optimized IP core for the Xilinx Virtex-6 FPGA, the 52663 is ideal for mobile monitoring systems that must capture some or all of the 1100 uplink and downlink signals in both upper and lower GSM bands. The Model 52663 accepts four analog inputs from an external analog RF tuner, such as the Pentek Model 8111, where the GSM RF bands are down converted to an IF frequency. These IF signals are then digitized by four A/D converters and routed to four channelizer banks, which perform digital downconversion of all GSM channels to baseband. Two of the banks handle 175 channels for the lower GSM transmit/receive bands, and two banks handle 375 channels for the upper bands. The DDC channels within each bank are equally spaced at 200 kHz. Each DDC output is re-sampled to a 4x symbol rate of 1.08333 MHz to simplify symbol recovery. Every four DC outputs are combined into a frequency-division “superchannel” that allows transmission of all 1100 channels across the PCIe Gen 2 x8 interface. The GSM channelizer IP core is supported with additional factory-installed FPGA functions including packet formation, time stamping, four DMA controllers, gating and triggering. Baseband super-channel packets are sent via DMA controllers to processor memory where customers apply processing algorithms. The Model 52663 3U VPX board is available in ruggedized and conduction-cooled versions. The Model 53663 3U VPX module includes a crossbar switch to support additional PCI Express backplane routing options. The board is also available as an XMC module, Model 71663. Pentek, Upper Saddle River, NJ. (201) 818-5900. www.pentek.com

PICMG 1.3 Host Board Sports BGA-Mounted Intel Core Processors

MicroTCA Carrier Hub Boasts 40 Gbit Ethernet Option

WIN Enterprises provides the MB-80560, a full-size PICMG 1.3 Single Host Board (SHB) with Ball Grid Array (BGA)-mounted, 22nm, 4th Gen Intel Core i7/i5/i3 processors. BGA mounting (soldered) provides greater reliability in challenging and mobile environments than socketed processors that may become dislodged. Other advantages of BGA processor mounting include lower thermal resistance, lower unwanted inductance and superior electrical performance. Memory includes DDR3 up to 32 Gbytes and 4 x SATA 3 links with RAID. I/O includes 6x COM, USB 3.0 and 2.0 configurable to 12x, 1x LPT and 2x GbE LAN. All versions of the MB-80560 have integrated graphics support. Display support includes DVI-D and VGA with optional DP support (via pin header).

VadaTech now offers a MicroTCA Carrier Hub (MCH) with a 40GbE option, synchronous Ethernet and advanced clocking/GPS capability. The UTC004’s 40GbE option is a 4x boost in performance from today’s 10GbE solutions. The MCH also provides PCIe Gen 3, SRIO Gen 2 and a crossbar switch (CBS) option. The switch allows any fabric to be utilized including custom solutions. A key feature of the UTC004 is the advanced clocking/synchronization capability. The MCH enables highly flexible master/slave clock and time synchronization to multiple clocking standards including GPS, IEEE1588 (PTP), SyncE and NTP. The MCH bridges these standards together to provide Grand Master Clock capability to the attached chassis network.

WIN Enterprises, North Andover, MA. (978) 688-2000. www.win-ent.com

VadaTech, Henderson, NV. (702) 896-3337. www.vadatech.com

Lightweight Synchro Booster Amplifier Targets Shipboard Applications Data Device Corp. has introduced a lightweight, smallest form factor Synchro Booster Amplifier for shipboard applications. The SBA-3500x provides up to a 75 percent reduction in weight and 50 percent reduction in size compared with similar solutions while maintaining the rich feature set from previous generation products. The unit’s 25VA output drive enables synchro or resolver signals to be amplified to high-power 90V synchro signals required to drive multiple CT (Control Transformer), CDX (Control Differential Transmitter) and TR (Torque Receiver) loads. The high-efficiency, high-power capability and compactness of these units make them ideal for training simulators, remote indicators, gunfire control and retransmission systems. The unit weighs only 1.25 lbs with a low-profile case option. Output power is 90V synchro 60 Hz or 400 Hz up to 25 VA. Input is 90V synchro or 6.8V, 5V, 2V resolver 60/400 Hz inputs with custom input voltages available. The unit is powered from the reference input—no additional power source is required. Features include short circuit, overload, load transient and over temperature FIND the products featured in this section and more at protection. It operates over -40° to +85°C temperatures and an MTBF report is available. www.intelligentsystemssource.com

