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Raleigh DeGeer Amyx LIVE AUCTION SEPTEMBER 17 & 18


How to Bid BID IN PERSON

Session One: Lot 1 - Lot 348 Attend the auction Wednesday, September 17 and bid live! The auction will be held at the Omni Parker House, 60 School Street, Boston, MA 02108, and starts promptly at 11 AM ET. You may fill out an absentee bid form onsite if you are unable to stay for the entire sale. Session Two: Lot 350 - Lot 454 Attend the auction Thursday, September 18 and bid live! The auction will be held at the Omni Parker House, 60 School Street, Boston, MA 02108, and starts promptly at 11 AM ET. You may fill out an absentee bid form onsite if you are unable to stay for the entire sale.

BID BY INTERNET

Thursday, September 11 - Tuesday, September 16 Visit www.RRAuction.com to place bids on lots before the live auction begins. Pre-live auction bidding will close at 3 PM ET, September 16. Session One: Lot 1 - Lot 348 Live online bidding begins Wednesday, September 17 at 11 AM ET at www.RRAuction.com. Session Two: Lot 350 - Lot 454 Live online bidding begins Thursday, September 18 at 11 AM ET at www.RRAuction.com.

BID BY PHONE

Please call our office should you wish to arrange a live phone bid for the day of the auction. Absentee phone bids can be made by calling our office at (800) 937-3880 up to 12:30 PM ET on Tuesday, September 16.

BID BY EMAIL

You can email your bids to Sue Recks (Sue.Recks@RRAuction.com). Please list lot numbers and bids in columns. Include your name, address, and phone number as well as a statement that you accept the Terms and Conditions of the auction. Emails will be accepted up to 3 PM ET, September 16.

Auction Info Live Auction

Session One: Lot 1 - Lot 348 September 17, 2014 • 11 AM ET The live auction will be held at the Omni Parker House, 60 School Street, Boston, MA 02108 Session Two: Lot 350 - Lot 454 September 18, 2014 • 11 AM ET The live auction will be held at the Omni Parker House, 60 School Street, Boston, MA 02108

Auction Preview

September 15, 2014 • 12 PM - 4 PM September 16, 2014 • 10 AM - 4 PM The auction preview will be held at the Omni Parker House, 60 School Street, Boston, MA 02108 Auction preview will also be available in our offices by appointment only at RR Auction.

Online Bidding

September 11-16, 2014 • 12:30 PM ET Visit www.RRAuction.com starting September 11 to place bids on lots before the live auction begins. Pre-live auction bidding will close at 3 PM ET, September 16. Session ONE: Lot 1 - Lot 348 September 17, 2014 • 11 AM ET Visit www.RRAuction.com at 11 AM ET to watch and place bids live against floor bids. Session TWO: Lot 350 - Lot 454 September 18, 2014 • 11 AM ET Visit www.RRAuction.com at 11 AM ET to watch and place bids live against floor bids.

QUESTIONS

If you have any questions please call our office at (800) 937-3880.


The Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection

MA/Lic. #3214

is one of the most impeccably documented in the world, with most items being accompanied by a provenance letter establishing direct lineage. We encourage you to visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and important provenance material.

Session One

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PRESIDENTS.........................................................6 John Adams ...........................................................6 Abraham Lincoln...................................................8 Ulysses S. Grant ..................................................13 James A. Garfield ................................................14 Grover Cleveland ................................................14 Theodore Roosevelt..............................................15 William H. Taft.....................................................19 Woodrow Wilson ..................................................22 Warren G. Harding .............................................25 Calvin Coolidge...................................................35 Herbert Hoover....................................................42 Franklin D. Roosevelt..........................................50 Harry S. Truman..................................................95 Dwight D. Eisenhower.......................................110 John F. Kennedy ................................................136 Lyndon B. Johnson.............................................147 Richard Nixon....................................................155 Gerald Ford ......................................................162 Jimmy Carter.....................................................165 Ronald Reagan ..................................................167 George Bush ......................................................175 Bill Clinton ........................................................181 WHITE HOUSE CHINA ................................. 185

Session Two

AUTOGRAPHS & MANUSCRIPTS ............... 194 THE OLYMPIC GAMES ................................. 202 SPORTS .............................................................. 236

Provenance Stories RALEIGH DeGEER AMYX..................................2 LILLIAN ROGERS PARKS Part One ...............................................................18 Part Two ...............................................................41 MRS. ARTHUR PRETTYMAN ..........................49 TOI BACHELDER................................................62 JOHN & DELORES MOANEY.........................109 VIOLA WISE.......................................................142

Terms & Conditions TERMS & CONDITIONS..................................241 PRE-REGISTRATION FORM..........................249 ABSENTEE / TELEPHONE BID FORM.........250


“Behind every great man, there’s a great woman” We would like to dedicate this catalog to Hilda Patterson Amyx, Raleigh’s beloved wife. Hilda has unwaveringly supported Raleigh in his endeavour to preserve history, even taking it upon herself to organize and file her husband’s extensive collection. Without Hilda’s meticulous notes and inventory system, the production of this catalog would have been near impossible. She was always there to lend a helping hand to our editor as questions and needs arose.

Thank you Hilda, we couldn’t have done it without you!

CONTRIBUTORS Special thanks to Jon Becker and David Searles Bob Eaton CEO, Acquisitions Bob.Eaton@RRAuction.com

Jon Siefken Consignment Director Jon.Siefken@RRAuction.com

Dan McCarthy Catalog Writer, Researcher Dan.McCarthy@RRAuction.com

Carla Eaton Owner, Auctioneer Carla.Eaton@RRAuction.com

Kelly Daniell Consignment Representative Kelly.Daniell@RRAuction.com

Adam Karr Shipping Supervisor Shipping@RRAuction.com

Bobby Livingston Executive Vice President, Public Relations Bobby.Livingston@RRAuction.com

Linda Hernandez Consignor Customer Service Linda.Hernandez@RRAuction.com

Joe Doucette Inventory Executive Joe.Doucette@RRAuction.com

Bobby Eaton Vice President of Operations Auctioneer, MA/Lic. #3214 Bobby.Eaton@RRAuction.com

Erika Rosenfeld Managing Editor Erika.Rosenfeld@RRAuction.com

Sue Recks Customer Service Executive Sue.Recks@RRAuction.com

Tricia Eaton Editor, Authenticator Tricia.Eaton@RRAuction.com

Sarina Carlo Creative Director Sarina.Carlo@RRAuction.com

Bill White Lead Authenticator Bill.White@RRAuction.com

Annie Nichols Junior Art Director Annie.Nichols@RRAuction.com

Mandy Eaton-Casey Finance Manager Amanda.Casey@RRAuction.com Elizebeth Otto Consignment Director Elizebeth.Otto@RRAuction.com

Mike Nelson Senior Catalog Writer Mike.Nelson@rrauction.com Robert S. Eaton Sr. 1940–2001


Session One

The Live Auction begins on September 17, 2014 at 11 AM ET PRESIDENTS.....................................................................................................6 WHITE HOUSE CHINA ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� 185

Session One of the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection Auction covers Lots 1–348 and is comprised mainly of artifacts personally owned by many of our most beloved US presidents and first ladies. Spanning John Adams through Bill Clinton, a majority of the presidents are represented, with especially notable offerings from Presidents Eisenhower and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. There are also some historically significant presidential autographs present throughout. Session One will conclude with a collection of some of the finest presidential china in private hands, spanning Thomas Jefferson through Bill Clinton.


Raleigh Degeer Amyx

Collection

RR Auction is proud to present the internationally renowned collection of Raleigh DeGeer Amyx. More than an assortment of artifacts, this represents the life-long dream of one man, a personal quest to preserve and share American history—indeed, the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection, with a special focus on the 19th and 20th century, embodies the nation’s past at its finest. As a young man, his avid interest in history and politics led him to employment with the Federal Bureau of Investigation in 1957, at first serving as a messenger to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, while also attending night school at American University. It was in this FBI position that he began to come into contact with the newsmakers themselves—Dwight D. Eisenhower, Lyndon B. Johnson, and a young senator named John F. Kennedy were among his personal encounters.


Delores Moaney was a similar figure—her husband, Sgt. John Moaney, served as Dwight D. Eisenhower’s valet for nearly thirty years beginning in WWII, becoming a close personal friend that the president would later describe as ‘indispensable.’ Mrs. Moaney also served as the personal cook for Dwight and Mamie Eisenhower, and both she and her husband went on to live and work within the Eisenhowers’ Gettysburg mansion during all post-presidential years. Some magnificent items related to President John F. Kennedy originate from Viola ‘Big Momma’ Wise, a maid who often babysat the Kennedy children. It is these relationships that make the Amyx Collection unique—nearly all items were obtained directly from these types of figures and include letters from them addressed to Mr. Amyx himself, providing excellent historical provenance.

Mr. AMYX with toi BACHELDER It was these important brushes with greatness while in Washington that inspired his realization that there were hundreds of firsthand witnesses to history milling about nation’s capital, each with their own fragment of history. Raleigh DeGeer Amyx, possessing a major background in American history, made it his quest to become acquainted with these folks—Mr. Amyx met the valets, housekeepers, cooks, secretaries, butlers, Secret Service agents, groundskeepers, upholsterers, and other career up-stairs assistants who had served presidents, many of whom worked at the White House for decades. Through these close personal connections, Mr. Amyx assembled the story of America, piece by piece, a project that took decades of diligence and continual contact with key career assistants. Raleigh DeGeer Amyx’s first and most important friend came in Lillian Rogers Parks, who followed in her mother’s footsteps as a longtime White House maid and seamstress, later detailing this unique insider view in a bestselling memoir, My Thirty Years Backstairs at the White House. In addition to the fantastic memorabilia acquired through this close friendship, Mrs. Parks was able to introduce Raleigh DeGeer Amyx to the friends she had made during her long career. One of these important individuals was Toi Bachelder, an early polio test patient at FDR’s Warm Springs Foundation who later joined President Roosevelt’s staff at the White House, where she served as a secretary and became one of the most trusted members of the president’s inner circle. Another was Mildred Prettyman, whose husband Arthur S. Prettyman served as FDR’s close personal valet during the last six years of his presidency.

The depth and breadth of the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection is truly astounding, with the personal effects of numerous presidents and people of influence, museum-quality autographic material from the individuals who shaped the world as we know it, and perhaps the finest official White House china in private hands. No story of world history would be complete without the mention of sports, and also featured in the collection are world-class Olympic items dating back to the Summer Olympics of 1900, the second modern Olympic Games to ever be held. The vast array of material available is truly impressive, and it is a privilege to offer for sale this selection of rare and historically important items from the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection.

(left to right) Mary Ann esperancilla, Mildred prettyman, mr. amyx, lillian Rogers parks


Rare lock of John Adams hair

1 John Adams’s

Lock of Hair

ESTIMATE: $8,000-$10,000

A very rare substantial lock of founding father John Adams’s hair, originally obtained from the estate of George F. Noyes of Portland, Maine. Hairs measure approximately 3.5˝ in length and the lock is affixed to a 4 x 3.75 off-white sheet with a single spot of red wax. Notation on the sheet reads, “Presented me by Elizabeth Adams Quincy, President Adams hair Quincy.” Accompanied by the original period envelope the hair was discovered in, labeled “President Adams’ hair.” Also accompanied by a desirable and important letter of provenance which states, in part: “The enclosed lock of President John Adams hair was uncovered while searching through the estate of George F. Noyes of Portland, Maine. He was a Civil War officer on General Abner Doubleday’s staff. The remnants of his belongings included several boxes of papers and included a letter from Doubleday, many letters to his wife, several thousand envelopes, etc…This [ generous] lock of hair was in a sealed envelope, stuffed among the many others.”

HISTORY After graduating from Bowdoin College, George Noyes established a law practice in Boston, eventually moving to California in 1849 and establishing the largest law firm in the state. At General Doubleday’s request he joined his staff as captain of the Commissary Department, and later served on the staff of General Wadsworth. At the conclusion of the war he settled in New York to devote himself to his legal profession again. While small strands of Adams’s hair occasionally appear of sale, this substantial lock is perhaps the most generous and consequential President Adams hair lock ever offered. A founding father relic of immense historical importance.

6 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


collection of ABIGAIL Adams’ sewing sundries

2 Abigail Adams’s

Sewing Kit and Lace

ESTIMATE: $8,000-$10,000 Remarkable collection consisting of Abigail Adams’s personally-owned and -used sewing needle case and two swatches of the dress Adams is seen wearing in her famous portrait by Gilbert Stuart. Her sewing kit needle case, sewn by Abigail Adams herself, is an off-white silk with beautifully embroidered floral designs on both sides, opening to reveal slots for her sewing materials and implements, with two inner pocket flaps nicely embroidered with flower and bird designs. Also included are two generous dress fabric swatches, each measuring 3 x 8, and two different strands of delicate lace trim identifiable in the Gilbert Stuart portrait of the first lady now held by the National Gallery of Art. Includes a July 1876 handwritten letter of provenance from First Lady Abigail Adams’s own granddaughter, Elizabeth Coombs Adams, signed “E. C. A.,” in full: “A piece of Reps silk dress worn by Abigail Adams in London, wife of John Adams, Minister to the Court of St. James, Coming home to Quincy in 1787—& bought the home stead which has had five generations living in it. This dress & long train left

to my mother in Abigail’s will. The Reps silk with the pink dots and garnet sattin dress that she is painted in Stuart’s portrait & now belongs to the Charles F. Adams’ & I have the old lace scarf back from the old State House in Philadelphia where we sent things for the Centennial.” The sewing kit is accompanied by a contemporary note in another hand, reading: “Needle case belonging to Abigail Adams.”

HISTORY Material related to Abigail Adams is extremely rare—more so than Martha Washington—particularly with the superior provenance provided in the form of a 19th-century note by her granddaughter. Elizabeth Coombs Adams was related to President John Adams and First Lady Abigail Adams via her father, Thomas Boylston Adams, who was their son and the brother of John Quincy Adams. Like much of the family, Thomas Boylston struggled with alcoholism, and Elizabeth Coombs Adams moved to the family mansion in Quincy and lived there with her uncle and aunt, John Quincy and Louisa Adams, for a period of time. A marvelous grouping of important material from one of the nation’s preeminent ‘Founding Mothers.’ A truly epochal offering worthy of the most advanced collector or institution.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 7


President Lincoln’s eyeglasses, acquired from his Washington optician

3 Abraham Lincoln’s

Eyeglasses

ESTIMATE: $10,000-$15,000

President Lincoln’s gray metal eyeglasses, with +1.62 prescription lenses, featuring straight adjustable-length temples and a fixed bridge, with small loops at the earpieces. The frames are marked inside the right temple by the maker, “Fisher, Philad’a.” Many years ago, Raleigh DeGeer Amyx was able to obtain these from Franklin & Co. Opticians of Washington, DC, which outfitted ten presidents for their eyeglasses. At one time the Franklin Company had displayed their presidential collection in downtown Washington for anyone to view, but eventually they were safely tucked away in separate sections of an old optician’s glasses drawer, befitting the back room of a working optical company. Having been acquainted with the owner of Franklin Opticians, Raleigh DeGeer Amyx was able to acquire the contents of this drawer to add to his world-class collection. Glasses are in fine condition. Includes a typed statement on a Franklin & Co. business card certifying the authenticity of the eyeglasses as being those of President Lincoln. Also accompanied by a photocopy of the check President Lincoln used to pay for an eye test and glasses fitting at Franklin & Co. Opticians in 1864. The company had initially been co-founded in Philadelphia by Isaac Heilprin during the 1850s, before relocating to Washington in 1861, establishing the storefront just four blocks from the White House—along with their fine service, it was this close proximity that made Franklin & Co. the favored optician of so many presidents. The check that President Lincoln wrote to Franklin & Co., which is dated May 4, 1864, covered the cost of a pair of steel glasses and case—an important note, as dignitaries generally favored gold frames at much greater expense. This choice is demonstrative of both his humility and personal financial situation—despite holding the nation’s highest office, Abraham Lincoln’s bank account was frequently overdrawn. Knowing this, Heilprin opted to never cash the check, keeping it as a souvenir while also alleviating this small debt—today it is believed to be the only uncashed check written by the president extant.

8 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


HISTORY This rare pair of Lincoln glasses is a wonderful and most intimate historical artifact—President Lincoln required glasses to read, and can easily be envisioned wearing this stately pair. Although not generally imagined wearing glasses, one of the most famous photos of Abraham Lincoln shows the bespectacled president reading with his young son Tad. He is also known to have worn glasses during some of the most important moments of his presidency, particularly when reading speeches and addressing the public. In multiple recollections of his speech at Gettysburg, he is described as wearing glasses similar to these. In 1891, journalist John Russell Young recalled his memories of the speech, writing, ‘From an ancient case he drew a pair of steel-framed spectacles, with bows clasping upon the temples in front of the ears, and adjusted them with deliberation.’ A later book by Henry Ester Jacobs described his actions thus: ‘He drew from his pocket a metallic spectacle case and adjusted a pair of steel glasses near the tip of his nose.’ President Lincoln was also carrying two pairs of gold glasses with him when he was assassinated, one pair matching this prescription of +1.62 and the other prescribed at +2.00; he was also carrying a Franklin & Co. glasses case. These are all held today by the Library of Congress. The example of Abraham Lincoln’s eyeglasses here offered is of the utmost historical interest and appropriate for the personal or institutional collections of the highest distinction. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 9


Dr. Robert K. Stone

10 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


“Used for my last visit to Prest Lincoln” Quintessential medical kit from the president’s personal doctor

4 Abraham Lincoln’s

Last Medical Kit

ESTIMATE: $20,000-$30,000

Dr. Robert K. Stone’s personallyowned and -used black leather medical case, measuring 5 x 2.5 x 1, hand-engraved on the top plate of the front clasp. “R. K. S., M. D.,” with an ornate swirl effect elegantly engraved on the lower portion. The interior is lined with soft purple velvet and the case still contains a syringe and various medical instruments and attachments. Includes an astounding period handwritten and signed original statement of provenance from Dr. Stone himself. In full: “For Thomas, this case was used for my last visit to Prest Lincoln. Please have it, your father, Robert King Stone.”

HISTORY Robert King Stone, an accomplished doctor and professor of medicine considered ‘the dean of the Washington medical community,’ was President Abraham Lincoln’s physician of choice who tended to his entire family, frequently visiting them because of Mary Todd Lincoln’s frequent migraine headaches and other various illnesses; Stone continued to look after her even after the assassination of her husband, President Lincoln. Dr. Stone also cared for their sons, Tad and Willie Lincoln, during their bouts with typhoid in early 1862; unfortunately, Willie was unable to recover and passed away. Still, Lincoln trusted Dr. Stone and recommended the doctor’s suggestions for wartime field treatments to Surgeon General William A. Hammond. When President Lincoln was shot at Ford’s Theatre on the evening of April 14, 1865, he was first attended to by Dr. Charles Leale, a member of the audience seated just forty feet away from the president’s box. After determining that President Lincoln might not survive a carriage ride back to the White House, Dr. Leale ordered that he be moved across 10th Street to the Petersen House. Robert King Stone arrived at Petersen’s boarding house shortly thereafter, and Dr. Leale ceded control of the situation to him after showing Dr. Stone the wound and describing his initial treatment, which Dr. Stone approved of. As it became apparent that the president’s wound was mortal, Dr. Stone was then tasked with telling Robert Todd Lincoln of his father’s fatal condition. This medical case, which Dr. Stone describes firsthand as being used for his last visit to President Lincoln, is a noteworthy artifact from a seminal moment in American history—worthy of inclusion in an advanced presidential collection.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 11


Significant President Lincoln directive to an adjutant general

IMAGE IS LARGER THAN ACTUAL SIZE

5 Abraham Lincoln

Autographed Note Signed

ESTIMATE: $6,000-$8,000

Bold Civil War–dated ANS as president signed “A. Lincoln,” one page on an off-white 3 x 1.75 card, December 12, 1864. In full: “Adjutant General please see & hear the bearer.” In fine condition, with mild discoloration. Accompanied by an attractive hand-tinted 19th-century engraving of President Lincoln; presented with Lincoln’s note, this is an appealing and eminently displayable pairing. A highly desirable and certainly uncommon variety of Lincoln autograph, penned shortly after his reelection in 1864. At this time the Civil War was finally winding down, with well over 650,000 deaths, and the Union victory was on the horizon—U. S. Grant had General Lee besieged in Petersburg, and Sherman had completed his famous ‘March to the Sea.’ This historically significant note, written approximately four months before his assassination, does not appear in the Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, and it is an excellent portrayal of Lincoln’s role in overseeing the military, even at this late date in the war.

12 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


General Grant’s handsome 1862 pocket cigar holder 6 Ulysses S. Grant’s

Cigar Holder

ESTIMATE: $3,000-$4,000 President Grant’s personally-owned and -used wooden cigar case, measuring 3.25 x 6.5 x 1, featuring a brass plate on the front finely hand-engraved with his initials and date, “USG, 1862.” The case is hinged and held shut by a pull-out clasp, opening to reveal four slots to hold cigars within. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The handsome wood cigar pocket holder case, with brass clasp, was owned and used by President U. S. Grant. It held four cigars and was handsomely identified on the outside with a date of 1862 and ornate initials. This piece came into the hands of Maggie Rogers, my Mother.” This marked an extremely important year in U. S. Grant’s career, as he was promoted to major general in the Union Army; he was also a well-known cigar aficionado, said to smoke anywhere from 12 to 20 per day. General Grant would confide to General Horace Porter that he ‘had been a light smoker previous to the attack on Donelson’ in February 1862, but after being described in the newspapers as smoking a cigar throughout the battle he received ten thousand as gifts from around the nation. He went on to say that due to ‘having such a quantity on hand I naturally smoked more than I would have done under ordinary circumstances, and I have continued the habit ever since.’ A handsome piece, absolutely iconic of General US Grant.

7 Ulysses S. Grant’s

Silver Pearl-handled Table Knife

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 President Grant’s gorgeous personally-owned table knife, measuring 10.75˝ long, featuring a beautiful pearl handle carved with maple leaf designs and stamped on the blade, “Presented by the workmen of the Lamson & Goodnow Mfg. Co., Shelburne Falls, Mass, March 1869,” with another stamp of a patriotic eagle lettered below, “U. S. Grant, President of the United States.” Representing the Lamson & Goodnow workers, B. F. Pond presented a 62-piece dinner set to President Grant on November 17, 1869; half of the pieces were set in pearl handles and the other half in ivory, all engraved with the same maple leaf designs on the handles. President Grant sent a message to the workers in response, writing, ‘It affords me special pleasure to see American Manufacturies succeed in making those things which are generally articles of import. The specimens of cutlery sent me affords such evidence in one line of Manufactury at least.’ It is indeed a wonderful knife in itself, and such visually appealing personal articles that are specifically mentioned within presidential papers represent the highest echelon of collectibility. A truly stunning piece with the potential for an attractive display.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 13


8 James A. Garfield

White House Framed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 A lovely cloth-edged 6.75 x 8.5 frame with a green cloth mat subtly decorated in a floral pattern, with an oval opening encircled by gold ribbon, displaying a photograph of President James A. Garfield. A statement of provenance has been written on the back of the frame by Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. In full: “This frame was in the Blue Room in White House before 1910.” In addition to the provenance written directly on the item, there is also a hand-dated 1985 White House card from Lillian Rogers Parks sharing additional historic details. A significant offering—straight from the White House.

President Cleveland’s pince-nez eyeglasses 9 Grover Cleveland’s

Eyeglasses

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 President Cleveland’s pince-nez eyeglasses, with +3.00 prescription lenses, featuring a flexible metal frame with yellowed rubber nosepieces, and an elegant loop on the side for a chain. Includes the original leather case gilt-stamped by the maker, Franklin & Co. Opticians of Washington, DC. Includes a letter of provenance from Raleigh DeGeer Amyx, in part: “Having been acquainted with the owner of Franklin Opticians for sometime, I was able to acquire the Pince Nez 3.00 RX glasses and case of Grover Cleveland, directly from the President’s drawer of Franklin’s Inc. In this old glasses drawer, there were RX glasses of several American Presidents. At one time the old Franklin Company displayed their Presidential collection in downtown Washington for anyone to view. They were proud that so many Presidents availed themselves of Franklin Company. Later, the Presidential RX glasses were safely tucked away in separate sections of an old opticians glasses drawer, befitting the back room of a working Optical Company.” Also accompanied by a typed statement on a Franklin & Co. business card certifying the authenticity of the pince-nez glasses as being those of President Cleveland. A highly personal and unusual presidential piece from the poor-sighted Cleveland, who humorously commented on a new pair of glasses in an 1883 letter, saying: ‘I rather hate to give up boasting about my good eyes, but you and I know we cannot always be young.’ In overall fine condition.

14 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Gorgeous oval presidential portrait 10 Theodore Roosevelt

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Spectacular matte-finish 6 x 8 oval bust portrait of Theodore Roosevelt as president, affixed to a 7.5 x 10.75 mount, beautifully signed on the mount during TR’s incumbency in bold black ink, “Sincerely yours, Theodore Roosevelt, May 20th 1906.” Attractively suede-matted and framed to an overall size of 15 x 18. In splendid condition. A wonderful image captured in 1904 by photographer George Prince, this portrait is rife with desirable traits—it is a handsome formal portrait of President Roosevelt as the nation’s chief executive, was signed during his presidency, and both the image and signature remain in positively remarkable condition. A truly magnificent piece.

11 Theodore Roosevelt

Photograph

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Impressive crystal-clear 3.75 x 5 matte-finish portrait of Roosevelt in his dramatic full dress ‘Rough Rider’ uniform, stamped on reverse “Pres. File,” taken by B. J. Falk in 1898. Photo is housed in a quality, patriotically ornate metallic 5 x 8.25 period frame, with a raised eagle and painted enamel shield at the top, stars along the vertical sides, and flags along the bottom. In fine condition. This stunning piece, originally displayed at the White House, descended to the collection of Raleigh DeGeer Amyx through ‘First Maid’ Maggie Rogers and her daughter Lillian Rogers Parks.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 15


12 Theodore Roosevelt’s

Comb

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used black folding travel comb, measuring 5.25˝ long when opened, featuring wonderful scenes in relief on both sides of the handle, one showing a stagecoach and the other a boxing match. The manufacturer or artist is identified below the stagecoach as “Slack.” Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Lillian Rogers Parks. In full: “The carved horn comb, with a stage coach and team on one side and boxers in the ring on the other, was owned and used by Theodore Roosevelt. My Mother, Maggie Rogers, began her White House 30-year career in 1909. The comb was given to her by Chief Usher, Ike Hoover, who worked for Theodore Roosevelt and several other Presidents.” An exceptional personal piece as both scenes capture the rough-and-tumble, hypermasculine qualities that Roosevelt’s name conjures.

Marvelous sterling pocket case

from the year of ‘Teddy’s Bear’ 13 Theodore Roosevelt’s

Sterling Silver Card Case

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 President Roosevelt’s ornate and attractive personally-owned and -used sterling silver card carrying case, measuring 3.25 x 2.25 x .5, with intricately impressed beautiful designs on all sides, and a circular area in the center expertly hand-engraved with his initials and the year, “TR, 1902.” The case opens via a push-button clasp on the right edge to reveal thin bars on either side to secure the inner contents. The hinge and clasp function perfectly in spite of a few tiny dings and minor bends to the case edges. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. In full: “The ornate sterling silver card case was owned and used by President Theodore Roosevelt. After T. R. left it at the White House, it was given by Chief Usher, Ike Hoover, to my Mother, Maggie Rogers, First Maid of the White House for 30 years.” This exceptionally gorgeous, museum-quality piece is made especially notable by its date—1902 marked the first full year of Roosevelt’s presidency, and it saw the origin of one of his most well-known legacies. On a hunting trip in November 1902, Roosevelt refused to shoot a defenseless black bear, deeming it unsportsmanlike—it was this moment that inspired the name of the ‘Teddy’ bear. A supreme example, representing the essence of Theodore Roosevelt, this card case belongs in the most discriminating collection or institution. 16 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


President Roosevelt’s ornate sterling silver

White House tea caddy

14 Theodore Roosevelt’s

Sterling Silver Tea Caddy

ESTIMATE: $5,000-$6,000 President Roosevelt’s exceptional personally-owned and -used silver tea caddy, measuring 6˝ tall with a 3 x 3 base in the shape of a cross, featuring royal imagery raised in relief on four side panels, with finely engraved borders on the gently curved panels in between. The top cover is in the shape of a bulb with an intricate pattern in a ring around the center and the president’s full name ornately hand-engraved on top, “Theodore Roosevelt.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. In part: “The tea caddy was owned and used by President Theodore Roosevelt, while he was in the White House. The silver tea caddy…is expertly hand engraved Theodore Roosevelt on the top of the bulbous cover. This [exceptionally artistic] silver [presidential relic] piece is German made with a Napoleon III design. It is [spectacularly] octagonal in shape. It is marked on the bottom 800 with a small crown and quarter moon which is the silver mark of the 1800’s. The First Lady, Edith Roosevelt… gave this silver tea caddy to the Chief Usher, Irwin ‘Ike’ Hoover. On March 8, 1909, my Mother, Maggie Rogers, went to work at the White House. She later became First Maid of the White House and knew ‘Ike’ Hoover for many years. He gave the tea caddy to my Mama who then gave it to me.” A superior and truly exceptional piece of presidential memorabilia with great artistic merit, this relic deserves a place in the most discriminating collection or institution.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 17


‘first maid’ Maggie RoGERS

Lillian Rogers

Parks M

any of the earlier items held in the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection come from Lillian Rogers Parks, a second-generation White House seamstress and maid who went on to become a bestselling author with her 1961 memoir My Thirty Years Backstairs at the White House, filled with anecdotes and personal recollections from her unique insider perspective. Mrs. Parks became even more prominent in 1979, when her best selling memoir was adapted to the screen for a widely acclaimed NBC television miniseries, Backstairs at the White House, which earned 11 Primetime Emmy Award nominations. Parks officially began her 30–year White House career at the start of the Hoover administration in 1929, although she was already familiar with the Executive Mansion, having accompanied her ‘Mama’ there earlier on in life—her mother, Maggie Rogers, spent an equally long time on the domestic staff and had begun her service to the First Family under President Taft, rising to become the ‘First Maid’ during her tenure under six different presidents.

LILLIAN ROGERS PARKS


Superior Barbour Silver inkwell set

used at the White House

15 William H. Taft’s

Silver Inkwell Desk Set

ESTIMATE: $4,000-$6,000 President Taft’s exceptional personally-owned and -used two-piece inkwell desk set, consisting of a robust glass inkwell set upon an ornate silver base, with a hinged silver top nicely hand-engraved in the center of a raised design, “W. H. T.,” with “1910” engraved below, featuring delicate flourishes of artistry on either side. The inkwell itself measures 3 x 4.25 x 3 and has a gorgeous starburst pattern engraved on the bottom. The base measures 6 x 6 with gently curved edges decorated by an elegant raised floral vine design, with similarly elaborate corner pieces raised in the center to secure the inkwell. On the bottom are makers’ stamps reading, “Barbour Silver Co., Silver, Quadruple,” and “2385.” Includes a detailed letter of

provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. In part: “This handsome desk set or ink well was owned and used by President William Howard Taft. This ornate desk set is made of superior quality quadruple silver-plate…The silver ink well top was elegantly hand-engraved…It was given to my mother during the rush to pack the belongings of the Taft family to make way for the new First Family. President and Mrs. Wilson (Ellen Louise Wilson) moved into the White House on March 4, 1913. My ‘Mama’ Maggie Rogers was ‘First Maid’ of the White House and was often with Mrs. Taft and close by was the President.” Also accompanied by an unsigned image of William Howard Taft and one of Mrs. Taft’s personal visiting cards. This ornate inkwell set is of the highest quality and represents an exquisite desk piece actually used by President Taft in the White House.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 19


16 William H. Taft’s

Summer Home Plate

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 President Taft’s personally-owned white china plate depicting his sprawling summer home in Beverly, Massachusetts, measuring 9.25˝ in diameter, with a stunning golden gilt rim. In addition to the blue image of the estate in the center, the outer portion is further decorated with a beautiful American flag. The plate bears the manufacturer’s stamp on the bottom, “Carnation McNicol.” Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. In part: “The 9 inch plate of President Taft’s summer home with the American flag above was owned by him…It was given to my ‘Mama,’ Maggie Rogers who served the President and Mrs. Taft at the White House their entire term.” Also accompanied by a photo of Lillian Rogers Parks holding the plate.

17 William H. Taft’s

Summer Home Plate

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 President Taft’s personally-owned white china plate depicting his sprawling summer home in Beverly, Massachusetts, measuring 7.25˝ in diameter, with a worn gilt rim. The plate bears the manufacturer’s stamp on the bottom, “Carnation McNicol.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. In part: “This plate was owned by President William Howard Taft and Mrs. Nellie Taft…It depicts the summer home of President Taft in Beverly, Massachusetts. It is blue on a white background…President Taft gave this plate to mama saying, ‘I already know what my house looks like Maggie, would you like to have this?’ My mama, Maggie Rogers, accepted with sincere pleasure…I trust that this plate which belonged to the Tafts while they lived in the White House will be preserved for future generations.”

20 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


18 William H. Taft’s

Letter Opener

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 President Taft’s personally-owned gilt-over-bronze letter opener, measuring 10.5˝ long, featuring a stunning sculptured eagle that wraps around the hilt and a cornucopia pommel, with patriotic shields extending down onto the blade. The blade is expertly hand-engraved on both sides, with one reading, “23rd Annual Banquet of the Ohio Society of New York, Dec. 16th, 1908,” and the other inscribed, “In honor of William Howard Taft, President-elect of the United States.” Some areas of the blade are lightly tarnished but this hardly detracts from the exquisite craftsmanship of the piece. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The ornate letter opener was owned by President William Howard Taft…The other guests (except for the President and Mrs. Taft) attending the 1909 dinner received the same item except theirs was not gold.” Interestingly, Maggie Rogers made the 1908 trip to Syracuse to attend to the first family. Accompanied by a photocopied article from the December 17, 1908, New York Herald, which discusses the Banquet of the Ohio Society and names the prominent attendees, with William H. Taft listed as the guest of honor. An impressive presidential display piece of the highest quality.

19 First Ladies:

Taft, Coolidge, and Hoover ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Three signed photos: a 7.25 x 10 Harris and Ewing photo of Helen Taft, presented to First Maid Maggie Rogers, signed in black ink and housed in its original 8.5 x 11.25 frame; a matte-finish 6.5 x 10 Harris and Ewing portrait of Grace Coolidge, signed and inscribed, “To faithful Maggie, with all good wishes, Grace Coolidge,” and housed in its original 7.5 x 11 frame; and a matte-finish 10 x 14 full-length Underwood and Underwood photo of Lou Henry Hoover, signed and inscribed to White House maid Maggie Rogers, “To Maggie, with most cordial greetings, Lou Henry Hoover. Photo is housed in its original 13.5 x 17 frame. All frames were furnished to Mrs. Rogers by the internal White House’s carpenters office. In overall fine condition. As the White House’s First Maid, Maggie Rogers, mother of Lillian Rogers Parks, was kept close at hand by all the first ladies she served. Maggie Rogers and her daughter Lillian served an astonishing combined 60 plus years at the White House.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 21


Exquisite piece from the president’s desk—

the eraser for his ‘pen’ 20 Woodrow Wilson’s

Typewriter Brush

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,500 President Wilson’s personally-owned and -used ornate silver typewriter eraser brush, measuring 1 x 2.75, featuring a beautiful ornate handle engraved in the domed center with his initials, “W. W.,” which holds the brush’s horsehair bristles and topped with a rubber eraser. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The ornate sterling silver desk piece (typewriter eraser) is monogrammed, “W.W.” and was owned and used by President Woodrow Wilson…At one time, it had a small eraser at the top. The ivory colored brush is still in the bottom as it was when the President used it at his desk.” Based on Parks’s description, the eraser atop the handle seems to be a replacement, though of the same period. Wilson was extremely fond of his typewriter—he purchased a Hammond while president of Princeton University, which he referred to as his ‘pen.’ It was this typewriter—with the innovative ability to change fonts—that he took with him to the White House, where he went on to use a number of different Hammonds, his brand of choice. The legacy of Wilson’s typewriter lived on into the 1960s, when President John F. Kennedy was presented with the typewriter that Wilson used to write the ‘14 Points’ speech. This exceptional monogrammed presidential relic is of great historical interest as it is intimately associated with Wilson’s work as president.

21 Woodrow Wilson’s

Sterling Shoe Horn

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 President Wilson’s personally-owned and -used elegant sterling silver shoe horn, measuring 6˝ long, with a gently sloped design featuring an ornately patterned rolled lip around the top edge, expertly engraved in an elaborate font with his initials, “T. W. W., 1913.” The reverse is stamped with a Galt & Bro. sterling silver maker’s mark with the numbers “3” and “27” below. The date on this beautiful presentation piece corresponds with the first year of his presidency, and is unusually engraved with the full initials for his given name, Thomas Woodrow Wilson. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The striking sterling silver shoe horn was given to President Wilson by either First Lady Edith Axson Wilson…or First Lady Edith Galt…This lovely sterling silver shoe horn was owned and used by President Wilson in the White House, and given to my ‘Mama,’ Maggie Rogers.” It seems safe to assume that this was given to Wilson to celebrate the first year of his presidency, which would mean that it was given to him by his first wife, Ellen Axson Wilson. What is most interesting about this piece is its serendipitous association with President Wilson’s future. Ellen passed away in August 1914, and in February of the following year he would meet his eventual wife, the widowed Edith Bolling, whose first husband was Norman Galt—the owner of Galt & Bro., from whom she had inherited the company after he passed in 1908. As such, this is not only a personal gift from a first lady to a president, but a wonderful association piece between first ladies from the same administration and an eerie prediction of what was to come. Condition is near pristine. An exemplary relic of the highest form befitting the most advanced collector or institution.

