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Academic Calendar

18/19


Senior School Academic Calendar 2018-2019

120 HOWLAND AVENUE TORONTO, ON M5R 3B5 416.533.6724

MR. STEPHEN BEATTY ’86, HEADMASTER MR. PAUL O’LEARY, ASSISTANT HEADMASTER AND HEAD OF SENIOR SCHOOL

Photos: Tom Stevens, students, staff and friends of RSGC


TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 1 Our Vision, Mission & Objectives______________________________________________ About Us & Our Community_ ________________________________________________ The Secondary School Program______________________________________________ Learning To 18___________________________________________________________ Timetable_ ______________________________________________________________ Standards of Conduct_ ____________________________________________________ Student Behaviour_ _______________________________________________________ Student Academic Conduct__________________________________________________ Student Attendance Expectations_____________________________________________ Ontario Secondary School Diploma Requirements_________________________________ Ontario Secondary School Certificate Requirements_______________________________ Certificate of Accomplishment Requirements_____________________________________ Definitions_ _____________________________________________________________ Types of Courses_ ________________________________________________________ Course Codes____________________________________________________________ Ontario Student Record (OSR)_ _____________________________________________ Ontario Student Transcript (OST)____________________________________________ Full Disclosure_ _________________________________________________________ Prior Learning Assessement and Recognition_____________________________________ Equivalency Credits_ ______________________________________________________ Prerequisite and Recommended Preparation______________________________________ Substitution for Compulsory Credits___________________________________________ Access to Outlines of courses of study_________________________________________ The Provincial Secondary School Literacy Requirement_ ___________________________ Music Certificates Accepted for Credit_________________________________________ Course Selection Process & Availability of Courses_______________________________ Course Add/Drops________________________________________________________ Assessment and Evaluation of Student Performance_______________________________ Late Assignment Policy_____________________________________________________ Evaluation Days_ _________________________________________________________ Reporting Student Achievement to Parents______________________________________ Recognition of Academic Achievement__________________________________________

1 1 2 2 2 4 5 7 8 10 11 11 11 12 13 14 14 14 15 15 15 16 16 16 18 18 18 19 22 23 23 24

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 25 Community Involvement_____________________________________________________ Guidance________________________________________________________________ Library Services__________________________________________________________

25 26 28

ACADEMIC PROGRAM 29 Course load_____________________________________________________________ Enrichment______________________________________________________________ E-Learning______________________________________________________________

29 29 31

PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 32 Grade 9 program_ ________________________________________________________ Grade 10 program_________________________________________________________ Grade 11 program_ ________________________________________________________ Grade 12 program_________________________________________________________

32 36 41 49

ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION 61


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INTRODUCTION Mission Statement To challenge and inspire each boy to become the best version of himself.

Our Values Our values are guiding beliefs and principles that inform our decision-making and behaviour throughout the College, from the boardroom to the classroom. • Known and Loved: Each boy is understood and valued. • Manners Maketh Men: We value manners and demonstrate respect through our actions. • The Power of Community: We believe in the power of collaboration, working together and building community. • Action with Integrity: We are guided by moral and ethical principles and are accountable for our actions. • Spirituality Matters: We celebrate our Anglican affiliation and nurture our boys’ spiritual lives. We are inclusive and supportive of our diverse and multi-faith community. • Learning Never Ends: We must continue to learn, ask important questions, explore new ideas and be responsive to changing needs.

About Us RSGC is an independent boys’ day school located in a residential area in the heart of Toronto. The majority of our students live in the Greater Toronto Area and most Senior School students travel to and from school by public transit. The school was founded in 1964 as an Anglican boys’ choir school. There are approximately 280 students enrolled in the Senior School (Grades 9–12) and 160 in the Junior School (Grades 3-8). The school year runs from Labour Day to mid-June and is divided into two terms, with formal reports in early February and mid-June.

Our Community RSGC is distinguished by its people and by a reputation built on commitment and integrity. RSGC students are talented, spirited and focused; they seek and value the learning experiences that will support others and better themselves. Our teachers are skilled in their practice, dedicated and nurturing; they are passionate about their roles in education and in guiding young men. Parents and Old Boys actively maintain their connection to the school; they are committed to its mission and its time-honoured traditions.

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The Secondary School Program Diploma and Certificate Requirements Three types of recognition are granted to students, depending upon the number of credits and other requirements which they complete while in secondary school: the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD); Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC); and the Certificate of Accomplishment (COA).

Ontario Scholar Upon graduation from high school, a student may be designated an Ontario Scholar if he satisfies both of the following requirements: he obtains an aggregate of at least 480 marks in any combination of ministry-approved, Grade 12 level courses that provide a total of six credits; and, he has been recommended by the school principal for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) in either the current school year or the previous school year. For more information on the Ontario Scholar designation, go to www.edu.gov.on.ca/extra/eng/ppm/53. html

Learning to 18 As per the current Ministry policies, it is their requirement that students in the province of Ontario remain in school until he has reached the age of 18 or obtained an Ontario Secondary School Diploma. RSGC strives to reach every student and help him achieve a successful outcome from the secondary school experience. Our commitment is to every student. This means both “raising the bar,” to encourage the absolute highest achievement from our students, and “closing the gap,” to ensure that we develop strategies to help every student learn, no matter their personal circumstances.

Timetable RSGC’s timetable consists of four 75-minute periods on an eight-day schedule (8 rotational blocks). For reporting purposes, the academic year is divided into two terms; however, most courses are taught from September through June. The exceptions are half-credit courses and semestered mathematics courses: MHF4U and MCV4U.

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Daily Schedule

Homeroom (until November)

7:50 – 8:10 am

Period 1

8:15 - 9:30 am

Period 2

9:35 - 10:50 am

Assembly/Chapel Advisors

10:50 - 11:30 am

Period 3

11:30 am - 12:45 pm

Lunch

12:45- 1:30 pm

Period 4

1:30 - 2:45 pm

Thursday Evensong

2:45 -3:15 pm

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Standards of Conduct Royal St. George’s College is a community of students, faculty, staff and parents dedicated to excellence in education; fostering personal and social growth in an environment of individual responsibility; the development of independence and self-discipline in each student; and the expansion of students’ interests and skills in many activities outside the classroom. In this community, students must feel safe, nurtured, welcomed, respected and free of intimidation, bullying and discrimination. The Code of Conduct is for parents and faculty as well as students. The following qualities are expected of each member of the Georgian Community and have guided the development of our Code of Conduct: • Honesty, integrity and truthfulness • Respect for the rights, dignity and property of others regardless of their race, ancestry, colour, religion, age, sexual orientation or socioeconomic status • Courtesy and consideration for others • Good sportsmanship • Responsibility for one’s actions • Conflict resolution and assistance for those in need • Commitment to the ideals of the school and adherence to its rules Student Responsibilities: • Demonstrate a commitment and readiness to learn • Be punctual and maintain regular attendance • Maintain regular communication with teachers • Take responsibility for his actions • Adhere to the RSGC Academic Honesty Policy, Acceptable Use of Technology Policy and all school rules Parent and Guardian Responsibilities: • Take an active role in supporting their son’s education by ensuring that he is prepared for learning • Ensure punctual and regular attendance • Report authorized absences and late arrivals promptly • Maintain ongoing communication with the school • Review the school Code of Conduct with their son and help him to follow school expectations Faculty and Staff Responsibilities: • Help students achieve, to the best of their ability, the development of self-worth, academic success and responsible citizenship • Maintain order and safety in the school and hold everyone to the highest standard of respectful and responsible behaviour • Communicate regularly and meaningfully with parents/guardians • Establish clear, fair, developmentally appropriate supports and interventions for appropriate student behaviour.

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Student Behaviour In accordance with the Georgian Code, all members of the Georgian Community are expected to behave respectfully toward others both in and out of the classroom. This includes fellow students, faculty, staff members, parents, neighbours and visitors to the College. The following constitute unacceptable conduct: 1. Lying and cheating 2. Plagiarism—the use of another’s material without proper acknowledgement 3. The use, possession or distribution of alcoholic beverages, or being under the influence of alcohol on school grounds or at any outside activities recognized as school functions (eg. sporting events, dances, excursions) 4. The possession or distribution of illegal drugs or being under the influence of illegal drugs 5. Vandalism, theft or disrespect for the property of others 6. Bullying, cyberbullying, discrimination and intimidation Disruptive behaviour will result in the following: Minor - Moderate Incidents: Will be dealt with directly by the teacher, coach or staff advisor Example: disruptive behaviour in class Major Incidents: Will be referred to Senior Administration.

Disciplinary System As a general rule, the severity of consequences will be consistent with the nature and degree of the offence, although each case will be treated individually. No two actions or misdemeanors are exactly alike, nor are the needs of the people involved.

Discipline Committee Any student who is guilty of repeated violations of school rules or who is involved in a major incident that may result in expulsion will appear before a discipline committee. The committee will be comprised of two faculty members and a member of the Parents’ Guild. The student and his parent(s) are invited to be present at the hearing. They may also elect to have the student’s advisor present for counsel and a senior student as a student voice. Senior Administration will determine whether or not a referral will be made to a discipline committee. This disciplinary hearing will commence with the student being given the opportunity to explain his actions or involvement and answer questions from the committee members. At the end of the hearing, the committee will provide recommendations to the Headmaster. These recommendations may be accepted, rejected or modified by the Headmaster, who will make the final decision regarding disciplinary action.

Consequences Loss of Privileges: A student may have normal privileges withdrawn for a specified time period (eg. leaving school property, library use, leadership positions, participation in sports or other co-curriculars and attendance at social events). In-School Suspension: A student is required to be at school; however, he may not attend classes. Assignments due during this period may receive a mark of zero, but at the discretion of the teacher, may be handed in (with the corresponding late mark penalty) when the student is permitted to return to classes. Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College 5


Out-of-School Suspension: A student will be required to remain at home under the supervision of parents/ guardians for a specified period of time. Assignments due during this period may receive a mark of zero, but at the discretion of the teacher, may be handed in (with the corresponding late mark penalty) when the student is permitted to return to classes. Expulsion: A student will be withdrawn from the College.

Bullying Prevention and Intervention Bullying happens when one person (or a group of people) deliberately tries to upset another person by repeatedly saying or doing hurtful things. Bullying can happen on a physical (pushing, shoving, punching, kicking, tripping, etc.) or emotional level (isolating, ridiculing, teasing, name calling, making fun because some one is short, thin, small, fat, wears glasses, etc). The person who is being bullied believes he is powerless to stop this from happening regardless of what he does and usually feels humiliated by the behaviour. Bullying behaviour makes students feel scared, sad, angry and “small”. “I was just joking” will not be accepted as an excuse for bullying behaviour. Whether the bullying is direct or indirect, the key component of bullying occurs when the physical or psychological intimidation occurs repeatedly over time by the same or different individuals. If you are a target of bullying, the single biggest favour you can do for yourself is to come forward to a teacher, your advisor or Senior Administration. You have every right to stand up for yourself by informing an adult. Those who think you are “telling” are wrong and want you to be afraid. When you are afraid, you do not tell, when you do not tell, they have the power. Stand up for yourself and take the power back by speaking to a teacher or another adult you trust. Bullying will not be tolerated at RSGC. Disciplinary action will be taken against those found to be acting in a bullying or discriminatory manner and may include suspension or expulsion.

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Student Academic Conduct Academic Integrity RSGC makes every effort to ensure that students understand its academic integrity policy. It is the student’s individual responsibility to ensure an adherence to the letter and spirit of the school’s academic integrity policy. Students failing to adhere to these standards on examinations may be expelled; those guilty of academic dishonesty on term work or tests are subject to disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion. Incidents of academic dishonesty include cheating or a demonstrable intent to cheat on exams, tests or assignments. Cheating can constitute copying or paraphrasing the work of others without citation (plagiarism), viewing or using tests or exams without permission of the teacher, bringing information in any orm to the location of the exam or test without the permission of the instructor, sharing information in any form, including but not limited to, orally, by physical signs, by auditory signals, by electronic signals or by copying (or allowing to be copied) answers; or theft of the test or exam.

Roles and Responsibilities Teacher – If an incident of academic dishonesty is suspected, the teacher will assemble relevant evidence and interview the student. If the student has a satisfactory explanation, the process stops. If the student has no explanation and/or denies dishonesty, then the teacher will present the evidence to the Director of Teaching & Learning. Director of Teaching & Learning – The Director of Teaching & Learning will examine the evidence, interview the student(s) and inform parent(s). Parent(s) will be given notice of the particulars of the case at this point: what is alleged, what the policy is and what the potential outcomes are. The Director of Teaching & Learning will determine whether the student is or is not guilty of academic dishonesty. The Director of Teaching & Learning will meet with the student and inform him of the decision and sanctions, and contact parents to inform them. If, based on balance of probabilities, the student is not guilty of academic dishonesty, the process ends and the student and his parent(s) are informed.

