RSHP - Selected Projects

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Selected Projects by RSHP, Worldwide Unified, never uniform, we bring uncommon thinking to building projects of all types and scales.

Introduction

Introduction Contents 7 Practice Profile 8 Sustainability 10 Project Timeline 12 Selected Projects The Leadenhall Building 17 3 World Trade Center 27 8 Chifley 33 88 Wood Street 39 Antwerp Law Courts 44 Bodegas Protos 49 British Museum World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre 54 Burlington Gate 62 Campus Palmas Altas 68 The Cancer Centre at Guy’s Hospital 75 LSE Centre Building 81 Ching Fu Group Headquarters 87 Chiswick Park 92 Geneva Airport, Aile Est 98 Grand Paris - The Design of the Parisian Agglomeration of the Future 105 Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Youth Entrepreneurship Zone 109 H-FARM 114 Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge Hong Kong Port - Passenger Clearance Building 118 Contents International Quarter London 125 International Spy Museum 130 International Towers 136 Las Arenas 145 Lloyd’s of London 150 Lloyd’s Register 156 Maggie’s Centre 162 Merano 169 Minami Yamashiro Primary School 172 National Assembly for Wales 176 NEO Bankside 183 The River ONE 188 Nuovo Centro Civico 193 One Hyde Park 199 One Monte Carlo 204 One Park Taipei 211 PLACE / Ladywell 216 R9 Station 222 Riverlight 229 Lyon-Saint Exupéry Airport, Terminal 1 234 Taoyuan Airport T3 240 Terminal 4, Barajas Airport 246 Terminal 5, Heathrow Airport 254 The Berkeley Hotel Entrance 260 The Macallan Distillery and Visitor Experience 266 Torre BBVA Bancomer 274

Practice Profile

Unified, never uniform, we bring uncommon thinking to building projects of all types and scales.

No site is too constrained, or project too challenging, to unlock the social and commercial value hidden within it. Difficult is made beautiful at RSHP, with solutions rooted in pragmatism and elevated by a shared passion for design that places the experiences of people first. Across the world, our team ethos is guided by our Approach, constantly evolving over decades to deliver impactful and uplifting architecture that leaves our cities and built environments better than we found them.

Designing for the future is in our DNA

We advocate design that is rooted in thoughtfulness, problem-solving and ingenuity. Our ‘people places’ respond to human needs for interaction and selfexpression, and make for ease of update, upgrade and reuse. Beyond sustainable, we aim for regenerative.

A strong social vision

Our distinct make-up makes us different. Social responsibility is at the heart of RSHP, with our professional beliefs enshrined in our Constitution since 1990. This includes ownership of our practice by a charitable trust, not individuals, and an ongoing philanthropic commitment determined by our employees.

Four decades of evolution

1977

Our practice is founded as the Richard Rogers Partnership.

2007

We became Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, reflecting the contributions of Graham Stirk, designer of the iconic Leadenhall Building, (our London base), and Ivan Harbour, designer of the Stirling prize-winning Maggie’s West London Centre and Madrid airport’s Terminal 4.

Today as RSHP

Our talented teams of 180 people support an ever-diverse range of projects from our studios in London, Paris, Melbourne, Sydney, Shanghai, Shenzhen and soon New York.

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“Our design solutions are never the same because we analyse every aspect of the site, looking at both the physical and the socioeconomic contexts, to create a building that is an original, but entirely fitting, response.”
Graham Stirk, Senior Partner
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Sustainability

Our founding constitution is at the forefront of environmentalism. Today we continually aim to do better and have set ourselves ambitious sustainability goals- the climate emergency poses huge challenges which we have a collective responsibility to address.

We work closely with our clients, partners and leading industry consultants to design environmentally responsible buildings, biodiverse public spaces and cities for the future that consider the health and wellbeing of the communities they serve. We develop innovative, practical solutions for all our projects which minimise their long-term environmental impact, improve all-round building performance, sustain rather than pollute, and are adaptable rather than replaceable.

We follow sustainability best practice across the regions in which we work; we are members of the UK Green Building Council, founding signatories of UK’s Architects Declare and are committed to the principles of the RIBA 2030 Climate Challenge. Members of our sustainability group sit on industry wide panels such as LETI and hold qualifications in environmental and passivhaus design. Our collaborative projects have received the highest sustainability and wellbeing certifications, including several industry firsts, but our holistic approach to sustainable design ensures we go beyond box ticking.

Our designs for energy efficient buildings have been part of the practice DNA since the early days, achieved through innovative passive design at site and building scale combined with fabric first principles and advanced MEP and control systems. These have led to schemes

such as Daimler Chrysler delivering 70% savings in carbon emissions compared to a typical building. Today we continue this approach and have recently delivered leading edge designs with significantly reduced operational emissions including at International Towers Sydney, which received a Nabers 5.5 and 6* rating and is carbon neutral in operation, Geneva Airport Aisle Est and Cardiff Crofts Street housing both of which are designed to be energy positive in operation.

We also address embodied carbon and circular economy in our projects - reviewing the carbon contribution of structural solutions, material, and system selections early on to understand where the biggest impact can be made in the design. We are working on several schemes which will significantly reduce embodied carbon by efficient and optimised structure, low carbon and hybrid structures and careful material selection. An example of the delivery of a building with this approach is the LSE Centre Building where a 35% saving in embodied carbon was achieved compared to baseline. An expanding portfolio of adaptive re-use projects supports our low carbon and circular design approach, we are currently adapting buildings such as the existing Grade 1 Hammersmith Town Hall dating between 1939 through to 2003.

In addition to addressing carbon reductions, we also focus our attention on maximising opportunities for landscaping, increasing biodiversity and responsible water use on all projects. Our work places emphasis on the public realm and aims to broaden the benefits of a scheme to the community as well as supporting the health and wellbeing of building occupants.

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Project Timeline

A history of selected projects

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19711977
19781986
19791981
19821985
19851988
19871992
19871993
19872005 Terminal
Heathrow
UK 19882008 European
France 19891995 Channel 4 HQ London, UK 19901997 88
Street
UK 19901999
China 19921994 Europier,
Airport London, UK 19921995
France 19921998
Japan 19931995
UK 19932000
19952003
19961999
19952001
19962002
19961999
19972005
19982005
UK 19992003
Assemby
19982005
19992011
19992016
20002014
20012008
20022004
20032006
20032007
Centre Pompidou Paris, France
Lloyd’s of London London, UK
Fleetguard Brittany, France
Patscenter Laboratories Princeton, USA
Billingsgate Market London, UK
Reuters Data Centre London, UK
Kabuki-Cho Tower Tokyo, Japan
Tower Bridge House London, UK
5,
Airport London,
Court of Human Rights Strasbourg,
Wood
London,
Shanghai Masterplan Shanghai,
Heathrow
Bordeaux Law Courts Bordeaux,
VR Techno Plaza Gifu,
Lloyd’s Register of Shipping London,
Minami-Yamashiro Elementary School Kyoto, Japan
The Millennium Dome London, UK
GRIPS Tokyo, Japan
Broadwick House London, UK
Amano Research Laboratories Gifu, Japan
Terminal 4, Barajas Airport Madrid, Spain
Antwerp Law Courts Antwerp, Belgium
Paddington, Waterside London,
National
for Wales Cardiff, UK
Las Arenas Barcelona, Spain
Chiswick Park London, UK
The Leadenhall Building London, UK
Maggie’s West London London, UK
Mossbourne Community Academy London, UK
Wembley Masterplan London, UK
R9 Station Kaohsiung, Taiwan

One Park Taipei Taipei, Taiwan

Terminal 1, Lyon-SaintExupery Airport Lyon, France

Barangaroo South Masterplan Sydney, Australia

Centre Building at the LSE London, UK

BBVA Bancomer Tower Mexico City, Mexico

PLACE / Ladywell London, UK

Riverlight London, UK

Cancer Centre at Guy’s Hospital London, UK

H-FARM Roncade, Italy

The River ONE Ningbo, China

International Spy Museum Washington D.C. , USA

Centre de conservation du Louvre Liévin, France

International Towers Sydney Sydney, Australia

Hong KongZhuhai-Macao Bridge Hong Kong Port –Passenger Clearance Building Hong Kong, China

Merano London, UK

Global Clinic London, UK

One Monte Carlo Monte Carlo, Monaco

The Richard Rogers’ Drawing Gallery Provence, France

Burlington Gate London, UK

The Macallan Distillery and Visitor Experience Speyside, UK

Atrio - Bogota Centro Interancional Bogota, Colombia

Geneva Airport, Aile Est Geneva, Switzerland

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20032011
One Hyde Park London, UK
20042008
Bodegas Protos Peñafiel, Spain
20042009
300 New Jersey Avenue Washington, USA
20052009
Campus Palmas Altas Seville, Spain
20052013
8 Chifley Sydney, Australia
20062012
NEO Bankside London, UK
20062016
The Berkeley Hotel London, UK
20062018
3 World Trade Center New York, USA
20072014
British Museum WCEC London, UK
20082013
Grand Paris Paris, France
20062014
Scandicci Nuovo Centro Civico Scandicci, Italy
20082018
20092015
20092016
20092016
20102016
20092017
20102016
20102018
20112018
20122017
20122018
20132018
20142019
20142016
2016
20152019
20152019
20172018
20082019
20122020
2012 -
20112021

Selected Projects

The Leadenhall Building

London

Place London, UK

Date

2002 - 2014

Client

The British Land Company plc and Oxford Properties

Site Area

3,500 m²

Lettable Area

56,670 m²

Gross Internal Area

86,500 m²

Structural & Services Engineer Arup

Main Contractor

Laing O’Rourke

Landscape Architect

Edco Design London

This 51-storey tower opposite Lloyd’s of London rises to a height of 225 metres (738 feet), its slender form creating its own distinctive profile within an emerging cluster of tall buildings in this part of the City of London. The building’s tapering profile is prompted by a requirement to respect views of St Paul’s Cathedral, in particular from Fleet Street. The tower’s design ensures that from this key vantage point the cathedral’s dome is still framed by a clear expanse of sky.

The office floors are designed to meet the highest quality office space standards taking the form of rectangular floor plates which progressively diminish in depth towards the apex. Instead of a traditional central core providing structural stability, the building employs a full perimeter braced tube which defines the edge of the office floor plates and creates stability under wind loads. The circulation and servicing core is located in a detached north-facing tower, containing colour-coded passenger and goods lifts, service risers and on-floor plant and WCs.

The building’s envelope expresses the diversity of what it encloses, reinforcing the composition and providing legibility to the primary elements. Although the tower occupies the entire site, the scheme delivers an unprecedented allocation of public space – the lower levels are recessed on a raking diagonal to create a spectacular, sun-lit seven-storey high space complete with shops, and soft landscaped public space.

This public space offers a half-acre extension to the adjacent piazza of St Helen’s Square. Overlooking the space is a public bar and restaurant served by glazed lifts. This new public space provides a rare breathing space within the dense urban character of the City of London.

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For me, The Leadenhall Building is about drawing people in. Yes, it’s impressive; yes, it’s an incredible feat of engineering; but it’s also permeable and accessible in a way so many other buildings in the City are not. It engages people - they feel it belongs to them.

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Awards

2018 RIBA National Award

2017

The British Constructional Steelwork Association Awards, Main National Award WInner and Special Award for Best Overall Project

2016

NLA New London Awards Office Buildings Built Winner Award

The Commercial Workplace of the Year category at the BCO (British Council of Offices) London and South East Awards

BCO prize for the Best Commercial Workplace in the UK

2015

The City of London Building of the Year

British Council for Offices Innovation Award

British Council for Offices ‘Best Commercial Office London and the South East’

2011

Working (Unbuilt category): NLA Award BREEAM Excellent Rating Environmental Certification

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3 World Trade Center

New York Place New York, USA

The masterplan for the World Trade Center (WTC) site in Manhattan, New York, was designed by Studio Daniel Libeskind and focuses on the 9/11 memorial – two reflecting pools in the centre of the site. The Freedom Tower, and towers by RSHP, Bjarke Ingels Group and Maki Associates spiral around the pools in descending height order.

The architectural concept for 3 World Trade Center was realised as part of the wider context of the WTC masterplan, and represents a resolution of the varying requirements of the New York Port Authority and the client, Silverstein Properties.

3 World Trade Center is on a site bounded by Greenwich Street to the west, Church Street to the east, Dey Street to the north and Cortlandt Street to the south. It is opposite the WTC Memorial and Cultural Center, and at the heart of the cluster of buildings which surround the memorial. The brief for 3 World Trade Center outlined the building’s function as the site’s commercial core. The tower had to address the issue of balancing retail and office space, while also complementing and acknowledging the WTC memorial.

The building has an orthogonal relationship to the main space between the proposed memorial water pools. To complement this relationship, the central zone of the building has been reduced in mass as it rises towards the sky. The effect is a stepped profile which accentuates the building’s verticality, relating to the memorial site and is sympathetic to the height and positions of the neighbouring buildings. Antennae emphasise the height and slender profile of the building both in the local context, and as part of the Manhattan skyline.

The design includes five trading floors, 54 office floors (totalling 2.1 million sq ft (195,096m2) and five retail levels, as well as eight mechanical floors which serve the trading and office floors, 37 passenger lifts and two principal stairwells. The lower part of the building – the ‘podium building’ – contains the tower’s retail element and the trading floors. The upper levels of the tower hold the office spaces. ‘Live’, active façades, at street level, enable the free-flowing movement of shoppers. There are two belowgrade retail levels and three retail levels above the ground floor, served by two lifts and four stairwells.

To maximise sustainability in terms of the building’s day-to-day functioning, similar ‘green design’ features as those included in the design of 7 World Trade Center have been incorporated. The design team has ensured that energy use and costs are significantly reduced compared to typical Manhattan office buildings.

The design will aspire to LEED ‘Gold’ Certification for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design from the U.S. Green Buildings Council.