22 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Patriotic brooch given to Edith Wilson on her wedding day by her husband, the president 22 Edith Galt Wilson’s

Engraved Brooch

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Edith Bolling Galt Wilson’s personally-owned and -worn brooch, given to her by her husband, President Woodrow Wilson, on their wedding day. Enamel and sterling silver brooch measures 2.25˝ wide, with a large eagle in the center with a red, white, and blue shield, all encircled with blue enamel and stars. Reverse is expertly handengraved, “W. W. to E. B. G, December 18, 1915.” Accompanied by a 1982 letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The lovely enamel and sterling silver broach [sic] was a gift from President Woodrow Wilson to Edith Bolling Galt Wilson on December 18, 1915…This was their wedding day just prior to the end of his first term… It is a lovely piece and was worn by the First Lady when in the company of the President on some special days.” In fine condition.

23 Edith Galt Wilson’s

Purple Purse

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Edith Galt Wilson’s personally-owned and -used fine purple silk purse, measuring 7 x 6 folded, featuring a finely embroidered patriotic eagle on the front, clutching an American flag in its talons, with the words “For Democracy” below, as well as a pin that reads “USA.” The purse is trimmed with a lovely off-white ribbon, and opens to reveal an inner pocket made from an American flag. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The First Lady gave it to my Mama, saying, ‘President Wilson prefers that I not keep this because someone might see me with it and not understand’…the wording on the outside of the linen bag would, according to President Wilson, have been interpreted as a pro Suffragette statement on the part of the First Lady.” A notable offering of historic consequence.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 23


24 Ellen Wilson

Collection of Five Items

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Interesting collection of five items, all personally-owned by the Wilson family during their time in the White House: a pair of fine white ermine fur pieces used by First Lady Ellen Wilson as trim for her coat; a fine pair of off-white doeskin gloves, personallyowned by First Lady Ellen Wilson; a long braid of First Lady Ellen Wilson’s hair kept by Maggie Rogers, who regularly trimmed her hair; a beautiful evening purse embroidered with gold thread, personally-owned by President Woodrow Wilson’s cousin, Helen Bones; and a white lace cravat personally-owned by Helen Bones. Includes detailed letters of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. Helen Bones was Woodrow Wilson’s first cousin and she actually resided with the Wilson family at the White House for six years, serving the administration in various capacities, including as First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson’s social secretary. Fascinatingly, it was Ms. Bones who first introduced President Wilson to Edith Galt, whom he married shortly thereafter. Personal items belonging to the first Mrs. Wilson are virtually nonexistent.

25 Ellen Wilson

Collection of Five Items

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Collection of five items, all personally-owned by First Lady Edith Wilson: two beautiful large sections of beaded blue velvet fabric from a dress personally-owned and -worn by Edith Galt Wilson; lavender and turquoise feathers from a fan personally-owned and -used by Edith Wilson; a small brown vase personally-owned by the President and Mrs. Wilson; and a blue rayon beaded belt personally-owned and -worn by Edith Wilson. Includes detailed letters of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In overall fine condition.

26 Ellen Wilson

Collection of Three Items

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Three scarce personally-owned items of Ellen Wilson, all presented to former White House ‘first maid’ Maggie Rogers. Items are: an attractive silver diamond-shaped brooch, with a blue stone (likely cornelian) set inside a delicate filigree pattern; a pair of champagne beige doeskin evening gloves, marked inside “Lavable,” each with three buttons; and an off-white pair of doeskin gloves. All three items are accompanied by letters of authenticity, on White House stationery, from Maggie Roger’s daughter Lillian Rogers Parks. In fine condition, with expected light wear. Personal items belonging to the first Mrs. Wilson are virtually nonexistent.

24 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


President Harding’s tortoiseshell pince-nez eyeglasses

28 Warren G. Harding’s

Eyeglasses

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 President Harding’s personally-owned and -worn pince-nez eyeglasses with circular prescription lenses, featuring tortoiseshell frames with molded nosepieces attached by a flexible metal band. There is a very small edge crack above the chain loop on the right eyepiece, not affecting the integrity of the glasses. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “These eyeglasses (Pince nez) were owned and used by President Warren G. Harding…Florence Harding gave them to my Mama, Maggie Rogers…There are photographs of President Harding in books showing him wearing these glasses or a companion pair.” Also accompanied by two vintage photos of Warren G. Harding wearing this style of glasses. An exceptional and stylish piece of presidential history of exemplary quality.

29 Warren G. Harding’s

Necktie

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President Harding’s personally-owned and -worn necktie, presented to White House maid Maggie Rogers by Florence Harding after her husband’s passing. Quality made black silk Herringbone pattern, with small blue dots is labeled inside the lining in an unknown hand, “W. G. H.” Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This Tie was owned and used by President Warren G. Harding.” In fine condition, with a small period brass safety pin attached to the reverse of the smaller end. An exemplary sample of presidentially-worn apparel straight from the executive mansion.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 25


30 Warren G. Harding’s

Handkerchief

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President Harding’s personally-owned and -used handkerchief, presented to White House maid Maggie Rogers by Florence Harding, after the passing of her husband. Off-white silk handkerchief measures approximately 22.5 x 24, is embroidered with Harding’s initials, and has stitched borders. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. Letter reads, in part: “This handsome handkerchief was owned and used by President Warren G. Harding. When the President died on August 2, 1923, the First Lady, Florence Harding gave it to my Mama, Maggie Rogers, First Maid of the White House.” In fine condition, with a bit of scattered light soiling. A splendid presidential offering direct from the White House.

31 Warren G. Harding’s

Leather Jacket Wallet

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President Harding’s personally-owned and -used leather jacket pocket wallet. Black leather wallet measures 4 x 7, and is handsomely embossed in gold on one side, “‘Warren’ Harding,” with “Here’s hoping you put on, take all, put two, Fred W. MacKenzie,” embossed along the bottom. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. Letter reads, in part: “The gold embossed leather jacket wallet was owned and used by President Warren G. Harding. When Mrs. Harding left the White House, she gave it to my Mama, Maggie Rogers, soon to be First Maid of the White House.” In fine condition. Seldom is a president’s personal wallet offered, especially in such splendid condition.

26 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Harding’s leather travel toilet kit, presented by his widow to the White House maid

32 Warren G. Harding’s

Toilet Kit

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,000

President Harding’s personally-owned and -used travel toilet kit, presented by Florence Harding to White House First Maid Maggie Rogers after the president’s sudden passing. Leather kit, with carrying strap, measures 12 x 8, with “W. G. H.,” embossed in gold on the front flap above the latch. Opening to an overall size of 16.5 x 20, the kit has straps and loops for 15 different pieces, with four original pieces still contained in the kit. Included are: a bar of soap and covered soap dish, shaving brush, and two empty tubes. Accompanied by a 1982 detailed letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. Letter reads, in part: “This Toilet Kit was owned and used by President Warren G. Harding. When the President died in August 1923, the First Lady, Florence Harding gave it to my Mama, Maggie Rogers, First Maid of the White House. This was during the few days Mrs. Harding was packing so that President and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge could move into the White House…The President used this on trips from Marion, Ohio as well as Washington, D. C. [and all over the country]” In fine condition, with expected light wear from travel and use. A distinguished and particularly refined relic of the former president.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 27


33 Warren G. Harding’s

Silver-Plated Box

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,000 President Warren G. Harding’s personally-owned and -used engraved silver-plated box. Box measures 6.5 x 3 x 3, and is artistically hand-engraved on the lid, “W. G. H.” Bottom of the box bears six hallmarks, including a lion, two arms and hammers, and two bells, as well as a BSCEP hallmark, which stands for Barbour Silver Co. Electro Plate. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This handsome Silver Plated Box was owned and used by President Warren G. Harding…Perhaps the President used this box for cigars. President Harding was an avid cigar smoker.” In fine condition, with no plate wear evident. An impressive presidential relic of the highest quality, this piece would display with great ardor.

34 Warren G. Harding’s

Leather Writing Case

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 President Harding’s personally-owned and -used leather writing case. Black leather case, made by Cross of London, is impressively embossed on the front cover in gold, “Warren G. Harding, Marion, Ohio,” measures 12.75 x 9.5, has two brass corners, and four pockets and leaves inserts. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This handsome leather writing case was owned and used by President Warren G. Harding…This was used by the President in Ohio as well as Washington, D. C.” In fine condition, with expected light wear. A first-class presidential relic and, according to our research, the first of its format—of any president—ever offered for sale.

28 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


35 Warren G. Harding’s

Ink Well

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 President Harding’s personally-owned and -used ink well, presented by Florence Harding to White House maid Maggie Rogers after the president’s passing. Stunning ink well stands 1.25˝ high, has a clear crystal base, and a metal top (pewter or nickel-silver), trimmed in brass, which bears the older version of the Seal of the President of the United States. Accompanied by a 1982 detailed letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This handsome ink well was owned and used by President Warren G. Harding…This item was used in the Oval Office for a time as well as the President’s private study.” In fine condition, with expected light wear. An exemplary presidential relic intended for a collector with exquisite taste.

Harding’s monogrammed playing cards from the White House 36 Warren G. Harding’s

Playing Cards

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President Warren G. Harding’s personally-owned and -used playing cards, presented to White House maid Maggie Rogers by Florence Harding after her husband’s passing. Gilt-edge cards, made by the Bailey, Banks, & Biddle Company of Philadelphia are housed in their original box, with the back of each card monogrammed with Harding’s initials. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “These playing cards were owned and used by President Warren G. Harding…The President was an avid poker player and he used these cards as well as others…The President loved to play cards with his friends in the White House.” In fine condition, with expected light wear and a bit of soiling. An historic relic, owned and used by the poker playing president, complete with a compelling story from the original recipient.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 29


President Harding’s

White House mahogany poker set

37 Warren G. Harding’s

Mahogany Poker Set

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,500 President Harding’s personally-owned and -used poker set. Set consists of a 9.5˝ diameter ‘lazy-susan-style’ mahogany holder which stands 4.25˝ tall, has 12 circular openings to hold chips, and a chrome-type handle attached to the top. A total of 164 beige, red, and blue chips are with the set, almost all marked on both sides with a version of the United States seal. Also included is a deck of cards, and the set’s black

leather cover. A quality set befitting a sitting president. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “These poker chips and holder were owned and used by President Warren G. Harding...the First Lady, Florence Harding gave them to my Mama, Maggie Rogers, First Maid of the White House…The President was an avid poker player and he used this set of poker chips as well as others.” In fine condition, with expected wear from use. Harding, a renowned poker player, is said to have gambled away an entire set of White House china dating back to the presidency of Benjamin Harrison on a single hand. An exemplary presidential offering.

30 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


38 Warren G. Harding’s

Crystal Wine Glass

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 President and Mrs. Harding’s personally-owned and -used crystal wine glass. Delicate stem glass is made by the Sinclair Glass Company, measures 5˝ tall and is beautifully hand-engraved, “WGH” on one side. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. Letter reads, in part: “The fine Wine Glass engraved W.G.H. was owned and used by President Warren G. Harding and the First Lady, Florence Harding in the White House as well as their home in Marion, Ohio. When Mrs. Harding left the White House upon the sudden death of President Harding she gave it to my Mama, Maggie Rogers, soon to be First Maid of the White House…Other examples of this lovely crystal are in the Harding Home and Museum in Marion, Georgia.” In splendid condition, with an inventory label and collector’s felt tip notation on underside of base. An illustrious quality example for the most discriminating of collectors.

39 Warren G. Harding’s

Crystal Cordial Glass

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President and Mrs. Harding’s personally-owned and -used cordial glass. Diminutive glass, of the highest crystal quality, is made by the Central Glass Works of Wheeling, West Virginia, measures 4.75˝ tall, with a stunning gold-encrusted pattern marked “H,” on one side. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. Letter reads, in part: “The lovely Cordial Glass was owned and used by President Warren Harding and the First Lady, Florence Kling Harding. It was used in the White House as well as their home in Marion, Ohio…This is a piece from the Harding family service. Other examples may be found in the Harding Home and Museum in Marion, Ohio.” In splendid condition, with an inventory label and collector’s felt tip notation on underside of base. An elite collector of quality presidential crystal will appreciate this offering.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 31


40 Warren G. Harding’s

Vegetable Bowl

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 President Warren G. and First Lady Florence Kling Harding’s personally-owned and -used vegetable bowl. Attractive Wedgwood bowl, pattern #2006, measures 5.5˝ in diameter, with a beautiful floral print around the inside edge, with two faint stamps along the bottom. Accompanied by a 1982 detailed letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: ”The lovely Vegetable Bowl was owned and used by President Warren G. Harding and First Lady, Florence Kling Harding. It was used in the White House as well as in their home in Marion, Ohio…It is Wedgewood pattern #2006. This is of particular interest because it was from the first set of dishes bought by the Hardings after their marriage in 1891.” In very fine condition, with a couple small collector’s notations to bottom, as well as a small label.

41 Warren G. Harding’s

Vase

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Stunning pitcher-style vase owned by the Hardings and displayed in the White House. Vase measures an imposing 11˝ tall, with two painted floral panels on the sides, and the remainder of the vase being covered in an eye-catching raised relief design. Accompanied by a 1987 handwritten letter of provenance, on a White House card, by Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. Letter reads, in part: “The lovely flower vase (11 inch) was owned by the Hardings. They gave it to my mother who was the first maid of the White House.” Also included is an important color photo of Parks posing with the vase many years ago. In fine condition. A superb porcelain example direct from the Harding White House.

32 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


42 Warren G. Harding

Photograph

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 A matte-finish 6.75 x 10 bust portrait of President Harding in a stately pose, blind-stamped in the lower border by the Baker Art Gallery of Columbus, Ohio. In fine condition. A wonderful original image with rich sepia tones.

43 Warren G. Harding

Photograph

44 Warren G. Harding

Photograph

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 A matte-finish 8.25 x 11 candid photo of Warren G. Harding in an eye-catching full-length pose on the golf course, labeled in the lower border. “President Harding Playing Golf with Charles Dawes, Marion Country Club, July—1922.” Affixed to a samesize mount. In fine condition. An uncommon and superbly candid presidential shot.

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 A glossy 8 x 10 photo of President Harding just after taking a swing on the golf course, nicely dressed in appropriate attire. Stamped on the reverse, “Reproduced from the collection of the Library of Congress.” In fine condition, with very mild overall creases.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 33


45 Warren G. Harding

Photograph and Invitation

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 A desirable original pearl-finish 7 x 5 photo of Warren G. and Florence Harding with Vice President Calvin Coolidge, showing President Harding crouching down to pick a flower from the sidewalk, blindstamped in the lower right by Edmonston of Washington, DC; and an official White House invitation from the President and Mrs. Harding for a dinner to be held on February 23, 1922. In overall fine condition.

46 Warren G. Harding

Postcard Photographs

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 A handsome assortment of eight period postcard photos of Warren G. Harding, most showing him as the single subject in a full-length pose, with one of President Harding on a balcony with William Jennings Bryan during a visit to Bryan’s home in Miami. In overall fine condition.

47 Florence Harding’s

Black Shoe Buckles and Evening Bag

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 First Lady Harding’s personally-owned and -worn shoe buckles and evening bag presented to White House maid Maggie Rogers. Oval-shaped black leather buckles measure 2.75 x 2, with a sewn-on bead pattern; colorful metallic purse measures 3.75 x 7.5, has a black, gold, turquoise and white pattern on the sides, with a silver chain link handle and solid clasp. Both pieces are accompanied by July 4, 1982, detailed letters of authenticity, on White House stationery, from Lillian Roger Parks. In the letters Mrs. Parks states both items were presented to her mother Maggie Rogers, who in her role as White House First Maid was often around the First Ladies. In fine condition.

34 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Coolidge’s ancestor is honored for his Revolutionary War service

49 Calvin Coolidge

1924 Typed Letter Signed ESTIMATE: $400-$600 TLS as president, one page, 7 x 9, White House letterhead, November 20, 1924. Letter to Walter Gilman Page of the Society of the Sons of the Revolution. In full: “I want to take this opportunity of expressing to you my sincere thanks for the action of the Sons of the Revolution of Massachusetts in presenting to the town of Plymouth the flagpole in honor of my great-great-grandfather, Captain John Coolidge. There is little, perhaps, that I can properly say of the pride which I feel in his honorable service to his country, but I can express, I am sure, my own sense of appreciation for this action on your part. The fact that this memorial comes from the State House has especially touched me, and I am very grateful to you for it.” Coolidge has added the final two words of the text in his own hand. In fine condition, with scattered mild toning. Coolidge’s great-great grandfather who served as a private during the American Revolutionary War, was promoted to captain after the war ended, and was later one of the first selectmen of the town of Plymouth Notch, Vermont. An unusual presidential format, relating not only to the president’s own ancestor, but to others that fought in the Revolutionary War.

Address given in honor of the 150th anniversary of the Virginia Resolutions for Independence 50 Calvin Coolidge

Signed College of William and Mary Address

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Historic typed and signed address, as president, two pages, 6.5 x 9, of Calvin Coolidge’s address given at the College of William and Mary, on May 15, 1926. Address begins: “No one who is interested in the early beginnings of America, or who is moved by love of our country, could come into these historic and hallowed surroundings without being conscious of a deep sense of reverence. In a land which is rich in the interesting records of the past, that portion of Virginia lying between Washington and Norfolk stands out unrivaled in important events and great names. Colonial importance, Revolutionary fame, the statesmanship of the early Republic, the great struggle for the supremacy of the Union—these epoch-making stories can not be told without relating the history of this locality and recounting the eminence of its illustrious sons. Very much of this narrative centers around the venerable town of Williamsburg and the old college of William and Mary.” Signed on the second page in black ink. In fine condition, with a vertical fold. This address, relayed over telephone to Richmond for broadcast by radio station WRVA, was warmly received by the audience and made headlines for its focus on states’ rights. An important historical offering.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 35


51 Calvin Coolidge’s

GoldTone EVERSHARP Pencil

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 President Coolidge’s personally-owned and -used mechanical pencil. Goldtone Eversharp pencil measures 5.25˝ long and is handsome and artistically hand-engraved below the clip, “C. Coolidge.” Accompanied by a letter of authenticity, on a White House card, from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The goldtone Eversharp pencil was owned and used by President Calvin Coolidge…the Coolidges gave my Mother, Maggie Rogers and me, several of their personal possessions.” In fine condition. A documented writing instrument—of any president—is scarce to say the least.

52 Calvin Coolidge’s

Sherbet Glass

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 One of President and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge’s personally-owned and -used sherbet glasses. Elegant glass measures approximately 4.25˝ high, etched with a delicate floral design, with gold lined rim and base. Accompanied by a July 4, 1982, detailed letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “Shortly before the inauguration of President Herbert Hoover, President and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge were giving away some of their personal possessions to favorite members of the staff. Since my Mama, Maggie Rogers, was First Maid of the White House and sewed frequently with Mrs. Grace Coolidge, a number of personal items belonging to the President and First Lady came our way…The lovely sherbet glass…comes from a set of four which were owned and used by the President and the First Lady.” In really splendid condition.

36 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Grace Coolidge’s own custom-made dress given to the White House maid

53 Grace Coolidge’s

Lace Flapper Dress

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Grace Coolidge’s stunning personallyowned and -worn dress. Soft golden color 1920s flapper-style dress features a double layer of gold lace around the knee area, three bows along the zip-up back, and a Sophie DeParis maker’s label sewn into the collar. Dress also features a gold satin lining, which may have been added later. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. Letter reads, in part: “This beautiful silk lace dress of First Lady, Grace Coolidge, was given to my Mama, Maggie Rogers, First Maid of the White House…My Mama and Mrs. Coolidge did a lot of sewing together. Mrs. Coolidge loved to sew on the sun porch of the third floor of the White House…Mrs. Coolidge sewed some of her own clothes. The President never liked to see her in the same dress twice.…I do trust that this beautiful First Lady’s dress will be preserved for future generations.” Also included is a four-page 1929 ALS from Grace Coolidge written to Maggie Rogers. In fine condition. A striking and very modern-looking design, certainly fit for the renowned White House hostess. This offering is representative of the class First Lady Grace Coolidge was known for and is a superior display relic.

54 Grace Coolidge’s

Handmade Beige Chiffon Stole

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Elegant sheer beige stole of the highest quality, handmade by Grace Coolidge herself, lined with turquoise chiffon. The stole, measuring 7´ 4˝ long and 7˝ wide, tapers into beautiful gray tassels. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This lovely…stole was handmade by Grace Coolidge…The First Lady did fine work... My Mama and Mrs. Coolidge did a lot of sewing together. Mrs. Coolidge loved to sew on the sun porch of the third floor.” Condition is extra fine.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 37


55 Grace Coolidge’s

Handmade Rose Chiffon Stole

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Stately rose-pink stole of the highest quality, handmade by Grace Coolidge herself, lined with light gray silk and intricately decorated with delicate gray and beige hand-embroidered floral applique. The stole, measuring 7´ 5˝ long and 1´ wide, has delicate fringed tassels at both ends. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This lovely rose/pink stole was handmade by Grace Coolidge…My Mama and Mrs. Coolidge did a lot of sewing together. Mrs. Coolidge loved to sew on the sun porch of the third floor.” Condition is extra fine.

56 Grace Coolidge’s

Sterling and Enamel Perfume Flask

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 G r a c e C o ol i d g e’s elegant personallyowned and -used perfume flask, given to her by her husband, P re s i d e n t C a l v i n Coolidge. Sterling and enamel flask-style bottle measures 2˝ long, features a color image of blooming roses on the front black enamel, with the back hand-engraved, “C. C. For G. C.—1923,” and “Sterling” along the bottom. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This delicate and beautifully engraved ‘C. C. For G. C.—1923,’ perfume bottle was owned and used by Mrs. Calvin Coolidge. She gave it to my mama, Maggie Rogers.” First Maid Maggie Rogers and Mrs. Coolidge were together often, frequently visiting and sewing in the first lady’s private White House quarters. In fine condition, with some scattered light surface wear and tarnishing to back of bottle.

38 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Mrs. Coolidge’s engraved button hook 57 Grace Coolidge’s

Button Hook

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Grace Coolidge’s fashionable personally-owned and -used button hook. Ivory-handle button hook measures 7˝ long, with the ivory handle beautifully and artistically engraved on one side, “G. C.,” and the other side trademarked, “Parisian Ivory—Loomeni France.” Accompanied by a 1982 detailed letter of provenance, on White House letterhead. In part: “This button hook was owned and used by the First Lady, Grace Coolidge, for her high button shoes. The button hook is clearly engraved with her initials G. C.” First Maid Maggie Rogers and Mrs. Coolidge were together often, frequently visiting and sewing in the first lady’s private White House quarters. In fine condition.

58 Grace Coolidge

Collection of Six Items

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Fine collection of six items, all personallyowned by the Coolidge family: a small cobalt blue swirl glass pitcher personally-owned and -used by President Calvin Coolidge and Mrs. Coolidge; an elegant rhinestone belt buckle personally-owned and -worn by Grace Coolidge; two delicate veils personally-owned and -worn by Grace Coolidge; a glass crackle-textured vase personally-owned and -used by President Calvin Coolidge and Mrs. Coolidge; and a blue glass perfume bottle personally-owned and -used by Grace Coolidge. Includes detailed letters of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. An enticing grouping of first family history.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 39


59 Grace Coolidge

Collection of Five Items

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Nice collection of five items, all personally-owned by Grace Coolidge: a lovely rhinestone brooch personally-owned and -worn by Grace Coolidge; a gorgeous piece of red velvet cloth from the train of First Lady Coolidge’s dress, as seen in the portrait of her by Howard Chandler Christy that still hangs in the White House; lavender-colored feathers from a fan personally-owned by Grace Coolidge; and two veils personallyowned by the first lady. Includes letters of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. An impressive grouping of first family history.

60 Grace Coolidge

Collection of Five Items

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Collection of five items owned by Grace Coolidge. Items are: a 3.25˝ tall camelshaped perfume bottle; a pair of decorative porcelain birds kept in the Coolidge’s bedroom; an 8˝ tall doll that was kept on the Lincoln bed in the White House at times; a peacock-blue veil, approximately 21 x 65.5, worn by Grace Coolidge; and a large wicker basket, approximately 18˝ tall, which occasionally held personal items of the Coolidges. Each item is accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. An enticing First Lady assemblage.

61 Grace Coolidge

Collection of Four Items

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Collection of four items, all personally-owned and -worn by Grace Coolidge: a black mourning veil personally-owned and -worn by Grace Coolidge during the period following the death of President Warren G. Harding; two gorgeous swatches of red velvet cloth from the train of First Lady Coolidge’s dress, as seen in the official White House portrait of her by Howard Chandler Christy that still hangs in the Executive Mansion; and an ornate metal filigree and jade belt buckle personally-owned and -worn by the first lady. All in fine condition. Includes detailed letters of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. A desirable grouping.

40 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Lillian Rogers

Parks L

illian Rogers Parks was the most important early patron of the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection, contributing items that she or her mother had acquired over the course of their combined 60-plus years of work at the White House. After their initial meeting, Parks and Raleigh DeGeer Amyx developed a close friendship of nearly two decades—Amyx describes her as ‘one of the top ten people’ he ever knew, and at Mrs. Parks’ request he served as a pallbearer at her funeral in 1997. Even more pivotal than the material she offered from her own White House collection were the contacts that she had developed with other insiders—it was through Parks that Amyx was introduced to Mrs. Arthur Prettyman, Viola Wise, Mrs. Isaac Esperancilla, and Mrs. Melvon O. Carter, all of whom provided material to the collection and are represented in this sale, and all of whom developed personal relationships with Mr. Amyx of their own.


62 Herbert Hoover’s

White House Displayed Artwork

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 President Hoover’s astounding personally-owned piece of fabulous artwork kept on display in his White House living quarters during his presidency, consisting of a detailed reverse-painted image of two eagles carrying an American flag set against an iridescent background created with actual butterfly wings. The impressive artwork is housed in its original 23 x 18.5 wooden frame, featuring a wooden backing bearing an affixed tag that reads: “Joalheria Anglo America, Avenida Rio Branco, 29A., Tel. Norte 3729, Rio De Janeiro.” There is some chipping to the white paint in the flag’s stripes but the piece displays beautifully overall. Includes a detailed

letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This most unusual piece of art was a gift from the President and Mrs. Hoover to my Mama…It depicts two painted eagles holding aloft a hand-painted American flag. The background is totally made up of butterfly wings in beautiful blue and purple colors…The back also has the original label of what is believed to be the studio or seller of the piece. The President and Mrs. Hoover kept this beautiful piece in the family living quarters of the White House during their tenure there. On the day the Hoovers left office, Mrs. Hoover, (Lou Henry Hoover) stood by the elevator and bade good-bye to Mama. It was the first time Mama had ever seen her with tears in her eyes. She said, ‘Maggie, my husband will live to do great things for this country.’” Also accompanied by a candid photo of Parks beside the artwork. An example of creative original art, this is an exceptional presidential relic.

42 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


63 Herbert Hoover

Photographs

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Two original unsigned glossy 10 x 8 International News press photos: one of Hoover during a solemn moment on board a battleship; and one of Hoover riding in a parade through Arlington, Massachusetts, dated October 15, 1928. Reverse of photo bears an affixed caption. In fine condition, with some scattered creases and surface marks. Accompanied by a facsimile copy of a brief ALS from Hoover, as president, dated August 10, 1947, which reads: “Greetings from old friends never fail to warm ones heart.”

64 Herbert Hoover

Brocade Fabric From Monroe Room

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 A large swatch of brocade fabric from a footstool that was in the Monroe Room of the White House during President Hoover’s administration, measuring 18 x 9, featuring a lovely black and gold Asian-inspired design. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. In part: “The fabric is a brocade and is gold on black and is from the footstool of the Monroe Room in the White House…I worked at the White House during the Hoover Administration when Mrs. Lou Henry Hoover gave me this. I did much sewing for the First Lady.” An interesting historical offering.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 43


65 Herbert Hoover’s

Butterfly Wing Artwork

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President Hoover’s personally-owned piece of original artwork kept on display in the White House during his presidency, consisting of a detailed reverse-painted image of a large sailing ship set against an iridescent background created with actual butterfly wings and framed to an overall size of 6 x 8. Reverse of the frame bears several original labels which read: “#4 Hoover,” “Made of wings of Morpho Menelaus from French Guyana,” and “The glass on this picture must never be replaced.” Accompanied by a July 4, 1982, letter of provenance on a White House card from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This early 1900s 6 x 8 framed item is made with blue iridescent butterfly wings…My original inventory #4 Hoover label is on the back…It was given to me by Mrs. Hoover before they left the White House. I often saw it on display.” A diagonal crack to glass, otherwise fine condition.

66 Herbert Hoover’s

Chinese Rice Bowl

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 President Hoover’s personally-owned and -used Chinese rice bowl. Glazed white bowl measures 5˝ in diameter, with hand-painted scenes of a family, a river, and pagodas around the outside, and a hand-painted border around the inside edge. This bowl was kept by the Hoovers in their upstairs White House living quarters, and bears a label affixed to the bottom, which reads, “#21 Hoover.” Accompanied by an August 10, 1982, letter of provenance, on a White House card, from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The Chinese rice bowl…was owned & used by Pres. & Mrs. Herbert Hoover in their upstairs living quarters. It was given to my mother, Maggie Rogers, who served the W. H. from 1909 until 1939, when the Hoovers left office.” Expected wear and soiling, otherwise fine condition.

44 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


67 Herbert Hoover’s

Gifted Plate

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 President and Mrs. Hoover’s personally-owned Nippon porcelain dessert plate. Plate measures 7.75˝ in diameter, with hand-painted flowers around the edge and center, separated by two decorative borders. Bottom of the plate is marked, “Hand Painted Nippon.” Accompanied by a 1984 letter of provenance on a White House card, by Lillian Rogers Parks. Letter reads, “This plate was a gift to my mother ‘Maggie,’ from President Hoover in memory of Mrs. Hoover, four years after her death in 1944.” Also included is Parks’s handwritten copy of Hoover’s presentation letter, which reads, “This is just a note to affirm that the china plate was presented to you by Mrs. Hoover and myself with our kind appreciation of your kind and thoughtful service.” At the conclusion, Parks adds, “This is a copy of the original letter.” The original Hoover letter was donated to his library many years ago. In fine condition. Considering that this attractive plate came directly from President Hoover, following the First Lady’s death, it is notable that he personally reached out to this particularly favored White House servant.

Hoover’s innovative Eversharp mechanical pencil, used by him at the White House

68 Herbert Hoover’s

Eversharp Pencil

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 President Hoover’s appealing personallyowned and -used Eversharp gold mechanical pencil, measuring 5.25˝ long, handsomely hand-engraved along the side, “Herbert Hoover.” The pencil features a finely engraved bulbous top which rotates to dispense the graphite medium, a tiny bit of which remains. Manufacturer’s marks are engraved below this round cap, reading: “Wahl Eversharp, Gold Filled, Made in USA.” Accompanied by the original Eversharp plush-lined pencil box. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Lillian Rogers Parks. In full: “The goldtone Eversharp pencil was owned & used by President Herbert Hoover. It is hand-engraved below the round top design with his name. I worked for the President and Mrs. Hoover at the White House. When they left and FDR came in, in 1933, the Hoovers gave my Mother Maggie Rogers and me several of their own possessions.” A supremely attractive, personally-used presidential piece.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 45


Lighting the way for a White House Christmas surprise 69 Herbert Hoover’s

Brass Candleholder

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 President Hoover’s personally-owned and -used historic brass tealight candleholder, measuring 4˝ tall and 1.75˝ in diameter, featuring a small curved handle on the back. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The brass candle holder was owned by President Herbert Hoover and Mrs. Lou Henry Hoover. If you read page 228 of my book…you will see more detail about how this was used at the White House on Christmas about 1930.” Accompanied by a photocopy of page 228 from her book My Thirty Years Backstairs at the White House, reading, in part: “On the first Christmas at the White House, Mrs. Hoover had a Christmas party for fifty…After the dinner, the President...led a march all through the parlors...and all the ladies who followed had to ring the bells that were at their places, and the men carried the candles in the darkened room. The march continued up to the second floor, where a surprise was waiting—a motion picture.” Also accompanied by an unused candle that fits the holder. The detailed letter of provenance from Lillian Rogers Parks makes this historic offering special. A fabulous memento from a light moment in the Hoover administration, used in the White House during a joyous traditional holiday celebration.

70 Herbert Hoover’s

Congress Playing Cards

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Two decks of playing cards, used by President and Mrs. Hoover, and gifted to First Maid of the White House, Maggie Rogers. Reverse of one deck bears a colorful image of a woman, with “Petite” printed along the bottom edge of each card; and the other features a gold, black, and green design, and includes three mismatched cards. Both decks are housed in a 5 x 3 green box, marked on the outside, “Congress Playing Cards.” Accompanied by a July 14, 1982, detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead, from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The double deck of playing cards were a gift from President Herbert Hoover and Lou Henry Hoover, to my Mama, Maggie Rogers…The playing cards sit in a green box without a lid.” In fine condition, with expected handling wear.

46 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


71 Herbert Hoover’s

Playing Cards

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Deck of President Hoover’s personally-owned playing cards. Imperial poker playing cards feature an image of a Geisha girl on the back of each, and come in their original box. In fine condition, with one corner separation to box.

Stunning and delicate feminine hand paperweight

kept on the First Lady’s desk 72 Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover’s

Bronze Paperweight

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,500 Substantial bronze paperweight in the shape of a woman’s right hand, presented by President Herbert Hoover to his wife, Lou Henry Hoover, complete with ring, bracelet, and ruffled cuff, measuring 6.25˝ long, and engraved along the top, “H. H. and L. H. H. 1929.” This quality paperweight was kept on Mrs. Hoover’s desk during her four-year time at the White House and gifted to Maggie Rogers, First Maid of the White House. Mrs. Rogers was often in the presence of first ladies as she performed her many duties. Accompanied by an August 10, 1985 letter of provenance, on a White House card, from Lillian Roger Parks. In part, “The lovely 6 1/4 inch golden bronze hand was owned and used by President and Mrs. Hoover. The First Lady, Mrs. Lou Henry Hoover kept it on her desk as a paper weight.” In fine condition. An uncommon and very well-documented offering of a gift from a president to his wife.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 47


73 Lou Henry Hoover’s

Silk Doilies and Notebook of Dress Records

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Historically fascinating black leather records book, 5.5 x 8, for the outfits worn by First Lady Lou Henry Hoover, compiled by White House First Maid Maggie Rogers. First entry is from 1929 with the last entry from June 28, 1938, when Rogers came back to assist Eleanor Roosevelt after Missy Le Hand became ill. Pages, written in ink and pencil, list various outfits, instructions, and other notes related to housekeeping in the White House. Clothing choices include outfits for church, dinner and theater, receptions, a cabinet dinner, diplomatic receptions, as well as a couple of packing lists. This may be one of the most detailed historical records pertaining to a first lady over nearly decade long period available. Accompanied by a two-page 1932 ALS from Lou Henry Hoover written to Maggie Rogers. Also included is a pair of beautiful hand-painted silk doilies, 6 x 6, with paintings of a purple pansy and narcissus in the centers. The book and doilies are accompanied by detailed letters of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. In overall fine condition. A grouping befitting an accomplished historian or institution.

74 Lou Henry Hoover

Collection of Four Items

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Collection of four items personallyowned and -used by Lou Henry Hoover, all originally presented to White House maid Maggie Rogers. Items are: a pair of wooden glove-stretchers, 2.5 x 12.25; a hand-made light brown chiffon scarf done by White House seamstress Lillian Rogers Parks; a small hand-tooled brown leather case, with a flower and cactus design and embossed, “Tucson, Arizona”; and an attractive 4.75˝ green celluloid comb. Each item is accompanied by detailed letters of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In overall fine condition.

48 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Mrs. Arthur

Prettyman A

selection of the finest President Franklin D. Roosevelt items in the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection were acquired through Mildred Prettyman. Although she had worked in the White House for a short while herself, her husband Arthur S. Prettyman acted as FDR's personal valet and was one of the president's most trusted assistants, serving from 1939 until the president's unfortunate passing in 1945. In her letters, Mrs. Prettyman describes the close relationship between her husband and FDR: "President Roosevelt once said of his valet, 'You are my lifeline, the keeper of my keys.' By this he meant the keys to FDR's secrets. The president was close to his valet and enjoyed his company. Being the valet to President Roosevelt was grueling work. With the president's physical handicap there was so little he could

do for himself. Everything concerning the president's bedroom involved the valet. Much lifting of the president was required, particularly when assisting with his bath and grooming needs. My husband loved the president, who always made such a fuss over him. The president kidded him about having a pretty face—just like his name. Arthur wore a small, neat mustache and the president teased him about being a 'lady killer.' My husband would reply, 'One does not refute the chief executive, Mr. President.' When FDR died on April 12, 1945, in Warm Springs, it was my husband and Dr. Bruenn who carried him to his bed. This great loss haunted Arthur until his death in 1957." Three of the collection’s premier items—Franklin D. Roosevelt’s stunning cape, ivory handled cane, and 1933 inaugural top hat—were acquired from Mrs. Prettyman.


