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Volume 15 Number 10 October 2013

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The Journal of Military Electronics & Computing

10

Military Comms and Networking: Hitting Ground and Taking Off

CONTENTS October 2013

Volume 15

Number 10

SPECIAL FEATURE

Embedded Computing Building Blocks for Comms and Networking

10  Military Comms and Networking: Hitting Ground and Taking Off Jeff Child

18

Box-Level Solutions Smooth Development of Complex Systems

COTS (kots), n. 1. Commercial off-the-shelf. Terminology popularized in 1994 within U.S. DoD by SECDEF Wm. Perry’s “Perry Memo” that changed military industry purchasing and design guidelines, making Mil-Specs acceptable only by waiver. COTS is generally defined for technology, goods and services as: a) using commercial business practices and specifications, b) not developed under government funding, c) offered for sale to the general market, d) still must meet the program ORD. 2. Commercial business practices include the accepted practice of customerpaid minor modification to standard COTS products to meet the customer’s unique requirements. —Ant. When applied to the procurement of electronics for the U.S. Military, COTS is a procurement philosophy and does not imply commercial, office environment or any other durability grade. E.g., rad-hard components designed and offered for sale to the general market are COTS if they were developed by the company and not under government funding.

Departments 6 Publisher’s Notebook More Positive Signs 8

The Inside Track

46

COTS Products

50 Editorial Time and Tide and Technology

RJ McLaren, Kontron America

Coming in November See Page 48

TECH RECON

Upgrade Paths for Legacy CompactPCI Systems

24  Upgrade Technologies Pave Path for Legacy CompactPCI Jeff Child

SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

EXCLUSIVE: Designing at the System-to-System Level: The Industry’s New Challenge Part 2

28  Open Architectures Revamp Naval Electronic Warfare’s Future Jeff Child

34  UAV Payloads Soar Forward with New Capabilities Jeff Child

TECHNOLOGY FOCUS

Rugged Stand-Alone Box Products

39  Box-Level Rugged Systems Meet Diverse Needs Jeff Child

40

Rugged Box Systems Roundup Digital subscriptions available: cotsjournalonline.com

On The Cover: Lockheed Martin not only builds the Advanced Extremely High Frequency spacecraft (AEHF) military communication satellites, it also contributed payload system engineering, mission control ground software, solar arrays and the A2100 spacecraft bus. Shown here, the second AEHF launched last year from Cape Canaveral. The third launched last month. The satellite was carried aboard an Atlas V launch vehicle. (Photo courtesy of United Launch Alliance)


U.S. Postal Service Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation Required by 39 USC 3685. 1) Title of Publication: COTS Journal. 2) Publication Number 1526-4653. 3) Filing Date 10/1/2013. 4) Frequency of issue is monthly. 5) Number of issues published annually: 12. 6) Annual subscription price: n/a. 7) Complete Mailing Address of Known Offices of Publication: The RTC Group, 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250, San Clemente, CA 92673 Orange County. 8) Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters of General Office of Publisher: The RTC Group, 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250, San Clemente, CA 92673 Orange County, California. 9) Publisher: John Reardon, The RTC Group, 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250, San Clemente, CA 92673 Orange County, CA 92673. Editor: Jeff Child The RTC Group, 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250, San Clemente, CA 92673 Orange County. Managing Editor: Sandra Sillion: The RTC Group, 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250, San Clemente, CA 92673 Orange County, CA 92673. 10) Owners: John Reardon, Zoltan Hunor. The RTC Group; 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250, San Clemente, CA 92673 Orange County. 11) Known Bondholders Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities: None. 12) Tax Status: The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes have not changed during the preceding 12 months. 13) Publication Title: COTS Journal 14) Issue date for Circulation data: 9/1/2013. 15a) Extent and Nature of Circulation: average numbers of copies each issue during preceding 12 months (Net press run): 21,250. Number copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: (net press run) 20,000 15b) 1. Paid/requested outside-county mail subscriptions stated on form 3541. (Include advertiser¹s proof and exchange copies)/Average number copies each issue during 12 months: 20,498; number copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: 19,195 b)2. Paid in-county subscriptions (include advertiser¹s proof and exchange copies)/average number copies each issue during preceding 12 months/number copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: n/a. b)3. Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, counter sales and other nonUSPS paid distribution/average number copies each issue during preceding 12 months: n/a, number copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: n/a. b)4. Other classes mailed through the USPS/average number copies each issue during preceding 12 months: n/a, number copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: n/a. c) Total paid and/or requested circulation [sum of 15c. (1), (2), (3) average number copies each issue during preceding 12 months: 20,498. Number copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: 19,195. d) Free distribution outside of the mail (carriers or other means)/ average number copies each issue during preceding 12 months: 716; number copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: 785. e) Total free distribution (sum of 15d. and 15e.)/ average number copies each issue during preceding 12 months: 716, number copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: 785. f) Total distribution (sum of 15 c and15e)/ average number copies each issue during preceding 12 months: 22,079 number copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: 20,214 g) Copies not distributed/ average number copies each issue during preceding 12 months: 20, number copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: 20 h) Total (sum of 15g and h)/ average number copies each issue during preceding 12 months: 22,099 number copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: 19,980 i) Percent paid and/or requested circulation (15c divided by 15g times 100)/ average number copies each issue during preceding 12 months: 96.6%, number copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: 96.1% 16) Publication of statement of ownership. Publication will be printed in November issue of this publication. 17) Signature and title of the editor, publisher, business manager or owner: Sandra Sillion (Managing Editor), Date: 10/3/2013. I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subjected to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment)and/or civil sanctions(including multiple damages and civil penalties). Sandra Sillion, Managing Editor

4

COTS Journal | October 2013

The Journal of Military Electronics & Computing

Publisher PRESIDENT John Reardon, johnr@rtcgroup.com PUBLISHER Pete Yeatman, mail@yeatmangroup.com

Editorial EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jeff Child, jeffc@rtcgroup.com MANAGING EDITOR/ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sandra Sillion, sandras@rtcgroup.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR Johnny Keggler, johnnyk@rtcgroup.com SENIOR EDITOR Clarence Peckham, clarencep@rtcgroup.com COPY EDITOR Rochelle Cohn

Art/Production ART DIRECTOR Jim Bell, jimb@rtcgroup.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Michael Farina, michaelf@rtcgroup.com LEAD WEB DEVELOPER Justin Herter, justinh@rtcgroup.com

Advertising WESTERN REGIONAL SALES MANAGER Mike Duran, michaeld@rtcgroup.com (949) 226-2024 MIDWEST REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL SALES MANAGER Mark Dunaway, markd@rtcgroup.com (949) 226-2023 EASTERN REGIONAL SALES MANAGER Jasmine Formanek, jasminef@rtcgroup.com (949) 226-2004 BILLING Cindy Muir, cmuir@rtcgroup.com (949) 226-2000

COTS Journal HOME OFFICE The RTC Group, 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250, San Clemente, CA 92673 Phone: (949) 226-2000 Fax: (949) 226-2050, www.rtcgroup.com EDITORIAL OFFICE Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief 20A Northwest Blvd., PMB#137, Nashua, NH 03063 Phone: (603) 429-8301 Published by THE RTC GROUP Copyright 2013, The RTC Group. Printed in the United States. All rights reserved. All related graphics are trademarks of The RTC Group. All other brand and product names are the property of their holders.


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Publisher’s

NOTEBOOK More Positive Signs

E

arlier this year we reported on the dismal attendance by exhibitors and attendees at the 2013 AUSA Winter conference—and our disappointment in the lack of support for their industry by many major primes. Either there has been an industry turn around seen by primes, or they’ve decided that failing to support their industry while still recording extremely good profits is not in their best interest. AUVSI’s Unmanned Systems North America 2013 reported an increase over last year’s conference to more than 600 exhibitors and over 8,100 attendees. COTS Journal has strongly supported MILCOM for years and recently started to provide similar support to the AUVSI conference. Hurricane Sandy last year was not only a disaster by those that were hit by the storm, but also a devastating blow to MILCOM’s organizers, exhibitors and attendees when the conference had to be canceled. Seeing a positive outcome of this year’s AUVSI conference is a good sign that maybe this fall will be a good season for many military conferences. Sequestration and general military budget reductions have put a tight squeeze on conference attendance and travel by military personnel in general. Jeff Child, COTS Journal editor-in-chief, attended AUVSI in Washington DC this year and reported that there seemed to be fewer attendees in uniform than last year—however, the floor was very active and enthusiastic. MILCOM 2013 in San Diego this November will be the real test. It not only has to come back from its cancellation last year, but also from the general cutbacks in military funding including travel. The one thing that MILCOM shares with this year’s highly successful AUVSI, which should be a positive sign for its success, is that it focuses on the same electronic technologies with the added exclamation where it bills itself as “Balancing Commercial and Defense Technologies.” Additionally, MILCOM should benefit from the shift in focus for the military to a greater emphasis on electronic warfare (EW). Unless the MILCOM governing board is not in touch with the military’s future direction, it will broaden its stated “communication” focus to include all the technologies that are key to what has recently been called “spectrum warfare”—EW, cyber warfare, photonic/optical warfare, navigational warfare and others. The key to any conference’s success is its relevance and providing essential information that cannot easily be obtained elsewhere. That information has to be presented in an atmosphere of intellectual interchange. In the current military budget climate, with the heavy emphasis on electronics, both MILCOM and AUVSI have 6

COTS Journal | October 2013

At this summer’s AUVSI 2013 show, Craig Hughes, acting director of innovation at the Office of Naval Research, participates in a panel session achieved those goals. In contrast, AUSA and other military conferences with a strong focus on tactical hardware may be coming less relevant and be in for difficult times. Although the military electronics industry has been hit by budget reductions, there is a need to move ahead with product development, and validating the products being developed will be relevant in the changing military climate. This type of information cannot realistically be obtained through the Internet, it requires interaction between many sources to ensure that sufficient data is obtained prior to making a determination. Conferences provide a venue for a global view of what other industry participants are doing, and in many cases conferences are the initiation point of developing a relationship with parties that can assist in involvement in future programs.

Pete Yeatman, Publisher COTS Journal


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The

INSIDE TRACK Curtiss-Wright’s Signal Processing Technology Tapped for Joint STARS Radar Curtiss-Wright Controls has been awarded an approximately $8 million follow-on production contract by Northrop Grumman to provide an upgraded Radar Signal Processing (RSP) solution for use in the U.S. Air Force Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System (Joint STARS) program. The estimated value of this follow-on order over the lifetime of the program is $22 million. Under the contract, the award began in November 2012. The program is expected to continue through 2015. The RSP is one of two subsystems that Curtiss-Wright supplies on the Joint STARS aircraft. Joint STARS is the premier airborne command, control, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C2ISR) platform for the U.S. Air Force’s air-to-ground battle management and surveillance operations (Figure 1). The Air Force’s Radar Airborne Signal Processor (RASP) system performs the radar signal processing capabilities of the Joint STARS aircraft, enabling its ability to process data that results in the ability to locate targets. The contract is part of a larger upgrade to the RASP system used in Joint STARS. Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions Ashburn, VA. (703) 779-7800. [www.cwcdefense.com].

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

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Joint STARS is the premier airborne command, control, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C2ISR) platform for the U.S. Air Force’s air-to-ground battle management and surveillance operations.

concurrent with the Initial Operational Capability for the first DDG 1000.

