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ClubRunning WE RUN THE NATION!

Spring 2014

RRCA Roads Scholars Class of 2013–14 Giving Back: Elite Athlete Development,  pt.  3 2014 Spring Shoe Review

RRCA National 1–Mile Champion SUSANNA SULLIVAN, age 23 Falls Church, VA

Permit #351

PAID U.S. Postage NON PROFIT ORG

DC Road Runners Club

Bolingbrook, IL

RRCA.org


Bruce  Morrison

ClubRunning 5

Executive Director’s Letter

6

RRCA Members Share

7

Health & Safety Spotlight

8

Member Spotlight

RRCA Web Poll RRCA Facebook Page Apps We Love

Preventing ACL Injuries

2013 Runner Friendly Communities

FEATURES

10 RRCA ROADS SCHOLAR 14 GIVING BACK Class of 2013–14

®

Elite Athlete Development, part 3

17 Program Spotlight

Kids Run the Nation RUN@WORK : RUN@School Day

PERFO RMAN CE Newton Motion III

175

$

RENOVATION S i g 2014 Spring 2014

21 2014 Spring Shoe Review

Newton is evolving, and that’s reflected in its shoes, with specific categories to address biomechanical and technical preferences. The Motion III is the first of Newton’s mainline shoes to be updated. The upper now features a full saddle—light but secure, thanks to nosew overlays—and somewhat forgiving with a closed stretch-mesh. The interior is smooth, with Lycra in the ankle collar and tongue, which offers good comfort while keeping it spare enough to save weight. The high-quality EVA midsole features a 3mm drop from heel to toe, a broader midfoot that’s now a full-contact bottom, and the Action/Reaction plate in a new five-lug configuration. Between the broader and flatter geometry and new lug spacing, the shoe is much more stable yet it still delivers the unique Newton feel. Keeping an eye on the scale, the outersole minimizes the rubber and uses it thinly where it’s placed: coverage that’s adequate and lightweight. The Motion III delivers lightweight performance with a touch of stability, earning it our Best Renovation Award.

“Smooth, snug, comfortable fit. The ride was light and responsive, great for my faster runs.”

The Zoom Fly is a bit of a sleeper: Don’t be fooled by its low price and seemingly simple design. Borrowing from the Bowerman heritage and mixing in a bit of its Lunar engineering, the result is a Performance shoe for this moment. The upper is open mesh in the forefoot with closed mesh in the mid- and rearfoot, and married together with no-sew overlays. The tapered toebox provides a good fit and retains its shape well, thanks to a synthetic leather toe cap. The toebox also includes a bunion window to accommodate the forefoot width. The midsole is a combination of Phylon and Cushlon, molded to provide support and protection. It’s got a Zoom Air bag in the forefoot and uses 8mm geometry. The outersole is BRS 1000 carbon rubber in the heel, with mini-waffles providing traction up front. The Zoom Fly is an effective Performance shoe for faster-paced runs and even for long races. And at $90, it’s an outstanding value—so good, in fact, that it won honors as our Best Value Shoe.

“Secure fit and a nice, low-to-the-ground feel. Protective and nimble. This has been a go-to shoe for fast running.”

Sizes: Men 6–13,14,15; Women 5–12 Weight: 9.5 oz. (men’s 11); 7.7 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics to mild overpronation, for faster-paced runs

27 Championship Spotlight

Nike Zoom Fly

90

$

VALUE Spring 2014

On Cloud

109

$

Performance Spring S i 2014 4

RRCA National 1–Mile RRCA National 5K RRCA National Half Marathon Sizes: Men 7–13,14,15; Women 6–11 Weight: 9.8 oz. (men’s 11); 8.3 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics to mild overpronation, for faster-paced runs

The RRCA is proud to be a BBB Wise Giving Alliance Accredited Charity and a Gold-Level Guidestar Exchange Partner. The Cloud takes On technology a step beyond. The original outersole lugs, called clouds, were made of dense—and heavy—rubber. Thanks to a new process, On is now using road-grade EVA foam, a much lighter material that’s been engineered to achieve the same effect without the extra weight. The closed mesh upper has a partial gusset and an overlapping saddle to secure the midfoot. It comes with both traditional laces and a stretch lace, and the smooth interior is suitable for sockless wear—both nods to its triathlon roots. The midsole is a high-quality EVA blend, forming the clouds along its length, and divided by a longitudinal gap that allows the foot to flex more naturally throughout the gait. Its 6mm geometry supports greater gait efficiency. The outersole sports a few touches of rubber at the heel and toe for durability, with the clouds managing the rest of the cushioning duties. The fit, ride, and innovation earned the Cloud our Best Performance Shoe award.

“Smooth—even plush—interior. Flexes well, has an agile feel to it; light and smooth. For my fast runs, these were what I reached for.”

Sizes: Men 8–14; Women 6–10 Weight: 8.5 oz. (men’s 11); 7.2 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics, for faster-paced runs

CONTENTS

Puma Faas 500 v3

4 • ClubRunning Spring 2014

$

110

The Faas 500 is the taproot of the Faas series, with other models branching off to suit different needs. Round 3 makes changes to the upper, while maintaining the ride and feel of Round 2. The upper offers a closed mesh, as in v2, but the midfoot now features a saddle-like framework with synthetic leather stanchions that loop into the lacing, snugging the foot over the midsole. The ankle collar and interior have beefier layers of memory foam, achieved without adding much weight—a worthwhile trade-off. The midsole continues with the 4mm geometry, and the EVA blend of elastomers offers the resilient cushioning, flexibility, and comfort the model has been known for. The outersole remains substantially the same—good news, since it was already an effective set-up going into the update. The result is a familiar shoe that works well for faster runs, a share of your daily training, or—in a pinch—even the occasional race. 

“Snug fit and good ground feel. Decent cushioning with a bouncy feel, especially for a lighter shoe. I enjoyed running my midlength runs in them.”

Sizes: Men 7–13,14; Women 6–12 Weight: 10.8 oz. (men’s 11); 9.0 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

RRCA.org


Spring 2014 www.ClubRunning.net

ROAD RUNNERS CLUB OF AMERICA (RRCA) Executive Director Jean Knaack RRCA President David Cotter

Photographers Victor Sailer www.PhotoRun.net BigStockPhoto.com Bruce Morrison DC Road Runners Club Iowa State Sports Information Department Oregon State University Penny Photography PhotoRun.NET Wilson Bridge Half ZAP Fitness Writers David Hunter Jean Knaack Steve Nearman Marc Norcross, PhD George Rehmet Andy Smith

W

elcome to the first issue of Club Running magazine for 2014. We are going digital-only for this first issue of the year to highlight the importance of member-events advertising in our print publication to promote community-owned events. Advertising support is the lifeblood of your membership magazine, and we will deliver print editions later in 2014. In a recent article that FORTIUS Media Group LLC publishing director Larry Eder shared with me, it’s the multiplatform approach to engagement that’s the key to keeping print publications going. The article points out that the coexistence of a print magazine and a companion website brings in more advertising revenue. This is a lesson that clubs and events can adopt as part of their marketing strategies. The growing importance of the synergy between print and online presences was on display in November 2013 when we launched our refreshed brand image for the RRCA that includes an updated look for www.RRCA.org We’re pleased to share our fresh, new design and easier-to-navigate website. Our key site color, yellow, is intended to remind runners to remain visible at all times while out on a run. In this ever-changing world of technology, we must reach out to runners in a variety of ways beyond our website by using a multiplatform approach that engages as many people in the running community as possible. In fact, our members have reported that, collectively, their events engage over 5 million runners annually. Our outreach potential as an organization is vast. We know that runners, in general, consume information from more than one medium. It’s well known that if a consumer sees an ad more than once, he or she is more likely to buy a product, or in our case, sign up for an event. So we invest in producing both print and digital options for our members. Our Facebook page and Twitter followers have grown exponentially since we launched them. Join us on our social media pages, if you haven’t already done so. Our email list has been growing weekly and has proven to be a valuable way to receive RRCA information and drive people to our website for more information. Our digital following for Club Running, www.RRCA.org/publications/club-running, is growing, but we would love to see more of our members take advantage of the free digital magazine subscription by embedding it in club websites. To help members easily find each issue of Club Running, the RRCA has built your membership magazine link into the home screen of our newly launched RRCA app, which you can read about on page 6. Your engagement with the RRCA and by advertising member events in Club Running helps us to further connect with the running community, our advertisers, and our members in a meaningful way.

 

Bruce  Morrison

ClubRunning

Executive Director’s Note

—Jean Knaack #RunSmart, #RunSafe

Designer Alex Larsen/Alex Graphics Proofreader Red Ink Editorial Services, Madison, WI

FORTIUS Media Group, LLC Advertising Larry Eder Publishing Director 608.239.3785 fortiusmediagroup@gmail.com Advertising Production Manager Alex Larsen/Alex Graphics Counsel Perry F. Goldlust www.rrca.org www.runblogrun.com Custom Published By

DC Road Runners Club

Group & Coordinating Editor Christine Johnson/Holding Space LLC On  the  Cover:  Susanna  Sullivan,  age  23  of  Falls  Church,   VA,  captured  the  RRCA  National  1-­Mile  title  in  a  time   of  5:00.0.   See  story  on  page  27.

ClubRunning is a complimentary publication made possible by our advertisers and created through a partnership between the Road Runners Club of America (RRCA) and FORTIUS Media Group LLC. You’re a member of your local running club and your local running club is, in turn, a member of the RRCA.

ClubRunning ClubRunning is custom published by FORTIUS Media Group, LLC for publisher Road Runners Club of America (RRCA). All ad materials should be mailed to P.O. Box 6450, San Jose, CA 95120. Insertion orders should be emailed to fortiusmediagroup@gmail.com FORTIUS Media Group LLC assumes no liability for matter printed. Publisher assumes no responsibility or liability for content of paid advertising and reserves the right to reject paid advertising. Publisher expects that all claims by advertisers can be substantiated and that all guarantees will be honored. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Publisher. Copyright ©2014 by Road Runners Club of America (RRCA) unless otherwise noted. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission of the Publisher. We recommend, as with all fitness and health issues, you consult with your physician before instituting any changes in your fitness program.

Let Us Hear From You!

ClubRunning welcomes your suggestions, comments, and questions. Direct them to share@rrca.org

Address Changes/Missing Issues

Visit www.rrca.org/publications/club-running/ about address changes, duplicate mailings, or missing issues. Please include both old and new addresses.

RRCA.org

Spring 2014 ClubRunning • 5


RRCA Members Share

RRCA.org Website Poll The main reason I participate in organized events is ... I want to compete with other runners for awards/prize money — 29%

We invite our readers to participate in the RRCA website polls at www.RRCA.org

I want to set a personal record or improve times — 29%

Find us on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube!

I want to stay motivated to run by having a goal event — 39% I want to raise money for a charity — 3% Votes

50

100

150

250

350

450 Total  Votes:  1,077

From Recent Discussions on the RRCA Facebook Page Compiled  by  Andy  Smith,  RRCA  Program  Coordinator Some runners are grateful for more overcast days, while others miss the warmer temperatures and sunnier skies. What’s your favorite type of weather for a run? I had a great summer race season ... it was beautiful. But I am LOVING fall. The cool down is helping [me] run faster and farther ... a long run in the rain is perfect right now! —Erik K.

What was your favorite race to run in 2013 and why? The Great Cranberry Island Ultra Marathon. I had never been to that part of Maine and ferrying to an island to run an Ultra intrigued me. The local support was grand, specifically the potato lady, the residents offering watermelon, the runners cheering each other on without ever, ever meeting before the race. Each runner was celebrated. —Victoria G.

48 to 55 degrees is perfect for shorts and singlet and a long run. —Randy J.

Hollywood Half Marathon. Watching it in 2012 inspired me to train to do a half, which led me to my 1st full marathon. —Barry M.

I love the cooler temps. Plus the scenery is absolutely beautiful here in West Virginia during the fall. —Kim C. Every runner has a unique story or reason for what initially inspired their participation in the sport. Fill in the EODQNRQWKLVVWDWHPHQW,ƂUVWVWDUWHG running because ... We moved into a new house that had stairs. Every time I used them, I had to use my inhaler. 9 months later I don’t have to anymore. —Shawna D. Because there were no racquetball courts at our summer vacation spot. Since 1994 I have run 11 marathons, lots of half marathons, served on the board of our awesome local running club, and my favorite place to run is on the beach—barefoot. —Wendy P. 40 years ago I quit smoking and started running. I never smoked again and never stopped running. —Marc W.

6 • ClubRunning Spring 2014

For runners, often the seemingly smallest adjustment can make a big difference. Fill in the blank on this statement: The best running tip I ever received was ... It doesn’t matter how fast you run, it’s the time on your feet that matters. —Cathy H. Don’t worry about your pace/weight, just get out and run often and the time & weight will drop... —Jess B. Starting at 7:30 am versus 9:00 am makes a world of difference. —Tiffany B.