Spectacular formal top hat worn for his

1933 inauguration 77 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

1933 Inaugural Top Hat ESTIMATE: $20,000-$30,000

President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -worn top hat, size 7 3/8, worn for his first presidential inauguration on March 4, 1933. The impressive format top hat is made of high quality beaver fur with a white silk lining and leather inner band, with the president’s full name, “Franklin Delano Roosevelt,” embossed in gold lettering on the left side of the leather band and on the inner crown. Includes the original storage box, constructed of leather-wrapped wood with a dark green smooth satin lining, embossed on the front in gold lettering, “F. D. R.,” and stamped by the maker, “Cross.” Includes a detailed full-page letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Mildred Prettyman, a White House worker and the widow of Arthur S. Prettyman. Her husband had served as Franklin D. Roosevelt’s valet from 1939 until the president’s death in 1945, and continued working for Harry S. Truman until he left office in 1953. Mrs. Prettyman describes the close relationship between her husband and FDR, in part: “President Roosevelt said of his Valets, ‘You are my lifeline, the keeper of my keys.’ The President did not mean real keys, but the keys to FDR’s secrets.” Discussing this specific piece, she writes: “It gives me pleasure to present to you a beautiful black Inaugural top hat, owned and used by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The Inaugural top hat with the original box came to my husband, Arthur S. Prettyman, along with other important F. D. R. personal items…In addition to the President’s Inauguration, he would wear his top hat to various occasions, such as formal dinners and receptions.”

50 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


HISTORY Roosevelt wore top hats to his 1933, 1937, and 1941 inauguration ceremonies; the latter two hats are accounted for in institutional collections. This 1933 Inauguration top hat is in absolutely splendid condition. Franklin Pierce began the tradition by wearing a top hat for his presidential inauguration in 1853, with nearly every president thereafter following suit through Nixon, with Eisenhower and Johnson being notable exceptions. This FDR 1933 formal hat topped off the stylish ensemble worn by Roosevelt for his 1933 inauguration, which included striped trousers, fur-trimmed morning coat, cane, and pince-nez spectacles. FDR rode to the ceremony in an open-topped car alongside President Hoover, and is seen in numerous pictures with the hat—wearing it and animatedly waving it to the crowd gathered along the street—as they made their way to the East Portico of the Capitol, where he would receive the oath of office from Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes. Once sworn in, President Roosevelt delivered a speech that remains one of the most well-known in American political history, opening with the strong and oft-quoted assertion ‘that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself.’ With the nation embroiled in economic depression and the world facing the specter of fascism’s rise, Roosevelt’s inauguration marked a crucial turning point around the globe—and this iconic hat, FDR’s most prominent article of clothing on that day, is a monumental relic of this critical moment in history.

For further details go to www.RRAuction.com or call (800) 937-3880 | 51


The quintessential

iconic cape worn by Franklin D. Roosevelt

78 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Wool CAPE

ESTIMATE: $100,000-$150,000

52 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


President Roosevelt’s remarkable personally-owned and -worn blue-black cape custom made of the highest quality manufacture and material by Lewis & Thos. Saltz of Washington, constructed of a fine heavyweight wool with a satin lining and velvet-trimmed collar. The manufacturer’s tag is sewn inside the neck area below a metal chain, and the cape features an ornate braided fastener at the neck. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Mildred Prettyman, a White House worker and the widow of Arthur S. Prettyman. Her husband had served as Franklin D. Roosevelt’s valet from 1939 until the president’s death in 1945, and continued working for Harry S. Truman until he left office in 1953. Mrs. Prettyman describes the close relationship between her husband and FDR, in part: “President Roosevelt said of his Valets, ‘You are my lifeline, the keeper of my keys.’ The President did not mean real keys, but the keys to FDR’s secrets.” Discussing this specific piece, she writes: “It gives me pleasure to present to you one of the beautiful blue/black capes owned and used by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The navy blue/black cape came into the possession of my husband, Arthur S. Prettyman, shortley [sic] after the death of the President on April 12, 1945…This custom cape of superior quality was owned and used by President Roosevelt…At the back of the inside collar there is a custom chain for hanging purposes. This is because of the heavy weight of the wool. It is trimmed with a beautiful velvet collar. The cape [manufactured of the highest quality method and material] is held together in front by elegant epaulette-style braid with elegant crisscrosses.” Also accompanied by a number of photos showing President Franklin D. Roosevelt dressed in his characteristic attire, available for reference online at RRAuction.com.

HISTORY Lewis & Thos. Saltz was one of Washington’s premier clothiers, known for outfitting the nation’s elite—presidents, senators, and Supreme Court justices

were all known to frequent the prominent haberdashery, and is thus an appropriate choice of maker for this FDR cape. The garment is undoubtedly the most iconic item in FDR’s wardrobe— nearly all popular images of him from throughout his presidency show him in such a cape. More than a fashion statement, it was a practical piece of clothing—the design was less restrictive than a regular dress overcoat, allowing the president the extra upper arm mobility that he relied on to support himself due to the paralysis of his legs. In the pictures of Franklin D. Roosevelt at the Yalta conference, he can be seen wearing his cape as he met with Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin to determine the course of Europe’s postwar future, and his flowing cloak is immortalized in the statue at the FDR Memorial in Washington—in both of these depictions, FDR’s cape bears the distinctively designed woven clasp that fastens it in front. He is also shown in a similar cape in Douglas Granville Chandor’s 1945 portrait displayed in the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, and in Elizabeth Shoumatoff’s portraits of him, including the famous ‘Unfinished Portrait,’ which he was sitting for at the time of his stroke and subsequent death. With the exception of Lincoln’s top hat, FDR’s cape is perhaps the most recognizable article of any piece of presidential clothing. A defining element of his image, the cape projected an aura of power and strength to the public at large—a subliminal invocation of the emergent superhero and nod to the kings of old—allowing Roosevelt, afflicted with polio-induced paralysis from the waist down and confined to a wheelchair, to command the respect of the nation and world as it faced its greatest challenges of the century. This magnificent example of one of his capes, obtained directly from the wife of his longtime valet, is the quintessential FDR collectible—a piece of the greatest historical importance that defined the man and the era.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 53


Significant ivory handled walnut cane

frequently used by the paralyzed president

79 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Walnut cane

ESTIMATE: $40,000-$60,000

President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used walnut cane with a white bone handle and tip, measuring 39.5˝ long, featuring two black rings below the grip and a silver ring at the bottom of the handle. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Mildred Prettyman, a White House worker and the widow of Arthur S. Prettyman. Her husband had served as Roosevelt’s valet from 1939 until the president’s death in 1945, and continued working for Harry S. Truman until he left office in 1953. In part: “It gives me pleasure to present to you one of the canes owned and used by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It was given to my husband, Arthur S. Prettyman shortly after the handle was cracked, by the President…This particular cane was used a great deal by the President until he cracked the ivory top. It has a curved handle for the hand grip and two black rings near the top. At the bottom of the handle is a silver ring. The bottom of the cane has an ivory tip nearly 3 1/2 inches long…This most personal possession of the President must be preserved for future generations.” Accompanied by multiple photos of President Roosevelt holding the cane at various events, including a visit with Winston Churchill, as well as a photo of Mildred Prettyman with the cane at the time she transferred it to the distinguished Amyx collection.

54 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


HISTORY This cane is a historically significant reminder of FDR’s personal struggle with the crippling effects of polio that inspired one of his lasting legacies—the fight to eradicate the disease. Roosevelt became permanently paralyzed from the waist down after contracting polio at the age of 39 during a family trip to Canada in 1921. Unwilling to acquiesce to this immobile fate, he spent the rest of his life trying to recover—he spent the next three years searching for any means possible to walk again, concerned that this inability would affect his political career. Having exhausted most other options, he heard about a young man who had shown improvement after a course of hydrotherapy in the mineral-rich waters at a Georgia resort. It was then, in 1924, that FDR famously traveled to Warm Springs, Georgia, where the immersion in warm water was one of the few things that seemed to ease his pain—shortly thereafter he purchased the resort and developed it into what became a world-famous polio treatment center—the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, still in operation today as the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation. It was at Warm Springs that he was able to strengthen his withered leg and hip muscles and eventually found himself able to stand on his own, at which point he fitted his hips and legs with iron braces and laboriously taught himself to walk a short distance by swiveling his torso while supporting himself with a cane. The cane became an essential part of his image—he was careful to never be seen in his wheelchair in public, instead appearing either seated or standing upright with the support of a cane or aide. This exact cane is seen in many images of President Roosevelt throughout the early 1940s, including at a number of extraordinarily important historical events such as his meetings with Winston Churchill in 1941 and 1942, which resulted in the Atlantic Charter and the establishment of the United Nations, as well as more ordinary occasions like the visit of Princess Juliana of the Netherlands at Hyde Park. The extensive photographic evidence available of Franklin D. Roosevelt clearly using this cane throughout his presidency establishes its importance as a relic of American history—as an item often used by FDR, this particular cane is of paramount historical significance. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 55


Silver-topped engraved presentation cane

dated the day FDR assumed the presidency

80 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

1933 Inauguration Presentation Cane ESTIMATE: $3,000-$5,000 Magnificently impressive wood and silver-topped cane presented to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Cane measures 36˝ long with the handle artistically hand-engraved on the top, “FDR,” with an ornate laurel underneath, and beautifully hand-engraved around the edge, “President of the U. S. A., March 4, 1933.” Silver-tipped heel also bears an engraved border along the top edge. Cane comes with a 9 x 44.5 display frame. Accompanied by a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. Letter dated 1975 (but intended as 1985) reads, in part: “This beautiful cane inscribed F.D.R. on the silver handle was owned by the President. The cane is dated March 4, 1933. When our beloved President passed away the First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt told the staff we could have some of the President’s personal belongings. This lovely cane was one of these items.” Also included is a color photo of Mrs. Parks with the cane. In fine condition, with some scattered light tarnishing to silver, handle a bit loose, and a couple of minor surface cracks to wood. A beautiful presentation of an instrument which was critical to Roosevelt keeping a strong appearance during his political career after being stricken with polio in 1921 and an elite offering worthy of the most advanced collector.

81 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Cane Holder

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,000 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used very attractively designed cane and umbrella holder, measuring 20˝ tall with an 11˝ diameter, featuring a lovely raised floral design with a fine white and brown craquelure finish. The cane holder is constructed of some form of pottery and has a chip to the base, that does not really detract from display. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on a White House card from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The umbrella stand (20x11) was owned and used in the White House upstairs living area by President Franklin Roosevelt and his family.” An important piece which FDR would have used to store his canes, which were of the highest personal importance due to his polio-induced lower-body paralysis—a splendid White House piece of historic significance.

56 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


82 Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 Charming 9.25 x 7.25 Christmas photo of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt relaxing at a patio table with a book and some knitting, taken on July 4, 1941, signed in fountain pen, as president, “Franklin D. Roosevelt,” and “Eleanor Roosevelt,” with “Christmas 1941” added in another hand. Green velvet matted and framed to an overall size of 14 x 13. In fine condition, with a bit of scattered light silvering to darker areas of background, as is customary. Given as a presidential Christmas gift to members of the White House staff, the photo was taken on the south porch of their family home in Hyde Park.

Gorgeous engraved pendant watch presented by FDR to commemorate their marriage 83 Eleanor Roosevelt’s

Sterling Silver Pendant Watch Given to Her By FDR

ESTIMATE: $4,000-$6,000 Eleanor Roosevelt’s beautiful personally-owned and -used Swiss lady’s .900 silver hunting cased pendant watch, sold through A. Frankfield & Co. of New York and so signed on dial, presented to her by her husband, Franklin D. Roosevelt. The finely decorated silver case is artistically ornate and elaborate with a textured pebble pattern and floral theme, with her initials engraved in an escutcheon on the front, “E. R.” The rear cover opens to reveal the skillfully engraved cuvette with gift inscription and date of their marriage, “F. to R., March 17, 1905.” Manufacturer’s engravings inside the front cover also include the serial number, “15766 S,” “K & M 0.900,” and a silver hallmark. The watch has a 35 mm case diameter, white enamel dial, Louis XV gilt hands, cylinder escapement, 6 jewels, stem-wound and lever set. The small setting lever next to the dial at the 4 o’clock position shifts and locks upward toward the pendant, and may be pushed back or returned simply by closing the cover. The watch is in exceptional original condition, running well despite not being serviced for decades, showing hardly any wear but abundant tarnish to the silver case, here preserved just as it was passed along. The dial is clean and ideal, and the hands are in excellent condition. A. Frankfield & Co. was a jeweler operating in the Roosevelts’ home state of New York during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, known to sell pocket watches, cuckoo clocks, sterling, and silverplate. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The silver pendant/pocket watch which is ornately hand-engraved by A. Frankfield & Co. of New York, was owned and used by First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt in the years following her marriage to FDR on March 17, 1905.” One of the most interesting notes regarding the wedding of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt was that then-president Theodore Roosevelt, Eleanor’s uncle, gave the bride away, as both of her parents had passed away during her youth. A superb and very special memento given to America’s premier first lady by FDR himself. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 57


58 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


The Roosevelts’ sacred Holy Bible, kept “in the family living quarters of the White House”

84 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Bible

ESTIMATE: $15,000-$20,000

President Roosevelt’s personally-owned hardcover edition of the Holy Bible. Cleveland: The World Publishing Company. Hardcover, 6.75 x 9.75, gilt-stamped on the lower right of the front cover, “Franklin D. Roosevelt, July 25, 1942.” The book bears FDR’s personal bookplate affixed to the first free end page, featuring his family coat of arms with their surname below, “Roosevelt.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. In part: “The Bible was one of those owned by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. It is engraved in gold color on the front with his [full] name and the [World War II] date, July 25, 1942…This Bible was in the family living quarters of the White House and not in the White House Library. I have seen it on more than one occasion. When the President passed away it was so sad…Shortly thereafter the First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt, called a few White House staff members into her bedroom…Among other things I was given this Bible. It has meant a lot to me.” Also accompanied by photos of Lillian Rogers Parks with the Bible.

HISTORY President Roosevelt was an Episcopalian and quietly spiritual leader, and while religion was a formative force in his life and politics—he occasionally invoked biblical passages in his speeches, and Christian social ethics certainly informed elements of the New Deal—he was a strong advocate of freedom of worship, declining to use his international prominence as an evangelical platform. Of her husband’s faith, Eleanor Roosevelt would reflect that ‘it was a very simple religion’ and she ‘always felt Franklin’s religion had something to do with his confidence in himself.’ In his renowned Four Freedoms speech, given on January 6, 1941, Franklin D. Roosevelt explicated the idea of free religion as one of America’s chief ideological tenets, saying, ‘The second is freedom of every person to worship God in his own way—everywhere in the world.’ On the presentation date of this Holy Bible, July 25, 1942, President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9205 to establish the President’s War Relief Control Board, to oversee all charities ‘controlling in the public interest charities for foreign and domestic relief, rehabilitation, reconstruction, and welfare arising from war-created needs.’ This helped individual charities to become more efficient and cooperate in order to have the most effective impact on the nation. This presents a nice connection to President Roosevelt’s first Inaugural Address, given nearly a decade before on March 4, 1933, in which he invoked the language of scripture to invigorate the depressed American spirit, saying, ‘The money changers have fled from their high seats in the temple of our civilization. We may now restore that temple to the ancient truths. The measure of the restoration lies in the extent to which we apply social values more noble than mere monetary profit… These dark days will be worth all they cost us if they teach us that our true destiny is not to be ministered unto but to minister to ourselves and to our fellow men.’ A truly epochal offering worthy of the finest collection or institution.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 59


FDR’s personally-owned copy of African Game Trails 85 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Book

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned copy of African Game Trails by Theodore Roosevelt. Later printing. NY: Syndicate Publishing Company, 1910. Hardcover, 7 x 9.5, 583 pages. The book bears FDR’s truly scarce personal bookplate affixed to the half-title page, featuring an image of an anchor with his full name in a banner below, “Franklin Delano Roosevelt.” A wonderful association between these presidential icons and distant cousins. A book bearing such an uncommon personal FDR bookplate, and relating to the only other Roosevelt to hold the title of president of the United States is a desirable combination indeed.

Fantastic and unique 1936 drawing of ‘Smilin’ Thru’ inscribed to his artistic White House secretary 86 Franklin D. Roosevelt

Signed Original Artwork

ESTIMATE: $2,500-$3,000 Impressively rare and detailed original pencil artwork of President Roosevelt smiling, drawn by an accomplished artist, FDR’s secretary Mabel Williams, signed and inscribed in the lower right in pencil by Roosevelt as president, “For Mabel Williams, from Franklin D. Roosevelt.” Also signed and dated in the lower left by the artist, “Mabel E. Williams, December, 1936.” In very fine condition. Handsomely and archivally double-suedematted and framed to an overall size of 18.75 x 21.5. Accompanied by much fascinating correspondence between Amyx and Williams, with one letter from Williams actually describing the sketch, in part: “I am giving you the original photograph from which I made the drawing. Also enclosed is one of the clippings showing me holding the drawing at my desk in the White House. That was published in the Washington Daily News on Jan. 1, 1937…It does identify the picture as the ‘Smilin’ Thru’ photograph which was ‘distributed’ by the Daily News on Thanksgiving Day, 1936…As I remember the ‘Smilin’ Thru’ photograph received a lot of attention when it was first published because it was such a wonderful likeness.” The original newspaper clipping referenced, as well as the photograph distributed by the Washington Daily News, are included as well. Also accompanied by the original shorthand notes that Ms. Williams took during the announcement of the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. This outstanding original piece of artwork captures FDR perfectly and demonstrates exquisite artistic skill. That it was actually drawn by his White House secretary and subsequently inscribed to her provides superlative provenance and a fine historical background for this quintessential one-of-a-kind piece, with superior display potential.

60 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


87 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Bust of Will Rogers

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned cast metal memorial bust of Will Rogers, measuring 4.75˝ tall, featuring a head-and-shoulders depiction of the actor set atop a base that reads, “In Memory of Will Rogers, 1935.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This small metal statue of Will Rogers was owned by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. He kept it on the mantel in the White House with his collection of miniature dogs and pigs. He was an admirer of Will Rogers and upon his death in a plane crash in 1935, FDR kept this nearby.” Will Rogers had campaigned for Roosevelt in 1932 and gave speeches in support of the New Deal, making this an especially poignant association.

“To Mrs. Roosevelt, Love from your friend, Shirley Temple” 88 Shirley Temple

Signed Photograph Inscribed to Eleanor Roosevelt

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 Unique vintage glossy 6.5 x 8 photo of Temple and Eleanor Roosevelt seated in a movie theater in 1938, signed and inscribed to the First Lady in fountain pen, “To Mrs. Roosevelt, Love from your friend, Shirley Temple.” Beautifully archivally double-suede-matted and framed with a detailed descriptive plaque to an overall size of 14.75 x 23. In fine condition. Temple emerged as Hollywood’s foremost child star as the Great Depression raged and FDR took office—she became a national icon, exuding happiness with her bright smile at a time when the country needed it most. President Roosevelt recognized her importance on multiple occasions, saying, ‘It is a splendid thing that for just a fifteen cents an American can go to a movie and look at the smiling face of a baby and forget his troubles,’ and ‘As long as our country has Shirley Temple, we will be all right.’ A truly remarkable photograph presented to her friend, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and actually displayed by her in the White House, this rarity, linking two of the greatest female personalities of 20th century American history, is a particularly noteworthy piece.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 61


Toi

Bachelder T

oi Bachelder first met Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1925 when she was just 14 years old—afflicted with polio, she was one of the first 25 test patients to be rehabilitated at FDR’s newly established Warm Springs Foundation in Georgia. On her first night there she was a bridge partner with the future president, and the two became friends of long duration. When FDR assumed the presidency in 1933, Bachelder was invited to work as one of his major secretaries at the White House. She accepted the job and became one of the most trusted members of his inner circle, and was often in the president’s travel party—he never left Washington for Warm Springs without inviting her along, and she was at Warm Springs that fateful April 12th, 1945, at the time FDR passed away. She continued to work for Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. President Johnson’s po-

litical hero was Franklin D. Roosevelt and so he held a special esteem for Toi Bachelder; upon her retirement in 1967, he held a private reception for her in the Cabinet Room and the Oval Office and invited the press to cover the event. As with Lillian Rogers Parks, Raleigh DeGeer Amyx formed a close personal friendship with Toi Bachelder throughout nearly two decades, and he served as a pallbearer at her funeral as well. Among the most significant items in his collection that originate from Bachelder’s time at the White House are multiple statuettes from President Roosevelt’s Oval Office desk with photographic provenance and a remarkable oversized signed photo of FDR and his other secretaries, along with other historically important personal items used by JFK and LBJ.


Magnificent oversized portrait at his Oval Office desk,

presented to his White House secretary and rife with historical associations 89 Franklin D. Roosevelt

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Exceptional mattefinish 12.75 x 10 photo of President Roosevelt at his desk in the Oval Office, signed and inscribed in fountain pen to White House secretary, and member of FDR’s inner circle, Toi Bachelder by all four pictured, including Franklin Roosevelt as president, “For Toi, Franklin D. Roosevelt,” his secretaries, “To Toisy, On the last four! Love, Grace [Tully]” and “To Toi—March 4, 1941, from, Missy [LeHand],” and by FDR’s White House press secretary, “Stephen Early.” Also signed in the lower right by the photographer, “Jackie Martin.” Beautifully archivally double-matted and framed to an overall size of 20 x 17.5. In fine condition. This is an amazing photo showing an intimate moment from President Roosevelt’s third term, the president surrounded by some of the most trusted members of his inner circle—Marguerite ‘Missy’ LeHand, Grace Tully, and Stephen T. Early. FDR biographer Doris Kearns Goodwin called LeHand ‘the most celebrated private secretary in the country,’ and there is said to have been a romantic nature to her relationship with the president. In June 1941, only shortly after signing this photo, Miss LeHand suffered a devastating stroke that left her paralyzed, and her assistant, Grace Tully, took over as Roosevelt’s head secretary. The third signer, Stephen T. Early, was extremely influential in shaping FDR’s reputation among the American people—he is often credited with modernizing the relationship between the press and White House, and helped to originate Roosevelt’s ‘Fireside Chats,’ an integral part of FDR’s legacy and the first media development that facilitated intimate and direct communication between the president and the nation’s citizens. The photographer, Cecilia ‘Jackie’ Martin, was one of America’s first prominent women photojournalists—she began her photographic career at Underwood & Underwood, going on to work at the Washington Times-Herald for nearly two decades, rising to the position of art director before going freelance. According to a retrospective hosted in 1986 by her alma mater, Syracuse University, Martin took this photograph in March 1941 and it was never published. That this image is inscribed to Toi Bachelder—another of FDR’s close personal secretaries, inner circle companions, and a fellow polio survivor—makes it that much more unique. A truly remarkable and historic piece.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 63


As historically photographed on the Oval Office desk— a statuette symbolic of the Democratic Party

90 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

White Alabaster Donkey Straight From His Presidential Desk

ESTIMATE: $10,000-$12,000 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned lovely off-white alabaster like donkey figurine that he proudly displayed upon his Oval Office desk, measuring 6.5˝ long and 6.25˝ tall, featuring an elegant smooth finish and nicely detailed face. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Toi Bachelder, one of Roosevelt’s secretaries and a well-known member of his inner circle. In part: “Before President Truman moved into the Oval Office (after personal belongings had been distributed to family, close staff members and friends) Grace Tully gave us the opportunity to choose whatever we wished from President Roosevelt’s desk top. My mother [Mabel Bachelder] chose the white alabaster donkey with turned head, which was symbolic of the Democratic Party. On the bottom of the base are several mfg. markings including the number 5216. This historical item was photographed on F. D. R.’s desk both before and shortly after his death.” Also accompanied by the original typed presentation note from Miss Tully on a White House card, in full: “From the desk of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Presented to Mable Linda Bachelder on April 19, 1945.” Also includes a photo of Roosevelt at in the Oval Office in which the figurine is distinctly seen at the edge of his desk, close to the president’s left arm. An exceptional artifact embodying FDR’s progressive politics as a Democratic Party leader, the symbol of the party that backed his immensely influential New Deal, which determined the course of American social and economic policy for the century to come. This truly quintessential historical offering is befitting of the finest personal collection or institution.

64 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Directly from the president’s Oval Office desk via his longtime secretary

91 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Ho-Toi Chinese Figurine

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned kiln-glazed clay figurine of a Chinese gentleman with a pleasant countenance wearing traditional pink and yellow garb, measuring 5.5˝ tall, presenting a purple jewel atop a pillow held between his arms. The bottom of his garment is engraved with the words “Ho-Toi,” and he stands upon a white circular base. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Toi Bachelder, one of Roosevelt’s secretaries and a member of his inner circle. In full: “This Chinese figurine called ‘Ho.Toi’ was presented to me by Grace Tully [well-known FDR secretary] as an item from the desk of Franklin D. Roosevelt. I had the honor of working for FDR from 1933–45. I met him in 1925 in Warm Spgs., Ga. I was one of the first 25 polio test patients. Over the years I came to know him quite well.” Accompanied by the original typed presentation note from Tully on a White House card, in full: “From the desk of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Presented to Toinette Marya Bachelder on April 19, 1945.” Also includes a photo of Roosevelt at his desk in which the back of the figurine can actually be seen. Toi Bachelder told Raleigh DeGeer Amyx that every time she entered FDR’s Oval Office he would announce her arrival with a smile and then blurt out ‘Hoi-Toi,’ before the pair began work. A truly stunning, momentous artifact from FDR’s administration—sitting on the Oval Office desk, this figurine observed some of the most important decisions and bill signings from an immensely influential period in world history. For further details go to www.RRAuction.com or call (800) 937-3880 | 65


Keys to the president’s desk 92 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Presidential Oval Office and Council Room Desk Keys

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 Two metal keys to President Roosevelt’s desks: one to his Oval Office desk, from the collection of FDR’s Oval Office doorkeeper and Secret Service agent William D. Simmons, embossed on the head by the manufacturer, “Eagle Lock Co., Terryville, Conn. U. S. A.,” and engraved on the reverse, “76P25”; and another to the redwood desk in the Council Room, embossed on the head by the maker, “The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co., Yale,” and on the reverse, “Made in U. S. A.” Accompanied by a letter of provenance from Simmons’s grandson on a photocopied letter from President Truman to Agent Simmons, in full: “This is to certify that the key to Pres. Roosevelt’s [Oval Office] desk came to me through my grandfather, Bill Simmons, who passed away in 1970. My grandfather also served F. D. R. as a secret service agent.” FDR relics of the utmost consequence.

93 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Letter Holder

ESTIMATE: $500-$700 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used pewter letter holder, featuring a 5 x 1.75 base and 3.25˝ tall rear panel and 2˝ tall front panel, with his initials engraved on the front, “F. D. R.,” below a raised emblem bearing a portrait of him in relief encircled by the words, “President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Hyde Park, N. Y.” The bottom of the holder is stamped “Val-Kill,” as it was made by Val-Kill Industries, an artisanal craft company established by Eleanor Roosevelt. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The ‘F. D. R.’ monogrammed letter holder was owned and used by him.” Also accompanied by seven original White House envelopes with toning evident from having been stored in the holder. Roosevelt had founded Val-Kill Industries in 1927 with the goal of creating fine, heirloom quality items using traditional craft methods, including furniture, pewter, and homespun cloth, with the broader social goal of providing a supplemental income for local farming families. Their metalworking forge was not established until 1934 and the company as a whole dissolved in 1940, thus dating the letter holder to this brief six-year period. In addition to its personal use by the president, the association with Eleanor’s influential social activist concern—she transformed the role of the first lady from one of domestic hostess to international activist—makes this a particularly significant piece. An important relic directly from the desk of FDR.

66 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


94 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Letter Opener

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used pewter letter opener, measuring 5.5˝ long, featuring his initials engraved in the center, “F. D. R.,” below a detailed inset presidential seal emblem. The high-quality opener was made at Val-Kill Industries, the socially conscious business founded by Eleanor Roosevelt, and gently slopes from the nicely weighted round head into a sharp point, exhibiting significant use from light chips and dings to the tip. Includes a letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Arthur S. Prettyman, who had served as Roosevelt’s valet from 1939 until his death in 1945, and continued to work for President Truman, as his valet, until he left office, in 1953. In part: “It gives me pleasure to present to you this letter opener which was used by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The President gave it to my husband, Arthur S. Prettyman, sometime during World War II…This pewter piece was forged at Val-Kill near the President’s Hyde Park home. Val-Kill was started and managed by the First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt along with two women friends… With the small factory, they wanted to provide work during the Great Depression for the local under-privileged and unemployed…This was a personal possession of FDR’s who gave it to my husband.” An important relic, often used by FDR, one of the greatest presidents in American history.

95 Franklin D. Roosevelt

White House Writing Materials

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Small collection of White House writing materials and stationery from the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration, including: a box of Velvet blue band pencils, an empty ink bottle, a pad of White House stationery, a number of loose White House stationery sheets, three generic lined notepads, a few White House envelopes, and a thick pad of White House telegram paper. Also includes a Warm Springs revitalization plan booklet. On one of the pads Mrs. Bachelder wrote a note dated April 12, 1985, “This steno pad together with two others and a supply of White House stationery, typewriter ribbons, empty ink bottle, and typewriter eraser and pencil used in the daily routine of the Presidential ‘office on the road’ were found in an office box following the departure of the Presidential Party on 4/13/45.” Whenever Toi Bachelder, a member of FDR’s inner circle, was in close proximity to the president while traveling, she made certain to have these supplies at the ready.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 67


96 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Wooden Dog and Pig Figurines

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned small pig and dog figurines, including one wooden pig with painted black-andwhite eyes, measuring 1.5˝ long, and two black dogs, one pug and one terrier, each measuring .75˝ long. Includes two letters of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. One letter, in part: “This small black dog was owned by Franklin D. Roosevelt. The small dog represents Fala…given to me by Mrs. Roosevelt upon the death of the president…The President gained comfort from having his collection of dogs and pigs placed on his desk and bedroom mantel. I was the person entrusted with packing up the whole fragile kit and kaboodle of them each time his study was painted.” Parks also mentions these items in her 1961 memoir My Thirty Years Backstairs at the White House, stating that Mrs. Roosevelt allowed the employees to take mementos after FDR’s death, so she picked out her two favorite pigs and two favorite dogs from his collection. “Fala,” as mentioned in her letter, was the name of Roosevelt’s famous Scottish Terrier that was frequently seen by his side. There is significant FDR symbolism in these relics, as they capture a major part of his beloved animal collection kept on his Oval Office desk and on his mantel and dresser.

97 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Chinese Doilies

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Six beautiful silk doilies given to a member of FDR’s inner circle, Toi Bachelder, by President Roosevelt as a gift in 1938, each measuring 6˝ in diameter, colorfully embroidered with various Asian-themed designs, including two with village pagoda scenes and four with floral patterns. Includes the ANS on a White House card that President Roosevelt presented, signed “FDR,” in full: “For Toi, Belated news from Panama.” These are impressively mounted, matted, and framed together to an overall size of 20 x 30. Also includes a historic and richly detailed three-page letter of provenance from Bachelder on her personal letterhead, in part: “The six Chinese mats were given to me by President Roosevelt in 1938…On the way to Warm Springs the President told me that he had a present for me which he had purchased in Panama as the Houston traversed the Canal...It came to my desk, in the White House loosely wrapped in white tissue paper a week or so before Christmas…The thoughtful President made sure by the informality of the loosely wrapped package and the wording of the card that I did not mistake it for my annual Christmas gift from him.” An imposing FDR display, personally presented to his trusted and beloved secretary.

68 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


98 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Red Donkey

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned red cast heavy iron donkey figurine which he once displayed in his White House study, measuring 4.5˝ tall and 4.5˝ long, featuring a slot in its saddle for use as a coin bank. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks, in part: “The red donkey was owned by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. He gave it to me in 1935 or 1936...Someone had given him the donkey years before. And he kept it on the mantle in his study at the White House…He collected a million things, including, for some obscure reason, little dogs and pigs. He seemed to get annoyed when people would present him with the Democratic symbol—the donkey—when what he really wanted was dogs and pigs.” An excellent piece, in splendid condition, associated with the president’s hobbies as well as his politics, enhanced by its fantastic provenance and humorous backstory.

99 Franklin D. Roosevelt Family’s

Toy Donkey

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 The Roosevelt family’s extremely captivating personallyowned rolling toy donkey, measuring 14.5˝ tall and 17.5˝ long, with a nice detailed body covered in soft hair, a red bridle and saddle, and wooden wheels on metal axles attached to its hooves. An electrical plug of indeterminate purpose is attached to the donkey’s left front hoof by a very short cord, indicating some form of an extension cord was likely needed for use. Includes a letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Irineo Esperancilla, formerly chief steward of the Navy. In part: “The antique gray toy donkey was owned by President and Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt. They kept it in the White House for the use of their grandchildren. It was given to my husband, Irineo Esperancilla by Mrs. Roosevelt after the President’s death. He served, along with Arthur Prettyman, as the President’s valet during WWII until F. D. R.’s death in 1945.” Antique toys are very collectible themselves, and here we have the added allure of it having been used within the White House by the Roosevelt family.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 69


Unique animal collection which hung on FDR’s own White House bed post

100 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Miniature Animals

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 A collection of 11 small glass and ceramic animals, sewn on to four separated sections of half-inch beige ribbon, all of which used to be connected as a single strand, and hung on President Roosevelt’s bed post in the White House. Animals include: a fish marked “Germany 1920,” a dog, a turtle, a duck, a buck, an elephant, and several birds. Animals are removably housed in a beautiful beveled glass case, with tan velvet trim—how they have been displayed for over 30 years. Accompanied by a detailed 1983 letter of authenticity from the wife of President Roosevelt’s valet, Arthur Prettyman, which reads, in part: “It gives me pleasure to present to you the sewn on animal collection, owned by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It was given to my husband, Arthur S. Prettyman by the First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt...President Roosevelt kept this hanging from his bed post in the White House. It was at the head of his bed. The President collected miniature animals…It is a most personal possession of the President.” Also accompanied by a snapshot of Prettyman walking the president’s dog, Fala. In very good condition, with wear and partial separations to ribbon, some chips and paint loss to a few of the animals, and an unattached dog, which is missing a foot. An animal lover and collector, these figurines are a lovely representation of two of President Roosevelt’s passions. A unique artifact deserving of a place in a distinguished FDR collection.

101 Franklin D. Roosevelt Family’s

Rag Doll

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 The Roosevelt family’s personally-owned handmade rag doll, measuring 16˝ tall, kept by the family in the White House living chambers. Includes a letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The President and Mrs. Roosevelt owned ‘Rastis.’ It was always kept in the White House Family Living Quarters.” Antique toys and dolls are often coveted by collectors, even when not associated with an iconic personage.

70 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


FDR’s handsome bedside curio box which housed his most personal correspondence

102 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Wooden Box Kept on his Bedside Table

ESTIMATE: $8,000-$10,000 President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s historic quality personallyowned and -used wooden box, kept on his bedside table at the White House. Beautiful wood inlaid box measures 9.5 x 7 x 3.5, with the President’s initials, “FDR,” handsomely inlaid in ebony on the cover. The box’s lock has been disabled and has no key, but easily opens and closes. Accompanied by a detailed 1990 letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of White House valet and steward Irineo Esperancilla. Letter reads, in part: “The lovely wood inlay box…was kept in the White House by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on his bedside table… In this box President Roosevelt kept his most personal correspondence. It was so personal that when the President passed away…

my husband promptly picked up the locked box…and brought it home…The contents of FDR’s most personal correspondence was burned by my husband in our own kitchen sink—He did this act out of loyalty and respect for the President.” Also included is a second letter of provenance from Esperancilla’s wife on a White House card, a copy of a letter to Esperancilla from Naval Aide to the President Edward Leach, written on the occasion of Esperancilla’s retirement, thanking him for his loyal service to four presidents, as well as a photocopy of Esperancilla’s obituary. In very fine condition, with expected light wear, that does not detract from its aesthetic appeal. President Roosevelt once told his valets they were his ‘lifeline and keeper of his secrets,’ which was certainly the case with the disposition of the contents of this box. One could only wonder what secrets this box might have held at the time of Roosevelt’s death, with the truth known by only two men, the president and his loyal valet. An impressive FDR relic of the most personal order, deserving of a place in a distinguished collection.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 71


103 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

1933 Century of Progress Box ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,500 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned positively gorgeous wooden box with a burl veneer, measuring 11 x 7.5 x 2.25, featuring a metal plate on the top with a presentation inscription, “A Century of Progress, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Chicago 1933.” A thin crack passes through the center and there is a chip to the veneer on the top edge. The interior is lined with padded cloth on the top and lining on the bottom appears to have been removed. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This beautiful box…was owned by the president.” An incredibly personal and impressive FDR relic with the potential for a handsome display.

104 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Brazilian Presentation Box

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 President Roosevelt’s magnificent personallyowned decorative presentation box given to him as a gift from Brazil in 1945, measuring 10.5 x 8.25 x 2.75, featuring amazing mixed-media artwork beneath the glass cover depicting an oceanfront Brazilian city, accomplished using paint and actual butterfly wings, a very hands-on art format. The box itself also has an intricate inlaid design on the cover’s borders and the bottom edge. The top cover is lined with padded yellow cloth bearing a Brazilian flag, with similar padding lining the bottom. A loose yellow pad provides extra protection and bears a large green “V” for ‘victory.’ Housed inside is a spectacular piece of original artwork depicting a butterfly, made entirely by hand out of postage stamps to acknowledge the president’s hobby; this is presented in an ornate frame, portions of which have been repaired to secure the embellishments in the corners. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The lovely wooden presentation box of President Franklin D. Roosevelt…is hand painted and part of the decoration is done with butterfly wings. It is a gift to the President from Brazil in early 1945. Inside the box is a separate framed butterfly made exclusively from stamps (this is symbolic in that President Roosevelt was a stamp collector)…The stamp design is in the form of a butterfly with the Statue of Liberty in the center on top of the frame…This is a personal item that belonged to the President. It was in his office at the White House for a short time.” A visually imposing, first-class FDR relic.