Lockheed Martin Gets Contract to Transition the LRLAP to Production Lockheed Martin received an $18 million contract from the National Warhead and Energetic Consortium to transition the Long Range Land Attack Projectile (LRLAP) to production. The contract includes developing production line tooling, test equipment and manufacturing process plans for initial production of the advanced projectile. The guidance and control unit will be assembled at Lockheed Martin’s Ocala, FL, facility. Final assembly of LRLAP will be performed at the company’s Troy, AL, facility. LRLAP is a 155-mm projectile fired from the Advanced Gun System for the U.S. Navy’s

Figure 1

Figure 2

LRLAP is a 155-mm projectile fired from the Advanced Gun System for the U.S. Navy’s nextgeneration DDG 1000 destroyer. next-generation DDG 1000 destroyer (Figure 2). It provides precision fire support from a safe standoff distance to U.S. Marine Corps, Army and Joint/ Coalition forces engaged in expeditionary assaults or urban operations in coastal cities, with minimal collateral damage. To withstand the gun-launch environment, LRLAP uses an advanced rocket motor and hardened electronics, including a global positioning system and inertial measurement unit. LRLAP will be fielded in 2016

COTS Journal | October 2013

Lockheed Martin Bethesda, MD. (301) 897-6000. [www.lockheedmartin.com]

GrammaTech Selected by the U.S. Navy to Improve Software Security GrammaTech has been selected by the U.S. Navy to develop a tool that will provide computer systems with the ability to understand and react to malicious attacks and then continue running safely. Protecting software from such attacks continues to be a challenge for critical systems. Since misbehaving software is not characterized by some universal pattern, it’s difficult to actively monitor systems to detect breaches and respond to them.

In this project, GrammaTech researchers will use a combination of automatic program analysis and manual tuning techniques to develop a tool for creating a model of a system’s intended behavior, capturing its most important properties and determining what low level events must be tracked in order to observe the system’s critical behavior. The development of this tool will provide security critical systems with an extra layer of protection against attacks, including attacks that don’t involve unusual system call activity. The technology will be immediately useful to branches of the government, financial institutions and any companies whose systems require strenuous security protection. Grammatech Ithaca, NY. (607) 273-7340 . [www.grammatech.com]


The

INSIDE TRACK U.S. Navy Purchases Six New AUVs from OceanServer Technology

Figure 3

The OceanServer Iver AUVs will be used by four different Navy directorates for a variety of defense-related applications. OceanServer Technology announced that it has received purchase orders for six new Iver AUVs across three different contracts. The vehicles will be used by four different Navy directorates for a variety of defense-related applications (Figure 3). All six systems have or will be delivered within the next few months. The Iver platform has gained strong acceptance from Navy customers around the globe for high resolution imaging in littoral waters. OceanServer continues to lead the AUV industry in driving costs lower while offering world-class sonar solutions from five different recognized vendors. The f lexible vehicle design also allows for a wide range of water quality sensors, remote helm applications and in-water communications. Early this year, OceanServer delivered the 200th AUV system, which marks a milestone attained by a select few companies. All Iver AUV models come standard with OceanServer’s VectorMap Mission Planning and Data Presentation tool, which provides geo-registered data files that can be easily exported to other software analysis tools. This AUV design has

Military Market Watch Report Says Unmanned Surface Vessel Market Has Bright Future Unmanned surface vessels (USVs) still lag far behind their aerial equivalents in terms of technical capabilities, technology and deployment. But according to Frost & Sullivan’s Aerospace and Defense practice, new threats, cost-benefit calculations, operational experiences in the past decade, and new technological developments are driving rapid growth in the market. USVs may be used instead of manned vessels not only for defense but also in Homeland Security (HLS), security and civil applications such as vessel monitoring, law enforcement (drugs, piracy) and enforcement of fishing and environmental laws. When protecting and securing strategic facilities at sea, USVs can fill all parts of the integral security solution—surveillance and detection, recognition and alerting, and finally neutralizing the threat (Figure 4). USVs can also be launched from shore, patrol vessels or from the facility itself, which is another important advantage over a standard vessel. According to the Frost & Sullivan report, there are some challenges holding down the unmanned revolution. One of them is a decline in defense budgets due the economic recession. For security and HLS applications, the lack of a central procurement authority for government applications and the absence of legislation and regulations for safe sailing routes in open and closed seas is a major obstacle. Nevertheless, the industry anticipates that a combination of USVs Integration in Sea Critical Infrastructure Security Solution technical evolution and regula10-20 NM tory frameworks will enable vast defense and non-defense applica5-10 NM tions for USVs. There are also some techni0-5 NM cal and technological challenges USVs should overcome. The key Surveillance and detection one is the communications probRecognition lem. A drop in communication and alert Neutral with USVs can cause complete threat disorientation of the vessels, posing a real danger of them crashing into other vessels. The inability to respond in real time when needed will be a huge disadvantage as well. The small size of USVs also impacts the capability of its energy sources. Batteries need to supply Figure 4 power to radar, GPS and other navigating systems as well as com- USVs can fill all parts of the integral security solution—surveillance and puters, electro optics, weapons, detection, recognition and alerting, and finally neutralizing the threat— stabilizers and more. Additionally, categorized by their nautical miles (NM) from shore. OEMs still need to close gaps in independent navigation capabilities, autonomous decision-making and sensors stabilization. For more information on Frost & Sullivan’s new research, Analysis of USV Adoption and Integration in Defense & Security, please contact Joanna Lewandowska, Corporate Communications, at joanna.lewandowska@frost.com. Frost & Sullivan, San Antonio, TX. (210) 348-1000. [www.frost.com].

enabled OceanServer to carve out a very strong position in the research space for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles, sensors and behavioral studies. The VectorMap program can input NOAA ENCs or any

geo-referenced charts, maps or photo images, allowing the operator to intuitively develop AUV missions using simple point-and-click navigation.

OceanServer Technology Fall River, MA. (508) 678-0550. [www.ocean-server.com]. FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

October 2013 | COTS Journal

9


SPECIAL FEATURE Embedded Computing Building Blocks for Comms and Networking

10

COTS Journal | October 2013


Military Comms and Networking: Hitting Ground and Taking Off The push for a network-focused military remains strong. From satellites to mobile ground-based platforms, several key military communications programs are now becoming real. Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

D

riven by a goal to ensure what the DoD calls “full spectrum dominance,” a set of technologies are being called upon to defeat adversaries or control any situation across the full range of military operations. That goal is being achieved through a broad array of capabilities enabled by an interconnected network of sensors, shooters, command, control and intelligence. The key is to provide access to the best possible information by decision-makers at all levels, thus allowing dispersed forces to communicate, maneuver and share a common user-defined operating picture. This network-centric strategy includes programs developed by the Command, Control, Communications, Computer and Intelligence (C4I) community to build joint architectures and roadmaps for integrating joint airborne networking capabilities with the evolving ground, maritime and space networks. It encompasses the development of technologies like gateways, waveforms, network management and information assurance. Defense communications technologies such as tactical radios and military satellite and network-centric communications are the key technologies driving this transition. Providing the processing for those platforms are next generation embedded computing solutions—in the form of single board computers, box-level systems and special-function subsystems—used to build sophisticated compute-intensive radio and network nodes—each one crafted for their particular environments, platforms and warfighter types. October 2013 | COTS Journal

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Untitled-1 1

COTS Journal | October 2013

9/6/13 10:27 AM

The MUOS waveform allows the fourchannel DMR to communicate using the MUOS satellite communications network.

Space, Sky and Ground Comms While defense budget cuts are more extreme than in decades, it appears that networking and comms-related programs are more likely to live on. The argument is that in a reduced-sized military, the ability to do more situational awareness and reconnaissance becomes more of a priority when forces are smaller or in a less active mode. The systems span across all the branches, and include programs like the Mobile User Objective

System (MUOS) and the Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite. Airborne comms systems are playing a role too, such as those aboard various UAV and manned recon aircraft. Meanwhile, other programs play closer to the individual warfighter like the Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS) program and the Warfighter Information Network – Tactical (WIN-T), which also form a vital part of this net-centric build out. For its part, Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) is among the key spacebased communications platforms. MUOS is the next generation DoD advanced narrow band Ultra High Frequency (UHF) communications satellite constellation. It consists of four satellites in geosynchronous orbit with one on-orbit spare and a fiber optic terrestrial network connecting four ground stations. The MUOS satellite includes the new networked payload and a separate legacy payload. The MUOS will replace the existing UHF Follow-On (UFO) constellation and provide a much higher data rate capability for mobile users. The plan is to be able to produce 16 beams per satellite with data rates of 64 Kbits/s “on the move.” The DoD Teleport will be the portal to the Defense Information System Network (DSN, SIPRNET and NIPRNET). The 2014 DoD Budget Request calls for funding on-orbit testing for satellite #2; remaining testing and preparation efforts to support launch of satellite #3 scheduled for July 2014; and continues production of satellites #4 and #5, scheduled for launch in July 2015 and October 2016, respectfully.

2nd MUOS Satellite Launch In July, the second Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite built by Lockheed Martin for the U.S. Navy was launched from Cape Canaveral. The Lockheed Martin-led initialization team is now commanding the satellite from the Naval Satellite Operations Center located at the Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, Calif. The first MUOS satellite, launched in 2012, has been providing high-quality legacy voice communications for users, and terminals are already testing using the advanced payload that enables data exchanges.


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SPECIAL FEATURE

More than 20,000 existing terminals are compatible with and can access the MUOS legacy payload. And with the release of the new waveform developed for increased data-handling capacity, many of these terminals can be retro-fitted to access the Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) payload. This advanced WCDMA payload incorporates commercial technology designed to

provide 16 times the number of accesses above requirements for the legacy UHF Follow-On system. The satellites also include a hosted legacy UHF payload that will be fully compatible with the current ultra-high-frequency system and legacy terminals.

MUOS Support on JTRS Radios A couple device-related efforts were

put into motion for MUOS earlier this year. First, the Army ordered kits to upgrade 100 Handheld, Manpack, Small Form Fit (HMS) AN/PRC-155 twochannel radios to enable them to communicate with the military’s Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite communications system. This MUOS channel upgrade, comprising a field-replaceable power amplifier and supporting software, will allow secure voice and data communication with the MUOS system. The two-channel PRC-155 Manpack radio also runs the essential waveforms from the defense department library. With the MUOS capability in the PRC155, a network of soldiers can be interconnected with others in a far distant location. With a smartphone-like flow of information, the upgraded PRC-155 radios will allow soldiers to access the MUOS communications system wherever they are deployed, on foot or from land vehicles, ships, submarines and aircraft. Meanwhile, General Dynamics C4 Systems earlier this year received a $40 million contract modification in December 2012 from the U.S. Navy to port the Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) waveform and the Integrated Waveform into the AN/USC-61(C) Digital Modular Radio (DMR) (Figure 2). General Dynamics has been delivering DMRs to the Navy since 1998. General Dynamics developed the MUOS waveform as part of the MUOS program and has integrated it into the Handheld Manpack Small Form Fit (HMS) AN/PRC-155 Manpack radio. The company is also building the four MUOS ground sites that support worldwide communication from the ground to the MUOS satellites and from one enduser to another.

AEHF for Ultra-Survivable Comms Progress also continues with another major communications satellite program: Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF). AEHF will be a constellation of communications satellites in geosynchronous orbit that will replenish the existing EHF system MILSTAR satellite. A single AEHF satellite provides greater total capacity than the entire legacy five-satellite MILSTAR constellation. Individual user Untitled-1 1

14

COTS Journal | October 2013

7/31/13 12:33 PM


SPECIAL FEATURE

WIN-T Hits Ground Running

Figure 3

Soldier of Army’s 10th Mountain Division works with WIN-T during capability Set 13 fielding. data rates will increase five-fold, permitting transmission of tactical military communications, such as real-time video, battlefield maps and targeting data. AEHF will provide 24-hour low, medium and extended data rate satellite connectivity from 65 N to 65 S latitude worldwide. It includes 8 full time spot beam antennas at 75 bits/s to 8.192 Mbits/s data rate and 24 time shared spot beam coverages at 75 bits/s to 2.048 Mbits/ss data rate. Two crosslink antennas per satellite provide 60 Mbitss and up to 160 simultaneous agile beam coverages provide 75 bits/s to 8.192 Mbits/s data rates. The constellation provides survivable, anti-jam, worldwide secure communications for strategic and tactical users aimed at withstanding shocks from a nuclear attack. It also provides transmission of tactical communications, such as real-time video, battlefield maps and targeting data. Last month the third AEHF military communication satellite, built by a Lockheed Martin team for the U.S. Air Force, was successfully launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station aboard a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket. Lockheed Martin contributed payload system engineering, mission control ground software, solar arrays and the A2100 spacecraft bus, which is a dependable and low-risk platform for commercial, civil and military satellites. Both AEHF-1 and AEHF-2 are on orbit, and AEHF-4 through -6 are progressing on schedule.