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COTS Journal | June 2014

Data Device Corp., Bohemia, NY. (631) 567-5600. www.ddc-web.com


COTS PRODUCTS

Non-Isolated Buck Boost Converter Has Broad Voltage Ranges SynQor offers the latest release in its High Voltage NiQor family of non-isolated buck boost converters with the NQ60W60HGC40. The new NQ60W60HGC40 will operate over a continuous input voltage range of 9-60V. The output voltage is set by using only a single resistor or voltage source, permitting the user to create a customizable output voltage from 0-60 VDC. Like many converters targeted for the industrial, medical and communications markets, the device has broad input and output voltage range of interest to military system designers. The input or output current can be as high as 40A. Military-grade versions of these products are available. The NQ60W60HGC is highly efficient, achieving up to 95 percent, allowing more usable power to be realized from the converter in realistic system environments. The module features built-in current sharing, clock synchronization and adjustable current limit with current monitor that makes it suitable for battery charging applications. This user configurable HVNiQor product is particularly useful for applications in high-power systems that do not require input to output isolation in the converter or where traditional DC/DC converters do not meet system requirements for power density, efficiency or volume. The NQ60 provides new options for customer requirements that cannot be met with other standard off-the-shelf converters, or where the cost and timeframe usually associated with custom supplies is prohibitive. SynQor, Boxborough, MA. (978) 849-0600. www.synqor.com

3U Backplane Integrates PCIe into the PXI Architecture Elma Bustronic has designed a 3U 17-slot backplane to meet the PXI Express Hardware Specification Revision 1.0 (with X1 PCIe connections). Designed for OEM embedded control and highly integrated test and measurement applications, the backplane integrates PCIe into the PXI architecture. The new PXIe backplane features one system slot controller and one timing controller slot as well as 15 peripheral slots, each with a PCIe Gen 1 1X lane to the controller. PXI Express, based on PCI Express, offers high-bandwidth PCI Express connections to modules, enabling up to 2.5 Gbytes/s per direction to PXI Express and CompactPCI Express modules. In addition to the PXIe backplane, Elma offers chassis platforms and PXI-compatible boards, and integration services. Elma Electronic Systems, Fremont, CA., (510) 656-3400. www.elma.com

High Resolution PCIe Cards Offer Cost-Effective Data Acquisition Elsys Instruments has expanded its family of LAN controlled transient recorders with a new, cost-effective series of high-resolution PCIe data acquisition cards. The high-precision, high-resolution digitizers offer sophisticated features such as advanced trigger modes, continuous data acquisition mode, single ended and differential inputs, digital input lines and ICP coupling for powering piezo sensors. They enable the development of scalable systems that can be expanded to meet growing data acquisition needs. Synchronization can be established with many associated channels, as well. Advanced trigger modes include slew rate, pulse width, pulse pause, period, missing event, window-in and window-out as well as the usual edge pos/neg triggering with trigger hysteresis values set by the user. A sophisticated data acquisition mode, ideal for troubleshooting applications, available for the TPCE-LE platform is event controlled recording (ECR) mode. ECR requires a trigger event, but eliminates the dead time between triggers using an overlapping technique of adjacent acquisitions. Pricing for individual TPCELE modules starts at $3,400. Elsys Instruments, Monroe, NY. (845) 238-3933. www.elsys-instruments.com

XMC Card Supports HD-SDI Output to High Res Avionics Monitors Tech Source has announced the Condor 3001xF XMC graphics and video card, which supports the output of video signals to the next generation of avionics monitors running at resolutions of up to 1080p60. Based on the AMD Radeon E6760 embedded graphics processing unit (GPU), the Condor 3001xF offers exceptional graphics performance. The card features two 3G/HD/SD-SDI video outputs. Its built-in video decoder enables dual HD decoding of H.264, VC-1, MPEG4 and MPEG2 compressed video streams. The card can be used for GPGPU (general purpose computing on graphics processing unit) since it supports OpenCL and has 480 shaders delivering up to 576 GFLOPS of single precision floating point performance. Tech Source, Altamonte Springs, FL. (407) 262-7100. www.techsource.com