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty The consequences of academic dishonesty on any work, assignment or test, other than an examination, will be dependent upon the severity of the case of academic dishonesty, the student’s grade level and the student’s history of academic integrity policy infractions. The student may receive sanction(s) including, but not limited to: • A letter to the teacher demonstrating an understanding of the seriousness of cheating and of what to do the next time the student needs to make a decision about academic integrity • Alternative assessments or assignments graded or not to be graded • 50% of the graded evaluation • A zero grade • Suspension of one or more days • Expulsion

Second Offences In the event of a second offence, the Head of Senior School will meet with the student and his parent(s). The student will receive a grade of zero on the test or assignment and will be required to meet with the Disciplinary Committee to determine further sanctions and recommendations, up to and including expulsion. Repeated Offences - Such conduct will result in further sanctions up to and including expulsion. The frequency of infractions of the school’s academic integrity policy is tracked for the duration of the student’s attendance at RSGC. Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College 7


Student Attendance Expectations RSGC has a set of standards by which all members of the school are expected to abide. These expectations are intended to guide students and faculty alike in their activities within the school community. For our community to function successfully, we must all work together to support the aims of the school. None of these standards, however, is absolute. In all cases, common sense will prevail. This handbook provides students with an overview of our guidelines.

Attendance Policy Academic success is directly correlated with attendance and participation in class. Students are expected to attend all classes and school activities such as Chapel services, advisor meetings, assemblies, house league, spirit and activity days. Punctuality shows respect for peers, faculty and school. Students should strive to be on time for classes, Chapel, assemblies, special meetings and practices.

Unexplained Absences All students are expected to arrive on time and attend all scheduled classes. Any student who misses more than half of a class without a valid reason provided by a parent or legal guardian will be called to a conference with Senior Administration. Any subsequent unexplained absences will lead to an in-school suspension. Third infractions will result in an out-of school suspension and a conference with the Head of School.

Late Arrival and Early Departures A student who is late for Period 1 (8:15 am) or who leaves before the school day ends must register with the office. Failure to have a parent/guardian email or phone the office will result in consequences. We cannot dismiss a student without prior consent via phone call or email.

Unexcused Lates Per Term 3rd late Student counseled by Adminstrator, plus parent notification 4th late Mandatory study hall, escalation to tiered reponse Should a student accrue five unexcused lates in a term, he will be put into a tiered response system. Any subsequent unexcused lates that term will escalate to the next tier. Tier 1: Study Hall (5 lates) Tier 2: In-school Suspension (6 lates) Tier 3: Out of School Suspension (7 lates) Tier 4: Meeting with Headmaster

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Daily Attendance The regular school day runs from 8:00 am to 2:45 pm and to 3:15 pm on Thursdays. If a student is absent from school, his parent/guardian must call the school at 416.533.6724, ext. 225. Please call in each day that the student is absent. All students must attend the morning Chapel/Assembly/Advisor session each day. Attendance at Chapel and Eucharist services is compulsory for students of all denominations. Every effort is made to include all members of the Georgian community during these services.

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Ontario Secondary School Diploma Requirements A student entering Grade 9 must complete the diploma requirements outlined by the Ontario Schools, Kindergarten to Grade 12, Policy and Program Requirements 2016 (OS) document.

To Earn the Diploma, an OSS Student Must: • Earn 18 compulsory credits • Earn 12 optional credits • Complete 40 hours of community involvement activities • Successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Component

Compulsory Courses (Total of 18) • 4 credits in English (1 credit per grade) • 1 credit in French as a second language • 3 credits in mathematics (at least 1 credit in Grade 11 or 12) • 2 credits in science • 1 credit in Canadian history • 1 credit in Canadian geography • 1 credit in the arts • 1 credit in health and physical education • 0.5 credit in civics • 0.5 credit in career studies PLUS one credit from each of the following groups: GROUP 1: 1 additional credit in English, French as a second language,** a Native language, a classical or an international language, social sciences and the humanities, Canadian and world studies; guidance and career education or cooperative education.* GROUP 2: 1 additional credit in health and physical education, the arts, business studies, French as a second language** or cooperative education.* GROUP 3: 1 additional credit in science (Grade 11 or 12), technological education, French as a second language**, computer studies or cooperative education. * A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education can count as compulsory credits. ** In groups 1, 2 and 3, a maximum of 2 credits in French as a second language can be counted as compulsory credits, one from group one and one from either group 2 or group 3.

Optional Credits (Total of 12) In addition to the 18 compulsory credits, students must earn 12 optional credits. Selection of optional courses will be determined by students’ planned career destination. Consultation with parents, classroom teachers, the Director of University Counselling and the Head of Senior School will help students determine the best optional courses for their educational program. To ensure thorough academic preparation, students are encouraged to explore a wide variety of optional courses and may choose to stay in secondary school beyond four years.

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Ontario Secondary School Certificate Requirements The Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted on request to students who leave school before earning the Ontario Secondary School Diploma provided they have earned a minimum of 14 credits, distributed as follows: Compulsory credits (total of 7) • 2 credits in English • 1 credit in Canadian geography or Canadian history • 1 credit in mathematics • 1 credit in science • 1 credit in health and physical education • 1 credit in the arts or technological education Optional credits (total of 7) • 7 credits selected by the student from available courses (Canada. Ministry of Education, Ontario. Policy and Program. Ontario Schools Kindergarten to Grade 12 : Policy and Program Requirements. Toronto: Ministry of Education, 2016. Print. Section 6.3 p 68).

Certificate Of Accomplishment Requirements Students who leave school before fulfilling the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma or the Ontario Secondary School Certificate may be granted a Certificate of Accomplishment. This certificate may be a useful means of recognizing achievement for students who plan to take certain vocational programs or other kinds of further training. Students who return to school to complete additional credit and non-credit courses will have their transcript updated but will not be issued a new Certificate of Accomplishment. The Ontario Secondary School Diploma or Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted when a student has fulfilled the appropriate requirements (Ontario Schools Kindergarten to Grade 12 : Policy and Program Requirements. Toronto: Ministry of Education, 2016. Print. Section 6.4 p 68).

Definitions Credit: A credit is awarded by the Ministry of Education for successful completion of 110 hours of study in an approved course (a half credit is 55 hours). Prerequisite Course: This is a course that is absolutely essential for the successful understanding of the subsequent course. If there is no prerequisite listed, none is required for that course. Suggested Prerequisite: This is a course recommended by a department as background preparation. Ontario Student Transcript (OST): The Ontario Student Transcript is the official record of a student’s scholastic achievement. Each course is listed along with the date of completion, the credit value and the mark achieved. Compulsory subjects are identified and the date that the diploma is earned is ultimately recorded. A permanent copy of the transcript remains with a student’s last high school. Ontario Student Record (OSR): The Ontario Student Record is the official record for a student. The OSR is maintained in the Guidance Office and contains achievement results, credits earned, diploma requirements completed and other information important to the education of the student. Students and their parents may examine the contents of the OSR. These records are protected by the Education Act and Freedom of Information legislation. Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College 11


Types of Courses Offered Grade 9 and 10 Courses The following two types of courses are offered in Grades 9 and 10: • Academic courses develop students’ knowledge and skills through the study of theory and abstract problems. These courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and explore related concepts as well. They incorporate practical applications as appropriate. • Open courses, which comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students, are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university, college or the workplace in mind. In Grades 9 and 10, students will select an appropriate combination of academic and open courses in order to add to their knowledge and skills, explore their interests and determine the type of educational program they are best suited to undertake in Grades 11 and 12. When selecting their courses in Grades 9 and 10, students are not expected to make binding decisions about a particular education or career pathway; however, they should try to ensure that they have the prerequisites required for future courses they plan to take (Ontario Schools Kindergarten to Grade 12 : Policy and Program Requirements. Toronto: Ministry of Education, 2016. Print. Section 7.2.1 p 71).

Grade 11 and 12 Courses The following types of courses are offered in Grades 11 and 12: • University preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs. • University/college preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for specific programs offered at universities and colleges. • Open courses, which comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students, are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university, college or the workplace in mind. In Grades 11 and 12, students will focus increasingly on their individual interests, and will identify and prepare for their post-secondary pathways (Ontario Schools Kindergarten to Grade 12 : Policy and Program Requirements. Toronto: Ministry of Education, 2016. Print. Section 7.2.2 p 72).

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Course Codes Course codes are adopted from the Ontario secondary school curriculum guidelines and can be interpreted as follows:

ENG1D

The Course English

The Year of Study Grade 9

The Course Type/ Destination Academic

Explanation of ENG1D: • The first three characters are from the Ministry’s list ENG-(English) of common course codes • The fourth character denotes the grade level 1 - Year 1 (Other options: 2-Grade 10; 3-Grade 11; 4-Grade 12; or for some languages courses: A, B, C, D • The fifth character describes the academic level D - Academic (Other options: see below) • The sixth character, when used, indicates a halfR - Half-credit course credit course • At RSGC, Advanced Placement courses are AP - Advanced Placement identified by adding the letters “AP” • University Preparation Courses - U To equip students with knowledge and skills for university entrance • University/College Preparation Courses - M To equip students with knowledge and skills for university or college entrance • College Preparation Courses - C To equip students with knowledge and skills for college entrance or for an apprenticeship program. • Workplace Preparation Courses - E To equip students with knowledge and skills for entry into the workforce directly after achieving the OSSD or for entrance into an apprenticeship program • Open Courses - O To broaden a student’s understanding of a given area of study. These courses are designed to complement the education of university-, college-, or workplace-bound students.

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Ontario Student Record (OSR) An information file containing report cards, an up-to-date transcript and other material pertinent to the student’s academic achievements, called the Ontario Student Record (OSR), is maintained by RSGC for each student enrolled and is retained for 55 years after graduation. A full policy document describing the Ontario Student Record can be found at http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/document/curricul/osr/osr.html.

Ontario Student Transcript (OST) The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) was developed in 1983 to provide an official and consistent record of the Ontario secondary school credit courses successfully completed by a student. The OST is kept in the student’s Ontario Student Record (OSR), which is maintained in the school administration office. A parental request to review the OSR (with or without the student in attendance) may be made to the Head of Senior School. As of September 1999, all withdrawals after the course drop date from any Grade 11 or 12 course must be recorded on the OST. As well, any repeat of a course must also be recorded on the OST and the credit is awarded to the course attempt with the highest grade upon completion. The OST will include the following: • All Grade 9 and 10 courses successfully completed by the student, with percentage grades obtained and credits earned • All Grade 11 and 12 courses completed or attempted by the student, with percentage grades obtained and credits earned; • Identification of compulsory credits, including credits that are substitutions for compulsory credits identified by the ministry as diploma requirements • Confirmation that the student has completed the 40 hours of community service • Confirmation that the student has successfully completed the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) A full policy document describing the Ontario Student Transcript can be found at http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/elemsec/ost/ost.html

Full Disclosure All courses coded with a 3 or 4 and a U, M, C or O designation are subject to the Full Disclosure Ministry Policy. All courses in which a student is registered five days after the issue of the January report will be recorded on a student’s transcript whether the course has been successfully completed or not. In addition, any repeated courses will be recorded on a student’s transcript. This information is to be made available to community colleges and universities for them to consider when making admission or scholarship decisions.

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Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) Prior learning includes the knowledge and skills that a student has acquired, in both formal and informal ways, outside of the secondary school setting. Where such learning has occurred, students may have their skills and knowledge evaluated against the expectations outlined in the provincial curriculum policy documents in order to earn credits towards the secondary school diploma. This formal evaluation and accreditation process is known as Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) and is only available in certain subject areas and to a maximum of four non-Grade 12 credits. RSGC does not offer PLAR credits at this time.

Policy for Granting Equivalency Credits It is the responsibility of the Head of Senior School to implement the policies and procedures related to the equivalency process. These must be consistent with the Ontario Ministry of Education’s policy (Ontario Schools, Kindergarten to Grade 12: Policy and Program Requirements, section 7.2.5). For regular day school students who are transferring from home schooling, a non-inspected private school or a school outside Ontario, principals will grant equivalency credits for placement purposes through the PLAR process, based on their evaluation of the student’s previous learning. The Principal of the receiving school will, in the process of deciding where the student should be placed, determine as equitably as possible the total credit equivalency of the student’s previous learning, and the number of compulsory and optional credits still to be earned. To ensure provincial consistency in establishing equivalency for students for placement purposes, the Principal will use as a guide, the table entitled Ontario Schools, Kindergarten to Grade 12: Policy and Program Requirements, Appendix 2 to determine the number of credits, including compulsory credits, that the student must earn, as well as other diploma requirements that the student must satisfy, in order to qualify for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. In cases where an adult student or the parent of a student who is not an adult disagrees with the Principal’s placement decision for students transferring to an Ontario secondary school from a noninspected private school or a school outside Ontario, the adult student or the parent may ask the appropriate Supervisory Officer to review the matter. The Principal will also ensure that all documentation relating to the granting of equivalency credits be kept in the student’s OSR and recorded in accordance with the Ontario Student Transcript (OST): Manual, 2013.

