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Tech Focus: CompactPCI and

CompactPCI Serial Board Roundup

The Journal of Military Electronics & Computing

PLUS: Rugged Power Supplies and Batteries Adapt to Military Needs Security Technologies and Analytic Tools Enable Reliable Systems An RTC Group Publication

Volume 16 Number 2 February 2014

cotsjournalonline.com


CAN Protocol Solutions

Fiber and Twisted-Pair CAN Networks from RTD For Additional Fiber-Optic CAN Devices

Isolated CAN Network #1

Stackable ISA Bus

TXD4

RXD4

TXD3

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X10 Open

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Dual CAN Module Isolated CAN Network #2

TXD2

RXD2

RXD1

Isolated Copper Twisted-Pair CAN Bus #1

8-36 VDC Input +5 V Output

CAN Device

Isolated Copper Twisted-Pair CAN Bus #2

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These modules are shown separately for clarity in the diagram. In real-world applications, the PC/104 modules can be stacked together to form a rugged unit. Our dual-CAN controller supports up to 32 devices on each isolated network.

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RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc. provides a wide range of CAN bus products for vehicle-based and monitoring applications. Pair the robustness of the PC/104 architecture with the benefits of the CAN protocol including bit-wise message arbitration, simple connectivity, and error detection. The scalability and modularity of these CAN networks offer system designers a wide range of solutions. Contact our engineering team to learn more.

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CPU Module

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The Journal of Military Electronics & Computing

10

GPGPUs Secure Their Place as Ideal Paralleling Processing Technology

CONTENTS February 2014

Volume 16

COTS (kots), n. 1. Commercial off-the-shelf. Terminology popularized in 1994 within U.S. DoD by SECDEF Wm. Perry’s “Perry Memo” that changed military industry purchasing and design guidelines, making Mil-Specs acceptable only by waiver. COTS is generally defined for technology, goods and services as: a) using commercial business practices and specifications, b) not developed under government funding, c) offered for sale to the general market, d) still must meet the program ORD. 2. Commercial business practices include the accepted practice of customer-paid minor modification to standard COTS products to meet the customer’s unique requirements. —Ant. When applied to the procurement of electronics for the U.S. Military, COTS is a procurement philosophy and does not imply commercial, office environment or any other durability grade. E.g., rad-hard components designed and offered for sale to the general market are COTS if they were developed by the company and not under government funding.

Departments 6 Editorial It’s About People

Number 2

SPECIAL FEATURE

8

The Inside Track

GPGPUs for Military Signal Processing

44

COTS Products

10  GPGPUs Secure Their Place as Ideal Paralleling Processing Technology

50 Marching to the Numbers

Jeff Child

TECH RECON Military Battery and Power Supply Trends for Board and Box Level Systems

16  Power Supplies and Mil Batteries Bulk Up for Success

Coming in March See Page 48

SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

On The Cover: The MEADS launcher is A400M a transportable and can engage and defeat targets attacking from any direction. Using its 360-degree defensive capability, MEADS defends up to eight times the coverage area using far fewer system assets. A transition to GPGPUs means that in this type of system, dozens of PowerPCs boards can be replaced with a GPGPU-based system one tenth of the size.

Security Issues for Military Systems

(Photo Courtesy of MEADS International)

Jeff Child

20  Board and Box Level Systems Face SWaP Design Challenges Lino Massafra, North Atlantic Industries

26  Separation Kernels Enable Rapid Development of Trustworthy Systems Will Keegan, LynuxWorks

30  Dealing with the Unstructured IED Data Exploitation Gap Dr. Michael Stumborg, Intelligent Software Solutions

TECHNOLOGY FOCUS CompactPCI and CompactPCI Serial Boards

38  CompactPCI Boasts a Solid Past and Bright Future Jeff Child

40

CompactPCI and CompactPCI Serial Board Roundup Digital subscriptions available: cotsjournalonline.com


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The Journal of Military Electronics & Computing

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Publisher PRESIDENT John Reardon, johnr@rtcgroup.com

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COTS Journal HOME OFFICE The RTC Group, 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250, San Clemente, CA 92673 Phone: (949) 226-2000 Fax: (949) 226-2050, www.rtcgroup.com EDITORIAL OFFICE Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief 20A Northwest Blvd., PMB#137, Nashua, NH 03063 Phone: (603) 429-8301 PUBLISHED BY THE RTC GROUP Copyright 2014, The RTC Group. Printed in the United States. All rights reserved. All related graphics are trademarks of The RTC Group. All other brand and product names are the property of their holders.

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COTS Journal | February 2014


A surprising blend of personalities

That’s the nature of the AB2000 Avionics BusBox® With so many built-in capabilities, the highly-flexible AB2000 family from Astronics Ballard Technology is the ideal fit for a wide range of applications. These rugged, conduction-cooled, COTS devices combine a powerful computer processor, multi-protocol databus interfaces, Ethernet, USB, other I/O, and PMC expansion in a small, lightweight package. Discover what the AB2000 can do for you. Visit our website or call 425-339-0281 for more information. www.ballardtech.com/AB2000

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COTS

EDITORIAL Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

It’s About People

A

nyone who’s been in my circle of contacts in this industry has heard the term “It’s a people business.” While I certainly didn’t invent the term, I wholeheartedly believe it and I respect those who believe it too. In recent weeks I’ve been reminded more than ever of the meaning of how true this is and how it’s influenced our industry. You could argue that any business or market is a people business, but in this embedded electronics and computing industry—one grown of a myriad of smart, dynamic companies that began as engineering startups— it’s especially so. And even though many of those companies became part of larger, above $100 million firms through of a succession of mergers and acquisitions, the roots of that engineer-run business are still there. One key aspect of military embedded computer and embedded systems in general is the desire to see stuff up close. There’s a wealth of information on technology you can get from the Internet, but I have not seen any real substitute for face-to-face meetings where you can talk about products and technology with any degree of depth. This was again brought home at our RTECC show in Santa Clara, CA last month. With another impressive attendance of over 500 Silicon Valley engineers, and several new exhibitors that weren’t there last year, there was a palpable buzzing of activity. The notion of this being a people business hit home in another way recently with the change of VITA leadership. Among the most respected trade associations serving our industry, VITA has played a central role in many key technologies important for military system design. As of January 1st, Jerry Gipper became the new Executive Director of VITA, with the current Executive Director Ray Alderman moving up to continue as the chair of the VITA board of directors. Last month at a press event, I was fortunate to be present at the official public “passing of the torch” from Ray to Jerry. Meanwhile John Rynearson, the Technical Director of VITA, has said he plans to retire from VITA early in 2014. And while John’s shoes are big ones to fill, Jerry, with John’s help, is working to transition those duties as smoothly as possible. I’ve know Jerry for as long as I’ve known of VME. In fact, in my first technology journalist job as New Products Editor, I 6

COTS Journal | February 2014

recall that Jerry was one of the first people I even talked to about VME. But Jerry’s history with VITA goes way back to the late 1980s when he began participating in VITA business development, marketing and standards efforts while working at Motorola Computer Group. Then in 2005, Jerry took on the role of Director of Marketing for VITA and was instrumental in helping to forge various marketing alliances to promote and grow the adoption of VITA specifications and related technology. In fact, in was only while writing this column that I realized 2005 was coincidently the same year I took the reigns as COTS Journal’s Editor-in-Chief. As Ray Alderman moves to a more oversight type of role with VITA, he’s made some talk of retirement activities like fly fishing, but we’ll see. Ray’s an insightful guy with lots of opinions, so I expect his voice will continue to be a strong presence in our industry. For me, one bemusing irony with Ray is how for more than a decade now he has preached that “optical backplane technology is coming!” Over the years I’ve kept a healthy skepticism of such predictions, but I’m having to put that reluctance aside. What started as a VITA research effort in 2010 eventually evolved into a series of specifications under ANSI/VITA 66.02011 VPX: Fiber Optic Interconnect. The specification defines a family of blind mate Fiber Optic interconnects for use with VITA 46 backplanes and plug-in modules. And leveraging just those specifications, last month Pentek’s Rodger Hosking—at the same press gathering mentioned above—rolled out the first FMC/VPX Carrier with an optical backplane interface. The module incorporates the emerging VITA 66.4 standard for half size MT optical interconnect, providing 12 optical duplex lanes to the backplane. Using a serial protocol, the VITA-66.4 interface enables Gbit backplane communications between boards independent of the PCIe interface. So basically today, as Ray is half out the door at VITA, the future has finally caught up to his prediction. Not only are the bandwidths of optical backplanes very much needed in advanced military system designs, but it’s also been—through VITA—feasible and practical. Kudos to you Ray. And congratulations to Jerry and good luck in your new role. Folks like you remind me that it’s not just a people business—it’s a business of exemplary people.


Innovation

That Detects.

Mercury SySteMS iS a leader in developing Softwaredefined SubSySteMS that detect, intercept and defeat SignalS of intereSt — on land, at Sea and in the air. theSe ew, Sigint and c4i SubSySteM deSignS are born froM our long Standing expertiSe in analog, Mixed Signal and digital technologieS. becauSe that’S what it takeS to coMbat next-generation electronic attackS. Mercury

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Other Mercury Innovations Big Data streaming analytics Electronic countermeasures High-density storage High-performance computing Mission security Open EW architecture Thermal management

Visit mrcy.com/protect to see how Mercury Systems’ SIGINT and COMINT solutions deliver unrivaled capabilities. Copyright © 2014 Mercury Systems, Innovation That Matters are trademarks of Mercury Systems, Inc.


The

INSIDE TRACK Octagon Systems Corporation Receives Order for U.S. Navy’s LPD Octagon Systems announced that it has been awarded an additional delivery order from Raytheon to provide their rugged FLEET computers for deployment on several of the Navy’s LPD 17 class of expeditionary warfare ships (Figure 1). The LPD 17 class is the U.S. Navy’s newest generation of amphibious warfare ships. Octagon’s product dependability will support the success of warfare missions. The LPD 17 ship class supports amphibious transport of assault forces of the United States Marine Corps. This class of ship is becoming the most sophisticated amphibious ship ever produced, offering unprecedented war fighting capabilities. Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems is the total ship electronics systems integrator for all LPD 17-class ships and prime contractor for lifecycle engineering and support of Raytheon-designed and developed equipment. The open architecture FLEET computers are well suited for this program’s high-reliability requirements, a feature proven through uncompromised performance. This recent order for the FLEET computer on LPD 25 is preceded by 104 initial fielding on the LPD 17 class in service ships. Fielding across the class will result in the eventual deployment of hundreds of Octagon computing platforms. Octagon Systems Westminster, CO (303) 430-1500. www.octagonsystems.com.

Figure 1

Open architecture computers are well suited for LPD 17 class ship’s highreliability requirements.

the valuable investment they have in space.

Lockheed Martin to Provide Data Resources for Space Situational Awareness Lockheed Martin will continue tracking and sharing data on orbiting space assets and debris through a $3.9 million contract from the U.S. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center. Under this contract, Lockheed Martin will continue to develop the Non-Traditional Data PreProcessor (NDPP) under the Integrated Space Command and Control (ISC2) contract. ISC2 is responsible for providing conclusive and timely air and missile warning (Figure 2). In addition, ISC2 provides space situational awareness to the United States Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM) and Air Force Space Command utilizing inputs from the Space Surveillance Network to accurately track and 8

Lockheed Martin Bethesda, MD. (301) 897-6000. www.lockheedmartin.com. Figure 2

Integrated Space Command and Control (ISC2) is responsible for providing conclusive and timely air and missile warning. catalog more than 23,000 space objects. The NDPP system is an expansion of the ISC2 space data server, and it extends the communications infrastructure allowing operators to share data between sensor and satellite sources around the world with the Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) at Vandenberg Air Force Base. The JSpOC maintains the space object catalog that many countries depend on to safeguard

COTS Journal | February 2014

Cubic Awarded $25 Million Contract for Air Combat Training Gear Cubic Defense Systems has been awarded a contract worth $25 million from the U.S. Air Force for its P5 Combat Training System (P5CTS) to meet international requirements, including delivery to several Middle East allies as part of F-15 and F-16 foreign military sales contracts. This contract extends the breadth of P5 sales in the Middle East and should yield long-term operations and maintenance opportunities. Cubic is the prime contractor responsible for performance in all

areas of systems engineering, and for development / integration / installation of the ground instrumentation subsystem. DRS is the principal subcontractor responsible for performance in all areas related to the P5CTS airborne instrumentation subsystem. Cubic Defense Systems San Diego, CA. (858) 277-6780 www.cubic.com

Two UAV Makers Team to Showcase Unmanned Electronic Attack Capabilities General Atomics Aeronautical Systems (GA ASI) and Northrop Grumman announced the second successful demonstration of Predator B/MQ-9 Reaper’s Electronic Attack capability featuring Northrop Grumman’s new Pandora Electronic Warfare


The

INSIDE TRACK Figure 3

For the demonstration, a GA-ASI company-owned Predator B RPA was equipped with a companyproduced jamming pod containing Northrop Grumman’s Pandora EW System and controlled by a GAASI Ground Control Station. (EW) system at the U.S. Marine Corps’ (USMC) Weapons and Tactics Instructor (WTI) course held at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Yuma. The purpose of this second demonstration was to evaluate the capability of an RPA to conduct electronic warfare missions in concert with other unmanned aircraft systems and EA-6B Prowlers in a multinode approach against a more capable Integrated Air Defense System (IADS). The event expanded upon GA-ASI and Northrop Grumman’s successes in last April’s WTI exercise and focused on delivering a more integrated and networked EW capability. GA-ASI participated in the demonstration with a company-owned Predator B RPA equipped with a company-produced jamming pod containing Northrop Grumman’s Pandora EW System and controlled by a GA-ASI Ground Control Station (GCS) (Figure 3). The Northrop Grumman payload proved to be very effective and was integrated seamlessly with the Predator B avionics and command and control architecture. General Atomics San Diego, CA. (858) 455-3000. www.ga.com.

Figure 4

Boeing EA-18G Growler is an American carrier-based electronic warfare aircraft, a specialized version of the two-seat F/A-18F Super Hornet.