Join in the RRCA Facebook discussions by downloading the RRCA app from the iTunes store for free or Like us at www.facebook.com/ Roadrunnersclubofamerica

APPS WE LOVE

RRCA Launches Mobile App – Get It Now! We’re happy to announce the RRCA app is ready to download for your iPhone/iPad, Android, Kindle, and more to help you Keep Pace with the RRCA. Key features of the RRCA app include easy-to-access links to RRCA publications on the home screen, including Club Running and Inside Track, along with quick links to RRCA social media accounts on Facebook and Twitter. Read the RRCA News and Running News feeds directly on our mobile app. Find RRCA member events, member clubs, and RRCA certified coaches—all on our easy-to-navigate app. Connect with the oldest and largest distance running organization in the U.S. Download it for free at the App Store (iPhone), Google Play (Android) and Amazon.

lo*ca*lei*kki

Have you ever been traveling and wanted to find a good place to run, walk, or bike?  Or maybe you had a workout to do and would enjoy jumping into a local group’s training session if only you could find one? The traveling athlete’s solution is lo*ca*lei*kki, an active travel guide designed to help the millions of active individuals who travel for business

RRCA.org


and leisure. Our crowdsourced database, currently accessible via our website and iPhone/iPad app, helps active individuals make informed decisions on where to play in relation to where they stay, all based on recommendations from peers. It’s athletes helping athletes. lo*ca*lei*kki provides active individuals with a straightforward tool to help them find great places to train wherever they are traveling. This database focuses on local recommen-

dations from fellow active individuals about publicly accessible locations to run, walk, hike, and/or bike, with information most useful to the traveler unfamiliar with an area: distance, surface, parking, bathrooms, activities, images, descriptions/local tips, and geo-location functionality. Want to find a local group to train with? We have that information, too.

your weekly runs so that runners can find you, whether they are new to your community, or new to running. As an Individual: Share great places to run in your community, a social and economic benefit. As an Individual: Never be at a loss for where to run, walk, hike, or bike again. Show off the great places to run and groups to run with in How RRCA Members Benefit: your community. We’re excited to grow our lo*ca*lei*kki is about helping people stay content and encourage our users to “play it active and promoting great resources in com- forward” by adding their favorite “place” or munities across the country (eventually, the “group” to lo*ca*lei*kki. world!). Join lo*ca*lei*kki today and play local! As a Club: Grow your member base: List

Health & Safety Spotlight

Different Landing Strategy May Prevent Some ACL Injuries By  Marc  Norcross,  PhD   Assistant  Professor,  College  of  Public  Health  and  Human  Sciences,  Oregon  State  University Women are two to eight times more likely than men to suffer a debilitating tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee, and a new study suggests that a combination of body type and landing technique may be to blame. In two new studies published online recently in the Journal of Athletic Training, lead author Marc Norcross of Oregon State University documented how women who were asked to undergo a series of jumping exercises landed more often than men did in a way associated with an elevated risk of ACL injury. Both men and women tended to land stiffly, which can lead to ACL injuries, but women were 3.6 times more likely to land in a “knock-kneed” position, which the researchers said may be the critical factor leading to the gender disparity in ACL tears. “We found that both men and women seem to be using their quad region the same, so that couldn’t explain why females are more at risk,” Norcross said. “Using motion analysis, we were able to pinpoint that this inability to control the frontal-plane knee loading— basically stress on the knee from landing in a knock-kneed position—as a factor more common in women. “Future research may isolate why women tend to land this way,” he added, “but it could in part be because of basic biology. Women have wider hips, making it more likely that their knees come together after jumping.” Norcross, an assistant professor of exercise and sport science in OSU’s College of Public

Health and Human Sciences, is a former collegiate athletic trainer who has dedicated his research to the prevention of ACL tears. “You see ACL injuries in any sport where you have a lot of jump stops and cuts, so basketball, soccer, lacrosse, and volleyball are high-risk sports,” said Norcross. “We know that people who hurt themselves tend to look stiff when they land and that the combined ‘knee loading’ from multiple directions is likely causing the injury event. But it wasn’t clear initially why women had more injuries than men.” The researchers used motion analysis software to monitor the landing strategies of 82 physically active men and women. They found that both males and females had an equal likelihood of landing stiffly, likely from tensing the muscles in their quads before landing, putting them at higher risk of ACL tears. Women, however, were more likely to land in a “knee valgus” position, essentially knock-kneed. Norcross said his next research project will focus on high school athletes, looking for a sustainable way to integrate injury prevention into team warm-up activities through improved landing technique. “We are trying

to create a prevention strategy that is sustainable and will be widely used by high school coaches,” he said. “A lot of athletes do come back from an ACL injury, but it is a long road. And the real worry is that it leads to early onset arthritis, which then impacts their ability to stay physically active.”

This study was supported by the NATA Research & Education Foundation Doctoral Grant Program. Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Greensboro contributed to this study.

About the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences: The College creates connections in teaching, research, and community outreach while advancing knowledge, policies, and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.

Biomechanical model of a female using a “knock-kneed” technique and experiencing high frontal plane knee loading during a jump landing.

Oregon  State  University

RRCA.org

Spring 2014 ClubRunning • 7


Member Spotlight

RRCA Designates Runner Friendly Communities for 2013

bigstockphoto.com

By  Andy  Smith,  RRCA  Program  Coordinator

The RRCA is pleased to announce that the recipients of the 2013 Runner Friendly Community  designation are Chattanooga, TN; Sarasota, FL; Kalamazoo, MI; and South Lake, FL.  These communities have shown that they meet the program’s criteria, which include community infrastructure, community support, and local government support of running. Each community has an infrastructure that fosters physical activity in a safe environment; a proven track record of organizations and businesses that work together to promote running as a healthy exercise and sport; and positive relationships between the running community and local government. Chattanooga, TN Chattanooga has all the ingredients for an outstanding runner friendly community, and one of its best assets is its citizens. Chattanooga residents take pride in their community and show their support of running through participation in for-profit and charity events, as well as constructing and maintaining the community’s magnificent trail systems and parks. Chattanooga residents also support runners through training programs and clinics, many on a volunteer basis. Over the past decade, the Chattanooga region has established a considerable reputation as a venue for many types of outdoor athletic activities. Local government entities have embraced running and walking events for their economic impact and as part of a strategy of marketing the city’s healthy lifestyle to attract new businesses and residents. Ten years ago the city established Outdoor Chattanooga, a municipal division responsible for making outdoor recreation an attractive, healthy, and distinguishing lifestyle for Chattanooga’s residents and visitor population. The city’s infrastructure is remarkably runner friendly, with water fountains as well as community bathrooms or portable toilets along pedestrian networks. The pedestrian networks include accessible parking, emergency phones, and well-lit trails. Furthermore, the community makes a tremendous effort to reclaim unused parcels of land and convert them to uses that

8 • ClubRunning Spring 2014

Chattanooga has also been designated the 2013 Outstanding Runner Friendly Community. The RRCA will honor Chattanooga with a commemorative award at the upcoming 56th Annual RRCA National Convention, to be held May 1–4 in Spokane, WA. The goal of the Runner Friendly Community program is to shine a national spotlight on communities that stand out as runner-friendly and provide incentives and ideas for other communities to work toward becoming runner friendly. Runner friendly communities improve the quality of life, encourage physical activity for residents, and have a positive economic impact on the community.

support a healthy lifestyle. For instance, Enterprise South Nature Park is situated on 2,800 wooded acres that were previously part of the Volunteer Army Ammunition Plant. Opened for free public use by the Hamilton County government, the park offers miles of walking paths, bicycle paths, and off-road biking and running trails, including American with Disabilities Act–accessible trails. The Chattanooga Track Club (CTC) is an important pillar of the Chattanooga running community. A key part of CTC’s vision and mission emphasizes developing an appreciation of running among youth and families. The club’s website, weekly e-news, and quarterly newsletters communicate training opportunities, events, race reviews, and results. In addition to offering discounted membership rates to students, CTC works with local schools and universities to bring running events and programs to young runners and their families. For several years, CTC has hosted the elementary cross country series, consisting of four fall races for third-, fourth-, and fifth-graders, drawing over 600 students each year from public, private, parochial, and home school teams throughout the area. “Running and fitness have long been an integral part of the renaissance of Chattanooga,” said Sen. Bob Corker (R–TN).  “While serving as Mayor, Chattanooga initiated a citizen-based planning process for outdoor

recreation. This planning led to the creation of Outdoor Chattanooga, an initiative that encourages runners and other outdoor enthusiasts to take advantage of all our city has to offer in terms of scenery and amenities.” Sarasota, FL The Sarasota community offers hundreds of miles of trails and sidewalks that wend their way along the Gulf Coast and bayfront and into the interior of Sarasota County, including Myakka River State Park, Legacy Trail, and Oscar Scherer State Park.  Sarasota has several business partners who rise early on Saturday mornings to strategically place hydration stations along the popular training routes. Public works employees open public restrooms by 6 a.m. to accommodate runners and walkers. The City of Sarasota works closely with organizations to secure activity permits in a timely manner and is responsive to all requests. Local law enforcement officers are regulars at running events, many of them being runners themselves, but always cheering on the runners and supporting them by working or volunteering. Some of the local races are led by motorcycle officers, and officers are always aware of the activities. The community is home to several running clubs, among them the Manasota Track Club (MTC), which supported the Runner Friendly Community application, along with

RRCA.org


Member Spotlight bigstockphoto.com

other area clubs. As one of the strongest forces in the Sarasota running community, MTC hosts 11 races as part of its racing series, including the annual Sarasota half marathon. Local races often feature Sarasota middle school or high school students competing, a strong testament to the area’s longstanding commitment to youth running. In fact, many of the local running coaches have been active in the community for more than two decades. “Sarasota enjoys a well-deserved reputation as being committed to develoing and maintaining safe pathways for runners while respecting the integrity of environmentally sensitive areas and wildlife habitat,” said Sarasota County Commissioner Joseph Barbetta. Kalamazoo, MI Kalamazoo represents community collaboration at its finest, with running event and program organizers, businesses and municipalities, schools systems, and nonprofit organizations striving in partnership to grow the sport of running. It’s this spirit of collaboration that has helped thousands of Kalamazoo citizens embrace a healthy lifestyle through the sport. Kalamazoo Area Runners (KAR) is the largest RRCA running club in Michigan, with more than 1,200 members. It works cooperatively with local government to organize large-scale races in both the city of Kalamazoo (including the Kalamazoo Klassic and the Run Through the Lights) and the city of Portage’s Winter Blast Half Marathon. KAR works with local schools and colleges/universities on training programs and events, including the Turkey Trot Time Prediction Run at Portage West Middle School and the Fast Track 5K/10K Training Program at Western Michigan University. Businesses, schools, and other organizations permit use of their facilities for KAR’s training programs. Kalamazoo and Portage work closely with KAR and other race organizers to host running events throughout Kalamazoo County. Portage is a formal partner with the KAR in hosting the Winter Blast Half Marathon & 5K, a major event sited on the city streets and trails. Both cities work closely with race organizers to coordinate venues, routes, police, road closures, and operations planning. Kalamazoo is home to the Kalamazoo Marathon and Borgess Run for the Health of It, a major community event that collaborates extensively with businesses, organizations, and government. In 2013, the Borgess Run attracted approximately 8,500 race participants and 900+ to its Borgess Run Camp Training Program, which is supported by more than 75 sponsors. “The cities of Portage and Kalamazoo have a long-standing tradition of being proponents of infrastructure improvements to enhance

RRCA.org

physical activity for regional benefit,” said Portage Mayor Peter J. Strazdas. “The city embarked upon a multi-use trail system over 25 years ago and now has 18 miles of independent trails. The main trail is over six miles in length and has distance markings and minimal road crossings.” South Lake, FL In the gentle, sloping hills of South Lake, runners of all ages, health, and fitness abilities find a community whose roots in health, wellness, and running go deep. Some of the best and most desirable running assets, facilities, and races, including the Lake Mineola Half Marathon, are found in South Lake. The community’s culture of running and its tangible benefits have given rise to innumerable investments in a network of year-round paths, trails, and sidewalks enhanced with mileage markers, shaded canopies, clean restrooms, ample parking, safe crosswalks, and shared space lanes. In fact, runners are able to traverse more than 20 miles on South Lake’s pedestrian network before it ends. Local running clubs such as the South Lake Striders have charitable arms that support existing South Lake youth charities. Additionally, the local running clubs collaborate with local government, public and private schools, and the business community to promote the tangible health and wellness benefits of running. The local clubs have a longstanding relationship with the community, stakeholders, and leaders and collaborate in a spirit of cooperation to fulfill the running needs of the community. The hallmark of the South Lake community is a local government that understands the quality of life for the South Lake community is inextricably intertwined with its health status.