Prerequisite and Recommended Preparation Certain courses have prerequisites that must be completed before the course can be taken as mandated by the Ontario Ministry of Education. Where applicable, we have listed in the course descriptions additional recommended preparation that, in our experience, better indicates the desired level of academic background needed to succeed in the given course. Students wishing to take courses at the next grade level may need to obtain departmental permission and check course-specific prerequisites. For further information, they should consult the appropriate departmental description in this calendar. Note: In exceptional circumstances, the Head of Senior School may waive a prerequisite. This may be as a result of limited course offerings or evidence of suitable background knowledge that has been demonstrated by a student. Subject proficiency will be assessed in consultation with the department head. Appropriate documentation will be placed in the OSR when prerequisites are waived.

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Substitution for Compulsory Credits To ensure that all students can qualify for the OSSD, substitutions may be made for a limited number of compulsory credits. With permission, students may replace up to three credits (or the equivalent in halfcredits) with courses selected from the remaining courses offered by the College that met the requirements for compulsory credits. In all cases, the number of compulsory and optional credits will not be less than 30 to earn the OSSD. Substitutions will only be made to meet the special needs of students. Substitutions will be made after consultation between the student, his parents and the Head of Senior School. Each substitution will be noted in the Ontario Student Record.

Access to Outlines of Courses of Study The Director of Teaching and Learning retains on file, up-to-date copies of the outlines of courses of study for all courses offered at the school. These outlines of the courses of study must be available at the school for parents and students to examine. Information regarding access to these outlines may be obtained by contacting the school. Curriculum policy documents may be accessed through the Ministry of Education website at http://www.edu.gov. on.ca.

The Provincial Secondary School Literacy Requirement All students must successfully complete the Provincial Secondary School Literacy Requirement in order to ear an Ontario Secondary School Diploma. This requirement may be completed by: • Passing the Ontario Secondary School Liteacy Test or • Successfuly completing the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OLC4O)

Grade 10 Literacy Test During the Grade 10 year, students will be given the opportunity to write the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). The successful completion of the OSSLT is a graduation requirement for all students. The literacy test evaluates students’ reading and writing skills based on curriculum expectations in language and communications developed to the end of Grade 9. Successful completion of the OSSLT is recorded on the Ontario Student Transcript.

Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course Students must pass the OSSLT or the Ontario School Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC) in order to graduate. In June 2004, policy was changed to grant principals the discretion to allow a student to enroll in the OSSLC before he has had a second opportunity to take the OSSLT, if the principal determines that it is in the best educational interests of the student. The credit earned for successfully completing the OSSLC may be used to meet the Grade 11 or the Grade 12 compulsory credit requirement in English. If used to meet the Grade 11 requirement, the course is coded OLC3O. If used to meet the Grade 12 requirement, the course is coded OLC4O. The credit may also be used to meet the group 1 compulsory credit requirement for the OSSD. Students should check admission requirements for postsecondary institutions since the OSSLC may not be accepted as the Grade 12 English entrance requirement for college or university programs. The OSSLC may be used as a substitution to meet the requirements for compulsory credits. 16 Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College


An adjudication process exists at the end of the school year to provide certain students with an additional opportunity to meet the literacy graduation requirement. These students include those who would otherwise be eligible to graduate in June but, through no fault of their own, have not been able to take advantage of the normal opportunities to write the OSSLT and/or have not been able to enroll in or complete the OSSLC, owing to unforeseen circumstances.

Accommodations, Deferrals and Exemptions for the Provincial Literacy Test Accommodations: The necessary accommodations must be made to ensure that students who are receiving special education programs and services and who have an Individual Education Plan (IEP) have a fair and equal opportunity to successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test. The accommodations made will be the same as those that are set out in the student’s IEP and/or that are available to the student in the course of his regular school work, including examinations and other forms of evaluation. While accommodations such as alternative forms of print and extra time are acceptable, the actual content of the OSSLT must not be altered. Deferrals: Students who might benefit from a deferral of the test may include students who have been identified as exceptional and students registered in English as a second language/ English literacy development (ESL/ELD) courses who have not yet acquired the level of proficiency in English required for successfully completing the test. If a parent or adult student requests a deferral, the Head of Senior School will determine whether or not a deferral should be granted and, if so, for what period of time. The Head of Senior School may also initiate consideration of a deferral. The Head of Senior School will make his decision in consultation with the parent or adult student and appropriate school staff. Exemptions: A student whose IEP indicates that he is not working towards the attainment of a secondary school diploma may, with parental consent and the approval of the Head of Senior School, be exempted from participating in the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Requirement (Literacy Test or Literacy Course). Students who do not successfully complete the Literacy requirement will not be able to receive a secondary school diploma. Should the learning expectations contained in the student’s IEP be revised at some point so as to allow the student to work towards the attainment of the secondary school diploma, the student would be expected to successfully complete the OSSLT or the Ontario Literacy Course.

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Music Certificates Accepted for Credit 1. A maximum of one Grade 11 university/college preparation music credit may be awarded toward the OSSD for the successful completion of one of the follows: • Grade VII Practical and Intermediate Rudiments (formerly Grade I Rudiments) of the Royal Conservatory of Music, Toronto, Ontario • Grade VII Practical and Grade III Theory of Conservatory Canada, London, Ontario • Collegial I Practical and Collegial I Theory of any conservatory of music in the province of Quebec • Grade V Practical and Grade III Theory of Trinity College London, England • Grade VII Practical and Grade VI Theory of the Royal Schools of Music, England 2. A maximum of one Grade 12 university/college preparation music credit may be awarded toward the OSSD for the successful completion of one of the follows: • Grade VIII Practical and Advanced Rudiments (formerly Grade II Rudiments) of the Royal Conservatory of Music, Toronto, Ontario • Grade VIII Practical and Grade IV Theory of Conservatory Canada, London, Ontario • Collegial II Practical and Collegial II Theory of any conservatory of music in the province of Quebec • Grade VI Practical and Grade IV Theory of Trinity College London, England • Grade VIII Practical and Grade VII Theory of the Royal Schools of Music, England Please submit this document to the Head of Senior School so that the appropriate notation can be made on the Ontario Student Transcript (OST).

The Course Selection Process The course selection process is explained to students in grade meetings at the beginning of February. We also host an information meeting for parents toward the end of that month. Students are encouraged to consult with their parents, advisors, teachers, department heads and administrators as necessary to ensure that appropriate choices are made. Prior to the March break, students submit their course selections online via myRSGC. The online system remains open for approximately 10 days, during which the students have the opportunity to reflect on these choices and further discuss them with their family members. Parents and advisors are asked to sign off on final course selections. Following this, teachers and department heads will review prospective course lists. Students are then approved for entry into the courses or are referred to the Head of Senior School for further counselling.

Availability of Courses RSGC has every intention of delivering the courses listed and described in this calendar. Our small school size and the number of unique, single-section courses offered place constraints on our timetable, this includes availability of teachers and classrooms. We, therefore, reserve the right to determine whether or not a course will actually run. To best meet the needs of our students, we base our staffing and scheduling decisions on an analysis of the best use of academic resources - faculty and facility - with student enrollment per course as our guide.

Course Add/Drop Procedure All course changes, additions and deletions must be made in consultation with the Head of Senior School. A timetable change is not official unless approved through this process. The last day on which a student may add a course is the first day of class following the Thanksgiving break. The last day on which a student may delete a course is the fifth day of class following the first report card. 18 Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College


Note: If a student in Grade 11 or 12 receives permission to withdraw from a course after this time, the student’s percentage grade at the time of the withdrawal will be entered in the OST and a “W” will appear in the “credit earned” column of the OST.

Assessment and Evaluation of Student Performance RSGC’s Assessment and Evaluation practices are aligned to the guidelines outlined in Growing Success Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting in Ontario Schools, 2010. The page numbers in this document refer specifically to the Growing Success document. 1. Purpose of Assessment and Evaluation The primary purpose of student assessment and evaluation is to improve student learning (p 6). The assessment and evaluation process involves the continual gathering and interpreting evidence of student learning in a way that promotes a positive learning experience and improves student learning. Teachers’ professional judgments are at the heart of effective assessment, evaluation and reporting of student achievement (p 8). • Students understand what the course expectations are, how they are to demonstrate achievement of the expectations and how the expectations are to be assessed and evaluated • Where possible, students are provided exemplars to demonstrate standards for their work • Achievement charts will be used as a reference point for what sets the standard of the achievement of the course expectations • Students will be provided with regular and continuous feedback to help identify the necessary steps to improve their work 2. Fundamental Principles of Assessment and Evaluation The assessment and evaluation policy is based on fundamental principles that guide the collection of meaningful information that will help inform instructional decisions, promote student engagement and improve student learning (p 6). To ensure that assessment, evaluation and reporting are fair, valid and reliable, and that they lead to the improvement of learning for all students, teachers use practices and procedures that: • Are fair, transparent and equitable for all students (p 6) • Support all students to show what they have learned (p 6) • Are carefully planned to relate to the curriculum expectations and learning goals, and as much as possible, to the interest, learning styles and preferences, needs and experiences of all students (p 6) • Are clearly communicated to students and parents at the beginning of the school year or course and at other appropriate times (p 6) • Are ongoing, varied in nature and administered over a period of time to provide multiple opportunities and a variety of ways for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning (p 6) • Provide ongoing descriptive feedback that is clear, specific, meaningful and timely to support improved learning and achievement; feedback tells students what they are doing well, where improvements are needed and how to improve (p 6) • Develop students’ self-assessment skills to enable them to assess their own learning, set specific goals and plan next steps for their learning (p 6) • Include evaluations based on evidence of student learning that are consistently graded with reference to established criteria for four levels of achievement (pp 2, 19) 3. Learning Skills And Work Habits The development of learning skills and work habits are an integral part of a student’s learning and are critical to student success (pp 10, 12). Teachers work with students to help them understand and develop learning skills and work habits (p 13). Teachers assess, evaluate and report on learning skills and work habits separately from their Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College 19


assessing, evaluating and reporting on the achievement of curriculum expectations. Unless learning skills are an integral part of the Ministry Curriculum Expectations, their assessment is not included in the final grade (pp 10, 45). 4. Performance Standards—The Achievement Chart Assessment and evaluation will be based on both the content standards (overall and specific curricular expectations) and performance standards (achievement chart). Teachers ensure that student learning is assessed and evaluated in a balanced manner with respect to the four categories of knowledge and skills (knowledge and understanding, thinking, communication and application) (p 17). 5. Assessment for Learning and as Learning Assessment is the process of gathering information that accurately reflects the extent to which a student is able to understand the curriculum expectations. Assessment for the purpose of improving student learning is seen as both “assessment for learning” and “assessment as learning.” In Assessment for Learning, assessment evidence is used by the teacher to decide how to adjust teaching and learning activities. The teacher uses the evidence to determine where students are in their learning, where they need to go and how best to help the student get there by providing descriptive feedback and coaching for improvement. In Assessment as Learning, assessment evidence is used by students to improve their own learning through reflection and specific goal setting. Students use the evidence to adjust their own learning and set their own goals. Teachers obtain assessment information through a variety of means, which may include formal and informal observations, discussions, learning conversations, questioning, conferences, homework, tasks done in groups, demonstrations, projects, portfolios, developmental continua, performances, peer and self-assessments, selfreflections, essays and tests (p 29). As essential steps in assessment for learning and as learning, teachers will: • Plan assessment concurrently and integrate it seamlessly with instruction to inform instruction, guide next steps, and help teachers and students monitor students’ progress towards achieving learning goals (pp 29, 30, 33). • Identify and share specific learning goals and success criteria with students at the outset of learning to ensure that students and teachers have a common and shared understanding of these goals and criteria as learning progresses (pp 28, 32, 33). • Gather information about student learning before, during and at or near the end of a period of instruction, using a variety of assessment strategies and tools (pp 28, 34). • Give and receive specific and timely descriptive feedback that informs students about what they are doing well, what needs improvement and what specific steps they can take to improve (pp 29, 32, 34). • Help students to develop skills of peer and self-assessment including setting individual goals (pp 29, 35). 6. Assessment of Learning (Evaluation) Assessment of Learning (Evaluation) is the process of judging the quality of student learning on the basis of established performance standards and assigning a value to represent that quality (p 38). Evaluation summarizes and communicates what students know and can do with respect to the overall curriculum expectations at a particular point in time (p 39). Assessment of Learning (Evaluation): Evidence is used to make judgements about how well students are learning according to a standard. Reporting on that information takes place at the end of a unit of study or at the end of a reporting period. i. Course Work The course work grade consists of evaluations conducted throughout the year. The evaluation of student learning is the responsibility of the teacher and must not include the judgment of the student or of the student’s peers (p 39). 20 Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College