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COTS Journal | October 2013

Even as military communications satellites take off and go into operation, important ground-based networking technologies are hitting the ground. An example is the Army’s Warfighter Information Network–Tactical (WIN-T) effort. This is the Army’s on-the-move, highspeed, high-capability backbone communications network, linking warfighters in the battlefield with the Global Information Grid (GIG). The system is being developed as a network for reliable, secure and seamless video, data, imagery and voice services for the warfighters in the theater to enable decisive combat actions. The 2014 DoD Budget Proposal funds the upgrade of 81 units with Modification kits. The upgrade enables the units to communicate efficiently with units that will be fielded with WIN-T Increment 2 capability. It supports Increment 2 Full Rate Production decision for 4 Brigade Combat Teams and 1 Division; and continues fielding and support for previously procured Low Rate Initial Production equipment; integration of 179 Modification kits for the AN/TRC-190 shelters. It procures and fields Tactical NetOps Management Systems to 48 Units, along with program management support for Single Shelter Switch (SSS), High Capability Line of Sight, Battlefield Video-Teleconferencing Center and Troposcatter Communications. Last month saw the first Brigade-level deployment of the General Dynamicsbuilt WIN-T Increment 2; the Soldier’s Network is successfully supporting soldiers with the 4th Brigade, 10th Mountain Division (4/10) in Afghanistan. Their mission, supporting Afghan security forces, involves communications across dispersed forces in some of the most rugged, remote locations in Afghanistan (Figure 3).

WIN-T on Combat Patrol Over this past summer, WIN-T Increment 2 participated in its first successful combat patrol using its on-themove capability between several network nodes. Voice over IP calls were placed and use of onboard mission command applications was successful. Using WIN-T

Increment 2, soldiers down to the company level have unprecedented secure access to voice and data that vastly increases their ability to communicate during a mission and on-the-move. The entire fleet of WIN-T Increment 2 vehicles help to maintain mission-critical connectivity for soldiers and commanders at the company level and up to higher echelons. Tactical radios like the AN/PRC-154A Rifleman radio complete the Soldier’s Network extending network communications and connectivity to the dismounted soldier. WIN-T recently completed a Follow-on Operational Test and Evaluation (FOT&E) during the U.S. Army’s recent Network Integration Exercise (NIE) 13.2. During the evaluation, more than 3,800 soldiers from the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division conducted a wide range of on-the-move military and peacekeeping operations, both day and night, using the WIN-T Increment 2 system. The tests took place at White Sands Missile Range, N.M., from May 6 to May 23. WIN-T Increment 2 systems are currently fielded with the 101st Airborne and two Brigade Combat Teams with the 10th Mountain Division. WIN-T Increment 1, the predecessor to WIN-T Increment 2, is fielded to the entire Army with 210 systems in the hands of active-duty Army, Army reserve and National Guard units. General Dynamics C4 Systems Scottsdale, AZ (480) 441-3033. [www.gdc4s.com]. Lockheed Martin Bethesda, MD. (301) 897-6000. [www.lockheedmartin.com].


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SPECIAL FEATURE Embedded Computing Building Blocks for Comms and Networking

Box-Level Solutions Smooth Development of Complex Systems Compute-intensive applications like radar and SIGINT face greater pressure for speeding programs from development to deployment. Sophisticated box-level solutions help ease this process. RJ McLaren, Portfolio Manager for Military and Commercial Aerospace Products Kontron America

M

aximizing efficiency has taken on greater importance at the Department of Defense (DoD) since the Budget Control Act was passed by Congress. To keep defense program costs in line with budget guidelines, the DoD is implementing a “more disciplined use of resources� that calls for efficient acquisition strategies. The good news for military systems and technology contractors is that the DoD still believes it is crucial to keep investing in new electronic warfare and communications capabilities such as unmanned systems, advanced ISR, surveillance and networking programs that match strategic modernization initiatives. However, the latest acquisition strategies are designed to increase competition and reduce costs, which means contractors must constantly find ways of boosting efficiencies within their own organizations while developing the most advanced systems (Figure 1). It is also no surprise that systems developed for the current combat environment require ever-increasing levels of integration, interoperability, reliability and longevity. Suppliers of COTS system-level technology continue to answer military systems OEMs needs with proven rugged system building blocks based on more integrated and leading-edge technologies. COTS-based boards 18

COTS Journal | October 2013

and systems also allow OEMs to leverage the cost-effectiveness and time-to-market advantages inherent in these standardized products. The more complex and demanding military systems become, contractors must always be on the lookout for cost-efficient, proven and technically stable solutions that they can adopt easily to deploy in next-generation applications.

Pre-Integrated Solutions Emerge The evolution of COTS system-level technology has taken a giant step forward in the last couple of years with the availability of pre-integrated, complete or boxlevel solutions that free developers from the burden of integration challenges, enabling them to concentrate on core competencies. More important still is the fact that these application-ready systems help military systems contractors smooth the development to deployment path, allowing them to be competitive in the more efficient and agile procurement process the DoD has put forward. A case in point is that these box-level systems can dramatically streamline the process from design to field deployment of next-generation radar and sonar systems that are expected to make a tremendous jump in processing power and data

I/O bandwidth. Box-level system solutions make the most sense where size, weight and power (SwaP) are primary design considerations, and embedded computing suppliers have designed the latest line of application-ready systems to satisfy a wide range of formats, sizes and configurations. These complete embedded computing solutions provide tested and enclosed computing platforms that eliminate complex integration chores for customers.

Features in Demand Rugged box-level systems are currently offered in a broad array of sizes, standards and configurations to meet the varying feature requirements of the wide spectrum of military programs. Always in demand are solutions that take ruggedness to the limit with extended temperature operation, advanced cooling methodologies, high shock and vibration tolerance and adherence to size, weight and power (SWaP) restrictions. Embedded computing suppliers offer the integration of COTS building blocks with purpose-built hardware and software components in next-generation box systems that provide increased system performance at reduced cost to achieve SWaP-C. Massive data processing and connectivity is a constant challenge. Today’s


SPECIAL FEATURE

box-level HPEC (high-performance embedded computing) systems now offer I/O data bandwidth matched with CPU performance ratios in small, air-cooled or conduction-cooled platforms to provide the necessary computing infrastructure for efficient implementation of the most demanding sensor processing applications. The current offering of VPX-based, multiprocessor and highly integrated HPEC systems delivers the high-end processing military programs require without forcing developers to make compromises in terms of performance or mandating a move to more proprietary architectures. HPEC systems deliver the faster computing speeds, resolution and accuracy that networked military programs demand. With the newest 3U VPX box systems, this pre-integrated platform is a compact solution making it even more applicationready. These smaller solutions don’t skimp on functionality and can be utilized in places military personnel only dreamed of until now. A fully functional system

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Figure 1

Continued technology investments by the DoD call for a more streamlined process from development to deployment of crucial programs. Shown here, a MQ-9 Reaper UAV flies above Creech Air Force Base, NV.

9/10/13 10:01 AM

October 2013 | COTS Journal

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SPECIAL FEATURE the needs of the agile process and are also ready for demonstration.

Sophisticated Requirements

Figure 2

The StarVX uses PCIe 3.0 to deliver 40GbE equivalent data transfer rates using common TCP/IP protocols. The combination of PCIe 3.0 and TCP/IP is achieved through Kontron’s VXFabric middleware, which implements the TCP/ IP protocol over the PCIe infrastructure to boost transmission bandwidth to nearly 40GbE speeds.

with datacenter bandwidth is able to move away from a command and control center right into the field. Enhancing reliability, 3U VPX box-level systems are available with essential system health management. A computer management board (CMB) is integrated to provide extensive health status information at the board and sub-rack level. Information such as airflow temperature can be controlled for each slot, and payload boards can be held in standby mode to accommodate low-energy surveillance mode. Furthermore, detailed boot stage information can also be accessed for each CPU.

Satisfying Agile Procurement Needs To help ensure that military systems and the technologies they integrate are leading-edge and better aligned to battlefield needs, the military has implemented a more agile procurement process allowing the DoD to keep pace with industry, commercial and technological advances. This agile process is put in place to help accelerate the pace of network modernization and match the speed of advanced technology introductions that would have been unachievable by former acquisition strategies. Other procurement policies make it a necessity that new technologies be demonstrated and not just experimental or in the R&D phase. Proven COTS-based platforms are welcome solutions that serve 20

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COTS Journal | October 2013

9/26/13 9:30 AM

High-Performance Embedded Computer (HPEC) systems transport supercomputing I/O bandwidth and performance, previously only achieved in IT datacenters, to the battlefield. New HPEC systems give military designers an impressive list of building blocks—from the most advanced processor-based computing blades that offer up to quad-core performance, to coprocessing FPGA and GPGPU boards and integrated software and workload management support to satisfy the most demanding sensor designs. Transforming the landscape of military supercomputing, this latest generation of HPEC systems offers a simplified and costeffective platform that integrates a unique combination of mainstream technologies and incredible bandwidth in a small footprint. Designers are advised to seek out HPEC solutions based on mainstream TCP/ IP, PCI Express and processor technologies in order to provide broad platform support and assured longevity. The use of standard communication protocols such as TCP/IP or UDP/IP allows OEMs to protect their application software investments. Developers can design legacy software to operate in the current application, and if the requirements evolve or change, new software based on TCP/IP is ensured to be supported for years to come. This design approach enables OEMs to optimize the total cost of ownership (TCO) and have a direct migration path from their existing application to systems deployed in the future. For 3D reconstruction-based application such as unmanned vehicles, radar and sonar systems, HPEC systems built with mainstream technologies are the right approach that lets military systems developers drastically reduce the process from design to field deployment. An example of the latest HPEC boxlevel system available is the Kontron StarVX, which was co-developed with Intel and PLX Technology. This system integrates 3rd generation Intel Core processors that provide sustained 16 Gbytes/s speeds to/from the memory subsystem, while the Kontron 3U VPX platform architecture provides up to 6 Gbytes/s sustained bandwidth on the data plane through TCP/IP and 4 Gbytes/s on the PCIe backplane from


SPECIAL FEATURE

Kontron’s high-speed switch fabric, VXFabric (Figure 2). This application-ready platform delivers up to ten times more I/O data bandwidth than previously offered 3U VPX-based systems, and it can even enhance existing TCP/IP-based unmodified applications. This approach also simplifies the migration of deployments to standards such as 10 and 40 Gbit Ethernet (GbE). Helping contractors to secure ambi-

tious deployment schedules is another viable option: modular box systems. These systems, too, are prequalified solutions based on COTS building blocks, which give designers a cost-efficient, proven and technically stable solution to quickly deploy next-generation military systems. Modular box systems also feature prequalified hardware and software, giving OEMs a proven platform to develop reliable sys-

Figure 3

An example of a modular box-level system is the ApexVX, a fully functional, multi-mission rugged computer system using space-saving 3U VPX computing technology. Application-ready, the Kontron ApexVX integrates all components required for the early evaluation phase up to long-term deployment.

Aircraft Interface Devices (AID) Solve avionics system integration and compatibility problems with Ballard Technology’s versatile Aircraft Interface Devices. These rugged units are an essential part of many avionics upgrades, such as tactical mission systems and electronic flight bags (EFB), where they serve avionics data while protecting aircraft control domains from interference and corruption. Speed program development and reduce costs with our validated COTS (Commercial-Off-The-Shelf) AIDs Visit our website or call 425-339-0281 to learn more. www.ballardtech.com/AID

Kontron Poway, CA. (888) 294-4558. [www.kontron.com].

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COTS Journal | October 2013

tems within limited time constraints and strict budgets. The modular design of these platforms also provides features that enable fast customization and give OEMs the ability to adapt to the specific requirements of multiple missions, further streamlining a challenging development process and reducing integration chores (Figure 3). Some suppliers are offering modular box-level systems that include system monitoring capabilities. These can be used for the control of critical parameters such as temperature, airflow/fans and power supply. Another feature is in-depth system diagnosis for all peripheral components across the backplane, which can be used from early lab trials up to deployed systems to evaluate computing configurations against a pre-recorded reference. This diagnostic capability can also identify and record transient errors in order to increase quality and reliability of a given application.