Military Market Watch Electronic Warfare Market to Grow to $15,590 Million by 2020 Electronic warfare is an indispensible component of any military force. The capability and efficiency of the electronic warfare system can change the outcome of a war. Electronic warfare systems in the past consisted of analog systems with capabilities limited by the hardware and software. The advancements in the field of electronics enable today’s electronic warfare systems to incorporate more digital capability, and faster signal processors enable better performance. Though airborne and naval platforms have dominated electronic warfare in the past decade, landbased electronic warfare systems are now gaining importance. There is also an increasing popularity of smaller electronic warfare systems that can be integrated with smaller platforms like UAVs and patrol vessels. According to research by ASD Media, the market will see considerable growth due to stealth aircrafts and naval vessels. These platforms are hard to detect and track. As a consequence electronic warfare systems will play a crucial role for maintaining stealth, and also for counter stealth operations. According to ASD’s report on the topic, the global electronic warfare market is estimated to be $12.15 billion in 2014 and is expected to register a CAGR of 4.50% to reach $15.59 billion in 2020. The growth regions will be Latin America, Middle East and Asia-Pacific (Figure 4). The ASD Media report, Global Electronic Warfare Market, provides data on market sizes and forecasts, but also offers a detailed analysis of the market trends and factors influencing market growth. It also provides in-depth geographic analysis of the electronic warfare market in the United States, Europe, Canada, Brazil and Japan. The report draws the competitive landscape of commercial aviation, providing an indepth comparative analysis of the technological and marketing strategies of the key players. ASD Media Amsterdam, The Netherlands. +31 (0)20 486 1286. www.asdreports.com.

February 2014 | COTS Journal

9


SPECIAL FEATURE GPGPUs for Military Signal Processing

10

COTS Journal | February 2014


SPECIAL FEATURE

GPGPUs Secure Their Place as Ideal Paralleling Processing Technology By offering more core-per-chip density and easier programming, GPUs are becoming accepted as a solid choice for parallel processing military systems. Jeff Child Editor-in-Chief

O

ne of the most compelling new trends in military signal processing architectures in recent years is the idea of “GPUs as general-purpose processing engines.� Emerging in 2007, this approach continues to gather momentum. It offers a simpler way to do complex multiprocessing by putting high-performance graphics processors to work on general-purpose processing tasks. Feeding those needs, graphics chip vendor NVIDIA developed a parallel computing architecture called CUDA. System developers can also use AMD GPUs using OpenCL instead of CUDA. Languages like CUDA and OpenCL let programmers use conventional computing languages to access the massively parallel processing capabilities of the GPU. Aside from serving applications in radar, signals intelligence and video surveillance and interpretation, GPUs have potential in other application areas, including target tracking, image stabilization and SAR (synthetic aperture radar) simulation. February 2014 | COTS Journal

11


SPECIAL FEATURE

The GPGPU approach allows for much more compute density. One groundbased radar system, for example, used to require a rack containing 72 conventional processors (18 6U boards) and producing a peak capability of 576 Gflops, which can take up 4 cubic feet, weigh over 105 lbs. and consume over 2000W. By replacing that with GPGPU technology, system designers could use just three 3U VPX

boards yielding peak processing power of 766 Gflops in less than 0.4 cubic feet.

Rugged Board-Level GPGPU Products

Like most chip companies, the focus of NVIDIA for its graphics processors are for the large-volume consumer markets like gaming and similar devices. The volumes in the defense market are very

The 100GB Revolution Is Taking Off

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The World’s Highest Performance AMC Line Cards - from VadaTech They are here! The 100GbE Processor AMC with Cavium CN6880 and a high-end FPGA with Altera Stratix V usher in the next echelon of performance. With 100G out the front ports and 40GbE across the backplane, the market just hit a new dimension of speed, density, and options. Whether it’s the full ecosystem of MicroTCA-based products or a customized architecture, Mic come to VadaTech–The Power of Vision.

100GbE Processor AMC – AMC738 •Cavium™ CN6880 multi-core •Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA •Dual CFP2 or zQSFP+ ports to front panel

12

Boards

COTS Journal | February 2014

Chassis Platforms

Application - Ready Platforms

Figure 1

The GPU-based HPEC system is housed in a 6U OpenVPX rackmount chassis and is capable of delivering 20 teraflops (20 trillion floating point operations per second) in computing horsepower.

small in comparison. But over the past five years, the number of board- and box-level GPGPU products has skyrocketed from just a handful to over a dozen or more in the past twelve months. A recent example along those lines is the C530 from Aitech Defense Systems. The 3U VPX GPGPU combines exceptional processing and high data throughput capabilities with a rugged design ideal for C4ISR and advanced sensor processing. Aitech’s new C530 carries the latest industry-standard MXM modules with the ability to easily upgrade to newer modules as they become available. These state-ofthe-art MXM modules enable one module to be leveraged across multiple platforms, providing expanded graphics and teraflop processing options for each system. The C530 GPGPU board is currently offered with one of two state-of-the-art MXM modules. The first option is an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 675MX at 600 MHz with 4 Gbytes of GDDR5 memory at 1800 MHz. The other is an AMD Radeon


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SPECIAL FEATURE

Figure 2

The NVIDIA GeoInt Accelerator enables applications like this mission planning tool with real-time line-of-sight capability.

HD 7970M at 850 MHz with 2 Gbytes of GDDR5 memory at 1200 MHz. The multiple format video output channels included as standard on the new C530 enable the board to be used in a variety of rugged signal processing and high resolution graphics requirements. The C530 connects to any Intel-based VPX SBC via a high-speed PCIe Gen 2.0 link using up to 16 lanes over the VPX backplane. This makes for easy integration into VPX-based systems, while meeting the high-performance requirements of graphics-based applications. The new C530 GPGPU meets the critical task of effectively processing sensor data and situational awareness information in defense and aerospace applications. The new C530 GPGPU comes in commercial and rugged air-cooled as well as conduction-cooled configurations for severe and harsh environments per VITA 46. Conductioncooled versions are compliant with VPXREDI (VITA 48.2).

Air Force Using GPGPUs

Last month, GE Intelligent Platforms announced that it received an order from the High Performance Systems Branch (RITB) of the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Information Directorate (RI) for a HPEC (High Performance Embedded Computing) system that will enable the development and deployment of advanced neuromorphic architectures and algorithms for adaptive learning, large-scale dynamic data analytics and reasoning. The system takes advantage of NVIDIA GPU accelerators, leveraging the 14

COTS Journal | February 2014

High Density Compute Acceleration for GeoInt Applications by Mark Gunn, One Stop Systems

Geospatial Intelligence (GeoInt) applications used by the military to create real-time mapping of the battlefield require high compute acceleration to provide necessary data quickly. Today these calculations are performed with specialized software running on GPU cards, coprocessors, or FPGA cards. The military gathers vast amounts of information from a variety of sources that needs to be manipulated to generate the 2D and 3D mapping required by field operations. GPU cards, with thousands of cores each, offload the number crunching and image processing from the CPUs. GPUs are typically added to a server, but the amount of data that can be manipulated is dependent on the number of GPUs the computer can support. Current computers provide 7 slots, but only one or two generally have enough bandwidth to fully support the latest GPUs. In most cases, the more GPUs available to manipulate data, the faster the data reaches the analyst. The most advanced computers hold multiple GPUs for this purpose, but GPUs require a lot of power and cooling and most computers are not equipped to accommodate more than one or two GPU cards. Multiple GPUs can be added to any computer by expanding the PCI Express (PCIe) bus from the computer to a separate enclosure that houses multiple boards. These enclosures are connected to one or more servers through PCIe Gen3 x16 cables with a theoretical bandwidth of 128 Gbit/s. Connecting to the computer’s PCIe bus through PCIe eliminates the necessity for any software conversion back to the root complex, tremendously reducing latency and cost. The One Stop Systems (OSS) High Density Compute Accelerator (HDCA) accommodates up to 16 GPUs in a 3U chassis. All boards have sufficient bandwidth and there is ample redundant power and cooling available. These enclosures support up to 16 NVIDIA GPU cards or Intel Phi coprocessors. The 3U HDCA is a modular system that is easy to install with only three basic parts: rack-mountable chassis, four canisters and three power supplies. Once the chassis shell is installed in the rack, the canisters and power supplies are slid into place from the front. Four PCIe connections are available at the rear of the chassis to support up to four host servers. One server can operate all 16 GPUs, two servers can operate 8 GPUs, and four servers can operate 4 GPUs each. The system automatically selects the number of servers attached and maps the GPU to the appropriate server connections. GPUs are used in numerous defense and intelligence operations today and the number is rapidly growing. The need to get the huge amounts of data transcribed and made useful through data and image processing is becoming overwhelming. The more GPUs available, the quicker the data can be used. GPU appliances supporting multiple NVIDIA GPUs and Intel Phi coprocessors are quickly becoming the best and most economical way of accomplishing this tremendous feat.


SPECIAL FEATURE

highly parallel nature of the technology to deliver maximum performance. The GE system will provide real-time processing for high-bandwidth data derived from RF (radio frequency) sensors. It is designed to support the U.S. DoD’s High Performance Computing Modernization Program (HPCMP), and will be used for the development of next-generation radar programs such as Gotcha wide-area SAR (synthetic aperture radar). The GPU-based HPEC system is housed in a 6U OpenVPX rackmount chassis and is capable of delivering 20 teraflops (20 trillion floating point operations per second) in computing horsepower (Figure 1). The system is scalable and can be expanded to include additional racks and compute nodes. The GE HPEC system is modular in design, with each rack comprising five SBC625 single board computers featuring quad core Intel Core i7 processors, and RDMA-capable Mellanox 10 Gigabit Ethernet/InfiniBand adapters. The single board computers are coupled with modules featuring the latest NVIDIA GPU accelerators based on the NVIDIA Kepler computing architecture, delivering a total of 13,440 cores. Inter-board communication is achieved via GE’s 20-port IBX400 InfiniBand switch.

Military-Specific GPGPU Tools

While NVIDIA’s focus has been on the consumer market-leaving embedded board makers to bring their technology to the defense world-last summer the company did release its first technology aimed specifically for defense use. The NVIDIA GeoInt (Geospatial Intelligence) Accelerator is the first GPU-accelerated platform to enable security analysts to find actionable insights quicker and more accurately than ever before from vast quantities of raw data, images and video (Figure 2). The NVIDIA GeoInt Accelerator provides defense and homeland analysts with tools that enable faster processing of high-resolution satellite imagery, facial recognition in surveillance video, combat mission planning using geographic information system (GIS) data, and object recognition in video collected by drones. It offers a complete solution consisting of an NVIDIA Tesla GPU accelerated sys-

tem, software applications for geospatial intelligence analysis, and advanced application development libraries. Its Luciad Lightspeed function provides situational awareness for mission planning by overlaying image, radar and sensor data for line-of-sight analysis. A GeoWeb 3D function delivers native 3D GIS fusionincluding LIDAR remote sensing technology and full motion video-without preprocessing. The GeoInt Accelerator also features a number of libraries that serve as building blocks for defense contractors and system integrators to build their own applications for GPU-accelerated image, video and signal processing. NVIDIA GPU accelerators are already widely used in the defense industry for imaging, video and signal processing. Aitech Defense Systems Chatsworth, CA. (888) 248-3248. www.rugged.com. AMD Corp. Sunnyvale, CA. (408)749-4000. www.amd.com. Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions Ashburn, VA. (703) 779-7800. www.cwcdefense.com. GE Intelligent Platforms Charlottesville, VA. (800) 368-2738. www.ge-ip.com. Mercury Systems Chelmsford, MA. (866)627-6551. www.mrcy.com. NVIDIA Santa Clara, CA. (408) 486-2000. www.nvidia.com. One Stop Systems Escondido, CA. (877) 438-2724. www.onestopsystems.com.

February 2014 | COTS Journal

15


TECH RECON Military Battery and Power Supply Trends for Board and Box Level Systems

Power Supplies and Mil Batteries Bulk Up for Success Battery and power supply technologies continue to advance their solutions to feed the ever power-hungry requirements of today’s defense systems. Such technologies are vital to managing the needs of SWaP-constrained military systems. Jeff Child, Editor in Chief

O

nce treated as an afterthought in embedded military computer system designs, choosing batteries, power supplies and power conversion electronics can become make or break technical choices. Now that more and more computing is stuffed into smaller spaces, power has direct implications on the size, cooling and mobility of a boardor box-level system. Add to that the challenges of multi-voltage electronics and the complexity of distributed system architectures, and it’s clear that military system designers need solutions that address those needs. Often the unsung hero of a military system design, power supplies and converters are critical enablers for meeting today’s rugged requirements. The good news is that vendors are smoothing the way with flexible options and robust solutions. Military power conversion vendors and battery makers are easing the burden with more efficient products, new partitioning strategies and increased ruggedization. New solutions continue to roll out, not just at the component or brick level, but also at the module and board level.

Batteries for the JLTV

First on the battery side, vendors continue to advance their power densities both with new chemistry innovations and 16

COTS Journal | February 2014

by refining their existing processes. Lithium-ion for its part remains the favorite choice for today’s computing-based systems. Last spring Saft was awarded a contract from Lockheed Martin for delivery of e6T Li-ion battery systems for the engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) phase of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) Program (Figure 1). The JLTV program will produce a family of vehicles capable of performing multiple mission roles that will be designed to provide protected, sustained, networked mobility for personnel and payloads across the full range of military operations. The Saft e6T Li-ion battery system features an advanced, lightweight design within the dimensions of a traditional lead-acid battery, enabling easy integration into the vehicle. The system provides power for starting, lights and ignition, as well as for silent watch missions, while also providing critical frontline power to recharge personal electronics like night sights and GPS devices. The 25.5V battery features CANBus communications technology, which relays vital information such as state-of-charge, cell voltages and temperatures, and battery diagnostics. Meanwhile on the rechargeable battery side, Tadiran Batteries offers a line of long-life rechargeable lithium-ion cells

Figure 1

On the JLTV, the Saft e6T Li-ion battery system provides power for starting, lights and ignition, as well as for silent watch missions, while also providing critical front-line power to recharge personal electronics like night sights and GPS devices.

designed specifically for high survivability in harsh environments. Standard rechargeable lithium-ion cells have inherent drawbacks, including short operating life (maximum 5 years), low maximum cycle life (1,000 cycles), high annual selfdischarge (up to 60 percent per year), and limited temperature range (0 to 60 degrees C) with no possibility of charging at low and high temperatures. By contrast, TLI Series batteries utilize technology found in Tadiran’s pat-


Rugged. Reliable. Rechargeable.