The course work grade will: • Address the achievement chart categories in a balanced manner with respect to the four categories (knowledge and understanding, thinking, communication and application) (p 17) • Represent evidence gathered from a variety of completed assessments throughout the course (p 17, 39) • Reflect the individual student’s achievement of the overall expectations (p 38) • Include evidence that is collected over time from three different sources: observations, conversations and student products (p 39) • Include assignments and tests that have been completed, whenever possible, under the supervision of a teacher and not include ongoing homework that students do to consolidate their knowledge and skills or to prepare for the next class (p 39) • Reflect individual achievement; assignments for evaluation may involve group projects as long as each student’s work within the group project is evaluated independently and assigned an individual mark (p 39) • Emphasize students’ most consistent level of achievement within a unit and throughout the year, although special considerations should be given to more recent evidence of achievement (p 41) • Include evaluations that were preceded by opportunities for students to practice skills, demonstrate knowledge and receive feedback • Be derived from evaluations that are consistent in nature and complexity across sections of a course ii. Final Evaluation Thirty per cent of the grade will be based on a final evaluation administered at or towards the end of the course. This evaluation will be based on evidence from one or a combination of the following: • An examination • A performance • An essay • Another method of evaluation suitable to the course content The final evaluation allows the student an opportunity to demonstrate comprehensive achievement of the overall expectations of the course. Final evaluations happen in June. 7. Responsibilities of Teachers and Students Teachers and students assume a number of responsibilities as they jointly engage in assessment and evaluation practices that promote and support learning. Teachers will: • Discuss assessment and evaluation practices, including grading procedures, with students at the beginning of each course based on a course information sheet or a written outline distributed to students and parents (p 6) • Describe specific evaluation criteria to students prior to each assessment and evaluate students based on their achievement of these criteria • Use exemplars and samples of student work where possible to model levels of achievement • Use a variety of assessment and evaluation methods including observation, conversation and student products (p 39) • Ensure that assessment and evaluation tasks are based on both the content standards (curriculum expectations and the performance standards achievement chart categories and standards) (p 16) • Ensure that student learning is assessed and evaluated in a balanced manner with respect to the four achievement chart categories (knowledge and understanding, thinking, communication and application) and that achievement of particular expectations is considered within the appropriate categories (p 17) • Assess and evaluate student work with reference to established criteria for levels of achievement that are standard across the province, rather than by comparison with work done by other students, through the ranking of student performance or with reference to performance standards developed by individual teachers for their own classrooms (p 19) Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College 21


• Use professional judgment to determine which specific expectations should be used to evaluate achievement of the overall expectations and which ones will be accounted for instruction and assessment but not necessarily evaluated (p 38) • Provide students with opportunities to demonstrate learning over time (p 29) • Provide regular, descriptive feedback to support student self-knowledge and promote student success (pp 29, 32, 34) • Take steps to avoid and address late and missing assignments (see Late and Missed Assignments) • Emphasize the learning skills and work habits including the importance of timeliness as a life skill Students’ Responsibilities Students will: • Demonstrate their learning by providing evidence of their understanding, knowledge and skills within established assessment and evaluation timelines (p 42) • Participate in the process of assessment and evaluation to support their development as self-directed learners and informed decision-makers (p 42) • Self-assess and self-evaluate when appropriate to check, track and deepen their understanding • Meet assessment deadlines (p 42) • Take the initiative to seek extra assistance when needed and in a timely manner • Submit their own work • Seek to improve their learning skills and work habits

Late Assignment Policy Knights’ Support The Knights’ Support (KS) is unique to RSGC. We require students who have not finished major assignments on schedule to attend the KS after school where they are given the guidance and time to complete their work. Procedure • Students can be mandated to attend the KS only for a major assignment that has been posted to the grade calendar and on the teacher’s Haiku page. • Failure to submit on the due date results in the subject teacher being able to email student names to the “Knights’ Support” email account. The student and advisor are then informed of the KS referral. • Teachers may utilize their judgment and discretion in granting extensions and working out a plan with an individual student before submitting name to KS. • The assignment must be submitted to the KS by 4:00 pm no later than the fifth day following the referral. Fifteen per cent is deducted from the assignment and whatever work is completed will be evaluated with the remainder of incomplete work being graded as a zero. • There is a graduated approach to KS. • First referral in a co-curricular term: Boy has three days to clear his name before attending the Learning Centre for support on that day and missing any co-curricular for two more days before the assignment grades 0. • Second referral in a co-curricular term: Boy has two days to clear his name before attending the Learning Centre that day for support and missing any co-curricular for four more days before the assignment grades 0. • Parents are included on the email notification of this occurrence. • Third referral in a co-curricular term: Boy must attend the Learning Centre the next day and miss co-curriculars until the assignment is completed to a maximum of seven days before the assignment grades 0. Starting on the day following the referral, the student is withdrawn from his co-curricular commitments and must attend the KS. 22 Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College


• Any subsequent referrals in a term: Boy has meeting with Head of Senior School and parent. Strategies are devised to help with work completion. Consequences for Not Attending the KS The KS is an extension of the classroom. Students who choose not to attend will be subject to consequences associated with the skipping of any class. ** All time referrals include weekends in the count

Evaluation Days Attendance at final evaluation sessions is compulsory. Students and parents are requested not to make any other plans during the formal evaluation schedule in June. Students who miss a final evaluation will receive zero for the evaluation unless the absence is verified and legitimate. In order for the absence to be considered legitimate, the student must have visited his family doctor, a hospital emergency department or a recognized health care practitioner and provide the Head of Senior School with a medical certificate stating the exact date(s) the student was seen for treatment. For any other absence to be considered legitimate, approval of the exceptional circumstance must be given by the Headmaster or the Head of Senior School. Students missing an evaluation because of a verified legitimate absence will not be academically penalized and they will receive aegrotat standing for the final evaluation.

Reporting Student Achievement to Parents • Report cards are produced and distributed in February and June. These reports are evaluative and contain percentage grades. They also include anecdotal comments from teachers. • An interim report card is available to families in November. • Up-to-date cumulative marks are available online, 24 hours a day and seven days a week, to students via a secure password-protected website. • Percentage grades on report cards are cumulative and represent the student’s overall achievement to date in a given course. • Copies of student reports are kept on file at the school as part of the student’s Ontario Student Record (OSR). • Questions regarding evaluations should first be directed to the subject teacher and then, if necessary, to the Director of Teaching & Learning.

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Recognition of Academic Achievement Throughout the academic year, RSGC takes pride in recognizing the accomplishments of its students in a variety of ways. Only students meeting minimum course load expectations are eligible for the following recognition.

Academic Breakfasts Qualifying students and their parents are invited to attend a special breakfast, hosted by the faculty, to recognize categories of achievement following the first term report.

Proficiency Awards Students earning the designation of The Headmaster’s Honour Roll will also be recognized at this special ceremony.

AP® Scholar Board RSGC recognizes those students demonstrating substantial university level achievement through Advanced Placement courses of study. The names of those students scoring 3 or higher on three or more full-year AP® exams earn a permanent entry on the AP® Scholar Board.

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Community Involvement According to the Ministry of Education, all students must complete a minimum of 40 hours of unpaid community service before graduating from high school. This requirement is in addition to the 30 credits needed for the OSSD. The community involvement requirement is designed to encourage students to develop an awareness and understanding of civic responsibility, and of the role they can play in supporting and strengthening their communities. Students choose their own community service activities, within guidelines provided by RSGC under the direction of our Community Service Coordinator. Students are responsible for fulfilling this requirement on their own time and for keeping a record of their activities. Below is a list of events and organizations in which RSGC students have supported over the years in fulfilling community involvement: • Sorting food at food banks such as The Daily Bread Food Bank and Stop 103 • Working with children at the Bloorview MacMillan Centre • Selling toques for Raising the Roof • Tutoring students from Ryerson Community School • Visiting with the elderly at various seniors’ homes • Working at Habitat for Humanity’s Restore • Serving food at Out of the Cold Programs or the Yonge Street Mission • Playing with kids through Right to Play • Tree planting initiatives • Volunteering in one-day events such as the CN Tower Climb for the United Way and the CIBC Run for the Cure for the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation

Ineligible Activities The ministry has developed a list of activities that may not be chosen as community involvement activities. These are referred to as ineligible activities. An ineligible activity is an activity that: • Is a requirement of a class or course in which the student is enrolled (eg., cooperative education portion of a course, job shadowing, work experience) • Takes place during the time allotted for the instructional program on a school day. However, an activity that takes place during the student’s lunch breaks or “spare” periods is permissible • Takes place in a logging or mining environment, if the student is under 16 years of age • Takes place in a factory, if the student is under 15 years of age • Takes place in a workplace other than a factory, if the student is under 14 years of age and is not accompanied by an adult • Would normally be performed for wages by a person in the workplace • Involves the operation of a vehicle, power tools or scaffolding • Involves the administration of any type or form of medication or medical procedure to other persons • Involves handling of substances classed as “designated substances” under the Occupational Health and Safety Act • Requires the knowledge of a tradesperson whose trade is regulated by the provincial government • Involves banking or the handling of securities, or the handling of jewellery, works of art, antiques or other valuables • Consists of duties normally performed in the home (eg., daily chores) or personal recreational activities • Involves activities for a court-ordered program (eg., community-service program for young offenders, probationary program)

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Guidance The purpose of Student Support Services is to coordinate support for students in order to promote optimum success. It strives to provide effective, appropriate, meaningful and accessible services to all students. Each student in the Senior School is assigned a faculty advisor who is the primary contact for home-school communication relating to all aspects of school life. The advisor will monitor academic progress and socialemotional development and will come to know your son well during his high school years.

Head of Senior School The Head of the Senior School provides leadership to faculty and students by overseeing all aspects of the operation of the College. Together with the Director of Teaching and Learning, the Head works to provide programmatic excellence.

Director of University Counselling Our University Counsellor works with students and parents in all grades to help them prepare for the university application and admission process. This process intensifies early in the fall of the graduating year with a series of individual counselling appointments and an advisor time devoted to arranging visits to university campuses and completing applications for admission and scholarship. Every fall, RSGC arranges for a host of presentations at the school by university representatives, both Canadian and international. Additionally, we arrange three parent information nights: one for parents of graduating students; one for parents of students in Grades 8 through 11 and one specifically geared towards “competitive” university admissions (US, UK or select Canadian programmes).

Chaplain Our school has a full-time Chaplain on staff who is prepared to assist students of any faith at any time for any reason. He coordinates our religious services and counsels students on spiritual or other matters.

Counselling Services Our school social worker promotes awareness of matters relating to personal well-being. She is also available to counsel students and families on any issues that may affect a student’s achievement and his emotional development.

Learning Centre Coordinator Our Learning Centre Coordinator works with students in all grades, helping them learn to manage their time effectively, develop appropriate study habits and create strategies to support their individual learning styles. She collaborates with subject teachers to deliver a variety of workshops related to study skills, test preparation and organization. The Learning Centre Coordinator also provides specialized support for students with learning exceptionalities and designs Individual Education Plans (IEPs) for students who have up-to-date assessments on file.

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The Learning Centre The RSCG Learning Centre is committed to providing support to every Senior School student. Our classrooms are inclusive and welcome a diversity of learning styles. Learning Centre policies are designed to ensure that the special education needs of individual learners are met within this context. Learning strategies are instructional strategies to help students attend, listen, read, comprehend and study more effectively. Strategies are established on a student’s individual learning style and needs. These strategies include, but are not limited to, improved memory, writing techniques, reading comprehension techniques, organizational and test-taking skills. RSGC offers Learning Strategies Support Services (to students with identified documented learning needs) to enhance the instructional needs of students and to provide them with ongoing support while they continue their academic studies. The Learning Centre team ensures students with exceptional learning needs are identified and accommodated through an IEP. The team will work with teachers to ensure that differentiated instruction is provided in the classroom for all students in Grades 9-12. In addition, more personalized support will be provided to students with exceptionalities both in and out of the classroom. The student plays an important role in this process. He will come to understand that learning differences are part of our diverse learning environment at RSGC. Part of a student’s role is to learn to self-advocate. The Learning Centre team promotes self-advocacy and works will students as they learn to apply these important life skills. All students are welcome to use the Learning Centre throughout the school day. Coaching sessions related to organizational, time management, executive functioning and study skills are scheduled after school. Additional academic support is also provided on a drop-in basis for students before school, during lunch hour, after school, as well as during spare periods for students in Grades 11 and 12. The main focus of student support provided through the Senior School Learning Centre is to ensure that students are supported so that they can experience academic success as they progress through Grades 9-12 at RSGC.

Summary of Services Provided through the RSGC Learning Centre • Individual student support • Small group support • Executive functioning skills coaching • Remedial support in all subject areas • Study skills development • Counselling for test anxiety • Assistance for students with documented learning needs • Parent consultation • Faculty consultation • Test supervision • Workshops/training sessions • Tutor referral • Psycho educational testing referral • Individual education plans

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Library Services The primary focus of the library is to provide educational resources for faculty and students. These resources include print and non-print materials, as well as computerized access to information. Materials are selected primarily to support the school curriculum as well as the broader interests of the RSGC community. Students are taught critical thinking, location and retrieval skills as well as an understanding that information comes in a variety of forms. Strong emphasis is placed on the use of computers to access, retrieve and manipulate data. Students are assisted to develop their ability to evaluate and synthesize information through the research process.

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ACADEMIC PROGRAM RSGC is a university preparatory school. We are very proud of our long tradition of teaching excellence and success in preparing young men to enter the academic program and university of their choice. Our school promotes a liberal arts education as the best way to ensure that graduates will meet the challenges presented by a rapidly changing society. Students are exposed to two years of compulsory Arts, Languages and Physical Education. RSGC is a nurturing community that supports students throughout their years in the Senior School. Each of these years has a grade coordinator who serves as a team leader and meets regularly with the students’ subject teachers. Together, they discuss areas of common interest and concern to ensure that each student reaches his full potential. *Copies of all outlines of courses of study are filed in the Senior School Office and are available upon request from the Head of Senior School.