8/30/2013 3:30:48 PM


TECH RECON Upgrade Paths for Legacy CompactPCI Systems

Upgrade Technologies Pave Path for Legacy CompactPCI CompactPCI’s established legacy in the military is strong. Enhancements to the form factor bring serial and switched fabric technologies to bear for throughput-intensive applications. Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

H

aving long ago shaken it’s perception as “new” for the military, CompactPCI boards have both maturity and broad product range, which has won many programs for the technology. The 3U flavor of cPCI is particularly attractive to space/weightconstrained applications, eclipsing any comparable performance that 3U VME could achieve. There’s not much chance that cPCI will ever match the legacy of VME in the military market, but CompactPCI did fill a lot of needs during the gap when VPX was going through its growing pains. An example where CompactPCI technology has been used for several years is Rockwell Collins’ Common Avionics Architecture System (CAAS). Initially developed for the SOA MH47G Chinook and MH-60L/M Black Hawk aircraft (Figure 1), CAAS has a fully integrated flight and mission management capability that provides exceptional mission effectiveness. As the common digital architecture for rotary wing aircraft for the U.S. Army, CAAS was one of the first fully open, non-proprietary systems that completely embraced existing commercial standards on large platforms. 24

COTS Journal | October 2013

When faced with technology upgrade choices, there are many cases where there’s no need to move away from CompactPCI. That’s because the PCI Industrial Manufacturers Group (PICMG) has developed performance upgrade paths for cPCI, such as PICMG 2.16 and CompactPCI Express, and the PICMG 2.30 specification, called CompactPCI PlusIO. The most recent CompactPCI Serial (CPCI-S.0) specification adds greater support for serial point-to-point fabrics like PCI Express, SATA, Ethernet and USB in the classic CompactPCI form factor. The specification contains definitions for both system and peripheral slots in 3U and 6U board sizes. It also includes definitions for eight PCI Express links, eight SATA/SAS serial buses, eight USB 2.0/3.0 buses and eight Ethernet interfaces at system slots.

Rev 2 of CompactPCI Express In the spring of this year, PICMG meanwhile announced a new revision and upgrade to the CompactPCI Express specification, Revision 2. The new revision to the CompactPCI Express specification adds 5 gigabits per second transfer rate and 8 gigabits per

second transfer rate PCI Express operation. This provides up to four times the bandwidth while maintaining full backward compatibility with previous CompactPCI and CompactPCI Express products. Equally important, the specification goes to great length to define how a product’s PCI Express signaling is validated to ensure interoperability. The available CompactPCI Serial products on the market have continued to expand in the past couple years. Earlier this year, MEN Micro rolled out its latest 3U CompactPCI Serial SBC, the G22 (Figure 2). With speeds up to 3.3 GHz using Turbo Boost functionality, the new Intel Quad Core i7-based board provides exceptional processing performance in data-intensive environments. The G22 also provides high graphics performance as well as state-of-the-art I/O functionality. The board enables fast serial data transfers up to 12 Gbit/s and full mesh capabilities without additional configuration overhead. All of the eight Gigabit Ethernet interfaces specified in the CompactPCI Serial standard can be led to the backplane. The G22 comes with 4 or 8 Gbytes of soldered DDR3 DRAM, complete with ECC. All components are soldered to withstand heavy shock and


TECH RECON

vibration, and conformal coating protects the 3U SBC from dust and humidity. Watchdogs monitor the processor and board temperature.

Point-to-Point PCI Express As part of its High-Speed CompactPCI Initiative, Kontron has announced its first 3U CompactPCI Serial (CPCI-S.0) processor board. The Kontron CPS3003-SA comes equipped with 3rd generation Intel Core i7 processors and offers PCI Express Gen 3.0, USB 3.0, SATA 6G and Gigabit Ethernet over backplane (Figure 3). Kontron’s new CompactPCI Serial processor board is available in multiple versions and scalable from the 1.7 GHz dual-core Intel Core i7-3517UE processor to the quadcore Intel Core i7-3612QE. For memoryhungry applications, it offers up to 16 Gbytes of ECC DDR3 SDRAM. The Mobile Intel QM77 Express chipset already provides numerous interfaces by default, so that the processor board delivers a high performance density in the smallest of spaces. The whole spectrum of serial pointto-point interfaces is accommodated in just three units of height; peripheral boards, which are especially data-intensive, can be connected via two PCI Express Gen 3.0 fat pipes with x8 or x4 lanes. Additionally, five PCIe x1 lanes are available. Hard disk carriers can be connected via four SATA ports, two of them via SATA 6 Gbit/s ports. Plus, there are two USB 3.0 as well as six USB 2.0 ports routed to the backplane. For networking purposes, there are two Gigabit Ethernet ports, which can be routed to the front panel or to the backplane. Additionally, OEMs are presented with two additional USB 2.0 ports and two DisplayPort connections on the front. Furthermore, the CPS3003-SA provides the option to offer rear I/O via the P6 connector, which adds two USB ports (1x USB 3.0 and USB 2.0), a third independent DisplayPort and two serial ports.

A Focus on High-Speed I/O CompactPCI Serial is an effective technology for integrating a lot of high-speed I/O. EKF Elektronik offers a

Figure 1

The MH-47G Chinook helicopter, during the aircraft’s rollout ceremony almost a decade ago.

Figure 2

On the G22, serial data transfers up to 12 Gbit/s and full mesh capabilities are possible without additional configuration overhead. All of the eight Gigabit Ethernet interfaces specified in the CompactPCI Serial standard can be led to the backplane.

October 2013 | COTS Journal

25


TECH RECON

Figure 3

The CPS3003-SA sports 3rd gen Core i7 processors and offers PCI Express Gen 3.0, USB 3.0, SATA 6G and Gigabit Ethernet over backplane.

4HP/3U CompactPCI Serial CPU board that is equipped with an Intel Core i7 Ivy Bridge + ECC (dual- or quad-core) mobile processor based on 22nm technology. The front panel of the company’s SC1-Allegro is provided with two Gigabit Ethernet jacks, two USB 3.0 receptacles and two

SMR 3521 SMR 3522 SMR 3822 SMR 5550 SMR 5550i DXR 5571

Mini-DisplayPort connectors for attachment of high-resolution digital displays. The SC1-Allegro is equipped with a set of local expansion interface connectors, which can be optionally used to attach a mezzanine side board. A variety of expansion cards is available, e.g. providing legacy I/O and additional PCI Express-based I/O controllers such as SATA, USB 3.0 and Gigabit Ethernet, or a third video output. Most mezzanine side cards can also accommodate a 2.5-inch drive. The module is equipped with up to 16 Gbyte RAM with ECC support. 8 Gbyte memory are provided for rugged applications, and another 8 Gbyte are available via the DDR3 ECC SO-DIMM socket. As an option, a low-profile mezzanine module with dual mSATA SSDs may serve as a high-speed RAID mass storage solution. The SC1-ALLEGRO backplane connectors comply with the PICMG CompactPCI Serial system slot specification. Typically, the SC1-Allegro and the related side card would come as

CS 5020 CS 5060 CS 6040 CS 6080

SCR 7204 WJ 8615 WJ8617

a ready-assembled 8HP unit. As an alternative, low-profile flash-based mezzanine storage modules are available that fit on the SC1-Allegro while maintaining the 4HP profile. The C42-SATA module is equipped with a very fast 1.8-inch SATA Solid State Drive (SSD), which is suitable for installation of any popular operating system. EKF Elektronik Hamm, Germany. +49 (0)2381/6890-0. [www.ekf.de]. Kontron Poway, CA. (888) 294-4558. [www.kontron.com]. MEN Micro Ambler, PA. (215) 542-9575. [www.menmicro.com].

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COTS Journal | October 2013

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SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT COTS JOURNAL EXCLUSIVE

Designing at the System-to-System Level: The Industry’s New Challenge Part 2

Open Architectures Revamp Naval Electronic Warfare’s Future By leveraging common, open, scaleable systems architectures, the Navy is improving its overall electronic warfare capabilities. This way the latest emerging technologies can be applied to enhance anti-ship missile defense and EW situational awareness. Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

A

pplying new electronics technologies to aid Navy electronic warfare has been an ongoing challenge. That’s because of hardware obsolescence issues in legacy systems. COTSbased approaches have come to the rescue as the Navy replaces closed systems with scalable, upgradable architectures. The stakes are high when it comes to improving ship defense, especially as advanced anti-ship missiles have become a threat. And with the shift to an Asia-Pacific defense, Navy modernization in general will be a priority. What’s being replaced is the AN/SLQ-32, the legacy surface ship EW detection and countermeasures system initially installed in the fleet during the late 70s. Since 2003, a program called Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP), a spiral-block development program, provides a common/open and scaleable architecture to leverage emerging technologies. General Dynamics has been the Lead Systems Integrator for SEWIP. General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems has partnered with the Navy on the continued evolution of SEWIP through Blocks 1A, 1B1, 1B2 and now 1B3. For the 1B3 system, Lockheed Martin MST is supporting General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems as a major subcontractor. 28

COTS Journal | October 2013

Low Risk Upgrades SEWIP Block 1 improvements focus on the rapid development and fielding of low risk upgrades that will enhance current AN/SLQ-32 warfighting capabilities while solving the critical hardware obsolescence issues residing in the legacy system. Block 1A, with 18 installs completed and 103 additional installs planned, incorporates the updated Improved Control and Display (ICAD) Human Machine Interface and the Electronic Surveillance Enhancements (ESE) upgrade to provide a much-needed COTS-based technology refresh for the obsolete AN/SLQ-32 display and pulse processing. Block 1B1, 38 installs completed and 29 planned, introduces standalone Specific Emitter Identification (SEI). Future SEWIP Block 1B upgrades continue with the addition of integrated Specific Emitter Identification (SEI), High Gain High Sensitivity (HGHS) capabilities, and network-centric and mission planning capabilities. Block II and beyond will focus on replacing the legacy AN/SLQ-32 all together with new hardware (receiver/transmitter) and software improvements resulting in an innovative, effective and cost-efficient EW Suite for the 21st century. In late August the Navy awarded General Dynamics Advanced In-

Figure 1

In Block 2 of the Navy’s SEWIP initiative, the AN/SLQ-32(V)2 system found on all U.S. aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers and other warships is upgraded with key capabilities that determine if the electronic sensors of potential foes are stalking the ship.


Primary Radar is Our Passion Simulation, Display, Tracking, Recording, Open Standards Network Distribution

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New HPx-300 Radar Output

Radar Toolkit The Cambridge Pixel family of radar components covers scan conversion, network streaming, target tracking and recording. We offer modular toolkits for developers and we provide cost-effective ready-torun applications for PC-based radar display and tracking under Windows and Linux.

The Cambridge Pixel Approach Our approach is to provide flexible, easy-to-use modules of software. We can supply complete turn-key solutions or individual software modules for inclusion in a customer’s existing application. And it is all backed by Cambridge Pixel’s do-what-it-takes technical support to help you when you need it. Cambridge Pixel Ltd New Cambridge House Litlington Royston Herts SG8 0SS UK T: +44 1763 852749 enquiries@cambridgepixel.com www.cambridgepixel.com

The new HPx-300 Radar Output Card generates radar video signals for system testing, simulation, training and video streaming • Highly configurable output signals • Output timing synchronised to input data • Video (x2), Trigger, ACP/ARP, SHM, parallel azimuth • Configurable scan rates, PRFs • Compact half length PCle card • Available with SPx Simulator and Development software

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SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

Figure 2

U.S. Navy 110217-N-8607R-204 A CH46E Sea Knight helicopter flies by the guided-missile destroyer USS Stockdale.

formation Systems a $15 million contract modification to continue development and production of the SEWIP Block 1B3.