Date

2006 - 2018

Client Silverstein Properties Inc.

Construction Cost

$900 million

Site Area

60,000 ft² (5,574m²)

Net Lettable internal Area

2.1 million ft² (195,096m²)

Gross Internal Area

2.8 million ft² (260,129m²)

Architect of Record

Adamson Associates

Structural Engineer

WSP Cantor Seinuk

Dynamic Loading Consultants

Weidlinger Associates Incorporated

Security Consultants

Ducibella Venter & Santore, Robert Ducibella, Philip Santore Service Engineer

Jaros Baum & Bolles

Consulting Engineers

Environmental Certification

LEED Gold

Awards

2019 American Architecture Award

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A soaring symbol of revitalization of downtown New York City and a testament to the enduring spirit of New Yorkers after 9/11
Andrew Cuomo New York Governor
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RSHP 29 Floor 00 Floor 15 Floor 46 Floor 62

8 Chifley is a premium grade office building in Sydney, Australia. The scheme – developed in conjunction with Lippmann Partnership – comprises of a 30-storey office building situated in the Central Business District (CBD) of Sydney. The overall concept was for a development that provides functional quality offices while creating opportunities for connectivity between occupiers from different parts of the building.

The office spaces across 21 levels are connected by a series of adaptable two and three-storey interlinked vertical ‘villages’. These villages (ranging from 1,800 to 2,600 metres square) provide the building with a high degree of flexibility. They also create a variety of individual workspace environments which allow privacy and interaction between individuals. This hollowing out of floor space within the tower allows the redistribution of space higher up the building where better views can be enjoyed. The villages are interspersed with full floor office levels which allow for multiple villages to be connected.

The building has been designed specifically for its prominent, north-facing site. The design creates an environment in tune with demands of the contemporary office lifestyle, where technology is the driver, and the distinction between the office and home is blurred or overlapping. The latest technology and materials have been used to help modify the internal environment. This includes louvred sunscreens on the northeast and west façades; a series of mid- and roof-level, landscaped podiums which incorporate break-out areas for occupiers; external solar shading incorporating tint-free glass which creates a truly transparent building both internally and externally; and an internal environment modified by a displacement floor system, chilled beams and an exposed concrete soffit.

A five-storey open space at street level creates a grand entrance to the building as well as creating a new, significant area of public space which complements the existing, adjoining space of the Chifley Square precinct.

Central to the building’s sense of connectivity and community is the elevated ‘village square’ on the 18th floor set within a three-storey void. This area provides a focal point for all occupants of the building, comprising an entire floor of multi-functional, landscaped space.

The building’s carbon emissions are at least 50 per cent less than those of a ‘typical’ Sydney CBD office. It also achieves a high degree of sustainability through effective water reduction, reduced emissions of CFCs and the use of sustainably-sourced materials. A balanced approach to these areas resulted in a 6-Star ‘Greenstar’ rating, the highest benchmark achievable in Australia.

Place Sydney, Australia

Date

2006-2013

Client

Mirvac Developments

Areas

Site Area 1,580 m²

Net Lettable Area 19,000 m²

Total Floor Space 27,000 m²

Total Storeys 34

Construction Cost

$160 million

Co-Architect Lippmann Partnership

Structural and Services

Engineers

Arup

Landscape Architect

Aspect Studios

Contractor

Mirvac Constructions

Environmental Certification

6 Star Green Star

Awards

2015

Property Council of Australia / Rider Levett Bucknall

Innovation and Excellence Awards - Best Sustainable Development (New Buildings)

2015

Property Council of Australia / Rider Levett Bucknall Innovation and Excellence Awards - Best Office Development

2015

Property Council of Australia / Rider Levett Bucknall Innovation and Excellence AwardsDevelopment of the Year

2014

AIA National Award for Commercial Architecture

2014

Sustainability Awards: Large Commercial Category

2014

UDIA Retail/Commercial Development of the Year

2014

Sydney Design Award Commercial - Constructed

2014

AIA NSW Award for best Commercial Architecture

2014

COLORBOND® Award for Sustainable Architecturecommendation

2014 Sir Arthur G Stephenson Award

2014

Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat: Best Tall Building in Asia and Australasia - Finalist

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Chifley Sydney

8 Chifley embodies the evolution of modern workplace design by creating collaborative, connected communities of a type not seen before in Australia.

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88 Wood Street

London

88 Wood Street demonstrates the potential for speculative commercial development that does not compromise on quality and enhances the public domain.

The site was formerly occupied by a 1920s telephone exchange – delays in securing the demolition of this building, combined with the onset of an economic recession in the 1990s, led to the cancellation of a scheme for a prestige banking headquarters. A larger scheme was designed in 1993–94, with speculative letting in mind.

This building is arranged as three linked blocks of office accommodation that step up from eight storeys on Wood Street, where the context includes two listed buildings, to 14 and finally 18 storeys to the west, responding to the taller built topography towards London Wall. The connections between blocks provides very a large floor area that can be easily subdivided. By using the extensive basement of the telephone exchange for the building plant, roof levels are kept largely free.

The office wings are constructed of in-situ concrete, contrasting with the lightweight, steel-framed service towers. The use of brilliant colour enhances their impact – air intakes and extracts at street level are also brightly coloured, contrasting with the neutrality of the occupied floors. The façades of the main office floors are glazed from floor to ceiling to maximise daylight and views – in addition, levels 8, 12 and 16 lead directly onto roof terraces with spectacular views over the City.

Though built to a strict commercial budget, 88 Wood Street contains many innovative elements. Its tripleglazed façade is formed of single panels of highly transparent float glass. The inner faces of the external panes have a low emissivity coating which further reduces solar gain, while the cavity between the double glazed units and the third panel is fitted with motorised, integral horizontal blinds with perforated slats. Photocells on the roof monitor light conditions and adjust the angle of the blinds, thus minimising glare, heat gain and energy consumption.

Place London, UK

Date 1993-1999

Client

Daiwa Europe Properties

Cost

£52 million

Area

33,073m²

Structural Engineer

Ove Arup & Partners

Services Engineer

Ove Arup & Partners

Quantity Surveyor Gardiner & Theobald

Project Manager

D J Williams & Associates Ltd

Construction Manager Laing Management Ltd

Main Contractor

Kajima/Laing Management

Joint Venture

Fit-Out Contractor

Kajima/Hazama Joint Venture

Landscape Architect

Edward Hutchison

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With its unapologetic modern facade, the building combines a jagged profile in an elegant concrete frame ... oozing an airy spirit full of honesty but not lacking in bravado.

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Awards

2002

The American Institute of Architects London/UK

Chapter Excellence in Design Award Winner

2000

RIBA Stirling Prize Shortlist Civic Trust Award

Royal Fine Art Commission Trust Award

Royal Academy Summer Exhibition Bovis/Lend

Lease Award for Best Architectural Exhibit

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Antwerp Law Courts

Antwerp

Place Antwerp, Belgium

Date

1998 – 2005

Client

Regie der Gebouwen

Cost

£ 86 million

Gross Internal Area

77,000 m²

Cost/m²

£ 1,115

Co-Architect

VK Architects

Structural Engineer

Arup/Bureau Van Kerckhove

Services Engineer Arup/Bureau Van Kerckhove

Quantity Surveyor Bureau Van Kerckhove

Main Contractor Interbuild/KBC/Artesia

Lighting Consultant Arup

Landscape Architect Wirtz International BV

The new law courts for the Flemish city of Antwerp is one of the practice’s major public buildings of the early 21st century. Like many projects by the practice, it reflects a vision of the city as a humane and democratic place with a commitment to the regeneration of urban life. The site for the law courts is at the Bolivarplaats, on the southern edge of Antwerp’s central area, where the urban fabric is broken by a massive motorway interchange, cutting off the boulevard that leads into the city. The new

building is one of the catalysts for the practice’s longterm masterplan of ‘the new south’ of the city. The new building, designed in conjunction with Belgian architects VK Studio, is conceived both as a gateway to the city and to provide a link across the motorway between the city centre and the Schelde River. It houses eight distinct civil and criminal courts and includes 36 courtrooms plus offices, chambers for judges and lawyers, library and dining room, with a great public hall (the space traditionally known as the ‘Salle des Pas Perdus’) linking six radiating wings of accommodation. This space is capped by a striking roofstructure, crystalline in form, rising above the paraboloid roofs that cover the courtrooms.

A low-energy services strategy is fundamental to this project – natural light is used to optimum effect, natural ventilation is supplemented by low-velocity ventilation for the hearing rooms and rainwater is recycled. The building, straddling a major highway, looks out to a large area of parkland – the design creates ‘fingers’ of landscaped that extend right into the heart of the building. The landscape is configured and planted to shield the building from the noise and pollution of the motorway.

Antwerp Law Courts has been welcomed as an iconic and sustainable building that meets the aspirations of its users. The striking roof structure will become a landmark for future generations.

Awards

2008 Chicago Athaneum International Architecture Award RIBA European Award

2007 RICS Awards Regeneration Category: Commended

2006 Staalbouwprijs

2004 Civic Trust Award (Commendation)

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Bodegas Protos

Bodegas Protos is a wine cooperative in a small village in the Ribera del Duero region of Spain, where almost everyone in the village has a stake in the winery. In response to increasing demand for Protos wines in recent years, a new building to extend and modernise production facilities has been built. The winery is an industrial building whose design and arrangement follows the process of wine making, from the harvesting of the grapes to the bottling of the wines. Most of the winery’s internal area is underground, where the thermal mass of the ground is used to keep the wine cool, with the production area at ground level beneath a dramatic vaulted wooden roof.

This building connects via an underground link to the original winery and also provides custom-designed areas for tastings and special events, as well as administrative functions.

Because the building had to be cost efficient, the architect chose to use materials found locally. Timber parabolic arches were used as the main structure, taking advantage of the forms ability to carry large loads on very slim beams.

Terracotta roofing tiles are common to the architecture of the region, and the stone that forms the walls is waste material from a local quarry. The use of traditional materials such as wood and stone and the sensitive use of form to break down the scale of the building has resulted in a winery which complements the surrounding traditional architecture style of Peñafiel.

With building work completed in September 2008, Bodegas Protos processed its first harvest of grapes from the vineyards surrounding Penafiel during October 2008. Over a fifteen-day period, tractor-pulled trailers carrying the grape crop were driven up the ramp to the processing area on the south side of the building and unloaded into vats for fermentation. The facility is now providing capacity to process one million kilos of grapes a year.

Place Valladolid, Spain

Date

2003 – 2008

Client Bodegas Protos

Cost

£ 15 million

Gross Internal Area

19,450 m²

Co-Architects

Alonso Balaguer

Arquitectos Asociados

Structural Engineer

Arup/Boma/Agroindus

Services Engineer

BDSP/Grupo JG/Agroindus

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Awards

2009

RIBA European Award

Shortlisted for the RIBA Stirling Prize

Chicago Atheneum Award

World Architecture Festival – Production, Energy and Recycling

Civic Trust Award

Conde Nast Traveller

IStructe Award

ID & D Gourmet Category Istructe Award

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This new winery, which started as a project for the future, is today the flagship upon which we build our present, while we search for the highest quality in our wines. It allows us to define our future with greater clarity.

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British Museum World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre

London

The World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre (WCEC) is one of the largest redevelopment projects in the British Museum’s 260-year history. Located in the north-west corner of its Bloomsbury estate, the new nine-storey building consists of five pavilions, one of which is entirely underground, and accommodates 175 staff. It provides the Museum with a new major exhibition gallery, state-ofthe-art laboratories and studios, and world class storage for the collection, as well as important facilities to support its extensive UK and international loan programme.

The design is sensitive to the Museum’s existing architecture and that of the surrounding Bloomsbury Conservation Area – the WCEC is bordered by seven listed buildings – whilst maintaining its own identity. The Portland stone and kiln-formed glass used on the pavilions are inspired by the materials of the existing buildings and the shaded façade subtly reveals the activities within. The mass and height of the pavilions are designed to create a subtle transition from the grand scale of the Museum to the more domestic proportions of the predominantly 18th century properties in the neighbouring streets.

Whilst conservation studios and offices are housed at the top of pavilions in order to provide good quality daylight for detailed work, almost 70% of the building is underground, including the Collections Storage Facility where heavy floor loading capability and the building’s most stable environmental conditions are found. Over 5,000m² of new storage space means the Museum can now house its entire, disparate collection at the Bloomsbury site and the addition of a 42-tonne truck lift (one of the biggest in Europe) allows large or incredibly fragile objects to be safely transported to and from the building under controlled conditions.

The Sainsbury Exhibitions Gallery, which connects at ground level to the Great Court for easy public access, replaces the Reading Room as the Museum’s largest temporary exhibition’s space, providing a total area of 1100m² and 6-metre headroom for displays. It is capable of operating independently of the rest of the Museum with potential for 24/7 public access and has its own foyer and shop. It opened in March 2014 with the exhibition “Vikings: life and legend” that took full advantage of the spacious new gallery by installing a 37m-long, reconstructed Viking ship.

Place London, UK

Date 2007-2014

Client The British Museum

Area 18,000 m²

Construction Cost £90 million, Shell + Core + FFE (fixed furniture and equipment)

Structural Engineer

Ramboll UK

Services Engineer Arup

Landscape Design Gillespies LLP

Quantity Surveyor

AECOM

Project Manager

AECOM

Strategic Planning & Consultation Strategy

The Green Brain

Planning Consultants

Montagu Evans

Townscape Consultant

Francis Golding

Construction Manager

Mace

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56 RSHP Awards 2017 RIBA Stirling Prize Shortlist 2017 RIBA National Award 2017 RIBA London Award 2015 RICS Awards - Best Building in the Tourism and Leisure Sector

The WCEC is a transformative addition to the British Museum a development that will continue to benefit the Museum and the world for many years to come.

