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INSIDE TRACK Figure 3

For the demonstration, a GA-ASI company-owned Predator B RPA was equipped with a companyproduced jamming pod containing Northrop Grumman’s Pandora EW System and controlled by a GAASI Ground Control Station. (EW) system at the U.S. Marine Corps’ (USMC) Weapons and Tactics Instructor (WTI) course held at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Yuma. The purpose of this second demonstration was to evaluate the capability of an RPA to conduct electronic warfare missions in concert with other unmanned aircraft systems and EA-6B Prowlers in a multinode approach against a more capable Integrated Air Defense System (IADS). The event expanded upon GA-ASI and Northrop Grumman’s successes in last April’s WTI exercise and focused on delivering a more integrated and networked EW capability. GA-ASI participated in the demonstration with a company-owned Predator B RPA equipped with a company-produced jamming pod containing Northrop Grumman’s Pandora EW System and controlled by a GA-ASI Ground Control Station (GCS) (Figure 3). The Northrop Grumman payload proved to be very effective and was integrated seamlessly with the Predator B avionics and command and control architecture. General Atomics San Diego, CA. (858) 455-3000. www.ga.com.

Figure 4

Boeing EA-18G Growler is an American carrier-based electronic warfare aircraft, a specialized version of the two-seat F/A-18F Super Hornet.

Military Market Watch Electronic Warfare Market to Grow to $15,590 Million by 2020 Electronic warfare is an indispensible component of any military force. The capability and efficiency of the electronic warfare system can change the outcome of a war. Electronic warfare systems in the past consisted of analog systems with capabilities limited by the hardware and software. The advancements in the field of electronics enable today’s electronic warfare systems to incorporate more digital capability, and faster signal processors enable better performance. Though airborne and naval platforms have dominated electronic warfare in the past decade, landbased electronic warfare systems are now gaining importance. There is also an increasing popularity of smaller electronic warfare systems that can be integrated with smaller platforms like UAVs and patrol vessels. According to research by ASD Media, the market will see considerable growth due to stealth aircrafts and naval vessels. These platforms are hard to detect and track. As a consequence electronic warfare systems will play a crucial role for maintaining stealth, and also for counter stealth operations. According to ASD’s report on the topic, the global electronic warfare market is estimated to be $12.15 billion in 2014 and is expected to register a CAGR of 4.50% to reach $15.59 billion in 2020. The growth regions will be Latin America, Middle East and Asia-Pacific (Figure 4). The ASD Media report, Global Electronic Warfare Market, provides data on market sizes and forecasts, but also offers a detailed analysis of the market trends and factors influencing market growth. It also provides in-depth geographic analysis of the electronic warfare market in the United States, Europe, Canada, Brazil and Japan. The report draws the competitive landscape of commercial aviation, providing an indepth comparative analysis of the technological and marketing strategies of the key players. ASD Media Amsterdam, The Netherlands. +31 (0)20 486 1286. www.asdreports.com.

February 2014 | COTS Journal

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COTS Journal  

February 2014

COTS Journal  

February 2014