EW Upgrade Using Compliant Systems Earlier this year in May, Lockheed Martin was awarded a $57 million contract to upgrade the fleet’s electronic warfare

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defenses against anti-ship missile threats. Under this low-rate production contract for Block 2 of the Navy’s Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP), Lockheed Martin will upgrade the AN/ SLQ-32(V)2 system found on all U.S. aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers and other warships with key capabilities to determine if the electronic sensors of potential foes are stalking the ship (Figure 1). The system is the first sensor to be fully compliant with the Navy’s Product Line Architecture strategy, which facilitates the rapid introduction of new technology into the fleet. By using COTS components, it provides additional cost savings and ease of maintenance for sailors. The Navy competitively awarded Lockheed Martin a contract in 2009 to develop SEWIP Block 2, and the company recently completed successful integration and test activities for two engineering development models. In keeping with the program’s COTS approach, companies from the military embedded computing industry have naturally

been involved in SEWIP. For example, Mercury Systems is providing Lockheed Martin with advanced radio frequency (RF) microwave tuner and intermediate frequency (IF) products as part of the U.S. Navy’s Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP) Block 2 Upgrade program. Lockheed Martin will provide a modular enterprise solution based on its Integrated Common Electronic Warfare System (ICEWS), an integral part of which includes Mercury’s high-performance Echotek Series microwave tuner and digital receiver. The SEWIP Block 2 Upgrade will include the receiver and antenna capabilities as well as the combat system interface of the legacy surface ship EW system. Leveraging commercial off-the-shelf COTS electronics, the ICEWS is designed to scale across all ship classes in the Navy’s surface fleet including Arleigh Burke class Aegis destroyers like the USS Stockdale (DDG-106) (Figure 2). For the program, Mercury is leveraging technology from its acquisition of LNX. Based in Salem, New Hampshire,

8/23/13 2:43 PM


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SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

LNX designs and builds next-generation RF receivers for Signals Intelligence, Communications Intelligence as well as Electronic Attack applications.

Open Network Tech for the Navy Beyond the EW side, the idea of open systems based on COTS technologies has filtered into several other parts of Navy program efforts. The most sweeping of

these is the Consolidated Afloat Networks and Enterprise Services (CANES) program. CANES consolidates and modernizes shipboard, submarine and shorebased command, control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) network systems to increase capability and affordability across the fleet. Consolidation through CANES will eliminate many legacy, stand-alone networks and

Figure 3

The Shipboard Peripheral Replacement System (SPRS) is designed to operate exactly like the peripheral device being replaced, so no program changes are required on the host computer.

provide a common computing environment infrastructure for dozens of command, control, intelligence and logistics applications. In February of last year the Navy awarded Northrop Grumman $37 million for the CANES production and limited deployment phase. The contract includes options that would raise the cumulative value of the contract to $638 million, if all options are exercised. CANES will consolidate and modernize shipboard network systems to improve operational effectiveness and affordability across the fleet. Northrop Grumman uses the Modular Open Systems Approach-Competitive process for its CANES solution to achieve the lifecycle benefits of open-systems architecture and commercial off-the-shelf components and software. The strategy strengthens the network’s infrastructure, improves security, reduces the existing hardware footprint and decreases total ownership costs. In addition to providing greater capability, CANES will allow fleet end-users to benefit from reduced operations and sustainment workloads as a result of common equipment, training and logistics. Early this summer Northrop Grumman announced it would submit a bid for the U.S. Navy CANES full deployment contract. According to Northrop Grumman, its CANES solution offers considerable cost and performance improvements over existing shipboard networks includUntitled-6 1

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SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

ing a modernized C4I architecture with increased security and reduced development, deployment and life cycle costs. Numerous kinds of computing form factors will reportedly make up CANES, with ATCA among those considered.

Solution for Legacy Peripherals Replacement At the other end of the food chain are open systems solutions product examples such as Sabtech’s Shipboard Peripheral Replacement System (SPRS). Earlier this year Sabtech announced its SPRS for the U.S. Navy had received its official nomenclature: OJ-839(V)/U. Giving SPRS an official nomenclature indicates that the system is unique from systems in the existing U.S. inventory. As part of the Navy’s Aegis midlife extension program, the SPRS will replace existing legacy peripherals for the Shipboard Gridlock System (SGS), Gun Weapon System (GWS) and Vertical Launching System (VLS). Sabtech’s SPRS will be installed on 22 Aegis destroyers by FY ’18. SPRS replaces legacy Navy peripheral (data storage) equipment that is difficult and expensive to maintain. It combines the advantages of modern off-the-shelf technology with a robust mechanical design that allows it to meet the environmental specifications required for naval shipboard applications. With an intuitive graphical user interface, SPRS operates exactly like the peripheral device being replaced, so no program changes are required on the host computer (Figure 3). SPRS adds powerful capabilities not possible with the original equipment such as networking, remote control, and greatly increased storage capacity. It is configured with military connectors that mate with existing cables to further simplify the transition and save costs. Conversion of existing media to SPRS is done using either standard Navy utility programs or with Sabtech’s tape conversion utility (included). Once converted, SPRS completely eliminates dependence on unsupportable hardware and obsolescent tape and disk media.

General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems Fairfax, VA. (866) 943-2410 [www.gd-ais.com]. Lockheed Martin Bethesda, MD. (301) 897-6000 . [www.lockheedmartin.com].

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Northrop Grumman Los Angeles, CA. (310) 553-6262 [www.northropgrumman.com]. Sabtech Industries Yorba Linda, CA. (714) 692-3800 [www.sabtech.com].

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October 2013 | COTS Journal

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SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT COTS JOURNAL EXCLUSIVE

Designing at the System-to-System Level: The Industry’s New Challenge Part 2

UAV Payloads Soar Forward with New Capabilities As defense budgets get tighter than ever, UAV and UAV payloads continue to drive demand for smaller, less power-consuming, rugged subsystems. Those subsystems are providing ever more powerful capabilities to UAVs. Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

E

ven as defense budgets shrink— with more severe cuts ahead—the area of Unmanned Arial Vehicles (UAVs) is seeing less of a hit. Technology upgrades of existing UAV platforms and payloads will see more activity as decision makers move toward improving already deployed UAVs while limiting development of new ones. And meanwhile, all branches of the military are continuing to invest heavily in UAV platform development. Those trends are positive ones for the embedded computing industry, as they roll out new integrated box-level systems with the proper size, weight and power (SWaP) for UAV requirements. The design approach in the large UAV segment has been to employ multiprocessing with arrays of big, powerhungry boards based on general-purpose processors. This is being replaced with more integrated boards sporting FPGAs. In recent years stand-alone function-specific box-level systems have in some cases replaced traditional slot-card implementations. Sub system consolidation of that kind impacts the radar, imaging processing and communications capabilities of large UAVs by allowing more functionality in the same space. 34

COTS Journal | October 2013

Figure 1

The Block 40 Global Hawk completed its first full system flight with the MP-RTIP sensor at Edwards Air Force Base, CA in July 2011.

J-STARS, Global Hawk Interoperability The largest UAV, the Global Hawk, continues to push capability boundar-

ies. In early March, Northrop Grumman announced it compled the successful exchange of radar data during a flight test involving the U.S. Air Force’s E-8C Joint


SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (Joint STARS) and the RQ-4B Global Hawk Block 40 unmanned aircraft system (Figure 1). The demonstration was conducted Feb. 25. The exchange was the first collaborative effort to stream ground moving target radar data from a Global Hawk Block 40 to a Joint STARS aircraft. Information can then be relayed from Joint STARS to ground forces. The flight successfully demonstrated the interoperability of both platforms to potentially improve and expand surveillance capabilities for deployed forces. Joint STARS is an airborne battle management and command and control platform that conducts ground surveillance of fixed and moving ground targets to develop an understanding of the enemy situation and support location, tracking, targeting and attack operations. Global Hawk carries a variety of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance sensor payloads that allow military commanders to gather imagery and use radar to detect moving or stationary targets on the ground.

Image Processing Capability Another significant interoperability milestone was achieved by the Global Hawk when Northrop Grumman’s Common Imagery Processor (CIP) demonstrated an important new capability by processing Global Hawk Block 40 data on the Distributed Common Ground System—Imagery (DCGS-I) testbed. A live flight event late last year marked the first time that Global Hawk Block 40 data was successfully received, processed and disseminated on the DCGS-I testbed using the CIP. After the Global Hawk platform transmitted the newest Block 40 concurrent modes data to the testbed, the CIP processed and transmitted this data to other downstream ground station components for viewing and exploitation. As the primary sensor processing element of the DCGS-I testbed based in China Lake, CA, the CIP accepts airborne imagery data, processes it into an exploitable image and then outputs the image to other elements within the testbed. The CIP is the standard image processor used by the U.S. Department of Defense. The CIP also helps coalition partners to consolidate redundant

and stovepiped processing systems. The CIP’s latest software allowed for the newest synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery mode to be processed while simultaneously passing the ground moving target indicator data on to another system for processing. The CIP is the only platform capable of processing concurrent SAR data. Since 2000, the CIP has applied its critical ability to ingest data via the Com-

mon Data Link to serve as the main imagery processor of the DCGS-I testbed. The DoD uses the DCGS-I testbed to evaluate new intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance technologies in an operational environment. The testbed has been an active participant in ongoing block upgrades for the Northrop Grummandeveloped Global Hawk unmanned aircraft.

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October 2013 | COTS Journal

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SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

Figure 2

As this artist’s representation shows, the Lynx Multi-mode Radar detects time-sensitive targets and offers a long-range, wide-area surveillance capability that can provide highresolution SAR imagery slant ranges well beyond EO/IR sensor range.

Improved Grey Eagle UAV General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, the dominant player in medium UAV platforms, boasted a number of successful advances in recent months. In July the company’s Improved Gray Eagle (IGE) made its first flight. The craft is a next-generation derivative of the combatproven Block 1 Gray Eagle Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) that has accumulated over 70,000 flight hours since 2008. The flight occurred today at the company’s El Mirage Flight Operations Facility in Adelanto, CA. IGE was designed for increased endurance, with 23 additional hours for reconnaissance missions. The aircraft’s payload capacity features 50-plus percent more payload carriage than Gray Eagle, while also offering 50 percent more fuel capacity via its deep belly fuselage. An upgraded centerline hardpoint supports integration of a 500 pound optional external fuel tank or 360 degree sensor payload—over twice the capability of the current Gray Eagle. Lastly, IGE’s additional space, combined with an improved Heavy Fuel Engine (HFE), provides growth capability for an improved airworthiness design, with the potential of incorporating lightning protection, damage tolerance, and Traffic Collision Avoidance 36

COTS Journal | October 2013

System (TCAS) features. The technologically sophisticated Gray Eagle aircraft performs long-endurance surveillance, communications relay, and weapons delivery missions with double the weapons capacity of the combat-proven Predator. Featuring a HFE for increased supportability in the field, the aircraft is also equipped with triple redundant avionics, redundant flight controls/ surfaces, and Electro-optical/ Infrared (EO/IR) and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) payloads. Gray Eagle is currently operational and anticipates a fullrate production decision in June.

SAR Payload Tested for UAV Use Meanwhile, at the Paris Air Show this summer, General Atomics announced the successful integration and operational testing of its VideoSAR software system, which provides continuous, real-time, all-weather, day/night Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) surveillance, in full, High-definition (HD) video format (1080p). The prototype system was installed on a King Air 200 aircraft and flown successfully on March 25, 2013 in Ramona, CA. During the company-funded test, VideoSAR imaged a wide variety of stationary and moving vehicles, marking the first real-time

flight demonstration of the high-resolution VideoSAR mode. Additionally, this new mode enables automatic Ground Moving Target Indication (GMTI) with very low minimum detectable velocity and precise SAR geo-location accuracy, enabling VideoSAR to detect both stationary and moving objects while maintaining non-stop, uninterrupted eyes on target. The VideoSAR flight was conducted using a Lynx Block 20A radar, the most advanced variant in the Lynx family of radars. Lynx Block 20A is equipped with SAR/GMTI, Dismount Moving Target Indicator (DMTI), and Maritime Wide Area Search (MWAS) modes. The VideoSAR processors are currently being ruggedized for flight on RPA, including Predator C Avenger. Featuring photographic-quality resolution, the Lynx Multi-mode Radar detects time-sensitive targets and offers a long-range, wide-area surveillance capability that can provide high-resolution SAR imagery slant ranges well beyond EO/IR sensor range (Figure 2). Lynx also incorporates a broad area GMTI scanning capability to detect moving vehicles, operating day and night.