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Burlington Gate

London

Burlington Gate is made up of apartments and galleries, as well as a new public space in the form of an arcade that runs from Old Burlington Street to Cork Street. Not only does this project enhance the experience of London’s most established art gallery district, it also re-establishes the character of the Georgian streetscape with a contemporary building of the highest architectural quality.

The development is in the heart of Mayfair close to the Royal Academy and Burlington Arcade. The area was developed most extensively during the 18th Century and is typified by a hierarchy of streets and squares framed by close grained Georgian architecture. Successive eras of development have taken place and the area now has a great variety of architectural styles and scales.

RSHP’s design has evolved through an analysis of the immediate and wider context, which has resulted in a sensitive scheme that responds to the height, scale and urban grain of its surroundings and provides a positive contribution to the streetscape of Old Burlington Street and Cork Street. The development comprises two linear

Place London, UK

Date

2012 – 2017

Client

Ten Acre (Mayfair) Two Ltd

Area 12,000 m2

Development Manager

Native Land

Structural Engineer Waterman Structures Ltd

Services Engineer Waterman Building Services

Cost Consultant Core 5

Planning Consultant DP9

Fire Consultant Waterman

buildings connected by a single translucent core that allows light into the heart of the scheme. The street façades are expressed in a series of bays in proportion to the nearby townhouses, restoring the prevalent urban grain. Inside, apartments are arranged so that the living areas face the streets and bedrooms face the internal light well, taking advantage of daylight as much as possible. At the upper levels, the façade is inclined and this setback responds to the surrounding roofscapes.

The materials for this project have been carefully selected to reflect the architectural heritage of the area. The main structural frame will be made up of high-quality reinforced concrete that contains a high proportion of crushed granite, basalt and mica aggregate. This dark background is broken up by a series of light stainless steel frames and matches the colour contrast of the surrounding brick façades with their white window frames. These stainless steel elements surround either windows or solid panels made up of handmade bricks, referring to the subtle modelling on the adjacent building exteriors.

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66 RSHP

Behind a cool exterior of simple, flexible accommodation lies Mayfair’s first new arcade since the 1930s. This is the real joy of the project, a route through from Old Burlington Street to Cork Street that provides a dynamic and vibrant public space. This building will only reveal its true modernity after crossing the threshold.

RSHP 67

Campus Palmas Altas

Seville

Campus Palmas Altas is a new model for an energy efficient business park in Abengoa in the South of Spain. Abengoa’s objectives for their new headquarters complex were to bring the company together from three different buildings in Seville onto a single site and to use the move to unify and radically change working practices: to maximise communication and encourage cross fertilisation between its various divisions. Abengoa is an international technology company whose primary activity focuses on sustainable development in the infrastructure, environment and energy sectors. The scheme comprises seven buildings, five of which are occupied by Abengoa and the remaining two by tenants who have synergies with the client.

The design creates a more compact and urban in character development than conventional business parks, but also particularly suited to the extreme summertime conditions prevalent in the south of Spain. In total, the buildings provide approximately 47,000m² of office space across highly compact floorplates in self-contained structures between 3–4 storeys in height. The buildings are arranged on either side of a central space which is made up of a sequence of interconnected plazas. The central space unifies all seven buildings and, because of the stepped arrangement, creates a sequence of discrete spaces each of which has slightly different characteristics. In this way, a variety of outdoor spaces ranging from patios to sunken courtyards and terraces,

are created which, depending on the prevalent weather conditions, can be comfortably occupied by the buildings’ tenants virtually all year round. The organisation of these spaces aims to reduce the heat load on the building fabric and avoid the creation of ‘heat islands’. The visual mass is broken down by the landscape treatment of the spaces in between buildings.

Colours have been chosen that reflect those found in traditional glazed Andalucían tiles. The structure of each building is formed from in situ concrete with precast elements used for exposed edge cantilevers. The façades are of glass with a ‘floating’ horizontal transom of corrugated aluminium creating a small glazed panel at floor level. Fixed glass louvres of varying densities (depending on orientation) shade the glazing.

Energy-saving criteria are applied across the whole design – from the site layout and the orientation of the campus to the geometry of the buildings themselves, the design of the building envelope and the selection of materials. The design of individual buildings and the linear arrangement of all the buildings maximises self shading, thereby reducing the amount of secondary shading required. Additional measures include photovoltaic panels, a tri - generation plant, hydrogen batteries and chilled beams. It is hoped that the development will become a model for more sustainable office complexes in the future.

Place Seville, Spain

Date 2005 – 2009

Client Abengoa

Cost € 132 million

Area 96,000 m²

Co-Architect Vidal y Asociados arquitectos (VAa)

Services Engineer Arup

Structural Engineer Arup

Environmental Certification

LEED Platinum

Awards

2010

American Institute of Architects UK Chapter, Excellence in Design Award

RIBA European Award

Prime Property Awards: Best Sustainable Real Estate Project, Europe

68 RSHP

Abengoa staff now enjoy a modern and social environment that complies with the company’s aspirations for sustainable development.

Arup Journal, January 2011

RSHP 71
RSHP 73

The Cancer Centre at Guy’s Hospital

London

The Cancer Centre at Guy’s brings together all oncology services from across Guy’s and St Thomas hospital, integrating research and treatment services within the same building.

At a city scale, the 14-storey height of the building provides a transition from the 300-metre (1,000-foot) height of Renzo Piano’s the Shard and the hospital’s Tower Wing to the lower rise areas to the south and defines a new gateway to the Guy’s campus.

The building is made up of a number of stacked ‘villages’ each relating to a particular patient need – chemotherapy, radiotherapy or the one-stop clinic – and each with their own distinct identity. In addition there is a double-height welcome area at the base of the building and private suites at the top. By breaking up the functions of the building into two-, three- or four-storey chunks, a human scale is created for each of the care villages, making orientation easier. Visitors exit the lift at their desired section and enter into the ‘village square’ – a non clinical space which includes a planted external balcony as well as informal seating and relaxation areas for patients waiting for consultations, appointments or results. Patients then navigate to consultation and treatment rooms via stairs and lifts within each village.

The treatment areas are efficient, ergonomic, functional and safe, in order to maximise clinical gain and patient care. Across the centre the focus is on improving the user experience, providing patients and staff with views and light, making a series of inclusive spaces with straightforward way-finding and patient-centred facilities.

The building is designed to actively support change in clinical and accommodation needs over time. Flexibility and adaptability are key parts of the design, structure and services strategy.

Place London, UK

Date 2010 - 2016

Client Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust

Cost

£120 million

Internal Area

20,000 m²

Co-architect

Stantec

Structural Engineer Arup

Services Engineer Arup

Main Contractor

Laing O’Rourke

RSHP 75

The design [for the Cancer Centre at Guy’s], developed in conjunction with patients, was intended to ensure excellence in both the ‘art of care’ and ‘science of treatment’.

76 RSHP
Alastair Gourlay, programme director of estate development, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust
78 RSHP

Awards

2017

FX Design Awards - Best Public Sector Project

Building Better Healthcare

- Grand Prix Design Award, Clinician’s choice, Best sustainable development, Best acute hospital development, Best internal environment

New London ArchitectureAshden Prize for Sustainability, Built Wellbeing

Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) AwardsLondon regional

LABC (Local Authority Building Control) Building Excellence Awards - Best Public Service Building

European Healthcare Design Awards - Interior Design and the Arts

ICE London Civil Engineering Awards - Best Building

2016 Healthcare Business AwardsBest Hospital Building

2015

Architects for Health (AfH) award for Ideas or New Concepts

2013

Be Inspired Award WinnerInnovation in Building

RSHP 79

LSE Centre Building London

RSHP’s design is inspired by LSE’s core values: Collaboration, Excellence and Innovation. As well as the demolition and redevelopment of a number of existing buildings on the Aldwych campus, the initial brief called for world-class architecture to match LSE’s international academic reputation. The RSHP design goes further by placing a public square at the heart of the campus, creating a new focal point and improving connectivity and wayfinding throughout the site.

The building provides simple flexible floor plans for a range of academic and department uses, allowing the creation of innovative and inspirational spaces to attract the best staff, academics and students. The design is vertically zoned with most of the public and highly serviced facilities such as the restaurant, auditorium and large lecture theatres situated at the lower levels. This facilitates natural interaction with the public realm of Houghton Street and animates the newly created LSE Square.

On the first and second floors, general teaching provision is accommodated and there is access to a large external terraced garden. These public and student facilities are all connected by the atrium space, which provides a dramatic and fl owing circulation route between the floors with informal spaces to encourage students to come together to explore, debate and collaborate.

Above the second floor, a number of academic departments are located on flexible floorplates providing both open plan and modular accommodation. These upper levels are connected visually and physically via a dynamic stair that moves in a series of double height spaces across the façade,creating connectivity between departmental floors.

As part of the decision making process, a public exhibition was held during which LSE staff, students and visitors were encouraged to vote for their favourite design from the shortlist. The RSHP design won by an overwhelming margin.

Place London, UK

Date 2013 –2019

Client London School of Economics

Cost £ 78 million, Shell + Core

Area 16000 m²

Structural Engineer AKT II

Services Engineer

Chapman BDSP

Fire Strategy and Acoustic Consultant

Hoare Lea

Landscape Architect Gillespies LLP

Environmental Certification BREEAM Outstanding (88.9%)

RSHP 81
RSHP 83

Awards

2021

RIBA National Award

RIBA London Award

AJ Architecture Award finalistHigher Education Civic Trust Award Winner

2020

Regional Finalist - Civic Trust Awards

Regional Finalist - RIBA Awards

BREEAM Award winner - Public Sector Project – Post Construction Award

Winner Client of the Year LSEEducation Estates Awards

Winner Social Infrastructure Project of the Year - British Construction Industry Awards (BCIA)

Highly Commended Project of the YearEducation Estates Awards

Highly Commended - Structural Steel Design Awards

The Guardian University Awards’ Finalist - Buildings that inspire category Planning Awards’ Finalist - Award for Design Excellence

84 RSHP
RSHP grasped that this would be a building at once for the university and for the city, an enhancement to public as well as academic space.

Place Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Date 2005 – 2007

Client

Ching Fu Shipbuilding Co. Ltd

WeeLee International Co. Ltd

WeeLee International Tourism Management Co. Ltd

Cost

£20 million

Site Area 7,123m²

Building Area 25,178m²

Co-Architect

HOYA Architects & Associates

Structural Engineer Supertech Consultants International Services Engineer

Co-Young Engineering Consultants, Inc

Façade Engineer Bright Curtain Metal Co. Ltd

Contractor Fu Tsu Construction Co. Ltd

Ching Fu Group Headquarters

Kaohsiung

Following a competition in early 2005, RSHP designed a new headquarters for Taiwan’s largest private shipbuilder aimed at uniting all the various activities of the group in one building.

The site for the new HQ building is close to the edge of Kaohsiung Bay, separated from the water by a small park. The brief called for a building which offers generous views across the harbour and which sits on a North / South axis to maximise frontage to the sea. The site of the Ching Fu Group Headquarters building is located in a new science and business park and adjacent to a proposed exhibition centre. The design is based on a series of repeated 8.5m x 8.5m orthogonal grids, with a core located at either end of the structure.

The ground and first floor levels incorporate the atrium, as well as an exhibition / display area and a 100-seat auditorium. The remaining eight storeys contain company offices. Due to planning regulations relating to the massing of buildings, the upper three storeys have been set back from the façade creating the opportunity for a large terrace for staff. An observation deck – for staff and visitor use – has been created along the Southern side of the building above the louvres and a smaller, private observation deck is also included on the Northern side.

One of the main features of the design of the Ching Fu building are the ‘boxes’. These are extensions of the office space at different levels which appear to ‘float’ beyond the façades to provide meeting rooms and private office areas. The upper levels of each box are decked to provide external balconies.

Kaohsiung is located along the Tropic of Cancer and is subject to long hot summers as well as periods of intense monsoon activity. As a result, the louvre roof serves to reduce heat gain on the building envelope and creates a distinctive finish to the building. A series of façade louvres also help to reduce heat gain and louvres fitted to the southwest facing windows adjacent to the ‘box’ voids are designed to deliver reflected natural light into the office space.

Exposed columns and large extractor funnels in vivid primary colours (red, blue and yellow) express the system of building elements and also – in part – acknowledge the corporate brand of the Ching Fu Group of companies.

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RSHP has provided a spectacular building in a prominent position. The use of eye-catching colours not only helps to express the system of building elements but also acknowledges the corporate brand of the Ching Fu Group

RSHP 91

Chiswick Park

London

Chiswick Park is a business park located within an existing built-up area on the site of an old bus depot. It is largely dependent on public transport with 75 per cent of those working there arriving either on foot or by bicycle, bus, or train.

The spectacular parkland forming the heart of the site is public space and includes an open-air performance area, a lake and nature reserve. The site is located off Chiswick High Road in West London, close to Gunnersbury Underground Station. The award winning project offers 185,000m² of office space spread across 12 buildings, including a restaurant and bar. Within each building, provision is made for car parking and plant.

The buildings at Chiswick are standardised, using off-site construction technology, securing economies of time and cost. The project reflects the conviction of developer Stanhope that high quality can be achieved using standardised components and construction management procurement. The aim was to produce a development that is highly distinctive yet buildable within commercial constraints.

The office buildings contain highly flexible space that can be configured in open plan or cellular form. The clarity of the building plan – a central core surrounded by uninterrupted 18m -deep office plates – is assisted by the use of external escape stairs which contribute to the scheme’s distinctive identity. The central atria provide views out to the landscaped park and bring light into the heart of each building. The energy strategy is designed for economy and environmental responsibility – fixed external aluminium louvres and retractable external fabric blinds (activated by light sensors) together shade 90 per cent of the buildings’ surfaces. This significant reduction of solar gain makes possible the use of a displacement ventilation system – Chiswick Park’s energy efficiency results in low running costs in the long term.