TLI WORKS WHEN CONSUMER LITHUIM ION BATTERIES FAIL.

Introducing the only rechargeable lithium ion battery designed for long-term use and extreme temperatures. From Tadiran, manufacturer of the world’s longest lasting lithium batteries, comes the world’s toughest rechargeable lithium ion battery, the TLI Series. These powerful little workhorses are able to… • operate and recharge in extreme temperatures -40°C to 85°C (storage to 90°C) • deliver high pulses (5A for AA cell) • offer lower self-discharge (under 5% per year) • recharge more times (5,000 cycles) • provide longer operating life (20 years) Available in AA and AAA diameters, TLI is not your standard consumer rechargeable battery and is recommended only for the toughest assignments. Contact us today to see if TLI lithium ion rechargeable cells are right for you.

Tadiran Batteries 2001 Marcus Ave. Suite 125E Lake Success, NY 11042 1-800-537-1368 516-621-4980 www.tadiranbat.com


TECH RECON

ented hybrid layer capacitor (HLC), which stores the high current pulses required for two-way wireless communications, and has been field-proven in millions of cells to deliver 25+ year service life. TLI Series batteries modify this technology to deliver reliable, long-term performance under extreme environmental conditions. TLI Series batteries feature wider operating temperature (-40 to 85 degrees C, with storage

up to 90 degrees C). TLI Series cells can be recharged using DC power or can be used in conjunction with photovoltaic solar systems or other energy harvesting devices to deliver reliable long-term power for a variety of mil/aero applications.

Brick Level Innovations

Brick-level products still are the heart of technology innovation among DC/DC

converters. Vicor’s latest offering along those lines is its expanded ultra-highdensity Picor Cool-Power PI31xx series of isolated, ZVS-based DC/DC converters. They are optimized for 24V industrial, 28V aerospace/defense and/or demanding wide temperature applications. The new Cool-Power PI31xx converters retain the product series’ signature 0.87 x 0.65 x 0.265-inch surface-mount package profile to provide up to 334 W/in3 power density and 2,250V input to output isolation. At less than 50 percent the size of a conventional isolated 1/16th brick, Cool-Power PI31xx converters provide exceptional performance in an IC package for use in high-density system designs. Configurable solutions are becoming more popular as system designers try to leverage their efforts toward specific requirements. Feeding that need, last fall SynQor introduced its first line of MultiQor Plate DC/DC Configurable Assembly power supplies that provide up to four customer-defined output voltages. The MultiQor Plate delivers up to 450W with efficiency as high as 95 percent. Depending on the desired number of outputs and output power, MultiQor Plates are available in two packages (3.80 x 6.80 x 0.92 inch and 6.70 x 6.84 x 0.92 inch). Using SynQor’s Mil-COTS line of high-efficiency, high-reliability, fixed switching frequency converters and EMI filters MultiQor Plate Assemblies are designed to comply with MIL-STD-704, MIL-STD-1275, DEFSTAN 61-5 and MIL-STD-461, and are able to withstand the harsh environments of military and aerospace applications. MultiQor Plate Configurable Assemblies offer an internal EMI filter with ceramic stabilizing bulk capacitor, spike and surge protection, thermal shutdown, no minimum load requirements and soft-start of all outputs. Optional features are available including a cover and an internal input fuse. SynQor also offers accessories cables.

Shipboard Requirements

As the U.S. Military makes its pivot toward Asia-Pacific concerns, Navy shipboard technologies are going to become increasingly significant. Power supply vendors are part of that trend, some making solutions to meet specific needs. An Untitled-4 1

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COTS Journal | February 2014

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TECH RECON

Figure 2

MultiQor Plate Assemblies are designed to comply with MIL-STD-704, MILSTD-1275, DEF-STAN 61-5 and MILSTD-461, and are able to withstand the harsh environments of military applications.

example is Intellipower’s new line of NAVY Shipboard 4U 120 VAC 3000 VA 2100W Isolated High Temp rackmount UPSs with built-in PDU. Developed to meet all specs for the Navy’s SEWIP (Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program), the unit provides double conversion on line, clean regenerated sine wave. Voltage inputs are 115 VAC, with voltage output at 120 VAC. A built-in power distribution unit (PDU) offers multiple features including front panel output push to reset circuit breakers. It also has two power input circular Mil connectors and eight AC power output circular Mil connectors. A control connector supplies LVDS signals for power status and controls battleshort command, battleshort status, relay contacts and status indicators for fan fail and over-temperature.

Martek Power Torrance, CA. (310) 202-8820. www.martekpower.com.

SynQor Boxborough, MA. (978) 849-0600. www.synqor.com.

NOVA Power Solutions Sterling, VA. (800) 999-6682. www.novapower.com.

TDK-Lambda Americas San Diego, CA. (619) 575-4400. www.lambdapower.com.

Pico Electronics Pelham, NY. (914) 738-1400. www.picoelectronics.com.

Vicor Andover, MA. (978) 470-2900. www.vicorpower.com.

Rantec Power Systems Los Osos, CA. (805) 596-6000. www.rantec.com.

VPT Blacksburg, VA. (425) 353-3010. www.vpt-inc.com.

RECOM Power Brooklyn, NY. (718) 855-9710. www.recom-power.com.

Calex Concord, CA. (925) 687-4411. www.calex.com. Falcon Electric Irwindale, CA. (626) 962-7770. www.falconups.com. Intellipower Orange, CA. (714) 921-1580. www.intellipower.com.

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February 2014 | COTS Journal

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TECH RECON Military Battery and Power Supply Trends for Board and Box Level Systems

Board and Box Level Systems Face SWaP Design Challenges Reducing size, weight and power of military systems remains a challenge, especially when shrinking budgets are putting pressure on costs. The modular nature of open architecture provides a path for having the best of both worlds. Lino Massafra, VP of Sales and Marketing, North Atlantic Industries

D

esigning board- and box-level systems utilizing a modular open architecture addresses three of the biggest challenges facing military system designers today: time-to-deployment, SWaP (size, weight and power) and shrinking budgets. The modular nature of open architecture provides both exceptional longevity and maximum flexibility as subassemblies and even complete subsystems can be upgraded without requiring a custom data acquisition system or a complete system redesign. Open architecture can even help engineers avoid redesigning their systems to meet changing mission requirements.

Time-to-Deployment

There are many single board computers (SBCs), I/O and communications boards and power supplies available on the market. Many of them meet demanding application requirements and deliver solid performance with adequate software support. However, problems can arise when engineers need to design a functional system around these individual boards, which often come from different suppliers. The system I/O integration part is not always so easy and often leads to delays. In fact, it usually involves making 20

COTS Journal | February 2014

Figure 1

Programmable intelligent I/O modules offer more functionality and flexibility in a smaller footprint, in less time, reducing overall time-to-deployment. Shown is a 6U VME multifunction I/O board.

some difficult tradeoffs in terms of price, performance, footprint and time-to-deployment. When building mil-aero systems that include complex I/O requirements, it is

important and preferable to utilize COTS components that enable a smarter, faster, more efficient system design at a lower cost. A different COTS approach could be one that features pre-tested, modular subsystems that are specifically designed for sensor-rich, mil-aero applications. For example, a Custom-On-Standard Architecture (COSA) from North Atlantic Industries takes a unique modular approach. COSA is comprised of I/O function modules on individual standard board platforms that allow users to mix and match field-proven I/O functions to meet specific customer requirements. COSA enables customizable, highly programmable I/O and SBC boards, subsystems and systems with off-the-shelf efficiency that significantly accelerate a customer’s time-to-mission. Utilizing multifunction modules built on standard board platforms, the modular and adaptive technology provides plug-and-play interoperability. COSA-enabled solutions eliminate the need to design custom data acquisition systems for most sense-and-response applications by using configurable, pretested hardware, which facilitates faster system integration. Instead of spending months specifying, designing, building


TECH RECON

communications function modules. On a 3U board, design engineers can mix and match up to three I/O and communications function modules. COSA enables the utilization of a wide selection of function modules (40+ unique functions) so that virtually any embedded system design requirement can be met. Rugged system chassis offerings range from a one I/O function NANO to a Sensor Interface Unit

(SIU) containing up to 15 high-density I/O or communication functions with or without an SBC (Figure 3). A COSA design platform also provides a proven and seamless software integration, enabling complex I/O functions to be easily integrated into an existing system.

Shrinking Budgets

Budget cuts are nothing new to the

Figure 2

Using solutions like this 3U CompactPCI SBC, designers don’t need to compromise size, weight and/or power. and testing the underlying data acquisition system, design engineers can immediately begin focusing their efforts at the application level. Programmable intelligent I/O modules deliver significantly more functionality and flexibility in a smaller footprint, in less time, reducing overall timeto-deployment. Figure 1 is an example of a 6U VME multifunction I/O board.

Focus on SWaP

An open architecture design approach centered around distributed processing and distributed I/O can provide an extensive list of field-proven I/O offerings in small, modular packages that feature greater flexibility and higher density than conventional rugged COTS solutions. Designers do not need to compromise size, weight and/or power, as the highly configurable and modular function modules are designed to solve the specific I/O, measurement or simulation requirements encountered in demanding applications (Figure 2). These requirements can include I/O density, performance, processing speed, power considerations, bandwidth and reliability, to name a few. Design engineers can discover that they don’t have to trade performance for footprint, power consumption cost or development time. For example, on a standard rugged 6U VME SBC, instead of providing two PMC/XMC slots, a COSA approach offers customers the ability to mix and match up to six high-density, intelligent I/O and

Input Protections

EMI Filters Surge Protectors Hold-Up Pre-regulators MIL-STD 461-704-1275

DC-DC Converters

Compact 4 to 200W 1, 2 or 3 Outputs Ultra-Wide input MIL-STD 704-1275-1399

AC-DC Converters

35 to 350W PFCs 95-140 & 85-265VAC Low Harmonic Distortion MIL-STD 704-1275-1399 DO160 ABD100

February 2014 | COTS Journal

21


TECH RECON

U.S. military, as the Department of Defense (DoD) continues efforts to reduce costs. The DoD funding has recently experienced a significant reduction as a result of the U.S. government’s budget restraints. During 2013, the inability to balance the national budget forced the U.S. government to impose a limit-called sequestration-on government spending and temporarily shut down government operations.

Uncertainty around government spending has many program managers pulling back on important battlefield management systems (BMS), according to research firm and consultancy Frost & Sullivan. As defense budgets tighten, research and development (R&D) on BMS improvements are expected to remain stagnant-putting U.S.-developed BMS at a disadvantage. One of the ways defense

sie-cs.com

contractors cope with budget constraints is by moving from military-specification (mil-spec) components to COTS devices. Government contractors have been transitioning to COTS in an attempt to save costs associated with mil-spec devices. Companies with BMS offerings that can be easily upgraded to integrate with commercial off-the-shelf technologies and capabilities will gain firm standing within this market space, the consultancy added. With respect to budget constraints, designing with a modular, open architecture greatly reduces engineering efforts to complete the system. The adaptive nature of a COSA platform usually only requires a quick configuration of a set of standard products to meet application specifications. Intended for complex I/O operations, COSA-enabled I/O functions support all of the different sensors required in mil-aero applications. As a result, a modular, open architecture design platform eliminates non-recurring engineering (NRE) fees to configure a system.

Managing Longevity

rugged & ready when you are [

OPEN VPX [ configured and ready to ship enclosures backplanes system integration & custom solutions VME VPX CompactPCI Open VPX...

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22

COTS Journal | February 2014

The rapid rate of component changeover associated with the commercial market is a concern for mil-aero companies. It forces mil-aero program managers to constantly track the market to deal with perpetual, unanticipated product obsolescence. Utilizing COTS suppliers, the program manager offloads much of the tracking and obsolescence maintenance to the supplier. Designed to ensure long-term viability of mil/aero products, the modular nature of an open architecture approach provides both exceptional longevity and maximum flexibility as subassemblies and even complete systems can be upgraded without requiring a complete system redesign. This is an especially attractive feature to organizations faced with shrinking budgets and time constraints. In general, the lifespan of commercial hardware and software is significantly shorter than the lifespan of most military programs. This forces military program managers to develop specific timelines for COTS insertions and upgrades to meet changing program requirements. Open architecture design platforms allow milaero products to be developed with inser-


TECH RECON

tion cycles in mind. Maintaining form, fit and function upgrade compatibility ensures that customers don’t have to design “around” their systems to meet changing mission requirements. As technologies advance, insertion cycles can be accomplished with seamless transitions in functionality, performance and support. Compatible with proven VME, OpenVPX, PCI/PCIe, cPCI, PC/104, PMC and

VXI platforms, COSA-enabled embedded solutions can be configured from more than 40 off-the-shelf modules including I/O, measurement/simulation, communication and power as well as single board computers.

Configurable Solution

A Custom-On-Standard Architecture design platform enables customizable and

Figure 3

The Rugged Sensor Interface Unit (SIU) contains up to 15 high-density I/O or communication functions with or without an SBC.

highly configurable boards, self-standing subsystems and systems to be developed with off-the-shelf efficiency. Utilizing multifunction modules built on standard board platforms, the modular and adaptive technology delivers SWaP-efficient I/O-intensive boards and systems with more processing power, under tighter timelines at a lower system cost. This approach provides distributed I/O and processing solutions that meet demanding customer requirements, in less time, with less weight, less program risk, no special code required and no NRE. With COSA design principles and disciplines, engineers can get a completely integrated and tested solution, not just hardware, in less time at a lower cost. North Atlantic Industries Bohemia, NY. (631) 567-1100. www.naii.com.