Better health has a direct impact on the health of employees, retirees, students, and families. The local government, in coordination with South Lake Hospital, health care professionals, residents, business leaders, educators, and students, has taken this on as a leadership opportunity to support running, runners, running events, and related activities. Given the community’s interest in outdoor endurance pursuits, it has been a natural fit to integrate running, runners, running events, and related activities into the city’s considerations for planning, land use, funding, and other decisions. “Our community is a network of supportive businesses, residents, and town staff that understands runners are a part of the very fabric of our community,” said Troy Bennett, mayor of Monteverde in South Lake County. “Currently, we have funding to extend our trail system to enhance our current network of trails which provides an additional contiguous space for runners and outdoor enthusiasts.”

Learn how to designate your city as an RRCA Runner Friendly Community at www.rrca.org/programs/runner-friendlycommunity/

Spring 2014 ClubRunning • 9


INTRODUCING THE 2013–14

RRCA ROADS he caught the eye of the cross country coach at Garden City Community College (GCCC) in Kansas. After helping GCCC to two national thirdplace finishes, Proctor moved to Western Colorado State University’s (WCSU) team under the guidance of coach Jennifer Michel. Despite some initial struggles with the increased level of competition, Proctor’s commitment to training and perseverance paid off. In 2011, he was a leading member of WCSU’s NCAA Division II National Championship cross country team. In 2013, he won the individual national championship in the outdoor 10K with a time of 28:58 and in the 5K with a time of 13:55. Proctor attended the 2013 RunPro Camp as an invited athlete. Now running professionally for Mammoth Track Club under coach Andrew Kastor, Proctor ran a 1:04:38 in October 2013 at the San Jose Rock ’n Roll Half, finishing fourth with a time that qualified him for the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials – Marathon. In an interview with Competitor.com, Proctor said that while he’s doing everything he can to make the 2016 Olympics, “all [he] thinks about is qualifying for the 2020 Olympic Marathon” and that he is doing everything in his power to make sure that happens.

Since 1996, the Road Runners Club of America has awarded grants totaling over $450,000 through our Roads Scholar® program. The program’s goal is to assist American postcollegiate runners who show great promise to develop into national and world-class road running athletes. The RRCA grants go directly to the athletes to support their goals of becoming world-class distance runners. While traditionally the RRCA has distributed six grants, the strong credentials and impressive potential of this year’s pool of applicants, coupled with the ability to lay the groundwork for qualification for the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics, warranted the expansion of the 2013– 14 class to eight recipients. The RRCA is pleased to introduce the 2013–14 Class of Roads Scholars. Congratulations to them all! Gabe Proctor

Born in Ethiopia, Gabe Proctor was adopted at the age of 10 by Jim and Caryl Proctor. Gabe began running competitively as a high school senior in Vermont. While his school didn’t have a track team, he was fortunate to train with Jeff Johnson of Lebanon, NH, who shaped Proctor’s early running and remains a respected advisor. By coming in second in the state in the indoor 3200m,

10 • ClubRunning Spring 2014

Zap  Fitness  

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Cole Atkins An accomplished high school soccer player in his native Charleston, SC, Cole Atkins attended High Point (NC) University on a scholarship where he appeared in 76 games in his four years as a soccer midfielder. At the end of his soccer career, Atkins approached Mike Esposito, High Point’s track and cross country coach, to ask if he could run with the team. The switch to running proved fruitful, as Atkins showed a talent for the sport, running 9:04 for 3K and 15:18 for 5K

mere weeks after joining the team. In his two short years training under Esposito, Atkins ran 14:17 for 5K and 29:20 for 10K, the latter mark being the #2 all-time performance in school history, as well as earning three All–Big South Conference awards. These early moments of success attracted the attention of Pete Rea at ZAP Fitness, which Atkins joined in 2010. During his first year as a professional runner, he ran the fastest road 8K by an American in 23:18. In 2012, he bettered that mark, running 22:50, and he clocked 14:19 for 5K on the roads. This past winter, Atkins qualified for the USA Indoor Track Championships in the 3000m by way of his 8:00 performance in Boston. In May, he ran 47:43 for 10 miles in Philadelphia, which was the second-fastest time any American had run on the Broad Street course in the past 10 years. Now five years into training, Atkins is committed to making sure his best days lie ahead of him. He plans to run the U.S. Half Marathon Championships in Houston next January with the hope of making his first of many U.S. teams. Atkins began his 2013 campaign in Boston at the BU Terrier Invitational, where he ran 8:00.6 in the 3K, finishing second. This performance qualified him for his first USATF Indoor Championships. In March, Atkins finished fourth at the USATF Indoor meet in Albuquerque. Following this short indoor season, Atkins ran the USATF 15K Championships at the Gate River Run in Jacksonville, FL, finishing 36th in 46:29. After a good spell of training in April and early May, Atkins traveled to Philadelphia for the Broad Street 10-Miler, where he ran a brilliant 47:43, finishing fifth overall and the first American. Following a great early fall of training, where Atkins regularly hit between 110–120 miles per week, he opened his season in Boston at the Mayors Cup XC race in November, running 24:30, which was good for eighth place. Since receiving the Roads Scholar grant, Atkins traveled to San Jose for the Silicon Valley Turkey Trot 5K and ran a fast 13:51.9 to finish fifth in a very competitive field. He closed out the year by helping his ZAP Fitness team finish

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SCHOLARClass ®

Meaghan Nelson

Iowa  State  Sports  Information  Department

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Alexi Pappas Alexi Pappas grew up in Alameda, CA. In high school, she won seven HAAL championships—five in running and two in soccer. She played on the Cal North State Olympic Development Soccer Team. When Pappas did finally fall in love with running in college, she fell hard. Literally, Pappas has fallen while running in many a steeplechase and cross country race, but has captured success along the way. As a proud Dartmouth Big Green, she finished third in the steeplechase at the 2012 NCAA Outdoor meet and holds the 2012 Ivy League title and Dartmouth school record in the event. She ran the lead leg on Dartmouth’s third-place distance medley relay squad at the 2012 NCAA Indoor Championships and qualified for the 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials in Eugene as a steeplechaser. Pappas is a seven-time All-American. After graduating as a runner at Dartmouth College, she finished her remaining two seasons of eligibility at University of Oregon, where she helped lead the team to a team NCAA title in the 2012 cross country and 2013 indoor track seasons. Pappas began the 2013 regular season at Oregon by recording a time of 17:12.9 (5000 meters) in the Park Pier Invitational and placing second. She

Tyler Pennel

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Entering high school in Cedar Rapids, IA, Meaghan Nelson was focused on competing in volleyball, basketball, and especially swimming. Prior to her sophomore year, her high school coach convinced her to do both swimming and cross country, helping Nelson discover that she had potential in distance running. Her second-place state cross country finishes in her sophomore and senior years, and winning it in 2006, convinced her that cross country was a sport she could do in college. Nelson decided to go to Iowa State University after being recruited by coach Corey Ihmels. After some injuries and setbacks, she made a big jump in performance in 2011–12 and gained All-American status in all three seasons, finishing 17th in cross country, fourth indoors in the 5K, and fourth in the 10K outdoors. She capped this season by running in the Olympic Trials in Eugene. In her final year, she accrued All-American status in cross country and in the 10K outdoors. Nelson assisted her Iowa State team to two Big 12 championships in cross country and in 2013 she became the Big 12 champion in the 10K. Overall, she’s a five-time All-American and the seventh-fastest 10,000 meter athlete in NCAA history. Her collegiate PRs are 9:16 (3K), 15:51 (5K), and 32:14 (10K). With collegiate success came the desire to continue to pursue running as a professional. Nelson attended RunPro Camp in 2013 as an invited athlete. After receiving the Roads Scholar grant,

then won the Dellinger Invitational with an individual time of 16:23 (5000 meters) and was central to Oregon’s first-place team finish at the meet. She also found continued success at the 6000 meter race at the Pre-Nationals, recording a time of 19:56.9 and placing third out of 265 runners. She was Oregon’s top finisher at the meet and propelled the Ducks to a second-place team finish. Later, she helped Oregon win the Pac-12 Conference Championships with an individual time of 20:12 (6000 meters) and a fourth-place individual finish. At the NCAA championships, Pappas finished eighth individually with a time of 19:43.9 (6000 meters), contributing the Ducks’ second-fastest individual time, helping the team win the national title. Pappas was named an All-American by the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association. This summer, Pappas discovered and came to love the world of road racing. After braving the hills at the Bix 7-mile race, she finished as the second American in the TD Beach to Beacon 10K Road Race. She was most recently the first American finisher at the 2013 Falmouth Road Race in Falmouth, MA, as well as the third-place female finisher at the U.S. Champs CVS 5K in Providence, RI—her first outdoor 5K (15:34). Now training under Mark Rowland with the Oregon Track Club Elite, Pappas looks forward to training and competing with her new team.

Nelson made the transition to pro and moved to Boise to continue training with her college coach, Corey Ihmels, who is now the head coach at Boise State University. Nelson took time in the fall to get some solid running in and adjust to the new location. She competed in the USA Club Cross Country Nationals in Bend, OR, where she placed 23rd. In January 2014, Nelson competed in the Chevron Houston Half Marathon, her first race at that distance. She ran a 1:14:02, finishing 13th and qualifying for the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials – Marathon.

an agonizing second place—by just 1 point!—at the USATF Club XC Championships in Bend, OR. Individually, He ran 32:20 on an extremely challenging course, good for 36th place overall. Rounding out the year, Atkins traveled to contest the NYRR Midnight Run 4-Miler on New Year’s Eve, where he captured the victory in 18:45.

Tyler Pennel grew up in Golden, CO playing soccer and baseball. While attending Golden High School, he was convinced by his father to give cross country a try and quickly discovered that he was the best runner on the team. Throughout high school he continued to improve while setting school records in the 1600m (4:25) and 3200m (9:49).

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Pennel placed ninth at the Gate River Run 15K with a time of 44:17, his first top-10 finish in a USA championship race, and a performance he considers his best on a ZAP Fitness singlet. A few weeks later, Pennel kept up the momentum with a 13:45 PR in the 5000m at the Raleigh Relays. Throughout the early fall, Pennel worked to build up his weekly training mileage to 110, a strategy that paid off with a breakthrough performance at the U.S. 12K championships in Alexandria, VA, finishing third with a time of 34:37. Mattie Suver

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After graduation, Pennel attended Western Colorado State University (WCSU) where, under the guidance of coach Jennifer Michel, he became one of the most decorated Mountaineers in school history. Pennel earned 11 All-American honors and 12 RMAC All-Conference honors. He had a breakout season in the fall of 2011, finishing second at the NCAA DII National Cross Country meet and running the seventh-fastest 10,000m time in DII history (28:23). Later that spring, he won the 10,000m and finished runner-up at the DII national track & field meet. Since leaving WCSU, Pennel joined the ZAP Fitness/Reebok training group based in Blowing Rock, NC. His first year as a professional runner has been successful, placing in the top-10 at three USATF national championships, culminating in a seventh-place finish at the USATF 10K National Road Championships on July 4. He also lowered many of his track personal bests in the spring. He attended the 2013 RunPro Camp as the athlete representative for ZAP Fitness. Pennel had what he considers potentially his best year in running, which includes receiving the Roads Scholar grant. After shaking off a nagging knee injury, he began the year in Florida on a training trip with his North Carolina–based ZAP Fitness team, eventually logging up to 95 miles in a week. He registered his first win of the year at the Reedy River Run 10K in Greenville, SC in March, with a time of 30:08. The win spring him to two more strong performances. boarded

Mattie Suver graduated from Laramie (WY) High

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School. She originally joined the track team as a way to stay in shape for volleyball and didn’t run cross country until her senior year. She was never a standout in high school, placing 17th in the state cross country meet, and never breaking 20 minutes for the 5K. But she fell in love with the sport and knew that she wanted to continue running in college. Mattie walked on to Eastern Washington University, ultimately  earning a scholarship and making it to the NCAA Division I cross country and track nationals. She graduated in three years and attended the University of Oregon for graduate school, where she completed her final two years of running eligibility. She was a three-time Division I All-American at University of Oregon. Suver attended the 2011 RunPro Camp and quickly became a standout. She joined the BRC/adidas team and American Distance Project under coach Scott Simmons in July 2012. Since then,  her running career has taken off, posting personal bests in every distance she’s raced, from 10K (32:29) to the half marathon (1:11:56). She was the 2012 club cross country champion, earning a spot on  Team USA  for the  World Cross Country Championships BUPA Edinburgh, where, as a member of the 2013 U.S. team, she placed 26th overall and third for Team USA. In November 2013 after receiving the Roads Scholar grant, Suver ran the New York City Marathon. Despite conditions that were not ideal, she managed to PR with a time of 2:41:17, qualifying for the 2016 Olympic Trials – Marathon,

Professional Distance Running Resource Center

RunPro Camp The RunPro Camp is designed for distance runners who are interested in pursuing a professional running career after college. The 2014 RunPro Camp will be held in Arlington, VA on July 17-19, 2014 by the RRCA. Applications for RunPro Camp are due on May 15, 2014. College graduates from June 2013 – June 2014 are encouraged to apply. Select individuals will receive funding to attend the camp.