Place London, UK

Date

1999 – 2015

Client Stanhope plc

Cost £ 130 million

Gross Internal Area

185,000 m²

Site Area

13 hectares

Structural & Services Engineer

Arup

Quantity Surveyor

Davis Langdon/Mott Green & Wall

Civil Engineer

Laing O’Rourke

Façade Consultant

Josef Gartner

Main Contractor

Bovis Lendlease

Landscape Architect

W8 Landscape Architects and Urban Planners/Charles Funke Associates

Environmental Certification

BREEAM

Excellent (Buildings 6, 7, 8, 9)

Awards

2011-2016

FT’s Top 50 Great Places to Work

2019

Green Apple Environment Award

2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012

UK’s 50 Best Workplaces

2007

UK’s Healthiest Workplace: Yakult Healthy Workplace Awards

2006

OAS (Office Agents Society)

Best Speculative Building Outside Central London: Building 5

2003

RIBA Award

2002

Civic Trust Award

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The move here would make a fascinating business - sociological case study because it really did reinforce what you can do with the right working environment.
Tim Richards, CEO & Founder Vue Entertainment

Geneva Airport, Aile Est

Geneva

The Aile Est (East wing) project represents an important improvement for Genève Aéroport (GA) in terms of flexibility of its operation and passenger comfort. The project reflects the increase of its commercial activity with regard to medium-haul and long-haul flights. The Aile Est will allow Genève Aéroport to strengthen its position in the Central Europe region as well as acting as a gateway to the city of Geneva. It will provide a world-class infrastructure project. Six out of seven of the gates will be contact-stands designed to accommodate code C/D/E and F aircrafts. Four of the contact-stands will be “MARS” stands designed to serve two aircraft at once.

Importantly, the project will replace the existing temporary building which mainly processes the Non-Schengen longhaul flights as well as the temporary “Finger” pier. The Aile Est consists of a “Processor” with passport control booths for immigration and emigration and Non - Schengen departure and arrival gates with the capacity to accommodate airline lounges at mezzanine level.

The project is based on a collaborative approach with consultants forming the RBI-T consortium being based in four countries.

The project is designed to meet the objective of delivering an energy positive building with regard to energy consumption. In order to reach this objective, the building will rely on a holistic sustainable strategy consisting of the following elements: 110 geothermal piles for heating and cooling, glazed facades guaranteeing a low dependency on artificial lighting, a high-performance solar protection strategy for the glazed facades, approximately 4,000 m² of photovoltaic panels on the roof, LED lighting strategy with responsive control systems and low water consumption using methods such as rainwater harvesting.

Place Geneva, Switzerland

Date

2011 -2021

Client Genève Aéroport

Construction Cost

CHF 398 million

Shell + Core + Fit-Out

Total Area 40,000 m²

Co-Architect

Atelier Jacques Bugna SA

Structural Engineer

Ingérop & T-Ingénierie SA

Services Engineer

Ingérop

Lighting Consultant

Speirs Major

Wayfinding Consultant

Mijksenaar

Acoustic Consultant

Architecture & Acoustique SA

Public Address Consultant

Bien Entendu

Facade Consultant

Arcora

Fire Consultants

Swissi SA & Exova

98 RSHP
Both in its aesthetics - the fruit of the imagination of architect Graham Stirk and the RSHP team – and the technical prowess of its execution, the East Wing becomes the new emblem of Geneva airport. It is also a symbol of the sustainable airport of tomorrow
Corine
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Grand ParisThe Design of the Parisian Agglomeration of the Future

Paris

The practice was invited by the French President to study ‘Grand Paris’ looking at the future of the French capital as an integrated metropolitan region. A team comprising RSHP, the London School of Economics and Arup was commissioned to address the key social and environmental challenges facing Grand Paris in the 21st century.

As part of an integrated approach to public transport, the team proposed a series of circumferential metro lines linking strengthened poly centres in the Parisian suburbs and reinforcing the existing public transport network. New ‘metropolitan armatures’ were also proposed, to be constructed over the divisive and inaccessible urban canyons formed by the existing rail lines and housing integrated infrastructure. These would link the centre of the city to the suburbs and also create lateral routes between previously separated neighbourhoods.

RSHP continues to work directly with the French Government to develop a more humane, responsive and ecologically sensitive Paris for the 21st century.

Place Paris, France

Date

2008 – 2013

Client

Ministère de la Culture

Architect RSHP

Team

London School of Economics

Arup

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This collaboration with the French Government will help develop a more humane, responsive and ecologically sensitive Paris for the 21st century.

10 Principles for Metropolitan Paris:

• Restructure metropolitan governance in the Ile-de-France

• Build Paris on Paris

• Complete the metropolitan transport network

• Create a polycentric Metropolitan Paris

• Build balanced communities

• Rebalance the regional economy

• Bridge the physical barriers of the city

• Create a metropolitan open space network

• Reduce the environmental footprint of Metropolitan Paris

• Invest in high-quality design

RSHP 107

Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Youth Entrepreneurship Zone

Shenzhen

Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Youth Entrepreneurship Zone, a designated youth entrepreneurship zone, offers an oasis of innovation and creates an urban work-life balance community in Qianhai.

Containing both a metro and bus station, the site forms a dynamic link between the local community and the emerging skyline. The project comprises of 16 buildings, all connected by an elevated sky deck with landscaped gardens accommodating primarily flexible office floor space, in addition to amenity and retail programs situated within a large, landscaped park.

This urban innovation and creativity hub is a pedestrianised, masterplan development with a central public square and central park, surrounded by walkable streets, green courtyards with urban gardens and trees and water features. The central square provides a series of shared outdoor spaces for social meetings and gatherings, performances, sports and other leisure activities, relaxation and regeneration.

A cluster of lower and elevated buildings with planted terraces, vertical green villages and sky gardens on a gentle urban slope hosts a raised landmark cultural and arts building providing a large multi-purpose hall, exhibition and office spaces. Commercial spaces are flexible and column-free, with options to be divided into open plan, cellular or mixed office units.

The building design and layout is based on flexibility, adaptability and physical and visual connectivity. In contrast to the new ‘super high rise’ developments within the Qianhai area of Shenzhen, this ‘super low rise’ development aims to create a people focused concept for an ‘urban living room’.

Place Shenzhen, China

Date 2018 - 2020

Client Qianhai Inno-Tech Investment/ Qianhai Holdings

Site Area 90 000 m2

Height 7m / 23ft

Floors

Typically 6; Landmark has 8 Co-Architect

Hong Kong Huayi Design

Structural Engineer

Hong Kong Huayi Design Services engineer

Hong Kong Huayi Design

Project Manager

China Overseas Construction

Landscape Architect

AOYA-HK

Cost Consultant

China State Construction International Co., Ltd

Contractor

China State Construction International Co., Ltd

Fire consultant

Hong Kong Huayi Design Consultants

RSHP 109
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RSHP 113

H-FARM

Treviso

Located on the outskirts of Venice, the H-FARM building is part of the wider masterplan for H-Campus. The completed scheme is to include a primary school, secondary school, university and student accommodation, aiming to become a tech start-up orientated education facility for a world which is constantly reinventing itself. Students are to live alongside start uppers, entrepreneurs, teachers, experts and ma¬nagers of large companies — a community of people who will participate in building a collective and cultural identity.

The RSHP-designed focal building will be a multi-purpose, flexible exhibition hall/conference signature building sitting within the centre of the scheme and linking all surrounding facilities.

The east wing will comprise a large kitchen and seating area aiming to satisfy the needs of the entire campus, while the west wing will contain a flexible multipurpose hall with seating for 1000 people. This facility will accommodate a variety of events, including exhibitions, workshops and conferences.

At either end of the building, the ground will rise up creating a gentle pedestrian route up and over the building. In such a flat terrain, even this gentle gradient will provide distant views over the surrounding countryside.

The whole building will essentially perform as a covered arena, a real centre of gravity for the entire campus. It is conceived as a public square where students, digital district users and the external community can all meet.

114 RSHP

Place Roncade, Treviso, Italy

Date 2016

Client H-Farm

Site area 2500m2

Floors 2

Co-architect

ZAA

Structural engineer

RS Ingegneria

Services engineer

Manens-Tifs

Project manager

Manens-Tifs

Environmental certification

LEED Platinum

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Hong Kong Place Hong Kong Date 2010 – 2018 Client Highways Department Government Area 98,570m2 Co-Architect AEDAS (Hong Kong) Civil Engineer Aecom Steelwork & Structural Engineer Buro Happold Services Engineer Aecom
Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge Hong Kong PortPassenger Clearance Building

The Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge provides new strategic connections between Zhuhai, Macao and Hong Kong. The bridge will foster the flow of people, goods, capital and information – and improve the overall connectivity of the Greater Bay Area. The bridge improves transport connectivity within the Greater Bay Area, and greatly reduces travelling time between Hong Kong and other Greater Bay Area cities.

The Passenger Clearance Building (PCB) is built on a new 150-hectare artificial island reclaimed from the open waters to the North-East of Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) and benefits from the proximity to the HKIA’s transport links, including the SkyPier Ferry Terminal, and the MTR’s Airport Express and Tung Chung line. It is the new crossing point over the boundary between Hong Kong, Zhuhai and Macao, and the facilities serve as a gateway for all those passing through it. The building provides a unique opportunity to give Hong Kong an architectural ‘front door’ which celebrates travel, surrounded by water with views to a natural skyline of evergreen mountains and hills.

The PCB is constantly filled with movement: buses arrive and leave the public transport interchange, and visitors and residents wait to gain immigration clearance. Careful thought has therefore been put into how users move around the building. The simple, clear circulation through the facility and the undulating flow of surrounding waters is reinforced by the wave-form roof, enhancing legibility and providing intuitive wayfinding. The movement through the building is punctuated with full-height canyons allowing natural daylight to penetrate all levels of the building and ensure there is a visual connection to the linear roof form to further reinforce clarity of wayfinding.

The elegant modular roof form ideally lent itself to offsite pre-fabrication and has enabled an efficient construction process achieving a very high level of quality. The project is environmentally friendly, aiming to meet the highest standards for new developments and utilise innovative green technologies.

The building opened to the public on 24 October 2018.

RSHP 119

Awards

2020

Best Public Service Architecture Asia

Pacific - International Property Awards

The Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award

MIPIM Awards finalist - Best Industrial & Logistics Development

HKIA Annual Awards - Merit Award in the Industrial/Transport/Utility category

2019

WAF Shortlist for Completed Buildings: Transport

Hong Kong Institution of Engineers AwardsGrand Award for Structural Excellence

The bridge is a vital project for the Greater Bay Area in Southern China, which includes Hong Kong, Macau and nine mainland cities and aims to be a powerhouse of innovation and economic growth like San Francisco, New York and Tokyo. This building serves as a beautiful gateway to Hong Kong, and we are honoured to have worked on it.

RSHP 123
Keith Griffiths, Chairman, Global Design Principal Aedas

International Quarter London

London

Place London, UK

Date

2014 -2022

Client

Lendlease and London

Continental Railways

Total Cost

£2.1 billion

Area

Total Area: 371,000 m²

S5: 48,000 m² NIA

S6: 24,619 m² NIA

S9: 26,088 m2 NIA

International Quarter London (IQL) is a joint venture between Lendlease and London Continental Railways to create a thriving business quarter at the heart of London’s newest metropolitan area, Stratford City, E20. As well as new homes and community facilities, IQL London provides approximately 4,000,000 ft² of work space along with retail and a hotel, creating 25,000 jobs.

The commercial space is spread across two sites, North and South, and designed around the core values of promoting health and wellbeing in the workplace. RSHP has created a masterplan for both sites, including a design framework that enables buildings of different sizes and configurations to be created using the same basic components. This ‘kit-of-parts’ approach provides overall design coherence whilst allowing scope for the development of individual building identities as well as flexibility to adapt to specific tenant requirements.

All commercial buildings offer activity and variety at lower levels to create a vibrant public realm, whilst higher levels read as a composition of large elements when seen from distance. Natural daylight, views, connectivity and open spaces are all key considerations in the masterplan, which also includes 32,000 ft² of shops and restaurants as well as 350 new homes together with community facilities.

In addition to the masterplan, RSHP is also responsible for the design of individual office buildings on site. Building S5, the new home of the Financial Conduct Authority, provides 515,000 ft² net internal office space over 20 storeys of flexible, open plan floorplates. Each floor plate is between 20,000 and 30,000 ft², wrapped around a perimeter atrium and split into three - storey high ‘villages’. This arrangement maximises horizontal and vertical connectivity and creates a vibrant hub at the heart of the building.

Structural Engineer

Arup

Ramboll

Services Engineer

Hoare Lea

Landscape Architect

Gustafson Porter

Environmental Certification

BREEAM Excellent (S5)

BREEAM Excellent (S6)

BREEAM Outstanding (S9), WELL Core & Shell, IWB Gold (S9)

Building S6, into which TfL has moved, rises to 11 storeys and provides 265,000 ft² net internal office spaces, designed using the same principle of large open floor plates and central atrium. The two buildings form the enclosure of a significant new public space to be known as International Square where retail and ancillary accommodation at ground level enliven the public realm.

Building S9, the home of Cancer Research UK, British Council and Fin-Tech New Zealand, is formed of large flexible open plan floor plates, an off-set core location, double height atrium cassettes, and a series of external terraces for break-out and relief spaces. The building successfully offers a backdrop for a variety of working environments adaptable to the constantly evolving workplace.

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International Quarter London will be London’s newest and most progressive business district, delivering...a lasting legacy for East London’s economy.