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

COTS Journal | June 2014

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COTS PRODUCTS

Customizable SBC Serves Up Dual XMC I/O Sites Innovative Integration has announced the SBC-Duo—a user-customizable, turnkey embedded single board that includes a full Windows/Linux PC and supports a wide assortment of ultimateperformance XMC modules. With its modular I/O, quad-core CPU performance and compatible PC architecture, the SBC-Duo reduces time-to-market for customers, providing outstanding performance while maintaining a tiny footprint and low cost. Optional GPS/IEEE1588-synchronized timing, triggering and sample control is available for remote I/O. Limitless expansion via multiple nodes. Uniquely customizable—dual XMC sites for I/O each employing eight-lane PCIe gen2 signaling and J16 signals exposed via VITA 57.1 mechanical mezzanine compatible with the company’s assortment FPGA-accelerated analog and digital I/O at sample rates to 4 GHz. Also includes flexible triggering and timing control, eight USB ports and dual RS-232 to connect to tunable RF receivers. Data streaming provides up to 2000 Mbytes/s with 4x SATA3 SSDs or up to 1300 Mbytes/s thru cabled-PCIe) or 1Gb/s Ethernet. Optional, stand-alone, autonomous operation is provided with GPS/1588-disciplined sampling. The convection cooled unit boots from SSD drive in a compact, rugged 250 x 170 mm footprint that is ready for embedded operation. Innovative Integration, Simi Valley, CA. (805) 578-4260. www.innovative-dsp.com

Rugged COM Express Module Provides Scalable Performance

Acceleration Card Serves Up Xilinx UltraSCALE FPGAs

MEN Micro has released the CC10C, a Rugged COM Express (RCE) module that offers an abundance of I/O design flexibility. Supporting different Freescale ARM i.MX 6 processors, the scalable COM module easily accommodates various system requirements. The i.MX 6 family also provides on-chip controllers and interfaces supporting Gigabit Ethernet, USB 2.0, PCI Express, UART or CAN as well as multimedia interfaces, such as LVDS, DVI, audio and a camera connection. The new VITA 59 RCE computer-on-module features a configurable FPGA with 140 pins for additional I/O customization. Pricing for the CC10C is $598. MEN Micro, Ambler, PA. (215) 542-9575. www.menmicro.com

Alpha Data has added boards with Xilinx 20nm Kintex UltraSCALE devices to its offerings, enabling a new class of accelerator cards. Early access to the Vivado Design suite has proven very successful and Alpha Data is pleased to announce the ADM-PCIE-KU3, in conjunction with Vivado 2014.1 support for the KU devices. The ADM-PCIE-KU3 is a high-performance, reconfigurable, half-length, low profile, x 16 PCIe form factor board based on the Xilinx Kintex UltraSCALE FFVA1156 ASIC-class FPGA. The ADM-PCIE-KU3 features 16 Gbyte memory banks in two independent channels of DDR3-1600 ECC memory capable of 25 Gbytes/s bandwidth, dual QSFP ports supporting 10G/40G Ethernet, dual SATA connections, voltage/temperature/current control and monitoring, air-cooled heat sink, all on a small 6.6 x 3.8 PCIe board. Alpha Data, Denver, CO. (303) 954-8768. www.alpha-data.com

VPX Single Board Computers Sports Low-Power ARM Processing Curtiss-Wright announced that its Defense Solutions division has introduced the first member of its new family of rugged ARM-based COTS processing modules. The VPX3-1701 is a 3U VPX SBC based on a CPU that features dual 1 GHz ARM processors. This cost-effective, low-power small form factor SBC is rated at less than 15W maximum power dissipation. The VPX3-1701 delivers the benefits of ARM technology to system designers today while providing a path to technology insertion with pincompatible, higher-performance Curtiss-Wright ARM SBCs to follow. The VPX3-1701’s integral high-speed backplane and XMC connectivity enable multi-Gbyte/s data flows from board to board through the backplane interface and from the backplane to its onboard XMC site to support the acquisition, processing and distribution of sensor data for demanding C4ISR applications such as video, radar and sonar data processing. The new small form factor VPX3-1701 provides similar I/O interfaces and pin-compatibility with Curtiss-Wright’s other popular 3U VPX SBCs, including the Power Architecture-based VPX3-131 and VPX3-133 and the Intel-based VPX3-1257. The compact, lightweight VPX-1701 is ideal for technology refresh applications. For example, for customers looking to upgrade to VPX from their legacy CompactPCI (cPCI)-based system architectures, the VPX3-1701 delivers contemporary compute bandwidth and I/O performance for similar cost and power. FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

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COTS Journal | June 2014

Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions, Ashburn, VA. (703) 779-7800. www.cwcdefense.com.