72 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


105 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Rose Room Box

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Rose-colored box kept in the Rose Room of the White House and presented by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to longtime White House seamstress and housekeeper Lillian Rogers Parks. Wooden box covered in moire silk measures 11.5 x 3.5 x 6, and is trimmed on the lid with a gold braid. Accompanied by a 1982 detailed letter of authenticity on White House letterhead from Mrs. Parks, which reads, in part: “This lovely box was given to me by President Franklin Roosevelt about 1939. The President said, ‘Lillian, take this for your very own. With Winston Churchill coming we might have to have a trunk instead of this little box.’ It was in the Rose Room…Actually, at least four other Queens from other countries had used this box and the room previous to Queen Elizabeth I…It is difficult to put an exact date on the origin of the box. It was in the White House many years prior to President Roosevelt. It was used to keep personal effects in it such as small fans, jewelry and other things.” This box would have been used by many Presidents, First Ladies, as well as distinguished guests.” Some dampstaining and surface loss to one panel of the inside and one broken ribbon hinge, otherwise fine condition. A notable White House relic.

106 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Paper Weight

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned pewter paperweight, measuring 2.75 x 2.5 x 1.5, with an appealing smoothly curved dome design topped with a dimesized emblem bearing a portrait of FDR raised in relief, encircled by the words, “President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Hyde Park, N. Y.” The bottom is also handengraved with the president’s initials, “F. D. R.,” and stamped by the maker, “Val-Kill.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Arthur S. Prettyman, who was with FDR daily, serving as his valet from 1939 until his death in 1945. In part: “This pewter paper weight…was forged at Val-Kill near the President’s Hyde Park home…Val-Kill was started and managed by the First Lady…to provide work for the local under privileged and unemployed during the Great Depression…This was a personal possession of F.D.R.’s who gave it to my husband.” In splendid condition.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 73


107 Franklin D. Roosevelt

1942 Christmas Gift ESTIMATE: $600-$800 Black leather checkbook folder given to Toi Bachelder by President Roosevelt as a Christmas gift in 1942, embossed in gold with a presentation inscription on the front, “Christmas, 1942, from F. D. R.” The folder measures 3 x 6.75 and features two inside pockets. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Bachelder, in full: “The black leather holder was a Christmas gift to me in 1942 from F. D. R. I served him from 1933 to 1945. He was a great man. I miss him still.” Accompanied by a red silk ribbon printed with an American flag and the text, “Official President Roosevelt Tour, August 27, 1936.” Condition is excellent.

108 Franklin D. Roosevelt

1943 Christmas Gift ESTIMATE: $600-$800 Desktop magnifying glass given to Toi Bachelder by President Roosevelt as a Christmas gift in 1943, featuring a mahogany-colored leatherette covering embossed in gold with a presentation inscription, “Christmas 1943, To T. M. B., from F. D. R.” The glass base measures 3.75 x 3.75, and the device is 1.25˝ tall at the highest point of the magnification bubble. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Bachelder, in full: “The glass magnifier, with my initials, T. M. B, appearing on the lower left corner, was a Christmas present to me from F. D. R. I served him from 1933 to 1945. He was a great man. I miss him still.” Although President Roosevelt was known to have presented these 1943 Christmas gifts to several people, only a select few, such as Toi Bachelder, Missy LeHand, and Grace Tully, were personally embossed like this example. Bachelder, a fellow polio he had known since she was 14, was a particular favorite of the President, and he always took her along to Warm Springs for treatment. An impressive FDR relic in splendid condition

74 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Place card for the “President’s Mess, United States Ship Arizona” 109 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

USS Arizona Place Card

ESTIMATE: $300-$400 President Roosevelt’s very own identification place card from the famous battleship USS Arizona, 3.5 x 3.5 when laid flat, printed with an image of the Department of the Navy insignia and the words “President’s Mess, United States Ship Arizona,” calligraphically labeled below, “The President.” This card places President Roosevelt aboard the USS Arizona not long before the deadly attack by the Japanese empire. Identified on the reverse in pencil as having been given to Arthur S. Prettyman, who served as President Roosevelt’s close personal valet from 1939 until the president’s death in 1945. During the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, the USS Arizona was bombed and sunk, killing 1,177 officers and crewmen. The horrendous wreckage of the historic ship, a reminder of Japan’s attack, lies still visible just beneath the surface of the waters at Pearl Harbor. This was the catalyst for the entry of the United States into World War II, a defining moment of FDR’s presidency. The following day, the president gave the famous speech in which he called the day of the attack a ‘date which will live in infamy.’ With this remarkable association, this is a truly exquisite piece.

110 Franklin D. Roosevelt:

Mabel Bachelder Diary

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Historically interesting diary kept by White House employee Mabel Bachelder, mother of FDR secretary Toi Bachelder, a member of FDR’s inner circle, consisting primarily of typed entries and affixed newspaper clippings, 33 pages, dated July 1938 through July 1939. The first entry, dated July 28, 1938, in part: “On June 1st of last year I was given a position in the office of the President, this was brought about by the resignation of Mrs. John Edward Lewis who left to make her home in New York,” continuing on to elaborate on her first impressions of the appearance of the White House. An entry on October 3, [1938], in part: “Since writing last the world has been fairly torn apart and put together again. The war was averted largely through the efforts of our own President he sent a personal message to Adolf Hitler and Premier [Prime Minister] Chamberlain, advocating arbitration, and later sent a personal message to Mussolini requesting him to use his influence with Hitler to persuade him to hold his troops out of Czechoslovakia.” On January 30, [1939], she writes, in part: “To-day is the President’s birthday and in addition to the ball last night…Mrs. Roosevelt entertained visiting folk from Hollywood…I stood close enough as the line passed by to touch each one, had I cared to do so. Headed by James R— came Bruce Cabot, Errol Flynn, Jean Hersholt, Ralph Bellamy, their wives, Mitzi Green, Eleanor Powell, and several others.” A tremendously interesting firsthand view of the daily goings-on in President Roosevelt’s White House during his second term.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 75


111 Queen Elizabeth II’s

Personal Itinerary to Visit FDR

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,500 Queen Elizabeth’s elegant copy of the itinerary for the famous British Royal Visit to the United States on June 7-12, 1939. Beautifully printed itinerary, 6 x 9, bound in quality off-white doeskin, is embossed on the cover, “The Visit of Their Britannic Majesties to the United States of America.” Inside lists the members of the traveling royal party, an incredibly detailed narrative of their travel and social arrangements, and the distances and map of their train travel from the White House all the way to Hyde Park. Accompanied by a handwritten letter of provenance on White House letterhead written by Lillian Rogers Parks. Her note reads, in full: “This is a copy of the personal itinerary used by the Queen. Queen Elizabeth used this copy during her visit at the White House in 1939. God save the Queen.” Also included is a typed room arrangement for the royal party at the White House, dated June 1939, and signed by Parks; a typed manuscript, signed by Parks, about the June 8, 1939 State Dinner, listing the menu and describing the challenges faced by the White House chefs, and a red, white, and blue commemorative ribbon. In exceptionally fine condition. With Europe on the brink of war, President Roosevelt invited the King and Queen to the United States to help them win American support and to build a stronger alliance between the US and England, which was strained at times. Roosevelt himself planned every minute of the visit, which would be the first time a reigning British monarch had set foot on American soil. Once FDR finally got the royal couple out of the White House and onto his Hyde Park estate, he famously served them American hot dogs. An important piece of both royal and presidential history.

112 Winston Churchill’s

Cigar

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,500 Prime Minister Churchill’s personally-owned cigar, measuring 6.75˝ long, wrapped in a golden band that reads, “Romeo y Julieta, Churchill, Habana.” The metal case is marked by cigar dealer Erik Stokkebye, measuring 7˝ long, and is labeled “Santa Maria, Havana,” with smaller text at the bottom reading, “Dedicated to The Right Honourable Winston Churchill, Doctor philosophiae honoris causa, The University of Copenhagen, Oct. the 10th 1950.” Includes a letter of provenance by an associate of Raleigh DeGeer Amyx, Sister Muriel Thomson, a private nurse to Winston S. Churchill. In full: “This is to certify that the ‘Santa Maria’ Havana cigar, is the said cigar, one of two, given to me by the late Sir Winston L. Spencer Churchill as supplied by Erik Stokkebye of Denmark.” Also accompanied by one photo of Sister Thomson holding the cigar and another of Churchill smoking a cigar. On October 10, 1950, Churchill attended a ceremony in Denmark to accept an honorary doctorate from University of Copenhagen, where he was introduced as the ‘architect of victory’ in World War II. The speech he gave spoke volumes about his appreciation of the mission of the university, memorably declaring: ‘The first duty of a university is to teach wisdom, not a trade; character, not technicalities. We want a lot of engineers in the modern world, but we do not want a world of engineers.’ It seems that Erik Stokkebye, the official supplier of Churchill’s cigars and a native of Denmark, gave this as a gift to Churchill to honor the event. This style of cigar is so iconic that it has become literally synonymous with the prime minister—the ‘Churchill,’ as labeled on the cigar band. A positively remarkable piece of history with terrific provenance from his nurse. 76 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Ornate silver cigarette case

presented to FDR on his 53rd birthday 114 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Silver Cigarette Case

ESTIMATE: $3,000-$4,000 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used sterling silver cigarette case presented to him on his 53rd birthday, crafted with a spring-loaded hinge and gently curved edges. The front cover features a magnificently ornate decorative floral border surrounding a pattern of braided vertical stripes, engraved in the center crest with his initials, “FDR.” The back cover has a smooth silver surface, again meticulously hand-engraved with his prominent initials, “FDR,” as well as the date, “January 30, 1935.” Inside are two clips for securing the contents of the case, and an inner edge is stamped “Sterling.” Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The handsome & ornate silver case was owned & used by Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt. When he passed away in 1945, Mrs. Roosevelt gave a number of his personal possessions to favored employees. The sterling card/cigarette case is hand-engraved.” Condition is impressive. It is well known that FDR was a chain smoker, a vice that contributed to his passing. An impressive FDR artifact of paramount significance.

115 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Cigarette Case

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used silver tone cigarette case made by Volupte, measuring 3 x 5.5, featuring an original painting on the cover made to imitate Van Gogh’s ‘Portrait of Armand Roulin,’ and nicely engraved on the reverse with Roosevelt’s initials, “F. D. R.” He presented this personal cigarette case to his secretary, Toi Bachelder, in 1940. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Bachelder, in part: “It pleases me to present to you a cigarette case given to me personally by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt…President Roosevelt personally handed me this in what was then known as the President’s Study. (It may now be known as the Yellow Room). At the time (1940), of this presentation, I was taking dictation from the President. He paused briefly and asked, ‘Toi, would you like to have this.’ I accepted with sincere pleasure.” A superb relic, symbolic of FDR’s well-known smoking habit.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 77


A staple of FDR’s iconic public image— his personally-used cigarette holder 116 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Cigarette Holder

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,500 President Roosevelt’s personallyowned and -used cigarette holder, measuring 3.5˝ long, featuring a yellow celluloid body with a metal tip to secure the cigarette. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from White House worker and wife of Arthur S. Prettyman, who had served as Roosevelt’s valet from 1939 until his death in 1945. In part: “This cigarette holder which President Roosevelt used has a soft celluloid tip measuring 2 1/2 inches. The silver looking end that held the cigarette is almost 1 1/4 inches long with four rings as a design. President Roosevelt smoked (unfortunately) Camel cigarettes incessantly. He is well known for always using a cigarette holder. This is a most personal possession of the President.” President Roosevelt was indeed known for the trademark cigarette holder dangling from his mouth—he was often seen in photographs and political cartoons with the device clenched between his lips, and it soon became part of the image of FDR ingrained in the public imagination. With its classic celluloid construction and intimate use by the president, this is a fantastic memento from both the era and Roosevelt’s presidency. A remarkable FDR relic to be treasured by the most discriminating of collectors.

117 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Electric Cigar Lighter

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned electric cigar and cigarette lighter, measuring 4.75˝ tall, featuring a red button activation on the side of the metal ‘salt shaker’ lighting device, a black base, and cloth-wrapped cord. Includes a letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Melvon O. Carter, who worked on the White House maintenance crew from Hoover through Nixon. During Mr. Carter’s over 40 years of White House service, he was often in close proximity to the first family and was called upon for a variety of tasks. In part: “The cigar and cigarette lighter was given to my husband by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. I do not recall when. All I recall is that the President did not think much of this contraption. He preferred to light his camel cigarettes without it…although the President did not use this much, it was his. Therefore, it should be preserved.” A fascinating glimpse into the lifestyle of FDR—an inveterate smoker until the end of his days.

78 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


118 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Ashtray

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used large and heavy metal ashtray, featuring three cigarette-holder indentations around the edges, engraved on top of the thick rim, “Franklin D. Roosevelt, Commander in Chief, United States Navy.” The circular ashtray is constructed of a substantial, high quality silver-colored metal, weighing 2.5 pounds and measuring 7˝ in diameter on top, 5.75˝ in diameter at the base, and 2˝ tall. It demonstrates frequent use, with a few nicotine stains and rubbing wear near the cigarette rests; there is also some general mild tarnishing from age. Includes an important, detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Arthur S. Prettyman, who had served as Roosevelt’s valet from 1939 until his death in 1945, and continued to work for President Truman as his valet until he left office, in 1953. In part: “It gives me pleasure to present to you an ashtray owned and used by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It was given to my husband, Arthur S. Prettyman sometime after D-Day 1944, by the President…The ashtray is made of a silver type of metal. It is inscribed on top in block letters, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Commander in Chief, United States Navy. This ashtray sat on the President’s desk during the War. The nicotine stains from the President’s cigarettes still show on the three places so designated for cigarettes.” An imperative FDR relic directly from the table of the chain smoking president.

119 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Leather Matchbook

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,000 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used fine quality brown leather matchbook, measuring 2 x 2.25 closed, featuring his gilt-embossed initials on the front flap, “FDR.” The matchbook is fully stocked with 15 matches and features a small black fastener at the bottom, allowing the matches to be replaced—a function of FDR’s valet. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Arthur S. Prettyman, who had served as Roosevelt’s valet from 1939 until his death in 1945, and continued to work for President Truman, as his personal valet, until he left office, in 1953. In brief part: “President Roosevelt once said of his Valet, ‘You are my lifeline, the keeper of my keys’…the keys to FDR’s secrets,” and, in part: “It gives me pleasure to present to you one of the leather matchbook covers that was owned and used by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It was given to my husband, Arthur S. Prettyman sometime during World War II, by the President…The personal matches of the President have 1/2 inch FDR initials embossed in gold on the leather cover…This personal matchbook cover is most attractive.” A cogent piece of FDR history—a necessity for the lifelong cigarette smoker.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 79


120 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Cufflinks

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 President Roosevelt’s gorgeous pair of personally-owned and -worn gold tone cufflinks made by Sporrong & Co., featuring stunning cobalt blue enamel stones decorated with three miniature crowns. The curved necks on both pieces are handsomely engraved with the manufacturer’s name and both bars are engraved with Roosevelt’s initials, “F. D. R.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. In part: “This pair of cuff links were owned and worn by President Franklin D. Roosevelt…The cuff links were given to me by the First Lady. The cuff links appear to be gold filled…The face of each has a blue enamel type stone with three small gold shaped crowns. President Roosevelt once remarked ‘since they accuse me of trying to be King I might as well wear these.’ But he did not wear them much, perhaps for that very reason.” A momentous, quality relic straight from the cuffs of FDR.

121 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Handkerchief

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,500 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used off-white linen handkerchief, folded to an overall size of 5.25 x 5.25, featuring an exquisite monogram embroidered in deep blue thread to imitate his signature, “FDR.” The handkerchief features a finely textured border and measures 17.5 x 18 when unfolded. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from White House worker and wife of Arthur S. Prettyman, who had served as Roosevelt’s valet from 1939 until his death in 1945. In part: “The lovely fine white linen handkerchief was owned and used by President Franklin D. Roosevelt… His initials F. D. R. are embroidered on it in blue. This has been expertly done in the exact form of his own personal signature.” An impressive FDR relic in excellent condition.

80 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


122 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Handkerchief

ESTIMATE: $700-$800 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used simple off-white linen handkerchief, folded to an overall size of 4.5 x 4.5, expertly embroidered in light silvery blue thread to imitate his signature, “Franklin D. Roosevelt.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Arthur S. Prettyman, who had served as Roosevelt’s valet from 1939 until his death in 1945, and continued to work for President Truman, as his valet, until he left office, in 1953. In part: “It gives me pleasure to present to you one of the President’s handkerchiefs that was owned and used by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It was given to my husband, Arthur S. Prettyman, by the President…The white linen handkerchief is embroidered with the facsimile signature of the President…This runs diagonally across one corner. This most personal possession of the President should be properly cared for.” An important artifact, owned and used by FDR.

123 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Handkerchief

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,000 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used simple off-white linen handkerchief, folded to an overall size of 4.5 x 3.75, expertly embroidered in white with an ornate monogram, “R,” within an elegant paisley triangular crest. Includes an original White House Official Business envelope labeled in ballpoint in the hand of Oval Office doorkeeper and Secret Service agent William D. Simmons, “Handkerchief F. D. R. left in his desk,” as well as a letter of provenance from Simmons’s grandson on a photocopied letter from President Truman to Agent Simmons, in full: “The purpose of this historical note is to certify that my grandfather, Bill Simmons, served F. D. R. as a secret service agent as well as the above. This explains why the personal handkerchief of F. D. R. came into the possession of grand-daddy. The handwriting on envelope is that of my grandfather. (Ref. Handkerchief F. D. R. left in his desk.)” The phrase “left in his desk” refers to FDR leaving this hanky in the Oval Office just prior to departing in April 1945 for Warm Springs, a trip from whence he would never return. A seminal piece.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 81


124 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Blue Silk Scarf

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 President Roosevelt’s handsome, quality personally-owned and -worn navy blue scarf with an intricate white diamond pattern, measuring 46˝ long and 10.5˝ wide, featuring lovely satintextured bands at either end. A small white tag is sewn along the edge of one end and embroidered in red with the president’s name, “Roosevelt,” and the manufacturer’s tag is sewn at the other end, reading “Scarf by Cisco” on one side and “Rayon 5” on the other. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from the wife of Irineo Esperancilla, formerly chief steward of the Navy. In part: “The lovely Blue Scarf with a white diamond design…was owned and worn by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. My husband, Irineo Esperancilla, served our President from 1927–1955. During WWII he was one of F. D. R.’s valets.” Esperancilla assisted primary valet Arthur Prettyman when it became necessary for FDR to have two valets due to his health issues. A stunning piece of practicality and quality.

125 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Undershirt

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -worn off-white cotton tank-top undershirt made by Lord & Taylor, the well-known upscale store in New Youkand Washington, DC. The manufacturer’s tag is sewn into the collar area, below which is a small white tag embroidered in red with the president’s name, “F. D. Roosevelt.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Arthur S. Prettyman. In part: “It is my pleasure to present to you this tank-top undershirt that was owned and used by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt...Arthur brought it from Warm Springs, GA, immediately after the death of the President on April 12, 1945. He was with the President on that final trip…This tank-top undershirt is of fine quality cotton and was from Lord & Taylor, ‘The Man’s Shop,’ New York. It has the department store label sewn at the top and FDR’s usual cotton laundry label…The shirt is a Henley-style button-top neck with a cotton reinforced placket and four buttons. ” A poignant, personally-worn item from Roosevelt’s final days.

82 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


FDR’s dapper Brooks Brothers fedora, given to his valet shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor

126 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Black Hat

ESTIMATE: $4,000-$6,000

President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -worn hat. Handsome black satin fedora hat, with matching band, is lined in white satin, with the liner tip labeled “Made in England expressly for Brooks Brothers, New York and Boston,” printed below a Herbert Johnson label. Brown leather sweatband is imprinted in gold, “F. D. R.,” “Made in England by Herbert Johnson expressly for Brooks Brothers New York and Boston,” and another Herbert Johnson label. A white ribbon tied in a small bow is affixed underneath where the sweatband and silk lining meet. A small reorder label is affixed inside the sweatband, with 151 K6, and CA printed on the label. Accompanied by a detailed 1983 letter of authenticity on White House letterhead, from the wife of President Roosevelt’s valet Arthur S. Prettyman. Mrs. Prettyman was also employed at the White House for a time. Letter reads, in part: “It gives me great pleasure to present to you a black fedora owned and used by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It was given to my husband, Arthur S. Prettyman shortly after Pearl Harbor was bombed in 1941, by the President…The handsome black fedora was owned and used by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. It is a dressy fedora and not typical of the type he used to campaign in…It is important that this most personal possession of President Roosevelt be preserved.” In fine condition. An exemplary and historic FDR offering.

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127 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Black and White Striped Tie

ESTIMATE: $3,000-$4,000 President Roosevelt’s personallyowned and -worn black silk neck tie with thin white stripes, made by Lord & Taylor, measuring 47˝ long. A small white tag is sewn inside the collar area and embroidered in red with the president’s name, “F. D. Roosevelt,” and the Lord & Taylor tag is sewn to the narrow end. Various portions of the white thread have faded to black. Includes an important letter of provenance on a White House card from the wife of Irineo Esperancilla, formerly chief steward of the Navy. In full: “The Black Tie with horizontal stripes was owned and worn by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. My husband, Irineo Esperancilla, served our President from 1927–1955. During WWII he was one of F. D. R.’s valets.” Accompanied by a photo of FDR wearing this style of tie and a photocopy of the letter sent by Edward Beach to Irineo Esperancilla, offering good wishes upon his retirement from the Navy.

128 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Burgundy Tie

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 President Roosevelt’s personallyowned and -worn burgundy silk neck tie, lined with amber silk, measuring 46˝ long. A small white tag is sewn inside the collar area and embroidered in red with the president’s name, “F. D. R.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Mildred Prettyman. In part: “It gives me pleasure to present to you one of the ties that was owned and used by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It was given to my husband, Arthur S. Prettyman, by the President…The tie is a lovely burgundy color. It has a high shine to it and is a satin or silk material. The interior lining is beige or tan. On the inside collar area is a small personal identification tag of the President. It reads: F. D. R. The tie appears to have been handmade. This is a personal possession of President Roosevelt.” An exceptional and historic artifact.

84 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


129 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Blue Tie

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -worn navy blue silk crepe neck tie, lined with lilac silk, measuring 47˝ long. A small white tag is sewn inside the collar area and embroidered in red with the president’s initials, “F. D. R.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Mildred Prettyman. In part: “It gives me pleasure to present to you one of the ties that was owned and used by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It was given to my husband, Arthur S. Prettyman, sometime during World War II, by the President…When FDR died on April 12, 1945, it was my husband and Dr. Bruenn that carried him to his bed in Warm Springs.” A compelling piece from Roosevelt’s wardrobe, bearing his initials, in a desirable patriotic color.

130 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Dotted Tie

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,000 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -worn navy blue silk neck tie with golden polka dots, made by A. Sulka & Company, measuring 47˝ long. A small white tag is sewn inside the collar area and embroidered in red with the president’s initials, “F. D. R.,” and the A. Sulka & Company tag is sewn to the narrow end. Various portions of the dots’ golden thread have faded to black and there is significant fraying to edges of the tie, particularly in the collar area. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from the wife of Irineo Esperancilla, formerly chief steward of the Navy. In full: “The Blue Tie with the gold dots was owned and worn by Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt. My husband Irineo Esperancilla served our President from 1927–1955. During WWII he was one of F. D. R.’s valets.” Accompanied by a photocopy of an important news article about Esperancilla, detailing his close personal service to Presidents Hoover, Roosevelt, Truman, and Eisenhower.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 85


Expertly hand-crafted US seal bedspread

used by President Roosevelt and his distinguished White House guests 131 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Hand-crocheted Eagle Bedspread

ESTIMATE: $4,000-$6,000 President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used and artistically hand-crocheted bedspread, used on his own bed as well as the bed of various dignitaries. Beautifully handcrafted bedspread features a well-done United States seal in the upper portion, with two Grecian women and children on the lower portion. All of the edges are profiles of peacocks, with their tails forming a scalloped-edge to the bedspread. Accompanied by a detailed 1983 letter of provenance on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “When President Franklin D. Roosevelt passed away…the First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt, called a few White House staff members into her bedroom. Some personal effects were there. She said, ‘Take what you want now, because the rest is going to Hyde Park and you will never have another chance. I was given this lovely bedspread along with several other things… This is a personal item that belonged to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. It was on his White House bed at times. And, sometimes FDR’s bedspread was used on the bed of important over-night diplomats.” Also accompanied by a photo of Mrs. Parks with the bedspread. In very fine condition. An item of superior craftsmanship, highly treasured by the Roosevelts as it was used not only personally, but for their incredibly distinguished house guests. This one-of-a-kind piece has the potential to be a beloved treasure for the most discriminating of presidential collectors.

86 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Beautiful hand-made blanket which graced

the First Lady’s bed in the White House

132 Eleanor Roosevelt’s

White House Satin Bedspread and Pillows

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 Eleanor Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used quality handmade bedspread and pillows. The beautiful double bedspread successfully captures the essence of the first lady’s superior taste and is hand-made in a ‘yo-yo’ quilt pattern of individual cream, peach, and light pink satin rosettes, and is accompanied by two delicate matching throw pillows. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance on White

House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “When President Franklin D. Roosevelt passed away…the First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt, called a few White House staff members into her bedroom. Many personal effects were there. She said, ‘Take what you want now, because the rest is going to Hyde Park and you will never have another chance.’ I was given this exquisite bedspread and several other things…This exquisite bedspread was owned by First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt. It is one of the most beautiful pieces of handwork I have ever seen. I do not recall who may have given it to her…This is a personal item that belonged to First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt.” In fine condition. This exceptionally well-crafted piece—essentially a work of art—impressively resided on the bed of the iconic first lady, Eleanor Roosevelt.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 87


Coverlet used by Winston Churchill and Queen Elizabeth 133 Franklin D. Roosevelt

White House Queens’ Room Rose Wool Blanket

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 An unusual rose-colored wool blanket used at the White House by numerous notables, including King George VI’s wife Queen Elizabeth and Winston Churchill, during President Roosevelt’s administration and before, measuring 5´ wide and 6´ long, trimmed with a fine satin border. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This lovely rose colored coverlet was given to me by Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt in 1945…This coverlet was in the Rose Room. But after King George VI and Queen Elizabeth I [Queen Mother] visited in 1939, the room was eventually called the Queens Room, as it is to this day. Actually at least four other Queens from other countries had used this coverlet and the room previous to Queen Elizabeth I [Queen Mother]. During World War II, Winston Churchill spent many nights at the White House. He always slept in this room. He used this rose colored coverlet too. I remember him well…It is difficult to put an exact date on the origin of the coverlet. It was in the White House many years prior to President Roosevelt. While it may have been used in other rooms, my ‘Mama,’ Maggie Rogers, and I remember it only being in the Rose Room (Queens Room) on the chair lounge at the foot of the bed. The coverlet would have been used by many Presidents, First Ladies, as well as distinguished guests.”A notable offering in fine condition.

134 Franklin D. Roosevelt

White House Queens’ Room Seat Cushions

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Pair of peach-colored satin seat cushions from the Roosevelt White House, custommade for a 1939 royal visit by King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, each measuring 15.5 x 14, used atop cane chairs in the Rose Room bathroom by the Queen. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The satin peach colored seat cushions were made by me in 1939, for the state visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth [Queen Mother]…They were used in the Rose Room bathroom, (Queens Room) by the Queen…Later the chairs were removed and the cushions were given to me by Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt.” Also accompanied by a photo of Parks with the cushions. A memorable offering in fine condition.

88 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Used by President Roosevelt to

toast the end of Prohibition 135 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Prohibition Glass

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 President Roosevelt’s magnificently detailed drinking glass, used at the White House on April 7, 1933, to celebrate the date the Cullen-Harrison Act went into effect allowing the sale of beer with alcohol content of 3.2% or lower, which was the first step toward the complete repeal of prohibition. After using the glass in a toast to the significant event, the president gave it to a favored maitre-de, Charles Ficklin. The glass is of an appealing design with a bulge pattern on the exterior and thin diamond band engraved in a ring around the center, etched near the top with the historic date, “April 7th 1933,” and the president’s initials in a crest below, “F. D. R.” The glass measures 5.25˝ tall with a 3.25˝ diameter at the rim, and the base is engraved with an elegant starburst pattern. In fine condition. Charles Ficklin served as a maitre-de at the White House from 1947 through 1967; all together, nine members of the Ficklin family were employed at the White House through the years, including his brothers John and Samuel, with each having been acquainted at some point with Raleigh DeGeer Amyx. Includes a detailed two-page letter of provenance on White House letterhead from James Ficklin, the son of Charles. In part: “On April 7, 1933, FDR signed the repeal of the ‘Volstead Act’ legalizing 3.2% beer. This paved the way for the ratification of the 21st amendment which…ended prohibition altogether…This handsome 5˝ glass (one of my father’s prized possessions) was used in the White House, on April 7, 1933 for a special glass of beer for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The quality glass (cut crystal) was designed with a deeply ridged etching encircling the glass (for better grip), as well as handsome ‘bubbled’ motif with etched date, ‘April 7, 1933,’ and etched ‘FDR’ in a handsome crest. This glass was given to my father, Charles Ficklin (1913–1977), who was Maitre de of the White House from FDR through LBJ.” This extraordinary glass represents what was arguably the most socially impactful laws passed during Roosevelt’s administration—while running for president in 1932 Franklin D. Roosevelt made the repeal of prohibition part of his platform, and he signed the Culen-Harrison Act into law within weeks of taking office. It became effective on April 7, upon which a caravan of Milwaukee brewers—Blatz, Schiltz, Pabst, and Miller included—drove crates of their beer to Milwaukee Airport to be delivered to the president in Washington, carried aboard a plane appropriately christened ‘The Spirit of 3.2.’ This exceptional beer glass represents an important moment in American history, used by FDR to celebrate his first major progressive victory as president.

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FDR’s personally-owned and hand-engraved silver castor set from the Holland America Line

136 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Silver Castor Set

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 President Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used appealing silverplate pickle castor set, consisting of an elegant sterling silver stand, a matching pair of serving forks, and two well-designed simple glass jars with flat faces and delicate matching stoppers, both expertly hand-engraved in elaborate and artistic lettering with his initials, “F. D. R.” The frame is engraved with an unusual square emblem with the initials “NASM,” standing for Nederlandsch-Amerikaansche Stoomvaart Maatschappij [Holland America Line], and the base of the frame is stamped with Christofle and Van Zwanenburg Rotterdam proof marks as well as various numbers, “GR 53,” “90,” “1,” and “4.” Both forks have three tines with barbs on the sides and are similarly engraved with the NASM symbol, but stamped on the reverse with Elkington, England, proof marks and the letter “V” displayed in a shield. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. In part: “This pair of jars and silver holder was owned and used by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. When my favorite president, FDR, passed away in 1945…Mrs. Roosevelt said we should take what we wanted because it was all going to Hyde Park and this would be our last chance. This pair of jars and the silver holder was given to me by the First Lady…The silver holder bears some type of seal on the top. It also has a handle and two places to hold a pair of…silver forks, also bearing some sort of seal. The President loved the sea. This piece probably would have been used, at one time, while at sea. But, it was also in his office at the White House as well as in his bedroom. I ought to know, I had to polish and dust it often enough…Since they were President Roosevelt’s I trust they will be preserved for future generations. It is a lovely combination piece.” As this castor set is stamped with the Holland America Line symbol it certainly did relate to Roosevelt’s lifelong love of the sea, which extended from his youth—he learned to sail and was given a sailboat at the age of 16—through his White House years, when he frequently used his presidential yacht, the USS Potomac, for official business as well as leisure. That this is from the Holland America Line is also of note, as the forefathers of the prominent Roosevelt family were Dutch and settled in the New York area during the 17th century. An impressive offering of appeal to the advanced collector. 90 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


137 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Decanter

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 President Roosevelt’s beautiful personally-owned and -used cut crystal decanter, measuring 7.5˝ tall, featuring dimpled diamond-pattern neck, engraved starburst base, and lovely ornate pattern etched around the bowl, with Roosevelt’s name beautifully handcrafted as etched above, “Franklin Delano Roosevelt.” The stopper is topped with a magnificent sterling silver sphere with a beautiful floral design in deep relief, with a curious monogram engraved on the top, “PEK.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This decanter was owned and used by President Franklin D. Roosevelt…The decanter was given to me by the First Lady. This delicate decanter is ornately hand engraved by a skilled craftsman. It bears the name, Franklin Delano Roosevelt…It was obviously the President’s some years before he entered the White House but he must have brought it with him in 1933. And it was there until he left us in 1945. I ought to know. I dusted and cleaned it often.” An especially appropriate relic from the Roosevelt White House, as he promised the repeal of federal prohibition laws as a part of his 1932 presidential campaign. A poignant prohibition reminder and classy FDR relic of the utmost quality.

138 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Blue Cup

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s personally-owned and -used cup. Large blue coffee cup measures 6˝ in diameter, with an attractive blue country scene around the outside, with “For Auld Lang Syne,” printed around the inside blue-bordered edge. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. Letter reads, in part: “The lovely flow-blue cup…was owned and used by President Franklin D. Roosevelt…My original sticker with the word ‘Roosevelt’ is on the cup bottom and written in my own hand. The Roosevelts brought this piece to the White House when they arrived on March 4, 1933. President Roosevelt occasionally used this large cup for soup or coffee. He gave it to my Mama, Maggie Rogers, First maid of the White House, at the time she left the Roosevelts service in 1939.” Also accompanied by a second handwritten letter, on a White House card, from Parks, stating that Roosevelt used this cup in the White House. A small chip to edge, a couple of small repaired hairline cracks inside, and expected light wear from use that does not detract, otherwise fine condition.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 91


139 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Cup and Saucer

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,500 President Roosevelt’s beautiful personally-owned and -used cup and saucer breakfast china, both stamped “Germany 57” on the bottom. The cup measures 4.25˝ tall and has a 4.25˝ diameter rim, featuring an immaculate design with four roses on one side and a single rose on the other, with purple accents to the rim and handle. The white saucer measures an impressive 7.75˝ in diameter and features an elegant raised design around the rim, with a purple accent matching the cup. Includes a typed note signed by Eleanor Roosevelt, in full: “This cup and saucer was often placed on the breakfast tray of President Roosevelt and it was used by him for many years.” Mrs. Roosevelt presented the items to Dorothy Dow, her longtime secretary, and the lot is also accompanied by a letter of provenance on a White House card from Dow, in full: “The cup and saucer was a gift from Eleanor Roosevelt in 1945.” Dow also published a book of her correspondence, and her life with the Roosevelt’s including how she taught the first lady to dive into a pool, entitled Eleanor Roosevelt: An Eager Spirit. An impressive world-class set of FDR artifacts, personally authenticated by Eleanor Roosevelt as frequently used by her late husband.

140 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Pink Cup and Saucer

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,000 President Roosevelt’s beautiful personally-owned and -used cup and saucer set with a gorgeous deep magenta Japanese pattern, both with identical British makers’ marks on the bottom. The cup measures 3˝ tall and has a 5.75˝ diameter rim, featuring a magnificent intricate design with alternating flower and village vignettes, and a seaside courtyard scene in the bottom of the bowl, with the same scene depicted on the sides of the cup. The saucer measures an impressive 8˝ in diameter and features a matching vignette pattern around the rim and the seaside courtyard scene prominently displayed in the center, showing a person on the steps of a building by the shore, with a sailboat and building in the distance. There is a thin hairline crack inside the cup near the bottom, in no way affecting the appearance or integrity of the piece. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The lovely pink patterned large cup…was owned and used by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. On the bottom it is marked with an anchor surrounded by a crossed leaf decor and reads above ‘Japan’ and below ‘England.’ The Roosevelts brought this piece to the White House when they arrived on March 4, 1933. President Roosevelt occasionally used this large cup for soup or coffee. He liked his coffee in a big cup. Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt gave the cup and saucer to me along with another one of a different color at the time of the President’s death.” A truly superb FDR relic.

92 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


141 Franklin D. Roosevelt’s

Swan Pitcher

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s personally-owned pitcher. Decorative ceramic pitcher stands 7˝ high, with two scenes of a trio of swimming swans on either side. Bottom of the pitcher bears a maker’s mark of VJS and a peacock, and is numbered 2119, with several small inventory labels affixed to the bottom as well. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of provenance on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. Letter reads, in part: “When President Franklin D. Roosevelt passed away on April 12, 1945, it was so sad…The First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt, called a few White House staff members into her bedroom. Many personal effects were there. She said: ‘Take what you want now, because the rest is going to Hyde Park and you will never have another chance.’ I was given this lovely pitcher and several other things.” In overall fine condition. An impressive piece of presidential porcelain of historical importance.