Lendlease

128 RSHP

International Spy Museum

Washington DC

Place Washington DC, USA

Date

2015-2019

Client The Malrite Company

Area 140,000 ft 2 (13,000 m²)

Client Representative The JBG Companies

Architect of Record Hickok Cole Architects

Structural Engineer SK&A MD

Facade Engineer Eckersley O’Callaghan

Landscape Architect Michael Vergason Landscape Architects Ltd

Exhibition Design Gallagher & Associates

Environmental Certification

LEED Silver

130 RSHP

The International Spy Museum forms part of RSHP’s masterplan for L’Enfant Plaza in Washington DC, and creates a new home for the privately-owned Spy Museum previously located in a 19th Century building in Penn Quarter.

As a cultural building, The International Spy Museum generates activity and interest within a neighbourhood noted for large scale government office buildings. Consequently, the new Spy Museum acts as a catalyst for the regeneration of 10th Street, initiating and reinforcing the intentions of the National Capital Planning Committee SW Ecodistrict Plan.

Drawing its inspiration from the techniques of espionage, the building ‘hides in plain sight’. Its exhibition space is contained in a dramatic, pleated ‘black box’ with opaque diagonal translucent walls, articulated by bright red fins. This glass veil is suspended by red columns, and reduces glare and reflections.

The veil also encloses an atrium and ground floor lobby and circulation space – a continuation of public realm from 10th Street through to the new office buildings within the Plaza. Behind this veil, the prominent façade of the box angles out over the street and public space to one side, breaking the building line to create a disruptive landmark at the crest of 10th Street, visible from the National Mall at one end and Banneker Park at the other.

Above the double height lobby, and the three floors of exhibition and theatre space contained within the box, are two floors of set-back event space, inconspicuous from street level, with a roof terrace giving views across Washington DC’s cityscape and waterfront. Lifts are at the back on the building, but visitors can also exit the Museum box into the atrium above street level, contributing life to the façade.

RSHP 131

Awards 2022 American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) IDEAS² Award - Merit Award

The Commission [of Fine Arts] members commended the project team for an exceptional design and program, observing that the museum will contribute to the transformation of this part of the city

RSHP 135

International Towers

Sydney

Place Sydney, Australia

Date

2010 - 2016

Client

Lendlease

Site Area

C3

Office: 107,563m²

Total: 116,286m²

C4

Office: 96,965m²

Total: 99,656m²

C5

Office: 84,799m²

Total: 90,524m²

Collaborating Architect Lend Lease Design

Structural Engineer Arup

Façade Engineer Arup

Environmental Certification

6 Star Green Star

WELL Platinum

The towers are conceived as three sibling buildings within the RSHP masterplan for Barangaroo South, each with their own identity. They form a western extension to Sydney’s CBD, meeting increased demand from tenants for large floorplate offices, and integral to the ongoing viability and success of Sydney as a global city and key financial centre.

Together they assist in completing Sydney’s framework of tall buildings, established at Circular Quay and adjacent to the Botanic Gardens, with a rising form from south to north and a strong edge to the open water beyond. This cluster of buildings, similar in height to some of the existing CBD buildings, completes the city’s northwestern limit.

Each office tower responds to its unique geographic and environmental condition, along with the changing solar load throughout the day. This response has informed the design development of the floorplate and facades, bringing diversity and individuality to the design of each building.

One of the aspirations for the project was to set new environmental benchmarks in Australia. This is achieved through the combination of solar shading, glass technology and thermal performance directly

Awards

2015

Property Council of Australia Awards – RLB

Australian Development of the Year

Property Council of Australia Awards – Eagle Lighting

Australia Award for Best Workplace Project

Property Council of Australia Awards – WSP Award for Best Sustainable Development – New Buildings

Property Council of Australia Awards – Liberty Steel

Award for Best Mixed Use Development

Property Council of Australia Awards – Tenderfield

People’s Choice Award

responding to context, orientation and solar path. Energy consumption is reduced by arranging the lift cores and ‘vertical village’ community spaces on the northern elevation of the building, which provides shading for the internal workspace. These vertical villages – which include communal breakout spaces and meeting areas – enable visual and physical connections to be made between floors and encourage social interaction between users and visitors throughout the building. The precinct-wide centralised plant spaces allow the whole rooftop to be used as an open terrace and the podium roofs, vertical villages and building insets all provide the opportunity for planting, adding biodiversity to this urban site.

The towers sit on a three-storey plinth conceived as a carved piece of ground that mediates between the waters’ edge and the cliff edge presented by the city behind. The plinth creates a tight human scale streetscape with lobbies alongside other street activities such as retail and leisure. To minimise the number of service vehicles entering the development, the buildings share a common basement accessed from a single point of entrance, leaving the surrounding streets fully pedestrianised or pedestrian prioritised. All these factors help to generate a public realm that is vibrant and animated and safe.

136 RSHP
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I have been impressed by [RSHP’s] imaginative design skills, their drive to challenge past achievements and find new approaches to masterplanning and delivering a world class outcome on the Barangaroo site.

RSHP 143

Las Arenas

Barcelona

The Las Arenas bullring formally re-opened to the public on 25 March 2011 as a major new mixed-use leisure, entertainment and office complex. The historic bullring, built at the end of the 19th century, fell largely into disuse during the 1970s due to the declining popularity of bull fighting in Catalonia. However, the strong civic and cultural role which the building played in the life of Barcelona over nearly a century led to a decision by the city council not to demolish the façade. The design has created an open and accessible entrance to the new building at street level. In addition, an adjacent building – the ‘Eforum’ – will provide retail and restaurants at ground and first-floor levels, with four levels of offices above.

The approach has involved the most advanced architectural and engineering technologies to reestablish the original building as a visually striking landmark for the city. The most spectacular aspect of the intervention is the inclusion of a 100-metre-diameter habitable ‘dish’ with a 76-metre- diameter domed roof, floating over the façade of the bullring and structurally

Place Barcelona, Spain

Date

2000 – 2011

Client

Metrovacesa (originally Sacresa)

Area

Gross internal area: 105,816 m²

Bullring: 46,973 m²

Eforum: 5,500 m²

Parking: 53,343 m²

Co-Architect

Alonso Balaguer y Arquitectos Asociados

Structural Engineer Expedition Engineering and BOMA Services Engineer

JG and BDSP

Quantity Surveyor

TG3

Retail Consultant Sociedad Centros Comerciales España (S.C.C.E)

Main Contractor Dragados

independent from it to cover the various activities taking place below. This ‘plaza in the sky’ incorporates large terraces around the perimeter with space for cafés and restaurants with stunning views over the city. New plazas are also created at street level to provide connections with the existing metro station and neighbouring Parc Joan Miró. The development links strongly to the nearby Fira de Barcelona – a key European business exhibition venue attracting 3.5 million visitors annually– and the neighbouring districts of Eixample and Sants-Montjuic.

RSHP set out to re-establish Las Arenas – a late 19th century bullring – as a 21st century landmark for the city. This involved retaining the entire existing façade as well as re-integrating what had become an isolated traffic island into the city fabric. The retrofit includes a new leisure and retail development within this façade, and has also created significant areas of public realm both in the new dome structure – with its 360-degree roof terrace rising above the existing wall – and at the surrounding street level, which will help to revitalise this part of Barcelona.

Awards

2013

World Architecture News

Adaptive Re-use Award - Shortlist

2012

Civic Trust Award

RIBA International Award

2011

Award for Arts or Entertainment

Structures Structural Award

RSHP 145

Las Arenas had more than 300,000 visitors in its opening weekend … The rooftop public viewing platform has been a huge hit Families seem to have incorporated it into their evening stroll.

RSHP 149

Lloyd’s of London

London

Lloyd’s of London is the world’s greatest insurance market. It had moved its dealing room twice in 50 years and wanted a building that would provide for its needs well into the 21st century. It was also imperative that Lloyd’s could continue their operations unhindered during the rebuilding operation, which almost inevitably involved the demolition of the existing 1928 building. The competition for a new building was won on the basis not of an architectural proposal but of a strategy for the future of this key City institution.

The Practice proposed a building where the dealing room could expand or contract, according to the needs of the market, by means of a series of galleries around a central space. To maximise space, services are arranged on the perimeter. As the architectural form of the building evolved, particular attention was paid to its impact on the surrounding area, especially on the listed 19th century Leadenhall Market. As a result, Lloyd’s became a complex grouping of towers, almost Gothic in feeling – an effect enhanced by the height of the external plant-room towers.

Lloyd’s is one of the great architectural achievements of the 1980s, one of the buildings which confirmed the practice’s position in the front rank of international architects. It has emerged as one of the greatest modern British buildings, one which balances technical efficiency with architectural expressiveness to produce an effect which might be called highly romantic and judged a very positive addition to the London skyline.

The building was Grade I listed in 2011, the youngest structure to obtain this status. English Heritage described it as “universally recognized as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch”.

Place London, UK

Date

1978 - 1986

Client

Lloyd’s of London

Construction Cost

£ 163 million

Area

55,000 m²

Structural and Services Engineer Ove Arup & Partners

Quantity Surveyor

Monk Dunstone Associates

Lighting Consultant

Friedrich Wagner of Lichttechnische Planung

Main Contractor

Bovis Construction Ltd

Awards

2011

Grade I listed by English Heritage

1988

RIBA Regional Award

PA Award for Innovation in Building Design and Construction

Eternit 8th International Prize for Architecture (Special Mention)

1987

Financial Times ‘Architecture at Work’ Award

Civic Trust Award

Concrete Society Commendation

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The building is still modern, innovative and unique – it has really stood the test of time just like the market that it sits within.
Richard Ward, Chief Executive Lloyd’s of London
RSHP 153
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RSHP 155

Lloyd’s Register

London

Place London, UK

Date

1993 - 2000

Client

Lloyd’s Register

Cost

£ 70 million

Area 34,000 m²

Structural Engineer

Anthony Hunt Associates

Services Engineer

Ove Arup & Partners

Landscape Architect

Edward Hutchison

Planning Consultant

Montagu Evans

Awards

2002

World Architecture Award for Best Commercial Building in the World Civic Trust Award

RIBA Award/Stirling Prize Shortlist

2001

Aluminium Imagination Awards –Commendation

2000

Concrete Society Certificate of Excellence ‘Building Category’

The brief for Lloyd’s Register’s London headquarters represented a major design challenge – of building new office space on a tight urban site, in an architecturally sensitive conservation area.

The site is defined by existing buildings on two sides - including the Grade II listed 71 Fenchurch Street constructed for Lloyd’s Register in 1901 and now extensively restored and incorporated into the new headquarters. The building steps up from six to 14 storeys of office space with two basements, covering a total of 24,000 square metres. To respond to the shape of the site the new building is structured around tapered floor-plates, creating a fan-shaped grid around two atria spaces. These atria, and internal and external courtyards, allow daylight to penetrate to the heart of the building.

Clarity of architectural language is the key to this development, where the function of all constituent elements is celebrated, revealing the secrets of their manufacture and operation. Service cores are expressed as towers – two primary circulation cores face the churchyard, while secondary cores to the rear house toilets, goods lifts, staircases, and the main services risers. Highly transparent glazing offers instant legibility – people using the fully glazed wall-climber lifts and stairs animate the building’s exterior. The glazed façade forms part of an integrated cooling and heating system, which enables the building to achieve a 33 per cent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions compared with conventional air conditioning.

156 RSHP
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There cannot be a more beautifully accomplished medium-rise office building in London.

RSHP 161 0 FIRST FLOOR PLAN 25 m N

Maggie’s Centre

London

Place London, UK

Date

2001 – 2008

Client Maggie’s Centres

Cost £ 2.1 million

Gross Internal Area 370 m²

Structural Engineer Arup

Quantity Surveyor Turner & Townsend

Landscape Designer Dan Pearson Studio

Lighting Consultant

Speirs Major Main Contractor ROK

Awards 2009

RIBA Stirling Prize

RIBA Award for London

RIBA London Building of the Year

RICS London Award Community Benefit Category

162 RSHP

Maggie’s Centres offer support for people affected by cancer at any stage, be they patients, family members or friends. Their work is in complete support of conventional medical treatment. Maggie’s West London Centre, at Charing Cross Hospital in Hammersmith, is conceived as a contrast to the main hospital building. It is a non‑institutional building, an ‘open house’ of 370 square metres, arranged over one and a half floors. It is both flexible and adaptable. It can be transparent or opaque, noisy or quiet, light or dark and has a kitchen at the heart of the structure. RSHP hopes to create something that is more homely – more welcoming, more comfortable, more thought provoking and more uplifting. The entrance is approached from within the hospital grounds via the car park.

The building consists of four components: a wall that wraps around four sides, providing protection from its exposed location; the kitchen – a single height central space which is the main focus and heart of the building; annexes off the main space, conceived as meeting, sitting and consulting rooms; and a ‘floating roof’ that over sails the outer wall and helps flood the space with light. Small courtyards are formed between the building and the wall for quiet spaces.

The delicate landscape by Dan Pearson creates a visual and emotional transition from the existing hospital to the new Maggie’s Centre. Wrapping the building with trees also filters the noise and pollution of the surroundings whilst providing a leafy and relaxing backdrop, on what is a dense urban and uninviting site.

RSHP 163

[RSHP’s] quietly confident building is truly, unquestionably a haven for those who have been diagnosed with cancer. Their achievement is in having created a completely informal, home‑like sanctuary to help patients learn to live or die with cancer, beautifully.

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Merano

London

Located on the Albert Embankment, opposite the Tate Britain and within sight of the Houses of Parliament, Merano will offer a high quality, mixed-use development, including apartments, offices and a cafe. The building is formed of three stepped bays, providing a dynamic skyline of varying heights in contrast to the existing ‘wall’ of monotonous and dilapidated developments that occupy this area.

At the base of the building, a four-storey public space will be created offering a café and access through to Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens via Tinworth Street. The height of this public space is on par with the neighbouring Rose pub which is part of the Albert Embankment conservation area. This project will create a strong visual presence along the riverfront and act as a gateway to east Lambeth as well as a natural gathering space, overlooking Albert Embankment Gardens.