Course Load RSGC recognizes that life calls upon a person to balance the many demands placed upon him. By expecting students to carry a minimum course load in each of their years at the College, we aim to prepare the student to meet the challenges of life.

Grade Level 9 10 11 12

Minimum Course Load 8 8 7 6

Grade 11 or 12 students who wish to reduce their course load below the minimum requirements above must meet directly with the Head of Senior School for approval. All course adds and drops must also be approved by the Head of Senior School in consultation with the student’s subject teacher and advisor.

Enrichment Students looking for enrichment will find teachers who are capable of meeting their needs within the traditional classroom environment. Students excelling in various areas of the curriculum are met with challenging and enriched experiences. Many of our courses offer opportunities to explore concepts beyond ministry requirements taught by a committed faculty who challenge students individually. We offer an opportunity to enroll in preAP® type courses in French and Mathematics in the first two years of the Senior School, followed by an array of Advanced Placement (AP®) course options in the final two years.

Grades 9 & 10 Students with a high proficiency in the French language may be offered placement in our literature emphasis course, where there is a focus on text analysis and oral communication. Mathematics offers an enrichment opportunity for students who have a high proficiency in numeracy and problem solving skills. Although the course does not accelerate the secondary program, it goes deeper into problem-solving by exploring some of the topics covered through the AP® Calculus B course. In Science, opportunity is provided outside of the classroom on a regular basis to experience enrichment through field trips, contests or hands-on curriculum experiences in topics outside of the regular course. Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College 29


Grades 11 & 12 Enrichment at the Grade 11 & 12 level is delivered through both enriched and AP® courses. Similar to the Grade 9 & 10 programs, enrichment in Mathematics continues to be offered. Students may be offered placement or continue in the enriched math program. In addition, some departments begin to offer the AP® courses in Grade 11, with the majority of AP® courses being offered during Grade 12. Please refer to the Advanced Placement section for more details about this specialized program.

PSAT We ask all Grade 10 students to participate in the Preliminary SAT (PSAT) offered by the College Board in the fall. The PSAT identifies strengths and weaknesses in three distinct areas: Critical Reading, Writing and Mathematics. The score report the students receive provides feedback on 12 critical learning skills. This helps the individual teacher provide more directed instruction in these areas for each student. In addition to the feedback on learning skills, it also indicates in which AP® courses students may experience success.

Advanced Placement Program Highly motivated students looking for a rigorous academic program can enroll in AP® courses offered at RSGC. An AP® course is the equivalent to a first year university course and successful students receive academic credit or advanced standing at participating universities in Canada, the US and overseas. AP® courses are administered by the American College Board and are taught in more than 15,000 schools worldwide. A standardized AP® examination is administered worldwide during the second and third weeks of May, results of which are coded on a 5-point scale defined as follows: 5 – Extremely Well Qualified 4 – Well Qualified 3 – Qualified 2 – Possibly Qualified 1 – Not Recommended We currently offer the following AP® courses at RSGC: Biology English Language & Composition Macroeconomics Physics C Calculus AB English Literature Microeconomics Research Chemistry French Language & Culture Physics 1 Seminar

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AP Capstone™ AP Capstone™ is an innovative diploma program that provides students with an opportunity to engage in

rigorous scholarly practice of the core academic skills necessary for successful college completion. The program is built on the foundation of two courses – AP® Seminar and AP® Research – and is designed to complement and enhance the in-depth, discipline-specific study provided through AP® courses. It cultivates curious, independent and collaborative scholars, and prepares them to make logical, evidence-based decisions.

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PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS

COMPULSORY COURSES

THE GRADE 9 PROGRAM

ENGLISH, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC ENG1D

FOUNDATION YEAR It is in Grade 9 that students establish many of the patterns that carry them through the remaining three years of high school. For that reason, we call it the Foundation Year. All students in the Foundation Year undertake a common program and carry a course load of 8 credits. This includes 7 mandatory credits and 1 elective from the department of the Arts.

Course

Credits

English Mathematics (Regular or Enriched) Science

1 1

French (Core or Literature) Geography Physical Education Media Arts - Part 1 Civics Arts Elective: Drama/Visual Arts Instrumental Music Choral Music Total Credits

1

1

1 1 .5 .5 1 8

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This course is designed to develop the oral communication, reading, writing and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. The course is intended to prepare students for the Grade 10 academic English course, which leads to university or college preparation courses in Grades 11 and 12.

PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC MPM1D

This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of technology and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.


PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC (ENRICHED) MPM1D-E

This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. Our enriched program is designed to serve our most mathematically adept students and to provide skills and knowledge at a superior level that supports their ongoing success in pure and applied mathematics. Through a combination of enrichment and extension, students will be confronted with greater variety and profundity of problemsolving challenges, as well as previews of additional topics from upcoming years and from outside the traditional curriculum. Together, enrichment and extension will not only develop a more robust problem-solving toolkit, but also broaden their overall knowledge base. Topics typically previewed at the Grade 9 level would include refining average rate of change, binomial expansion and factoring based on product sum pairs, exponential growth and decay.

SCIENCE, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC SNC1D

This course enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to relate science to technology, society and the environment. Throughout the course, students will develop their skills in the processes of scientific investigation. Students will acquire an understanding of scientific theories and conduct investigations related to sustainable ecosystems; atomic and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; the study of the universe and its properties and components; and the principles of electricity.

CORE FRENCH, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC FSF1D Prerequisite: Minimum of 600 hours of elementary Core French instruction or equivalent.

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate and interact in French with increasing independence, with a focus on familiar topics related to their daily lives. Students will continue to develop language knowledge and skills by using languagelearning strategies introduced in the elementary Core French program, and will apply creative and critical thinking skills in various ways. They will also enhance their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop the skills necessary to become life-long language learners.

CORE FRENCH, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC FSF1D–L (LITERATURE) Recommended preparation: Competence in the French language or departmental permission. Prerequisite: Minimum of 600 hours of elementary Core French instruction or equivalent.

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate and interact in French with increasing independence, with a focus on familiar topics related to their daily lives. Students will continue to develop language knowledge and skills by using languagelearning strategies introduced in the elementary Core French program, and will apply creative and critical thinking skills in various ways. They will also enhance their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop the skills necessary to become life-long language learners. This course emphasizes the expansion of students’ oral communication, reading and writing skills in French through the study of themes that reflect their interests. Students will apply their knowledge of French in discussions, debates, dramatizations and oral presentations. Students will read and write in a variety of forms (eg., poems, articles, brochures and essays), and study short stories and novels intended for a French speaking audience.

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ISSUES IN CANADIAN GEOGRAPHY, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC CGC1D

CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP, GRADE 10, OPEN CHV2O (0.5 CREDIT)

HEALTHY ACTIVE LIVING EDUCATION, GRADE 9, OPEN PPL1O

This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate and express informed opinions about a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.

This course examines interrelationships within and between Canada’s natural and human systems and how these systems interconnect with those in other parts of the world. Students will explore environmental, economic and social geographic issues relating to topics such as transportation options, energy choices and urban development. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate various geographic issues and to develop possible approaches for making Canada a more sustainable place to live.

This course emphasizes regular participation in a variety of enjoyable physical activities that promote lifelong healthy active living. Students will learn movement skills and principles, ways to improve personal fitness and physical competence, and safety and injury prevention. They will investigate issues related to healthy sexuality and the use and abuse of alcohol, tobacco,and other drugs, and will participate in activities designed to develop goal-setting, communication and social skills.

MEDIA ARTS - PART 1 GRADE 10, OPEN ASM2O-R (0.5 CREDIT)

This half-credit course to be paired with CHV2O, Grade 10, Open. This course enables students to create media art works by exploring new media, emerging technologies such as digital animation, and a variety of traditional art forms such as film, photography, video, and visual arts. Students will acquire communication skills that are transferable beyond the media arts classroom and develop an understanding of responsible practices related to the creative process. Students will develop the skills necessary to create and interpret media art works.

34 Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College

Half-credit course to be paired with ASM2O-R, Grade 10, Open.

ELECTIVE COURSES DRAMA-PART 1, GRADE 9, OPEN ADA1O-R (0.5 CREDIT)

Half-credit course to be paired with Visual Arts, AVI1O-R. This course provides opportunities for students to explore dramatic forms and techniques using material from a wide range of sources and cultures. Students will use the elements of drama to examine situations and issues that are relevant to their lives. Students will create, perform, discuss and analyse drama, and then reflect on the experiences to develop an understanding of themselves, the art form and the world around them.


VISUAL ARTS-PART 1, GRADE 9, OPEN practices related to music, and will develop a variety of skills transferable to other areas of their life. AVI1O-R (0.5 CREDIT) Half-credit course to be paired with Drama, ADA1O-R.

This course is exploratory in nature, offering an overview of visual arts as a foundation for further study. Students will become familiar with the elements and principles of design, and the expressive qualities of various materials by using a range of media, processes, techniques and styles. Students will use the creative and critical analysis processes, and will interpret art within a personal, contemporary and historical context.

Course note: No previous music experience required; however, students enrolling in this course will be placed according to their understanding of elementary theory and prior experience (if applicable).

CHORAL MUSIC, GRADE 9, OPEN AMV1O

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience and is aimed at developing technique, sensitivity and imagination. Students will develop musical literacy INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC, GRADE 9, OPEN skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range AMI1O of reflective and analytical activities. Students will This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience develop an understanding of the conventions and elements of music and of safe practices related to and is aimed at developing technique, sensitivity music, and will develop a variety of skills transferable and imagination. Students will develop musical to other areas of their life. literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop an understanding of the conventions and elements of music and of safe

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THE GRADE 10 PROGRAM

COMPULSORY COURSES

TRANSITION YEAR Students in Grade 10 carry a course load of 9 credits. This includes 5.5 compulsory credits, one Language elective, one Arts elective, one Outdoor Ed elective (0.5 credit) and an additional elective from the list below.

Course

Credits

English

1

Mathematics (Regular or Enriched) Science Canadian History Physical Education Small Group Activities (Judo) Career Studies (online) The Arts: Choral Music Drama Instrumental Music Media Arts Visual Arts Modern Languages: French (Core or Literature) Spanish Additional Electives: Entrepreneurship: The Venture Computer Studies A second Arts elective A second Language elective Outdoor Ed. Credit PAD30

Total Credits

1 1 1 1 0.5

1

1

1

0.5 9

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ENGLISH, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC ENG2D Prerequisite: ENG1D

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 university or college preparation course.

PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC MPM2D Prerequisite: MPM1D

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.


PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC (ENRICHED) MPM2D-E Prerequisite: MPM1D

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problemsolving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. Our enriched program is designed to serve our most mathematically adept students and provide skills and knowledge at a superior level that supports their ongoing success in pure and applied mathematics. Through a combination of enrichment and extension, students will be confronted with greater variety and profundity of problem-solving challenges, as well as previews of additional topics from upcoming years and from outside the traditional curriculum. Together, enrichment and extension will not only develop a more robust problem-solving toolkit, but also broaden their overall knowledge base. Topics typically previewed at the Grade 10 level would include: algebraic work in three dimensions, exponential laws and solving problems involving exponential growth.

CANADIAN HISTORY SINCE WORLD WAR I, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC CHC2D

This course explores social, economic and political developments and events, and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community and the impact of various individuals, organizations and events on Canadian identity, citizenship and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.

HEALTHY ACTIVE LIVING EDUCATION, GRADE 10, OPEN PPL2O

This course emphasizes regular participation in a variety of enjoyable physical activities that promote lifelong healthy active living. Student learning will include the application of movement principles to refine skills; participation in a variety of activities that enhance personal competence, fitness and health; examination of issues related to healthy sexuality, healthy eating, substance use and abuse; and the use of informed decision-making, conflict resolution and social skills in making personal choices.

SCIENCE, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC SNC2D Prerequisite: SNC1D

This course enables students to enhance their understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and of the interrelationships between science, technology, society and the environment. Students are also given opportunities to further develop their scientific investigation skills. Students will plan and conduct investigations and develop their understanding of scientific theories related to the connections between cells and systems in animals and plants; chemical reactions, with a particular focus on acid‚ base reactions; forces that affect climate and climate change; and the interaction of light and matter. Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College 37


SMALL GROUP ACTIVITIES (JUDO), GRADE 10, OPEN PAI2O

This course emphasizes regular participation in a variety of enjoyable physical activities that promote lifelong healthy active living. Student learning will include the application of movement principles to refine skills; participation in a variety of activities that enhance personal competence, fitness, and health; examination of issues related to healthy sexuality, healthy eating, substance use and abuse; and the use of informed decision-making, conflict resolution and social skills in making personal choices. In this course, students will study Judo techniques covering all requirements from yellow belt to green belt syllabus, competition rules, judo history, as well as develop mentorship skills further expanding their practice of Judo principles.