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COTS Journal | February 2014


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SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT Security Issues for Military Systems

Separation Kernels Enable Rapid Development of Trustworthy Systems By using separation kernel technology and a security abstraction design approach, military system developers can use off-the-shelf components and tools to rapidly build and maintain high security systems. Will Keegan, Security Software Specialist, LynuxWorks

I

n the early days of high security defense computing systems, security vendors would build hardware and software from scratch, ensuring they had full knowledge of the platform’s design and a strong degree of confidence that their platforms were built without security flaws. These systems would then be evaluated by government agencies to validate that the system’s design and implementation have no security flaws and meet the security requirements of the target deployment environment. Today, this model faces significant challenges. Building systems from the ground up is very expensive and takes too much time to meet pressing schedules. Furthermore, modern computing platforms have gotten extremely complex to the point where it is close to impossible to fully evaluate a system. Security systems that used to go through detailed software analysis to prove the system is correctly designed and implemented are now evaluated at a shallower depth and tested against a generic set of security requirements.

Off-the-Shelf Approach

In response, security vendors are encouraged to integrate off-the-shelf hard26

COTS Journal | February 2014

ware and software to speed up production schedules and reduce product costs. But this is only a partial solution, creating a bigger challenge in security evaluations because systems are now being built with third-party components that have very little design documentation and were built for purposes that have little concern for security flaws. The use of separation kernel technology and a security abstraction design approach allows high security system developers to use off-the-shelf components and tools to rapidly build and maintain high security systems, while giving security evaluators a framework to cost-effectively evaluate systems and ultimately increase the level of confidence that a system is trustworthy to defend against nation state adversaries.

Supporting Security Abstraction

Integrating off-the-shelf hardware and software components to build high security systems can certainly reduce manufacturing costs and time-to-market. Using general purpose CPUs, operating systems and development tools allow vendors to focus on end-user solutions instead of reinventing the wheel. But security vendors must be very careful

when integrating off-the-shelf components. In security systems, it is important to understand whether an off-the-shelf component has a vulnerability that can compromise the security of the overall system. This can be very difficult when off-the-shelf parts are typically black box components that come with limited documentation or any form of assurance evidence. This is particularly true with general purpose hardware components, and even when source and design doc is available for software, the complexity of the software makes it impractical to understand. A good way to cope with using low assurance off-the-shelf parts on high security systems is to create system architectures that limit the amount of trust in off-the-shelf components. For instance, if a secure system requires confidential transportation network packets, an architect can use software encryption to encrypt all the packets before network cards, and network infrastructure to ensure network devices cannot leak cleartext packets. Taking the example further, an architect can also separate the software encryption from other software that could potentially corrupt or subvert the software encryption.


A19_COTS_2_25x9_875_A19.qxd 1/2/14 3:08 PM

SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

Monolithic Operating System

User Space

Critical App

Untrusted App

Kernel Space I/O Stacks Network, File System, USB...

Access Control

CPU Scheduler

Memory Manager

Physical Hardware CPU

Device Drivers

Size does matter!

I/O Devices RAM

Solutions running on monolithic operating systems or hypervisors are less cost-effective than those that use an SKH hosted on general purpose computing platforms.

Separating and protecting security functions, such as data encryption, from application functions establishes a security abstraction, where security-critical functions run completely independent from non-security enforcing software and in many cases hardware components. Creating a security abstraction gives more freedom to developers to build applications and select general purpose hardware components without having to incur the cost of integrating security controls in the user environment. For instance, if a secure chat system used a software encryptor with chat program that ran in the same operating system, special operating system rules and custom programming would be required to try and make sure the application or other applications would not leak chat conversations. Instead, a modular design can be made to pull the encryptor out of the operating system and place it in between the applications host OS and

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Figure 1

Separating Duties

OUNT M E C S U R FdA t h r u - h o l e ) s (an rmer o f s n Tr a d u c t o r s & In

network card, ensuring all conversations are encrypted before they go over the network. If the chat encryptor was separated, a focused group of encryption developers can cleanly update crypto algorithms without having to rebuild all the chat applications and update any OS rule sets. Establishing a security abstraction sounds simple but is non-trivial. In order to achieve true interdependence between security and non-security enforcing functions, all forms of shared resources and services must be severed. In general purpose operating systems like Windows and Linux, this is impossible by design. In order to achieve this security abstraction a unique technology is required to separate hardware and software called a separation kernel.

Separation Kernel Hypervisor

A separation kernel hypervisor (SKH) is a unique technology designed to isolate hardware resources and host software and guest operating systems in independent

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February 2014 | COTS Journal

27


SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

User Space Bare-metal App Partition

Virtual OS Partition

Inter-partition Communication

Guest OS Critical App

Message Transport

Access Control CPU Scheduler

Virtual Hardware vCPU vRAM

I/O Devices

Kernel Space

Virtual Hardware vCPU vRAM

Untrusted App

Memory Manager

Virtual Hardware vBIOS vCPU vRAM

I/O Stacks Device Drivers I/O Devices

Separation Kernel Hypervisor CPU Scheduler Memory Manager Physical Hardware RAM CPU

Figure 2

A separation kernel hypervisor (SKH) is designed to isolate hardware resources and host software and guest operating systems in independent partitions, and to control information flow between all hardware components and partitions. partitions, and to control information flow between all hardware components and partitions. The goal of an SKH is to host high security systems on general purpose computing platforms and support more cost-effective security evaluation compared to solutions running on monolithic operating systems or hypervisors (Figure 1). With virtualization support, vendors now have more flexibility using hypervisors to host a variety of off-the-shelf OSs, applications and developments tools. It is important to remember that a separation kernel hypervisor is also an off-the-shelf component that will have varying internal design and degrees of assurance evidence. Because the separation kernel serves as the foundation to all security enforcing functions, it is extremely important to examine the internal design to ensure an SKH vendor can fulfill key security abstraction requirements (Figure 2).

Controlling Evaluation Costs

In military defense systems a technical evaluation and acceptance process, generally known as a certification accredi28

COTS Journal | February 2014

tation (CnA) process, is required before a system is trusted to operate in its target environment. CnA is a costly process that ranges from 5 to 8 figures depending on the complexity of the system and system risk level. Today information stakeholders face a harsh reality that systems are constantly increasing in complexity. And as complexity goes up, evaluations reach a point where either limited budgets or massive complexity will prevent systems from being fully analyzed, leaving them exposed to unknown vulnerabilities. Furthermore, once a system is certified, the security enforcing codebase becomes frozen, meaning no changes to the system can be made that could impact the state of the security enforcing functions without causing a recertification. This creates a cost of maintenance issue where systems become very inflexible in the amount of capability enhancements that can be made. For instance, if a certified computing platform needed to upgrade a network card from a one gigabit card to ten gigabit card, the platform may need to be recertified because network configuration updates and privileged driver code would

need to be inserted into the platform’s operating system, which can potentially subvert other certified security enforcing components. Applying separation kernels and security abstraction to security evaluated systems can greatly improve the effectiveness of the evaluation and reduce the cost of both the upfront evaluation exercise and the ongoing maintenance of a certified codebase.

Complexity Reduction

Using a separation kernel and security abstraction techniques, new architectures can be formed to limit the amount of complexity required to enforce security in a system. For example, if a system needed to separate two applications that ran at different security levels, a separation kernel can run the applications in separate partitions with access to separate hardware. Compared to trying to separate applications in an operating system, a separation kernel can remove roughly a million lines or more of complex code to achieve the same capabilities. Flexibility: Flexibility is a challenging area with certified systems. Once a system is evaluated and certified, no modifications can be made to anything that can potentially change the trusted security functions. If security functions are integrated into applications, then any updates to the applications will require a recertification of the system. But if applications and hardware components were independent of critical security functions, then systems can be designed to support future upgrades without having to re-evaluate the trusted code because it has not changed. Reuse: Another major upside in adopting a security abstraction is the ability to reuse security functions that run independent of hardware. The certified separation kernel can be reused for new solutions, and security functions like cryptographic algorithms or data filters can easily be repurposed to future systems. For example, encryption components used for a secure chat system can be repurposed to protect data streams in a combat simulation system (Figure 3).

Applying the Technology

The need for more user features, more


SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

management tools and more fault tolerance capabilities will continue to persist in making computing systems larger, more complex, and include third-party components of unknown assurances. High security vendors and government agencies need to realize these complexities pose an intractable problem for controlling costs of security evaluations and maintaining acceptable trustworthiness levels in their computing systems. As the cyber warfront escalates, lowering the quality and assurance of high security systems poses a significant threat. Using a separation kernel technology and adopting the described security abstraction techniques, shows a promising road ahead for both security vendors and governing agencies. LynuxWorks San Jose, CA. (408) 979-3900. www.lynuxworks.com.

Figure 3

The encryption components used for a secure chat system like this one can be repurposed to protect data streams in a combat simulation system.

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SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT Security Issues for Military Systems

Dealing with the Unstructured IED Data Exploitation Gap Imposing structure on the data collection of IED info is problematic. Technologies like natural language processors and free text analytics help exploit available IED data. Dr. Michael Stumborg, Mission Engineer, Intelligent Software Solutions

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COTS Journal | February 2014

Unstructured Data Predominates

The forces that push IED data toward the unstructured end of the spectrum are many. Most are self-inflicted, some are the unavoidable result of human nature, and some derive from emerging trends. Remarkably few are created by the enemy. Specifically:

Solution #1

Structured IED Data

Easy

Exploitable Improvised Explosive Device (IED) data comes in textual, video and audio formats. Textual data can be highly structured, such as the entries in a prescribed operational report form, a spreadsheet, or a rigid hierarchical database. In practice, many textual data sources are a mix of structured and unstructured free-text narrative data elements. While our focus here is limited to textual IED data, the principles herein are applicable to most military intelligence data sets. Figure 1 summarizes the IED data exploitation problem: Structured IED data is easy to exploit, but difficult to collect. Unstructured IED data is easy to collect, but difficult to exploit. This problem has two potential solutions: Solution #1 requires

Effort required to collect the data

Defining the Gap

changes to Counter-IED Concepts of Operation to increase structured data collection. Solution #2 requires new technologies to ease unstructured data exploitation. Consider the viability of each potential solution. It has proven exceedingly difficult to develop the technologies required to exploit unstructured data. These difficulties are well known to the R&D community. Conversely, a decade of experience in Iraq and Afghanistan has shown that the problem of imposing structure on IED data is not only exceedingly difficult, it is also exceedingly expensive. Unable to easily exploit unstructured data, we will continue to impose structure on our data, but that continued expense argues for increased investment in natural language processors and free text analytics technologies as the only viable alternative to closing the unstructured IED data exploitation gap.

Difficult

“A

ttack the Network” strategies that depend solely on structured IED data will fail. Human nature and entrenched bureaucratic forces result in an unwieldy mix of unstructured and dissimilarly structured IED data repositories. Counter-IED analysts therefore require technologies such as natural language processors and free text analytics if they are to exploit all available IED data.

Solution #2

Easy

Unstructured IED Data

Difficult

Effort required to exploit the data

Figure 1

Illustrated here are the IED data exploitation problem and its potential solutions.

The Federal Acquisition Regulations: Because acquisition is so slow, operational commanders develop or purchase solutions with local funds. They will not wait for the system to catch up when they have troops under fire. The only way to stop these “bottom-up” solutions is to provide timely “top-down” solutions. Even with special acquisition authorities, we rarely act fast enough to meet the commander’s needs. Stove-piped data repositories, each


SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

with their own data structure (or no structure), are the result. They will proliferate so long as top-down acquisition is slow. Training: Collecting structured data requires training. “Natural Language Collection” requires no training. A high school graduate can generally write a proper narrative description of an IED device or event. Even if a data standard can be made flexible enough to keep pace with the adaptive adversary, our training infrastructure seldom matches that flexibility. A structured data application can be imposed on a small group of competent, well-trained collectors, but these often “fail to scale” to the larger general purpose force with its wide spectrum of end user training and competency (Figure 2). Organizational Self Preservation: Unfortunately, the natural organizational tendency toward self-preservation creates dissimilarly structured data sets. There are exceptions to the rule, but experience shows that the Services, our interagency partners, our allies and acquisition pro-

Figure 2

Airborne Special Forces practicing IED detection during training exercise.

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February 2014 | COTS Journal

31


SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

A TQMP2020 module with a Freescale QorIQ can save you design time and money

Material Sourcing

Targeting

Military Units Dept. of State & Commerce Host Nation Government

Military Units Military Units Interagency Partners NGOs

Operational Commander

Network Analysis Reports

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Non-Kinetic Targeting Packages

Support to Prosecution

Force Protection

Military Tribunals Detainee Ops Facilities Civilian Courts • US Domestic • Host Nation • Coalition Nations • International

Evidence

Request for Support

Deployed Units Acquisition Community Traning Cmds Development Labs Doctrine Cmds

C-IED Policy National Command Authority

Tactics C-IED Techniques Technology Procedures Requirements Trends & Patterns

Counter-IED Analysts Structured Data Analytics

Operational Reporting Requirements

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Structured Data

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IED Event Sites Forensic Laboratories Expeditionary and CONUS-based

Forensic Material

IED

IED

Forensic Material

US & Foreign C-IED Forces Military

Police

Intelligence Services

Intelligence Community HUMINT

SIGINT

MASINT

TECHINT

GEOINT

OSINT

Figure 3

An operational view of the structured and unstructured IED data environment.

grams would rather develop their own solution than adopt a solution created by someone else, even a superior and immediately available solution. The “not invented here” syndrome is formidable. Competition: Competing contractors support Counter-IED operations, leading to data sets that are willfully sequestered from each other. There is a strong disincentive to adopt a competitor’s data standard. Counter-IED analysts are then unable to make connections between associated data points in separate and incompatible, commercially developed data repositories. This occurs despite DoD mandates toward data interoperability. The 10,000 Mile Long Screw Driver: This expression describes the reluctance of people from higher headquarters to micromanage the affairs of units in the field. Unfortunately, this deference works against a uniform structure for IED data. Data standards are inherently top-down, “global,” and long-term. So long as personnel deployed on short rotations can establish, abolish, or change data standards agreed to by their predecessors without 3:57 PM

objections from headquarters, IED data structures will be unstable. Every Troop a Collector: Traditionally, well-trained intelligence officers collected and entered data in prescribed formats, providing the structure required to fully exploit it. The overwhelming majority of today’s IED data is collected by untrained personnel writing operational reports. We are not likely to revert to the days when analysts could rely on structured data collected by disciplined intelligence officers trained in collection techniques and indoctrinated into intelligence community report writing protocols. Authority over the Data: In the military, standardizing data should be as simple as issuing an order. Unfortunately, no commander has authority over all collectors. Collectors from non-DoD organizations support our military. Commanders have limited and fleeting administrative control over collectors from allied governments and zero authority over nations with no formal U.S. alliance. Military law enforcement and intelligence officers have separate administrative chains of com-


SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

mand. Data structure cannot be imposed from above. Fewer Cooperative Collectors: Coalition members are “cooperative collectors” with Counter-IED goals aligned with our own. We can elicit their cooperation in structuring data. With the drawdown in Afghanistan, we must shift from an environment where collectors under our control “generate” data, to one where data is “harvested” from sources we do not control. The unstructured data from media reports and Internet sites used by the enemy will rise in importance and value. The Associated Data: Counter-IED operations require biometric data and intelligence data (SIGINT, MASINT, HUMINT, etc.) beyond the technical categorization of IEDs and the tactical characterization of IED events. These external communities have their own struggles with structured data. Their inclusion in IED network attack amplifies the impediments to structured data already described.