All apartments will greatly benefit from the east-west orientation of the site. The vertical circulation core is placed on the eastern elevation, allowing bedrooms and winter gardens to be placed on the eastern side so that they can appreciate the morning sun and living spaces to

Place London, UK

Date

2011 - 2018

Client

St James Group

Gross Internal Area Office: 837 m²

Cafe: 100 m²

Residential: 6100 m²

Structural Engineer Ramboll

Landscape Architect Gillespies LLP

Awards

2019

RIBA London Award RIBA National Award

be positioned on the western side of the building where they can enjoy views out to the river and sunsets in the evening. The different uses of space within the building are arranged vertically, with commercial office spaces occupying the three floors above the café and public piazza and 46 dwellings taking up the upper levels, consisting of a mixture of private and affordable units.

The structure of the building is a simple concrete frame with steel bracing used to provide stability. This allows for the east and west façades to be primarily glass – creating a lightweight, transparent envelope –and enables open and flexible floor plates. Balconies and winter gardens are formed of a lightweight steel structure with colour applied to the undersides and flank walls, which brighten the exterior in contrast to the building’s monochromatic surroundings.

Graham Stirk, Partner in charge of Merano, said: “We have designed a highly flexible residential building that is tailored to its fantastic riverside setting. Its dramatically stepping profile responds to its immediate context and frames a much needed new public space at its base.”

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The three bay plan form of the proposal creates an elegant building with interesting roof profile which breaks up the existing ‘wall like development’ and provides a successful integrated public space
Lambeth council planning officer, Merano
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Minami Yamashiro Primary School

Kyoto

Place Kyoto, Japan

Date 1995 – 2003

Client Minami-Yamashiro Village

Cost

¥2.26 billion / £11.8 million

Site Area

24,400m²

Total Building Area

10,200m²

Structural Engineer

Umezawa Structural Engineers

Services Engineer

Setsubi-Sekkei 21 / Six Squares

Landscape Architect

Equipe Espace

Cost Consultant

Dan Surveyors Office

Contractor

Asanuma Corporation

Awards

2004 RIBA Worldwide Winner RIEF (Research Institute of Educational Facilities) Chairman Award

The design for Minami Yamashiro School was not only to provide teaching facilities for young children but also community centre facilities – a radical departure from the Japanese norm. The new building has been conceived as ‘a big house’, offering not only day-time schooling but evening classes and life-long learning for the community’s increasing adult population.

The heart of the school is a large common hall that mediates between the outdoor playing fields and two levels of flexible classroom spaces arranged within a repetitive framed grid of 8.1m x 8.1m. This multi-level, top-lit space is similarly organised within the expressed structural grid and contains all circulation and classroom breakout spaces. Specific spaces for art, science and music classes are grouped at the lower level. An adjacent gymnasium / village hall building frames the approach to the school and a swimming pool is provided as well. The stainless steel clad roof consists of a row of North-facing skylights which are designed to bring as much indirect sunlight as possible into the interior spaces. The wall colours express circulation and the ‘character’ of various internal spaces, defining different areas and functions.

This project uses simple, durable, low-maintenance materials to achieve elegant results. The building has a strength of its own, yet can be read within the classic Japanese constructional tradition which has long inspired modern architects.

172 RSHP
We are delighted with the elegance of the design.
Yoichi Hashimoto, Mayor Minami Yamashiro Village
RSHP 175
Cardiff Place Cardiff, Wales Date 1998 – 2005 Client National Assembly for Wales Cost £ 41 million Gross Internal Area 5,308 m² Structural Engineer Arup Environmental Consultant BDSP Partnership Project Manager Schal Landscape Architect Gillespies LLP Environmental Certification BREEAM Excellent
National Assembly for Wales

The election of the Welsh National Assembly in 1999, was a turning point in the history of Wales. Its home, Cardiff’s former docklands, is a striking addition to the local landscape and a statement of faith in the regeneration process. The Assembly building embodies democratic values of openness and participation, while its progressive environmental agenda establishes a new standard for public buildings in Britain.

The idea of openness is exemplified by the transparency of the building. Public spaces are elevated on a slateclad plinth and cut away to allow daylight to penetrate the administrative spaces at lower level. A light-weight, gently undulating roof shelters both internal and external spaces, pierced by the protruding extension of the Debating Chamber. A large circular space at the heart of the building, the Chamber is defined by the dramatic roof made from Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) rated Western red cedar timber, which is drawn down from the roof above to form its enclosure.

The Assembly also includes exhibition and education spaces, a café, committee and meeting rooms, press facilities, offices for the principal officers of the Assembly and a members’ lounge.

The servicing strategy responds to the varying demands of the internal spaces – air-conditioning is supplied in the debating chamber, while the public lobby is naturally ventilated. Heat exchangers capitalise on the potential of the ground as a cooling mechanism, while the thermal mass of the plinth tempers fluctuations in the internal environment. In this way, the design achieves significant energy savings compared to traditional buildings. Hard landscaping, together with an avenue of trees, creates a public space around the Assembly and completes the jigsaw of new development in this part of Cardiff Bay.

178 RSHP
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The Senedd is acclaimed by both Assembly members and the general public alike as being open, accessible and sustainable.

Awards

2007 Civic Trust Award

Chicago Athenaeum International Award

2006

RIBA Stirling Prize Building of the Year Shortlist

RIBA Award National

180 RSHP

NEO Bankside

London

Place London, UK

Date

2003 - 2013

Client

GC Bankside LLP (a Joint Venture between Native Land and Grosvenor)

Areas

Residential + Office: 28,600 m²

Retail + Basement: 1,560 m²

Cost

£132 million

Contractor’s Architect

John Robertson Architects

Structural Engineer

Waterman Structures Ltd

Services Engineer

Hoare Lea

Cost Consultant

WT Partnership

Planning Consultant

DP9

Landscape Architect

Gillespies LLP

Main Contractor

Carillion plc

This residential scheme lies in the heart of the Bankside area of London, located close to the River Thames and directly opposite the west entrance to Tate Modern and its new extension. NEO Bankside comprises 217 residential units in four buildings ranging from 12 to 24 storeys. These four hexagonal pavilions have been arranged to provide residents with generous accommodation, stunning views and maximum daylight. The steel and glass pavilions take their cues from the immediate context.

A generous public realm is created which is animated by retail at ground level. Landscaped groves define two clear public routes through the site which extend the existing landscape from the riverside gardens outside Tate Modern through to Southwark Street and will act as a catalyst for creating a lively and vibrant environment around the base of the buildings throughout the year.

The overall design hints at the former industrial heritage of the area during the 19th and 20th centuries, responding in a contemporary language which reinterprets the colouration and materials of the local architectural character. The oxide reds of the Winter Gardens echo those of Tate Modern and nearby Blackfriars Bridge, while the exterior’s timber clad panels and window louvres give the building a warm, residential feeling.

The pavilions’ distinctive external bracing system has removed the need for internal structural walls and created highly flexible spaces inside the apartments. Located outside of the cladding plane as a distinct and legible system the bracing gives a greater richness and depth to the façade and provides a scaling device which helps unify the micro scale of the cladding with the macro scale of the buildings. Interestingly, the dramatic appearance of the bracing and nodes has become a selling point, with many buyers requesting apartments with nodes outside their windows.

Winter gardens are enclosed, single-glazed balconies at the north and south ends of each building, suspended from the main structure on a lightweight deck with large sliding screens. They act both as enclosed terraces and additions to the interior living space. The gardens effectively create ‘prows’ and are expressed as exposed steel decks suspended from the main floor plates on a system of props and hangers. Glazed lift towers provide all occupants with great views of London and the river, and a dynamic expression of the vertical circulation on the eastern side of each building.

RSHP 183
It’s a tour de force of rigour, exceptional attention to detail, and engineering. Everything is beautifully made.
Bill Taylor 2012 Structural Steel Awards Judge
184 RSHP

Awards

2015

RIBA Stirling Prize Shortlist

RIBA London Award

RIBA National Award

World Architecture News

Residential Award - Shortlisted

2014

Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat: Urban Habitat Award - Finalist

2013

British Association of Landscape Industries - Best Hard

Landscaping £300k category

British Association of Landscape Industries - Best Soft Landscaping £300k category

London Building Excellence

Awards - Best Large Housing Development

Sunday Times British Home Awards - Best Landscaped Development

Institute of Civil Engineering Award - Shortlist

2012

RESI Awards - Development of the Year

Structural Steel Design Awards Commendation

Constructing Excellence (London and the South East) AwardsHealth and Safety Award Winner

Best Landscape Architecture (London) and Best Architecture

(UK): International Property Awards

New Homes and Gardens Awards: Gold for Best Communal Garden/ Landscape and Gold for Best Landscaped Urban Development

Best Large Development and Grand Prix Award, Evening Standard

2011

Best Large Development and Grand Prix Award: Evening Standard New Homes Awards

Best Development (London) and Best Development (UK): International Property Awards Best International Development (multiple units) International Property Awards

186 RSHP
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The River ONE

Ningbo

In 2008, the Chinese city of Ningbo – located on the banks of Hangzhou Bay, South of Shanghai – created a masterplan for a new mixed-use urban district. RSHP has designed two stepped towers to mark the western edge of this new city development. The pair of 152m (500 ft) high residential towers straddles the area’s waterfront and entrance to its central canal.

Each building comprises 150 units, ranging in size from one to six bedrooms, and includes penthouses, duplexes and maisonettes. Both towers feature two wings, which house the apartments, connected by a central concrete core that gives strength and creates dramatic entrance lobbies for each apartment floor. Large windows make the most of natural light, and balconies are placed on the outer corners of each of the wings to take advantage of the views.

This plan system and orientation gives clarity to the buildings’ form and connects them to the new waterfront and old city to the West and the rest of the masterplan to the East.

A double-height, ground floor entrance to the first, Northernmost tower links the apartments with a health club and spa located in an adjoining pavilion. At ground level, a new South-facing quayside has been created as a focus for residents and visitors. Each building’s primary structure – a diagonal stability frame – is placed on its exterior. As such, the structural walls do not dictate the plan layout, giving flexibility to the interiors.

As well as their expressive external structure, the towers employ a number of architectural components that provide them with a rational, clear and legible form. The external lift cores, structural concrete floor plates, entrance lobbies and generous public realm all contribute to an architecture that offers a human-scale grain to the development.

Place Ningbo, China

Date 2010 – 2017

Client Hongtai

Cost £130 million

Site Area 3,748m² + 3,584m²

Hotel Area 40,000m²

Apartment Area 40,000m²

Co-Architect

Ningbo LDI

Structural Engineer Arup

Services Engineer Ningbo LDI

Landscape Architect Gillespies

Awards

2018

Qianjiang Cup AwardQianjiang Cup for Quality Engineering Award

188 RSHP

The buildings are designed as a pair to frame the whole development and provide a visual link between the old and new parts of Ningbo.

RSHP

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Nuovo Centro Civico

Scandicci

The project is part of a wider masterplan commissioned by the Scandicci Council in 2003 that asked for a vision to transform Scandicci from a faceless satellite town into a vibrant city hub. In response, the practice designed a new public piazza, flanked by a series of buildings and served by a new tram station, that focuses on public and private activities for the whole community.

The character of the new development respects the scale of the existing surroundings and creates a contemporary architectural language and provides cohesion between different typologies. The result is a restrained architectural aesthetic that directs attention towards the setting rather than the buildings themselves. The project includes a cultural centre, a commercial building and residences. All ground floor areas contain retail activities that provide interaction with the piazza.

The cultural centre frames the Eastern edge and provides a multi-functional hall with flexible space for conferences, exhibitions and concerts and works both independently or in tandem with the piazza outside.

The new tramline – connecting Scandicci directly to the centre of Florence in just a few stops – is a key element of the town centre. It has been the generator for this project and offers the parallel benefits of reducing dependency on cars and encouraging the use of public transport.

The project adopts a sustainable approach by including the installation of solar and photo-voltaic elements, as well as a green roof on the cultural building. The landscape design helps to unite the development with its linear arrangement of trees and benches alongside the tram line.

The Nuovo Centro Civico has reinvigorated Scandicci’s community and will set the standard for urban development.

Place Scandicci, Italy

Date

2008 – 2014

Client

Scandicci Centro Srl

Total Construction Cost

€ 33.8 million

Areas

Site: 26,000 m²

Commercial: 2,350 m²

Development: 15,500 m²

Cultural Centre: 1,900 m²

Office: 4,000 m²

Residential: 7,250 m²

Local Architect

DA.studio

Quantity Surveyor

Studio Associato Zingoni

Landscape Architect

Erika Skabar

Structures & Services

Politecnica

Awards

2011

International Property Award –Highly Commended Development

2014

RIBA European Award

World Architecture News Urban Design Award – Shortlist

RSHP 193
Located at the gates of Florence, halfway between Casellina and the old town of Scandicci, the Nuovo Centro Civico is a new town centre designed by RSHP in collaboration with DA.studio.
194 RSHP
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The piazza is the focus of the civitas, which is the object of the whole project, as a way of fostering a civic sense and the city’s identity.
Simone Gheri, Mayor of Scandicci

One Hyde Park

London

One Hyde Park has given Knightsbridge a distinctive new residential development which relates strongly to the existing streetscape and opens up views between Hyde Park and Knightsbridge. Once inside the building these views are maintained from a series of fully-glazed circulation cores incorporating stairs, lifts and lobbies. One Hyde Park comprises 86 apartments and duplexes (including four penthouses) plus three retail units at ground floor level fronting onto Knightsbridge. Additional facilities for residents include: a private cinema; a 21m swimming pool; squash courts; gym; and a business suite with meeting rooms.

The design seeks to complement the existing streetscape of Knightsbridge and create a scheme that offers daylight and generous views whilst achieving the necessary degree of privacy for its occupants. As befits luxury apartments, elegant detailing and quality of construction were of great importance. Materials were chosen to reflect the colouring and texture of the surrounding buildings: red-brown copper alloy façades complement the surrounding red brick buildings; and pale structural concrete mimics stone details on the neighbouring Mandarin Oriental Hotel.