Note: Students must choose one of the following Modern Languages as their language option in Grade 10:

CORE FRENCH, GRADE 10 ACADEMIC FSF2D Prerequisite: FSF1D

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate in French about personally relevant, familiar and academic topics in real-life situations with increasing independence. Students will exchange information, ideas and opinions with others in guided and increasingly spontaneous spoken interactions. Students will continue to develop their language knowledge and skills through the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. They will also increase their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will continue to develop the skills necessary to become life-long language learners.

HEALTHY LIVING AND OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES - PART 1, GRADE 11, OPEN CORE FRENCH, GRADE 10, (0.5 CREDIT*) ACADEMIC PAD30-R FSF2D–L (LITERATURE) This course enables students to further develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices now and lead healthy, active lives in the future. Through participation in a wide range of physical activities and exposure to a broader range of activity settings, students enhance their movement competence, personal fitness and confidence. Students also acquire an understanding of the factors and skills that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them. Students build their sense of self, learn to interact positively with others and develop their ability to think critically and creatively.

Prerequisite: FSF1D

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate in French about personally relevant, familiar and academic topics in real-life situations with increasing independence. Students will exchange information, ideas and opinions with others in guided and increasingly spontaneous spoken interactions. Students will continue to develop their language knowledge and skills through the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. They will also increase their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will continue to develop the skills necessary to become life-long language learners. In addition, the Literature course will examine a variety of works form various genres. Students will analyze these works and produce written assignments and presentations. The use of correct grammar and appropriate language conventions will be emphasized throughout the course.

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SPANISH LANGUAGE, LEVEL 1, ACADEMIC LWSBD

This course is designed to enable students to begin to communicate with native Spanish speakers. Students will use simple language and read age and language appropriate passages for various purposes. They will explore aspects of the culture of countries where Spanish is spoken, including social customs and the arts, by participating in cultural events and activities involving both print and technological resources. Students will develop and apply their speaking skills in a variety of contexts, and will participate in activities that will improve their reading comprehension and writing skills.

CAREER STUDIES, GRADE 10, OPEN GLC2O

BLENDED

This course teaches students how to develop and achieve personal goals for future learning, work, and community involvement. Students will assess their interests, skills, and characteristics and investigate current economic and workplace trends, work opportunities, and ways to search for work. The course explores postsecondary learning and career options, prepares students for managing work and life transitions, and helps students focus on their goals through the development of a career plan.

ELECTIVE ARTS COURSES Students must choose one of the following Arts options in Grade 10:

DRAMA, GRADE 10, OPEN ADA2O

This course provides opportunities for students to explore dramatic forms, conventions and techniques. Students will explore a variety of dramatic sources from various cultures and representing a range of genres. Students will use the elements of drama in creating and communicating through dramatic works. Students will assume responsibility for decisions made in the creative and collaborative processes and will reflect on their experiences.

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC, GRADE 10, OPEN AMI2O This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop their understanding of musical conventions, practices and terminology, and apply the elements of music in a range of activities. They will also explore the function of music in society with reference to the self, communities and cultures.

CHORAL MUSIC, GRADE 10, OPEN AMV2O

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop their understanding of musical conventions, practices and terminology, and apply the elements of music in a range of activities. They will also explore the function of music in society with reference to the self, communities and cultures.

MEDIA ARTS, GRADE 11, U/C PREPARATION ASM3M Prerequisite: ASM2O This course focuses on the development of media arts skills through the production of art works involving traditional and emerging technologies, tools, and techniques such as new media, computer animation, and web environments. Students will explore the evolution of media arts as an extension of traditional art forms, use the creative process to produce effective media art works, and critically analyse the unique characteristics of this art form. Students will examine the role of media artists in shaping audience perceptions of identity, culture, and values. Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College 39


VISUAL ARTS, GRADE 10, OPEN AVI2O

This course enables students to develop their skills in producing and presenting art by introducing them to new ideas, materials and processes for artistic exploration and experimentation. Students will apply the elements and principles of design when exploring the creative process. Students will use the critical analysis process to reflect on and interpret art within a personal, contemporary and historical context.

ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES Students may choose a second Modern Language elective from the previous list, a second Arts elective from the previous list or one of the following other electives:

ENTREPRENEURSHIP: THE VENTURE, GRADE 11, COLLEGE PREPARATION BDI3C

This course introduces students to the world of business. Students will develop an understanding of the functions of business, including accounting, marketing, information and communication technology, human resources and production, and of the importance of ethics and social responsibility. This course builds a foundation for further studies in business and helps students develop the business knowledge and skills they will need in their everyday lives.

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER STUDIES - PART 1, GRADE 10 OPEN (0.5 CREDIT*) ICS2O-R

*Half credit course to be paired with Introduction to Computer Studies - Part 2, ICS20-R. This course introduces students to computer programming. Students will plan and write simple computer programs by applying fundamental programming concepts, and learn to create clear and maintainable internal documentation. They will also learn to manage a computer by studying hardware configurations, software selection, operating system functions, networking and safe computing practices. Students will also investigate the social impact of computer technologies and develop an understanding of environmental and ethical issues related to the use of computers.

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER STUDIES - PART 2, GRADE 10 OPEN (0.5 CREDIT*) ICS2O-R

*Half-credit course to be paired with Introduction to Computer Studies - Part 1, ICS2O-R. This course introduces students to computer programming. Students will plan and write simple computer programs by applying fundamental programming concepts, and learn to create clear and maintainable internal documentation. They will also learn to manage a computer by studying hardware configurations, software selection, operating system functions, networking, and safe computing practices. Students will also investigate the social impact of computer technologies, and develop an understanding of environmental and ethical issues related to the use of computers. RSGC’s Enriched Computer Studies half-course focuses on the study of computer hardware from the very basic levels of analog and digital circuitry, to arithmetic and logic functions, through to interfacing techniques. Safe computing practices as well as societal implications of technologies are also covered. Technical report-writing skills are also introduced and developed.

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THE GRADE 11 PROGRAM

COMPULSORY COURSES

SPECIALIZATION YEAR

ENGLISH

Students in Grade 11 carry a minimum course load of 7 credits. This includes 3 mandatory credits: English, Mathematics and Science*. The other electives should be based on specific academic interests. Academic counselling is provided by the student’s advisor, the Head of Senior School and the Director of University Counselling.

Course

Credits

English (ENG3U-AP) Mathematics (Choose MCR3U, MCF3M or MCR3U enriched) Sciences*: Biology Chemistry Physics Electives from the following departments: The Arts Business Studies Canadian & World Studies Computer & Information Science English Mathematics Modern Languages Physical Education Sciences Social Sciences & the Humanities Total Credits

1 1

1

4 or 5

ENGLISH AND AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION ENG3U-AP Prerequisite: ENG2D

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyze challenging literary texts from various periods, countries and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity, and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course. The AP® English Language and Composition course requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize and cite research to support their arguments. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in nonfiction texts.

7-8

*Students are not required to enroll in a Science course if they have successfully completed one of FSF2D, FSF2D-L, ICS2O-R/TEL3M-R.

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MATHEMATICS FUNCTIONS, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION MCR3U Prerequisite: MPM2D

This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

FUNCTIONS, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION (ENRICHED) MCR3U-E Prerequisite: MPM2D

This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. Our enriched program is designed to serve our most mathematically adept students and provide skills and knowledge at a superior level that supports their ongoing success in pure and applied mathematics. Through a combination of enrichment and extension, students will be confronted with greater variety and profundity of problem-solving challenges, as well as previews of additional topics from upcoming years and from outside the traditional curriculum. Together, enrichment and extension will not only develop a more robust problem42 Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College

solving toolkit, but also broaden their overall knowledge base. Topics typically previewed at the Grade 11 level would include solving problems involving exponential growth using logarithms, sum, difference and double angle formulae for sine and cosine.

FUNCTIONS AND APPLICATIONS, GRADE 11, U/C PREPARATION MCF3M Prerequisite: MPM2D or MFM2P

This course introduces basic features of the function by extending students’ experiences with quadratic relations. It focuses on quadratic, trigonometric and exponential functions and their use in modelling real-world situations. Students will represent functions numerically, graphically and algebraically; simplify expressions; solve equations and solve problems relating to applications. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

MATHEMATICS OF DATA MANAGEMENT, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION MDM4U Prerequisite: MCF3M or MCR3U

This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analysing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences and the humanities will find this course of particular interest.


AP® STATISTICS AND MATHEMATICS OF DATA MANAGEMENT, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION MDM4U-AP

Prerequisite: MCF3M or MCR3U This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analysing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest. The AP® Statistics course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving and writing as they build conceptual understanding.

SCIENCES Students may choose more than one science course.

BIOLOGY, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION SBI3U

CHEMISTRY, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION SCH3U Prerequisite: SNC2D Recommended preparation: SNC2D (75%+)

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds, chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions, solutions and solubility, and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.

PHYSICS, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION SPH3U Prerequisite: SNC2D Recommended preparation: SNC2D (75%+)

This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore kinematics, with an emphasis on linear motion, different kinds of forces, energy transformations, the properties of mechanical waves and sound, and electricity and magnetism. They will enhance their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics. In addition, they will analyse the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

Prerequisite: SNC2D Recommended preparation: SNC2D (75%+)

This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biodiversity, evolution, genetic processes, the structure and function of animals, and the anatomy, growth and function of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of the topics under study and helps students refine skills related to scientific investigation.

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ELECTIVE COURSES THE ARTS DRAMA, GRADE 11, U/C PREPARATION ADA3M Prerequisite: ADA1O or ADA2O

This course requires students to create and perform in dramatic presentations. Students will analyse, interpret and perform dramatic works from various cultures and time periods. Students will research various acting styles and conventions that could be used in their presentations, and analyse the functions of playwrights, directors, actors, designers, technicians and audiences.

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC, GRADE 11, U/C PREPARATION AMI3M Prerequisite: AMI1O or AMI2O

This course provides students with opportunities to develop their musical literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis and performance of music, including traditional, commercial and art music. Students will apply the creative process when performing appropriate technical exercises and repertoire, and will employ the critical analysis processes when reflecting on, responding to and analysing live and recorded performances. Students will consider the function of music in society and the impact of music on individuals and communities. They will explore how to apply skills developed in music to their life and careers.

CHORAL MUSIC, GRADE 11, U/C PREPARATION AMV3M Prerequisite: AMV1O or AMV2O

This course provides students with opportunities to develop their musical literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis, and performance of music, including traditional, commercial, and art music. Students will apply the creative process when performing appropriate technical 44 Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College

exercises and repertoire and will employ the critical analysis processes when reflecting on, responding to, and analysing live and recorded performances. Students will consider the function of music in society and the impact of music on individuals and communities. They will explore how to apply skills developed in music to their life and careers.

MEDIA ARTS, GRADE 11, U/C PREPARATION ASM4M Prerequisite: ASM3M

This course emphasizes the refinement of media skills through the creation of a thematic body of work, by applying traditional and emerging technologies, tools, and techniques such as multimedia, computer animation, installation art, and performance art. Students will develop works that express their views of contemporary issues and will create portfolios suitable for use in either career or postsecondary education applications. Students will critically analyse the role of media artists in shaping audience perceptions of identity, culture, and community value

VISUAL ARTS, GRADE 11, U/C PREPARATION AVI3M Prerequisite: AVI1O-R or AVI2O

This course enables students to further develop their knowledge and skills in visual arts. Students will use the creative process to explore a wide range of themes through studio work that may include drawing, painting, sculpting and printmaking, as well as the creation of collage, multimedia works and works using emerging technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process when evaluating their own work and the work of others. The course may be delivered as a comprehensive program or through a program focused on a particular art form (eg. photography, video, computer graphics, information design).


BUSINESS STUDIES FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING FUNDAMENTALS, GRADE 11, U/C PREPARATION BAF3M

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. Students will develop financial analysis and decision-making skills that will assist them in future studies and/or career opportunities in business. Students will acquire an understanding of accounting for a service and a merchandising business, computerized accounting, financial analysis, and ethics and current issues in accounting.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS, GRADE 12, U/C PREPARATION BBB4M

This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution and managing international business effectively. This course prepares students for post-secondary programs in business, including international business, marketing and management.

THE INDIVIDUAL AND THE ECONOMY, GRADE 11, U/C PREPARATION CIE3M Prerequisite: CHC2D

This course explores challenges facing the Canadian economy, as well as the implications of various responses to these challenges. Students will explore the economic role of business, labour and government, as well as their own role as individual consumers and contributors, and how all of these influence stability and variability in the Canadian economy. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, including economic models,

to investigate the impact of economic decisions.

CANADIAN & WORLD STUDIES WORLD HISTORY TO THE END OF THE 15TH CENTURY, GRADE 11 U/C PREPARATION CHW3M Prerequisite: CHC2D

This course explores the history of various societies around the world, from earliest times to around 1500 CE. Students will examine life in and the legacy of various ancient and pre-modern societies throughout the world, including those in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. Students will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating social, political and economic structures, and historical forces at work in various societies and in different historical eras.