Upgraded Fire Scout Delivered Among the most technically advanced UAVs is the Fire Scout—a helicopter-style unmanned craft. In July the U.S. Navy got its first look at the upgraded MQ-8 Fire Scout unmanned system when Northrop Grumman delivered its first MQ-8C system. Northrop Grumman is the Navy’s prime contractor for the MQ-8 Fire Scout program of record. The company delivered the first MQ-8C aircraft to the Navy in early July in preparation for ground and flight testing. The upcoming tests will be used to validate and mature the upgraded MQ-8 system for operational use. Initial ground testing will ensure that the systems work properly and communicate with the ground control station prior to conducting first flight. The MQ-8 system with the upgraded MQ-8C aircraft will share proven software, avionics, payloads and ship ancillary equipment with the MQ-8B aircraft.


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SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

Figure 3

The MQ-8C Fire Scout unmanned helicopter sits on the flight line at Naval Base Ventura County Point Mugu, CA, prior to conducting the first engine runs of the system on Sept. 20.

The upgraded Fire Scout responds to an urgent need to provide the Navy with increased endurance, range and payload. Using a modified commercially available airframe, the upgraded MQ-8 system can provide commanders with three times

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COTS Journal | October 2013

the payload and double the endurance at extended ranges compared to the current MQ-8B variant. The MQ-8B aircraft currently operates at sea on Navy frigates and on land in Afghanistan, where it provides intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities to maritime and ground commanders. The first deployment of the upgraded MQ-8 system with the MQ-8C Fire Scout aircraft will be in 2014. Last month the U.S. Navy powered up its first MQ-8C Fire Scout unmanned helicopter and rotated the aircraft’s four blades for the first time during initial ground testing and engine runs at Naval Base Ventura County Point Mugu, CA. (Figure 3). Conducting initial engine runs of the aircraft allows engineers to collect data to ensure that all the aircraft’s systems are functioning and communicating properly prior to its first flight.

General Atomics San Diego, CA. (858) 455-3000 . [www.ga.com]. Northrop Grumman Los Angeles, CA. (310) 553-6262 [www.northropgrumman.com].

8/27/13 10:13 AM


TECHNOLOGY FOCUS Rugged Stand-Alone Box Products

Box-Level Rugged Systems Meet Diverse Needs Rugged box systems vendors are enhancing their product offerings with new capabilities suited to a variety of development and end-application needs. Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

I

t’s been a trying year dealing with today’s “new normal” of constrained budgets and vexing uncertainty about programs. As a side effect of that, military system developers have ramped up their desire for higher levels of system integration. That’s put rugged box-levels systems in the limelight for military decision makers. These products are no longer simply a niche or specialty segment of the embedded computing industry, but instead they have become a category of technology just as central as the single board computer. As shown in the product roundup in this section, these systems can take a variety of forms. In the broadest terms they are defined as a set of embedded computing and I/O boards put together and delivered as a working system to provide a certain function, but they are usually intended to be used in a military customer’s larger system. Meanwhile, as more levels of integration are achieved, more of these box-level systems are used as the complete set of electronics and computing in some kinds of space-constrained platforms. Certainly one catalyst behind the demand for these systems is a hunger for complete systems that are at a high TRL (Technology Readiness Level). Motivated by the desire to avoid staking military programs on immature technologies, the DoD is pushing for demonstrations earlier in the program development phase. That means that technologies used also

Figure 1

An OH-58D Kiowa Warrior helicopter from the 1st Infantry Division takes off on a mission in 2004 from Forward Operation Base MacKenzie, Iraq. It is armed with an AGM-114 Hellfire and seven Hydra-70 rockets.

have to show higher TRLs than previously required. All of that has helped fuel demand for prepackaged and prequalified subsystems as primes find themselves without the time or the DoD funding to develop a prototype subsystem themselves. As TRL becomes a more significant part of military requirements, suppliers are crafting solutions with that specifically in mind. An emerging twist on the rugged box-level systems trend is the concept of using such solutions to streamline the development-to-deployment process.

With that in mind, a handful of vendors are now offering companion products where one system is made for development, while its companion counterpart is functionally identical but has a level of ruggedness suited for final deployment. Meanwhile, as pre-integrated systems evolve, there are a number of “extra” aspects being added to product solutions to make them more attractive to military customers. These range from everything to special security or network certification, to application-specific functionalities such as video processing or storage management. An example of today’s box-systems technology in use is the DuraCOR 810Duo tactical computer subsystems from Parvus. This summer the company announced it received a $3.3 million follow-on order from Mercom to supply DuraCOR 810-Duo subsystems to be integrated into U.S. Army OH-58D Kiowa military helicopters (Figure 1). Deliveries will take place within year end. The U.S. DoD recently announced that Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, AL, had awarded a firm-fixed-price contract with a maximum value of over $7 million to Mercom for the procurement of DuraCOR computers in support of this program.

October 2013 | COTS Journal

39


TECHNOLOGY FOCUS: Rugged Box Systems Roundup Rugged Box PC with Modular I/O Serves Cost-Sensitive Apps

The IOS-7200 Industrial PC from Acromag is an I/O server industrial PC targeted as an alternative to PC/104 or CompactPCI embedded computers. Field I/O signals are interfaced through an internal carrier card with related plug-in I/O modules. Working together, the rugged, fanless box computer and conduction-cooled I/O modules provide a truly integrated system for many measurement and control projects. A lowcost Geode CPU processes the I/O signal data and manages numerous interface connections for peripherals and networking. Inserting a mix of up to four mezzanine IOS modules on the slide-out carrier card enables A/D, D/A, discrete monitoring/control, counter/timer, serial communication and FPGA computing functions. A Model IOS-7200 I/O Server PC starts at $1,695.

Acromag, Wixom, MI. (248) 295-0310 • [www.acromag.com]

Rugged Box Marries 1553 and PowerPC

Ballard Technology, a wholly owned subsidiary of Astronics, offers its Avionics BusBox 3000 (AB3000) systems. The AB3000 is small, lightweight and loaded with capabilities for easy integration into today’s modern aircraft, UAVs and ground mobile platforms. With an efficient Intel E680T processor, Ethernet, USB, video, audio and PMC expansion, this rugged, conduction-cooled COTS device is ready to take on all of your toughest computing and interface problems. Avionics interface support includes MIL-STD-1553, ARINC 429/575, ARINC 708/453 and ARINC 717/573. Other interfaces supported include RS-232/422/485, Ethernet (10/100), USB 2.0 Host (High Speed), CANbus, Discrete I/O and PMC Expansion.

Ballard Technology, Everett, WA. (425) 339-0281 • [www.ballardtech.com]

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

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COTS Journal | October 2013

Rugged Box System Supports TRL 9 Level of Tech Readiness

Aitech Defense Systems offers the highly integrated, compact RediBuilt rugged COTS computer that boots and executes your real-time operating system right out of the box. This flexible computer can accommodate either Intel or Freescale processors as well as a CompactPCI or OpenVPX backplane in a condensed package. It is designed to TRL 9 (Technology Readiness Level) as defined by the DoD, NASA and other government agencies. Equipped with standard, circular MIL-DTL-38999 I/O connectors on the front panel and a two-slot 3U CompactPCI or OpenVPX backplane, RediBuilt provides all system interconnections, internal power distribution and filtering circuitry pre-assembled in the unit. The unit measures 202 mm (W) x 260 mm (D) x 126 mm (H) and weighs less than 13 lbs complete.

Aitech Defense Systems, Chatsworth, CA. (888) 248-3248 • [www.rugged.com]

Mission Computer Family Supports ARINC-429 MIL-STD-1553

CES’s Mission and Tactical Computers, implementing various processing and control functions, are available for the most demanding applications. CES is currently developing its new range of 3U VPX and VITA-74 SFF mission systems, complementing the existing portfolio of 6U VPX, VME and CPCI systems. One of these solutions (shown) is the CES sealed conductioncooled Mission Computer that is based on a generalpurpose PowerPC processor board. It provides a video output, two Ethernet connections, as well as several avionic interfaces, including discrete inputs and outputs, serial lines, ARINC-429 ports and redundant MIL-1553 interfaces, with empty slots for potential growth.

CES - Creative Electronic Systems, Geneva, Switzerland. +41.22.884.51.00 • [www.ces.ch]


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Rugged Box Systems Roundup

CompactPCI Chassis Morphs from Development System to Deployed Unit

Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions expanded this development-todeployment approach to a CompactPCIbased system. The new CompactPCI D2D ¾ ATR, a 7-slot ¾ ATR conductioncooled chassis eases the design of 3U cPCI-based systems by enabling the system integrator to use the same enclosure, via simple configuration upgrades, throughout the complete program lifecycle. The Demonstration configurations feature a standard COTS power supply backplane that is cabled to a standard backplane, with either an industrial grade fan or a MIL grade fan. And the application-specific Deploy configuration replaces the standard backplanes and cables with a custom backplane and I/O panel, and upgrades the industrial fans to MIL grade units.

Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions, Ashburn, VA. (703) 779-7800 • [www.cwcdefense.com]

Rugged Platform Aids FACE Application Development

The Future Airborne Capability Environment (FACE) reference architecture is designed to ensure interoperability, increase portability, promote innovation and competition, bring advanced capabilities to the warfighter faster and lower implementation costs. GE’s FACEREF1 Software Reference Platform is a complete, rugged subsystem that features GE’s SBC312 single board computer and PMCCG1 graphics PMC. The SBC312 is based on Freescale’s Power Architecture P4080 8-core processor, yet it has the power envelope of previous dual core systems, while the PMCCG1 features the high performance/low power S3 2300E GPU (graphics processing unit). The interface between the CPU and GPU is via a 4-lane PCI Express to PCI-X bridge, allowing high-bandwidth connectivity between the two processors.

GE Intelligent Platforms, Charlottesville, VA. (800) 368-2738 • [defense.ge-ip.com]

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

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VERY COOL PRODUCT RUGGED DEPLOYABLE

Rugged Box Systems Roundup

RAID DATA STORAGE

Core i7-Based Fanless Embedded Box PC Features Sealed Design

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A small and rugged fanless embedded box PC, the XPand6103 from Extreme Engineering Solutions is a reliable and maintenance-free highperformance computing platform well suited for space-constrained situations. It includes support for X-ES’s line of rugged COM Express modules, which integrate the most recent Intel Core i7 and Freescale QorIQ processors. The internal 64 Gbytes Slim SATA SSD memory module combines the convenience of high-capacity off-the shelf storage with the reliability and performance of SLC NAND Flash memory. The XPand6103 is equipped with a number of I/O interfaces through its rugged and environmentally sealed M12 connectors. The XPand6103 also supports operating temperatures from -40° to +70°C ambient.

Extreme Engineering Solutions, Middleton, WI. (608) 833-1155 • [www.xes-inc.com]

AS9100 Rev C/ISO 9001: 2008 Certified

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Rugged System Embeds Dual Computers for Secure /Non-Secure Ops

General Micro Systems has released the SB1002R-MD, the latest in the “Golden Eye” family of systems. It is the first ultra-small, secure, ultra-rugged, multi-domain workstation that successfully combines two fully isolated systems—one operating in the black (classified) domain and the other in the red (non-secure) domain—in one unit. Boasting a NSA-approved architecture, the SB1002R-MD houses an independent computer for each side (red/black) in the same enclosure—sharing only the secure internal DC power—and uses a proprietary mechanical system to completely isolate red from black domains electrically and from any electromagnetic force (EMF). Golden Eyes SB1002R-MD is available in quantity starting at $20,000.