MILCOM 2014

AFFORDABLE MISSION SUCCESS: MEETING THE CHALLENGE Oct. 6–8, 2014 Baltimore Convention Center www.milcom.org The premier international conference and exposition for military communications, MILCOM 2014 showcases the technical innovations and creative talents of military, academic and industry leaders. Attendees will experience an in-depth technical program with industry exhibits, panel discussions and tutorials, which are eligible for continuing education units. Technical tracks and topics include: Cyber Security and Trusted Computing Waveforms and Signal Processing Networking: Architectures, Management, Protocols and Performance System Perspectives Selected Topics in Communications


COTS

ADVERTISERS INDEX GET CONNECTED WITH INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS SOURCE AND PURCHASABLE SOLUTIONS NOW Intelligent Systems Source is a new resource that gives you the power to compare, review and even purchase embedded computing products intelligently. To help you research SBCs, SOMs, COMs, Systems, or I/O boards, the Intelligent Systems Source website provides products, articles, and whitepapers from industry leading manufacturers---and it's even connected to the top 5 distributors. Go to Intelligent Systems Source now so you can start to locate, compare, and purchase the correct product for your needs.

Index

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

Company Page# Website

Company Page# Website

Aydin Displays.....................................32....................www.aydindisplays.com Acces I/O Products, Inc.......................16.......................... http://accesio.com/ Acromag..............................................20........................... www.acromag.com Ballard Technology, Inc.......................33....................... www.ballardtech.com CM Computer......................................52......................www.cmcomputer.com Curtiss-Wright, Corp...........................23.................... www.curtisswright.com Data Bus Products, Corp.....................14.............. www.databusproducts.com Data Device Corporation.....................19............................www.ddc-web.com EDT.....................................................49.................................... www.edt.com Extreme Engineering Solutions............51..............................www.xes-inc.com GE Intelligent Platforms......................17............................defense.gp-ip.com Harting................................................12...................... www.harting-usa.com Innovative Integration.........................36..................www.innovative-dsp.com Intelligent Systems Source..................49.. www.intelligentsystemssource.com Interface Concept................................26...............www.interfaceconcept.com LCR Embedded Systems, Inc...............25........ www.lcrembeddedsystems.com

Mercury Systems, Inc. ........................15..................................www.mrcy.com Milcom 2014.......................................47............................... www.milcom.org MPL AG.................................................4.......................................www.mpl.ch North Atlantic Industries..................29, 31................................ www.naii.com One Stop Systems, Inc. ....................22, 39............. www.onestopsystems.com Phoenix International Systems, Inc. ....4.............................www.phenxint.com Pentek, Inc...........................................5................................www.pentek.com Pico Electronics, Inc............................35..................www.picoelectronics.com RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc. .......2......................................www.rtd.com RTECC.................................................28................................. www.rtecc.com Sealevel..............................................13............................ www.sealevel.com SynQor, Inc..........................................37............................... www.synqor.com Trenton Systems, Inc. .........................43................. www.trentonsystems.com TQ Systems GmbH...............................27.... www.convergencepromotions.com/TQ-USA WinSystems, Inc. .................................7........................www.winsystems.com

COTS Journal (ISSN#1526-4653) is published monthly at 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250, San Clemente, CA 92673. Periodicals Class postage paid at San Clemente and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to COTS Journal, 905 Calle Amanecer, Ste. 250, San Clemente, CA 92673.

COMING NEXT MONTH Special Feature: Target Report: HPEC System Strategies in Defense

System Development: Pre-integrated Systems Tackle Technology Readiness Hurdles

While the strict definition of High Performance Embedded Computing (HPEC) varies, the basic idea is to leverage technologies like VPX and PCIe to provide massive processing power for compute-intensive systems. Such systems can meet immense throughput and processing requirements in space-constrained systems handling more than a teraflop of data. Articles in this section look at the products and tools available to make these systems a reality.

In parallel with the trend toward rugged box-level systems is another trend toward “pre-integrated subsystems.” These are defined as a set of embedded computing and I/O boards put together and delivered as a working system to provide a certain function but intended to be used in a military customer’s larger system. These help feed the military’s desire for complete systems that are at a high TRL (Technology Readiness Level). Some of these are functionspecific, whereas others are more generic computing/networking platforms. This section explores the forces driving this trend and the trade-offs between the two types of systems.