CANADIAN AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICS, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION CPW4U Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities

This course explores various perspectives on issues in Canadian and world politics. Students will explore political decision making and ways in which individuals, stakeholder groups, and various institutions, including governments, multinational corporations, and nongovernmental oragnizations, respond to and work to address domestic and international issues. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate issues, events, and developments of national and international political importance, and to develop and communicate informed opinions about them.

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CANADIAN AND INTERNATIONAL LAW, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION CLN4U

Prerequisite: Any university, university/college or college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English or Social Sciences and Humanities. This course explores a range of contemporary legal issues and how they are addressed in both Canadian and international law. Students will develop their understanding of the principles of Canadian and international law when exploring rights and freedoms within the context of topics such as religion, security, cyberspace, immigration, crimes against humanity and environmental protection. Students will apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal inquiry process when investigating these issues in both Canadian and international contexts, and will develop legal reasoning skills and an understanding of conflict resolution in the area of international law.

CHALLENGE AND CHANGE IN SOCIETY - AP CAPSTONE SEMINAR COURSE, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION HSB4U-AP

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies. Recommended preparation: Students participating in the AP® Capstone Diploma Program are required to enrol in four other AP® courses and write a minimum of four AP® exams. This course focuses on the use of social science theories, perspectives and methodologies to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviour, and their impact on society. Students will critically analyse how and why cultural, social and behavioural patterns change over time. They will explore the ideas of social theorists and use those ideas to analyse causes of and responses to challenges such as technological change, deviance and global inequalities. Students will explore ways in which social science research methods can be used to study social change.

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AP® Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational, literary and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in research-based written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.

COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE, GRADE 11, U/C PREPARATION ICS3U Recommended preparation: ICS2O

This course introduces students to computer science. Students will design software independently and as part of a team, using industry-standard programming tools and applying the software development life-cycle model. They will also write and use sub-programs within computer programs. Students will develop creative solutions for various types of problems as their understanding of the computing environment grows. They will also explore environmental and ergonomic issues, emerging research in computer science, and global career trends in computerrelated fields.


INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE, GRADE 11, U/C PREPARATION ICS3U-E

This course introduces students to computer science. Students will design software independently and as part of a team, using industry-standard programming tools and applying the software development life-cycle model. They will also write and use sub-programs within computer programs. Students will develop creative solutions for various types of problems as their understanding of the computing environment grows. They will also explore environmental and ergonomic issues, emerging research in computer science, and global career trends in computerrelated fields. Students with a keen interest in pursuing a post-secondary program in Electrical, Mechanical, Computer, or Systems Design Engineering are at an advantage if they know the C computer language. RSGC’s Engineering adaptation of the standard ICS3U program covers all of the topics outlined in the above paragraph, but adds significant hands-on expectations for students in which PCB creation and CAD/3D printing skills are introduced in pursuit of project prototype development. Technical report-writing skills and techniques continue.

ENGLISH MEDIA STUDIES, GRADE 11, OPEN EMS3O Prerequisite: ENG2D

MODERN LANGUAGES CORE FRENCH, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION FSF3U Prerequisite: FSF2D

This course offers students extended opportunities to speak and interact in real-life situations in French with greater independence. Students will develop their creative and critical thinking skills through responding to and exploring a variety of oral and written texts. They will continue to broaden their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities and to develop the skills necessary for life-long language learning.

SPANISH LANGUAGE, LEVEL 2, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION LWSCU Prerequisite: LWSBD

This course offers students opportunities to further develop their knowledge of Spanish and to enhance their communication skills. Students will use increasingly sophisticated language in a variety of activities that will enable them to speak and write with clarity and accuracy. Students will also enhance their thinking skills through the critical study of literature, and continue to explore aspects of the culture of countries where Spanish is spoken through a variety of print and technological resources.

This course emphasizes knowledge and skills that will enable students to understand media communication in the 21st century and to use media effectively and responsibly. Through analysing the forms and messages of a variety of media works and audience responses to them, and through creating their own media works, students will develop critical thinking skills, aesthetic and ethical judgement, and skills in viewing, representing, listening, speaking, reading and writing.

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PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION INTRODUCTORY KINESIOLOGY, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION PSK4U

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 university or university/ college preparation course in science, or any Grade 11 or 12 open course in health and physical education. This course focuses on the study of human movement and of systems, factors, and principles involved in human development. Students will learn about the effects of physical activity on health and performance, the evolution of physical activity and sport, and the physiological, psychological, and social factors that influence an individual’s participation in physical activity and sport. The course prepares students for university programs in physical education and health, kinesiology, health sciences, health studies, recreation, and sports administration.

PERSONAL AND FITNESS ACTIVITIES, GRADE 12, OPEN PAF4O

This course focuses on the development of a personalized approach to healthy active living through participation in a variety of sports and recreational activities that have the potential to engage students’ interest throughout their lives. Students will develop and implement personal physical fitness plans. In addition, they will be given opportunities to refine their decision-making, conflict-resolution and interpersonal skills, with a view to enhancing their mental health and their relationships with others. This course emphasizes participation in a variety of enjoyable fitness activities (eg. weight training, aerobic and anaerobic training, fitness testing, exercise prescription, self-defense, etc). Students will develop and implement personal physical fitness plans and make extensive use of the resources in the Fitness Centre. As well, they will be given opportunities to refine their decision-making, conflict-resolution and 48 Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College

interpersonal skills, with a view to enhancing their mental health and their relationships with others.

SMALL GROUP ACTIVITIES: JUDO, GRADE 11, OPEN PAI3O This course focuses on the development of a personalized approach to healthy active living through participation in a variety of sports and recreational activities that have the potential to engage students’ interest throughout their lives. Students will develop and implement personal physical fitness plans. In addition, they will be given opportunities to refine their decision-making, conflict-resolution and interpersonal skills, with a view to enhancing their mental health and their relationships with others. In this course, students will study Judo techniques covering all requirements from blue belt and brown belt syllabus, competition refereeing, Judo philosophy, as well as develop greater mentorship skills further expanding their of Judo principles.


THE GRADE 12 PROGRAM

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

GRADUATION YEAR

COMPULSORY COURSES

Students in Grade 12 must carry a minimum course load of 6 credits. This includes one compulsory credit in English. University programs of interest and electives determine all other courses. Students will work closely with the Director of University Counselling throughout the year to understand the university application process, apply for scholarships and for any other assistance required in applying to post-secondary institutions.

ENGLISH, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION ENG4U

Course

Credits

*English (choose one): ENG4U ENG4U-AP Electives from the following departments: The Arts Business Studies Canadian and World Studies Computer and Information Science English Mathematics Modern Languages Physical Education Sciences Social Sciences and the Humanities Total Credits

1

5 or more

Prerequisite: ENG3U

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college or the workplace.

ENGLISH, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT STUDIES IN LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION ENG4U-AP Prerequisite: ENG3U (85%+ recommended)

6-8

*We strongly discourage students f rom taking ENG4U outside of the RSGC environment (summer courses, online courses). Students who do participate in ENG4U outside RSGC must enroll in ENG4U at RSGC during the school year.

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college or the workplace. Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College 49


This course is meant to be both a preparation for the AP® examination in English as well as a very high level exploration of the writing process. The intention of the AP® programme is to mirror the general entrylevel course at university and this course will follow the common composition focus through expository writing. The pedagogical approach is suggested as a cooperative venture between students and teacher in a tutorial format. Students will be required to assume responsibility for a high amount of reading and writing. In addition, relevant topics will be explored in detail though a student-led seminar process. A variety of writing forms will be examined – narrative, exploratory, expository and argumentative – but the primary thrust will be an expository style that may be applicable across the curriculum. Specific to the AP® exam, the course will guide the students toward being sophisticated readers able to identify elements from detailed passages that reveal fine distinctions in rhetorical methods.

ELECTIVE COURSES THE ARTS

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC, GRADE 12, U/C PREPARATION AMI4M Prerequisite: AMI3M

This course enables students to enhance their musical literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis and performance of music. Students will perform traditional, commercial and art music, and will respond with insight to live and recorded performances. Students will enhance their understanding of the function of music in society and the impact of music on themselves and various communities and cultures. Students will analyse how to apply skills developed in music to their life and careers. In this final year, students continue to study the greater depths of improvisation, theory and history. Emphasis is on greater technical facility. Students continue to write and perform their own music. Students will have access to a Computer Lab that includes Real Time performance, MIDI and CD-writing capabilities.

CHORAL MUSIC, GRADE 12, U/C PREPARATION AMV4M Prerequisite: AMV3M

DRAMA, GRADE 12, U/C PREPARATION ADA4M This course enables students to enhance their musical Prerequisite: ADA3M

This course requires students to experiment individually and collaboratively with forms and conventions of both drama and theatre from various cultures and time periods. Students will interpret dramatic literature and other texts and media sources, while learning about various theories of directing and acting. Students will examine the significance of dramatic arts in various cultures and will analyse how the knowledge and skills developed in drama are related to their personal skills, social awareness and goals beyond secondary school.

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literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis and performance of music. Students will perform traditional, commercial and art music, and will respond with insight to live and recorded performances. Students will enhance their understanding of the function of music in society and the impact of music on themselves and various communities and cultures. Students will analyse how to apply skills developed in music to their lives and careers.


MEDIA ARTS, GRADE 12, U/C PREPARATION ASM4M Prerequisite: ASM3M

This course emphasizes the refinement of media skills through the creation of a thematic body of work, by applying traditional and emerging technologies, tools, and techniques such as multimedia, computer animation, installation art, and performance art. Students will develop works that express their views of contemporary issues and will create portfolios suitable for use in either career or postsecondary education applications. Students will critically analyse the role of media artists in shaping audience perceptions of identity, culture, and community values.

VISUAL ARTS, GRADE 12, U/C PREPARATION AVI4M Prerequisite: AVI3M

This course focuses on enabling students to refine their use of the creative process when creating and presenting two- and three-dimensional art works using a variety of traditional and emerging media and technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process to deconstruct art works and explore connections between art and society. The studio program enables students to explore a range of materials, processes and techniques that can be applied in their own art production. Students will also make connections between various works of art in personal, contemporary, historical and cultural contexts.

BUSINESS STUDIES INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS, GRADE 12, U/C PREPARATION BBB4M This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution and managing international business effectively. This course prepares students for post-secondary programs in business, including international business, marketing and management.

ANALYSING CURRENT ECONOMIC ISSUES, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION CIA4U Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English or Social Sciences and Humanities.

This course examines current Canadian and international economic issues, developments, policies, and practices from diverse perspectives. Students will explore the decisions that individuals and institutions, including governments, make in response to economic issues such as globalization, trade agreements, economic inequalities, regulation and public spending. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, as well as economic models and theories, to investigate and develop informed opinions about, economic trade-offs, growth and sustainability, and related economic issues.

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ANALYSING CURRENT ECONOMIC ISSUES, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT MICROECONOMICS AND MACROECONOMICS CIA4U-AP Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English or Social Sciences and Humanities. Recommended preparation: CIE3M and permission from the Head of Department.

This course examines current national and global economic trends and policies from diverse perspectives. Students will explore the impact of choices that individuals and institutions, including governments, make in responding to local, national and global economic issues such as globalization and global economic inequalities, trade agreements, national debt, taxation, social spending and consumer debt. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, including economic models, to investigate and develop informed opinions about current economic issues, and help them make reasoned economic decisions. Students will examine economic stability, growth and international trade. Building on the theory developed in CIE3M, students also pursue a rigorous unit in microeconomic theory. In addition to the above material, students will explore units in greater depth than the regular CIA4U course, examine the American economy and study an additional unit on markets for factors of production.

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CANADIAN & WORLD STUDIES WORLD ISSUES: A GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION CGW4U

Prerequisite: Any university, university/college or college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English or Social Sciences and Humanities. This course looks at the global challenge of creating a more sustainable and equitable world. Students will explore a range of issues involving environmental, economic, social and geopolitical interrelationships, and will examine governmental policies related to these issues. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate these complex issues, including their impact on natural and human communities around the world.

WORLD HISTORY SINCE THE 15TH CENTURY, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION CHY4U

Prerequisite: Any university, university/college or college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English or Social Sciences and Humanities. This course traces major developments and events in world history since approximately 1450. Students will explore social, economic and political changes, the historical roots of contemporary issues, and the role of conflict and cooperation in global interrelationships. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, as they investigate key issues and assess societal progress or decline in world history.


CANADIAN AND INTERNATIONAL LAW, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION CLN4U

Prerequisite: Any university, university/college or college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English or Social Sciences and Humanities. This course explores a range of contemporary legal issues and how they are addressed in both Canadian and international law. Students will develop their understanding of the principles of Canadian and international law when exploring rights and freedoms within the context of topics such as religion, security, cyberspace, immigration, crimes against humanity and environmental protection. Students will apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal inquiry process when investigating these issues in both Canadian and international contexts, and will develop legal reasoning skills and an understanding of conflict resolution in the area of international law.

CANADIAN AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICS, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION CPW4U Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities

This course explores various perspectives on issues in Canadian and world politics. Students will explore political decision-making and ways in which individuals, stakeholder groups, and various institutions, including governments, multinational corporations, and non-governmental organizations, respond to and work to address domestic and international issues. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate issues, events, and developments of national and international importance, and to develop and communicate informed opinions about them.