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COTS Journal | February 2014

The Diversity of Counter-IED Analysts: Counter-IED analysts from multiple Service, technical, cultural and organizational backgrounds support the diverse operational outcomes across the top of Figure 2. Many of these analysts worked together for the first time in the Counter-IED fight. They brought with them many different and deeply ingrained practices that makes achieving data structure difficult. Lexicon: If all IED data collectors used exactly the same terminology, organized within the same structure, the resulting data would be easily exploitable by today’s technologies. This is the power and the promise of lexicons. Unfortunately, these foundational documents suffer from the same maladies as the data they seek to structure: creation and dissemination that cannot keep pace with the adversary they describe, and expensive and slow training. Lexicons are a mix of stable and dynamic parts: The five basic components of an IED remain the same, but adversary adaptations result in

significant differences in what they employ for each component. Consider the main charge migration from artillery shells to fertilizer-based explosives, or the shift from radio-controlled to victimoperated pressure plate switches. The stable categories are useful for the general education and training of data collectors, but the dynamic elements within them preclude the use of lexicons to build the (stable) data schemas required to structure IED data. The Adaptive Adversary: The adversary changes tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs) and technologies faster than our information sharing infrastructure can adjust to the new data structures required by their new TTPs and technologies. New data definitions and structured data repositories must be created, coded, acquired, trained to and deployed. By the time this happens, the adversary has adapted yet again and moved on to new TTPs and new technologies. Structure-dependent data solutions are obsolete upon delivery.


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SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

Unstructured IED Data Repositories

The forces above lead to data that is either unstructured, adheres to multiple incompatible structures, or is constantly changing in structure. At best, one or more sub-elements of the data set might maintain a degree of structure over time. But even then the result is an unstructured dataset because the existence of those multiple different data structures renders the integrated data set unstructured. Structured data solutions are worth their investment only if they require infrequent updates because the data structure stays stable over time, but that is rarely the case.

Closing the Gap

Imposing the structure on IED data needed to make it easily exploited using existing information technology tools is impractical. Structured IED data solutions will continue to be effective, necessary, practical and reasonably affordable

if we leverage prior investments in them. We must, however, accept that unstructured IED data will predominate in the future and that we cannot fully exploit it without free text analytics and natural language processing tools. Furthermore, the global and historical IED database we require will not be a database. A data “base” implies structure. It will at best be a federation of global and historical data repositories. Having all IED data co-located and controlled by one organization or on one server is also impractical. This would be an expensive proposition, and has already been made unnecessary by emerging technologies like Cloud computing. At best, one responsible organization could provide the data discovery, retrieval and transfer capabilities to make all data accessible from one user interface. This is a necessary but not sufficient first step. The second step is free text analytics and natural language processing. The amount of IED data that can be controlled by one organization, let alone be controlled and structured, gets smaller every day, while the body of data needed to effectively attack IED networks gets bigger every day.

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COTS Journal | February 2014

Structure Problem

Finally, the “structure problem” is not confined to IED data. Readers from other intelligence disciplines will recognize the obstacles above in their own fields. The natural tendency of data created by humans is toward the unstructured end of the spectrum. We all have the same problem; we all need the same solutions. We

can leverage each other’s investments. This, unfortunately, may cause CounterIED organizations to rationalize shifting this technology development to private industry. This desire ignores the reality that should this problem go unsolved, it could result in a trickle, and then an eventual flood, of deaths by IEDs that can still be avoided if we manage to exploit all of the data at our disposal, and make data we do not collect more valuable, and thus worthy of collection. The development of these technologies would be a paradigm shift in any intelligence or informationbased endeavor. This technology would usher in a new epoch in the Information Age with opportunities for intelligence exploitation and information-driven wealth creation that we can only begin to image at present. Intelligent Software Solutions Colorado Springs, CO. (719) 457-0690. www.issinc.com.


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TECHNOLOGY FOCUS CompactPCI and CompactPCI Serial Boards

CompactPCI Boasts a Solid Past and Bright Future Ongoing enhancements to the CompactPCI form factor bring serial and switched fabric technologies to bear for throughput-intensive applications. The military has reaped those rewards. Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

H

aving come a long way since it was developed in the mid-1990s, the CompactPCI embedded form factor has achieved the maturity and broad product range that puts it in a secure place in the mindshares of military system designers. Electrically a superset of desktop PCI with a different physical form factor, CompactPCI borrows the Eurocard form factor popularized by the VME bus. And with more than 20 years under its belt, the 3U flavor of cPCI is particularly attractive to space/weightconstrained applications like avionics. While there’s not any realistic chance cPCI will ever equal the legacy of VME in the military market, CompactPCI did fill a lot of needs during the gap when VPX was going through its growing pains-and won a number of key military programs while doing so. An example of where CompactPCI technology has been used for several years is Rockwell Collins’ Common Avionics Architecture System (CAAS). Initially developed for the SOA MH-47G Chinook and MH-60L/M Black Hawk aircraft (Figure 1), CAAS has a fully integrated flight and mission management capability that provides exceptional mission effectiveness. CAAS was one of the first fully open, non-proprietary systems that completely embraced existing commercial standards on large platforms, and it is now used as the common digital architecture for rotary wing aircraft for the U.S. Army. In terms of upgrade choices, there are many cases where there’s no need to move 38

COTS Journal | February 2014

Figure 1

CompactPCI technology has been used for several years in Rockwell Collins’ Common Avionics Architecture System (CAAS). The system was initially developed for the SOA MH47G Chinook and MH-60L/M Black Hawk aircraft. A MH-60L version is shown here. away from CompactPCI. That’s because the PCI Industrial Manufacturers Group (PICMG) has developed performance upgrade paths for cPCI, such as PICMG 2.16 and CompactPCI Express, and the PICMG 2.30 specification, called CompactPCI PlusIO. The most recent CompactPCI Serial (CPCI-S.0) specification adds greater support for serial point-to-point fabrics like PCI Express, SATA, Ethernet and USB in the classic CompactPCI form factor. The specification contains definitions for both system and peripheral slots in 3U and 6U board sizes. It also includes definitions for eight PCI Express links, eight SATA/SAS se-

rial buses, eight USB 2.0/3.0 buses and eight Ethernet interfaces at system slots. Last year PICMG made a new revision and upgrade to the CompactPCI Express specification, Revision 2. The new revision adds 5 Gbit/s transfer rate and 8 Gbit/s transfer rate PCI Express operation. This provides up to four times the bandwidth while maintaining full backward compatibility with previous CompactPCI and CompactPCI Express products. Equally important, the specification goes to great lengths to define how a product’s PCI Express signaling is validated to ensure interoperability.


TECHNOLOGY FOCUS: CompactPCI and CompactPCI Serial Board Roundup 3U CompactPCI PlusIO Compatible Blade Has 4th Gen Core i7

Conduction-Cooled 6U CompactPCI SBC Sports Core i7

Low-Power, RTCA-Compliant SBC Reduces Development Costs

ADLINK Technology provides its latest 4th generation Intel Core i7 3U CompactPCI Processor Blade, the cPCI-3510 Series, which supports the quad-core Intel Core i7-4700EQ at 2.4 GHz. It has 8 Gbytes of DDR3L-1600 ECC memory soldered on board and 32 Gbytes of SATA NAND flash. The cPCI-3510 is designed to meet MIL-STD-810G, supporting from -20° to 70°C and withstanding high-vibration environments of 5 Grms under operation. Integrated Intel HD 4600 graphics makes it highly suitable for video

Advantech’s MIC-3395MIL is a ruggedized 6U Compact Single Board Computer (SBC) based on the Intel Core i7-3500 mobile processor series. This new addition to the MIC-3395 family combines ultra-low-voltage multicore processors with very low power dissipation and a highly conductive aluminum heat sink to eliminate the need for onboard forced ventilation. Ruggedized requirements are satisfied by its conductioncooled design and allow it to meet extended operating temperatures of -40° to 70°C necessary

Aitech Defense Systems offers the RTCAcompliant C920, a rugged 3U CompactPCI PowerPC-based SBC (single board computer) with very low power dissipation of typically less than 5W. The SBC helps significantly reduce engineering resources typically diverted to RTCA design requirements, saving on overall system and software development costs. The SBC is safety-certifiable to the highest DAL A levels of both DO-178 (software) and DO-254 (hardware), making it ideal for safety- and mission-critical

transcoding applications. Three independent displays with two dual-mode DisplayPorts and one DVI-I output links are provided. The DisplayPort supports single link DVI or HDMI through a passive adapter cable and analog VGA interface using an active adapter cable. With the ADLINK XMC-G460 graphics module installed in the XMC site, the cPCI-3510 Series supports up to four independent displays and is suitable for military and aerospace industries in disaster recovery or multi-screen control center applications. With an optimum balance of CPU/ GPU/TDP and Extreme Rugged design, the conduction-cooled version of the cPCI-3510, the CT-3510, is able to support -40° to +80°C operation without forced air flow to meet the challenges of critical missions in a wide variety of harsh environments. The cPCI-3510 Series also provides strong system manageability by taking advantage of the Intel AMT 9.0 remote management technology included in Intel vPro technology, plus PICMG 2.9 IPMI system management. This combination allows a remote user to access, configure, control and monitor the system status. Remote health diagnosis and maintenance and automatic alarm features help save time and costs, as well as prevent catastrophic system shutdowns.

for use in military and defense, aerospace and transportation applications among others. Onboard soldered DRAM with ECC support and optional memory expansion extends the memory to a maximum of 16 Gbytes. An onboard XMC/PMC site with PCIe x8 gen.2 connectivity is able to host high-speed offload or I/O mezzanines. Special heat sink design to accommodate specific mezzanine cards from Advantech or the PICMG ecosystem can be studied upon request. With SATA-III support and up to 6 Gbit/s I/O, the latest enhancements in storage technology such as high-speed SSDs can be employed. Six Gbit Ethernet ports for PICMG 2.16, front and rear connectivity, ensure best in class network connectivity. The MIC-3395MIL also supports an onboard 2.5inch Serial ATA HDD or SSD, a CFast slot, an optional onboard, soldered NAND flash and a set of I/O functions brought through the backplane to the rear transition module. The RIO-3395MIL transition module expands connectivity to two GbE LANs, one P/S2, one COM (RJ45), one COM (D-Sub9), two USB, one DVI and one VGA connector.

Irvine, CA.

applications. In addition to reduced design costs, the C920 saves on DO-254 certification costs by minimizing the use of onboard FPGAs. Featuring increased processing power without the added overhead of additional heat generation, the C920 incorporates a highly integrated PowerQUICC II 8349E processor that is hardware-preconfigured to 400 MHz, ensuring the right mix of high processor horsepower and low power dissipation. The C920’s large onboard memory consists of up to 256 Mbyte fast DDR2 266 SDRAM with ECC protection for exceptional data integrity, 128 Mbytes of boot Flash, 256 Mbytes of user Flash and 512 Kbytes of NVRAM implemented. The C920’s compact 3U form factor accommodates a wide range of integrated I/O including two 10/100 BaseT Ethernet ports and two RS-232/-422/-485 serial ports. To control real-world systems, the rugged SBC also provides 21 single-ended general purpose TTL discrete I/O lines, where each line is independently user-programmable as either an input or output and able to generate a processor interrupt on a change of state. An industry standard PMC slot is compliant to ANSI/IEEE 1386 and ANSI/VITA 20. The COTS board is available in five different build levels, either air- or conduction-cooled.

ADLINK Technology

(949) 420-2500.

Aitech Defense Systems

San Jose, CA.

www.advantech.com/nc.

Chatsworth, CA.

Advantech

(408) 360-0200.

(888) 248-3248.

www.adlinktech.com.

www.rugged.com.