Apply today for this great opportunity at Funded by the Road Runners Club of America

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with a time of 2:16:20, then 24th at the U.S. Olympic Trials with a 2:15:11, and then won the California International Marathon in 2:16:29. While studying for the bar exam in July, Tapia was informed he’d been chosen as an injury replacement to represent the United States in the marathon at the IAAF World Track & Field Championships in Moscow, largely on the strength of a ninth-place 2:14:30 at the 2013 Boston Marathon. Under the guidance of his Hartnell coach, Chris Zepeda, and Colorado Springs–based American Distance Project coach Scott Simmons, Tapia compressed an eight-week training schedule into just four weeks. He finished the marathon in 2:18:31, good for 27th overall and second among Team USA runners. In January 2014, Tapia’s time of 64:32, just off his personal best, qualified him for the 2016 Olympic Trials – Marathon.

and finishing third among American females and 17th overall. Suver also placed third overall in the USA Road Running Circuit for the year. She was leading the standings up until the 12K championships, which were two weeks after NYC Marathon, and dropped to third after the 12K. In December, Suver made a trip to Bend, OR for USA Club Cross Country Championships with the BRC/adidas Retail Race team, where they placed second as a team. She was voted 10th by Runners World for the 2013 Running Times runner of the year, and took 7th place in the 2013 USATF 10K rankings. Most recently, Suver ran the USATF Half Marathon Championships in Houston, where she placed 6th overall in a time of 1:13:06. Daniel Tapia

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Amy Van Alstine

Daniel Tapia began running as a sophomore at North Monterey County High School in Castroville, CA, initially to get in better shape for soccer season. However, thanks to the success of his running team and the close-knit environment fostered by coaches Bruce White and Gustavo Ibarra, he fell in love with the sport. Though he had moderate success competing at Hartnell Community College, where he ran a 5K in 14:35, and on University of California, Santa Cruz’s club team, the spark for Tapia’s emergence in the sport came at the 2010 Big Sur Marathon. There, in the first marathon of his life, Tapia won the race with a time of 2:26:09. Working out twice a day in between waiting tables at his family’s restaurant and attending Monterey School of Law night classes, Tapia placed seventh at the 2011 San Diego Marathon

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Amy Van Alstine started running cross country and track for Midland Park (NJ) High School. Her siblings all ran and  excelled,  so her father encouraged her to follow in their footsteps. During her time at Midland Park, she became the 2004 Group 1 State Champion in cross country and indoor track (3200m) and outdoor track (3200m). She also earned first

Team All-State honors in cross country and was named 2005 YMCA Student–Athlete of the Year. Van Alstine ran for the University of Richmond Spiders in Richmond, VA, where she was a 2011 All-American in the 5K outdoors. She was also the school record holder in the outdoor 1500m, 3K, and 5K and broke the Atlantic 10 Conference  1500m record. At the end of her college career, she was named Atlantic 10 Athlete of the Year. Postcollegiate Van Alstine joined adidas-McMillan Elite in Flagstaff, where she has had great success,  achieving personal bests in every event from 1500m on the track on up to  10K on the  roads. She has personal bests from this past year of 4:14.56 (1500m) and 15:36.56 (5K) on the track, and 25:50 (8K) and 33:15.72 (10K) on the roads.   Van Alstine kicked off 2013 by finishing fourth overall and first American competitor in February’s Shamrockin’ Run 8K in New Orleans. Twice during the year, she set personal records in the 10K, running a 33:15 and finished second at the Newport 10K in Jersey City, NJ, then besting that time with a 32:51 at the Tufts 10K in Boston. Although she finished sixth overall and third among Americans, Van Alstine calls this performance her best race of the year. Later in the fall after receiving the Roads Scholar grant, Van Alstine entered a 5K in Phoenix with the intention of breaking the Arizona state record of 16:13. She shattered that mark, running a 15:50, breaking not only the course and state records, but also setting a new PR at her favorite 5K distance in the process.

Roads Scholar Fund

The following clubs, events, individuals, and corporate supporters helped raise $26,836 this year to support the Roads Scholar Fund. We thank them for their support and look forward to adding your name in 2014. Learn more at www.rrca.org/about/support/ Alaska Salmon Runs • Alta Vista Sports • Annette Kilder • Atlanta Track Club*** Atomic City Roadrunners • Bee McLeod and Goody Tyler** Blue Cross Broad Street Run* • Bobby Vance • Brevard County Dental Society Championship Racing LLC • Credit Union Cherry Blossom 10 Mile Race**** Club Northwest • Cumberland Valley Athletic Club** • Fulmont Road Runners Club Greater Redondo Youth Running Club • John Maley • Kansas City Track Club Lilac Bloomsday Association** • Mitchell E. Garner • Montana Amateur Sports Inc. NAPA Valley Marathon** • Nashville Striders • River City Run, Inc. River City Runners & Walkers Club • Riverbend Striders • Running Club of Granville Seashore Striders • Syracuse Chargers Track Club* • The Boilermaker Road Race, Inc. Travis Eliot Landreth Memorial Scholarship Fund** • Utica Road Runners White Rock Racing • Willamette Valley Road Runners

****$10,000 and above donors ***$5,000 and above donors **$1,000 and above donors *$500 and above donors

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GIVING ELITE ATHLETE DEVELOPMENT:

Transforming Potential into Performance / Part 3 of a Three-Part Series by  David  Hunter

The economic framework for competitive running in America has undergone several spurts of evolution over the past 40 years. The initial Shorter–Rodgers Running Boom of the 1970s sparked a more realistic, financially fueled system of open racing that replaced the noble, yet clearly antiquated concept of pure amateurism. More recently, business support of top-flight athletes has become more pervasive as Corporate America increasingly views elite runners—and the growing participation base behind them—as an effective vehicle to support

civilization’s oldest sport and—not coincidentally—to reach its marketplace and customers. Also helpful, although somewhat less consistently effective, has been the emergence of the club system, which has aided promising young runners with world-class potential. But runner support also comes from yet another noteworthy source: elite runners themselves. Inspired by a desire to extend their careers, to continue involvement with the sport they love, or in more than a few cases, to express their simple gratitude, successful runners have increasingly

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This is the third and final installment of a threepart series, “Elite Athlete Development: Transforming Potential into Performance.� The initial segment overviewed the history of this country’s bumpy transformation from the pristine Olympic ideal of amateur athletics to the more realistic, open racing framework. The second installment assessed the current state of elite athlete development in America. This final segment examines how some athletes have chosen to “give back� to the sport they love.

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BACK found ways to “give back” and to elevate the sport in a variety of helpful and meaningful ways. Notwithstanding the focus and commitment required for his world-class successes dating back more than a decade, Meb Keflezighi has made the time, created the vision, and provided the energy to give back to the sport that has been good to him. Working closely with his brother/agent, Merhawi (Hawi), Meb has found a way to combine his passion for running with his deep-seated desire to help promising youngsters in the sport, just as he himself was assisted. Hawi, four years Meb’s junior and a UCLA-trained lawyer, reflects on the Mammoth Track Club and how it all started. “When Bob Larson, Joe Vigil, Meb, and Deena Kastor started the Running USA program in Mammoth—now the Mammoth Track Club—they had an agenda,” notes Hawi. “Their agenda was to take athletes who grew up in the United States, went through the high school and college system here, and help them achieve big goals, Olympic medals.”

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These training groups of elite athletes didn’t focus myopically on the present. They were intent on creating an effective training dynamic that would become self-sustaining. “They knew that if they could prepare the current generation of runners to win medals on the world’s biggest stages, those performances would inspire the next generation,” Hawi explains. “I think the fruits of that labor have been the medals won in the Olympic Games. I think one of the primary things coming out of the Mammoth program has been motivation by performance and by achievement.” The Keflezighi brothers have found other ways to reach out, to lend a hand, to pay it forward. They both saw that the positive notoriety Meb enjoyed after capturing the 2004 Olympic marathon silver medal positioned him on a unique platform to help and inspire others. “Like the marathon, life can sometimes be difficult, challenging, and present obstacles. However, if you believe in your dreams and never, ever give up, things will turn out for the best,” states Meb, in reciting what has become his life’s credo. That governing principle inspired the MEB Foundation, an institution created by the brothers and guided by the goal of “Maintaining Excellent Balance” in life. It’s this drive for balance that Meb Keflezighi believes has contributed greatly to his success as a marathon champion, family man, and community leader. Through the MEB Foundation, the Keflezighi brothers have, among other things, provided meaningful support to the New York Armory’s College Prep Program “Classroom 2 Anywhere” and to Loma Linda (CA) Hospital’s Medals of Courage Program. Deena Kastor and her husband, Andrew, are another family duo that has found the balance between athleticism and mentoring. “Coach Joe Vigil and coach Bob Larson collaborated and built a team around Meb and Deena up here in Mammoth Lakes,” reflects Andrew on the club’s 2001 origin. Mammoth Lakes’ elected city officials were visionary enough to see a win-win situation and stepped up to offer meaningful economic support for the club. “The town was looking to branch off from simply being a winter ski resort town and wanted to position itself as a summer running destination as well. The leaders saw the ability to attract some high-profile athletes as advancing that goal.” Andrew notes how the deplorable state of American distance running in 2000 helped jumpstart the Mammoth training experiment. “The USA had such a dismal performance in the 2000 Sydney Olympics. We only sent one man and one woman in the marathon to those Games,” Andrew explains, “and there was a general

recognition that the East Africans had this great training model: group training at high altitude. So [combine] the high altitude savvy of coach Joe Vigil and the Mammoth Lakes experience of coach Bob Larson, who had been bringing his UCLA teams up to this region for summer training for decades,” notes Andrew, “and four years later, we had two athletes [Deena Kastor and Meb Keflezighi] on the Olympic marathon podium.” The 2004 Olympic marathon silver medalist Deena Kastor can look back on many assists she had on her road to the Olympic podium. One was certainly the economic support she received early in her career—when elite athletes on the rise need it the most—from the Roads Scholar program founded by the RRCA. Over the years the Roads Scholar program has aided many, including two recent Mammoth Track Club Roads Scholar recipients: Gabe Proctor and 2014 USATF Half Marathon runner-up Lauren Kleppin. More than a decade later and now guided by the Kastors, the Mammoth Track Club continues to nurture a select group of elite distance runners at its 8,000-foot retreat in the Eastern Sierras. “We have time standards,” explains Andrew, as he outlines how runners join the squad. “So if athletes make the minimum standards, we’ll take a look at them. All athletes have to visit for three or four days in Mammoth, paid for on their own, before they commit to the club. We want to ensure there is good chemistry among the athletes. Once they’re here, we provide housing for them.” Andrew Kastor smiles as he reveals the somewhat unorthodox way he handles the incoming stream of regular inquiries. “I have never recruited anybody,” admits Andrew. “I just field emails and phone calls. And I let the emails and phone calls slide,” he confesses. “And when they contact me again, I respond to them. Deena and I ultimately make the call on who joins the squad.” Under the Kastors’ leadership, guidance of the team is a shared responsibility. “The way we position ourselves, I’m the head coach and I write all the training programs and help strategize races for the athletes,” explains Andrew. “Deena is positioned as the mentor,” he says on the role of his Olympic medal–winning spouse. “She has performed on the world’s largest stages and been successful at racing at that level. Deena trains with the girls, and the girls ask her questions pretty much every single run. They talk about her development and her approach to racing.” The Kastors work to find that special balance that can create a professional, yet comfortable approach to pursuing world-class dreams in a team environment at altitude. “Between Deena and me, it’s a professional club, but it’s also a mom-and-pop club.” And in a serious moment, Andrew offers insight into the genuine motivation behind the Kastors’ dedication to Mammoth Track Club. “Distance running has been very good to us, and we want to give back,” Andrew explains.