Tech Recon: Safety-Critical and Mission-Critical Choices in Embedded Software The fact that military system functionally is now mostly software based means that the burden of security and safety-critical operation falls squarely in the embedded software realm. Such software has to be certified to the safety-critical standard DO-178B and its imminent successor DO-178C. But while those efforts seem costly, they pale in comparison to the huge costs associated with correcting software defects once they’re deployed on an airborne system. This section compares the tools and techniques available to help system developers meet real-time and safety-critical needs.

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COTS Journal | May 2014

Tech Focus: OpenVPX SBCs The OpenVPX spec provides implementation details for VPX payload and switch modules, backplane topologies and chassis products. And most importantly, it provides specific profiles on all the key aspects of an OpenVPX so that users and product vendors now have a clear language defining which OpenVPX are compatible with one another. Over the past couple years, the number of new OpenVPX boards continues to ramp. This section updates readers on the progress of those implementations, and displays a sampling of the current crop of OpenVPX SBC products.


COTS

PRODUCT GALLERY

aTCA-N700 40 GbE AdvancedTCA Packet Processing Blade • Two Cavium OCTEON II CN6880 processors • Eight memory sockets support VLP DDR31600 REG/ECC up to 128 GB • Onboard Ethernet switch connects to RTM, processors, backplane • Dual 1000BASE-T Fabric Interface channels • Powerful local management processor Freescale QorIQ P2041 • Flexible RTM support • Supports ADLINK Software for Networks (ADSN)

ADLINK Technology Phone: (408) 360-0200 Email: info@adlinktech.com Web: www.adlinktech.com

intelligentsystemssource.com

WE ASSURE YOU HIT A BULLSEYE EVERYTIME... Atlas PCI/104-Express SBC with Atom N2800 CPU The rugged Atlas SBC features a 1.86GHz Intel N2800 CPU and includes USB 2.0, serial, Gigabit Ethernet, SATA, and digital I/O. It supports PCI-104, PCIe/104, PCI/104-Express and PCIe MiniCard I/O expansion. Rugged features include a -40oC to +85oC operating temperature, SDRAM soldered on-board, and an integrated conduction cooling heatspreader.

Diamond Systems Phone: 1 (800) 36-PC104 Email: sales@diamondsystems.com Web:  http://www.diamondsystems.com/ products/atlas

WITH JUST A COUPLE CLICKS. • See Instructional Videos • Shop Boards Online • Read Articles & More • Request a Quote

COTS Journal | June 2014

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COTS Journal’s

MARCHING TO THE NUMBERS

36.7 hours

Length of the successful second endurance flight of the U.S. Army’s Improved Gray Eagle (IGE) prototype UAV. IGE is an advanced derivative of the mission-proven Gray Eagle. During the flight, IGE demonstrated its ability to carry an external signals intelligence (SIGINT) pod on one wing and two Hellfire missiles on the other. The flight test was a significant milestone for the Improved Gray Eagle program, proving the validity of the aircraft’s endurance claims in this specified payload configuration.

1.6 kilometers

Range at which a Lockheed Martin prototype laser system successfully disabled two boats in tests off the California coast. Lockheed Martin is developing the transportable, ground-based ADAM laser system to demonstrate a practical, affordable defense against short-range threats, including Qassam-like rockets, UAVs and small boats. In less than 30 seconds, the ground-based system’s high-energy laser burned through multiple compartments of the rubber hull of the military-grade small boats operating in the ocean.

$17.6 Billion 3,800 Soldiers Value of contract awarded by the U.S. Navy to General Dynamics Electric Boat for the construction of 10 additional Virginia-class submarines. The multi-year Block IV contract enables Electric Boat and its industry teammate, Newport News Shipbuilding, to proceed with the construction of two ships per year over a five-year period. This is the largest number of boats ordered to date in a single contract block.

75 ROUNDS PER SECOND

75 rounds per second – Rate of fire of Close-In Weapons System (CIWS) used in Combat System Ship Qualification Trial aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). The system successfully tracked and fired upon a mobile surface target during a surface gun exercise (GUNEX) last month. The CIWS is a 20 mm radar-guided Gatling gun system that protects the ship from surface and air threats. It uses forward looking infrared radar (FLIR) and other radar systems to track, lock onto and take down incoming threats. 50

COTS Journal | May 2014

Number of warfighters from the 2nd Brigade, 1st Armored Division who participated in the Network Integration Evaluation, or NIE 14.2—the seventh in a series of semi-annual field evaluations that focus on improvement and simplification of the Army’s networked capabilities. Coming to close on May 22, in the exercise the Army soldiers fought side by side in a combination of live, virtual and constructive battles with more than 900 Marines and a British mechanized brigade headquarters.