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

40

COTS Journal | February 2014


COMPACTPCI AND COMPACTPCI SERIAL BOARD ROUNDUP

6U cPCI SBC Combines 3rd Gen Core Processors and Rich I/O

Extended Lifetime of Rugged CompactPCI SBC Family

Concurrent Technologies offers their latest high-performance 6U CompactPCI processor board utilizing 3rd generation Intel Core processors. The PP 91x/x1x is a single-slot aircooled Single Board Computer (SBC) expanding on the success of the previous generations of 6U CompactPCI SBCs, allowing customers to easily migrate to the latest generation of Intel Core processors while reaping the benefits of significantly improved performance per watt and extending the lifecycle of already deployed

Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions (CWCDS) has extended the scheduled production life of its SCP/DCP-124 and SCP/ DCP-124P rugged 3U CompactPCI (cPCI) SBCs. The SCP/DCP-124/124P has completed a design update that removes obsolescence and extends the board’s LTB/EOL date out from 2013 to 2016. The design update is transparent to the user and does not require any software changes in the customer’s software application, which speeds and eases the longevity of supply process.

solutions. The PP 91x/x1x supports the dual-core and quad-core 3rd generation Intel Core i7 processors along with up to 16 Gbytes of ECC SDRAM. The PP 91x/x1x integrates the newly released Mobile Intel QM77 Express chipset, which provides enhanced connectivity. The board provides USB 3.0 connectivity, which allows for faster data delivery. Coupled with up to 6 Mbytes of on-die cache and a faster memory controller, it provides a peak bandwidth of 25 Gbytes/s. The PP 91x/x1x maintains both rear and front I/O compatibility with the previous generation PP 81x/x1x. The board can operate as a system controller board, a peripheral board or as a satellite board (blade). Support is also provided for PICMG 2.16 (Ethernet fabric), PICMG 2.9 (IPMI) and PICMG 2.1 (hot swap); the CompactPCI backplane interface operates at 33/66 MHz PCI signaling speeds. The board is designed to scale from commercial temperature grade 0° to +55°C (N-Series) through to extended temperature grade -40° to +85°C (K-Series).

The SCP/DCP-124 3U cPCI SBC is available in both conduction-cooled and air-cooled versions and delivers a rich complement of I/O in a compact 3U form factor. Powered by Freescale’s Altivec-enhanced 7448 PowerPC processor, these small form factor cards simplify the design of space- and weight-constrained COTS systems for military and aerospace applications. The SCP/DCP-124P variant of the popular SCP/DCP-124 expands I/O flexibility by enabling I/O signals to be routed to the backplane in compliance with the PICMG 2.3 standard. The board is designed to be used in cPCI backplane peripheral slots. The SCP/DCP124/124P supports a full 64-bit PMC site along with a wealth of additional I/O. Both boards are powered by a 7447A/7448 Power Architecture that is supported by 1 Mbyte of internal ECC L2 Cache memory running at core processor speed, and up to 1 Gbyte of DDR SDRAM with ECC.

Concurrent Technologies

Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions Ashburn, VA. (703) 779-7800. www.cwcdefense.com.

CompactPCI Serial SBC Features Quad-Core i7 and up to 16 Gbyte ECC Memory

A rich-featured, high-performance 4HP/3U CompactPCI Serial CPU board is equipped with an Intel Core i7 Ivy Bridge + ECC (dual- or quad-core) mobile processor based on 22nm technology. The front panel of the SC1-Allegro from EKF Elektronik is provided with two Gigabit Ethernet jacks, two USB 3.0 receptacles and two Mini-DisplayPort connectors for attachment of high-resolution digital displays. The SC1-Allegro is equipped with a set of local

expansion interface connectors, which can be optionally used to attach a mezzanine side board. A variety of expansion cards is available, e.g. providing legacy I/O and additional PCI Expressbased I/O controllers such as SATA, USB 3.0 and Gigabit Ethernet, or a third video output. Most mezzanine side cards can also accommodate a 2.5-inch drive. The module is equipped with up to 16 Gbyte RAM with ECC support. 8 Gbyte of memory is provided for rugged applications, and another 8 Gbyte are available via the DDR3 ECC SO-DIMM socket. As an option, a low-profile mezzanine module with dual mSATA SSDs may serve as a high-speed RAID mass storage solution. The SC1-ALLEGRO backplane connectors comply with the PICMG CompactPCI Serial system slot specification. Typically, the SC1-Allegro and the related side card would come as a ready-assembled 8HP unit. As an alternative, low-profile Flashbased mezzanine storage modules are available that fit on the SC1-Allegro while maintaining the 4HP profile. The C42-SATA module is equipped with a very fast 1.8-inch SATA Solid State Drive (SSD), which is suitable for installation of any popular operating system.

Woburn, MA.

EKF Elektronik

(781) 933 5900.

Hamm, Germany.

www.gocct.com.

+49 (0)2381/6890-0. www.ekf.de FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

February 2014 | COTS Journal

41


COMPACTPCI AND COMPACTPCI SERIAL BOARD ROUNDUP

Intel Core i7-Based SBCs Have Fast-Booting Technology

Multicore PowerPC Climbs onto 3U CompactPCI

6U 2.16 GHz Core 2 Duo Board Boasts Health Monitoring

Extreme Engineering Solutions offers products to support Fast Boot with Intel’s Firmware Support Package (FSP). With the integration of Intel’s FSP into its Intel Core i7-based bootloader solutions, X-ES enables the fastest possible boot times for Intel Core i7-based SBCs. The newly released FSP from Intel also opens the door for additional Intel-capable bootloader options beyond the legacy BIOS vendors. This facilitates an expanded ecosystem of both proprietary and open source bootloaders that can be more easily streamlined

CompactPCI is no longer the new kid on the block for military embedded systems. GE Intelligent Platforms offers the IMP3A, a 3U CompactPCI single board computer featuring the latest dual core QorIQ processor technology from Freescale. The IMP3A takes advantage of the QorIQ P2020 processor to deliver dual core performance in a single core power envelope. By coupling the P2020 with an extensive range of memory resources and I/O features, and implementing new features such as SATA

An increasing number of military applications are requiring computing that can operate autonomously. That means the system has to monitor its own health. With that in mind, General Micro System’s “2nd Coming” was the industry’s first 6U, 2.16 GHz Core 2 Duo, conduction-cooled cPCI SBC to provide full System Health Monitoring and reporting to meet all PICMG 2.9 specifications, while adding a slew of additional health monitoring and reporting system status to an external device.

and tailored for industry-specific needs. The initial products from X-ES supporting an FSP-based bootloader solution were the 3rd generation Intel Core i7-based (formerly “Ivy Bridge”) products, including the 3U VPX XPedite7470 and rugged COM Express XPedite7450. FSP support for 4th generation Intel Core i7-based (formerly “Haswell”) products, such as the 3U VPX XPedite7570, XPedite7501 XMC, 6U cPCI XCalibur4500 (shown) and 6U VME XCalibur4530 followed. The XCalibur4500 is a high-performance 6U CompactPCI single board computer that is ideal for ruggedized systems requiring high-bandwidth processing and low power consumption. With the 4th generation Intel Core i7 Haswell processor, the XCalibur4500 delivers enhanced performance and efficiency for today’s network information processing and embedded computing applications. The XCalibur4500 provides up to 32 Gbyte DDR3L-1600 ECC SDRAM in two separate channels, two PrPMC/XMC slots and up to 64 Gbyte of NAND Flash. The XCalibur4500 also hosts numerous I/O ports, including Gbit Ethernet, USB, SATA, graphics, and RS232/422/485 through the backplane connectors.

and NAND Flash memory, the IMP3A offers innovative technologies for programs committed to the 3U CompactPCI architecture as well as a highly cost-effective technology insertion opportunity for GE’s existing IMP1A/IMP2A customers. A typical application would see the IMP3A deployed as part of a control system on board a tank, armored vehicle or helicopter. The IMP3A supports a choice of either the QorIQ P2010 single core processor or the QorIQ P2020 dual core processor, operating at up to 1.2 GHz. Both symmetric and asymmetric processing are supported, enabling customers to scale performance through either threadlevel or application-level parallelism. A PCI-X PMC expansion capability enables customers to configure the IMP3A to their requirements without exceeding the capacity of a single CompactPCI slot. Up to 4 Gbytes of soldered DDR3 ECC memory is featured for maximum system throughput and reliability, while flexible connectivity is provided with two Gigabit Ethernet channels, up to 16 GPIO ports, two SATA channels, two COM ports and USB 2.0. The IMP3A is available in five build levels from office/benign to conduction-cooled with a maximum operating temperature of +85°C.

The CC276 supports up to 4 Gbytes of 667 MHz DDR-2 memory and vast onboard I/O. The standard I/O included are dual Gbit Ethernet on PCIe bus with TCP/IP Offloading Engine, dual IDE, quad SATA with RAID (0, 1, 5, 10 and 50) capabilities, five USB-2.0, 1 Mbyte of user/Boot flash and two serial ports. Additional standard I/O included are: one PMC/XMC site with rear I/O, 16 bidirectional Digital I/O lines and dual COM ports with RS-232/422 buffers (jumper selectable). The C276 module is fully compliant to IEEE Std. 1101.2 and ANSI/VITA 2-0 2001. The 2nd Coming operates from -40° to +85°C at the rails with relative humidity of 5-95 percent at 40°C, and may be exposed to shocks of up to 100g for 5 ms, or 40g for 11 ms in 3 axis. The 2nd Coming supports extremes; vibrations range from 5 Hz to 2 KHz for up to 30 minutes at 15g RMS in each axis.

Extreme Engineering Solutions Middleton, WI. (608) 833-1155. www.xes-inc.com.

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

42

COTS Journal | February 2014

GE Intelligent Platforms Charlottesville, VA. (800) 368-2738. defense.ge-ip.com.

General Micro Systems Rancho Cucamonga, CA. (909) 980-4863. www.gms4sbc.com.


COMPACTPCI AND COMPACTPCI SERIAL BOARD ROUNDUP

CompactPCI Board Features Intel Atom E3800 Processor

CompactPCI Serial SBC Offers Speeds up to 3.3 GHz

3U CompactPCI SBC Provides Multi-Function I/O

The Kontron CP3010-SA is equipped with the latest System-on-Chip (SoC) Intel Atom E3800 processors-formerly codenamed “Bay Trail”-and quadruples the performance in the low-power class of Intel Atom processor-based Kontron CompactPCI systems without increasing the thermal budget. This makes the new board an ideal drop-in replacement even for Intel Core 2 Duo processor-based CPCI systems. The special heatsink design optimized for convection-cooled environments makes the CP3010-SA a perfect

MEN Micro’s latest 3U CompactPCI Serial SBC, the G22, provides speeds up to 3.3 GHz using Turbo Boost functionality. The new Intel Quad Core i7-based board provides exceptional processing performance in data-intensive environments. The G22 also provides high graphics performance as well as state-of-the-art I/O functionality. As the second CompactPCI Serial-based SBC from MEN Micro, the G22 enables fast serial data transfers up to 12 Gbit/s and full mesh capabilities without additional

The 75SBC4 from North Atlantic Industries is a single-slot 3U cPCI low-power and highperformance Single Board Computer (SBC) with dual high-speed/performance function module slots for configurable multi-function I/O interface expansion. Powered by the Freescale 1.2 GHz QorIQ P2041 Power Architecture processor, the 75SBC4 offers an extremely lowpower, cost-conscious SBC solution for today’s demanding, space-constrained and resourcelimited embedded systems.

fit for all applications where fans are not desired or not possible. The new EN50155-compliant CompactPCI processor board features soldered SoC and memory and offers high resistance against shock and vibration, making it a perfect match for harsh environments. Moreover it supports the extended temperature range from -40° up to +85°C. The EN50155-compliant Kontron CP3010SA comes with up to quad core 1.9 GHz Intel Atom processor performance and up to 8 Gbytes of energy-efficient DDR3L memory. Integrating the new Intel Gen7 graphics, it delivers excellent 2D, 3D and video capabilities to up to two independent displays connected via 2x DisplayPort and VGA. Furthermore, Kontron’s latest CompactPCI processor board boasts a comprehensive set of leading-edge interfaces including 3x Gbit Ethernet, 1x USB 3.0, 3x USB 2.0 plus CAN bus and 2x COM ports. For data and software storage it provides 2x SATA interfaces used for an onboard CFAST socket, which can optionally be replaced by up to 64 Gbytes of soldered SATA Flash and a HDD/SSD option on the extension.

configuration overhead. Support of a Trusted Platform Module ensures data security and the Intel Active Management Technology allows easy maintenance, making the G22 single board computer a robust solution in safety-critical applications with high computing performance. Using the BIOS, the processor frequency can also be stepped down in order to lower the power consumption below the default 45W, allowing the board to be used in applications with higher temperatures. At the rear, four USB 3.0, four USB 2.0, two 3rd generation SATA and three 2nd generation SATA ports are standard, in addition to a Display or HDMI port, five PCI Express x1 and two PEG x8 ports. With added mezzanine modules, four, or possibly all of the eight Gigabit Ethernet interfaces specified in the CompactPCI Serial standard can be led to the backplane. Further expansion is accommodated through mSATA and microSD card slots. The G22 comes with 4 or 8 Gbytes of soldered DDR3 DRAM, complete with ECC. All components are soldered to withstand heavy shock and vibration, and conformal coating protects the 3U SBC from dust and humidity. Watchdogs monitor the processor and board temperature. Pricing for the G22 is $3,008.

Two I/O module slots enable integrators to mix and match a variety of I/O and communication functions. This unique, COTSconfigurable design offers a broad assortment of signal interfaces, including Digital I/O (Discrete, Differential, TTL/CMOS); Analog I/O (A/D, D/A, RTD, Strain Gage); Motion Control and Sensor Interfaces (Synchro / Resolver / LVDT / RVDT Measurement and Simulation, Encoder/ Counter) and Communications Interfaces (Serial RS-232/422/423/485, CANBus, MILSTD-1553 and ARINC 429/575). The 75SBC4 SBC configured with up to two modules allows systems integrators to confidently manage, monitor and process a host of sensor interfacing requirements with NAI’s flexible, leading-edge, fully programmable and continuous background built-in-test (BIT)-enabled I/O modules.

Kontron America Poway, CA. (858) 677-0877. www.kontron.com.

North Atlantic Industries Bohemia, NY. (631) 567-1100. www.naii.com.

MEN Micro Ambler, PA. (215) 542-9575. www.menmicro.com.