General Micro Systems, Rancho Cucamonga, CA. (909) 980-4863 • [www.gms4sbc.com]

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

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October 2013 | COTS Journal

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RUGGED BOX SYSTEMS ROUNDUP

Pre-qualified OpenVPX Platform Is Application Ready

Kontron’s ApexVX system is based on Kontron’s 3U OpenVPX computing technology and smart software including VXFabric, VXControl and PBIT system test solution. It integrates all components required for the early evaluation phase up to long-term deployment. The Kontron ApexVX comes in a fully sealed ½ ATR style chassis (5” W x 6” H x 13” D) suitable for harsh environments with scalable thermal solutions. This enables OEMs to directly deploy their development system, battle ready, to field trials and gain a critical timeto-market advantage. The system can be ordered as a pre-qualified system compliant to relevant MIL and AERO standards such as MIL-STD810 E for shock, vibration, humidity and salt fog, and MIL-STD461-E for EMC/ RFI.

Kontron, Poway, CA. (888) 294-4558 • [www.kontron.com]

Rugged Sensor Interface Supports Remote Data Acquisition

North Atlantic Industries (NAI) offers the SIU6 Sensor Interface Unit, a rugged, packaged, turn-key Embedded I/O system for remote data acquisition and distribution for large platform monitoring and control system applications. This high functional density system features COTS Multifunction I/O Boards with an integrated rugged Power Supply, enclosed in a compact, conductioncooled enclosure. The rugged chassis is designed to operate in harsh environments such as extreme temperature, EMI, shock and vibration. A fully integrated backplane and front panel architecture eliminates the need for custom internal cabling or wiring. Taking advantage of NAI’s high-density Multifunction I/O and Power Supply products, the SIU6 allows for a wide selection of different I/O and communications functions.

North Atlantic Industries, Bohemia, NY. (631) 567-1100 • [www.naii.com] FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

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COTS Journal | October 2013

Rugged Box System Provides Manpack-Sized Computing Platform

Enhancing the Ensemble 1000 Series family of computing systems, Mercury Computer Systems’ 2-slot PowerBlock 15 has a convectioncooled or coldplate mountable design suitable for deployment on small platforms operating in harsh environments. A point-to-point PCI Express connection delivers high-throughput, non-blocking, serial connectivity between processing and I/O nodes. External I/O can be customized to accommodate virtually any type of digital or analog I/O. Processing options include the Intel x86 architecture (LDS1100) Intel Core i7-620LE (Arrandale) dual-core processor at 2.0 GHz. Memory includes 2 Gbytes of DDR3-1066 ECC SDRAM, 4 Mbytes of BIOS flash and 4 Gbytes NAND flash.

Mercury Computer Systems, Chelmsford, MA. (866) 627-6951 • [www.mc.com]

Rugged Box-Level System Has PC/104, Mini PCI Expansion.

Octagon Systems offers the MOBL-D4, a low-power, rugged computing platform that excels in demanding mobile applications where the cost of failure is unacceptably high. The total integrated thermal design provides fanless operation over a -30° to 71°C temperature range. The MOBL-D4 is designed with PoE technology for almost unlimited flexibility in interfacing with the latest technology trends. Standard I/O includes Ethernet, USB, Serial, VGA with resolutions to 1280 x 1024 and digital I/O with protection. An onboard GPS is 50 channel, fast lock, high sensitivity. Ignition switch input ensures smart shutdown of the OS. Internal card slots provide PC/104 and Mini PCI expansion.

Octagon Systems, Westminster, CO. (303) 430-1500 • [www.octagonsystems.com]


Rugged Box Systems Roundup

Mission Computer Embedded Sandy/Ivy Bridge Core i7 The DuraCOR\ 80-40 is a rugged tactical mission computer subsystem based on the high-performance Intel Core i7 Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge processors with a highspeed, stackable PCI Express bus (PCIe/104) architecture for I/O card expansion. It combines powerful graphics and multicore processing with ultra-reliable mechanical robustness and modular I/O expansion for extreme environmental and EMI performance per MIL-STD-810G (thermal, shock, vibration, dust, water, humidity) and MIL-STD-461F.

Parvus, Salt Lake City, UT. (801) 483-1533 • [www.parvus.com]

Field-Deployed Ruggedized Computers Boast Advanced Graphics

Quantum3D’s Thermite XVG 4000 offers state-of-theart graphics and processing technology for applications ranging from real-time sensor signal processing to situational awareness. Its processor is an Intel Core i7-610E 2.53 GHz with Turbo Boost to 3.2 GHz (Dual Core) and other CPU options, with up to 8 Gbytes of system memory. Graphics include a CUDA-capable NVIDIA FX880M for mid-range workstation performance, or NVIDIA FX2800M for high-end performance.

Quantum3D, San Jose, CA. (408) 361-9999 • [www.quantum3d.com]

RTD Rugged Systems Meet Cisco’s Embedded Router

The HiDAN HDC5915-5 from RTD Embedded Technologies is a 5-port Fast Ethernet router system based on the Cisco 5915 ruggedized embedded router. This system enables the deployment of Cisco Mobile Ready Net capabilities in mobile, air, ground and unmanned applications. RTD’s waterproof, milled aluminum packaging and cylindrical connectors create an ideal chassis for this advanced Cisco 5915 system. This compact system pairs the ruggedness of RTD products and enclosure technology with the robust quality and performance of Cisco’s 5915 Router.

RTD Embedded Technologies, State College, PA. (814) 234-8087. • [www.rtd.com]

Join the growing number of programs that use LCR Electronics’ ATCA Chassis in the field for mission-critical computing. To learn more about LCR and our products, contact us today.

9 South Forest Avenue Norristown, PA 19401 (800) 527-4362 sales email: military-sales@lcr-inc.com

FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

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COTS FIND the products featured in this section and more at

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

PRODUCTS

Rugged Box Embeds Dual Computers for Secure/Non-Secure Systems

General Micro Systems has released the SB1002R-MD, the latest in the “Golden Eye” family of systems. It is the first ultra-small, secure, ultra-rugged, multi-domain workstation that successfully combines two fully isolated systems—one operating in the black (classified) domain and the other in the red (non-secure) domain—in one unit. The SB1002R-MD houses an independent computer for each side (red/black) in the same enclosure—sharing only the secure internal DC power—and uses a proprietary mechanical system to completely isolate red from black domains electrically and from any electromagnetic force (EMF). No radiation crosses between the two. Once the secure black domain is NSA-certified, reconfiguration and software modification of the non-secure red domain— changing I/O to meet the needs of a certain vehicle, for example—can be completed without recertification. The Golden Eye’s two independent computers each use an Intel Haswell Quad Core processor for maximum performance. These processors incorporate hyperthreading for a total of up to four logical cores, each operating at up to 2.3 GHz, with ability to turboboost up to 3.3 GHz. To handle this incredible performance, each CPU is coupled with up to 32 Gbytes of RAM organized in two banks that support Error Correcting Code (ECC). The ECC RAM provides two bit error detection and one bit error correction, and supports up to 1600 Mega Transfers / Second (MTS) between CPU and memory. Each domain I/O subsystem supports seven Gigabit Ethernet ports with TCP/IP offloading engine and six USB 2.0 ports. Each computer also comprises its own, onboard 512 Gbyte SSD drive, and can be additionally equipped with up to 512 Gbyte removable SATA SSD drive. The Golden Eyes SB1002R-MD is available in quantity starting at $20,000.

General Micro Systems, Rancho Cucamonga, CA. (909) 980-4863. [www.gms4sbc.com].

Rugged HardBack Case Protects Laptops

Pelican Products has introduced the Pelican ProGear 1070CC HardBack Case to offer legendary case p1070rotection for laptop computers up to 13 inches. Produced from a partnership with BMW DesignWorks, the Pelican ProGear 1070CC HardBack is designed to safeguard Ultrabook laptops (Hewlett Packard, Lenovo, Samsung, Acer, Dell and Asus) and Apple MacBook computers up to 13 inches. This streamlined, crushresistant case features the same militarygrade attributes as Pelican’s classic case products— including a watertight o-ring seal with automatic pressure equalization valve. With an MSRP of $89.95, the Pelican ProGear 1070CC HardBack Case is available in black.

Pelican Products, Torrance, CA. (310) 326-4700. [www.pelican.com].

MicroTCA.4 Chassis Offers Rear I/O Options

50W Compact DC/DC Converter Features 2:1 Input

ConTech, a Division of Calex, has announces the “TML” Series of DC/DC converters. The TML Series offers up to 50 watts of fully regulated output power with an industry standard 2 x 1” footprint. The series offers a 2:1 input range with nominal input voltages of 12 VDC, 24 VDC, and 48 VDC. Single outputs offered are 3.3, 5, 12, 15 and 24 VDC. The TML Series operates with efficiencies as high as 92 percent. Features include Remote On/Off, Output Trim and Short Circuit Protection. The operating ambient temperature range of the TML is -40° to +105°C case temperature. De-Rating curves will apply for operation in higher ambient conditions. The unit is encapsulated with a thermally conductive potting compound in a six-sided metal case for improved thermal performance in still air environments.

Calex, Concord, CA. (925) 687-4411. [www.calex.com].

VadaTech offers an 8U MicroTCA.4 chassis designed for applications that require rear I/O. The chassis features full redundancy, including dual fan trays, dual MicroTCA Carrier Hub (MCH) slots and quad Power Module (PM) slots. The VadaTech VT811 chassis features a lightweight aluminum construction with integrated cable ducts below the card cage. This allows the cables to be easily protected and routed to the rear of the chassis. The fan trays utilize Teflon strips, which make insertion/extraction smoother and easier. Plus, the trays have shrouded blind-mate connectors for both the male and female ends, which prevent damage and ease guided insertion. The VT811 chassis has a 30-layer impedance controlled backplane with slots for 12 double-wide AMC modules in the mid-size, plus 2 MCHs and 4 PMs. The clock traces are laid out to give equal track length from MCH to each AMC slot, easing latency equalization. The rear of the enclosure allows for 12 double-wide Rear Transition Modules (RTMs) to be inserted. The fan trays are arranged with sixteen 2” fans each above and below the card cage in a push-pull configuration. The smaller, powerful fans ensure each slot gets optimal airflow, avoiding hot spots.

VadaTech, Henderson, NV. (702) 896-3337. [www.vadatech.com].

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COTS Journal | October 2013


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Index

www.intelligentsystemssource.com

Company Page# Website

Company Page# Website

Acromag.......................................33.......................... www.acromag.com

LCR Electronics, Inc.......................45....................................www.lcr.com

Ballard Technology, Inc..................22.......................www.ballardtech.com

Marvin Test Solutions, Inc.............. 13........................www.marvintest.com

Cambridge Pixel............................29.................www.cambridgepixel.com

Mercury Systems, Inc....................27................................ www.mrcy.com

CM Computer................................52.....................www.cmcomputer.com

MILCOM ‘13.................................. 47.............................. www.milcom.org

Chassis Plans, LLC........................35...................www.chassis-plans.com

MPL AG Elektronikunternehmen.....43.................................... www.mpl.ch

CompactPCI & Graphics/Video Boards Gallery.......................................49

North Atlantic Industries, Inc..........37.................................. www.naii.com

Creative Electronic Systems........... 19.....................................www.ces.ch

Octagon Systems...........................38............... www.octagonsystems.com

Critical IO......................................31...........................www.criticalio.com

One Stop Systems, Inc................... 15............... www.onestopsystems.com

Data Device Corporation................42.......................... www.ddc-web.com

Pentek, Inc.................................... 51............................. www.pentek.com

Elma............................................. 14................................www.elma.com

Phoenix International......................43...........................www.phenxint.com

Equipto Electronics Corporation......32...................... www.equiptoelec.com

Pico Electronics, Inc....................... 12.................www.picoelectronics.com

Extreme Engineering Solutions, Inc..41............................ www.xes-inc.com

RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc....2.................................... www.rtd.com

FEI-Elcom Tech, Inc.......................26...................www.fei-elcomtech.com

Sealevel Systems, Inc....................30..............................ww.sealevel.com

GE Intelligent Platforms, Inc.............7............... defense.ge-ip.com/systems

SynQor, Inc.r.................................21............................. www.synqor.com

Getac, Inc...................................... 17............................... www.getac.com

Trenton Systems, Inc......................23.................www.trentonsystems.com

Great River Technology, Inc............20...................www.greatrivertech.com

VPT, Inc.........................................5...........................www.vptpower.com

COTS Journal (ISSN#1526-4653) is published monthly at 905 Calle Amanecer, Suite 250, San Clemente, CA 92673. Periodicals Class postage paid at San Clemente and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to COTS Journal, 905 Calle Amanecer, Ste. 250, San Clemente, CA 92673.