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“We don’t come into this sport to become rich and famous. We have done very well, but we want to be able to give back to the sport, too. We see value in giving back, and we are very happy to do so.” A growing number of athletes, many of whom have benefited from postcollegiate elite group training, see the benefit of the continued growth of these athlete-driven support groups. Amy Begley, a 15-time All-American distance star and two-time national champion while at the University of Arkansas, struggled to find the right training environment after leaving Fayetteville in 2001. After a frustrating, sixyear, nomadic existence with interim training stints that weaved through Indiana, Australia, Albuquerque, and Atlanta, Begley finally found the right fit with Nike Oregon Project. At the end of 2006, Begley, frustrated and frequently injured, was contemplating retirement. “I told myself I would give myself 18 months to make the Olympic team to see if I could make my dream come true,” says Begley. The move to Portland paid off. In 2008, Begley made the U.S. Olympic team in the 10,000 and finished 26th in the Beijing final. “The Oregon Project gave me all the resources I never had,” explains Begley. “I had free massage, free chiropractor. I was on a livable wage for

once with my contract. We had a sports psychologist. We had access to the pool, the weight room—all the things that an athlete would need. Everything I had been struggling to pay for [for] years was now being offered to me by the Oregon Project.” But there was more. The following year, Begley continued to ride the wave of ongoing Oregon Project support: She won the 10,000 meter USATF title, made the U.S. national team, and competed in the Berlin World Championships, where she finished sixth in the 10,000, posting a PR of 31:13.78. Now retired from elite competition, Begley serves as the women’s head cross country coach and assistant women’s track & field coach at the University of Connecticut. But she hasn’t forgotten how she stumbled into just the right situation that allowed her to achieve her dream. Stirred by her own postcollegiate struggle and the professional career that nearly slipped away, Begley has founded the Distance Divas Elite. “The goal of the group is to help U.S. distance women to bridge the gap between collegiate and professional running,” explains the 36-year-old former Olympian, who notes that final 501(c)(3) approval for her fledgling organization is pending. “The average age has typically been around 28 for women who make the Olympic team in the distance events. It is

pretty typical to have a gap between college and when you make the team. Too many talented young women slip through the cracks due to the limited number of well-funded opportunities that are available.” Begley—who, like Kastor, was an early beneficiary of the RRCA Roads Scholar program—wants to help other promising athletes, the majority of whom do not get the big postcollegiate contract, to bypass the missteps she made as a younger hopeful so they have a fair and supported chance to pursue a professional running career. Hoping to cultivate an alternative source of economic support different from the sparse and often-fickle traditional shoe company funding, Begley envisions an elite family of women distance runners who provide support for community fitness programs for youngsters and adults in exchange for funding from local businesses and foundations. Inspired by the earlier successes achieved by initiatives such as the MEB Foundation and the Mammoth Track Club and fueled by vision, gratitude, and pure distance runner determination, Amy Begley is unlikely to rest until the Distance Divas are up and flying and assisting the next wave of young women runners to achieve their fullest potential. It seems clear that the major economic engine for more effective elite athlete development in the U.S. road racing arena must come from the corporate sector, those Fortune 500 companies that have economic clout. They have been and will continue to be the companies that can see and cultivate that special dual opportunity that will both advance their business agenda while assisting a legion of promising postcollegiate athletes to transform potential into elevated performance. But, as can be seen in these examples, the assistance that can come from somewhat less muscular, yet well-designed support programs crafted and headed by respected elite athletes can also make a meaningful difference for the next generation of promising young athletes—and for the sport itself.

Dave Hunter, who ran his marathon P.R. of 2:31:40 back in the Paleozoic era, is a journalist who writes frequently about running and track & field. He can be reached at dhunter@brouse.com PhotoRun.NET

Amy Begley

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Program Spotlight

2013 RRCA Kids Run the Nation Grantees Inspire Thousands of Youth to Get Active By  Andy  Smith,  RRCA  Program  Coordinator Last October the RRCA announced the 2013 Kids Run the Nation (KRTN) grant recipients. Twenty-five programs throughout the U.S., serving more than 4,500 children, received a total of $20,250 in grants from the RRCA’s Kids Run the Nation Fund. In addition the RRCA donated more than 10,000 copies of “Kids Run the Nation: A Running Guide for Kids” booklets to program participants in 34 programs, an in-kind donation valued in excess of $10,000. Congratulations to the following grantees: Mississippi Delta Runners (Sledge, MS), Kids Run/Walk Arkansas (Conway, AR), Grand Strand Running Club (Myrtle Beach, SC), Keowee Kids Running Club (Seneca, SC), YMCA Club South Youth Runners Program (Baton Rouge, LA), Eagle Ridge Elementary PTA Running Club (Fort Worth, TX), YMCA Camp/Gadsden Runners Club Youth Division (Gadsden, AL), Somerville Road Runners Kids (West Somerville, MA), Patterson Park Public Charter School Running Club (Baltimore, MD), Gator Trek Club (Pine Hill, NJ), Longridge Running Club (Greece, NY), Navigator’s Running Club (Providence, RI), Kids Run the Nation – Saginaw (Saginaw, MI), Nielson Navigators Run For Fun (Galesburg, IL), Ontarioville Owls (Hanover Park, IL), Esperanza Eagles (Greenwood, IN), Cavanaugh Kids Run the Nation (Lansing, MI), YMCA in Woodbury Kids Run the Nation (Woodbury, MN), Pomaika’i Running Club (Kaului, HI), Jemez Valley Cross Country/100 Mile Club (Jemez Pueblo, NM), Hiawatha Elementary Run Club (Othello, WA), Birney Running Club (San Diego, CA), Clover Quick Feet (Los Angeles, CA), Jackie Kids Run the Nation (San Diego, CA), Torres Running Club (Los Angeles, CA). Detailed descriptions of each program can be found at www.RRCA.org/services/news/ Since 2007, the RRCA has provided over $90,000 in small grants to deserving youth running programs around the country through the Kids Run the Nation Fund. The fund is designed to provide needed resources to launch and support youth running programs as an opportunity to address the ongoing inactivity and obesity crisis facing today’s youth. The RRCA strives to award grants to programs that serve diverse student populations that are at an increased risk for diseases associated with inactivity and obesity, including the following highlighted programs that received grants in 2013. Mississippi Delta Runners – Sledge, MS Mississippi Delta Runners is an exciting, effective physical activity program for youth. This is an afterschool program that serves over 200 children in grades 4–8. At least three times a week during the school year, children run on the Delta Missions/Trinity Community Center parking lot, up to a total of 6 miles a week, according to their running abilities. When the children complete their running for the day, they return to the center for a snack and educational activities. The goal of the running program is to provide a fun, effective physical activity program for youth. The children served reside in the Delta area of Mississippi, where children’s bellies were once distended from malnutrition, but is now the fattest region in America and leads the country in childhood obesity. 88% of the children served are overweight or obese. 100% of them (200) live in poor families (defined as having an income below 100% of the federal poverty level).

RRCA.org

Kids Run/Walk Arkansas – Conway, AR Based on the 2009–10 Arkansas Center for Health Improvements Assessment of Childhood and Adolescent Obesity in Arkansas, 34.8% of Faulkner County’s children are overweight or obese. In addition, according to the 2012 County Health Rankings, Faulkner County is expected to see a 3.17%–5.19% increase over the next three years. It’s believed that overweight children are more likely to become overweight adults. Obesity can lead to diabetes, high blood pressure, and many other health problems. Long aware of this, the Conway Regional Health & Fitness Center created the annual Kids Run Arkansas Run/Walk in 2009. Over 200 kids participated in the inaugural event and by 2013 there were more than 500 participants. Highly qualified Conway Center staff members train and equip physical education teachers and parent volunteers in schools to implement the proven KTRN running and educational curriculum in before- and after-school programs. Offered twice a week for 10 weeks for both semesters, the focus is on participation and developing a healthy lifestyle. Lessons include running form, goal setting, nutrition, safety, and other concepts. Kids Run the Nation Saginaw – Saginaw, MI Kids Run the Nation–Saginaw follows the 10-lesson program guide provided by the RRCA’s KTRN program. Lessons are taught over 10 weeks, with 20 minutes of instruction followed by 40 minutes of a running activity and games. The program meets up to three times a week and has partnered with Saginaw Valley State University to provide student-athlete volunteers as well as other community partners who visit the “club” to talk about specific topics; e.g., nutrition and form. Every participant is provided with a t-shirt, a backpack tag, a KRTN booklet, a journal, and a snack at the end of each lesson. The program concludes with a celebratory 1-mile race. Presently, the program has 114 children registered from kindergarten through 5th grade. The program has expanded from the initial pilot school (44 participants) to two additional schools with plans in place to expand to the local YMCA during the summer of 2014. The projected number of youth served from Fall 2013 to Summer of 2014 is approximately 230.

Spring 2014 ClubRunning • 17


Program Spotlight “The need to financially support youth running continues to grow as more evidence-based research shows that organized running programs for youth are a key component in combating childhood obesity,” explained Jean Knaack, RRCA executive director. “We received over 230 applications for programs that are getting over 75,000 children running regularly, and they are all deserving of financial support.” The Kids Run the Nation program is a gender-inclusive, multiweek, turnkey, youth running program designed to meet the physical activity goals outlined by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA) for

children in grades kindergarten through sixth grade. A midcourse report issued by the USDA, “Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans,” outlines clear evidence that bringing physical activity into schools positively impacts youth. Through this program, the RRCA’s vision is to help establish locally managed youth running programs in every grade school in America. Learn more about donating to the program by visiting us online at www.rrca.org/about/support/

Thank you to the following individuals, events, and organizations that contributed over $23,480 to the Kids Run the Nation Fund in 2013. We thank them for their support. 15th Street Flyers Abilene Runners Club Alaska Salmon Runs Alta Vista Sports Andrea Thibault Francis Ann Arbor Track Club* Annapolis Half Marathon Annette Kilder Anonymous Donor Atomic City Roadrunners Bee McLeod*** Bill Ritter Bobby Vance Boston Police Runners Club Brevard County Dental Society Cardinal Track Club* Carz N Toyz Inc. Cecil Parks Columba Quintero Germantown Half Marathon & Mayor’s Cup 5K Greater Redondo Youth Run Club

18 • ClubRunning Spring 2014

Hawaii Ultra Running Team Hogeye Marathon and Relays Houston Striders** Joe Hannon John K. Huseby** Indianapolis Marathon John Maley Kansas City Track Club Kelly Richards* Lake Grapevine Runners and Walkers** Maine Track Club** Mark Acher Mark Grandonico Marleen Waldron Monisha Randolph Murfreesboro Half Marathon Nashville Striders North Carolina Roadrunners On My Own Two Feet, Inc. Pensacola Race Management PR Fitness Livestrong Group

River City Run Inc. Riverbend Striders Runner’s High Club Running Club of Granville Sarah Solie Seashore Striders Shelley Hodkiewicz Southern Arizona Roadrunners Springfield Road Runner’s Club Star Insurance Agency** Sustainable Sports Foundation** Terry Diller** Theresa Melvin Tidewater Striders Tough Mother LLC Varsity Running West Florida Y Runners Club White Rock Racing ***$5,000 and above donors **$1,000 and above donors *$500 and above donors

RRCA.org


Program Spotlight  2013 RUN@WORK, RUN@School Day Recap By  Andy  Smith,  RRCA  Program  Coordinator The Road Runners Club of America partnered with many businesses and schools to promote the 8th annual RUN@WORK Day and the 2nd annual RUN@School Day on Sept. 20, 2013. Through this partnership, our organizations worked together to promote physical activity and healthy living within our workplaces and communities around the country. The goal of RUN@WORK and RUN@ School Days is to encourage adults and children to get 30 minutes of exercise each day, as recommended in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, either in the morning, during lunch, or immediately after work or school. RUN@WORK and RUN@School Days also encourage businesses to help employees schedule time for physical activity. Incorporating exercise into one’s daily routine can markedly improve one’s overall physical health. “We chose to participate because I’m an avid runner who runs at lunch,” said Valerie Blajeski of the Alaska Dept. of Fish & Game in Anchorage. “Folks always mention that they’d like to join me but don’t always have an incentive to do so. This event shows them how feasible it is to squeeze in some physical activity during your lunch break.” Blajeski also noted that her office offered a 5K run or 1-mile walk along trails adjacent to her office at noon with a potluck lunch to follow. The office also put out a running clock at the finish so folks could time themselves if they wanted to. Christopher Wooleyhand, principal of Richard Henry Lee Elementary School in Glen Burnie, MD, said his staff “sponsored the event to promote a healthy and active lifestyle, not just for students but also for school staff members.” The school began the day with a 7:50 a.m. staff run where participants lapped the building twice. At recess, close to 500 students ran a cross country course, and every finisher received a medal. Throughout the day, teachers took smaller groups of students outside for various running activities. Durbin Elementary School in Hopatcong, NJ also found a unique way to celebrate the day. Four teachers—Kristine Mendyk, Tatianna Altamirano, Carmela Catizone, and Mary Noonan—ran the nearly 4.5-mile commute to work that morning, and were greeted by more than 200 cheering students upon their arrival. Mendyk told the New Jersey Herald that the run was “aimed at demonstrating to the students that they can incorporate exercise into their daily lives.” Landry’s Inc., a hospitality and restaurant group headquartered in Texas, participated in the event for a second year and saw its participants double in number. Recognizing the importance of promoting physical activity for employees, Landry’s has also an ongoing version of RUN@WORK, leading morning and evening workout sessions on the third Thursday of every month. Throughout 2013’s RUN@WORK and RUN@School Days, participants shared their pictures, observations, and videos on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram using the hashtag #runatwork. According to the social media analytics site Topsy, over 500 tweets were sent in the 24 hours of RUN@WORK and RUN@School Day. The outpouring of participants taking to social media allowed the RRCA to use Storify, a digital media curation tool, to assemble a visual timeline demonstrating the diversity and popularity of the event. To view this Storify timeline, visit www.rrca.org/services/news-entry/runwork-and-runschool-day-participants-share-pictures-reflections1/ Our friends at Brooks Running created several fun pictographics and shared five helpful tips for RUN@WORK Day, which has been shared on their site at www.talk. brooksrunning.com/2013/09/16/5-ways-to-celebrate-run-at-work-day It’s never too soon to begin planning your event for the 9th annual RUN@WORK Day and 3rd annual RUN@School Day scheduled for Sept. 19. As you prepare, use the hashtags #RRCANational and #Runatwork for your Twitter posts.