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

February 2014 | COTS Journal

43


COTS FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

PRODUCTS T orque-Limiting PCB Retainers Ensure Optimal Clamping Force

Achieving proper printed circuit board clamping force and getting the thermal management right are together hard enough. But to do so for deployed mission-critical electronic systems makes for a challenge, particularly in the adverse conditions common in military applications. With all that in mind, Pentair Equipment Protection has designed its Schroff brand of Calmark Series 223 and 224 Torque-Limiting Card-Lok retainers. Designed with a patented ratchet mechanism (US 7,883,289), the Series 223 and 224 provide consistently repeatable and highly reliable clamp without the need for a calibrated torque wrench. Standard card locks must be properly installed with the specified level of torque to yield optimal clamp force and thermal performance. The integrated ratcheting mechanism of the Calmark Series 223 and 224 Torque-Limiting Card-Loks simplifies installation by preventing over tightening, minimizing the risk of cold wall or PCB damage during field-level maintenance. The retainers provide optimal clamping force without the need for a calibrated torque wrench-the patented ratchet mechanism keeps the printed circuit board firmly in place while optimizing thermal transfer. The Calmark Series 223 and 224 Torque-Limiting retainers eliminate the need for specialized tools, ongoing calibration or technical knowledge-making them an ideal card-lok retainer solution for field-level maintenance within a Two Level Maintenance system. Featuring an industry-leading clamping force up to 400 lbs. and high durability printed circuit board protection, torque-limiting card-loks are optimal for high shock and vibration, high equipment availability and performance-critical applications. Series 223 measures 5.72 mm x 6.86 mm (.225 in. x .270 in. max) and Series 224 measures 5.33 mm x 7.24 mm (.210 in. x .285 in. max). Both are available in lengths from 3.8 in. - 12.8 in, in 0.5 in. increments and are available in standard or metric screw configurations.

Pentair Equipment Protection, Warwick, RI. (401) 732-3770. www.pentairequipmentprotection.com.

Compact Network Platform Sports AMD Embedded G-Series SoC

WIN Enterprises has announced the PL-80520, a desktop platform designed to support a range of applications requiring compact size and versatile performance. The device is powered by an AMD Embedded G-Series SOC, an embedded component guaranteed for long product life. The platform features a high-bandwidth DDR3 DIMM slot that supports memory up to 8 Gbytes. Storage interfaces include a 2.5-inch SATA HDD and CompactFlash. The unit is equipped with four Copper Gbit Ethernet ports, bypass function, a USB 2.0 port, a RJ45 console port, a mini-PCIe socket and 11 LED indicators for monitoring power, storage activities for system management, maintenance and diagnostics.

WIN Enterprises, North Andover, MA. (978) 688-2000. www.win-ent.com.

MIL-STD-1553 XMC Cards Blend Low SWaP and with High Channel Count

Data Device Corporation has expanded its MILSTD-1553 XMC card offering to include front and rear I/O options, along with air- and conduction-cooled configurations, to support a wide range of embedded applications. The BU-67112 XMC card utilizes the world’s most advanced MIL-STD-1553 technology, Total-AceXtreme, to deliver low power dissipation, high MTBF and high performance for rugged environments. The high channel count can save space, weight, power and cost in embedded systems. The cards support IRIG 106 Chapter 10 and Tx Inhibit, making them ideal for flight data recorders. An onboard DMA engine frees up host CPU resources.

Data Device Corp., Bohemia, NY. (631) 567-5600. www.ddc-web.com.

3U VPX SSD Module Carrier Houses High-Density 2.5-Inch SATA Drives

Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions has introduced a lost-cost, flexible solution for embedding rugged, high-density SATA SSD drives into deployed compute platforms. The FSM Carrier (FSM-C) is a 3U VPX (VITA 48.2) module designed to securely house industry standard 2.5-inch SATA solid state drives (SSDs). The FSM-C can be configured with SSD storage capacities ranging from 128 Gbytes to 1 Terabyte. Because the Vortex FSM-C uses industry-standard direct-attached SATA SSDs,, it eases technology refresh, reduces the risk of obsolescence and makes the board essentially “plug-and-play.” It also eliminates the need for system integrators to deal with software drivers, operating systems or processor types, which speeds and simplifies the deployment of removable industry-standard high-density SATA SSDs into embedded systems for defense and aerospace applications. The FSM-C is ideal for use in systems that require data transport, such as mission computers, sensor processors, mission recorders, instrumentation recorders and embedded ISR applications. The Vortex FSM-C is designed for system integrators seeking the most cost-effective, rugged solution for adding removable high-density storage to their embedded system. To ensure data security, the FSM-C’s internal SSD can be provided with Secure Erase or MIL Secure Erase features. When provisioned, these features can be initiated by an ATA command over the SATA lane. A variety of optional MIL Secure Erase algorithms can also be provided to meet the specific program or application security requirements. For those applications that require removable storage with very high level data protection, we offer our Vortex FSM, a rugged 3U VPX FIPS 140-2 certified 1 Terabyte memory module with on-module support for AES256-bit encryption.

Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions, Ashburn, VA. (613) 254-5112. www.cwcdefense.com. 44

COTS Journal | February 2014


COTS PRODUCTS FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

Encapsulated AC/DC Isolated Module Provides 3 Phase Input

Pico’s new Power Factor Corrected, AC3 series of modules has a single brick package that allows you to input a 208 VAC three phase AC delta connection. It offers isolated output voltages from 5 VDC to one of the highest V outs available, of 300 VDC, and output power up to 300W. Sixteen new models will operate from 208 VAC with an input frequency range of 47 to 440 Hz and provide an isolated, regulated DC output voltage at a fixed 100 KHz operating frequency. Standard features include over-current protection and built-in sense pins on modules with 48 VDC output and less, in a fully encapsulated module for use in a ruggedized environment. Upgraded modules for expanded operating temperature and COTS applications are available; just contact us today to review your requirements.t

Pico Electronics, Pelham, NY. (914) 738-1400. www.picoelectronics.com.

 ugged Rackmount Recorders Target Ground, R Ship and Airborne Systems

Pentek has made two additions to the Talon family of highspeed turnkey recording systems. The Model RTR 2728 rugged portable recorder and the Model RTR 2748 rugged rackmount recorder use state-of-the-art SSD (solid state drive) storage technology to achieve aggregate recording and playback rates up to 4 Gbytes/s. As complete recording systems, these Talon recorders are ideal for recording and reproducing wideband IF signals at sample rates up to 1 Gsample/s. Systems are built on a Windows 7 Professional workstation with an Intel Core I7 processor and provide both a GUI (graphical user interface) and API (application programmer’s interface) to control the system. Signal analysis tools are also provided to allow the user to monitor and analyze signals prior to, during and after a recording. Data files include time stamping as well as recording parameters and optional GPS information. Files are stored in the native Windows NTFS (new technology file system) format, eliminating the need for file conversion. Files can also be transferred from the system through Gigabit Ethernet, USB ports or written to optical disks using the built-in 8X double layer DVD±R/RW drive. The recorder’s SSDs are configured to support numerous RAID levels giving the user many options to balance performance versus failsafe trade-offs. They are hot-swappable and can be easily removed or exchanged during or after a mission to retrieve recorded data. Both recording systems use Pentek’s high-powered Virtex-6-based Cobalt boards that provide the data streaming engine for the high-speed A/D and D/A converters. A built-in synchronization module is provided to allow for multi-channel phase-coherent operation. The rackmount system is scalable to accommodate multiple chassis for more channels and higher aggregate data rates. Prices start at $49,995. Options are available for the number of recording and playback channels, storage capacity, and GPS time and position stamping.

Video Module Sports DaVinci Media Processor

Creative Electronic Systems has announced the VPP-8112 video I/O and processor XMC. The VPP-8112 is specifically designed as a powerful video acquisition and processing solution for harsh environmental conditions. The VPP-8112 features the DaVinci digital media processor from Texas Instruments. It incorporates an ARM Cortex-A8 processor, running an embedded Linux system, a floatingpoint VLIW DSP, a video image coprocessor for H.264 and MPEG-4 video compression, decompression and a 3D graphics processing unit. Its multiple integrated I/O peripherals provide native support for a PCIe x1 Gen2 link, two Gigabit Ethernet links, one SATA-II interface for external storage and two USB 2.0 ports. The VPP-8112 has two stereo audio inputs and outputs to complement the video capability of the module. The VPP-8112 module has options for air-cooled and conduction-cooled operating environments.

Creative Electronic Systems, Geneva, Switzerland. +41 (0)22 884 51 00. www.ces.ch.

Pentek, Upper Saddle River, NJ. (201) 818-5900. www.pentek.com.

3.5-Inch SBC Based on 4th Gen Intel Core Quad/DC i3/i5/i7 Processors

ADL Embedded Solutions has announced its ADLQM87HD 3.5-Inch SBC based on 4th Generation Intel Core Quad/DC i3/i5/i7 Processors. The ADLQM87HD features Intel’s 4th generation Intel Core processors with Intel’s latest HD Graphics 4600 engine and support for DirectX11.1, OpenGL 4.0 and OpenCL 1.2. The ADLQM87HD also introduces Intel’s new AVX2 instruction set and TPM 1.2 and USB 3.0 functionality.t The ADLQM87HD also supports a broad set of features including video ports for DVI/ VGA and HDMI/DP, 3x RS-232 COM ports, 4x SATA 6 Gbit/s with RAID 0, 1, 5, 10 support, 8x USB 2.0, 3x USB 3.0, two bootable Gigabit Ethernet LAN ports and HDA 7.1. Expansion possibilities include a miniPCI socket as well as a 2 x 40-pin PCIe expansion connector with four PCIe x1 lanes or one PCIe x4 lane for additional breakout or mezzanine board functionality. It is designed for -40° to +85°C operation with ruggedization options available. The ADLQM87HD is uniquely suited for ruggedized SFF systems and optimized for integration in the ADLMES-8200 modular enclosure.

ADL Embedded Solutions, San Diego, CA. (858) 490-0597. www.adl-usa.com. February 2014 | COTS Journal

45


COTS PRODUCTS FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

Rugged, 14-Port Gbit Managed Ethernet Switch Has 2 SFP Sockets

Diamond Systems has unveiled Epsilon-12G2, a rugged, managed Layer 2+ Ethernet switch module that offers twelve 10/100/1000 Mbit/s copper twisted pair ports and two small form factor pluggable (SFP) sockets in a compact COM Express form factor. A 480 MHz MIPS processor embedded directly into the switch manages all switch functions. The processor is accessed via an in-band Web interface over one of the Ethernet ports or via an out-of-band command-line interface over an RS-232 serial port. Designed for use in rugged applications including industrial, on-vehicle and military environments, Epsilon-12G2 operates over an extended temperature range of -40° to +85°C. All I/O connectors are latching, providing enhanced reliability over the RJ-45 connectors used in commercial Ethernet switches. A percent thicker PCB provides better protection against vibration in vehicle environments. The +5V to +40V-wide range DC/DC power supply is compatible with all common vehicle and industrial power sources. The switch’s dual SFP socket interfaces to 1G fiber Ethernet networks. One port can operate at an enhanced 2.5G to support efficient stacking of two switches together for a combined total of 26 ports. The Epsilon-12G2 14-Port Gigabit Managed Ethernet Switch is shipping now. Single unit pricing starts at $800.

Diamond Systems, Mountain View, CA. (800) 367-2104. www.diamondsystems.com.

3 U cPCI Serial Carrier Card Integrates M-Module Functionality

MEN Micro released the G204, a 3U CompactPCI Serial carrier card with an M-Module slot. An easy way to integrate flexible I/O, the M-Module slot provides users with the ability to interchange more than 30 I/O functions within a system. The M-Module, which needs only one CompactPCI Serial slot, is screwed tightly onto the G204 and requires no separately mounted transition panel. The new modular mezzanine card operates in the extended temperature range of -40° to +85°C for harsh environments. Developed in 1988 by MEN and later standardized by VITA, M-Modules are modular I/O extensions for all types of industrial computers, from embedded systems up to high-end workstations. Pricing for the G204 is $483 per unit.

MEN Micro, Ambler, PA. (215) 542-9575. www.menmicro.com.

 ugged Camera Does R 360 Degree Image Capture

Sundance has been appointed as a distributor of the iSTAR range of advanced cameras by NCTech Limited of Scotland. iSTAR is capable of capturing the image of an entire surrounding, 360 degrees in every direction, with the press of a single button. This rugged camera allows the user not to miss anything when taking the image from an environment. This is particularly valuable when taking image for remote control and commanding in a battle zone. Panoramic images can be taken from a single shot, which allows seasoned photographers to concentrate on the artistic content rather than on not missing part of the subject being photographed.

Sundance DSP, Reno, NV. (775) 827-3103. www.sundancedsp.com.

XMC Modules Link 10 Gbit Ethernet to PCI Express with TCP/IP Offload

With the adoption of 10GbE for video and other data sources, even the most powerful processors require help managing the data flow to prevent performance bottlenecks. Acromag’s new XMC6260 and XMC-6280 mezzanine modules provide a 10 Gbit Ethernet interface solution for dataintensive, real-time embedded computing systems. Ultra-high performance is achieved using a TCP/IP offload engine (TOE) ASIC connected to a PCI Express Gen2 x8 interface. The XMC-6260 has dual XAUI 10GBASE-KX4 ports and supports conduction-cooling or -40° to 85°C operation. The XMC-6280 features four SFP+ ports for fiber or copper cables. Applications include high-speed data storage, image collection/transfer, distributed control networks and board-to-board interfaces. To meet the needs of data-intensive, real-time applications, these fully integrated network interface cards (NIC) employ the Chelsio T4 processor. This ASIC has four XGMAC (10GbE) interfaces and supports up to 1M connections. Five gigabits of DDR3 memory enhances the number of virtual connections. The T4 chip provides full offload support for TCP, UDP, iSCSI and Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE). Other functions include high-performance packet switching, traffic filtering and management. By relieving the host CPU of these network processing tasks, very low Ethernet latency and high-level determinism are reliably achievable. All versions are available with lead or lead-free solder starting at $2,750.

Acromag, Wixom, MI. (248) 295-0310. www.acromag.com. 46

COTS Journal | February 2014


DISCOVER MORE Content within 60 sessions during four days of a comprehensive Conference program. Products and services from 350+ exhibitors showcasing the latest technologies and solutions in the global satellite communications marketplace. Exclusive networking events with high-level executives representing the government, military, broadcast, maritime, telecommunications, enterprise, commercial and mobile satellite markets. Mobile Satellite Services (MSS) through the co-located MSUA-11 Conference and Mobility Pavilion. Register today with VIP Code: COTSJOURNAL to qualify for Advance discounts on the Conference and free access to the Exhibition!