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: AP® RESEARCH, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION IDC4U-H

Prerequisite: For IDC4U, any university or university/ college preparation course Recommended Preparation: Students must have successfully completed the AP® Seminar course. This course will help students develop and consolidate the skills required for and knowledge of different subjects and disciplines to solve problems, make decisions, create personal meaning, and present findings beyond the scope of a single subject or discipline. Students will apply the principles and processes of inquiry and research to effectively use a range of print, electronic, and mass media resources; to analyse historical innovations and exemplary research; and to investigate real-life situations and career opportunities in interdisciplinary endeavours. They will also assess their own cognitive and affective strategies, apply general skills in both familiar and new contexts, create innovative projects, and communicate new knowledge. AP® Research allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest. Through this exploration, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long research-based investigation to address a research question. In the AP® Research course, students further their skills acquired in the AP® Seminar course by understanding research metholdology; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analysing and synthesizing information as they address a research question. Students explore their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of the development of their scholarly work in a portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of approximately 4,000-5,000 words (accompanied by a performance or exhibition of product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense.

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CHALLENGE AND CHANGE IN SOCIETY - AP® CAPSTONE SEMINAR COURSE, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION HSB4U-AP

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies. Recommended preparation: Students participating in the AP® Capstone Diploma Program are required to enrol in four other AP® courses and write a minimum of four AP® exams. This course focuses on the use of social science theories, perspectives and methodologies to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviour, and their impact on society. Students will critically analyse how and why cultural, social and behavioural patterns change over time. They will explore the ideas of social theorists and use those ideas to analyse causes of and responses to challenges such as technological change, deviance and global inequalities. Students will explore ways in which social science research methods can be used to study social change. AP® Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational, literary and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in research-based written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.

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COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE COMPUTER SCIENCE, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION ICS4U Prerequisite: ICS3U

This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills in computer science. Students will use modular design principles to create complex and fully documented programs according to industry standards. Student teams will manage a large software development project, from planning through to project review. Students will also analyse algorithms for effectiveness. They will investigate ethical issues in computing and further explore environmental issues, emerging technologies, areas of research in computer science and careers in the field.

COMPUTER SCIENCE, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION ICS4U-E Prerequisite: ICS3U-E

This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills in computer science. Students will use modular design principles to create complex and fully documented programs, according to industry standards. Student teams will manage a large software development project, from planning through to project review. Students will also analyze algorithms for effectiveness. They will investigate ethical issues in computing and further explore environmental issues, emerging technologies, areas of research in computer science, and careers in the field. In addition to the common elements outlined above, RSGC’s Engineering-focused ICS4U course builds on the experienced gained in the ICS3U program by introducing the lowest level of software programming: the assembly language programming of microcontrollers. It is only at this level can the maximum optimization of hardware performance be realized. Program teams tackle the larger prototype applications and students exploit global assets and


services to achieve their project prototyping goals. Technical report-writing techniques continue and culminate with a published hard copy of their threeyear investment upon graduation.

ENGLISH STUDIES IN LITERATURE, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION ETS4U Prerequisite: ENG3U

This course is for students with a special interest in literature and literary criticism. The course may focus on themes, genres, time periods, or countries. Students will analyse a range of forms and stylistic elements of literary texts and respond personally, critically, and creatively to them. They will also assess critical interpretations, write analytical essays, and complete an independent study project.

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: FILM STUDIES, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION IDC4U-E This course combines the expectations for Interdisciplinary Studies, Grade 12, University Preparation with selected expectations from Media Studies, Grade 11, Open; Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology and Sociology, Grade 11, University Preparation; and Challenge and Change in Society, Grade 12, University Preparation. This is a comprehensive film studies course that introduces students to film history, film aesthetics and digital video production. The focus in this course is on the intersection between film form and various cultural studies, such as psychology and the study of social change. Within these disciplines – media studies, media arts, psychology and social change – additional critical approaches to understanding film as a social force that influences behaviour and shapes our sense of individual and collective identity will be introduced. A variety of films, both classic and contemporary, will be examined from both a formal perspective and from interdisciplinary critical perspectives in order

to advance students’ understanding of the complex cultural phenomena that is a film and the ways that films shape our social and cultural lives. Analytical viewing, discussion and writing are the primary modes of learning. These will be complemented by creative and practical video production components, including a final course project in which students will apply the understanding and skills developed over the year.

MATHEMATICS Note: Use of a TI-84 Plus graphing calculator (or equivalent) is required for all mathematics courses.

CALCULUS AND VECTORS, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION MCV4U Prerequisite: MHF4U

This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three-dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra or physics course. Note: Advanced Functions, Grade 12, University Preparation, must be taken prior to or concurrently with Calculus & Vectors.

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CALCULUS AND VECTORS, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS AB MCV4U-AP Prerequisite: MHF4U

This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three- dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra or physics course. Calculus AB is primarily concerned with developing the students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. The courses emphasize a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results and problems being expressed graphically. Broad concepts and widely applicable methods are emphasized. The focus of the course is neither manipulation nor memorization of an extensive taxonomy of functions, curves, theorems or problem types. Thus, although facility with manipulation and computational competence are important outcomes, they are not the core of this course. Technology should be used regularly by students and teachers to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions, confirm written work, implement experimentation and assist in interpreting results. Through the use of unifying themes of derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modelling, the course becomes a cohesive whole rather than a collection of unrelated topics. Topics will be presented outside of regularly scheduled classes. Note: Advanced Functions, Grade 12, University Preparation, must be taken concurrently with MCV4U-AP. 56 Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College

MATHEMATICS OF DATA MANAGEMENT, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION MDM4U Prerequisite: MCF3M or MCR3U

This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analysing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest.

AP® STATISTICS AND MATHEMATICS OF DATA MANAGEMENT, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION MDM4U-AP

Prerequisite: MCF3M or MCR3U This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analysing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest. The AP® Statistics course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP® Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving and writing as they build conceptual understanding.


ADVANCED FUNCTIONS, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION MHF4U Prerequisite: MCR3U

This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs.

understanding of the culture(s), incorporate interdisciplinary topics (connections), make comparisons between the native language and the target language and between cultures (comparisons), and use target language in real-life settings (communities).

SPANISH LANGUAGE, LEVEL 3, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION LWSDU Prerequisite: LWSCU

This course prepares students for university studies in Spanish. Students will enhance their ability to use Spanish with clarity and precision, and will develop the language skills needed to engage in sustained conversations and discussions, understand and evaluate information, read diverse materials for both study and pleasure, and write clearly and effectively. Students will also have opportunities to add to their knowledge MODERN LANGUAGES of the culture of countries where Spanish is spoken through the use of community resources and computer CORE FRENCH, GRADE 12, technology. Students will produce written assignments UNIVERSITY PREPARATION AND AP® in a variety of forms, including the formal essay.

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE FSF4U-AP Prerequisite: FSF3U

This course provides extensive opportunities for students to speak and interact in French independently. Students will apply language-learning strategies in a wide variety of real-life situations and continue to develop their creative and critical thinking skills through responding to and interacting with a variety of oral and written texts. Students will also continue to enrich their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities and to develop the skills necessary for life-long language learning. In the AP® French Language and Culture course, you will use authentic French materials and sources to develop your language skills in multiple modes of communication, including two-way interactions in both writing and speaking, interpretation of audio, audiovisual and print materials, and oral and written presentation of information and ideas. When communicating, students will demonstrate an

PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION PERSONAL AND FITNESS ACTIVITIES, GRADE 12, OPEN PAF4O

This course focuses on the development of a personalized approach to healthy active living through participation in a variety of sports and recreational activities that have the potential to engage students’ interest throughout their lives. Students will develop and implement personal physical fitness plans. In addition, they will be given opportunities to refine their decision making, conflict-resolution and interpersonal skills, with a view to enhancing their mental health and their relationships with others. This course emphasizes participation in a variety of enjoyable fitness activities (eg. weight training, aerobic and anaerobic training, fitness testing, exercise Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College 57


prescription, self-defense, etc). Students will develop and implement personal physical fitness plans and make extensive use of the resources in the Fitness Technology Center. As well, they will be given opportunities to refine their decision-making, conflict-resolution and interpersonal skills, with a view to enhancing their mental health and their relationships with others.

SMALL GROUP ACTIVITIES: JUDO, GRADE 12, OPEN PAI4O This course focuses on the development of a personalized approach to healthy active living through participation in a variety of sports and recreational activities that have the potential to engage students’ interest throughout their lives. Students will develop and implement personal physical fitness plans. In addition, they will be given opportunities to refine their decision making, conflict-resolution and interpersonal skills, with a view to enhancing their mental health and their relationships with others. In this course, students will study Judo techniques covering all requirements from blue belt and brown belt syllabus, competition refereeing, Judo philosophy, as well as develop greater mentorship skills further expanding their of Judo principles.

INTRODUCTORY KINESIOLOGY, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION PSK4U

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 university or university/ college preparation course in science, or any Grade 11 or 12 open course in health and physical education This course focuses on the study of human movement and of systems, factors and principles involved in human development. Students will learn about the effects of physical activity on health and performance, the evolution of physical activity and sports, and the physiological, psychological, and social factors that influence an individual’s participation in physical activity and sport. The course prepares students for university programs in physical education and health, 58 Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College

kinesiology, health sciences, health studies, recreation, and sports administration.

SCIENCES BIOLOGY, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION SBI4U Prerequisite: SBI3U Recommended preparation: SCH3U strongly recommended.

This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields.

BIOLOGY, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION AND AP® BIOLOGY SBI4U-AP Prerequisite: SBI3U Recommended preparation: SBI3U (85%+) and SCH3U(85%+)

This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields. The AP® portion of the course will include those topics regularly contained in a high-quality university program in introductory biology (molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, organisms and populations). The aim of the course is to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge and


analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. Students accepting the challenge of an Advanced Placement course will be required to actively participate in all lectures and laboratory activities that are conducted during the year. Reading requirements for the course are rigorous and require a daily commitment in order to stay caught up in the class.

CHEMISTRY, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION SCH4U Prerequisite: SCH3U Recommended preparation: SCH3U (75%+) and MCR3U (75%+)

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.

CHEMISTRY, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION AND AP® CHEMISTRY SCH4U-AP Prerequisite: SCH3U Recommended preparation: SCH3U (85%+) and MCR3U (85%+)

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on

evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment. The AP® Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. Students will attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. The course will contribute to the development of the students’ abilities to think clearly and to express their ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and logic. This course differs qualitatively with respect to the kind of textbook used, the topics covered, the emphasis on chemical calculations and the mathematical formulation of principles, and the kind of laboratory work done by students. Quantitative differences appear in the number of topics treated, the time spent on the course by students, and the nature and variety of experiments done in the laboratory.

PHYSICS, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION SPH4U

Prerequisite: SPH3U Recommended preparation: SPH3U (75%+) and MCR3U (75%+) This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational and magnetic fields, and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

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PHYSICS, GRADE 12, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION AND AP® PHYSICS SPH4U-AP

Prerequisite: SPH3U Recommended preparation: SPH3U (85%+) and MCR3U (85%+) This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational and magnetic fields, and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment. AP® Physics 1 is an algebra-based introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of physics through inquirybased investigations as they explore topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion);

60 Academic Calendar 2018-19 • Royal St. George’s College

work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory simple circuits. AP® Physics C: Mechanics is equivalent to a one semester, calculus-based college-level physics course, especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in physical science or engineering. The course explores topics such as kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy, and power; systems of particles nd linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillation and gravitation. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout the course.


ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION In addition to the information contained in this calendar, numerous websites exist that can assist in the development of your education plans.

Ontario Ministry of Education

www.edu.gov.on.ca Gateway to Ontario Education policies, curriculum and standards.

Ontario Secondary School Curriculum

www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/ Comprehensive details and descriptions of the four-year secondary programme and courses of study.

Ontario Universities’ Application Centre

www.ouac.on.ca Central location for information pertaining to the university admissions process and procedures.

AP Central

www.apcentral.collegeboard.com Gateway for students and parents for complete details about the Advanced Placement programs.

AP Canada

apcanada.collegeboard.org General information relating to Advanced Placement programmes in Canada including the policies of Canadian universities.

Some Resources: • • • • •

RSGC University Planning Handbook Individual university websites Ontario: www.electronicinfo.ca Canada: www.schoolfinder.com, Maclean’s, Globe Campus US: www.collegeboard.com, US News & World Report, Fiske Guide, Princeton Review’s Best Colleges, Pope: Hidden Ivies & Colleges That Change Lives • UK: www.ucas.com, Times Good University Guide

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Royal St. George’s College 120 Howland Avenue Toronto, ON M5R 3B5 416.533.6724 rsgc.on.ca

RSGC 2018-19 Academic Calendar  

The RSGC Academic Calendar for the 2018-19 school year

RSGC 2018-19 Academic Calendar  

The RSGC Academic Calendar for the 2018-19 school year