RRCA.org

MAY 1 - 4, 2014 SPOKANE, WA

THE BLOOMSDAY ROAD RUNNER’S CLUB INVITES YOU TO JOIN US FOR THE 56TH ANNUAL RRCA NATIONAL CONVENTION WWW.RRCA.ORG/CONVENTION/

Spring 2014 ClubRunning • 19


FEEL THE RUN THE NEW NOT THE ROAD GEL-NIMBUS 16 速

Want to run on clouds? Equipped with GEL速 Cushioning technology, runners will float through each mile in the new luxuriously plush GEL- Nimbus 16.

#BETTERYOURBEST Available exclusively in run specialty stores through June 30, 2014 and at ASICS.com


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FORTIUS Media Group, LLC

2014 Spring Shoe Review

Partners

Welcome to the 2014 Spring Shoe Review from the FORTIUS Media Group, LLC partner publications and websites. Since 1998, we have been reviewing running footwear for you, our readers. The team of footwear reviewer Cregg Weinmann, designer Kristen Cerer, proofereader Marg Sumner, and project manager Christine Johnson, along with our many shoe weartesters, strives to provide clear, concise reviews of the best running products in the world. Our goal is simple: to help you find the perfect running shoe for you.

So, where should you go to try out and purchase your shoes? We strongly recommend a running specialty retailer. In other words, buy your shoes from one of your local running stores. If you want to buy online, go to the local running store’s website. Why do we encourage this? First, because we think that you get the proper fitting; and second, because you’re supporting the place that gives you information throughout the year and sponsors your local events and school teams. You may be wondering about FORTIUS Media Group, LLC. There have been some changes on the running scene, and it’s the name of our new company. Watch for some new social media options, digital video, and innovative training information that’ll be headed your way in the coming months. Our 22 publications and 29 websites are poised to help you continue to enjoy your running for many years into the future!

Larry Eder Publishing Director FORTIUS Media Group, LLC P.S. And as a reminder, we offer three—count ‘em 3!—ways for you to get regular information via the web. 1. Daily product reviews at www.runningproductreviews.com 2. Local running news and event info at the magazine websites (listed on the right) 3. The latest news and results at www.runblogrun.com

Brooks Transcend

Newton Motion III

Nike Zoom Fly

NEW SHOE

RENOVATION

VALUE

Spring S pring g 2014 201 20 4

S i g 2014 Spring 2014

Spring 2014

Mizuno Wave Paradox

New Balance Fresh Foam 980

American Track & Field www.american-trackandfield.com Athletes Only www.atf-athlete.com Austin Fit www.austinfitmagazine.com California Track & Running News www.caltrack.com Canadian Athletics www.athleticsontario.ca Club Running (RRCA) www.rrca.org/publications/ club-running Coaching Athletics Quarterly www.coachingathleticsq.com Colorado Runner www.coloradorunnermag.com Footnotes (Long Island, NY) www.glirc.org Get Active! www.healthclubs.com Latinos Corriendo www.latinoscorriendo.com Michigan Runner www.michiganrunner.net New England Exchange Zone www.usatfne.org RunMinnesota www.runmdra.org Running Journal & Racing South www.running.net RunOhio www.runohio.com Track & Field News www.trackandfieldnews.com Winged Foot (NYC) www.nyac.org Winged M (Portland, OR) www.themac.com Youth Runner www.youthrunner.com www.marathonguide.com www.runblogrun.com www.runningproductreviews.com Project Coordinator/Editor: Christine Johnson Reviewer: Cregg Weinmann Designer: Kristen Cerer Proofreader: Marg Sumner, Red Ink Editorial Services Shoe Photography: Daniel Saldaña, Cregg Weinmann Advertising Sales: FORTIUS Media Group, LLC Publishing Director: Larry Eder, 608.239.3785, fortiusmedia@gmail.com Legal Counsel: Perry F. Goldust This 2014 Spring Shoe Review is produced independently by FORTIUS Media Group, LLC for its partner publications. All shoes reviewed were tested by experienced, competitive runners who were matched to the biomechanical purpose of each shoe model.

On Cloud

Motion Stabilizing

Neutral

Performance

Spring 2014

S Spring g 2014 4

Spring S i 2014 4

Copyright © 2014 by FORTIUS Media Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be stored, copied, or reprinted without prior written permission of FORTIUS Media Group, LLC. FORTIUS Media Group, LLC and its partner publications suggest that, as with all fitness activities, you meet with a healthcare professional before beginning or changing your fitness regimen.

2014 Spring Shoe Review — 2 — FORTIUS Media Group, LLC


PER FO RM A N C E Newton Motion III

175

$

RENOVATION S i g 2014 Spring 2014

Nike Zoom Fly

90

$

VALUE Spring 2014

On Cloud

109

$

Performance Spring S i 2014 4

Puma Faas 500 v3

Saucony Mirage 4

110

$

110

$

Newton is evolving, and that’s reflected in its shoes, with specific categories to address biomechanical and technical preferences. The Motion III is the first of Newton’s mainline shoes to be updated. The upper now features a full saddle—light but secure, thanks to nosew overlays—and somewhat forgiving with a closed stretch-mesh. The interior is smooth, with Lycra in the ankle collar and tongue, which offers good comfort while keeping it spare enough to save weight. The high-quality EVA midsole features a 3mm drop from heel to toe, a broader midfoot that’s now a full-contact bottom, and the Action/Reaction plate in a new five-lug configuration. Between the broader and flatter geometry and new lug spacing, the shoe is much more stable yet it still delivers the unique Newton feel. Keeping an eye on the scale, the outersole minimizes the rubber and uses it thinly where it’s placed: coverage that’s adequate and lightweight. The Motion III delivers lightweight performance with a touch of stability, earning it our Best Renovation Award.

“Smooth, snug, comfortable fit. The ride was light and responsive, great for my faster runs.”

The Zoom Fly is a bit of a sleeper: Don’t be fooled by its low price and seemingly simple design. Borrowing from the Bowerman heritage and mixing in a bit of its Lunar engineering, the result is a Performance shoe for this moment. The upper is open mesh in the forefoot with closed mesh in the mid- and rearfoot, and married together with no-sew overlays. The tapered toebox provides a good fit and retains its shape well, thanks to a synthetic leather toe cap. The toebox also includes a bunion window to accommodate the forefoot width. The midsole is a combination of Phylon and Cushlon, molded to provide support and protection. It’s got a Zoom Air bag in the forefoot and uses 8mm geometry. The outersole is BRS 1000 carbon rubber in the heel, with mini-waffles providing traction up front. The Zoom Fly is an effective Performance shoe for faster-paced runs and even for long races. And at $90, it’s an outstanding value—so good, in fact, that it won honors as our Best Value Shoe.

“Secure fit and a nice, low-to-the-ground feel. Protective and nimble. This has been a go-to shoe for fast running.”

The Cloud takes On technology a step beyond. The original outersole lugs, called clouds, were made of dense—and heavy—rubber. Thanks to a new process, On is now using road-grade EVA foam, a much lighter material that’s been engineered to achieve the same effect without the extra weight. The closed mesh upper has a partial gusset and an overlapping saddle to secure the midfoot. It comes with both traditional laces and a stretch lace, and the smooth interior is suitable for sockless wear—both nods to its triathlon roots. The midsole is a high-quality EVA blend, forming the clouds along its length, and divided by a longitudinal gap that allows the foot to flex more naturally throughout the gait. Its 6mm geometry supports greater gait efficiency. The outersole sports a few touches of rubber at the heel and toe for durability, with the clouds managing the rest of the cushioning duties. The fit, ride, and innovation earned the Cloud our Best Performance Shoe award.

“Smooth—even plush—interior. Flexes well, has an agile feel to it; light and smooth. For my fast runs, these were what I reached for.”

The Faas 500 is the taproot of the Faas series, with other models branching off to suit different needs. Round 3 makes changes to the upper, while maintaining the ride and feel of Round 2. The upper offers a closed mesh, as in v2, but the midfoot now features a saddle-like framework with synthetic leather stanchions that loop into the lacing, snugging the foot over the midsole. The ankle collar and interior have beefier layers of memory foam, achieved without adding much weight—a worthwhile trade-off. The midsole continues with the 4mm geometry, and the EVA blend of elastomers offers the resilient cushioning, flexibility, and comfort the model has been known for. The outersole remains substantially the same—good news, since it was already an effective set-up going into the update. The result is a familiar shoe that works well for faster runs, a share of your daily training, or—in a pinch—even the occasional race. 

The Mirage has been the most versatile of Saucony’s Natural Motion Series shoes, nestled between the Kinvara and the Cortana. Round 4 focuses on the upper and midsole to raise the bar for excellence, but not at the expense of the expected performance. The upper is a closed mesh with the usual adjustments to overlays: here, lightweight Flexfilm that belies its strength and support. The midsole still sits on 4mm geometry, but the substitution of PowerGrid for Round 3’s ProGrid now provides a more responsive feel to the shoe’s ride. The outersole is unchanged: The XT-900 carbon rubber heel and iBR (injection blown rubber) of the forefoot provide traction, durability, and extra cushion. The Mirage 4 doesn’t disappoint. Its consistent nudge forward improves its quality and maintains its balance between high-mileage training and faster-paced runs.

2014 Spring Shoe Review — 3 — FORTIUS Media Group, LLC

Sizes: Men 6–13,14,15; Women 5–12 Weight: 9.5 oz. (men’s 11); 7.7 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics to mild overpronation, for faster-paced runs

Sizes: Men 7–13,14,15; Women 6–11 Weight: 9.8 oz. (men’s 11); 8.3 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics to mild overpronation, for faster-paced runs

Sizes: Men 8–14; Women 6–10 Weight: 8.5 oz. (men’s 11); 7.2 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics, for faster-paced runs

“Snug fit and good ground feel. Decent cushioning with a bouncy feel, especially for a lighter shoe. I enjoyed running my midlength runs in them.” Sizes: Men 7–13,14; Women 6–12 Weight: 10.8 oz. (men’s 11); 9.0 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

“Snug fit with better support than my other shoes. Responsive, but not super cushy. They are a little lighter and faster than my normal training shoes.” Sizes: Men: 7–13,14,15; Women: 5–12 Weight: 10.0 oz. (men’s size 11); 8.5 oz. (women’s size 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics to mild overpronation, for faster paced runs


MO T I O N S TA B I L IZING ASICS Gel-‐Kayano XX $160

ASICS GT-‐2000 2

120

$

Brooks Adrenaline GTS 14 $120

Brooks Transcend

160

$

NEW SHOE Spring S pring g 201 20 2014 4

Mizuno Wave Paradox $135

Motion Stabilizing Spring 2014

The Kayano is ASICS’ iconic Motion Stabilizing shoe, now updated for a remarkable 19th time! Round 20 builds on the strengths of Round 19 by refining the interaction between the FluidRide and FluidFit systems to improve the comfort of the ride. The upper has a similar stretch mesh as in Round 19, but the stretchy BioMorphic panels have been replaced with a matrix of welded overlays and the traditional overlays making up the logo stripe, each contributing to midfoot support. The midsole has more exposed Gel, a reduced layer of Solyte, and more SpEVA. This results in a softer ride that increases the weight but adds a plush feel to the ride. Fair tradeoff? Yes. The outersole is substantially the same, just some minor differences in texture. The expected performance remains: stability and a plush ride for the 20th time. Very well done.

“Plush feel, good support. The ride was like a luxury car, but still pretty responsive and durable.”

Since its introduction in the 1990s, ASICS’ 2000 series has been a bestseller, thanks to its focus on stability and cushioning. They remain its focus in the second iteration of the 2000. The upper sports minimal changes: Tweaks to the combination of welded and traditional overlays have improved the lacing and support. The midsole retains the FluidRide setup of the previous round, with a little more Gel even though the shoe is a bit lighter. The outersole, which was effective the first time out, sports minor changes to the molding, perhaps improving traction incrementally. The GT–2000 2 continues to offer stability and cushioning that will satisfy the faithful and provides a solid option for those looking for an effective stability shoe.

“The fit is familiar, trusted like an old friend. The ride is dependable, stable, and comfortable.”