142 Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman’s

Silver Gravy Ladle

ESTIMATE: $300-$400 Silver-plated gravy ladle used by both Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman while traveling on the presidential railcar, The Magellan, measuring 7.5˝ long, impressed on the reverse of the handle with the code “V-940.” Includes a detailed and historic letter of provenance on White House letterhead from F. Vaughn Ferguson, who was a technical service representative at the White House. In part: “The silver gravy ladle was used many times by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman as President, whenever they traveled by rail. This would have been particularly during Presidential Campaigns. This silverplated gravy ladle #V-9-40 was always in the personal railcar of the President. It was kept in a specially constructed highboy, with the other silver, in the Presidential car. The President’s private dining room was in the car and would seat approximately 12 people. After the 1948 ‘whistle-stop campaign,’ the President’s gravy ladle was given to me.” Ferguson goes on to describe at length the president’s railcar and his service at the White House. In excellent condition. A scarce and highly desirable presidential relic that traveled the rail for many years with two of America’s greatest presidents.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 93


143 Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman

White House Invitations

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Impressive collection of 17 invitations sent to well-known White House secretary Toi Bachelder, including ten from “The President and Mrs. Roosevelt” and seven from “The President and Mrs. Truman,” dated between 1935 and 1953. Nearly all measure 5.75 x 4.75 and invite Bachelder to various receptions at the White House; a particularly notable exception is an invitation from President Truman for a reception at the National Gallery of Art on January 20, 1949, which was the day of his inauguration. All are accompanied by their original White House transmittal envelopes and are in overall fine condition.

144 Franklin D. Roosevelt

Memorial Material

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Small but interesting archive of materials from the collection of FDR confidant Toi Bachelder, related to President Roosevelt’s death, including: seven condolence letters sent to her, a printed notice indicating the date of FDR’s funeral, a printed sympathy card, and a memo regarding attending his internment with a schedule and list of those traveling; also includes a scrapbook personally-owned by the Roosevelt family before being given to Lillian Rogers Parks, containing various images and news clippings related to the Roosevelts’ life Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This scrap book detailing the life of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was given to me upon the death of the President in 1945. Originally it was a gift to the Roosevelt’s from their friends Mrs. Henry Koel and Mrs. Keith Enquist of Fort Dodge, Iowa.”

94 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


“This Presidential Seal was kept on the corner by President Truman’s bed” 146 Harry S. Truman’s

Presidential Seal

ESTIMATE: $3,000-$4,000 President Truman’s personally-owned magnificent hand-painted heavy plaster presidential seal kept on his bedside table at the White House, measuring 15.5˝ in diameter and just over 1˝ thick, featuring the bald eagle raised in high relief with a patriotic shield on its chest, clutching an olive branch and bundle of arrows in its talons, with the motto “E Pluribus Unum” inset in black lettering on a banner clenched in its beak. A ring of 48 white stars encircles the eagle, and the rim is painted in two-tone gold with raised navy blue lettering, “Seal of the President of the United States.” The seal is set into a presidential blue suede mat and framed with a nameplate to an overall size of 21.5 x 23.5. Includes a letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “This Presidential Seal was kept on the corner by President Truman’s bed. It was sitting on a stand on top of his radio. He took great pride in the Presidential Seal. Perhaps, in part, because he standardized the design. The President did this by Executive Order on October 25, 1945. The Eagle previously faced the Arrows. President Truman reversed this so that it faced the Olive Branch. He also had the banner with the motto, ‘E Pluribus Unum’ changed so that the motto was grasped in the Eagles beak. And, he added the 48 stars representing each State at that time so that they would circle the Seal…I do not know for certain if he used this Seal on his speaking lecturn or during the 1948 ‘Whistlestop Campaign’…The President gave me this Presidential Seal which sat beside his bed shortly before leaving the Presidency. He said, ‘I know your Mother served our Presidents and First Ladies before you. And I know you have been working here for a long time too. I thought you might like to have this.’ I was quite surprised. It was an honor to accept such a personal gift.” Also accompanied by a photocopied image of Truman’s bedroom, in which the seal can be seen next to his bed. A monumental presidential seal offering of the most elite order, deserving of a place in an accomplished collection.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 95


96 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Rare, desirable, and historic WWII victory proclamation presented to the White House assistant press secretary

147 Harry S. Truman

WWII Proclamation

ESTIMATE: $10,000-$12,000 Impressive printed World War II proclamation, one page, 14 x 20.5, May 8, 1945. A stunningly decorative calligraphic proclamation, issued the day following the German surrender, for a day of prayer to be celebrated on May 13, 1945. The text reads, in part: “The Allied Armies, through sacrifice and devotion and with God’s help, have wrung from Germany a final and unconditional surrender. The Western World has been freed of the evil forces which for five years and longer have imprisoned the bodies and broken the lives of millions upon millions of free-born men. They have violated their churches, destroyed their homes, corrupted their children, and murdered their loved ones. Our Armies of Liberation have restored freedom to these suffering people, whose spirit and will the oppressors could never enslave. Much remains to be done. The victory won in the West must now be won in the East. The whole world must be cleansed of the evil from which half the world has been freed. United the peace-loving nations have demonstrated in the West that their arms are stronger by far than the might of the dictators or the tyranny of military cliques that once called us soft and weak… Now, therefore, I, Harry S. Truman, President of the United States of America, do hereby appoint Sunday, May 13, 1945, to be a day of prayer. I call upon the people of the United States, whatever their faith, to unite in offering joyful thanks to God for the victory we have won and to pray that he will support us to the end of our present struggle and guide us into the ways of peace. I also call upon my countrymen to dedicate this day of prayer to the memory of those who have given their lives to make possible our victory. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.” Beautifully signed and inscribed at the conclusion in bold fountain pen to his assistant press secretary, “This was a happy birthday for me. I hope this will be a happy Christmas for you. To Hon. Eben A. Ayers and Mrs. Ayers, 12/25/45, Harry S. Truman.” Beautifully archival cloth-matted and framed to an overall size of 24 x 30. In very fine condition, with subtle band of toning to the left edge. On Harry S. Truman’s 61st birthday, Tuesday, May 8, 1945, having only recently assumed the presidency, he held a press conference in the Oval Office to announce Germany’s surrender from World War II. Before an audience of his cabinet and other dignitaries, President Truman delivered this proclamation and declared May 13, 1945, a day of prayer in honor of those who served. What makes this piece stand out is the added importance of its being presented to Ayers, who served Truman throughout his entire presidency, acting as assistant press secretary from 1945 to 1950, and special assistant to the president from 1950 to 1953. During this time, he compiled an extensive diary of the everyday goings-on at the White House, which has become an indispensable primary source for historians studying this period in American history. Of quintessential historical importance, this is a beautiful proclamation from a hard-won day of celebration that brought one of the darkest periods of modern history to a close. And the rarely seen personal inscription to an American dignitary renders this piece worthy of a place in an advanced collection.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 97


Large and stately oversized portrait presented to the crew of the presidential yacht 148 Harry S. Truman

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 Superb oversized matte-finish 19 x 15 photo, signed, inscribed, and dated in fountain pen to the crew of his presidential yacht (where it was officially displayed), as president, “To The crew of The USS Williamsburg—with kindest regards and appreciation of all the courtesies they have extended to me. Harry S. Truman—White House— New Years Day—1952.” Attractively and archivally double-suede-matted and framed with UV glass and acid-free matting and backing, with a historically descriptive plaque to an overall size of 31.75 x 34. In fine condition. Built in 1915 for wood-pulp magnate Hugh J. Chisholm, the USS Williamsburg was acquired in 1941 by the US Navy and placed into service during World War II. After the war, the Williamsburg relieved the USS Potomac as the presidential yacht, and often carried President Truman to various regions, including Florida, Bermuda, and Cuba. She was decommissioned in 1953 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and this portrait, which hung in the USS Williamsburg’s main state dining room, was removed and preserved by Chief Steward Isaac Esperancilla. Along with Arthur Prettyman, Esperancilla had been a valet to Franklin Roosevelt. A remarkable offering deserving of a place in an advanced collection or institution.

149 Harry and Bess Truman

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 Important matte-finish 7.25 x 9.25 photo of the Trumans waving from the steps of their private plane, the ‘Sacred Cow,’ boldly signed in fountain pen, “Harry S. Truman,” and in black fountain pen, “Bess W. Truman,” bearing the calligraphic notation “Christmas 1946” along the bottom. Matted in hand-wrapped velvet and framed to an overall size of 12 x 15.5. In very fine condition, with a tiny bit of scattered light silvering. According to Mary Evans Seeley’s comprehensive book, Season’s Greetings from the White House, the Trumans ordered 1,000 copies of this photo, and on December 23, 1946, the president greeted 575 members of his White House staff and presented each with this signed photograph. This example marked only the second time that the president and first lady actually took the time to hand sign Christmas presents for the then limited White House staff.

98 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


151

150 Harry S. Truman’s

Book

ESTIMATE: $300-$400 President Truman’s personally-owned book: Blackbirds on the Wing by Mitchel J. Henderson. Philadelphia: Dorrance and Company, 1942. Hardcover, 5.25 x 7.5, 288 pages. Signed and inscribed to Truman on the first free end page by the author, “To Senator Harry S. Truman, with my warmest regards, M. J. Henderson, Dec. 16, 1942.” Truman’s bookplate is affixed to the front pastedown and there is a Library of Congress ‘duplicate’ stamp above the inscription. There is considerable toning to the signed page and some soiling to the front cover. Personal books owned and used by President Truman are incredibly scarce.

Harry S. Truman

1948 Christmas Gift ESTIMATE: $300-$400 Leather bookmark with tasseled ends given to Toi Bachelder by President Truman as a Christmas gift in 1948, measuring 1.75 x 11.5, featuring a gilt-stamped presidential seal and the text, “‘I would rather have peace in the world than be President.’ Christmas Greetings from The President and Mrs. Truman, 1948.” Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Bachelder, in part: “The leather bookmark with the Presidential Seal was a gift from the Trumans in 1948…I worked as a White House secretary from 1933 to 1967.” In excellent condition. Toi Bachelder was a well-known White House staple and member of FDR’s inner circle. An important gift from President and Mrs. Truman to a favored White House staff member.

President Truman’s iconic circular eyeglasses 152 Harry S. Truman’s

Eyeglasses

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 President Truman’s personally-owned and -worn bifocal eyeglasses, featuring perfectly round amber-colored lens pieces attached by a gold-tone bridge, with thin temples and flexible looped earpieces. Accompanied by a glasses case stamped by Dr. J. F. Leslie of Springfield, Missouri. Includes a letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Arthur S. Prettyman. In part: “These early style eyeglasses were given to my husband Arthur S. Prettyman during the major White House renovation around 1950…President Truman wore glasses from a very early age. These eyeglasses were the style used by Mr. Truman when he was a young WWI Lieutenant, and they remained his favorite style during his Senate years as well.” An exceptional personally-used presidential item, most likely from his early years as a Missouri senator—especially rare since well-documented Truman personal items from his early war and senatorial days are virtually nonexistent.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 99


President Truman’s monogrammed Gillette shaving kit

153 Harry S. Truman’s

Shaving Kit

ESTIMATE: $5,000-$7,000 President Truman’s personally-owned and -used Gillette shaving kit in a brass case, containing a double-edge razor monogrammed “H. S. T.” on the top and a rectangular replacement blade holder monogrammed “H. S. T.” on the front and back. Housed together in their original brass case, measuring 4 x 2.5 x 1.25, featuring an impressive linear design on the top cover, engraved in the center with his full name, “Harry S. Truman.” Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from best selling author Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The small brass shaving kit, hand-engraved, ‘Harry S. Truman,’ was owned and used by him as President. Inside is his razor, and his razor blade holder. Each is engraved, ‘H.S.T.” A premier personally-used presidential relic that gave Truman the clean-cut all-American look that—along with his folksy charm and strong leadership—endeared him to generations of his nation’s citizens. Befitting of the most advanced collector or institution.

100 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


President Truman’s ‘Open Road’ Stetson hat

154 Harry S. Truman’s

Stetson Hat

ESTIMATE: $7,000-$8,000

President Harry S. Truman’s personally-owned and -worn handsome Stetson hat. Light gray fedora hat, size 7 3/8 with matching band, has a cream-colored silk lining and brown leather sweatband. Imprinted on the sweatband in gilt is, “Made by Stetson especially for Harry S. Truman,” “The Open Road,” and the Stetson label boasting “Clear Beaver Quality.” The Stetson label is also imprinted in gold on the lining. A beige ribbon tied in a bow is affixed underneath where the sweatband and lining meet, with a sizing label also affixed above the bow. A label in the lining bears a reorder number of 566622. In fine condition. Accompanied by a 1982 letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, from White House doorman Carl Ferguson. Letter reads, in part: “The Stetson hat was given to me by President Harry S. Truman, just before he left office in 1953. I was near the President on numerous occasions in my capacity as White House Doorman. On this day we were alone briefly in the Oval Office. I had been wanting, like a number of people, one of the President’s hats made so famous by his morning walks…After I asked the President for a Stetson hat he said, ‘Ferguson, I think we can work that one out. See me tomorrow.’ When I did he handed it to me with a big smile…This was dressier than the other type he wore.” Also included is a glossy photo of Truman, standing on the White House steps, wearing a similar hat. Stetsons were the preferred hat for President Truman, and he routinely wore one during his daily morning walks from the White House, stopping to speak to other pedestrians along the way. Other Stetsons of Truman’s are kept in various museums and at the Truman Presidential Library Museum in Independence, Missouri. A magnificent piece of American history which has been carefully preserved for over six decades, this serious presidential relic is worthy of a place in an accomplished collection.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 101


155 Harry S. Truman’s

Burgundy Silk Tie

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 President Truman’s personally-owned burgundy silk neck tie with an interesting blue and gray floral design, measuring 52˝ long. A small tag reading “Countess Mara, New York,” is sewn inside the thick end. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from White House door man Carl W. Ferguson. In part: “One day I was in the Oval Office with President Truman when he pulled out this necktie and asked me if I would like to have it. It is a beautiful burgundy tie with a nice design…The President told me to be sure and wear the burgundy tie and not just store it away. However, I never felt like I should be wearing a silk tie intended for the President of the United States.” In excellent condition. Also accompanied by a photo of White House doorman Carl W. Ferguson. An historic relic of some magnitude, having been owned and worn by one of America’s greatest presidents.

156 Harry S. Truman’s

Handkerchief

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 President Truman’s personally-owned and -used simple offwhite linen handkerchief, folded into a 9 x 5 triangle, embroidered in white thread as a facsimile of his signature, “Harry S. Truman.” Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from White House maid Wilma Holness. In full: “The fine white linen handkerchief marked with the full signature of President Truman was owned and used by him at the White House. I served the Trumans nearly eight years. They were fine people.” Also accompanied by a photo of Wilma Holness with the handkerchief. Condition is excellent.

157 Vice President Alben W. Barkley’s

Handkerchiefs

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Collection of four Vice President Barkley’s personally-owned and -used off-white handkerchiefs, each monogrammed with his initials in a different style. Accompanied by two certificates of authenticity signed by Alben W. Barkley II, certifying that they were used by Vice President Barkley and originate from his estate, known as Angles.

102 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


158 Harry S. Truman

Photograph Kept on Mrs. Truman’s Dresser

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Handsome color hand-tinted matte-finish 2.75 x 3.75 portrait of Truman, personally owned by the First Family and kept by Mrs. Truman on her dresser in the White House. Attractively matted and framed to an overall size of 4.5 x 5.5, and in near pristine condition. Includes a letter of historic provenance on a White House card from the well-known best selling author Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from Hoover through Eisenhower. In part: “The 3x4 inch bust hand-tinted photograph of Harry S. Truman was owned by the President and Mrs. Truman. It was kept in the White House on Mrs. Truman’s dresser. I worked for them nearly eight years. Just before they left in 1953, Mrs. Truman gave this to me.” Accompanied by two cards bearing calligraphic descriptions of the portrait. A very personal relic from a highly regarding first family, actually owned by and displayed in the White House living quarters.

Truman presents a powder box:

“‘All ladies seem to want to powder their noses—I never did understand why’” 159 Harry S. Truman

White House Celluloid Powder Box

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 Stunning celluloid powder box, presented by President Harry S. Truman to longtime White House seamstress and housekeeper Lillian Rogers Parks, shortly before the 1948 renovation of the White House. Brown and gold powder box measures 7.75 x 2.5 x 5.25, marked on the bottom, “Lucite Empire,” with the lid trimmed in brown and black. Center of the lid bears an intricate full-length image of a Grecian woman wrapped in a flowing sash, and contained within a feathered-diamond border. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of authenticity, on White House letterhead, from Mrs. Parks. In part: “This beautiful celluloid powder box was given to me by President Harry S. Truman at the time of the major White House Restoration which began on November 10, 1948. The powder box was from the guest powder room of the White House…Many famous ladies would have used it…The powder box was used from the Administration of President Woodrow Wilson through Presidents Harding, Coolidge, Hoover, F. D. R. and Truman. When President Truman handed me the box he said, ‘All ladies seem to want to powder their noses—I never did understand why.’” In overall fine condition. A stunning example of superior quality early celluloid—direct from the Executive Mansion.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 103


160 Harry S. Truman

White House QUEENS’ ROOM Small Hat Stand

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 A wooden hat stand used in the Rose Room at the White House through part of President Truman’s administration, measuring 9.5˝ tall with a 4.75˝ diameter base, painted with gold rings around the base, which is accidentally speckled with pink paint, which could potentially be removed. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The small hat stand was given to me by First Lady Bess Truman just before the White House closed for a complete Restoration in 1948. It is difficult to put an exact date on the origin of the hat stand. It was in the White House many years prior to President Truman. While it may have been used in other rooms, my Mama, Maggie Rogers, and I remember it only being in the Rose Room (Queens Room)…This hat stand would have been used by Presidents First Ladies, as well as distinguished guests…I met almost every King, Queen, Prime Minister and Dignitary that stayed in the White House. Some stayed in the Rose Room (Queens Room).” A unique artifact that experienced considerable White House use.

161 Harry S. Truman’s

Wicker Basket

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 A wicker basket presented to President Harry S. Truman in the 1940s. Basket, with lid, measures 16 x 7.5 x 10.5, and has a handle and two loops on the front. Accompanied by a detailed 1984 letter of provenance on a White House card, by Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. Letter reads: “The lovely basket was presented to Harry S. Truman with a bottle of Southern Compfort [sic] in the 1940s. Harry loved his whiskey and his poker too.” Hinges broken off, otherwise fine condition.

104 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


162 Harry S. Truman’s

Flashlight

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 President Truman’s personally-owned and -used flashlight with a chrome and red plastic handle, measuring 7˝ long, with a metal spring-like protector surrounding a period Westinghouse bulb. The flashlight retains its black power cord with a direct-current power plug, and is presented in its original quality leather case with brass clasp, embossed on the flap in gold lettering, “Harry S. Truman.” This historic relic includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from White House doorman Carl W. Ferguson. In part: “The leather engraved flashlight case and enclosed flashlight was given to me by President Harry S. Truman…I was near the President on numerous occasions in my capacity as White House Doorman. On this day we were alone in his Office. President Truman gave me this personal possession in 1947. It was an honor to be offered something personal. The President said, ‘Ferguson, this thing plugs in your car and lights up. But now that they drive me every where in that big old limousine I don’t have anything to plug it into.’ I really admired and respected President Truman.” An automobile flashlight, such as this, that could be plugged in to a cigarette lighter was quite common in the 1940–1950s as a handy tool to illuminate street signs and house numbers at night. The provenance letter reveals insight into President Truman’s thoughtfulness and sense of humor. A relic of fascinating note, offering an interesting glimpse into the daily life of one of the great American presidents.

163 Harry S. Truman’s

Lighter

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Official Truman White House cigarette lighter given to Secret Service Agent Frank G. Stoner by President Truman. The lighter measures 1.5 x 2.75 x .5 and features a plastic base with chrome top, and a plastic insert printed with an image of the White House and the text “Harry S. Truman, Washington, D. C.” Includes a detailed historic letter of provenance on Association of Former Agents of the US Secret Service letterhead from Secret Service Agent Frank G. Stoner, in part: “It pleases me to present to you a plastic cigarette lighter…It was given to me in November 1949, while I was on a morning walk with President Harry S. Truman. He reached in his pocket and said ‘here Frank, would you like to have this?’ I was fortunate in that I accompanied President Truman on many of his ‘famous’ brisk early morning walks. I served with the U. S. Secret Service from March 1943 until October 31, 1969.” In excellent condition. An historic relic straight from the pocket of President Truman to the secret service agent charged with protecting him.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 105


164 Harry S. Truman and William Hassett’s

Pair of Large Oak Beer Steins

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Two enormous oak beer steins, one owned by President Truman and displayed in the White House and the other belonging to his secretary William Hassett. Beautiful oak Truman stein stands 16˝ tall, has a 7˝ diameter base, a 4˝ diameter top, and a hinged lid. Stein features a nicely carved lid and handle, with “The President, Harry S. Truman,” in impressive raised relief on one side. Stein also has six prominent metal bands attached with brass tacks. William Hassett’s stein is of the same dimensions and overall design but with an affixed Milwaukee’s Best Blatz Brewing Company label, with “1949 Best Wishes to the 35th Division from Battery ‘D. [his and President Truman’s old World War I combat group]’” and Hassett’s name on the opposite side. President Truman and Hassett would have been presented these steins when they both attended their World War I combat group reunion. Accompanied by a 1982 detailed letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, from Carl W. Ferguson, White House doorman from 1939 to 1956. In part: “The large stein was given to me by President Harry S. Truman, on May 8, 1945. This was the same day he signed a Proclamation calling for May 13, 1945, to be a Day of Prayer as Germany had finally surrendered…On this day we were alone briefly in the Oval Office. President Truman gave me a pencil…On this same day he gave me the large stein which had been in his Office or Study. It is a fine looking Stein and I felt so honored that the President wanted me to have it…This is the personal possession of the President.” Also included is a handwritten note for the William Hassett stein from Raleigh DeGeer Amyx on a White House card which reads, in part: “Battery D refers to Harry S. Truman’s World War I battery and the steins would have been presented to Wm. Hassett at a Battery D reunion.” Accompanied by a photo of Hassett’s secretary Rae Randell, a friend of Mr Amyx and from whom he obtained the Hassett stein. Both in fine condition. A superior presidential relic—with ties to Truman’s World War I military career—that makes for a magnificent display piece.

165 Harry S. Truman’s

Oak Beer Stein

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 An impressive large oak beer stein, owned by President Truman and displayed in the White House, presented by Truman to White House doorman Carl W. Ferguson. Beautiful oak stein stands 12˝ high, has a 6˝ diameter base, a 3.5˝ diameter top, and a hinged lid. Stein features a nicely carved lid and handle, with “The President, Harry S. Truman,” in raised hi-relief on one side. Stein also has four prominent metal bands attached with brass tacks. Accompanied by a 1982 letter of provenance, on White House letterhead, from Carl W. Ferguson, White House doorman from 1939 to 1956. In part: “The large stein was given to me by President Harry S. Truman, on May 8, 1945. This was the same day he signed a Proclamation calling for May 13, 1945, to be a Day of Prayer as Germany had finally surrendered… On this day we were alone briefly in the Oval office. President Truman gave me a pencil…On this same day he gave me the large stein which had been in his Office or Study. It is a fine looking Stein and I felt so honored that the President wanted me to have it…This is the personal possession of the President.” In fine condition. A significant presidential artifact that would display prominently in an elite collection. 106 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


“The President liked his bourbon. When you have a drink, remember Harry”

166 Harry S. Truman’s

Sterling Silver Jigger

ESTIMATE: $3,000-$4,000 President Truman’s personally-owned and -used sterling silver shot glass, measuring 2˝ tall with a diameter of 1.75˝, featuring a 3D dimpled ‘thimble’ design around the base, engraved above with the words “Only A Thimble Full,” and Truman’s initials, “H. S. T.” Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The sterling ‘jigger’ is engraved ‘only a thimble full—H. S. T.’ It was owned and used by the President in the White House from 1945 on. The President liked his bourbon. When you have a drink, remember Harry.” A one-of-a-kind piece of presidential barware, uniquely owned and used by President Truman and a rather profound offering representative of his favorite pastime—a drink with friends.

167 Harry S. Truman

White House Queens’ Room’s Pink Pitcher

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Pink ceramic pitcher from the White House, presented by Bess Truman to longtime White House seamstress and housekeeper Lillian Rogers Parks. Rose-colored pitcher stands 3.75˝ tall, and is trimmed in gold around the handle and top edge, with ”W. H. Tatler Decorating Co.,” printed on the bottom, as well as Parks’s affixed original inventory label. Accompanied by a 1983 detailed letter of authenticity, on White House letterhead, from Parks. In part: “This lovely small pitcher was given to me by First Lady Bess Truman just before the White House closed for a complete Restoration. It is difficult to put an exact date on the origin of the pitcher. It was in the White House many years prior to President Truman. While it may have been used in other rooms, my Mama, Maggie Rogers, and I remember it only being in the Rose Room (Queens Room). It was part of the original pitcher and bowl set…The pitcher would have been used by Presidents, First Ladies, as well as distinguished guests.” In very fine condition. The White House guests Mrs. Parks is referring to are Winston Churchill, King Edward and the Queen Mother, as well as many other notables.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 107


168 Bess Truman

Collection of SEVEN Items

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Collection of seven items from the Truman White House, each presented to a valued staff member. Items are: a 9 x 3 swatch of blue velvet trimmed from a robe; a 34 x 34.25 silk scarf made for the Minnesota Centennial; and two pieces of fabric trimmed off a dress worn by first daughter Margaret Truman for her appearance on the Jimmy Durante show in 1950. These four items are accompanied by three detailed letters of authenticity from Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. Other items are: a Peter Pan figurine, 17.5˝ tall, made by Multi Products and dated 1950 on the base. Figurine is accompanied by a letter of authenticity from the wife of White House general foreman Melvon O. Carter; a hand-crocheted linen handkerchief, marked in one corner in blue ink, “Bess 1952,” presented to White House maid Viola ‘Big Momma’ Wise, and accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Wise; and a woven straw cigarette case, 3.25 x 2.5, presented to Lillian Rogers Parks, and accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Parks. In fine condition, with fading and paint loss to figurine.

169 Harry S. Truman and Dwight D.Eisenhower

Inauguration Invitations

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Two original inaugural invitations, both for Lillian R. Parks. These personalized invitations are to Harry S. Truman’s 1949 inauguration, and Dwight D. Eisenhower’s 1957 inauguration. Each invitation is individually framed, by the White House’s Carpenter’s Office, both with handwritten notations on the reverse, by recipient Lillian Rogers Parks, identifying the invitations as, “gift to Lillian Rogers Parks from the Inaugural Committee.” In fine condition.

108 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


John and Delores

Moaney

T

he foremost patron of items related to Dwight D. Eisenhower in the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection was Delores Moaney, widow of Sgt. John Moaney, both of whom closely served the Eisenhower family for decades. Mrs. Delores Moaney served as the personal cook for Dwight and Mamie Eisenhower from their time at the White House through the end of their lives, with she and her husband going on to live and work within the Eisenhowers’ Gettysburg mansion during all postpresidential years. Sgt. John Moaney served as Dwight D. Eisenhower’s valet for nearly thirty years, beginning with an assignment to the general in 1942 in wartime London. He gradually became Ike’s close friend and most trusted assistant—the president would later describe Sgt. Moaney as ‘indispensable’ in his life. Sgt. Moaney was so important to the Eisenhowers that he was generously remembered in Dwight D. Eisenhower’s will with funds as well as, privately presented by Ike to Sgt. Moaney just before the general’s 1969 passing, an exceptionally significant item in the Rolex Datejust that Rolex presented to General Eisenhower following World War II. The exceptional material contributed to the collection by Mrs. Moaney aptly trace Dwight D. Eisenhower’s career, from the end of World War II—including his A-2 leather jacket, a painting of the house where the general planned D-Day operations, and his postwar Rolex—through his retirement at Gettysburg, with various historically significant personal belongings from Dwight and Mamie Eisenhower.


Remarkable original painting by General Eisenhower of his wartime cottage

110 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


171 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Original Painting of His 1944 London Home

ESTIMATE: $100,000-$150,000 Extraordinary original oil painting by General Dwight D. Eisenhower, 17.25 x 13.5, depicting his wartime retreat outside of London known as Telegraph Cottage, signed in the lower left in red paint, “DE.” Also signed and historically inscribed on the stretched canvas’s black backing in pencil, “Telegraph Cottage—small house south of London where I lived while planning both Torch (1942) and Overlord (1944). Painted for Master Sgt. Moaney in 1949 from a water color. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Jan. 1, 1950.” Beautifully suede-matted and framed to an overall size of 23.5 x 19.5. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead signed by Delores Moaney, the Eisenhower family’s cook and the widow of Sgt. John Moaney. Her husband had served as Dwight D. Eisenhower’s close personal valet from 1942 until the president’s death in 1969. In part: “This is an original oil painting by then General Dwight D. Eisenhower…the painting is of Telegraph Cottage, a small house south of London, where Ike lived while he was the Supreme Commander Allied Forces…My husband, Sgt. John Moaney, met President Eisenhower in 1942 and served as his personal valet and friend until Eisenhower’s death in 1969…This original oil painting has been authenticated by him, with his note on the back. We also loaned this painting to the Gallery of Modern Art in N.Y. in 1967, for a temporary Eisenhower exhibition. It was also on loan for a while at the Eisenhower Presidential Library.” Also includes two small photos of the painting as it hung in President Eisenhower’s pressing room on the third floor of the White House during Sgt. Moaney’s service there from 1953 to 1961, a glossy photo and magazine clipping depicting the cottage, a transcript of a 1972 interview with Sgt. Moaney conducted by the Eisenhower Presidential Library in which he mentions Telegraph Cottage over a dozen times along with this very painting, and a modern print of a photo showing Sgt. Moaney with President Eisenhower.

“small house south of London where I lived while planning both Torch (1942) and Overlord (1944)”

HISTORY With tremendous significance and magnificent provenance, this is a positively remarkable painting by one of the most influential figures of the 20th century. Dwight D. Eisenhower took up painting as a hobby later in life—a practice suggested by Winston Churchill—as a tool for relaxation, and became quite a skilled artist in his own right. Approximately 260 works by Dwight D. Eisenhower are known, most of which are landscape scenes, with some portraits portraying his family members or notable figures, but few if any have historical importance of the same magnitude as this artwork depicting Telegraph Cottage. We are unaware of any other Eisenhower painting with such an historically detailed holograph on the reverse. As the location of General Eisenhower’s main office while commanding the Allied Expeditionary force, Telegraph Cottage was where the general planned two of the war’s most important invasions—as he attests to himself on the reverse—in Torch, the invasion of North Africa, and Overlord, the D-Day invasion of Normandy. Also of interest is the association with Sgt. John Moaney; Telegraph Cottage is where the two first met, and this time-consuming, stunning, and thoughtful gift to Sgt. Moaney demonstrates their close relationship. In his informal memoir, At Ease: Stories I Tell My Friends, Dwight D. Eisenhower describes Sgt. John Moaney as someone who was indispensable to him throughout his life. This noteworthy painting is undoubtedly a quintessential piece of history deserving of the most discriminating collector or institution.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 111


112 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


The great general’s personal four-star WWII A-2 leather flight jacket 172 General Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Four-Star A-2 Jacket

ESTIMATE: $40,000-$50,000

President Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -worn dark brown Type A-2 leather flight jacket from World War II, size 42, featuring four-star epaulettes on the shoulders. The tag inside the neck area does not indicate a manufacturer, reading: “Type A-2 / Drawing No. 30-1415 / A. A. F. Contract / No. W535-AC-27753 / Property / Air Forces, U. S. Army.” An inspection stamp to the right of the tags is faded but visible. All markings are of the appropriate manufacture dates or delivery timeframe. The jacket has a brass Conmar zipper, brown stitching for the jacket, and olive drab stitching for the four-star epaulette patches. The pockets feature rounded lower corners and an angular flap. Includes a detailed letter of significant provenance on White House letterhead signed by Delores Moaney, the Eisenhower family’s cook and the widow of Sgt. John Moaney. Her husband had served as Dwight D. Eisenhower’s close personal valet from 1942 until the president’s death in 1969. In part: “This World War II leather jacket was worn by General Eisenhower while he was a four-star General from early 1943 until December 1944…My husband, Sgt. John Moaney was Valet to the General and President from 1942 until Ike’s death in 1969. He was with the General throughout the War years and traveled many miles with him…When the General no longer wanted this leather jacket, he gave it to my husband. After my husband’s death, I kept it in my personal possession.” Also includes additional pieces of important provenance consisting of a typed White House card signed by Mrs. Moaney, briefly outlining the same details, as well as four modern prints of photos showing John Moaney with Eisenhower, and nearly 100 very interesting and unique original black and white candid photos, mainly of workers at the White House, with several picturing Ike and Mamie Eisenhower, and a few picturing Sgt. John Moaney.

HISTORY The epaulettes decisively date the jacket to between February 11, 1943, and December 20, 1944, the period during which Eisenhower was considered a four-star general; it is most likely that this jacket was issued just a bit earlier, with new star patches sewn to the epaulettes as he advanced in rank. Most importantly, it was during this time that Eisenhower planned Operation Overlord, leading the Allied forces in the invasion of Normandy on D-Day—June 6, 1944. As an iconic World War II leather jacket owned and worn by General Eisenhower during the most crucial period of the war, still in excellent condition for its age, this is an artifact of ultimate historical interest and significance. A quintessential military and presidential relic to say the least.

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Etched with General Eisenhower’s four stars 173 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Four-Star Glass

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,000 President Eisenhower’s personally-owned drinking glass, measuring 4.5˝ tall and 2.5˝ in diameter, elegantly etched on the side with four stars (Ike’s rank for a period of 17 months during the war) and the general’s initials, “DDE.” The glass is quite appealing and elegant in appearance, with a tiny chip to the rim (chipped piece is included with the glass). Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Delores Moaney, wife of Sgt. John Moaney. In part: “The handsome ‘four star’ glass monogrammed ‘DDE’ was owned by President Eisenhower. The President gave this glass to my husband, Sgt. John Moaney, Ike’s valet.” Eisenhower was promoted to the rank of four-star general on February 11, 1943, before being elevated to five stars on December 20, 1944. It was during this period that General Eisenhower made his greatest military accomplishments, including the Allied invasion of Sicily and the D-Day assault on the beaches of Normandy. An exceptional piece with direct relation to Dwight D. Eisenhower’s finest hours as a military hero, owned by the general-turned-president himself.

174 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Churchill Toby Mug

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President Eisenhower’s personally-owned Royal Doulton ‘Toby mug’ in the form of Winston Churchill, measuring 5.5˝ tall with a 2.5˝ diameter at the base, depicting the prime minister as he is best remembered, fully outfitted with his overcoat, cane, bow tie, top hat, and cigar clenched between his teeth. The three-dimensional mug is beautifully detailed, and bears Churchill’s name and Royal Doulton maker’s stamp on the bottom. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Delores Moaney, the Eisenhower family’s cook and wife of Sgt. John Moaney, who served as President Eisenhower’s valet beginning in 1942. In part: “The small Royal Doulton Churchill Toby mug was owned and displayed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. My husband, Sgt. John Money was the President’s valet from 1942 until his death in 1969. And I was their cook, maid and friend until Mamie Eisenhower died.” Condition is excellent.

114 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


A handsome Napoleon piece engraved “General D. D. E.,” the man who liberated France in WWII 175 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Napoleon Bottle Opener

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,000 General Eisenhower’s personallyowned and -used silver bottle opener made by Christofle, featuring a superb and detailed portrait of Napoleon Bonaparte raised in high relief on the 2˝ diameter circular handle, surrounded by the words “Napoleon” and “Empereur.” The reverse features a small bee at the top, which was chosen by Napoleon as a symbol of his empire, and a ring of laurels encircling Eisenhower’s finely engraved title and initials, “General D. D. E.” The head of the opener bears Christofle maker’s stamps on both sides. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The bottle opener was owned and used by President Eisenhower. On the back it is engraved General D. D. E. This may have been a gift to him while he was in France in 1944 or 1945. But even after he was President some people referred to him as The General. So he could have gotten it after coming to the White House in 1953.” As this depicts Napoleon and refers to Ike as “General,” it has an exceptional connection to his military service during World War II. As the the Supreme Allied Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force, he was tasked with organizing and executing one of the most important and well-known moments of the war—Operation Overlord, the Allied invasion of Normandy, paving the way for the liberation of France and eventual invasion of Germany. In addition to being a beautifully crafted piece in itself, this bottle opener represents a defining moment of Eisenhower’s military career and associates him with another renowned military leader and bold tactician, as it depicts Napoleon on one side and Ike on the other. In extra fine condition.

176 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Leather Luggage Tag

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 President Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -used leather luggage tag, measuring 3.25 x 1.75, embossed in gold with the Santa Fe Railroad logo on one side and featuring a clear plastic window on the other to display an identification card, filled out with President Eisenhower’s information in manuscript, “Gen. D. D. Eisenhower, Gettysburg, P. A.” Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Delores Moaney. In part: “The small leather luggage I. D. card was owned and used by President Eisenhower. As valet to the President for 28 years my husband Sgt. John Moaney, always traveled with him.” An easily displayed and well-traveled presidential relic.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 115


Incredible and historically significant official chronometer presented to

General Eisenhower

by Rolex

177 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Rolex Watch

ESTIMATE: $1,000,000-$2,000,000

Considered by many the most important and monetarily valuable Rolex wristwatch, here offered is Dwight D. Eisenhower’s 1951 18K iconic yellow gold Rolex Oyster Perpetual DateJust reference 6305 chronometer on a matching 18K Jubilee bracelet with deployment clasp, presented to General Eisenhower by Rolex to celebrate the production of their 150,000th watch to obtain ‘Official Chronometer’ certification, and to recognize the general’s great achievements in World War II. Rolex employed a highly skilled artist in Switzerland to accomplish Ike’s requested engraving on the watch-back and clasp, in both places inscribing his initials, “DDE,” and on the watch-back adding the five-star general insignia and date that NATO appointed him as Supreme Allied Commander of Europe, “12-19-1950.” Dwight D. Eisenhower frequently wore this watch throughout his tenure in presidential office, 1953-1961, and it is accompanied by an unparalleled offering of corroborating information, documentation, and many desirable photographs of Eisenhower wearing this Rolex.