Module and System-Level Solutions from Intel® and Freescale™ Single Board Computers

XPedite7570

4th Gen Intel® Core™ i7-based 3U VPX SBC with XMC/PMC

XCalibur1840

Freescale QorIQ T4240-based 6U VPX SBC with dual XMC/PMC

Secure Ethernet Switches and IP Routers

XPedite5205

Secure Gigabit Ethernet router XMC utilizing Cisco™ IOS®

XChange3018

3U VPX 10 Gigabit Ethernet managed switch and router

High-Performance FPGA and I/O Modules

XPedite2400

Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA-based XMC with high-throughput DAC

High-Capacity Power Supplies

XPm2220

3U VPX 300W power supply with EMI filtering for MIL-STD-704 & 1275

Rugged, SWaP-Optimized, COTS-Based Systems

XPand4200

Sub-½ ATR, 6x 3U VPX slot system with removable SSDs

XPand6200

SFF 2x 3U VPX system with removable SSD and integrated power supply

XPand6000

SFF Intel® Core™ i7 or Freescale QorIQ-based system with XMC/PMC

Extreme Engineering Solutions 608.833.1155 www.xes-inc.com

Designed, manufactured, and supported in the USA


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MILITARY W W W. C M C O M P U T E R . C O M

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x �

CM MILITARY ATR CHASSIS ARE DELIVERED FULLY TESTED & CERTIFIED PER

MIL-STD-461F & MIL-STD-810F

-TO GUARANTEE IMMEDIATE FAULT FREE OPERATION-

� �

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

90

170

160

160

140

120

80

140

100

70

120

RE101-2 7cm Navy

60

40

100

200 300

500

1k

2k

3k

5k

10k

20

30

50

0 30

100k

Frequency in Hz

100

200 300

500

1k

2k

3k

5k

10k

20

30

50

90

70

70

60

60

Level in dBµV/m

Level in dBµV/m

100M

200M

300M

400

500

800

50 40 30

RE102-3 space system and aircraft(External)

40

20

20

100

200

300

500

800 1k

2k

3k

4k

8 10k

Frequency in Hz

*CE101. CONDUCTED EMISSIONS, 30 Hz - 10 KHz.

100

80

RE102-3 space system and aircraft(External)

50 40

EC CE102-1 28V

60

40

30

20

20 10

0

10

0 30

50

1G

80

120

Level in dBpT

80

90

80

60

60

*RE102. RADIATED ELECTRIC FIELD, 30 MHz - 1 GHz.

140

RE101-2 7cm Navy

10 30

50

Frequency in Hz

160

80

20

0 30M

100k

*RE101. RADIATED MAGNETIC FIELD POS.F, 30 Hz - 100 KHz.

100

60

40

10

50

Frequency in Hz

*RE101. RADIATED MAGNETIC FIELD POS.B, 30 Hz - 100 KHz.

80

20

20

50

RE102-3 space system and aircraft(External)

40 30

40

20

0 30

80

Level in dBµA

RE101-2 7cm Navy

60

50

Level in dBµV

80

EC CE101-4 above 28V

60

100

Level in dBµV/m

100

Level in dBpT

Level in dBpT

120

50

100

200 300

500

1k

2k

3k

5k

10k

20

30

50

100k

0 10k

Frequency in Hz

0 1G

20

30

50

100k

200 300

500

1M

2M

3M

5M

10M

20

Frequency in Hz

RE TU D I

THE EU

COMPO

M

Y

IDE US NS

*RE102. RADIATED ELECTRIC FIELD, 10 KHz - 30 MHz.

N

MILITAR

ANUFAC

*RE101. RADIATED MAGNETIC FIELD POS.C, 30 Hz - 100 KHz.

30M

2G

3G

4G

5G

6

8

10G

Frequency in Hz

*RE102. RADIATED ELECTRIC FIELD, 1 GHz - 18 GHz.

* Figures achieved by CM-ATR-3U chassis in MIL-STD-461F testing procedures conducted by Independent Authorised Labs. CS101, CS116, RS101 & RS103 certificates also available.

18G

-10 10k

20

30

50

100k

200 300

500

1M

2M

3M

5M

Frequency in Hz

*CE102. CONDUCTED EMISSIONS, 10 KHz - 10 MHz.

CM Computer

True Military COTS Products

10M

NT NE S I

COTS Journal  

June 2014

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