One measure of a brand’s success is sales volume, and Brooks has done well with the Adrenaline. Round 14 reflects the approach that has been key to its growth: Implement change slowly and don’t mess with what’s working. The upper now features a saddle that’s framed by traditional overlays with no-sew on the lateral side and synthetic leather shoring up the medial side. The entire upper is closed stretch mesh except for the lace throat, which is simple webbing to save weight while allowing the lacing to adapt to the foot. The ankle collar and tongue now feature two wicking fabrics: one striated for extra grip, the other with “pores” that allow moisture to escape. The midsole has been reshaped in the lateral midfoot—filled in to increase ground contact and stability—and the transition from heel to toe-off has been improved by extending the crashpad, which is worth the extra bit of weight. The outersole is much the same (carbon rubber in the heel and blown rubber in the forefoot) with minor changes to the molding. The result is a well-cushioned, stable, high-mileage running shoe, just as we’ve come to expect of the Adrenaline.

“Roomy and smooth interior. The base feels wide, but they aren’t sluggish.”

The release of the new Transcend has created a buzz. Technically, it’s a replacement for the Trance, but it’s actually quite different, even before you look at its new concepts and features. The upper is closed mesh with both traditional synthetic suede and no-sew overlays. The heel is supported by a TPU structure that connects to one of the shoe’s new concepts, the Guide Rails. The rails are plastic ridges that run the length of the shoe around the perimeter between the upper and midsole, keeping the foot aligned over the midsole without impinging on its natural movement. The midsole features new geometry for Brooks: a 10mm drop and a measured stack height of 35mm, maximizing the cushioning. The midsole shaping provides full contact to add stability and employs a compound called Super DNA, Brooks’ most resilient compound. The resulting ride is plush but not mushy. The outersole is HPR carbon rubber in the heel, rounded off to smooth the touchdown. Flextra blown rubber under the forefoot is segmented for good flexibility. The performance, innovation, and product execution earned the Transcend our award for Best New Shoe.  With technological affinities to the Sayonara, the new Wave Paradox refines the Mizuno line by replacing the Nirvana and Alchemy as Mizuno’s premier Motion Stabilizing offering. The upper is closed mesh with a covering of rubbery TPU overlays that provide support while both reducing weight and providing a smooth interior. The midsole is U4ic polyolephin foam surrounding Mizuno’s asymmetrical Wave plate that extends and connects to an articulated forefoot plate to provide responsive cushioning and stability. The outersole is X-10 carbon rubber with a blown rubber forefoot, all in a full-contact bottom design. The combination of performance, technology, and effective support earned the Wave Paradox our award for Best Motion Stabilizing Shoe.

2014 Spring Shoe Review — 4 — FORTIUS Media Group, LLC

Sizes: Men 6–14,15,16 (D,2E,4E); Women 5–13 (2A,B,D) Weight: 11.9 oz. (men’s 11); 9.7 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation

Sizes: Men 6–14,15,16,17 (B,D,2E,4E); Women 5–13 (2A,B,D,2E) Weight: 12.0 oz. (men’s 11); 9.8 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation

Sizes: Men: 6–13,14,15; Women: 5–12 Weight: 12.4 oz. (men’s 11); 9.9 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: combination Strobel lasted, fiber board/EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation

“Looks spacey, but looks can be deceiving. The ride was well cushioned and pretty responsive. They fit well and were protective.” Sizes: Men: 7–13,14,15; Women: 5.5–12,13 Weight: 13.2 oz. (men’s 11); 10.5 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation

“I like the way Mizunos feel. These have a great fit, a snappy feel, and they were really stable.” Sizes: Men 8–14; Women 6–10 Weight: 12.2 oz. (men’s 11); 9.8 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted Recommended for: low- to medium-arched feet with moderate overpronation


MOTI ON S TAB I L I Z I NG Nike Lunar Eclipse 4

Saucony Guide 7

135

$

120

$

Long the showpiece for Nike’s Lunar technologies, the Eclipse continues that trend with significant changes in Round 4. As in Round 3, the upper is engineered mesh, but here it relies less on the Flywire strands for security. Instead, the Flywire has been placed within a saddle support of welded overlays covered with firm mesh and offset lacing to secure the foot. The thermoplastic heel counter has been modestly beefed up, primarily on the medial side. The midsole has been reshaped, narrowing the waist slightly and reducing the firm feeling of the carrier foam. The forefoot has a concentric tree-ring-like suspension that flexes to accommodate the foot’s forefoot motion, and reduced carbon rubber in the heel saves weight. The overall effect is a comfortable and efficient Motion Stabilizing shoe.

“Good heel lockdown with excellent toe room. Good responsive ride that I put a lot of miles on.”

The Guide is Saucony’s most versatile shoe, thanks to its stability and cushioning. In Round 7, Saucony has zeroed in on these aspects. The upper has a similar open mesh and traditional overlays, efficiently securing the foot over the sole. The midsole has been significantly retooled, keeping the 8mm geometry but engineering the segmentation and molding to optimize touchdown and transition. A full-length PowerGrid layer manages the kinetic energy and rests between the midsole and the Strobel board. The outersole continues with XT-900 carbon rubber and iBR blown rubber in the forefoot, though now the flex grooves follow the contours of the sole for better segmentation. The Guide 7 is truly performance for feet in need of a balance of cushioning and stability.

“Snug fit, but flexes well with my feet. Healthy chunk of foam underfoot, plenty of cushion and keeps things lined up.”

With its then-new midsole material that brought outstanding performance, the original Energy Boost created excitement. As good as the midsole material was, the importance of geometry and fit can’t be overemphasized, and the Energy Boost 2 focuses on dialing these in. The upper retains the stretchy fabric of the original, but adjustments in tailoring and additional structure in the saddle allow a more accommodating fit to the snugness, while effectively conforming to more feet. In some cases, sizing up is recommended, and the only way to know what works for you is to try it on. The midsole is unchanged, making the Boost a lightweight Neutral shoe that protects but also has a pretty snappy feel. The outersole features full-length Continental carbon rubber for more durability. With its cushy and responsive ride, the Boost continues to attract fans.

“Really like the feel of these shoes, the combination of the toespring and the energy return of the Boost when running. No matter how far I run in them, my feet still feel good.”

Sizes: Men 6–13,14,15; Women 5–12 Weight: 12.7 oz. (men’s 11); 10.8 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation

Sizes: Men 7–13,14,15,16; Women 5–12 Weight: 10.9 oz. (men’s 11); 9.0 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation

NEUT R A L adidas Energy Boost 2 $160

adidas Supernova Glide Boost $130

Hoka One One Conquest

170

$

The Glide Boost replaces the Supernova Glide, becoming the second established adidas running shoe to be transformed by the new Boost Foam. The engineered mesh upper has no-sew overlays and a supportive saddle created from the logo stripes over the midfoot. The tongue is gusseted to improve and smooth the fit, and it can’t slip out of alignment. The midsole is Boost Foam topped by a layer of EVA that provides a familiar Glide feel and spreads the force more evenly across the bouncier Boost Foam. This gives a unique ride that’s firmer than the Energy Boost, while retaining its lively feel. The outersole is durable and grippy, thanks to a thin layer of Continental® carbon rubber that covers most of the forefoot, though there are slots that allow the foot to flex through the gait. All in all, the Glide Boost is a well-cushioned and responsive Neutral shoe with a traditional adidas fit and at a price that’s modestly more affordable.

Designed for the roads, the new Conquest sports some new solutions with a Hoka spin. The upper is two layers of mesh: open air mesh on the inside and stiff minimesh on top. The layers of mesh sandwich synthetic leather supports. No-sew overlays create a full rand that connects to the eyestay and is thin, light, and flexible. The midsole is a new design for Hoka: A cradle of foam is contoured under the foot and nestles into a second layer of R-Mat foam with vertical siping in the heel. The result is a more pliable material and a design that’s more flexible than previous Hoka midsoles. The toughened road-grade EVA outersole features a bit of carbon rubber at the toe and lateral heel to bolster the durability. Our verdict on the Conquest? A well-cushioned shoe that’ll keep you on the road for the long run.

2014 Spring Shoe Review — 5 — FORTIUS Media Group, LLC

Sizes: Men 6.5–13,14,15; Women 5–12 Weight: 12.2 oz. (men’s 11); 9.7 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics 

“This shoe is an awesome, lightweight trainer fit for any length run. My toes like the wiggle room in the toebox.” Sizes: Men 6.5–13,14,15; Women 5–12 Weight: 11.5 oz. (men’s 11); 9.6 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics 

“It takes a few runs to get used to the feel. There’s no feel through the soles, but the giant, squishy [mid]sole provides a stable platform on any surface and [makes them] fun to run [in] downhill.” Sizes: Men 7.5–14; Women 6–11 Weight: 12.8 oz. (men’s 11); 10.1 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics


NEUTRAL Karhu Fluid 3 Fulcrum

Mizuno Wave Rider 17

125

$

115

$

New Balance Fresh Foam 980 $110

Neutral S Spring g 2014 4

New Balance 890 v4

110

$

The North Face Ultra Smooth $120

26 • ClubRunning Spring 2014

Re-launched to the U.S. market in 2006, Karhu continues to adapt its Fulcrum technology. The Fluid 3 is the next iteration of Neutral shoes for Karhu, following on the success of the Trail, Road, and Race versions of the Flow. The Fluid 3’s upper is an open mesh with synthetic suede overlays and welded supports in key spots. A bit of structure comes via a small supporting saddle and a semi-rigid heel counter. Its key feature is a new Fulcrum configuration of the 2-density foam that’s offset medially/laterally to accommodate the neutral gait and sports 8mm geometry. The midsole is a new injection-molded EVA that has a firm feel and ride—definitely not for those who desire plush cushioning—and more of a feel for the road. The outersole is carbon rubber in the heel and blown rubber in the forefoot, offering the expected good traction and durability. The Fluid 3 Fulcrum is a solid training shoe aimed at more up-tempo paces.

“Good, smooth fit with decent support. The ride was responsive and very firm. They served well for longer runs, faster runs, and were surprisingly versatile.”

The Wave Rider is like a sports sedan: plenty of horsepower, but with some creature comforts. Version 17 pares some excess, improves the fit, and addresses the ride. The upper is a closed mesh with minimal no-sew overlays (similar to its predecessor), but is a nice step up in fit and feel. The interior is smooth enough to make socks optional. The midsole is effectively sculpted to flex well and cradle the foot from touchdown through toe-off. Lateral lugs beveled from the heel into the forefoot accommodate a variety of footstrikes. The outersole is X-10 carbon rubber in the heel with a swirled pattern of blown rubber lugs in the forefoot that provides improved grip and a little extra cushion. The long and short of it is, this Wave Rider is protective, nimble, and versatile.

“Comfortable fit with plenty of toe-room. Well cushioned and stable. A versatile, all-around shoe that is ready for whatever awaits out your door.”

The 980 is new to the New Balance line, but much of the interest generated is attributable to its use of Fresh Foam. The upper is a closed minimesh with minimal no-sew overlays. The ankle collar has a generous layer of memory foam to accommodate a variety of feet, and the interior is smooth and comfortable. The midsole employs a new polyethylene formulation called Fresh Foam that’s lightweight and cushiony. The geometry is a bit taller than in other New Balance shoes—a measured stack height of 28mm—and it features a heel-to-toe drop of 4mm. The full-contact outersole has a grippy, low-profile, lug-like pattern of variously sized hexagons. The heel is beveled slightly and decoupled to even out the touchdown. The fit, ride, and innovation of the Fresh Foam 980 earned it our award for Best Shoe in the Neutral category. 

“Secure but roomy fit; smooth and seamless. Really well-cushioned, but not too soft. Really well done.” 

By redefining what a Neutral shoe is, the 890 has been a game-changer for New Balance. Version 4 has undergone a transformation, both visually and structurally, along with a few updates. The upper is a closed mesh, with most of the fabric supported by no-sew overlays. Synthetic suede overlays at the heel, archband, and toe lend additional support. Much of the old structure has been removed so the shoe conforms better to the foot. A bit more memory foam in the ankle collar ensures an excellent fit. The upgraded midsole geometry has more toespring to roll better with the foot, while keeping the 8mm heelto-toe drop, which has been one of its strengths. A thermoplastic plate under the Strobel board distributes the forces more evenly throughout the sole, and a two-part design of pods under the heel adapts to varying footstrikes, effectively smoothing the touchdown. The outersole makes liberal use of blown rubber, which encircles a core of more durable rubber in the highest-wear portions.   