116 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


While Rolex production was rapidly approaching three-quarters of a million watches in the period, reflected by consistent case numbering for watches that had begun prior to 1927, a far smaller number had obtained ‘Official Chronometer Certificate’ status. The documentation shows how the 150,000th chronometer wristwatch was regarded as highly special and ideal for so important a client. Eisenhower’s prominent subsequent use of the watch gave birth to the ‘President’ concept of permanent Rolex fame to the present day. Rolex had previously made this type of presentation to other heroes of World War II, giving their own Swiss General Henri Guisan the 50,000th officially certified Swiss chronometer that they manufactured, and honoring Winston Churchill with the 100,000th; after presenting General Eisenhower with their 150,000th chronometer wristwatch they asked him for any suggestions as to who should receive the 200,000th, and both parties agreed that General Matthew Ridgway was a deserving choice. At the time of the presentation, Dwight D. Eisenhower was already an internationally respected figure, but would soon be launched into an even greater spotlight—whispers of support for a run at the White House had been present since WWII ended, but in 1951 the bipartisan grassroots ‘Draft Eisenhower’ movement emerged in full force, and Americans far and wide clamored for General Eisenhower to run for president. He became something of a media sensation, and he was featured on the cover of four issues of Life magazine throughout 1952. In the Dwight D. Eisenhower portrait that appeared on the cover of the July 21 issue, this rare Rolex is prominently displayed in full view on his left wrist. This came just after he had secured the Republican Party’s presidential nomination, and was thus a time when his public image was of the utmost importance. That this Rolex is so visible in Life’s formal, deliberately posed portrait affirms the sense of personal significance

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and great pride that Ike felt in the watch—and the departure from his typically dry and un-flashy style, with the presence of a solid gold 18K luxury timepiece only demonstrates this further. A full technical watch description and condition statement can be found online at www.RRAuction.com. As a token of appreciation for a lifetime of service, President Eisenhower presented this quintessential Rolex to Sgt. John Moaney, who served as his valet for nearly thirty years after being assigned to the general in 1942 in wartime London, gradually becoming a close personal friend. In his informal memoir, At Ease: Stories I Tell My Friends, Dwight D. Eisenhower described Sgt. John Moaney as someone who was indispensable to him throughout his life, and he generously bequeathed funds to Sgt. Moaney in his will. About 30 years ago, the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection acquired this most exquisite and immensely important historical piece from Sgt. Moaney’s widow, Delores Moaney, who served as the personal cook for Dwight and Mamie Eisenhower from their time at the White House through the end of their lives; she and her husband, John Moaney, were so close to the family that they lived at the Eisenhowers’ private residence in Gettysburg with Ike and Mamie during all post-presidential years. Extraordinary provenance from the Moaney family, Rolex, copies of General Eisenhower’s own Rolex records kept in the Eisenhower Presidential Library, as well as further historical details of importance—an impressively large binder full—safeguarded by Raleigh DeGeer Amyx accompany this iconic Rolex. Without question, the most historically significant Rolex ever offered for sale. 118 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


178 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Five-Star Glass

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President Eisenhower’s personally-owned drinking glass, measuring 4.5˝ tall and 2.5˝ in diameter, elegantly etched on the side with a five star ring and the general’s initials, “DDE.” The etching is expertly accomplished and the glass elegant in appearance, despite a significant chip to the rim (chipped off piece is still present). Includes a letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Viola Wise, who served as a maid at the White House from 1939–1982, from the time of President Franklin D. Roosevelt through President Ronald Reagan. In part: “This glass with the initials D. D. E. and Five Stars was brought to the White House by President Eisenhower in 1953. It was given to me by the President after it was chipped.” This is the only five star glass of General Eisenhower’s ever offered for sale to the public.

179 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Five-Star General Linen Handkerchief

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 General Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -used off-white linen five-star general handkerchief, folded to an overall size of 5.5 x 5.5, finely embroidered in white thread with the symbolic five stars surrounding his initials, “DDE.” In fine condition. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Delores Moaney. In part: “The ‘DDE’ five-star handkerchief was owned and used by President Eisenhower. My husband packed the President’s personal effects as they traveled together from 1942–1969.” In splendid condition. A paramount relic in symbolic five-star motif—the rarest of all President Eisenhower hankies—straight from the pocket of the general to his own long-standing valet, Sgt. John Moaney, a faithful companion from 1942 through to Eisenhower’s passing.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 119


180 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Brass Paperweight

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 President Eisenhower’s impressive personally-owned and -used circular brass paperweight modeled after the official coat of arms of the United States, measuring 3˝ in diameter and .5˝ thick, featuring the detailed bald eagle raised in relief with an enameled patriotic shield on its chest, with a group of 13 golden stars representing the colonies set against a blue enamel background above. The underside is handsomely engraved, “General D. D. E., 1945,” with a Wm. H. Horstmann Company manufacturer’s emblem raised in the center. A black presentation base accompanies the paperweight. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Delores Moaney. In part: “This Great Seal is in raised 3-D effect, with red, white and blue enamel. On the verso it is engraved ‘General D.D.E.’ and the date ‘1945.’ The President used it for a paperweight. He gave it to his valet, Sgt. John Moaney shortly before he died.” This dates to an extremely important time in Dwight D. Eisenhower’s military career, as in late 1944 he was promoted to five-star general, and in 1945 he oversaw the conclusion of World War II hostilities in Europe and the transition to a new, stabilized government in Germany. A notable relic of significance to the discriminating collector or institution.

181 White House

Handmade Game Table

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,500 Beautiful custom-made game table, made by White House carpenters from White House trees, circa 1950, and later presented to longtime White House favorite, Maitre d’ Charles Ficklin. Multi-purpose game table measures 30 x 30 and stands on four folding 26˝ legs. Table top is very skillfully inlaid with various types of wood for several games including checkers, chess, and backgammon. Accompanied by a detailed 2010 letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Ficklin’s son, James, which reads, in part: “This handsome 30˝ x 30˝ game table was skillfully handmade from White House trees—circa 1950. Using trees and trimmings from the White House lawn, this unique table was made by a highly skilled and artistic White House carpenter in the White House carpentry shop. It was presented to my father, Charles E. Ficklin (1913–1977), who was Maitre De [sic] at the White House.” Also included is a color photo of Raleigh DeGeer Amyx posing with Ficklin’s son and grandson, together with the table, as well as a photocopy of a picture of Charles and his brother, John Ficklin, at the White House. In fine condition. A meticulously hand-crafted piece quite suitable for White House use. President Eisenhower himself was an avid card player, excelling in both poker and bridge, and earning himself a reputation as being quite the card sharp, even forcing his son to abandon him as a bridge partner due to his competitiveness. In addition to its historical significance, this offering stands on its own as a masterful work of art.

120 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Custom-made tool chest given as a 1959 Christmas gift, complete with Eisenhower’s thank-you letter on White House letterhead

182 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Tool Chest

ESTIMATE: $5,000-$7,000 President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -used tool chest, given to him at Christmas by his valet John Moaney and his wife Delores, who was Eisenhower’s personal cook for over 25 years. Large tool chest, made by White House carpenters, measures 33 x 15 x 15, with “D. D. E.,” engraved into the inside of the lid, and a brass presentation plaque affixed to the top of the lid which reads: “To the President from Sgt. and Mrs. John Moaney, Christmas 1959.” Chest features three sliding compartmentalized trays, and replacement hinges, closing latch, corner guards and handles. All of the chest’s original brass ware is included. Chest was presented to President Eisenhower as a Christmas gift in 1959, and is accompanied by a thank-you letter sent by President Eisenhower, on White House letterhead as president, dated December 26, 1959, to the Moaneys which reads, in full: “I think you probably know how proud I am of that handsome tool chest, and consequently, how grateful I am for your thoughtfulness in having it made—and handsomely identified—for me. It was a wonderful idea, and I am more grateful than I can say.” Also included is a 1985 letter of provenance, on a White House card, from Moaney’s wife Delores. Letter reads, in part: “The large wood tool chest with a brass plaque on top was owned and used by President Eisenhower. It was a gift from my husband, Sgt. Moaney, to him in 1959. After the President died on 3/28/69, Mamie gave it back to my husband.” It is exceptionally rare for any presidential relic to appear accompanied by direct provenance from the president himself, directly referencing the item. Chest retains some tools and other instruments, some labeled with Moaney’s name, and others unidentified, but most likely the remainder are President Eisenhower’s. In very fine condition. Moaney became Eisenhower’s valet in 1942 during World War II, meeting the general at England’s Telegraph Cottage, and spent the next 27 years as his valet, including both his terms as president. After serving the Commander-inChief during his two terms, Moaney moved to the Eisenhower family farm in Gettysburg, and lived right in the mansion with Dwight and Mamie, finally retiring from the Army in 1969 after the President’s passing. But Sgt. Moaney would continue to work for Mamie Eisenhower until his death in 1978. A very thoughtful gift from one of the president’s most trusted and loyal companions, and deeply appreciated by the president as evident from his thank-you letter sent just one day after the holiday. This handsome and impressive piece has the potential to be the centerpiece in the room of the most discriminating collector.

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Ike’s superb 1953 Bausch & Lomb

Centennial leather-wrapped binoculars 183 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Binoculars

ESTIMATE: $5,000-$10,000 President Eisenhower’s exceptional personallyowned and -used Bausch & Lomb 7 x 35 binoculars and brown leather case. The metal body is painted by the manufacturer dark brown and the binoculars’ grips are wrapped in a fine light brown leather, with the eyepiece on the left side engraved, “Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States,” and the right side engraved, “Bausch & Lomb Centennial, 1853–1953.” The front cylinder is also stamped with serial number XG4299. Some of the paint is chipped from use and one plastic eyecup is absent, but the binoculars seem to be in overall fine condition and functional. The impressive leather carrying case matches the leather used on the binoculars, and is earnestly gilt embossed with the Bausch & Lomb logo on the bottom and the president’s full name on the top cover, “Dwight D. Eisenhower.” Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Delores Moaney, wife of Sgt. John Moaney, who served as Eisenhower’s valet beginning in 1942. Both Dolores and John Moaney lived with the Eisenhower family at their Gettysburg residence until the deaths of the General and Mrs. Eisenhower. In part: “The gold embossed binoculars were owned and used by President Dwight Eisenhower during the White House years as well as in retirement. The President gave them to his valet, Sgt. John Moaney, shortly before he died on 3/28/69.” Accompanied by a photo of Mrs. Moaney holding the binoculars, while she also wears Eisenhower’s Rolex on her wrist. Also accompanied by a photocopy of an internal Bausch & Lomb corporate memo and a photocopy of a letter written by President Eisenhower to Bausch & Lomb, which have been graciously provided by the Bausch & Lomb Corporate Archive. The photocopied memo is headed “Centennial Binoculars Have Been Presented to the Following,” and goes on to list 14 recipients of these specially prepared binoculars, including President Eisenhower, Governor Thomas E. Dewey, members of Congress, scientists, and editors of prominent publications. The photocopied letter from Dwight D. Eisenhower reads, in part: “I am happy to salute the Bausch & Lomb Optical Company on the occasion of its one hundredth anniversary. In all the wars tragically forced upon our Nation in this century, the singular skill of your company has served the armed forces of America. From optical gunfire control to aerial mapping equipment, you have filled the needs of our fighters.” Considering that Bausch & Lomb still retains the above mentioned correspondence in their permanent files attests to the importance of this pair. A very handsome offering of American-made binoculars particularly appropriate for the general-turned-president.

122 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


184 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Cufflinks

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 President Eisenhower’s gaudy pair of briefly personally-owned ceramic cufflinks, each featuring a prominent raised golden “E” against a deep blue background, with swivel-bars affixed to the reverse. Includes a detailed and humorous letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Melvon O. Carter, who had worked on the White House maintenance crew from the time of Presidents Hoover through Nixon. During Mr. Carter’s over 40 years of White House service, he was often in close proximity to the first family. In part: “My husband, Melvon O. Carter…had worked for the White House from the time of President Herbert Hoover until President Richard Nixon…These cuff links were given to my husband when he was in the bedroom of the First Lady, Mamie Eisenhower. Mrs. Eisenhower said, ‘The President would look ridiculous wearing these and so would I.’ She laughed then and said, ‘Do you want these to give to a friend or an enemy?’ My husband kept them in my jewelery box but we did not wear them either…Since these were a personal possession and gift from the First Lady they should be properly preserved.” Condition is fine.

185 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Shoehorn

ESTIMATE: $200-$400

President Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -used aluminum shoehorn, measuring 26˝ long, given to Dwight D. Eisenhower as a Christmas gift in 1958. The long shoehorn has a handle wrapped in black grip tape and the heel piece is attached by a flexible springlike piece. The heel piece is engraved to the president, “D. D. Eisenhower, Xmas-58,” as well as “H. F. Tennant,” who was likely the gift-giver. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Delores Moaney, wife of Sgt. John Moaney, who served as Eisenhower’s valet beginning in 1942. Both Dolores and John Moaney lived with the Eisenhower family at their Gettysburg residence until the deaths of the General and Mrs. Eisenhower. In part: “The long shoe horn engraved with his name and the year 1958, was a Christmas gift to President Eisenhower. After he used it for a while he gave it to my husband, Sgt. John Moaney, his valet from 1942–1969.” Of functional use for President Eisenhower himself.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 123


186 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Brass Button Straight From His Master’s Jacket

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Brass button from Dwight D. Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -worn green Masters Tournament jacket, circa 1950s, measuring just under 1˝ in diameter. The button was manufactured by the Waterbury Button Company and features the Augusta National Golf Club logo in the center. Originates from the collection of Sgt. John Moaney, who served as Ike’s close personal valet from 1942 until the president’s death in 1969, and includes two invitations with scheduling details for President Eisenhower’s flights from Washington to Augusta, Georgia, one for Sgt. John Moaney dated 1958 and one for Delores Moaney dated 1954. Also accompanied by three photos from the period, one showing President Eisenhower with Sgt. John Moaney on a bench at the exclusive golf club (picturing Ike wearing the green Master’s jacket that this button originated from) one showing Sgt. Moaney assisting President Eisenhower with his shoes, and one of the main building. Dwight D. Eisenhower was an avid golfer and frequented Augusta—the historic home of the Master’s—one of the course’s iconic features is known as the ‘Eisenhower Tree,’ a loblolly pine that the president unsuccessfully lobbied to have taken down because it interfered with his golf game.

187 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Practice Golf Club

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -used practice golf club. Club consists of a lightweight 35.5˝ shaft with a small weight attached to the bottom by several links of chain. Accompanied by a letter of authenticity on a White House card from President Eisenhower’s World War II driver Sgt. Leonard Dry, which reads: “The practice golf club with weighted ball was used by Pres. Eisenhower to practice his golf swing.” Also included is a photo of Dry with the club. An accompanying inventory printout indicates President Eisenhower gave him the club as he was beginning to have doubts it was helping his game. In fine condition. Since the invention of golf, players have utilized interesting shortcuts to improve their game—Ike was no different.

124 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


188 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Golf Ball, Tee, and Matches

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,000 President Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -used personalized Spalding golf ball, embossed in black on one side, “General Ike.” It also bears manufacturer’s marks that read “Spalding,” “1,” and “Dot Plus.” Accompanied by a peach golf tee stamped in black down the side, “Dwight Eisenhower,” as well as matchbooks from Augusta National Golf Club and Eldorado Country Club matchbooks. Eisenhower was an avid golfer, and had joined the exclusive Augusta National in 1948. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from White House doorman Carl W. Ferguson. As doorman, Ferguson saw the president daily on his way to the Oval Office. In part: “President Eisenhower loved the game of golf and he often practiced his putting and chipping on the south lawn of the White House. Sometimes in passing, he would toss a used or even brand new golf ball to me. At other times, I would find his balls while walking around the south lawn where he had been practicing…The President seemed to enjoy being called ‘General’ as much as ‘President’ and some of his golf balls were printed with various names, such as this one with ‘General Ike,’ and some with just ‘Ike’ as well as ‘President.’ This golf ball was used by the President and is not a presentation ball. Therefore, it should be preserved.” President Eisenhower’s enthusiasm for golf was well-known throughout the nation, and he is credited with helping to further popularize the sport—over his eight years in office, Ike played an average of about 100 rounds per year. An impressive group ensemble.

Eisenhower presidential golf ball retrieved from the South Lawn 189 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Golf Ball

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 One of Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -used golf balls, embossed in red ink, “Gen. Ike,” on one side and “-B-52-1,” on the other side, picked up from the South Lawn of the White House by White House General Foreman Melvon O. Carter. Accompanied by an April 30, 1982 letter of provenance from Carter’s widow, written on White House stationery, which reads, in part: “My husband, Melvon O. Carter…had worked for The White House from the time of President Herbert Hoover until President Richard Nixon…he would often pick up the personal golf balls of President Eisenhower, and later, President Kennedy, from the South Lawn of the White House…The President Dwight D. Eisenhower golf ball is marked in red ink, ‘Gen. Ike,’…This is not a presentation golf ball, but one owned by President Eisenhower.” In fine condition. Eisenhower enjoyed a passion for golf, joining the Augusta National Golf Club, and playing avidly both during and after his administration. A significant historical offering. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 125


190 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Golf Ball

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 President Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -used personalized Spalding golf ball, embossed in black on opposing sides with his initials, “DDE.” It also bears manufacturer’s marks that read “Spalding,” “Kro-Flite,” and “Cadwell-Geer Cover.” The ball exhibits general marks with signs of use. Accompanied by a white golf tee stamped in black down the side, “Dwight Eisenhower.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Melvon O. Carter, who had worked on the White House maintenance crew from the time of Presidents Hoover through Nixon. During Mr. Carter’s over 40 years of White House service, he was often in close proximity to the first family. In part: “My husband, Melvon O. Carter…had worked for The White House from the time of President Herbert Hoover in 1932, until President Richard Nixon…from time to time, he would often pick up the personal golf balls of President Eisenhower, and later President Kennedy, from the South Lawn of the White House… This ball belonged to the President and it is not a presentation golf ball…it was owned and used by the President.” President Eisenhower’s enthusiasm for golf was well-known throughout the nation, and he is credited with helping to further popularize the sport—over his eight years in office, Ike played an average of about 100 rounds per year. Golf balls actually used by presidents well-known for playing golf are highly coveted by advanced collectors.

191 Dwight D. Eisenhower

Collection of Buttons, Five-Star Pins, and Tray

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 A diverse collection of five items related to Dwight D. Eisenhower’s military career and presidency, including a presidential campaign button showing Ike smiling, surrounded by the words, “Peace and Prosperity with Eisenhower”; another button of a similar style showing President Eisenhower in a more serious pose, made to honor his inauguration; three pins in the form of the five-star general symbol; and a small blue enamel tray featuring Dwight D. Eisenhower’s facsimile signature across the center. In overall fine condition.

192 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Elephant Figurine

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 President Eisenhower’s personally-owned off-white plastic elephant figurine, measuring 1.5˝ long and 1˝ tall, featuring a textured finish and the elephant posing with its trunk raised in the air. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The small elephant figurine was owned by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, while he was in the White House. It sat in a group of other elephants on one of his dressers. Since the elephant represents the Republican Party, it was, naturally, one of the President’s favorite symbols.”

126 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


193 Dwight D. Eisenhower

Inaugural Handkerchief and Button

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Two items: a beautiful linen handkerchief with hand-crocheted lace edges, measuring 11.5 x 11.5, made to commemorate President Eisenhower’s second inauguration, with “Eisenhower,” “January 20, 1957,” “Washington DC,” and “Mamie,” beautifully crocheted within the lace-trimmed borders in block letters; and a presidential campaign button, measuring 3.5˝ in diameter, with a patriotic color scheme and the famous slogan, “I Like Ike,” prominently displayed in the center. A nice pairing of this attractive textile art and well-designed campaign badge.

194 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Linen Handkerchief

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President Eisenhower’s personally-owned off-white linen handkerchief, folded to an overall size of 5.25 x 5.25, finely embroidered in dark blue thread, “Ike.” Scattered light staining to edges, that does not significantly detract from overall appearance, otherwise fine condition. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Delores Moaney, the Eisenhower’s longtime personal cook and wife of Sgt. John Moaney, who served as Dwight D. Eisenhower’s valet beginning in 1942. In part: “The linen handkerchief with one corner monogrammed ‘Ike’ in medium blue letters was owned by President Eisenhower. My husband packed the President’s personal effects as they traveled together from 1942–1969.” An important personal artifact, straight from the pocket of the general to his own long-standing valet, Sgt. John Moaney.

195 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Linen Handkerchief

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -used off-white linen handkerchief, folded to an overall size of 5.5 x 5.5, finely embroidered in white thread, “Ike.” In fine condition. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Delores Moaney. In part: “The white linen handkerchief monogrammed with a white ‘Ike’ on one corner owned and used by President Eisenhower. He gave the ‘hanky’ to my husband, his valet, from 1942–1969.” A desirable personal artifact, straight from the pocket of the general to his own long-standing valet, Sgt. John Moaney.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 127


197 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Smoke Ring

ESTIMATE: $300-$400 President Eisenhower’s personally-owned hickory smoke ring, measuring 2˝ in diameter, engraved with the words, “Smoke Rings, Virginia”; and a swatch of the fabric used to make his apron, printed with small depictions of various presidents. Includes detailed letters of provenance for both items on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a best selling author as well as housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from President Hoover through President Eisenhower. One letter, in part: “I am proud to say I made one of President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s favorite garments—his cooking apron. It was made of the most unusual fabric—a piece of tan material with the pictures of many Presidents… The President loved to wear the apron, and he would sit down among his guests when he was cooking over the charcoal grill at the White House or Gettysburg still wearing it.” Also accompanied by a most fortunate and historic photo of President Eisenhower wearing the apron described.

199 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Napkin Ring

ESTIMATE: $100-$200

198 Dwight D. Eisenhower Family’s

Aprons

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Two aprons: a red, white, and blue waist apron hand-painted on the band in white, “Ike I Like!”; and a pink mesh apron with hand-stitched green and blue lettering on panels of pink fabric, “President Grandpa & Grandma Eisenhower,” “Barbara Anne,” and “Mary Jean.” Straight from the Eisenhower family of long ago.

President Eisenhower’s personallyowned and -used unusual hand-carved bone napkin ring, measuring 1.75˝ tall and 1.5˝ in diameter, carved such that it features raised lettering, “DDE 11 4 52,” in a design that features the date set above his smaller middle initial. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Delores Moaney. In part: “The handcarved napkin ring was owned and used by President Eisenhower. It is carved ‘DDE 11-4-52.’ My husband was the personal valet to the President from 1942 until the President’s death on 3/28/69.” It was on November 4, 1952, that Eisenhower was elected president in a landslide victory over Democratic challenger Adlai Stevenson,

128 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


200 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Laundry Forms

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Large collection of Dwight D. Eisenhower’s laundry tickets, dry cleaning receipts, and other similar ephemera, consisting of approximately 100 separate pieces, most dated throughout the 1960s. Many refer to the former president as “Gen. Eisenhower,” and are for a wide array of clothing including trousers, suits, jackets, many of the descriptions noting the color of the garment. The receipts originate from various laundries and cleaners, including Eddie’s in Gettysburg, Desert Hand Laundry in Palm Springs, Steele’s in Hanover, and the tailor shop on the SS America. Also within the group are a number of receipts from Brookside Dairy in Indio, California, with orders of various milks and cheeses, and a grocery list on a sheet of stationery for scoring games of bridge from Eisenhower’s aircraft, the Columbine. A most unusual and interesting collection with close ties to one of the 20th century’s most celebrated personages.

201 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

West Point Glass

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 President Eisenhower’s personallyowned drinking glass, measuring 5˝ tall and 2.25˝ in diameter, nicely etched on the side with the US Military Academy Coat of Arms. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Delores Moaney, wife of Sgt. John Moaney, who served as Eisenhower’s valet beginning in 1942. Both Dolores and John Moaney lived with the Eisenhower family at their Gettysburg residence until the deaths of the General and Mrs. Eisenhower. In part: “The lovely West Point glass was owned by President Eisenhower. The President gave this glass to my husband, Sgt. Moaney, his valet. They had traveled together from 1942–1969.” Also accompanied by an official printed card with a raised presidential seal bearing Eisenhower’s facsimile signature, reading, “A small token of my gratitude for your helpfulness.” In impeccable condition.

202 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Bar Glasses

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 President Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -used set of four humorous lime green glasses, measuring 3.25˝ tall and 2.5˝ in diameter, featuring nude figures splayed over conical bases with their rumps facing skyward in a literal nod to the phrase ‘bottoms up.’ As the glasses are curved on the bottom they can only stand facing down, and one thus has a superficial chip to the rim, all others are in excellent condition. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Delores Moaney. In part: “President Eisenhower’s ‘bottoms-up’ glasses were used by him and his guests more for a laugh than any other reason.” These glasses are a whimsical reminder of Ike’s sense of humor, which was a contributing factor to his success; he once acknowledged this, saying, ‘A sense of humor is part of the art of leadership, of getting along with people, of getting things done.’

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 129


203 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Gold Trim Glass

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 President Eisenhower’s personally-owned drinking glass, measuring 3.75˝ tall and 2.75˝ in diameter, attractively decorated with gold rings around the top and bottom, and an imposing design on the base. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Delores Moaney, wife of Sgt. John Moaney, who served as President Eisenhower’s valet beginning in 1942. Both Dolores and John Moaney lived with the Eisenhower family at their Gettysburg residence until the deaths of the General and Mrs. Eisenhower. In part: “The delicate gold trim glass with a gold ornate bottom was owned by President Eisenhower. The President gave this glass to my husband, Sgt. Moaney, his valet from 1942–1969.” Also accompanied by a color photo of Moaney and Eisenhower together. In impeccable condition.

204 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Swedish Vase

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President and Mrs. Eisenhower’s personallyowned and -used vase. Heavy Swedish crystal vase stands 6˝ tall with an engraved image of a nude woman sitting on a hilltop watching the sunrise. Accompanied by a 1985 letter of authenticity on a White House card from Dolores Moaney, the Eisenhower’s personal cook and the wife of President Eisenhower’s valet, Sgt. John Moaney. Letter reads, in part: “The 6 1/2 in. Fine Swedish crystal was owned and used by President and Mrs. Eisenhower. After the death of the President on 3/28/69, Mamie gave it to Ike’s valet, Sgt. Moaney, who served the President from 1942–1969.” In very good condition, with a chip to top edge, and surface wear to the inside center portion of vase.

130 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


205 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Eagle Bowl

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President Dwight D. and Mrs. Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -used bowl. Large ceramic bowl measures 10˝ in diameter, has two hand-painted United States seals painted on the outside, along with blooming flowers, and a hand-painted border around the inside, below the gold-bordered rim. Bottom of the bowl is marked, “Decorated in Hong Kong,” and also bears two small inventory labels. Accompanied by a 1985 letter of authenticity, on a White House card, from Dolores Moaney. Letter reads, in part: “The large bowl with two hand-painted eagles on it was owned and used by President and Mrs. Eisenhower. My husband, Sgt. John Moaney was the President’s valet. And, I was their cook, maid and friend for about 30 years.” In fine condition.

206 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Sugar Bowl

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 The Eisenhowers’ personally-owned and -used beautiful white china sugar bowl, measuring 3.25˝ tall with a diameter of 4˝ at the base, it is painted with lovely pink and green floral designs and gold accents on the edges and handles. The top cover is decorated to match. On the bottom of the bowl and underneath the cover are maker and distributor’s stamps reading, “Theodore Haviland, Limoges, France” and “Manufactured, Dulin & Martin Co., Washington, DC.” Included is a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from well-known best selling author Lillian Rogers Parks, who was a housekeeper and seamstress at the White House for over 30 years, from Hoover through Eisenhower. In part: “The sugar bowl belonged to President Dwight D. Eisenhower and First Lady Mamie Eisenhower. They used it on occasion when I worked for them. Mrs. Eisenhower gave it to me shortly before I left the White House in 1961. The sugar bowl is of fine Haviland China…The design is a delicate floral pattern in pinks, green and gold…This personal item once belonging to the President and Mamie Eisenhower should be preserved for future generations.” Condition is extra fine.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 131


207 Dwight D. Eisenhower’s

Soup Tureen

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 President and Mrs. Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -used soup tureen. Ornate electric tureen stands 6.5˝ tall, has a diameter of 6˝ at the top, and is covered in a raised fruit and flower pattern. Bottom of the base is marked, “The Akron Model AOW.” Tureen also comes with its original lid. Accompanied by a 1968 letter of authenticity on a White House card, from Dolores Moaney, the Eisenhower’s personal cook and the wife of President Eisenhower’s valet, Sgt. John Moaney. Letter reads, in part: “The white soup tureen was owned and used by the President and Mrs. Eisenhower. They gave it to my husband and me. My husband Sgt. John Moaney served as the General’s valet from 1942–1969.” In fine condition, with expected light wear.

Wonderful retirement presentation to Lillian Parks after almost 30 years of service 208 Dwight D. Eisenhower

Signed Retirement Congratulations

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Very nice, rare hand-calligraphed retirement presentation for Lillian R. Parks, longtime White House housekeeper and seamstress for over 30 years, from Hoover through Eisenhower. August presentation, measuring 8.75 x 12 reads: “Executive Mansion and The White House Office Friends of Lillian R. Parks extend congratulations and best wishes on the occasion of her retirement, December 23, 1933—February 29, 1960.” Boldly signed underneath by Dwight D. and Mamie Eisenhower, as well as 55 other friends and longtime White House backstairs employees, including: Viola Wise, Melvin Carter, Leroy Lyons, Janet Bowen, H. M. Hedges, Delores Moaney, Pearl Wiggins, Perry Nelson, Alton Shorey, Charles Ficklin, Walter Martin, Edgar Shipp, Nellie Butler, Rosa Woods, Clara Richardson, and many others of note. Framed, by the White House Carpenter’s Office, to an overall size of 11.25 x 14.5. In fine condition.

132 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


209 Dwight D. Eisenhower

1953 White House Staff Christmas Gift Print ESTIMATE: $300-$400 President Eisenhower’s limited edition 1953 Hallmark presidential White House staff gift Christmas print, 11.5 x 15.5, featuring a color 9.25 x 12 reproduction of Eisenhower’s painting of Abraham Lincoln, with a 3D white presidential seal affixed to the bottom border, as well as President Eisenhower’s preprinted signature. Card comes in its original presentation folder. In very good condition, with tape remnant to lower edge, trimmed top edge, small tack hole to top right, and scattered wear, soiling, and edge tears to folder. The President used a photograph of Lincoln done by Alexander Gardner in 1863, and a total of 516 of these 1953 Eisenhower gift prints were presented as gifts directly to White House staff members at the annual 1953 Christmas party. Few examples from this year survive, especially not in such fine condition.

Forwarding the first lady’s favorite casual portrait of Ike

to his longtime valet 210 Mamie Eisenhower

Autographed Letter Signed

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 ALS signed “Mrs. Eisenhower,” one page, 6.25 x 9, personal letterhead, December 9, 1970. Letter to the Eisenhower family’s trusted friend and longtime Ike valet, Sgt. John Moaney. In full: “I want to give you this picture of General Eisenhower in uniform—It is a wonderful informal likeness of him and you should have it as a remembrance of the many years you were to-gether.” Accompanied by the original 5 x 7 glossy photo of General Eisenhower in uniform, as well as the original transmittal envelope, addressed in Mamie’s hand. In fine condition, with scattered creases to photo, as well as mounting remnants to the reverse and a small tear to right edge. A beautiful combination that would display handsomely together.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 133


Great assortment of Mamie’s belongings, including fashion accessories, dinnerware, and a pack of her monogrammed cigarettes

211 Mamie Eisenhower

Collection of Fifteen Items

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Fine collection of 15 items, all personally-owned or given as gifts by the Eisenhowers: an elegant cut crystal perfume bottle personally-owned and -used by Mamie Eisenhower; a yellow and green flowered hat personally-owned and -worn by Mamie Eisenhower; an elegant hat personally-owned and -worn by Mamie Eisenhower; a colorful scarf given as a gift to Viola ‘Big Momma’ Wise by the first lady; a pair of large hand-crocheted brown earrings personally-owned and -worn by Mamie Eisenhower; an impressive purple fabric bow that adorned a gift given by Mrs. Eisenhower to Lillian Rogers Parks, which was hand-tied by the first lady herself; a colorful scarf given as a gift to White House maid Clara Richardson (a friend of Mr. Amyx) by the first lady; an unused pack of Mamie Doud Eisenhower’s Havana cigarettes given as a gift to Melvon O. Carter by President Eisenhower, embossed on each individual cigarette with her initials, “M. D. E.”; and various items personally-owned and -used by Mrs. Eisenhower at Gettysburg and given to Delores Moaney, including a set of three personalized ruby-colored glasses, a colorful woven tote bag, German porcelain mug, green cup and saucer, and elephant trunk letter opener. Includes letters of provenance from Delores Moaney, Lillian Rogers Parks, Mrs. Melvon O. Carter, and Viola ‘Big Momma’ Wise. In overall fine condition.

212 Mamie Eisenhower’s

Hats

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Two of First Lady Mamie Doud Eisenhower’s personally-owned and -worn hats. The first hat is made from four strips of champagnecolored mink, with a matching small veil, all stretched over a wire frame, with four strips of mauve-colored satin ribbon attached to the right side. Second hat is a black pillbox-style hat, with a black velvet ribbon and black veil in the front. Maker’s label inside reads, “Thorn—Phil. N. Y.” Both hats are accompanied by detailed 1982 letters of provenance on White House letterhead, by Lillian Rogers Parks. Mrs. Parks was presented both hats by the First Lady in 1960, shortly before leaving the White House. In fine condition. A symbolic representation of the care in which the first lady took to present herself to the public.

134 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


213 Queen Elizabeth II

White House Pencil Gift

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Rare and elegant royal sterling silver pencil holder given to White House maitre-de Charles Ficklin by Queen Elizabeth II during a 1957 visit to the president, measuring 3.25˝ long, handsomely engraved on the side with the Queen’s monogram, “ER,” beneath an impeccably detailed engraved royal crown. The silversmith’s hallmarks are stamped at the top of the elegant royal case, indicating that it was made by E. Baker & Son of Birmingham in 1954. The functional push-button top extends the pencil within, made by G. Rowney & Co. of England. Accompanied by the original royal case and two spare pencils. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from James Ficklin, the son of Charles. In part: “The sterling silver…mechanical pencil with burgundy leather presentation case and engraved ‘ER’ with crown, was given to my father, Charles Ficklin (1913–1977) who was Maitre de at the White House, by Queen Elizabeth, as a token of her appreciation during a visit to the White House. In his position as Maitre de, my father was well thought-of by many First Families as well as visiting dignitaries such as the Queen of England.” A rarely seen presentation piece from Queen Elizabeth II. In very fine condition.

214 Elvira Doud’s

Rosenstein Designer Lace Purse

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Elvira Doud’s personally-owned and -used Nettie Rosenstein designer purse, carried during Dwight D. Eisenhower’s first inauguration. Blue laced clutch purse, with a lace floral design is stamped inside, “Nettie Rosenstein,” and retains its compact mirror. Accompanied by a 1984 handwritten letter of provenance, written on a White House card, from White House employee Wilma Holness, which reads, in full: “The blue laced pocket book was worn or used by Mrs. Doud, the President’s mother-in-law during President Eisenhower’s first inauguration. I worked for the Eisenhowers eight years.” In fine condition. Rosenstein was one of the premiere designers from the 1920s to the 1960s, and was described by Life magazine as one of the most highly regarded American designers. Mostly renowned for her ‘little black dress’ and costume jewelry design, she also designed Mamie Doud Eisenhower’s dress for her husband’s 1953 inauguration. Rosenstein bags are considered quite collectible in their own right, even more so when paired with a notable owner. Condition is extra fine.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 135


JFK’s personal shaving kit,

recovered from his father’s embassy in London

216 John F. Kennedy’s

Shaving Kit

ESTIMATE: $10,000-$15,000

Gillette ‘Traveler’ shaving kit in a leather case, consisting of four “J. F. K.” monogrammed brass implements: a double-edge razor, two identical size round containers, one for powder and one to house a small brush (brush is present), and a small rectangular container for replacement blades. All the items are housed in their original form-fitting leather case lined in plush purple, measuring 3.75 x 5 x 1.75, embossed on the worn outer covering, “John F. Ke[nnedy]” Much of the gilt on the exterior letters has been worn away, and an area of surface loss has affected the rest of the surname, as well as a portion of JFK’s military rank.

HISTORY Accompanied by a very detailed, three-page letter of provenance to Raleigh DeGeer Amyx from a former US Air Force officer, stating that he was stationed in Europe from 1960–1964 and purchased the shaving kit in 1963 (prior to the assassination) from the estate of a man who was employed by the American embassy for many years on its maintenance staff, whose daughter recalled that he obtained the case from the disposable properties office at the embassy and used it as his own for a number of years. Once JFK was elected president, “her father had told her the case once or was believed to have been owned by the ‘new President’ of the United States, John F. Kennedy.” In examining the actual case and implements it is clear that statement is accurate. Joseph P. Kennedy, JFK’s father, had been the American ambassador to the UK from 1938–1940, and the future president visited frequently during those years; at some point, he must have left his shaving kit behind, allowing the embassy maintenance worker to acquire it. An exemplary, very personal JFK artifact, uncommonly and desirably tied to his early military career as Lieutenant John F. Kennedy. 136 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Personally-worn gold presidential cufflinks

218 John F. Kennedy’s

Presidential Seal Cuff Links

ESTIMATE: $3,000-$4,000 President Kennedy’s personally-owned and -worn gold-filled cufflinks featuring elegantly raised presidential seals, each engraved with his initials on the reverse, “J. F. K.” The swivel-bar type cufflinks also have the maker’s mark “R” and “10K” stamped into the reverse. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Toi Bachelder, a very well-known White House secretary, from FDR to LBJ, and personal secretary to JFK’s own Ted Sorenson. In part: “These gold-filled cuff links with a raised Presidential Seal was [sic] owned & used by President John F. Kennedy. He personally gave them to me. I was honored to be among the staff who accompanied JFK on his last European trip in June 1963.” Ms. Bachelder was aboard the presidential Air Force One as her boss, speech writer Ted Sorenson, needed her close at hand. An amazing set of custom-engraved and personally-worn presidential pieces of jewelry, given to a member of his inner circle. This impressive presidential relic is worthy of the most advanced collector.