Renowned lighting artist, James Turrell has created a unified lighting concept that interacts with the development’s architecture. It includes perimeter lighting for the five glass stair and lift structures and a colourful light display.

Place London, UK

Date 2005 – 2011

Client

Project Grande (Guernsey Ltd)

Development Managers

Candy & Candy

Cost

£ 250 million

Area 65,000 m²

Structural Engineer Arup

Services Engineer

Cundall Project Manager

GVA Second London Wall

Project Management

Planning Consultant

DP9

Landscape Architect Gillespies LLP

Interior Design

Candy & Candy

Interior Architect BFLS

Main Contractor

Laing O’Rourke

RSHP 199

As well as being an exceptional home, One Hyde Park is a piece of history to be treasured and passed down to future generations.

Christian Candy Candy & Candy

Award

2013 RIBA London Award

2011 LDSA Building Excellence Award

International Property Award –Highly Commended Development

A new gateway to the Park has been created by relocating Edinburgh Gate to the western edge of the site. The roadway is covered by a canopy and the top surface is planted to provide a visual amenity for all those overlooking it and protect residents from traffic noise. Epstein’s ‘Pan’ which was at the northern end of the existing Edinburgh Gate has been repositioned to maintain its relationship to the new roadway.

Along the eastern edge of the site, linking the Park to Knightsbridge, a new pedestrian route through the site, Serpentine Walk, has been created. The original Knightsbridge underground station entrance has been relocated adjacent to Mandarin Oriental Hotel. The entrance was designed using a similar palette of materials to those used in One Hyde Park creating a structure with a glazed roof and walls that appears to be both open and solid.

200 RSHP
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One Monte Carlo

Monte Carlo

This mixed-use project redevelops the site currently occupied by the Sporting d’Hiver building, located in the very heart of Monte Carlo. Bounded by the Hôtel de Paris, the Hôtel Hermitage and a neighbouring park, the present art deco style block offers little public access through the site and dominates the streetscape. RSHP have designed a series of mixed-use pavilions within a new city quarter that will provide high end residential accommodation, an office building, art gallery, conferencing facilities and retail accommodation within a landscaped public realm.

A newly created central street connects through the centre of the site into a new piazza within the neighbouring Hotel Hermitage site. With the aim of bringing the informal character of the adjacent Petit Afrique park into the scheme, the proposed streets will be framed by green spaces, with water features, sculptures and vertical planting on the pavilion façades . Overall an extra 30 per cent public space on the site will be created, breathing new life into the district.

The organisation of the residential blocks is modular, rational and flexible. A unique retractable façade system allows the interior living quarters of each apartment to transform into an external living space, maximising extraordinary views of the city, the sea and the mountains. Glass cores between each pair of buildings act to mitigate the impact of the pavilions from a massing point of view and allow light into the new pedestrianised spaces. Below ground they act as light wells bringing light into landscaped courtyards within three levels of conferencing facilities.

The locally renowned Salle des Arts from the existing building will be reinstated as the heart of the conferencing facilities. These facilities are made up from a comprehensive suite of rooms providing a multi-use centre in a central location. A new art gallery submerged within the Petit Afrique gardens can be joined to extend the facilities further, but will operate as an independent destination gallery, on the scale of London’s Serpentine Gallery for the most part of the year.

Place Monte Carlo, Monaco

Date 2008 –2019

Client

Société de Bains de Mer

Site Area

5,067 m²

Gross Floor Area 64,571 m²

Cost

€ 250 million

Local Architect

Alexandre Giraldi Architecte

Quantity Surveyor

Thorne and Wheatley

Structural Engineer

Tractebel

Environmental Services Engineer

SNC Lavalin

Façade Engineer

Arcora

Landscaping

Jean Mus

204 RSHP
206 RSHP
208 RSHP
RSHP 209

One Park Taipei Taipei

RSHP has designed two high-rise residential towers adjacent to Da-An Park in the city of Taipei. The site is located to the east side of Da-An Park along the Jianguo Road. The towers are two of the highest residential buildings in Taipei. The design has set a new benchmark in high-rise residential projects in Taiwan, in terms of location, views and aspect, spatial quality, landscape design and public amenities. The external ground floor area provides private landscaped spaces as well as swimming pools for residents of each tower.

The towers – one at 35 storeys and the other at 31 storeys above ground – accommodate apartment types ranging from 300 m² to 600 m². There are two apartments per floor for the small units, and one apartment per floor for the large units at the top of the towers. Each apartment benefits from panoramic views of the park with generous external terraces. The larger units have large doubleheight terraces. Whilst the park elevations are articulated by external terraces, the North and South elevations are articulated by projecting windows and external shading elements. The East elevation offers unique city views of Taipei CBD and Taipei 101. This elevation is further accentuated by the colourful and slender stair cores.

Place

Taipei, Taiwan

Date

2008-2018

Client Yuan Lih Construction

Area

80,800 m²

(North Tower: 37,480 m²/South Tower: 43,320 m²)

Co-architect

CT Chen Architects and Associates

Structural Engineer

Evergreen Construction Services Engineer

Continental Engineering Consultants, Inc

Landscape Architect Environmental Arts Design

Awards

2019

CTBUH Award of Excellence in the 100-199m category

RSHP 211
Two towers facing Da‑An Park sets a new benchmark for luxury high‑rise living in Taipei
212 RSHP
RSHP 213
RSHP 215

Place

2014 – 2016

Lewisham Council

Contract

Contractor

SIG Build

Landscape Architects Landform

Services Engineer

PBA

Project Manager

AECOM

PLACE / Ladywell

London

RSHP partnership with Lewisham Council to create a deployable residential development using a volumetric construction method on the site of the former Ladywell Leisure Centre, which was demolished in 2014 and left vacant pending redevelopment, responds to the high demand for housing in the Borough by offering a short term solution.

The temporary housing development has a maximum procurement budget of £4,980,000 and will remain on site for between 1-4 years, providing 24 homes for local people in housing need as well as eight ground-floor non - residential units for community and business use.

All units exceed the current space standard requirements by 10%, helping the Council to meet an existing shortfall in high quality temporary and two-bed accommodation whilst it develops new build and estate regeneration programmes for the Ladywell site and others.

2014

NLA Mayor of London’s award for project which best creatively contributes to the capital’s

2016

Mayor of London’s Prize, New London Awards

Temporary Building Award, New London Awards

2017

London Planning Awards –Highly Commended

This scheme may offer a solution to an all too common problem that plagues many development sites, which often sit unused while complex regeneration plans are put together.

216 RSHP
The volumetric technology provides high quality, energy efficient accommodation and means that the development can be built faster and cheaper than if traditional methods were used. The finished structure is also fully demountable meaning it could be used over a number of years and in different locations across the borough. London, UK
Date
Cost
million
Internal Area 2990 m²
Client
£4.98
Gross
Awards
Sir Steve Bullock Mayor of Lewisham
RSHP 219
220 RSHP
RSHP 221

R9 Station

Kaohsiung

Place Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Date 2003 – 2007

Client Kaohsiung Rapid Transit Corporation

Cost £15 million Area 14,300m²

Co-Architect

Resource Engineering Service, Inc.

Structural Engineer

Structured Environment

Service Engineer

Resource Engineering Service, Inc.

Contractors

Far Eastern Construction Co. Ltd.

Pan Asia Corporation

Iwata Chizaki Inc.

Awards

2009

FIABCI World Prix d’Excellence –Environmental Category

2nd Runner up

This station serves Kaohsiung’s popular Central Park and the Datong shopping district on the ‘Red’ line of the underground system. A large aluminium canopy sails over the underground concourse, protecting commuters from strong sunlight and rainfall but still allows for natural airflow. Aluminium was chosen as the canopy material due to its lightness, durability and resistance to corrosion. The canopy is approximately 50 metres by 50 metres, weighs 220 metric tonnes and sits on four yellow steel ‘trees’.

Across the canopy’s top surface there is a large number of glazed openings filled with frosted glass. On the underside, these openings are perforated to ensure that natural light can reach the concourse underneath, while still helping to dissipate the glare of the sun.

The station entrance, essentially, draws the landscaping down from the park into the station via a sloped, green bank that leads people down to concourse level, some 11 metres below ground. Two sets of escalators – plus staircases on either side – allow people to move between the concourse and park level and are divided by a cascading water feature which helps to animate the approach to the platforms. In addition to the main entrance, there are two sub-entrances on the opposite side of Chung-Shan Road. These have their own distinctive aluminium canopies supported on smaller yellow steel trees.

224 RSHP

The design of the canopy draws natural light underground and creates a meeting area for people entering and exiting the station below.

RSHP 225
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226 RSHP
RSHP 227

Riverlight

London

Place London, UK

Date 2009 - 2016

Client St James’ Group

Cost

£200 million

Site Area

2.2 hectares

Net Residential Area 98,015 m2

Executive Architect EPR

Structural Engineer Ramboll

Riverlight transforms a triangular, five-acre industrial estate – close to Battersea Power Station on the south bank of the River Thames – into a residential-led mixed use development, creating a transition between the large footprints of the power station and the smaller residential developments to the east.

The scheme includes 806 homes, underground parking, crèche, restaurants, bars, a food store and other retail spaces. It incorporates a river walk and landscaping to take full advantage of its location and create attractive public spaces for the local community. The development is delivered via six buildings, arranged in a rising-form composition, ranging in height from 12 to 20 storeys and giving the development a varied skyline. Around 60 per cent of the scheme is designated as public open space.

Services Engineer Hoare Lea

Planning Consultants and Environmental Service

Co - ordination TP Bennett

Landscape Architect Gillespies LLP

Townscape Consultant Montagu Evans

Awards

2012

BD Housing Architect of the Year - finalist

2018

RIBA National Award RIBA London Award

The architectural expression takes its cue from the former industrial warehouse buildings that lined the river. The language is of simple robust structures which emphasise their construction. Buildings are divided into three distinct zones: top, middle, and base. Top levels are lightweight, two-storey structures with gull-wing roofs; mid levels are represented as concrete floors expressed every two storeys, with intermediate floors expressed as lightweight steel balconies.

In landscape terms, each area of the development is conceived as having its own distinct character. The newly created river walk – slightly raised to allow views over the river wall to the Thames – brings a 17m-wide boulevard to a previously underused part of the waterfront. Commercial and community uses at street level – including restaurants, bars and cafés arranged around the dock inlet, as well as a food store, crèche and business suite –help to attract visitors onto the site and animate the public areas of the scheme.

RSHP 229

The design standard on this inaugural site in the regeneration of Nine Elms is absolutely spot on, with vast amounts of public space for everyone in the capital to enjoy sitting happily alongside well designed good quality housing.

230 RSHP
232 RSHP
RSHP 233

Lyon-Saint Exupéry Airport, Terminal 1

Lyon

Place Lyon, France

Date 2013 – 2018

Client

Aéroports de Lyon

Total Project Cost

€180 million

Total Area 70,000 m2

Co-architect Chabanne & Partenaires

Structural Engineer Bouygues Bâtiment Sud Est

Mechanical Engineer WPS

Electrical Engineer CAP Ingelec

Principal Contractor Bouygues Bâtiment Sud Est

Sustainability Consultant Inddigo

Environmental Certification HQE (France)

234 RSHP

The brief for the project was challenging: to extend a distinctive group of existing terminal buildings in order to provide additional stands and improved passenger facilities. It was important that the proposals should create a new identity for the airport yet respect the original architecture, and complement the nearby TGV train station, designed by Santiago Calatrava.

RSHP competition-winning solution is a circular building made up of bold, simple and elegant structural elements which extends, and gives a new focus to, the existing airport whilst offering future flexibility, adaptability and potential for growth.

Through a phased development until 2020, the scheme will nearly double the size of the airport, enabling it to welcome an additional five million passengers

annually. Connecting directly to the existing terminal 1, the curved form is extended into a new circular terminal which will offer a spacious and clearly defined entrance, a large shopping area and hanging garden at the centre, which will enrich the travelling experience for passengers. The angled façade allows passengers to take advantage of natural light and views over landscaped gardens and the airfield, whilst providing solar shading and protecting against solar gain.

A modular approach to the design and construction of the building responds to important economic constraints but also harnesses the quality and speed of construction inherent in prefabricated construction techniques.

RSHP 235
236 RSHP

Awards 2020

The existing airport campus has a very distinctive structural and architectural language in both form and colour. This ‘DNA’ determines the character of the new proposal.

RSHP 237

Taoyuan Airport T3

240 RSHP
Taipei

The design for Taoyuan Terminal 3 synthesises the practice’s previous major airport experience with the specific brief. It has brought together the flexibility of the single span, loose-fit volume of Heathrow Terminal 5 with the warmth and human qualities of the flowing interior spaces of Barajas Terminal 4. The result is a unique, dynamic and fluid architecture that allows for easy adaption and future transformation of airport functions without compromising the passenger experience or the architectural integrity.

The RSHP proposal is inherently simple in its concept. The design is inspired by Taiwan’s beautiful landscapes, the sea surrounding it, its rhythms of nature and life, to create a series of unique interior places designed for their purpose and protected beneath an elegant hardshell roof. Within, a soft inner surface is malleable and dynamic to celebrate and form the ever changing spaces below. The nature of the interior spaces – whether grand, intimate, uniform or dramatic–, and the extent of those spaces can be changed. This adjustable scaling will give passengers spatial clarity in all areas: large, small, busy or quiet, to reduce stress and improve wellbeing and comfort. This flexibility ensures the airport is always at its best and suitably presented as the principal gateway to and from Taiwan to the rest of the world.