The Ultra Smooth is The North Face’s first running shoe designed specifically for the roads. The upper is a closed mesh with no-sew overlays, which results in a smooth interior. The ankle collar is a smooth-but-thin polyester fabric called FlashDry over relatively little foam that cups the heel effectively, thanks to a Pebax nylon cradle. The thin tongue and flat laces secure the foot well without adding weight. The midsole is injectionmolded EVA, a rubbery blend that provides a resilient, though firm and responsive ride. The lateral portion of the midsole’s forefoot also constitutes the outersole. (Don’t worry, its toughened surface is equal to the task.) The outersole is a durable Vibram rubber compound, set into the midsole for a smooth transition. The effective Ultra Smooth earns a hearty “well done” and has us hoping that it hints at a broader series of road shoes from The North Face.  

2014 Spring Shoe Review — 6 — FORTIUS Media Group, LLC

Sizes: Men 8–13; Women 6–11 Weight: 11.1 oz. (men’s 11); 8.2 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics to very mild overpronation

Sizes: Men 7–13,14,15,16; Women 6–12 Weight: 10.1 oz. (men’s 11); 8.4 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics to very mild overpronation

Sizes: Men 7–13,14,15 (D,2E,4E); Women 5–11,12 (2A,B,D) Weight: 10.2 oz. (men’s 11); 8.0 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics to mild overpronation

“This shoe looks fun with its bright color, but it also delivers a cushiony ride, low weight for a training shoe, and great feel of what is underfoot, thanks to the modular sole.” Sizes: Men 7–13,14,15 (B,D,2E,4E); Women 5–11,12 (2A,B,D) Weight: 9.6 oz. (men’s 11); 8.0 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

“Really good-fitting shoe with a nice, smooth interior. Lightweight, but with a substantial underfoot feel. They managed plenty of good miles for me.” Sizes: Men 7–13,14,15,16; Women 5–12 Weight: 10.8 oz. (men’s 11); 8.9 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semicurved Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, polyurethane Strobel board Recommended for: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics to mild overpronation

RRCA.org


Championship Spotlight

2013 RRCA National 1-Mile Championship DC Road Runners 1-Mile Championships, Arlington, VA • July, 2013 By  Jean  Knaack The DC Road Runners 1-Mile Track Championship hosted the RRCA National 1-Mile Championship as part of the ninth stop on the inaugural Bring Back the Mile Tour, a national campaign to elevate and celebrate the iconic distance. The race took place on the evening of July 24 in Arlington, VA at the Washington-Lee High School track. With clear skies, tolerable summer heat, and moderate humidity, the event provided for some great head-to-head competition on the track. The event was free to all runners, member and nonmember alike, and included a kid’s mile, a racewalk mile, a variety of heats for masters, and time predictions—14 heats in all. For the women, the lead females stuck together until the final lap when Susanna Sullivan (Falls Church, VA) pulled away from Kristin Anderson and Claire Hallissey (2012 British Olympic marathoner). Anderson surged near the finish line but it wasn’t quite enough, and Sullivan won with a time of 5:00.0. Sullivan was one of many from the Capital Area Runners competing on the track that evening. Boston Athletic Association runner Dave Chorney, who happened to be in town visiting a friend, joined in the race and won, becoming the 2013 RRCA National 1-Mile Champion with a time of 4:13.67.

Congratulations RRCA National 1-Mile Champions Female Overall: Susanna Sullivan, age 23, of Falls Church, VA, with a time of 5:00.0 Male Overall: David Chorney, age 25, of Somerville, MA, with a time of 4:13.67 Female Master: Alisa Harvey, age 47, of Reston, VA, with a time of 5:21.68 Male Master: Randy McDermott, age 41, of Potomac, MD, with a time of 5:00.05 Female Grand Master: Susan Aaronson, age 59, of Arlington, VA, with a time of 7:35.33 Male Grand Master: Mark Neff, age 51, of Derwood, MD, with a time of 5:08.86 Female Senior Grand Master: Loida Veilla, age 65, of Falls Church, VA, with a time of 7:40.28 Male Senior Grand Master: Paul Ryan, age 62, of Arlington, VA, with a time of 5:58.32

DC  Road  Runners  Club

About Our Host Runners of all ages and speeds are invited to join the Washington, DC area’s premier running organization, the DC Road Runners. For the past 50 years, the DC Road Runners Club has offered outstanding services to its members. The DC Road Runners is an affiliate of the Road Runners Club of America and provides a year-round schedule of running events that offer everyone a chance to participate regardless of age, gender, or athletic ability. Visit www.dcroadrunners.org

2013 RRCA National 5K Championships Woodstock 5K, Anniston, AL • August 3, 2013 By  George  Rehmet

Penny  Photography

Attracting over 1,300 participants, the Woodstock 5K is the pride of Anniston, AL, a city of 23,000, and has been an RRCA national championship race for the last three years. The 2014 championship will be

RRCA.org

hosted elsewhere, but that didn’t deter first-time race director Haley Gregg (with assistance from the previous race director Dennis Dunn) and her dedicated crew of volunteers from making sure that the qualities that define a national championship competition were there. The race has the full support of the city, evidenced a month earlier, when it honored the race by placing historical markers at its start and finish lines. The Anniston Runners are very attentive to detail. As participants finished, they were given wet towels and water bottles filled with cold water. Once inside the Anniston High School cafeteria, they were treated to refreshments donated by local businesses. There was a concert, and children could play on an inflatable playground and participate in a 1-mile race. This wasn’t only a race, but a community event, and this year’s race donated the proceeds to Anniston High School, United Cerebral Palsy, and the Special Olympics. The awards ceremony took place in the school’s auditorium. Key volunteers were honored. Representing the RRCA national office was Coastal California state representative George Rehmet who recognized the RRCA national champions, with Alabama state representative Ron

Spring 2014 ClubRunning • 27


Championship Spotlight Macksoud and Georgia state representative Mark Ward assisting. On the men’s side, Patrick Cheptoek of Bowling Green, KY repeated his win from last year, with a course record of 14:05, defeating Stephen Sirma of Kennesaw, GA by 22 seconds on the rollercoaster course. On the women’s side, Lydia Kosgei of Kennesaw, GA was victorious in a time of 17:06 over Justyna Mudy of Rome, GA by nearly 30 seconds. Last year, Kosgei finished in fourth place. In other RRCA categories, Brooke Nelson of Munford, AL and Matthew Whitis of Columbus, GA were the Master Champions in times of 21:32 and 17:12, respectively. Both runners defeated the next runners by more than 30 seconds. Coming in as the 10th female in a time of 21:56—nearly 2 minutes faster than the next runner in her category—was Theresa Burst of Birmingham, AL, who was awarded Female Grandmaster champion. Defeating his competition by nearly a minute, John Glidewell of Athens, AL ran a 17:55 to be crowned Male Grandmaster champion. Wayne Heckler of Madison, AL gave a dominating performance of 20:07 to win the Male Senior Grandmaster, while Dolores Longoria of Dothan, AL won the Female Senior Grandmaster category. When the race event was completed, an exhausted but pleased Haley Gregg, surrounded by her volunteers, was determined to make the Woodstock 5K a national championship again. But whether the Woodstock 5K will again be a championship is unknown. What is certain is that this race will continue for a long time due to the immense community support of Anniston, Alabama! And by the way, although the race shirt has the Peanuts’ Woodstock bird, it isn’t named for the Charles Schultz comic strip character. Nor is it named after that 1969 music festival despite sightings of participants wearing hippie garb. The race is actually named after the street where the race begins and ends.

Road Runners Club of America 2014 RRCA National Championship Event Series The RRCA Championship Event Series boasts over 190 races that attract over 330,000 runners nationwide at the state, regional, and national level. We invite you to join us for the 2014 RRCA National Championship Event Series. March 2, 2014 RRCA Marathon Championship Kaiser Permanente Napa Valley Marathon – Napa, CA www.napavalleymarathon.org May 4, 2014 RRCA 12K Championship Lilac Bloomsday Run – Spokane, WA Preferred seeding for RRCA Convention attendees! www.bloomsdayrun.org May 31, 2014 RRCA 5K Championship TMC Meet Me Downtown 5K Night Run – Tucson, AZ www.azroadrunners.org/races/detail/mmd June 1, 2014 RRCA Half Marathon Championship The Dexter–Ann Arbor Run – Dexter, MI www.DxA2.com June 15, 2014 RRCA 1-Mile Championship Go Mile – North Little Rock, AR – Bring Back the Mile www.gorunning.com/gomile/

13.1, 10K, 5K May 18, 2014 Fredericksburg, VA

greatest half marathon in history

September 27, 2014 RRCA 10-Mile Championship The Genworth Virginia 10-Miler – Lynchburg, VA www.virginia10miler.com October 4, 2014 RRCA Ultra Championship – Rock/Creek Stump Jump 50K www.rockcreek.com/stumpjump November 8, 2014 RRCA 10K Championship – Cajun Cup – Lafayette, LA www.cajuncup.net RRCA Championship Series Sponsors Gatorade Endurance • Sports Authority Ashworth Awards • Running Network LLC Combined, RRCA National Championship Events will award over $93,000 in prize money.

marinemarathon.com

organized by the Marine Corps Marathon

28 • ClubRunning Spring 2014

RRCA.org


Championship Spotlight

2013 RRCA National Half Marathon Championship Woodrow Wilson Bridge Half Marathon, Mt. Vernon, VA • November 10, 2013 By  George  Rehmet Originally slated for last Oct. 6, the 13.1-mile USATF-sanctioned road race fell victim to the U.S. government shutdown. The course’s first 8 miles run through the scenic George Washington Memorial Parkway, a national park, which was affected when employees of the National Park Service and U.S. Park Police were furloughed during the shutdown. The new date, the only one available through Christmas that worked for all six jurisdictions involved with the unique course, was not ideal for many of the entrants, who deferred their registrations to 2014. However, the 1,739 runners who gathered at Mount Vernon on the new race morning were treated to conditions rarely so favorable, as well as fall foliage still intact so late in the season along the parkway. Girma Gebre and Kellyn Johnson made the most of the ideal conditions and ran to victory, earning the titles RRCA National Half Marathon Champions. Girma, just 20 and on his second U.S. tour from Ethiopia, waited until only 2 miles remained to unleash a powerful kick from the 1500-meter runner he is, leaving his countrymen in his wake. Gebre crossed the finish line at National Harbor in 1 hour, 4 minutes, 41 seconds. Siraw Kebede Gelaw and Nahom Mesfin, also from Ethiopia, followed in 1:05:12 and 1:05:16, respectively, giving the East African country a sweep of the men’s race.

“There were three runners with 2 miles to go,” Gebre said, through his New York–based coach and interpreter Alem Feven. “He picked up the pace. He is a sprinter, runs the 1500 and he says he said he picked it up going up the hill [on the backside of National Harbor] at 11 miles.” Gebre earned $1,200 for his effort. Kellyn Johnson, in successfully defending her 2012 title, used the same game plan this year as she did last year: Get out in front early. One of the nation’s top distance runners who trains with Team USA Arizona in the mountains of Flagstaff, Johnson hit the tape in 1:13:02, a full 22 seconds faster than last year but 35 seconds shy of her personal best set in Green Bay, WI earlier in 2013. “From the start, I was kind of by myself, which is kind of a bummer,” said the 27-year-old mother of one. “I felt OK, and with 4 miles to go I felt real good. But in the last mile I felt pretty awful because of the hill … I actually liked the bridge. That was the point where I was feeling strong.” Johnson’s margin of victory was 52 seconds, with four Ethiopians trailing her to the finish. Desta Tadesse (1:13:54), Waynishet Abebe (1:14:11), Meseret Ali Basa (1:15:35), and Etafirahu Temesgen (1:16:28) filed in behind the American, who earned $1,200 as overall champion and $600 as top U.S. competitor. Mattias Rosa, a 40-year-old from Ridgewood, NJ, and Stefani

UPCOMING TOUR DATES

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Galveston, TX – April 13 North Myrtle Beach, SC – April 27 Branson, MO – May 4 San Francisco Bay, CA – June 1 Peachtree City, GA – September 6 DC’s Wine Country, VA – September 13 Long Island, NY – October 5 San Juan, PR – November 9 St. Augustine Beach, FL – December 7 Temecula, CA – February 28

Save $10 with code CLUBRUNDIVA. Valid through 4/30/2014. Excludes Temecula, CA. The Divas Half Marathon® & 5K is not associated or affiliated with Running Divas®

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Spring 2014 ClubRunning • 29


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Watterson, a 44-year-old from Alexandria, VA, were top masters and RRCA Masters national champions in 1:20:06 and 1:28:38, respectively. Carol Clark of Luray, VA, age 51, earned the RRCA Grandmaster champion title with a time of 1:36:49, along with Steven Desantis of California, MD, age 52, with a time of 1:28:14. The RRCA Senior Grandmaster champions were Marjorie Marque of Alexandria, VA, age 62, with a time of 2:04:11, and Robert Beck of White Hall, MD, age 61, with a time of 1:31:24. Aaron Scheidies of Seattle, WA successfully defended his title in the Visually Impaired National Half Marathon Championships, setting a new event record of 1:16:25 after running 1:18:07 last year.

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