219 John F. Kennedy

1961 Gift Lighter ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Gorgeous chrome Zippo lighter engraved on one side with the presidential seal and the president’s initials, “J. F. K.,” and “J. F. K., 1961” on the other. In fine condition. These scarce lighters were commissioned by JFK as gifts for his closest friends and advisors during his first year in the Oval Office. Condition is superior.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 137


220 John F. Kennedy’s

Wooden Cigar Box

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 President Kennedy’s personally-owned and -used wooden cigar box, measuring 8 x 4.5 x 2.5, featuring a colorful presidential seal emblem inlaid in the top and an engraved plaque on the front, reading: “John F. Kennedy, My Cigars, 1962.” The high quality box is constructed with dovetail-style joints and lined in cedar. Two Flor Extra Fina cigars remain inside. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Toi Bachelder, a White House secretary. In part: “The wooden box…was owned & used by John F. Kennedy and is so indicated by a silver plaque…This box came from the President’s upstairs White House quarters and came to me in late November 1963 via JFK’s close aide Ted Sorenson, whom I served as a secretary.” An impressive JFK relic perfect for display.

Monogrammed golf ball from the White House, used by President Kennedy on the South Lawn 221 John F. Kennedy’s

Golf Ball

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$4,000 President Kennedy’s personallyowned and -used personalized presidential golf ball, embossed in black type on opposing sides, “Mr. President” and “John F. Kennedy,” with the number “3” in red below. Another side is embossed in red, “Steel Center.” The ball exhibits general marks and discoloration with signs of use. Accompanied by a white golf tee embossed in black down the side, “President John F. Kennedy.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Melvon O. Carter, who had worked on the White House maintenance crew from the time of Presidents Hoover through Nixon. In part: “My husband, Melvon O. Carter…had worked for The White House from the time of President Herbert Hoover until President Richard Nixon…from time to time he would pick up the personal golf balls of Presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy on the South Lawn…The president used to practice his shots on the White House South Lawn. M. O. Carter picked up the golf ball after President Kennedy hit it while practicing his game.” Kennedy was a capable golfer, having played on Harvard University’s golf team—he was said to have once had a single-digit handicap, and is widely considered the best golfer to have served in the Oval Office. A wonderful, personally-used item from one of the president’s favorite pastimes.

138 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


223 Joseph P. Kennedy

Signed Calling Card

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 One of the Kennedy patriarch’s scarce personal calling cards, 3 x 1.5, signed in black ink, “With best wishes for a Happy Christmas & Bright New Year,” with Kennedy crossing out his printed first name, and signing underneath, “Joe.” In fine condition, with a couple slight brushes to sentiment. Of particular interest to the advanced Kennedy collector, as this format is exceedingly uncommon.

224 Jacqueline Kennedy

Autographed Letter Signed

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 ALS signed “Jacqueline Kennedy,” one page both sides, 5 x 3.5, black-bordered JFK mourning stationery letterhead, March 24, 1965. Letter to White House maitre-de, Charles Ficklin. In full: “I was so very sad to hear that you had not been well—and pray that you will be feeling better soon. We think of you all the time—and miss your smile— and the way you always made everything so happy and so easy—and so perfect. The children send their love.” In fine condition. Charles Ficklin had faithfully served the President and Mrs. Kennedy as White House maitre-de, developing a close relationship with the first lady.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 139


140 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


A thoughtful remembrance before leaving in sorrow: “You made our brief years here all the pride they were—and you served the President so well—How we will miss you”

225 Jacqueline Kennedy

Autographed Letter Signed

ESTIMATE: $3,000-$4,000

ALS signed “Jacqueline Kennedy,” one page on a 4.5 x 3.25 White House stationery card, no date. Note sent to the White House maitre-de, Charles Ficklin. In full: “For dear Charles—You made our brief years here all the pride they were—and you served the President so well—How we will miss you.” In fine condition. Attractively archivally suedematted and framed with a detailed descriptive plaque to an overall size of 18 x 27.25. In splendid condition. Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope. Ficklin served as a maitre-de at the White House from 1947 through 1967; all together, nine members of the Ficklin family were employed at the White House through the years, including his brothers John and Samuel, with each having been acquainted at some point with Raleigh DeGeer Amyx. After the assassination of President Kennedy, LBJ allowed Jacqueline to continue living at the White House until December 8, 1963, during which time she wrote a few of the most important staff members personal notes of gratitude—this being one example of her warm and heartfelt thanks to a White House career servant who had tirelessly served the Kennedy family during their “brief years” in the White House. As maitre-de, Charles Ficklin often interacted with Mrs. Kennedy, as it pertained to serving the needs of her family or guests, thus their warm relationship. A notable offering of historical significance.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 141


Viola

Wise

L

ongtime White House maid Viola ‘Big Momma’ Wise, who served the First Families from 1939 through 1981, was a close friend of Lillian Rogers Parks and another of Raleigh DeGeer Amyx’s contacts and source of presidential material. Although she worked at the White House from the time of Franklin D. Roosevelt through early in Ronald Reagan’s administration, her most memorable moments came with the Kennedy children. As a well-trusted maid, at times she was called upon to babysit, and in her letters she recalls John F. Kennedy, Jr., in particular: “At first he, like a lot of babies, was ‘ugly.’ I would hold him and say ‘John John you may be an ugly darlin baby but you are a millionaire and the President’s son too.’ It gave me joy to see the President lie on his back and hold ‘John John’ over his head and play with him.” Viola ‘Big Momma’ Wise was in close contact with Raleigh DeGeer Amyx and they spent many pleasant days together.


227 Caroline Kennedy’s

Dolls

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Collection of six of Caroline Kennedy’s personally-owned and -used baby dolls, ranging in size from 15˝ to 7.˝ Included are four poseable plastic dolls, with articulating arms and legs, and eyes that open and close; and one hard plastic doll with movable arms and legs, dressed in a hand-crocheted outfit. Each doll comes with an outfit, with four having missing footwear. Also included are two maid’s uniforms worn by long-time White House maid Viola ‘Big Momma’ Wise, who worked in the White House from 1939–1981, with a name tag tied to the uniform. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of authenticity, on White House letterhead, from Viola Wise, which reads, in part: “This collection of dolls was owned and used by Caroline Kennedy…Caroline loved to play with dolls…These that I have are what I call the ‘real’ dolls, and the ones she loved to play with…After some were overly used, they were discarded and several were given to me at the White House…Some of these dolls were given to me by Mrs. Kennedy, as she and the children prepared to vacate the White House after the tragic assassination of the beloved President.” Also accompanied by a color photo of Wise in her uniform, and a laser print copy of President John F. Kennedy looking at baby Caroline in her bassinet. In very good condition, with moderate soiling to the dolls and clothing. Although the Kennedy children already had a nurse named Maude Shaw, Viola Wise often stood in as back up, dressing, feeding, and caring for the children in addition to serving the first lady’s needs.

228 Caroline Kennedy’s

Dolls

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Collection of four of Caroline Kennedy’s personally-owned and -used baby dolls. Dolls are made from both hard and soft plastic, each with articulating arms and legs and eyes that open and close; and range in size from 14.5˝ to 19.˝ Each doll comes with a partial outfit, with three missing footwear. Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter of authenticity, on White House letterhead, from Viola ‘Big Momma’ Wise, which reads, in part: “This collection of dolls was owned and used by Caroline Kennedy… Caroline loved to play with dolls…These that I have are what I call the ‘real’ dolls, and the ones she loved to play with…After some were overly used, they were discarded and several were given to me at the White House…Some of these dolls were given to my by Mrs. Kennedy, as she and the children prepared to vacate the White House after the tragic assassination of the beloved President.” Also accompanied by an unsigned matte-finish 5 x 7 portrait of President and Mrs. Kennedy posing with Caroline. In very good overall condition, with expected wear and soiling. Although the Kennedy children already had a nurse named Maude Shaw, Viola Wise often stood in as back up, dressing, feeding, and caring for the children in addition to serving the first lady’s needs. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 143


229 John F. Kennedy, Jr.’s

Silk Baby Shorts

ESTIMATE: $3,000-$4,000 John F. Kennedy, Jr.’s personally-owned and -worn off-white silk shorts from when he was a baby, patriotically trimmed in red with a light blue waistband, measuring 13.5 x 9, handsomely embroidered at the bottom of the left leg in blue thread, “JFK Jr.” Mounted against a light blue mat and framed to an overall size of 18.75 x 14.5. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Viola Wise. In part: “The lovely silk shorts…were worn by John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr., as a baby…I used to baby sit ‘John John’ and feed him in these silk shorts from time to time. At first he, like a lot of babies, was ‘ugly.’ I would hold him and say ‘John John you may be an ugly darlin baby but you are a millionaire and the President’s son too.’...The President and Mrs. Kennedy gave me these silk shorts in the family quarters after ‘John John’ outgrew them. It was in the summer of 1963.” A truly notable, unique relic from the first family of Camelot worthy of the most discriminating of Kennedy collectors.

230 John F. Kennedy Jr.’s

Silver Teething Ring

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 The Kennedy family’s personally-owned blue plastic teething ring for John F. Kennedy, Jr., measuring 1.75˝ in diameter, featuring an attached sterling silver rattle handsomely engraved with the initials “J. F. K. Jr.” and details of his birth, including “Month: 11-25,” “Year: 1960,” “6 LBS. 8 OZ,” and an analog clock indicating the time of his birth as 12:22 AM. The ring exhibits some light bite marks and a few areas of the rattle are slightly tarnished. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from Lillian Rogers Parks. In part: “The sterling silver teething ring is engraved J. F. K. Jr., November 25, 1960, 6 lbs. 3 oz., 12:22 A.M. It has a light blue plastic ring attached…Viola Wise, my close friend, used to baby sit ‘John John’ and feed him from time to time...The President, John Fitzgerald Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy gave her this teething ring in the family quarters at the same time they gave her a pair of silk shorts also monogrammed J. F. K. Jr. This was in the summer of 1963…This teething ring was a personal possession of the President, First Lady and their son.” John F. Kennedy, Jr., was born just two weeks after Kennedy won the 1960 presidential election, and he became a national beloved child and the subject of some of the most iconic photos from the Kennedy era—notably, the image of him sitting under his father’s desk in the Oval Office, and the photograph of him saluting his father’s casket during the president’s funeral. This teething ring is a scarce artifact from John F. Kennedy, Jr.’s earliest years in the White House and representative of the nation’s perspective of the Kennedy family’s heir apparent as they watched him grow from a newborn baby to a young toddler. A Camelot relic of extreme interest to the advanced Kennedy collector.

144 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Exact replica of the Kennedy rocker,

custom-built by JFK’s White House upholsterer Larry Arata 231 John F. Kennedy

Official Replica Rocking Chair and Mourning Fabric

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$2,000 An exact replica of President John F. Kennedy’s iconic upholstered rocking chair, made by Larry and Norma Arata, the same couple who made Kennedy’s personal chair. Rocking chair measures approximately 43˝ tall, with the base measuring approximately 24˝ wide, and 33˝ from front to back, and is upholstered in the exact same material as Kennedy’s original. Made for Raleigh DeGeer Amyx in 1982, the back of the upholstery bears an Arata label which reads, “Larry Arata’s Custom Upholstery of the Kennedy Rocker,” as well as an engraved brass plaque which reads: “Exact copy of authentic custom upholstered President John F. Kennedy’s rocker crafted for him by Lawrence J. Arata, White House staff, and duplicated for Raleigh and Hilda Amyx, Nov. 22, 1982.” President Kennedy frequently used this style of rocking chair to alleviate his chronic back pain. He had additional rockers for his homes and Camp David, and would travel with the chair on Air Force One. Also included is a 14 x 13 swatch of black cambric, which was leftover material used to drape the East Room of the White House after the assassination of President Kennedy. Material is accompanied by a detailed 1983 letter of provenance on White House letterhead from White House staff members Larry and Norma Arata. Letter reads, in part: “It is with sadness I present to you a piece of black cambric…which was leftover from the material used in the East Room immediately following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy…When the assassination occurred, Mrs. Kennedy…requested that the exterior and interior of the White House be decorated as closely as possible to the way it was when President Lincoln lay in state in the East Room in 1865…We draped the black cambric over the fireplaces, drapes, chandeliers, mantel pieces, windows, the White House exterior and the area in which our beloved President would lie in state. We worked all night and up BLACK MOURNING CAMBRIC until 4:30 am on Nov. 23, 1963. At that moment a dramatic event took place…The First Lady entered the room with Robert Kennedy, the Attorney General, by her side. There were no more than a dozen people in the East Room as the President’s body arrived…The rest is history.” Accompanied by a color photo of Norma Arata seated in the rocker with black cambric material in her lap, and a photo of Kennedy’s casket being placed in the East Room of the White House. The Arata’s were close to the Kennedys, with Larry Arata having been specifically brought to the White House at the behest of the first lady. After JFK’s assassination, both Arata’s were in the East Room of the White House when Mrs. Kennedy entered in the middle of the night, still wearing her blood stained clothing, to kneel at the side of her husband’s coffin for the very first time. A one-of-a-kind replica of Kennedy’s instantly-recognizable chair, as well as material readied for that somber day in November of 1963—all in all, a heart gripping dual offering.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 145


Swatches from the assassination limousine’s leather interior

232 John F. Kennedy

Leather from Dallas Limo

ESTIMATE: $8,000-$10,000

Two swatches of light and dark blue seat leather from the limousine Kennedy was riding in at the time of his assassination, measuring approximately 4.5 x 3 and 4.5 x 2.5. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from F. Vaughn Ferguson, a technical service representative at the White House whose primary responsibility was the care of the presidential limousine. Important to note that only Mr. Ferguson was permitted continual hands on contact with the 1963 presidential limousine after the tragic assassination of our president. In part: “The leather, light blue and dark blue, is from the automobile in which John F. Kennedy, President of the United States, was Assassinated in, on November 22 1963. Four days after the Assassination the White House upholsterer and I removed this leather at the White House. The light blue leather is from the center of the rear seat. The dark blue leather is from the border of the rear seat. The spots on the leather are the dried blood of our beloved President, John F. Kennedy.” Ferguson was able to retain the removed leather sections, and then the presidential limousine was sent to a Cincinnati firm for refitting and a security upgrade. Mr. Ferguson retained a close relationship with Raleigh DeGeer Amyx over the course of many years, they often spent time visiting at one another’s homes, allowing the gathering of a significant amount of historical information to accompany this relic. A desirable set of both types of leather upholstery in the 1961 Lincoln Continental X-100 presidential limousine and a poignant, historic reminder of that fateful November day. An iconic and seminal offering, related to the final moments of our martyred president’s life.

146 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Used to sign one of the most important acts of our time— the 1964 Civil Rights Act

234 Lyndon B. Johnson’s

Civil Rights Act Bill Signing Pen

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 Official dipping pen of immense historical importance, used by President Johnson to sign the Civil Rights Act into law on July 2, 1964. The presidential Esterbrook pen measures 6.25˝ long and features a black plastic grip with a Lucite handle imprinted with “The President—The White House.” Includes an official typed statement describing the act and a White House card bearing a calligraphic description of the pen. An actual pen used by the president for such an iconic piece of legislation is expected to have just such an official typed inclusion within the tan presentation box. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, was one of the first in attendance to receive such an official pen from LBJ. Prior to his assassination, President Kennedy had called for legislation to end racial discrimination and segregation in public accommodations, public education, and federally assisted programs. Shortly after his death, President Johnson urged Congress to honor his memory by passing such an act, declaring, ‘We have talked long enough in this country about equal rights. We have talked for one hundred years or more. It is time now to write the next chapter, and to write it in the books of law.’ His appeal was successful and manifested itself in HR 7152, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a landmark piece of legislation that banned segregation and racial discrimination, while guaranteeing equal job opportunities. The tremendous sociopolitical impact made the Civil Rights Act a crowning achievement of the 1960s Democrats and one of the most important laws passed in the 20th century. An epochal offering of a rarely seen official bill signer pen used by LBJ on that historic day in civil rights history.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 147


Used by LBJ to establish an international FDR memorial 235 Lyndon B. Johnson’s

Campobello Treaty Bill Signing Pen

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Historic dipping pen used by President Johnson to sign the Roosevelt Campobello International Park Agreement on January 22, 1964. This official bill signer Esterbrook pen measures 6.25˝ long and features a black plastic grip with a Lucite handle imprinted with “The President—The White House.” Includes eight pages from well-known White House secretary Toi Bachelder’s 1964 calendar book for the month of January 1964, noting daily events and happenings. The entry of January 22, in part: “The P & PM Lester Pearson signed the Campobello Roosevelt Memorial Park Treaty in the Treaty Rm…The P personally gave me one of the pens he used signing it said ‘Here Toi—you of all people ought to have one of these’ & gave one to Grace [Tully] too.” Also accompanied by a handwritten letter from Raleigh DeGeer Amyx, describing Toi Bachelder’s relationship with FDR. Roosevelt Campobello International Park, located in New Brunswick off the coast of Maine, preserves the house and surrounding landscape of the Roosevelt family’s summer retreat where FDR was stricken with polio in 1921. The Roosevelt Park was established via this international treaty between the US and Canada as a joint venture funded by both nations. A truly consequential presidential bill signer pen with historic notes from the commander-in-chief’s chosen recipient.

236 Lyndon B. Johnson

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 Exceptional color matte-finish 9.75 x 13 photo of Lyndon B. Johnson in his ornate office when serving as Senate Majority Leader, affixed to a 10.5 x 15.5 mount, signed and inscribed on the mount in blue ballpoint, “To Alice & Ed—With my love, Lyndon B. Johnson.” Matted and framed to an overall size of 15 x 21. In fine condition. Alice was an LBJ staff member from the earliest part of his illustrious career. This magnificent image was originally captured by renowned portrait photographer Arnold Newman on June 12, 1953. A most unusually large format.

148 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


237 Lyndon B. Johnson

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Color semi-glossy 7.5 x 9.5 photo of Johnson in the White House, affixed to a 12 x 15 mount, signed and inscribed on the mount in black ink, as president, “To Toi Bachelder, who knows the White House better than any of us, with appreciation of her friend—Lyndon B. Johnson.” Bachelder joined the White House staff following the inauguration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933 and continued working there for Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson before retiring in 1967. President Johnson was so impressed with her service, particularly as a member of FDR’s inner circle, that he gave a private retirement party for her in the White House. Framed to an overall size of 13.5 x 16.5. In fine condition, with a few light creases and ripples to edges of photo (due to adhesive on reverse), and a vertical separation to top edge of mount.

238 Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Rare color satin-finish 11.5 x 8 photo of the Johnson family, including Luci Johnson Nugent and husband Patrick and Lynda Johnson Robb and her husband, with Luci’s son sitting on Lyndon’s lap, affixed to a 13.5 x 11 mount, boldly signed and inscribed in black ink on the mount to 30-year White House maid Viola ‘Big Momma’ Wise, as president, “For Viola Wise—with the appreciation and best wishes of all our family—Lady Bird Johnson, Merry Christmas! 1968,” and “and Lyndon Johnson.” Very nicely framed to an overall size of 14.75 x 12. In fine condition. In Mary Evans Seeley’s book Season’s Greetings from the White House, Lady Bird Johnson was quoted as saying of the 1968 holiday season, “That Christmas, our last at the White House and in Washington, was a glorious chapter in our lives...so many changes had taken place while we lived there.” An unusual format since President Johnson presented these personally signed Christmas gifts on a limited basis to White House staff.

239 Lyndon B. Johnson

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Color 9.25 x 7.5 photo of Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson in the White House with their two daughters, affixed to a 13.75 x 11 mount, signed and inscribed on the mount in fountain pen, as president, to 30-year White House maid Viola ‘Big Momma’ Wise, “To Viola Wise—with best wishes, Lyndon B. Johnson.” Framed to an overall size of 15 x 12. In fine condition. ‘Big Momma’s huge personality was so beloved that the first families preferred to keep her close at hand.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 149


240 Lyndon B. Johnson

White House Staff Christmas Gift Prints

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Two impressive original oversized Hallmark presidential White House staff Christmas gift prints. One from 1965 features a work by artist Robert Laessig, entitled ‘Winter at the White House,’ bearing a pre-printed signature and sentiment from Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson. The president’s gift presentation folder is not included. Second gift print is from 1966 and features a different work from Laessig, depicting the North Portico of the White House and the American elm planted by President Woodrow Wilson in 1913, with a preprinted Christmas sentiment which reads, “Our warmest best wishes for a joyous holiday season and a bright and peaceful new year—Lyndon Johnson—Lady Bird Johnson 1966.” Presidential Christmas gift is housed in its original folder and is accompanied by its seldom-seen parchment scroll providing historical background to the artwork. This White House staff gift print is also accompanied by its original envelope, complete with gold foil seal and blue ribbon. In very good condition, with scattered toning and foxing, as well as some mild rippling.

241 Lyndon B. Johnson

White House Staff Christmas Gift Prints

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Three original oversized Hallmark presidential White House staff Christmas gift prints. Two from 1964, featuring a work by artist Robert Laessig, which pictures a great oak tree in front of the White House with two young girls and dogs playing in the front yard (to represent his own daughters and beagles), each bearing a pre-printed signature and sentiment from Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson, and each being accompanied by the original parchment scroll, providing historical background to the artwork; and one from 1966 and featuring a different work from Laessig, depicting the North Portico of the White House and the American elm planted by President Woodrow Wilson in 1913, with a pre-printed Christmas sentiment which reads, “Our warmest best wishes for a joyous holiday season and a bright and peaceful new year—Lyndon Johnson—Lady Bird Johnson 1966.” One of the 1964 presidential staff Christmas gifts is also accompanied by its original envelope. All in fine condition.

242 Lyndon B. Johnson’s

Cigar Box

ESTIMATE: $500-$1,000 President Johnson’s personally-owned and -used wooden cigar box, measuring 10.25 x 7.25 x 2.25, constructed primarily of light wood with dark accents on the sides, engraved on the top in fine script, “President Johnson.” As would be expected, the wood is of superior, firstclass quality. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Toi Bachelder, a White House secretary and member of FDR’s inner circle. In part: “The wooden cigar box imprinted ‘President Johnson’ was owned and used by him…I met FDR when I was 14 and began my White House service as a secretary in 1933. When I retired in 1967, President Johnson held a private reception for me in the Cabinet Room and the Oval Office.” In excellent condition.

150 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


243 Lyndon B. Johnson’s

Crystal Ashtray

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Lovely crystal ashtray with a ‘clam shell’ shape, the edges gently sloping downward into a single cigarette holder, etched with a presidential seal on the exterior and President Johnson’s facsimile signature on the bottom. In excellent condition.

244 Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson’s

Pair of Table Lighters

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Matching pair of silver-plated table lighters personallyowned and -used by Lyndon and Lady Byrd Johnson, measuring 3 x 2.25 x 1.75, manufactured by Ronson, one engraved “Lyndon” on the top and the other engraved “Lady Bird.” President Johnson’s lighter is a dark metallic gray, and Lady Bird’s is decorated in worn and faded pink paint. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Melvon O. Carter, who had worked on the White House maintenance crew from the time of Presidents Hoover through Nixon. During Mr. Carter’s over 40 years of White House service, he was often in close proximity to the first family and was called upon for a variety of tasks. In part: “The pair of silver plated table lighters were owned by President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady (Lady Bird) Johnson. They were given to my husband by the First Lady shortly before they left the White House in December 1968…Each silver plated lighter is engraved. One says Lyndon and the other says, Lady Bird...These are personal possessions of the President and First Lady.”

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 151


245 Lyndon B. Johnson

Gift Lighter

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Attractive chrome Zippo presidential gift lighter handsomely engraved with a gold presidential seal and President Johnson’s facsimile signature. In excellent condition. Accompanied by the very scarce original Zippo presentation box.

246 Lyndon B. Johnson’s

Blue Leather Box

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 President Johnson’s superior quality personally-owned and -used handsome blue leather box, measuring 5.5 x 4.25 x 1.25, lined with soft navy fabric inside, gilt-stamped on the top with his initials, “L. B. J.” Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Toi Bachelder, a White House secretary. In part: “This blue leather box imprinted in gold letters, ‘L.B.J.’ was owned and used by President Lyndon Johnson. It…is outlined around the edge with a gold design. I began service at the White House in 1933, with FDR, and I retired in 1967. President Johnson held a private reception for me in the Cabinet Room and the Oval Office.” Condition is rather impeccable.

247 Lyndon B. Johnson’s

Glass Paperweight

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Impressive glass paperweight, measuring 4˝ in diameter and 1.5˝ tall, featuring a large presidential seal engraved in the center with President Johnson’s facsimile signature etched below. In fine condition.

152 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


248 Lyndon B. Johnson’s

Paperweight and Stamp Dispenser

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Two items from LBJ’s desk: a paperweight made by L. G. Balfour, 3 x 2 x 1.5, featuring a lovely white marble base adorned on top with golden hands clasped in a handshake; and a cylindrical brass postage stamp dispenser, measuring 2.5˝ tall atop a 3˝ diameter base. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Melvon O. Carter. In part: “These desk items were given to my husband by President Lyndon Johnson. One is a stamp dispenser and the other is a heavy paper weight…He was a generous and jovial man who often liked to give gifts or personal items to favored staff members.”

249 Lyndon B. Johnson’s

Burgundy Striped Tie

ESTIMATE: $500-$700 President Johnson’s personally-owned striped burgundy silk neck tie with dark stripes, made by Bronzoni, measuring 53.5˝ long. The tie bears a Bronzoni maker’s stamp inside the thick end and a Reynolds Penland retailer’s tag sewn above. Reynolds Penland was a high-end menswear shop with locations throughout Texas, Johnson’s home state. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Melvon O. Carter, who had worked on the White House maintenance crew from the time of Presidents Hoover through Nixon. During Mr. Carter’s over 40 years of White House service, he was often in close proximity to the first family and was called upon for a variety of tasks. In part: “This tie was given to my husband by President Lyndon B. Johnson…One day my husband was on an errand in the President’s living quarters and the President handed him this tie and asked if he would like to have it. My husband was honored and assured the President he would wear it to church. However, he never did, and kept it packed away for fear he might cause damage to this personal gift from the President.” In impeccable condition.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 153


250 Lyndon B. Johnson’s

White Tie

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 President Johnson’s personally-owned narrow white neck tie artistically monogrammed on the front with Johnson’s initials, “LBJ,” measuring 53˝ long. A small tag reading “Simones, Dallas,” is sewn inside the narrow end. Scattered staining throughout, otherwise fine condition. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Melvon O. Carter. In part: “This tie was given to my husband by President Lyndon B. Johnson. One day my husband was in his bedroom at the White House checking on the repair of one of his many TV sets when the President handed it to him asking if he would like to have it…The tie has the initials LBJ on the front in black…Since this tie was owned by President Johnson it should be appropriately preserved.”

251 Lyndon B. Johnson’s

Handkerchief

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 President Johnson’s personally-owned and -used simple offwhite linen handkerchief, folded to an overall size of 4.25 x 4.25, expertly embroidered in the corner in dark thread, “Lyndon B. Johnson.” Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from White House maid Wilma Holness. In part: “The fine white linen handkerchief with the full name of Lyndon B. Johnson was owned and used by him.” Also accompanied by a photo of Wilma Holness with the handkerchief. Condition is excellent.

252 Lyndon B. Johnson’s

Metallic Eagle Wings

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Unusual embroidered patch made of intricate metallic threads with beaded adornments, in the design of an eagle holding a crest in its talons with the president’s initials in the center, “LBJ.” The reverse bears a pin clasp to be worn as a badge. Some fading and light soiling to portions, otherwise fine condition.

154 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Super rare White House podium presidential seal 253 Richard Nixon’s

Official Presidential Seal

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 Vibrantly-colored White House podium presidential seal from Richard Nixon’s administration. Hand-painted fiberglass and resin seal measures 15.5˝ in diameter, with “Seal of the President of the United States,” in raised letters around the outside, with the eagle and shield in the center. In fine, bright condition. These authentic seals are rarely made available to the public, as they are kept under close guard by the Secret Service, and brought out only when needed. Though the market is rife with reproductions, a firsthand look and feel of this example confirms its authenticity. We are proud to offer this rare official example, obtained directly from a retired Secret Service agent.

From the USS Sequoia presidential yacht, the unique official flag of the executive office 254 Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy

Sequoia Flag

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 Official flag from the USS Sequoia presidential yacht featuring Seal of the President of the United States, measuring 17.5 x 11.5, depicting the traditional bald eagle with a patriotic shield on its chest, clutching an olive branch and bundle of arrows in its talons, with the motto “E Pluribus Unum” printed in black lettering on a banner clenched in its beak, encircled by 50 stars representing each state. The flag’s body is a deep navy blue canvas and the hoist end is a reinforced off-white canvas with brass grommets in both corners. Handsomely mounted and matted above a small engraved plaque reading, “Presented by President Richard Nixon,” to an overall size of 24 x 19. Includes a letter of provenance from Amyx, in part: “This beautiful flag depicting the Presidential Seal…is from the Presidential Yacht, the Sequoia.” A profound piece of American history deserving the attention of a discriminating collector or institution.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 155


156 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Incredibly rare hand-embroidered White House flag, used inside over four different administrations 255 Richard Nixon’s

Presidential Flag

ESTIMATE: $20,000-$25,000 Very rare and impressive hand-made official presidential flag, of the most detailed handcrafted quality, used in the White House during Richard Nixon’s presidential administration. Beautiful double-sided (two completely identical and exquisite hand-sewn panels were affixed back-to-back) rayon flag measures 4´ x 3, with silver and gold metallic fringe around the edges, and an incredibly detailed presidential seal hand-embroidered on both sides. Inside sleeve of the flag bears a typed label which reads, “Flag Individual President / Rayon w/fringe 3´ x 4´ / Contract No. 6109-72 / 8345-570-9887 / DPSC Dir of Mfg,” and labeled in blue ink, “11/18/72,” indicating the flag was delivered to the White House on November 18, 1972. As required, there are soft leather loops hidden within the sleeves and either end. In very fine condition. Accompanied by a flag stand and cords with tassels for display. This flag was in service at the White House for presidents Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan, before being acquired as part of the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection in 1985. Comes from a longtime White House staffer with ties to the NSC. A nearly impossible to acquire White House artifact—seldom is such an exceptional example of presidential history offered.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 157


Exceptionally desirable official White House engraving

symbolizing Watergate’s upheaval of America’s highest office

256 Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford

Signed White House Vignette

ESTIMATE: $2,500-$3,000 Superb engraved vignette portrait of the exterior of the White House produced by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, 7.5 x 5.75, signed below the image in black felt tip, “Richard Nixon, 1-20-69–8-9-74” and “Gerald R. Ford, 8/9/74–1/20/77.” Nicely archivally hand-wrapped silk matted and framed with a photo and nameplate to an overall size of 16 x 28. In fine condition. To actually see in Richard Nixon’s hand, “8-9-74,” his last day of serving as our president is surprising and significant. A scarce combination highlighted by the most unusual inclusion of their dates in office, representing the transition of power amidst one of the greatest political scandals in American history.

257 Richard Nixon

White House Christmas Gift Prints

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Two original White House Hallmark Christmas presidential gift prints from the Nixons. One from 1969 featuring a reproduction of Gilbert Stuart’s famous portrait of George Washington; and one from 1973 featuring Samuel F. B. Morse’s portrait of James Monroe. Both are presented in red velour folders and accompanied by a gold-inscribed parchment cover sheet describing the portrait, and come with their original envelopes. In fine condition. President Nixon was the only president to give his staff gift prints housed in velour covers. 158 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Desk piece from the White House, dated for Nixon’s full second term

258 Richard Nixon’s

Silver Elephant

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 Imposing elephant desk piece or bookend. Silver colored Asian elephant bookend measures approximately 10˝ from trunk to tail and stands on a 4 x 8 black marble or granite base. An engraved presentation plaque on the base reads: “Richard M. Nixon—President of The United States—January 20, 1969 to January 20, 1977.” Accompanied by a detailed 1982 letter on White House letterhead from former 30 year White House maid Viola ‘Big Momma’ Wise, which reads, in part: “President Richard M. Nixon had a personal collection of gavels and elephants in the White House. I ought to know. I helped keep them clean. This fine piece was a gift to me from Patricia Nixon…Shortly before President Nixon’s resignation over Watergate she gave me this in her bedroom. At the time I did not think about the significance of the date inscribed upon it. Later, I thought Mrs. Nixon did, since it was engraved January 20, 1977. She gave it to me at the end of July or the beginning of August 1974…She simply said, ‘Viola, you have served the White House for a long time. I thought you might like to have this’…This is a personal possession of President Nixon’s.” In very fine condition. A unique and curious White House artifact from President Nixon’s own elephant collection. Rare as few items are seen listing Nixon’s two complete terms as Chief Executive.

259 Richard Nixon’s

Golf Ball

ESTIMATE: $500-$700 President Nixon’s personally-owned and -used personalized Titleist golf ball, embossed in black type on one side, “Dick Nixon.” It also bears manufacturer’s marks that read “Titleist,” “8,” and “Acushnet DT.” The ball exhibits general marks and discoloration with signs of use. Accompanied by a navy blue golf tee embossed in yellow down the side, “Richard Nixon.” Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Melvon O. Carter. In part: “My husband, Melvon O. Carter… had worked for The White House from the time of President Herbert Hoover until President Richard Nixon…The President Richard Nixon golf ball is not a presentation golf ball. It was a personal golf ball owned and used by President Nixon while practicing his game on the White House South Lawn. M. O. Carter picked it up after the President hit it. The golf ball is marked Dick Nixon in black.” Hampered by both a lack of talent and little experience, Nixon had not taken up golf until he was vice president, as a way to spend more time with his ‘boss,’ the avid golfer Dwight D. Eisenhower. An uncommon presidential golf ball and tee ensemble. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 159


260 Richard Nixon’s

Golf Ball

ESTIMATE: $500-$700 President Nixon’s personallyowned and -used personalized Spalding golf ball, embossed in black type on one side, “President Nixon.” It also bears manufacturer’s marks that read “Spalding-90” and “2 Dot.” The ball exhibits a few general marks with signs of use. Accompanied by the original Spalding box. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Melvon O. Carter. In part: “My husband, Melvon O. Carter…had served at the White House from the time of President Herbert Hoover in 1932 until President Richard M. Nixon…This President Richard Nixon golf ball is not a presentation or gift golf ball. It is a personal golf ball owned and used by President Nixon while practicing his game on the South Lawn.” Hampered by both a lack of talent and little experience, Nixon had not taken up golf until he was vice president, as a way to spend more time with his ‘boss,’ the avid golfer Dwight D. Eisenhower. Well-documented personal golf balls belonging to presidents are highly coveted by advanced collectors.

261 Richard Nixon’s

Golf Ball

ESTIMATE: $500-$700 President Nixon’s personally-owned and -used personalized Spalding golf ball, embossed in italicized black type on one side, “President Nixon.” It also bears manufacturer’s marks that read “Spalding,” “Top-Flite,” and “2.” The ball exhibits general marks and discoloration with signs of use. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the wife of Melvon O. Carter. In part: “My husband, Melvon O. Carter…had served at the White House from the time of President Herbert Hoover in 1932 until President Richard M. Nixon…This President Richard Nixon golf ball is not a presentation or gift golf ball. It is a personal ball owned and used by President Nixon while practicing his game on the South Lawn…According to my husband, President Nixon was not the most graceful or coordinated golfer in Presidential history. President Eisenhower was better and loved the game, but President John F. Kennedy was a much better golfer, despite his bad back. M. O. only judged athletic ability. He did not make judgments concerning Presidential greatness.” Hampered by both a lack of talent and little experience, Nixon had not taken up golf until he was vice president, as a way to spend more time with his ‘boss,’ the avid golfer Dwight D. Eisenhower. Well-documented personal golf balls belonging to presidents are highly coveted by advanced collectors.

160 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


262

Executive Protective Service Badge

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Very scarce official Executive Protective Service officer badge, measuring 2.5 x 2.75, featuring a raised patriotic eagle emblem against a blue enamel background near the top and an image of the White House raised in low relief on the main body. Reverse bears the engraved serial number 150 and a Blackinton manufacturer’s stamp. Historically desirable, this is actually an early uniform division secret service badge. The low #150 serial number indicates its use when the executive protective officers were known by that designation instead of the now more commonly known secret service uniform division.