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ADVERTISERS INDEX GET CONNECTED WITH INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS SOURCE AND PURCHASABLE SOLUTIONS NOW Intelligent Systems Source is a new resource that gives you the power to compare, review and even purchase embedded computing products intelligently. To help you research SBCs, SOMs, COMs, Systems, or I/O boards, the Intelligent Systems Source website provides products, articles, and whitepapers from industry leading manufacturers---and it's even connected to the top 5 distributors. Go to Intelligent Systems Source now so you can start to locate, compare, and purchase the correct product for your needs.

Index

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

Company Page# Website

Company Page# Website

Acromag........................................18......................... www.acromag.com

Octagon Systems............................31.............. www.octagonsystems.com

Ballard Technology, Inc....................5.......................www.ballardtech.com

One Stop Systems, Inc................. 23,49............ www.onestopsystems.com

Calex Manufacturing Co., Inc...........29...............................www.calex.com

Phoenix International Systems, Inc....4...........................www.phenxint.com

CM Computer................................52.....................www.cmcomputer.com

Pico Electronics, Inc........................27................www.picoelectronics.com

Cots Product Gallery......................49.......................................................

RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc.....2................................... www.rtd.com

Critical IO, LLC...............................13..........................www.criticalio.com

Satellite 2014................................ 47.................... www.satellite2014.com

Data Bus Products, Corp.................39............. www.databusproducts.com

Sealevel Systems, Inc.....................36...................................sealevel.com

Engineering Design Team, Inc...........4.................................. www.edt.com

SIE Computing Solutions.................22......................................sie-cs.com

Extreme Engineering Solutions....... 51............................ www.xes-inc.com

SynQor, Inc....................................33............................. www.synqor.com

GAIA Converter...............................21.................www.gaia-converter.com

Tadiran Batteries............................17....................... www.tadiranbat.com

GE Intelligent Platforms...................35................defense.gp-ip.com/gpgpu

TeleCommunication Systems, Inc....34........................... ww.toughssd.com

Innovative Integration......................24.................www.innovative-dsp.com

Trenton Systems, Inc.......................25................www.trentonsystems.com

Interface Concept...........................15............. www.interfaceconcept.com

TQ Systems GmbH..........................32......................................................

Mercury Systems, Inc......................7................................ www.mrcy.com

.............................................. www.convergencepromotions.com/TQ-USA

Mobile Pathways, Inc......................19.............. www.mobilepathways.com

Vadatech Incorporated....................12......................... www.vadatech.com

North Atlantic Industries.................37.................................. www.naii.com COTS Journal (ISSN#1526-4653) is published monthly at 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250, San Clemente, CA 92673. Periodicals Class postage paid at San Clemente and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to COTS Journal, 905 Calle Amanecer, Ste. 250, San Clemente, CA 92673.

Coming Next Month Special Feature: Positioning OpenVPX and VME as Separate or Combined Solutions VME, like no other form factor, boasts the richest successful legacy in military systems. That’s partly because of its unique ability to remain backward compatible and facilitate technology refresh in military programs. Meanwhile the VPX standard (VITA 46) or OpenVPX emerged with a different set of characteristics for system bandwidth and backward compatibility. VPX is decidedly aimed more at high-bandwidth, data-intensive military applications. Yet VME is still more suited for use in applications that are event-driven. This section looks at where VME and VPX overlap and at the strategies for hybrid VME/VPX military systems. System Development: Annual EOL and Component Obsolescence Directory Unique coverage of key military technology issues in a way that you can’t find elsewhere; that’s what COTS Journal is known for. Exemplifying that unique character is our Annual End-of-Life Directory. Now in its 14th year, the EOL Directory lists both key DoD organizations and commercial firms involved in solving the problems of component obsolescence. Tech Recon: DoD Budget Report: Major Programs With a budget deal in place, there’s at least the promise of more certainty in the year ahead. Many advanced programs are likely to see some shifts in funding, and tech refresh and upgrade programs are already seeing an increase in activity. This section examines what has happened in the DoD’s major military programs and what the opportunities are for embedded computing and electronics technologies. Tech Focus: VME SBCs for Tech Refresh VME was crafted specifically so that it can adapt to new technologies while still retaining backward compatibility. That’s why it’s perfect for technology refresh programs. A new board with the latest and greatest processor, memory and I/O can easily be dropped into a slot that could be decades old. Articles in this section examine the current activity in traditional VME SBCs with a product album listing representative products.

48

COTS Journal | February 2014


COTS PRODUCT GALLERY VPX55-3 DC/DC POWER SUPPLY 300W, 3U, VPX

Talon RTS 2718: LVDS 32bit Digital I/O Rackmount Recorder

• VITA 62 compatible I/O

•L  VDS Clock, Data Valid and Data Suspend signals

• Rugged/Conduction-cooled • Up to 400 Watts Output Power

•W  indows 7 Professional workstation with Intel Core i7 processor

• EMI Filter compatible with MIL-STD461F

•U  p to 20 TB storage to NTFS RAID disk array

• Transient Protection per MIL-STD704F & MIL-STD-1275 (optional)

•R  eal-time aggregate recording rate up to 1.0 GB/sec

• Remote Error Sensing • Current Share

•P  entek SystemFlow analysis tool includes virtual oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer

• 0. 8” pitch

North Atlantic Industries, Inc.

Pentek, Inc.

Phone: (631) 567-1100 Fax: (631) 567-1823 Email: info@naii.com Web: www.naii.com

Phone: (201) 818-5900 Fax: (201) 818-5904 Email: info@pentek.com Web: http://pentek.com/go/cots2718

CUBE

The

expansion enclosures

Choose from a variety of options: ExpressCard, PCIe, or Thunderbolt connectivity package

1, 2, 3, 5, or 8 slots

Full-length (13.25”), mid-length (9.5” ), or short card (7.5” )

Half-height or full-height cards

36W, 180W, 400W, 550W or 1100W power supply

Flexible and Versatile: Supports any combination of Flash drives, video, lm editing, GPU’s, and other PCIe I/O cards. The CUBE, The mCUBE, and The nanoCUBE are trademarks of One Stop Systems, Inc. Maxexpansion.com and the Maxexpansion.com logo are trademarks of One Stop Systems, Inc. Thunderbolt and the Thunderbolt logo are trademarks of the Intel Corporation in the U.S. and other countries.

ORDER TODAY!


10

MARCHING

TO THE NUMBERS

100,000 Hours Number of combat flight hours recently surpassed by Northrop Grumman’s Hunter Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS), in use with the U.S. Army since 1996. The MQ-5B Hunter is currently deployed supporting contingency operations across the globe. Flying over the battlefield with its multi-mission optronic payload, the MQ-5B gathers RSTA information in real time and relays it via video link to commanders and soldiers on the ground.

3 months

Number of estimated months of tests and calibration before Boeing’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS)-L is handed over to NASA. Boeing received the first on-orbit signals from the TDRS-L after a successful launch on January 24. TDRS satellites relay signals to and from Earth and the International Space Station and other space assets. TDRS-L joins four other Boeing TDRS satellites in NASA’s network. It is the second of three advanced versions of the satellites with the third-TDRS-M-ready for launch in 2015.

$32 million

Amount for the five-year IDIQ (indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity) contract Exelis has received to supply airborne surveillance radars, spares, support equipment and technical services to the U.S. Coast Guard. Integrated on the U.S. Coast Guard’s HC-130J Super Hercules long-range surveillance aircraft, the AN/ APY-11 multimode radar is designed to support the service’s maritime reconnaissance mission. The radar’s multifunction capability will augment the U.S. Coast Guard’s situational awareness. 50

COTS Journal | February 2014

117

Number of P-8A Poseidon aircraft approved as part of the fullrate production (FRP) phase for the program. The approval, reached Jan. 3 from the FRP Milestone Decision Authority, will allow the program office, resource sponsor, acquisition community and industry to continue to deliver the P-8A to the fleet with the required capabilities. Aligned under the Naval Air Systems Command, 13 of 37 Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) aircraft have already been delivered to fleet squadrons, with all deliveries on or ahead of schedule.

300 pounds The weight of Raytheon’s TALON laserguided rocket, a self-contained remote weapon system that incorporates an electro-optical sensor and laser designator. It requires only a target queue to engage on-mount target tracking and can be integrated on ships ranging in size from riverine to major surface combatants. Raytheon and L-3 Communications successfully fired Raytheon TALON laser-guided rockets from an L-3 remote weapon station using an LAU-68 launcher.


Module and System-Level Solutions from Intel® and Freescale™ Single Board Computers

XPedite7570

4th Gen Intel® Core™ i7-based 3U VPX SBC with XMC/PMC

XCalibur1840

Freescale QorIQ T4240-based 6U VPX SBC with dual XMC/PMC

Secure Ethernet Switches and IP Routers

XPedite5205

Secure Gigabit Ethernet router XMC utilizing Cisco™ IOS®

XChange3018

3U VPX 10 Gigabit Ethernet managed switch and router

High-Performance FPGA and I/O Modules

XPedite2400

Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA-based XMC with high-throughput DAC

High-Capacity Power Supplies

XPm2220

3U VPX 300W power supply with EMI filtering for MIL-STD-704 & 1275

Rugged, SWaP-Optimized, COTS-Based Systems

XPand4200

Sub-½ ATR, 6x 3U VPX slot system with removable SSDs

XPand6200

SFF 2x 3U VPX system with removable SSD and integrated power supply

XPand6000

SFF Intel® Core™ i7 or Freescale QorIQ-based system with XMC/PMC

Extreme Engineering Solutions 608.833.1155 www.xes-inc.com

Designed, manufactured, and supported in the USA


x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x FOR x xIMMEDIATE x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x DEPLOYMENT x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x3UxATR x HIGHLIGHTS x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x xenclosure x x(S+HES x x x x20°Cxlessxthanx x x 3UxATRsx x x Contaminant-free x x x x x x xModels) x x x x x Conventional x x x x x x x COTS: VPX, VME64 & cPCI ready (1” Pitch) Maintenance free Operation service x x x x x x x x x x x x x xin x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Accepts Conduction & Air-cooled 3U Modules Extensive set of Front Panel user Indicators x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Flexible x xTop &xBottom x I/Oxwiring x x x x Integrated x x Rear x fans x Finger x Guards x x x x x x x xMIL-STD-461E x x x x x xStandxalone xLowxWeight x solution x x x x x In-line x EMI/EMC x Temperature x x x-40ºC x Filter x+85ºC x x Internal x xCard-cage x xairflow x recirculation x x x x x Operating to x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Watts x per xslotx x x x x Independent x x x x Supply x x x x Upx to +85 Fan &xPower input x voltage x x x x Supervisory x x Unit x x xCustomizable x x toxspecific x requirements x x x x x Integrated Temperature x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Dramatically MTBFx by 4x Profile quickx release x x increases x xPayload x x x xLowx xMounting x xTrayxwithx x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

MILITARY W W W. C M C O M P U T E R . C O M

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x �

CM MILITARY ATR CHASSIS ARE DELIVERED FULLY TESTED & CERTIFIED PER

MIL-STD-461F & MIL-STD-810F

-TO GUARANTEE IMMEDIATE FAULT FREE OPERATION-

� �

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

90

170

160

160

140

120

80

140

100

70

120

RE101-2 7cm Navy

60

40

100

200 300

500

1k

2k

3k

5k

10k

20

30

50

0 30

100k

Frequency in Hz

100

200 300

500

1k

2k

3k

5k

10k

20

30

50

100M

200M

300M

400

500

800

70

60

60

Level in dBµV/m

50 40 30

RE102-3 space system and aircraft(External)

40

20

20

100

200

300

500

800 1k

2k

3k

4k

8 10k

Frequency in Hz

*CE101. CONDUCTED EMISSIONS, 30 Hz - 10 KHz.

100

80

RE102-3 space system and aircraft(External)

50 40

EC CE102-1 28V

60

40

30

20

20 10

0

10

0 30

50

1G

80

70

120

Level in dBµV/m

80

90

80

140

60

60

*RE102. RADIATED ELECTRIC FIELD, 30 MHz - 1 GHz.

160

RE101-2 7cm Navy

10 30

50

Frequency in Hz

90

80

20

0 30M

100k

*RE101. RADIATED MAGNETIC FIELD POS.F, 30 Hz - 100 KHz.

100

60

40

10

50

Frequency in Hz

*RE101. RADIATED MAGNETIC FIELD POS.B, 30 Hz - 100 KHz.

Level in dBpT

RE102-3 space system and aircraft(External)

40

80

20

20

50

50

30

40

20

0 30

80

Level in dBµA

RE101-2 7cm Navy

60

100

Level in dBµV

80

EC CE101-4 above 28V

60

Level in dBµV/m

100

Level in dBpT

Level in dBpT

120

50

100

200 300

500

1k

2k

3k

5k

10k

20

30

50

100k

0 10k

Frequency in Hz

0 1G

20

30

50

100k

200 300

500

1M

2M

3M

5M

10M

20

Frequency in Hz

RE TU D I

THE EU

COMPO

M

Y

IDE US NS

*RE102. RADIATED ELECTRIC FIELD, 10 KHz - 30 MHz.

N

MILITAR

ANUFAC

*RE101. RADIATED MAGNETIC FIELD POS.C, 30 Hz - 100 KHz.

30M

2G

3G

4G

5G

6

8

10G

Frequency in Hz

*RE102. RADIATED ELECTRIC FIELD, 1 GHz - 18 GHz.

* Figures achieved by CM-ATR-3U chassis in MIL-STD-461F testing procedures conducted by Independent Authorised Labs. CS101, CS116, RS101 & RS103 certificates also available.

18G

-10 10k

20

30

50

100k

200 300

500

1M

2M

3M

5M

Frequency in Hz

*CE102. CONDUCTED EMISSIONS, 10 KHz - 10 MHz.

CM Computer

True Military COTS Products

10M

NT NE S I

COTS Journal  

February 2014

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