Coming Next Month Special Feature: Small Form Factor Box Systems and Standards Rugged pre-integrated box systems have become a staple in today’s military embedded computing market. But there’s been little to no standardization on the format or I/O configurations between vendors of these products. This section looks at the VITA standards attempting to fill this void. Tech Recon: GPGPU vs. Traditional Processing for Radar Systems The concept of putting high-performance graphics processors to work on general-purpose processing tasks is beginning to gain traction. But GPGPUs are not expected to supplant FPGAs overnight. GPUs have potential in application areas including target tracking, image stabilization and SAR (synthetic aperture radar) simulation. Sensor processing and software defined radio are also well suited for this kind of processing. Board-level products have emerged specifically for GPGPU computing in a number of form factors including OpenVPX. System Development: Advances in Training and Simulation Systems Military simulation and training systems have taken on a whole different character as PC-based platforms take center stage. Articles in this section analyze the technologies behind that trend. Also featured is a preview of the products and papers to be showcased at the Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference (I/ITSEC). Tech Focus: High Reliability Power Supplies Selecting power supplies and power conversion electronics rank as make or break technical choices in embedded military computer systems. With more and more computing stuffed into smaller spaces, power has direct implications on the size, cooling and mobility of a board or box-level system. Articles in this section examine technology trends affecting DC/DC converters, power supply module bricks and slot-card power supplies (VME, VPX, cPCI and others). 48

COTS Journal | October 2013


CompactPCI & Graphics/Video Boards Gallery Featuring the latest in CompactPCI & Graphics/Video Boards Product technologies Aydin Displays 19” model 8819 military display and the 4419R4CPanel PC display

ARINC 818 Flyable Video Converter Module (VCM) This flight-hardened unit converts between DVI, RS-170, or HD-SDI and ARINC 818, easily adapting legacy equipment for use in modern ARINC 818 architecture. • RTCA DO-160F hardware qualification • HIRF-protected, EMI-shielded design • Robust 38999 Series circular connector • Enclosure less than 5 x 4 x 2.5 inches (including connector) • 20 to 34 VDC power input

The 8819 display is designed for top performance in a variety of severe environments, including track & wheeled vehicles, fixed wing jets, propeller, helicopter, and all naval applications. Built to comply with the most stringent military requirements, including DO-160D, MIL-STD-810G, and MIL-S-901D Grade A, the 8819 is a totally sealed unit, containing no internal moving parts.

Aydin Displays Phone: 610-404-7400

Web: www.aydindisplays.com

Great River Technology Phone: (505) 881-6262

LCR Electronics 3U VPX ATR

REASON #7: Fully scoop-proof interface suitable for blind mating.

Ships with 5-slot VPX backplane—ready out of the box for 3U VPX applications • Lightweight Aluminum Frame • (2x) 28 VDC 400W power supplies, convection over conduction-cooled • (2x) core i7 processor blades (2.5 GHz) 8 byte DDR3 • Optional 240GB storage blade

LCR Electronics, Inc. Phone: (800) 527-4362

Web: www.lcr-inc.com

See the Top 10 reasons why you should be using the new DEUTSCH 369 Series Connectors. Only from TE Connectivity. Learn more at te.com/369series

TE Connectivity Phone: (800) 522-6752

BPX8093 PCI Express 3.0 Backplane

Phone: (800) 875-6031

Web: www.TrentonSystems.com

Web: www.te.com/369series

Fleet-ready rugged displays featuring realtime enhanced video

The BPX8093 PCI Express 3.0 backplane used with a PCIe 3.0 capable single board computer like the BXT7059 delivers PCI Express Gen3 link speeds and expanded I/O card bandwidth to military computing, industrial automation, medical diagnostics, telecommunications and GPU computing applications.

Trenton Systems

Web: http://www.greatrivertech com/arinc-818-vcm.html

Real Time Enhanced Video (RTEV) is an embedded and low power technology supported by Z Microsystems’ intelligent FPGA-based video controller architecture. RTEV delivers significantly improved high-definition video imagery without added latency and is implemented at the video stream level, making integration possible in displays, handhelds, and other small form factors.

Z Microsystems, Inc. Phone: (858) 831-7000

Web: www.zmicro.com/cots

October 2013 | COTS Journal

49


COTS

EDITORIAL Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

Time and Tide and Technology

T

he nautical proverb “Time and tide wait for no man” may be a well proven truth in seafaring lore, but in technology development there is a trickier part of the equation. With the DoD now taking a more rigorous stance on Technology Readiness and at the same time being faced with ever tighter budget requirements, the most complex programs offer the most vivid examples of how challenging today’s technology development can be. In a construction effort as immensely complex as a modern aircraft carrier, timing and schedules are large beasts to tame. Case in point, the Navy is up against technical, design, and construction challenges to completing the Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78)—a first-in-class next generation aircraft carrier. These hurdles mean significant cost increases, along with a lessening likelihood that a fully functional ship will be delivered on time. The DoD relies on Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) to characterize the maturity of critical technologies in programs. Any technology below TRL 6 is at a stage of development where only components or a basic proof of concept of the system have been validated. Basically, technologies represented in prototypes that have been tested in a relevant environment are at TRL 6. In contrast, technologies developed into actual system prototypes—full form, fit, and function—and tested in an operational environment, meet requirements for TRL 7. Experience has shown that TRL 7 means low risk for starting a product development. That’s the level that should be achieved for individual technologies prior to detail design contract award. In the case of CVN 78, the Navy chose to produce some of these systems prior to demonstrating their maturity. A GAO report last month described how now—with construction of CVN 78 more than halfway complete—the Navy has had mixed success in developing the ship’s critical technologies. It’s a vivid example of how the pace of physical, mechanical construction is easier to predict than anything involving electronics integration and system testing. According to the report, the Navy assesses that 7 of CVN 78’s 13 critical technologies are mature—meaning that they have been proven in an operational environment. The remaining six technologies are being installed on the ship even though their capabilities are not yet fully proven. The problem is, as the GAO report points out, that such a strategy introduces the risk of late and costly design changes aboard the ship. The part of the report that interested me was its advocacy of a knowledge-based approach. The idea is that good acquisition outcomes are achieved through a knowledge-based approach to product development that demonstrates high levels of knowledge before significant commitments are made. In many examples, leading 50

COTS Journal | October 2013

commercial ship buyers and shipbuilders eliminate program risks, including technology risk, prior to signing a contract. Demonstrating the maturity of critical technologies is accomplished by testing representative prototypes in realistic environments. In the case of the CVN-78, some technologies moved through development with lower-than-desired levels of knowledge and subsequently faced technical, design, and production challenges. Three systems—the volume search radar, advanced arresting gear, and EMALS—were identified as immature at CVN 78 detail design and construction contract award in 2008. Looking deeper into the volume search radar situation, prior to the CVN 78 detail design contract award, the Navy had only built, tested, and integrated prototype components of the volume search radar in controlled lab environments. The plan was for the volume search radar to be developed and tested as part of the Zumwalt-class destroyer program. In 2010, however, to reduce Zumwalt-class construction costs, the Navy removed the volume search radar from the destroyer program and suspended remaining land-based testing. That left the Ford-class carrier testing requirements unaddressed. The effort was moved to the Ford-class carrier program, but that meant the land-based testing of the radar will occur in fiscal year 2014, 4.5 years later than originally planned. It’s not always straightforward making a link between the role technology suppliers from our industry play and the challenges of large prime-contractor development efforts. But in the case of Technology Readiness Levels the picture is pretty clear. In today’s era of constrained budgets and vexing uncertainty about programs, military system developers are hungry for higher levels of system integration. The rise of complete box-level systems reflects the degree to which prime contractors are increasing their reliance on technology supplier companies like embedded computing vendors. Sometimes they want integration expertise and a level of software development as part of those integration efforts. As more situations emerge—which they inevitably will—where critical technologies are slowing down large programs, the need to piece together electronic systems for testing quickly will be in high demand. That will only increase as primes find themselves without the time or the DoD funding to develop a prototype subsystem themselves. Along with that is the growing need for primes to contain their costs—especially in this era of tight budget constraints. Our embedded computing industry will continue to help alleviate those pressures as primes outsource complete pre-integrated systems to perform demos and verify Technology Readiness Levels— because time and tide wait for no man.


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With more than twice the resources of previous Virtex generations plus advanced power reduction techniques, the Virtex-7 family delivers the industry’s most advanced FPGA technology. Call 201-818-5900 or go to www.pentek.com/go/rtconyx for your FREE online Putting FPGAs to Work in Software Radio Handbook and Onyx product catalog.

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MILITARY W W W. C M C O M P U T E R . C O M

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CM MILITARY ATR CHASSIS ARE DELIVERED FULLY TESTED & CERTIFIED PER

MIL-STD-461F & MIL-STD-810F

-TO GUARANTEE IMMEDIATE FAULT FREE OPERATION-

� �

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

90

170

160

160

140

120

80

140

100

70

120

RE101-2 7cm Navy

60

40

100

200 300

500

1k

2k

3k

5k

10k

20

30

50

0 30

100k

Frequency in Hz

100

200 300

500

1k

2k

3k

5k

10k

20

30

50

70

60

60

Level in dBµV/m

Level in dBµV/m

100M

200M

300M

400

500

800

50 40 30

RE102-3 space system and aircraft(External)

40

20

20

100

200

300

500

800 1k

2k

3k

4k

8 10k

Frequency in Hz

*CE101. CONDUCTED EMISSIONS, 30 Hz - 10 KHz.

100

80

RE102-3 space system and aircraft(External)

50 40

EC CE102-1 28V

60

40

30

20

20 10

0

10

0 30

50

1G

80

70

120

Level in dBpT

80

90

80

140

60

60

*RE102. RADIATED ELECTRIC FIELD, 30 MHz - 1 GHz.

160

RE101-2 7cm Navy

10 30

50

Frequency in Hz

90

80

20

0 30M

100k

*RE101. RADIATED MAGNETIC FIELD POS.F, 30 Hz - 100 KHz.

100

60

40

10

50

Frequency in Hz

*RE101. RADIATED MAGNETIC FIELD POS.B, 30 Hz - 100 KHz.

80

20

20

50

RE102-3 space system and aircraft(External)

40 30

40

20

0 30

80

Level in dBµA

RE101-2 7cm Navy

60

50

Level in dBµV

80

EC CE101-4 above 28V

60

100

Level in dBµV/m

100

Level in dBpT

Level in dBpT

120

50

100

200 300

500

1k

2k

3k

5k

10k

20

30

50

100k

0 10k

Frequency in Hz

0 1G

20

30

50

100k

200 300

500

1M

2M

3M

5M

10M

20

Frequency in Hz

RE TU D I

THE EU

COMPO

M

Y

IDE US NS

*RE102. RADIATED ELECTRIC FIELD, 10 KHz - 30 MHz.

N

MILITAR

ANUFAC

*RE101. RADIATED MAGNETIC FIELD POS.C, 30 Hz - 100 KHz.

30M

2G

3G

4G

5G

6

8

10G

Frequency in Hz

*RE102. RADIATED ELECTRIC FIELD, 1 GHz - 18 GHz.

* Figures achieved by CM-ATR-3U chassis in MIL-STD-461F testing procedures conducted by Independent Authorised Labs. CS101, CS116, RS101 & RS103 certificates also available.

18G

-10 10k

20

30

50

100k

200 300

500

1M

2M

3M

5M

Frequency in Hz

*CE102. CONDUCTED EMISSIONS, 10 KHz - 10 MHz.

CM Computer

True Military COTS Products

10M

NT NE S I


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