This terminal will be the first of a new generation, a highlight in the journey for new and seasoned travellers alike. It will offer arriving passengers an equality of spatial experience to those departing. Its rational plan arrangement is forecast to deliver minimum connection times of just 40 minutes – the best in the region – with simple wayfinding and airside connectivity.

Place Taipei, Taiwan

Date

2015 –

Client Taoyuan International Airport Corporation

Gross Area

640,000 m2

Co-Architect

Fei & Cheng Associates

Structural Engineer

CECI Engineering Consultants / Arup

Landscape Architect

Gillespies

Transport Consultant

OTC

Aviation Services

Fraport

Retail Consultant

The Design Solution

Baggage Handling Consultants

BNP Associates

RSHP 241

[Terminal 3] will create brand new travel experiences for passengers and become the pride of all Taiwanese people.

242 RSHP
RSHP 243
244 RSHP
RSHP 245

Terminal 4, Barajas Airport

Madrid

The terminal, which is the biggest in Spain, was commissioned to enable Barajas International Airport to compete with major hub airports within Europe. The core building comprises a sequence of parallel spaces separated by a linear block allowing daylight to penetrate deep into the interior. The same form is applied to the satellite, which is comprised of two linear blocks, one for passport control and the other containing the gates.

The bamboo linear roof structure is connected above by a chain of roof lights, permitting maximum flexibility in the arrangement of accommodation on each of the floors. This enables the building to be expanded in phases. The new terminal has a metro, rail station and landside transit link to the existing terminals as well as a transit system linking the core terminal with the satellite.

Pedestrian circulation to and from the parking area is concentrated along the face of the parking structure, creating an animated façade opposite the terminal. The layout of the arrivals hall creates clear and separate routes to the various modes of ground transportation, giving equal weight to public and private transport. The arrivals and departures forecourts as well as the train and metro station are covered by a standard module of the roof, which thereby encompasses the entire sequence of activities from drop-off to departure gate.

Environmental measures, aimed at significantly reducing energy consumption, include a stratified cooling system, displacement ventilation supply to the piers, low-level air supply to all other passenger areas, extensive shading to the façades and roof lights, zoned lighting and the collection of rainwater to irrigate the landscape.

Place Madrid, Spain

Date 1997 – 2005

Client AENA

Cost

£448 million

Areas:

Total: 1,158,000 m²

Terminal: 470,000 m²

Satellite: 315,000 m²

Co-Architects

Estudio Lamela

Structural Engineer

Anthony Hunt Associates/TPS with OTEP/HCA

Lighting Consultant

Arup/Speirs Major

Façade Engineer

Arup

Landscape Architect dosAdos

Main Contractor Terminal: UTE

Satellite: UTE

Parking: DRAGADOS Baggage

Handling: Siemens Dematic

246 RSHP
248 RSHP
RSHP 249

In architectural terms they designed a wonderful building that makes an impact on everybody and created a truly functional and efficient airport that facilitates the flow of passengers through the building.

Awards

2008

AIA/UK Excellence in Design Award

Istructe Award for Commercial or Retail Structures

XX Urbanism Architecture and Public Works Awards, Madrid City Council Airport Council Award for Best European Airport

RIBA European Award

RIBA Airport Award

2006

RIBA Stirling Prize

250 RSHP
Jose Manuel Hesse Martin, Plan Barajas Director
RSHP 251

Terminal 5, Heathrow Airport

London

Place London, UK

Date 1989 – 2008

Client BAA plc

Total Project Cost

£4.3 billion

Total Area 300,000 m² Terminal, 60,000 m² Satellite 155,000 m² Satellite 2

Co-Architect Pascall + Watson

Co-Architect Rail Exchange HOK

Structural Engineer Arup

Civil Engineer

Mott MacDonald

Services Engineer DSSR / Arup

Awards

2014

Skytrax World’s Best Terminal

2013

Skytrax World’s Best Terminal

2008

RIBA London Award

RIBA National Award

Structural Steel Design Award

Sustain Magazine British Construction AwardsHighly Commended

Off Site Construction Award - Best Commercial Project Off Site Construction (OSC)

Structural Award for Commercial Structures

Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE)

Supreme Award for Structural Engineering Excellence

Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE)

RSHP won the competition for Terminal 5 (T5) at Heathrow Airport in 1989. The terminal became operational in March 2008, after being officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II.

The original competition scheme evolved during the 1990s, shaped by changing requirements, including a dramatic reduction in site area and different security needs.

The built scheme for the main terminal offers an unencumbered, long-span ‘envelope’ – developed with Arup – with a flexibility of internal space conceptually similar to that of the practice’s much earlier design for the Pompidou Centre in Paris. Departure and arrivals areas, check-in desks, commercial space, retail, offices, passenger lounges, back-up and other facilities are all contained within freestanding steel-framed structures inside the building and can be dismantled and reconfigured as future needs change. The built multi-level scheme is contained beneath an elegant, curved floating roof, supported by slim columns at the perimeter edges to

provide the required highly flexible and visually dramatic internal space. In this scheme, passengers depart and arrive in a terminal building which offers generous spaces and fine views across the airport.

As well as the design of the main terminal building, RSHP was also responsible for the design of two satellites and Heathrow’s new control tower, which became operational in early 2007. The main terminal, its satellite buildings, and the new control tower are all part of a wider T5 campus development that includes a landscaped motorway link from the M25, the creation of two new open rivers from previously culverted channels under the airport, the construction of more than a square kilometre of taxi-ways and aircraft stands, three rail stations (for the Piccadilly line, Heathrow Express, and overland rail), an airside track transit system, and an airside road tunnel connecting directly to Heathrow’s central terminal area.

256 RSHP
RSHP 257

Terminal 5 is an architectural and engineering tour de force that raises the standards of British airport design by 100%.

Jonathan Glancey, The Guardian, 2008

The Berkeley Hotel Entrance

London

The Berkeley Hotel has the charm and character of an English country residence, well-loved and looked after. As essentially residential in character the Hotel is a sequence of connected spaces and rooms with a comfortable and familiar scale and ambience. Over the years additions and changes have been made and in 2007 planning permission was granted for RSHP’s designs for a new extension along Knightsbridge and number of smaller scale additions throughout the Hotel.

The first of these interventions to be realised is a new entrance canopy with glazed pavilions flanking the entrance doors which will extend the Blue Bar and the Caramel Room. RSHP’s work is defined by a clear structural approach which is evident in the composition. The canopy is supported by a series of expressed carbon fibre beams formed to describe their structural diagram. The beams and glazing system is supported by the existing building and a series of stainless steel columns - the composition is set out on a stone base. The glazing for the canopy and flank walls has a honeycomb insert

which reflects light at night and allows for a sense of light, shadow and movement beyond, giving veiled views through the glass. The stone base integrates steps, a rising platform and series of sculpted timber masts forming a protective screen. This entrance design uses traditional and new materials and their composition is unique to The Berkeley.

The Iconic Blue Bar with its memorable interior is retained and the Caramel Room has been refurbished with a new interior concept by Robert Angell Design International. With the addition of a new glazed pavilion to each space, their frontage is renewed and gives presence to the street. Internally the spaces feel more integrated and have a more settled sense of space.

Throughout the works the hotel remains operational. The various parts of the project weave together into the existing building to make a greater whole, reinvigorating this grand dame of hotels for the future.

Place

London, UK

Date

2006-2016

Client

Maybourne Group Plc

Area

543 sqm

Structural Engineer

Expedition Engineering

Façade Consultant

Arup Façades

Contractor

Mastercraft Manufacturer

Bellapart

Services Engineer

Ernest Griffin & Son

Access Consultant

Vin Goodwin Associates

Lighting Consultant

Spiers Major

Landscape Architects Gillespies

260 RSHP
The detail is amazing – nothing has been spared Paddy McKillen, Owner, The Maybourne Group
262 RSHP
RSHP 263
264 RSHP

The Macallan Distillery and Visitor Experience

Speyside

Place Speyside, UK

Date 2012 –2018

Client The Edrington Group

Area 14,800 m²

Construction Cost £75 million, Shell + Core + £40m process costs + £7m visitor experience

Landscape Architect Gillespies LLP

Services Engineer Arup

Structural Engineer Arup

Lighting Design Spiers Major

266 RSHP

The new Macallan Distillery will be set into the landscape of the estate that has been responsible for creating the single malt whisky since 1824. The Macallan is already established as one of the most famous whisky makers in the world and wanted a new centre that could reveal the production processes and welcome visitors while remaining sensitive to the beautiful surrounding countryside.

The new building will provide a facility capable of increased production and also allow for easy expansion in years to come. Internally, a series of production cells are arranged in a linear format with an open-plan layout revealing all stages of the process at once. These cells are reflected above the building in the form of a gently undulating roof, formed by a timber gridshell. Grass-covered peaks will rise and fall from The Macallan estate grounds, signalling to approaching visitors the activities housed beneath. Set into the naturally sloping contours of the site, the design makes direct references to ancient Scottish earthworks.

Easter Elchies House – an original 18th century Highland manor house – must remain the primary focus of the estate and so the main access to the new visitor centre will begin near this building. The estate is as important to The Macallan as the buildings that make up the distillery and so a subtle manipulation of the terrain will be used to reveal the built form and control views without appearing forced or overtly grand. The great 18th century garden designers knew the importance of flow and movement in a large landscape; that parks should be experienced on a meandering journey.

The new distillery project will celebrate the whisky-making process as well as the landscape that has inspired it.

RSHP 267

Awards

2019 RIAS Award

RIAS Special Category Award – Wood for Good/Scottish Forestry Award for the Best Use of Timber

ArchDaily Award 2019 – Best Industrial Architecture Project

2018

Structural Timber Award – Winners of Winners

Structural Timber Award – Engineer of the Year

Structural Timber Award – Highly Commended Project of the Year Scottish Design Award – Leisure/Culture Building Project

270 RSHP

Our plan for the estate includes a contemporary distillery that embodies the international style of The Macallan and builds on the brand’s tradition of quality and craftsmanship.

RSHP 271
272 RSHP
RSHP 273

Torre BBVA Bancomer

Mexico City

A new urban landmark on the skyline of Mexico City, the tower marks the gateway to the Paseo de la Reforma from Chapultepec Park. The BBVA Bancomer tower is the result of a collaboration between architectural practices RSHP and Legorreta + Legorreta. In bringing together their different architectural languages yet common values, they have created a building that is both contextual and distinctive.

Mexico City is built on an ancient dried lake and is prone to severe earthquakes so an innovative engineering approach was needed to reduce the risk of tremors. A ‘fuse’ was incorporated into each of the externally expressed structural beams. Its design focuses the impact of an earthquake by absorbing the shock to protect the rest of the structure. This structural solution makes the tower uniquely safe for a building of its height.

To combat solar gain from Mexico’s strong sunlight, a lattice façade system, (which evokes traditional screens or ‘celosias’) shades the exterior of the building allowing daylight in, and views out.

The building is based on the reinterpretation of traditional office space organisation, offering a variety of new flexible working environments for all users. Sky gardens every nine floors create outdoor space within the tower and provide meeting and break-out areas where people can enjoy spectacular views. Consequently, the architecture promotes a sense of community and interaction between staff.

The 50 storey tower provides approximately 78,800m² of prime office space for BBVA Bancomer and can accommodate approximately 4,500 employees.

Place Mexico City, Mexico

Date

2009 - 2016

Client

BBVA -Bancomer

Construction Cost

$ 210 million

Site Area 6,620 m²

Total Area 188,777 m²

Office Area 78,800 m²

Architect LegoRogers

Structural Engineer Arup/Colinas de Buen SA de CV

Plumbing Engineer Arup/Garza Maldonado

Electrical Engineer Arup/DEC Group

HVAC Engineer

Arup/DYPRO

Lighting Consultant

Fisher Marantz

Cost Consultant

INPROS

Project Manager Jones Lang LaSalle

Environmental Certification

LEED Platinum

274 RSHP
276 RSHP

Turner International

Awards

2018

RIBA Award for International

Excellence 2018

2017

ArchDaily 2017 Office Building of the Year

2016

World Architecture Festival 2016 - Completed Office BuildingsShortlist

IStructe Award for Commercial or Retail Structures

American Architecture PrizeInstitutional Architecture Bronze Medal

ENR Global Best Projects Awards

2016 - Office Category - Award of Merit

Bienal Nacional de Arquitectura Mexicana, Silver Medal

MCHAP Awards - Nomination

Council for Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat - Nomination

RSHP 279
This building is the most sophisticated, highest‑quality building in Mexico. It’s a signature building for the bank, for the expansion of their business in North American markets.
Nick

The Leadenhall Building

3 World Trade Center

8 Chifley

88 Wood Street

Antwerp Law Courts

Bodegas Protos

British Museum World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre

Burlington Gate

Campus Palmas Altas

The Cancer Centre at Guy’s Hospital

LSE Centre Building

Ching Fu Group Headquarters

Chiswick Park

Geneva Airport, Aile Est

Grand Paris - The Design of the Parisian

Agglomeration of the Future

Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Youth

Entrepreneurship Zone

H-FARM

Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge Hong Kong

Port - Passenger Clearance Building

International Quarter London

International Spy Museum

International Towers

Las Arenas

Lloyd’s of London

Lloyd’s Register

Maggie’s Centre

Merano

Minami Yamashiro Primary School

National Assembly for Wales

NEO Bankside

The River ONE

Nuovo Centro Civico

One Hyde Park

One Monte Carlo

One Park Taipei

PLACE / Ladywell

R9 Station

Riverlight

Lyon-Saint Exupéry Airport, Terminal 1

Taoyuan Airport T3

Terminal 4, Barajas Airport

Terminal 5, Heathrow Airport

The Berkeley Hotel Entrance

The Macallan Distillery and Visitor Experience

Torre BBVA Bancomer

RSHP The Leadenhall Building 122 Leadenhall Street London EC3V 4AB +44 20 7385 1235 enquiries@rshp.com rshp.com
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