263

White House Weddings:

Patricia Nixon and Lynda Johnson ESTIMATE: $200-$400 A desirable collection of items from two White House weddings: five programs, three heart-shaped box wedding favors, and three small bags of rice from the wedding of Lynda Bird Johnson and Charles S. Robb; a signed photo of Lynda Bird Johnson and Charles S. Robb; and two photos, two programs, two wedding favors, and two bags of rice from the wedding of Tricia Nixon and Edward F. Cox. Also included are: an official White House photo of Gerald Ford and his extended family, an official marriage congratulations card from Vice President and Mrs. Ford, a 1915 wedding invitation for President Wilson’s marriage to Edith Bolling Galt, and an invitation for President Wilson’s daughter Eleanor’s 1914 wedding. These scarce White House programs were meant for invited guests and family members only. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 161


264 Gerald Ford’s

Podium Seal

ESTIMATE: $500-$700 Expertly hand-painted vice-presidential seal used on Vice President Ford’s podium prior to his becoming president after Nixon’s resignation in 1974. The seal measures 7.75˝ in diameter and features the traditional patriotic bald eagle in high relief, holding an olive branch and arrow in its talons, encircled by 13 raised blue stars. The rim is painted in gold and navy blue, with raised white lettering, “Vice President of the United States.” The seal has been archivally set into a soft cloth mat and framed with a nameplate to an overall size of 15 x 17. Includes a letter of provenance written by Raleigh DeGeer Amyx many years ago, in part: “This framed Vice Presidential Seal was used on the speakers podium of Vice President Gerald P. Ford prior to his becoming President in 1974. It was presented to a White House staff member, Richard E. King, shortly after Mr. Ford became President…The Vice Presidential Seal represents the original [vice presidential] design which was not used in following Administrations.” Condition is flawless.

265 Gerald Ford’s

Vice Presidential Glasses

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Collection of 15 cocktail glasses prepared for Vice President Gerald Ford. Collection consists of: seven highball glasses, each approximately 5.5˝ high, each with an ‘old style’ gold vice presidential seal and hand-etched “Gerald R. Ford”; and eight rocks glasses, each approximately 3˝ tall, also with the ‘old style’ gold vice presidential seal, and hand etched “G. R. F.” Accompanied by a letter of provenance from Raleigh DeGeer Amyx, which reads, in part: “This assortment of glasses…came to my collection from a long-time White House employee, Wilma H. Holness.” In fine condition.

266 Gerald Ford’s

Air Force One Ashtray

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Impressive metal ashtray from President Ford’s Air Force One, featuring two cigarette-holder indentations around the edges and an eagle seal raised in relief in the center, with raised lettering around the rim, “Air Force One, Gerald R. Ford.” The circular ashtray measures 7.75˝ in diameter and 1˝ tall, constructed of a silver-colored cast metal with alternating polished and matte-finish surfaces, and is covered by thin cork on the base to prevent skidding. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Larry Branscum, a White House NSC staffer.

162 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


267 Gerald Ford

Signed Broadside

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Scarce limited edition color 18.5 x 13.5 lithograph broadside, numbered 7/175, bearing President Gerald Ford’s August 9, 1974, Oath of Office and remarks to the American public, as well as a color image of President Ford, boldly signed in blue felt tip, “Gerald R. Ford.” Gorgeously double-matted and framed to an overall size of 27 x 22. In excellent condition. At 12:03 pm on August 9, 1974, just a half hour after President Nixon’s resignation was made official, Gerald R. Ford took the oath of office in the East Room of the White House, becoming the first president to ever assume the position without being elected. Interestingly, Ford is the only president to have authorized a broadside like this for such a momentous occasion.

269 Gerald Ford

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Official White House color satin-finish 10 x 8 photo of Gerald and Betty Ford posing in the Oval Office, boldly signed in black felt tip, on his first day as president, “Gerald R. Ford, Aug 9, 1974.” In fine condition, with a tiny small surface impression to the very bottom edge. A lesser-seen example with a presidential date of historic note.

270 Gerald and Betty Ford

Signed Photograph

268 Gerald Ford and George Bush

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,200 Color glossy 9 x 7.5 photo of President Ford meeting with future president George Bush in the Oval Office, signed in the lower border in black felt tip, “Best wishes, Gerald Ford, 8/17/74” and “I loved this office! Happy birthday! George Bush.” Gorgeously archivally cloth-matted and framed with a descriptive plaque to an overall size of 19 x 24. In excellent condition. At the time, Bush was unaware that the office he loved would soon be his own. A historical forecasting and most unusual example.

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Color satin-finish 7.25 x 7 photo of Gerald and Betty Ford, affixed to a 10.5 x 13.5 mount, inscribed on the mount in a calligrapher’s hand to 30-year White House maid Viola Wise, “To Viola Wise, with deep appreciation for your dedicated service to our family,” and signed underneath, as president, “Jerry Ford,” and “Betty Ford.” Framed to an overall size of 12 x 15. In fine condition, with Gerald’s signature slightly faded, but still completely legible.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 163


272 Gerald Ford’s

Golf Ball

271 Gerald Ford’s

Green Tie

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 President Ford’s personally-owned green pure silk neck tie with a handsome white stars and circles design, lined in off-white silk, made by Cecil Gee of London, measuring 52˝ long. The high quality tie bears Cecil Gee and “Made in Italy” tags sewn inside the thick end. Includes a 1982 letter of provenance on embossed letterhead from the office of Gerald R. Ford, signed by President Ford’s senior staff assistant Lee F. Simmons, in part: “Thank you, on behalf of President Ford, for your letter requesting an item for your fundraising event. President Ford is always pleased to be of assistance with projects such as yours and has asked me to forward the enclosed tie along with his best wishes.”

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 President Ford’s personally-owned and -used personalized Titleist golf ball, embossed in black type on one side, “Gerald Ford.” It also bears manufacturer’s marks that read “Titleist,” “7,” and “Acushnet DT.” The ball exhibits general marks and a large crack, consistent with use by the president. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Raleigh DeGeer Amyx. In full: “This golf ball was presented to me on the 10th anniversary of President Gerald R. Ford becoming president of the United States. It was used and cut (while playing golf) by the president. He used this Titleist 7 ball inscribed with his name at the Congressional Country Club while president.” Ford was one of the most athletic presidents to ever take office, owing to his days as a star player on the University of Michigan football squad.

273 Gerald Ford

White House Staff Christmas Gift Prints

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Five attractive official oversized Hallmark presidential White House staff Christmas gift prints, presented by the Fords to White House staff members, two from 1975, titled ‘Farmyard in Winter,’ featuring artwork by George Durrie; and three from 1976, titled ‘Philadelphia in 1858,’ featuring artwork by Ferdinand Richardt, with a pre-printed Christmas message from the Fords. All five presidential White House staff Christmas gift prints are accompanied by their original envelopes, one presented to White House staff member Clara Richardson, a friend of Mr. Amyx. All in fine condition.

164 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


274 Gerald Ford

White House Staff Christmas Gift Prints

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Three historic examples of official oversized Hallmark presidential White House staff Christmas gift prints, from the Fords, 1974–1976, two featuring artwork by George Durrie and one featuring a work by Ferdinand Richardt. George Durrie created the 1974 and 1975 presidential gift prints, titled ‘New England Snow Scene’ and ‘Farmland in Winter,’ respectively; 1976’s print by Ferdinand Richardt was titled ‘Philadelphia in 1858,’ a reproduction of the painting of the same name which hung in the Green Room. Each with a pre-printed Christmas sentiment from the Fords in the lower border. The 1974 presidential Christmas staff gift comes in its original envelope, presented to White House staff member Clara Richardson, a friend of Mr. Amyx. All in fine condition.

276 Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Official White House color satin-finish 8 x 10 photo of the Carters in the White House, boldly signed in black felt tip, as president, “Jimmy Carter 5/78,” and “Rosalynn Carter.” In very fine condition. A splendid display piece signed as president.

275 Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Color satin-finish 8 x 10 photo of the Fords posing with White House maid Viola Wise, signed and inscribed in the lower border in black felt tip, as president, “For Viola Wise, Best wishes—Rosalynn Carter,” and “Jimmy Carter.” Framed to an overall size of 9 x 11. In fine condition. Miss Wise was closely associated with Raleigh DeGeer Amyx and instrumental in assisting him on his quest to amass a major presidential collection.

277 Jimmy Carter

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Official White House color satin-finish 8 x 10 photo, boldly signed in black felt tip, as president, “Jimmy Carter, Summer 1978.” In very fine condition. A thoughtful and very uncommon notation by the incumbent president.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 165


278 Jimmy Carter

Signed Photograph

279 Jimmy Carter

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $200-$300

ESTIMATE: $200-$300

Official White House color satin-finish 10 x 8 photo of President Carter greeting the Apollo 11 astronauts at the White House, boldly signed in the lower border in black felt tip as the incumbent president, “Best wishes, Jimmy Carter 7/79.” In very fine condition. A notably unique display piece.

Official White House color satin-finish 10 x 8 photo of President Carter speaking at a podium, boldly signed in black felt tip, as president and dated as such, “Jimmy Carter 1979.” In very fine condition. An unusual presidential pose, not often seen.

280 Jimmy Carter

Secret Service ID Badge

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Scarce, quality manufactured Secret Service guest badge #209 issued during the administration of President Jimmy Carter, measuring 1˝ in diameter, featuring a raised gold presidential seal in the center surrounded by a green enamel border emblazoned with the words “Presidential Guest.” Includes a letter of provenance a White House card from NSC staffer Larry Branscum. In part: “The green enamel…lapel pin (#209) was used during the administration of President Carter. Each pin is numbered & controlled by the Secret Service. If you have reason to be near the President, this pin would be worn on your lapel for quick Secret Service identification purposes. I was often in the presence of the President.” Being a monitored item, these pins were supposed to have been collected by the secret service following a certain mission or circumstance. A prized collectible, secret service pins such as this remain nearly unobtainable to the private collector.

166 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Extremely fine and scarcely encountered

dated portrait of four Commanders-in-Chief 282 Four Presidents

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$4,000 Exceptional color satin-finish 7.5 x 9.5 photo of Presidents Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and Jimmy Carter gathered at the White House preparing to depart for Anwar Sadat’s funeral in 1981, signed in the lower border in black felt tip by all four, three adding the years of their presidency below, with Reagan notably writing the date he signed this remarkable format, during his presidency: “Richard Nixon, 1969–1974,” “Gerald R. Ford, 1974–1977,” “J. Carter, 1977–1981,” and “Ronald Reagan, March 5, 1987.” Gorgeously archivally suede-matted and framed with a descriptive plaque to an overall size of 15 x 23.5. In splendid condition. Accompanied by a listing compiled by the original collector, detailing the precise date that each signature was obtained. This is a positively remarkable photo in scarcity and historic importance—this is the most appealing example we have encountered, and the only one to which three presidents added the dates of their administration. Additionally, Reagan signed this photograph during a defining period of his time in office—the day prior, he had publicly addressed the nation for the first time regarding the Iran-Contra scandal, and on the day of signing spoke optimistically about a nuclear disarmament treaty between superpowers, anticipating the IntermediateRange Nuclear Forces Treaty between the US and Soviet Union that would be signed later in 1987. An imposing autographed piece of historical significance.

283 Ronald Reagan and George Bush

Signed White House Vignette

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Rare engraved vignette portrait of the exterior of the White House, 5 x 3.75, signed in black ink as president, “Ronald Reagan, President, June 15 ’87” and as vice president, “George Bush, vice-president, U. S. A.” Handsomely archivally suedematted and framed to an overall size of 15 x 26.5. In very fine condition. A scarce and desirable uninscribed engraving, signed by both Republican executives during the defining presidential administration of the 1980s—these are virtually impossible to find with the added “president” and “vice-president” titles, and as such this example is of the utmost desirability. Although the vignette is a familiar format, we have never encountered anything comparing to this historically inscribed piece. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 167


284 Ronald Reagan

White House Christmas Gift Prints

ESTIMATE: $300-$400 Collection of six original White House Hallmark presidential Christmas gift prints from the Reagans. Prints are from 1982–1983 and 1985–1988, and include artwork by Jamie Wyeth and Thomas William Jones, and each features a pre-printed Christmas message from the Reagans. Presidential White House staff gift prints are: 1982, featuring the Red Room by James Steinmeyer; 1983, featuring the Green Room by Mark Hampton; 1985, featuring the Blue Room by Thomas William Jones; 1986, featuring the East Room by Thomas William Jones; 1987, featuring The State Dining Room by Thomas William Jones; and 1988, featuring the North Entry Hall by Thomas William Jones. All six large gift prints are accompanied by their original envelopes. The Reagan’s notably invited several young artists to create art for their official Christmas cards. Nancy Reagan explained of the series, “I thought that people would like to see the different rooms in the White House and that’s what we did.” In fine condition. An impressive and highly collectible grouping.

285 Ronald Reagan

White House Christmas Gift Prints

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Collection of three original White House Hallmark presidential Christmas gift prints from the Reagans. Prints each depict a room in the White House as follows: 1983 (Mark Hampton’s Green Room), 1987 (Thomas William Jones’s, State Dining Room), and 1988 (Thomas William Jones’s, North Entry Hall). Each large White House staff gift print is accompanied by its original envelope. Nancy Reagan explained of the innovative series, “I thought that people would like to see the different rooms in the White House and that’s what we did.” In fine condition. A very classy grouping, just as you would expect from the President and Mrs. Reagan.

286 Ronald Reagan

White House Christmas Gift Prints

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Two original 1988 White House Hallmark presidential Christmas gift prints, housed in their original presentation folders, featuring artwork of the White House’s North Entry Hall by Thomas William Jones, and bearing pre-printed Christmas messages. Both are housed in their original envelopes. In fine condition. This would be the last Christmas card of the Reagan administration, an innovative series of which Nancy Reagan explained, “I thought that people would like to see the different rooms in the White House and that’s what we did.” An attractive offering from the Reagans. 168 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


287 Ronald Reagan

1982 Daily Calendar VIP Gift ESTIMATE: $200-$300 A ‘ready reference’ calendar book for the year 1982, 5.5 x 8.5, featuring a high quality dark brown leatherette cover gilt-stamped on the front with the Seal of the President of the United States and President Ronald Reagan’s facsimile signature. The book is unused and in fine condition. A first-class President Reagan artifact obtained directly by an NSC White House staffer.

288 Ronald Reagan’s

Leather Calendar Case

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 President Reagan’s personally-owned and -used black Abercrombie & Fitch black leather calendar folder, 5.25 x 7.75, gilt-stamped on the front with the Seal of the President of the United States and President Ronald Reagan’s facsimile signature. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Larry Branscum. In part: “The leather calendar case with the gold Presidential seal & signature was owned & used by President Reagan whom I served, along with George Bush…I was a military NSC staff member. The President’s calendar insert was removed to be shipped to California in 1988/89 for the Reagan Library. The leather case ‘remained’ with me in the White House.” A superb example, personally-used by the iconic Republican president.

289 Ronald Reagan

Gifted Card Case

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Scarce thin metal card case given as a gift by President Reagan to his associates, 3.5 x 2.25, featuring a gold presidential seal adorning the smooth black cover, engraved inside, “Ronald Wilson Reagan, February 6, 1982” and “Raleigh DeGeer Amyx.” Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Amyx. In full: “The engraved presidential card case was a [quality] gift from President Reagan on his birthday, February 6, 1982. It is believed he may have given 75 to 100 to his friends as well as political allies. It came to me via the assistance of Larry Branscum, White House [NSC] staff-military.” Also accompanied by an ideal suede slipcase. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 169


290 Ronald Reagan

Gold-Tone Dish

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 High quality gold-tone oval box, measuring 4.75 x 3.5 x 1, beautifully engraved on the cover with the Seal of the President of the United States and Ronald Reagan’s facsimile signature. The substantial box is nicely lined in red velvet. An impressive President Reagan artifact obtained directly by an NSC White House staffer.

291 Ronald Reagan

Pewter Gift Plate

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Alluring presidential pewter gift plate made by The Wilton Company, as authorized by the Reagan administration. Plate measures 10.75˝ in diameter with a deep relief engraving of the presidential seal in the center. Bottom is stamped “The Wilton Co.” In fine condition. During President Reagan’s administration, he or a few of his senior staff members would present these quality pewter plates as coveted presidential gifts.

292 Ronald Reagan and George Bush Administration

Leather Carry-on Bag

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Very nice, superior quality blue leather Reagan–Bush White House carry-on bag, measuring approximately 14.5 x 12 x 6, with a zip-up top, two carrying handles, a shoulder strap, and impressively detailed embroidered color presidential seal and “The White House” embroidered on the small front pocket. In very fine condition. An exceptional offering.

170 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


293 Ronald Reagan and George Bush Administration

Leather Hanging Clothes Bag

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Very nice, superior quality blue leather Reagan–Bush White House garment bag, measuring approximately 24 x 36, with a zip-up front, four smaller zip-up pockets, two carrying handles, and impressively detailed embroidered color presidential seal and “The White House” embroidered on the front. In very fine condition. A splendid offering.

295 Ronald Reagan

Matchbook

ESTIMATE: $100-$200

294 Ronald Reagan

Black Luggage Tag

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Hard black plastic luggage tag, 3.5 x 1.75, imprinted with the gold text, “President Ronald Reagan, The White House, Washington, D.C. 20500.” A short leather strap is attached to the left edge. To the best of our knowledge, this notable presidential artifact is the only Reagan luggage tag ever offered for sale.

An unused offwhite matchbook, 2 x 2, featuring the presidential seal on one side and a blind-embossed image of the White House on the other, with “Ronald Wilson Reagan” gilt-stamped along the lower edge. During the first term of President Reagan’s administration these matchbooks were made available to dinner guests, but following the Surgeon General C. Everett Koop’s strong discourse against smoking, the Reagan’s had them withdrawn from White House use.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 171


296 Ronald Reagan

Secret Service ID Badge

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Scarce quality manufactured Secret Service guest badge #228 issued during the administration of President Ronald Reagan, measuring 1˝ in diameter, featuring a raised gold presidential seal in the center surrounded by a red enamel border emblazoned with the words “Presidential Guest.” Includes a letter of provenance on White House letterhead from NSC staffer Larry Branscum. In part: “The red enamel…’Presidential Guest’ pin #228, was used during the administration of President Ronald Reagan…It would have been issued to a guest traveling with the President. The pin was to be worn at all times on the lapel for quick identification purposes by the Secret Service…If the President had invited a friend or Member of the U.S. Congress, to be a guest on Air Force One, or at Camp David, etc., then a pin such as this would have been issued…so that the Secret Service agent could readily identify, at a glance, that such a person was permitted to closely approach or be with the President. The pins were tightly controlled and this was the purpose of the coded number (228). They were to be turned back in to the Secret Service at the end of the scheduled Presidential visit.” A highly monitored and prized collectible, secret service pins such as this remain nearly unobtainable to the private collector.

297 Ronald Reagan and George Bush

Secret Service Badges

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Two original official uniformed division Secret Service badges, dated 1985 and 1989, for the inaugurations of presidents Ronald Reagan and George Bush. Both are matted and framed together against a color portrait of the South Lawn of the White House, along with a small plaque, to an overall size of 14.25 x 10.25. In fine condition, with the plaque detached from mat. Important to note that these badges would have been worn by the appropriately designated secret service officer (authorized issue number on the reverse of each badge) from the November election day until midnight, January 20th of inauguration day. Each secret service officer was only permitted their one issued badge, rendering this pair a very scarce example.

172 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


300 Ronald Reagan

Space Shuttle Photo Album

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Impressive leatherbound photo album honoring the first Space Shuttle flight, 6 x 4.5, gilt-stamped on the cover with a presidential seal, featuring six images from throughout the STS-1 mission. The first page bears a printed facsimile copy of President Reagan’s message to the astronauts, with a card on the opposite side printed in italics, “Presidential Luncheon Honoring Space Shuttle Columbia Astronauts John Young and Robert Crippen, the White House, Washington, DC, May 19, 1981.” Few of these albums exist as they were intended only for the participants in a special presidential luncheon held at the Executive Mansion.

301 Nancy Reagan

Silver Thimble

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Very detailed sterling silver commemorative thimble, which was a personal presentation from the first lady, engraved along the bottom, “NDR,” [Nancy Davis Reagan] with images of the north and south entrances to the White House, all surrounded with floral scroll. Thimble is housed in its delicate original leather presentation box, with “Nancy Reagan,” printed inside of the lining of the cover. In fine condition. The first of its kind we have ever encountered.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 173


174 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Huge hand-embroidered vice presidential flag

from the end of Bush’s service as vice president

302 George Bush’s

Vice Presidential Flag

ESTIMATE: $10,000-$12,000 Very rare and impressive hand-made official vice presidential flag used during George Bush’s term as vice president, and subsequently by Vice President Dan Quayle throughout his full term, during which this exquisite example stood just outside of their office in the elegantly wood paneled reception room. Beautiful double-sided (two completely identical and exquisite hand-sewn panels were affixed back-to-back) rayon flag measures 66˝ x 52˝, with deep blue fringe around the edges, and an incredibly detailed official vice presidential seal hand-embroidered on both sides. Inside sleeve of the flag bears a typed label which reads, “Flag Individual Vice President / Rayon w/fringe 4´4 x 5´6 / Contract No. 9047-87 / 8345-00-247-0440 / Defense Personnel Support Center,” and labeled in blue ink, “Vice President 10/19/88,” indicating the flag was delivered on October 19, 1988. As required, there are soft leather loops hidden within the sleeves and either end. In very fine condition. Accompanied by a flag stand and cords with tassels for display. This stunning flag comes from a retired NSC White House staffer. There are believed to be no more than six flags of this size and quality manufactured for any incumbent VP, nor does such an iconic example ever become available for sale. An impressive display piece, both in its size and extraordinary hand-craftsmanship, issued to the vice president’s office only several months before Bush assumed the presidency, and subsequently used by Vice President Dan Quayle throughout his four-year term.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 175


303 George Bush’s

Cufflinks

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 George H. W. Bush’s pair of personally-owned and -worn gold tone vice presidential cufflinks featuring the Seal of the Vice President of the United States with the golden eagle in the center raised in high relief against a white and navy enamel background, each with a raised facsimile of Bush’s signature on the reverse. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Larry Branscum. In part: “The pair of raised gold seal V. P. cuff links were owned and worn by President-Elect George Bush during his campaign for the Presidency. As a member of the N. S. C. staff for more than ten years, it has been my honor to work for Vice President and President-Elect George Bush as well as Presidents Carter and Reagan.” These personal 3-D set of cufflinks, owned by George H. W. Bush, are a bit more expensive and attractive than the presidential set he sometimes wore.

President Bush’s bifocals, repaired after cracking on Inauguration Day 304 George Bush’s

Eyeglasses

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,000 President Bush’s personallyowned and -worn bifocal eyeglasses, featuring large lenses in gold-tone aviator-style frames. Accompanied by a glasses case stamped by Carr & Busch of Washington, DC, President Bush’s optician for two decades of his accomplished life. Includes a letter of provenance on White House letterhead from NSC White House staffer Larry Branscum. In part: “The gold frame prescription eyeglasses are those of President George Bush. He owned and wore them. At one time a lens was totally cracked. Later it was repaired. I served at the White House for more than ten years while attached with the United States Army and the National Security Council…The cracked lens occurred on Inaugural Day 1/20/89 pm.” An unusual, personal presidential artifact with a unique backstory.

176 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


305 George Bush’s

Eyeglasses Prescriptions

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 Very rare and unique collection of 39 eyeglass prescriptions for George Bush, spanning from his time as UN Ambassador through his presidency, all labeled at the top with Bush’s name, including “Amb George Bush,” “Vice President George Bush,” and “President George Bush.” Also included is an envelope which once held a pair of glasses, as well as four labels, with Bush’s name written on each in an unknown hand. In fine condition. A complete Rx record, documenting the ever changing eyesight of a president over a two decade long period.

Tennis racket gifted by the 41st president to the loser of a doubles match at the White House 306 George Bush’s

Tennis Racket

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 George Bush’s personally-owned and -used tennis racket, used while serving as vice president and president. Green-framed Head Elite Pro racket has a leather grip and two broken strings. Racket comes in its original carrying case, notated on the inside “POTUS 1-89,” and “Vice Pres. Bush. This racquet is for a real pro. Hope you enjoy it. Clock Tower, Rex Parker.” Also included is a green tennis ball, with Bush’s facsimile signature printed on one side and the presidential seal printed on the opposite side. Accompanied by two handwritten 1991 letters of authenticity from Lewis M. Hubbard, on House of Representatives stationery, who was presented the racket directly from President Bush. First letter reads, in part: “The Green Head tennis raquet [sic] was owned and used by President George Bush as Vice President and President. I played tennis with George Bush on several occasions. In the Fall of 1989, at the White House Tennis Courts, where he beat me in a doubles match. He gave me his own raquet [sic] after he noticed the quality of mine was lacking!” Second letter presents the racket to Raleigh DeGeer Amyx, and reads, in part: “I, Lewis M. Hubbard, hereby donate…a tennis raquet [sic]…owned and used by President George H. Bush. This tennis raquet [sic] was given to Lewis M. Hubbard after a game at the White House tennis court…The foursome that day included the President, Congressman ‘Sonny’ Montgomery, former Congressman and Secretary of the Interior Tom Kleppe and me. The President and Cong. Montgomery wiped us out that day. President Bush, noticing that I had an ‘old’ wooden raquet [sic] suggested that I should try this new high-tech one and if I liked it I could have it.” Also included is a photo of Hubbard posing with the racket and one of his letters, and a photocopy of a signed photo of Bush, Hubbard, and Montgomery posing together at an event, signed and inscribed from Bush to Hubbard. In fine condition, with aforementioned broken strings. Bush was an avid sportsman, enjoying tennis, golf, and fishing, and known to be a fierce competitor. To our knowledge, this is the first example of personally-owned sports equipment from President Bush ever offered. A potentially impressive wall display piece. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 177


307 George Bush

Golf Ball

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 President Bush’s personallyowned and -used personalized Titleist golf ball, embossed in black type on one side, “President George Bush.” It also bears manufacturer’s marks that read “Titleist,” “4,” and “DT 90.” Accompanied by an unused presentation golf ball in its original box, bearing an image of the presidential seal and Bush’s facsimile signature. In overall fine condition. Includes a detailed letter of provenance on a White House card from Bernard ‘Buz’ Presock. In full: “The Titleist #4 golf ball marked ‘DT 90’ and ‘President George Bush’ was owned & used by the president. I played golf with him several times and he gave me the golf ball after we practiced around the White House sand traps and private presidential putting green. I also did advance campaign work for Bush in 92, and my mother, Patty Presock, worked closely with the president for several years, ending her career as special assistant to the president.” Accompanied by a copy of a photo of Mr. Amyx with Patty Presock in 1994. President Bush was an avid golfer, known for his quick pace on the course. While the Bush family is known for its legacy in the political arena, its patriarchs, George Herbert Walker and Prescott Bush (President Bush’s grandfather and father), both served as presidents of the United States Golf Association in the earlier half of the century, and George H. W. Bush was honored with the PGA Distinguished Service Award in 1997, the USGA Bob Jones Award in 2008, and the PGA Tour Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009. An impressive golf ball ensemble.

308 George Bush

Signed Baseball

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Official Rawlings American League baseball boldly signed in black felt tip on the sweet spot, “George Bush,” dated September 6, 1992, as the incumbent president of the United States. Light scattered toning, otherwise fine condition. Obtained from a White House staff member with direct daily access to the president. A fantastic piece, offering the combination of rare format and presidential-era signature, all tied to Bush’s well-known affinity for America’s pastime.

178 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


309 George Bush

Capitol Police 1989 Inaugural Badge

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Official United States Capitol Police special-issue badge for the inauguration of George Bush on January 20, 1989, measuring 2.25 x 3, featuring a patriotic eagle in the center and enameled flags on the outside. Reverse bears the engraved serial number 2548 and a Blackinton manufacturer’s stamp. This badge was worn by a federal officer only from President George H. W. Bush’s election until his swearing in on January, 20, 1989.

“Damn! Damn! Damn! Some stupid ruling has it that you can’t give me a present!” 311 George Bush

Autographed Letter Signed

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 Rare ALS as president signed “George,” three pages, 5.25 x 8.5, White House letterhead, April 18, 1990. Letter to Robert Mosbacher, his secretary of commerce. In full: “Damn! Damn! Damn! Some stupid ruling has it that you can’t give me a present! Never mind that we have been friends, real friends, for many years! We’ve gone too far in all this, but as for now, I have to give you back these ties! It’s nuts—the whole crazy system is nuts! Anyway, I’m grateful and besides I’ve enjoyed the ties. Technically the rule says if I’ve appointed you—no gifts allowed—weird, dumb!” In fine condition, with a staple hole to top left of each page. Mosbacher and Bush had been friends decades before his presidential appointment, working as chief fundraiser for three Bush campaigns, as well as serving on his cabinet. In this particular instance, Secretary Mosbacher, a major player within the Bush administration, had been attending a White House meeting with the president when he received this handwritten letter. This ALS was kept within his folder, along with the meeting’s agenda, however, when the meeting ended, he forgot to take the letter with him. Later, it was retrieved by a White House staffer, who had a place within President Bush’s inner circle, and presented it directly to Raleigh DeGeer Amyx. Bush handwritten letters from his single term as president are quite scarce and rarely offered for auction.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 179


312 George Bush

Autographed Note Signed

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 ANS as president signed “GB,” one page, 3 x 4, on the president’s personal letterhead, July 7, 1990. Brief note to an unidentified recipient. In full: “pregnant B’tiful, just B’tiful [beautiful].” In fine condition, with some brushing to first word in note. President Bush is exclaiming his enthusiastic feelings regarding a pregnancy, fitting given his pro-life political position. Obtained from a White House staff member with direct daily access to the president.

313 George Bush

Signed White House Card

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Mock White House card, featuring a vignette of the South Lawn, boldly signed in black felt tip, as president, “George Bush 1-20-89 PM.” In very fine condition. Obtained from a White House staff member with direct daily access to the president. Of interest to a discriminating collector, given Bush’s unique notation, written as president.

314 George Bush

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Official White House color satin-finish 8 x 10 photo of President Bush out on a golf course, boldly signed in the lower border in black felt tip, as president, “7-4-91 George Bush.” In very fine condition. Impressive display and very unusual presidential golfing format.

315 George Bush

Signed Presidential Seal Card

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Embossed card, with a gold presidential seal and “The President of the United States of America,” printed near the top, boldly signed in black felt tip as president, “George Bush 1-20-89 PM.” In very fine condition. Obtained from a White House staff member with direct daily access to the president. Of interest to a discriminating collector, given Bush’s unique notation, written as president.

180 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


316 George Bush

White House Staff Christmas Gift Prints

ESTIMATE: $300-$400 Collection of five attractive official Hallmark presidential White House staff Christmas gift prints, including four oversized, from Bush’s term as president, 1989–1992, each featuring a beautiful artist’s rendition of areas of the White House at Christmas time, including the Yellow Oval Room and the tree lighting on the South Lawn, sent in 1992, with the large and small format included. Some additional information on each presidential Christmas present print: 1989 was ‘Celebrating Christmas at the President’s House’ as painted by White House Director of Graphics William Gemmell; in 1990 it was President Bush’s own idea to put the Oval Office in the spotlight as painted by NY interior designer Mark Hampton; 1991 was ‘The Family Tree, Upstairs at the White House,’ picturing the Bush’s family quarters in the Yellow Oval Room, as painted by Czechoslovakian artist Kamil Kubik; 1992 was the ‘National Christmas Tree’ also painted by Kamil Kubik. Each oversized presidential staff gift print bears a pre-printed Christmas sentiment from the Bushes. All include their original envelopes. All in very fine condition.

317 George Bush

White House Staff Christmas Gift Prints

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Two impressive official oversized Hallmark presidential White House staff Christmas gift prints from the Bushes: one from 1991 featuring an image of the upstairs of the White House by Kamil Kubik, officially titled ‘The Family Tree, Upstairs at the White House’; and one from 1992 featuring Kubik’s work of the lighting of the National Tree on the South Lawn, officially titled ‘The National Christmas Tree.’ Each presidential staff gift print features a pre-printed Christmas sentiment from the President and Mrs. Bush, and both are housed in their original presentation folders. All in very fine condition.

318 Bill Clinton’s

Marble Box

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 President Clinton’s personally-owned and -used very high quality black hinged marble box, measuring 7.75 x 4.75 x 2.5, elegantly embossed on the top in gold lettering, “WJC,” with the “C,” for Clinton, featured most prominently in the center. The box is lined in plush black velvet. Includes a letter of provenance on a White House card from Larry Branscum. In part: “The attractive marble or fossil stone box was owned and used by President Clinton. It is lined in velvet and is black with his gold ‘wCj’ initials on the top. I served on the NSC staff at the White House under several Presidents and Vice Presidents, and will end my career with President Clinton and V.P. Gore.” In very fine condition. A stunning piece and an offering of supreme display quality. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 181


319 Bill Clinton

Oval Office Sofa Fabric

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 A generous swatch of maroon, white, and gold fabric from the couch that resided in the Oval Office during President Clinton’s time in the White House, measuring 3.75 x 1.75, nicely double-matted and framed with a black felt tip signature, “Bill Clinton,” and typed identification card to an overall size of 8.5 x 9. The Clintons had only 200 of these displays made by the official White House framer to offer as Christmas gifts to his immediate executive staff in 2000, his final Christmas as president. An impressive Clinton-era Oval Office artifact worthy of a discriminating collector.

320

321

Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton

ESTIMATE: $100-$200

ESTIMATE: $100-$200

Business card holder, made of a leather-like material, featuring the Seal of the President of the United States and President Clinton’s facsimile signature on the front, 5 x 10.25, with slots for a total of 48 business cards within its 12 clear pages. Also includes two leather bookmarks gilt stamped with the presidential seal, Bill Clinton’s facsimile signature, and the year 1993, as well as three unopened letters bearing facsimile copies of a holiday greeting written by the Clintons. A very nice combination offering.

Official star-shaped United States Capitol Police special-issue badge for the inauguration of Bill Clinton on January 20, 1993, measuring 2.75˝ in diameter, featuring a raised patriotic eagle emblem in the center with blue enameled lettering and an enameled American flag on the left side. The text “Gol-Tone” is engraved on the reverse. This badge was authorized for official federal officer’s use from Clinton’s 1992 election day, through to January 20, 1993.

Card Holder

Capitol Police 1993 Inaugural Badge

182 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


322 Bill Clinton

Secret Service 1997 Inaugural Badge

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Official United States Secret Service special-issue badge for the inauguration of Bill Clinton on January 20, 1997, measuring 2.5˝ in diameter, featuring a raised patriotic eagle emblem in the center with enameled white, red, and blue rings encircling it. Reverse bears the engraved serial number 36 and a Blackinton manufacturer’s stamp. This scarce badge was worn by a federal secret service officer only from President Clinton’s election until his swearing in on January, 20, 1997.

323

Presidential Service Badge

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Official Presidential Service Badge, measuring 2˝ in diameter, featuring a raised patriotic eagle emblem set on a blue enameled background. The text “PI, GI” appears on the reverse above the engraved serial number 14361. This badge was awarded to members of the military assigned to the White House after a period of one year. Accompanied by a copy of a photo of Colin Powell wearing a similar badge. A presidential service badge such as this is highly coveted by both collectors and career military personnel.

324 Bill Clinton

White House Christmas Gift Prints

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Collection of five original White House Hallmark presidential gift prints from the Clintons. Prints are from 1993 (a photo of Bill and Hillary in front of Lincoln’s portrait), 1995 (Thomas McKnight’s ‘fantasy’ version of The Blue Room), 1996 (Thomas McKnight’s ‘magical’ version of the Green Room), and two from 1997 (’White House Nocturne, South Lawn 1997’ by Kay Jackson). Each presidential White House staff gift housed in their original folders and accompanied by their original envelopes. In fine condition. An attractive grouping. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 183


WHITE HOUSE CHINA T

he Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection houses what is perhaps the finest collection of official White House china in private hands, a selection of which is presented here. Official White House china is among the most coveted and desirable of presidential relics, as it is both visually appealing and represents the dining table of the president of the United States. The demand for presidential china far exceeds the supply, with the general rarity increased because fewer than half of all presidents have ordered new porcelain service sets. Any sort of item associated with America’s Founding Fathers is of the highest collectibility, and early exemplars of their china are exceedingly rare, with time and fragility having taken their toll. Fortunately, the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection has made available two remarkable pieces from these forefathers, with Thomas Jefferson and James Madison represented within this extraordinary offering of presidential china. As a whole, however, this collection covers a broad spectrum of American history—following these early patriots are examples from Benjamin Harrison, Woodrow Wilson, Harry S. Truman, and Bill Clinton. Pieces from the Amyx Collection have been featured in magazines and reference guides, and the assortment here offered presents a wonderful opportunity for historians and collectors alike.

184 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Incredibly rare and majestic presidential bowl

from Thomas Jefferson

330 Thomas Jefferson

White House China Soup Bowl

ESTIMATE: $20,000-$30,000 Original Thomas Jefferson presidential china soup bowl. Beautiful china shallow soup bowl, circa 1790, is made of white Chinese porcelain, measures 9.5˝ in diameter (the same as the Jefferson dinner plate), and is painted blue with gilt fleur-de-lis edges. Center of the bowl bears an exceptional hand-painted design featuring Jefferson’s neoclassical shield studded with 13 gold stars which encloses the script initial “J,” surmounted by a plumed knight’s helmet. This particular gilt “J” dinner service has long been linked to Thomas Jefferson, including being published in Official White House China (mentioning early Chinese export) by M.B. Klapthor, with examples at one time on display at Monticello, the US State Department Diplomatic Reception Rooms, and the White House (before at least 1908). Jefferson’s 19th century direct lineal descendants strongly believed in Jefferson’s ownership of the 1790s “J” service, sought to re-acquire it, and then gifted four “J” pieces to the White House in the early 1900’s—where each piece has remained for over 100 years. An incredibly rare opportunity to acquire such an attractive piece of US history, as most, if not all, of the other china from the first three presidents were destroyed when the British ransacked and burned the Executive Mansion during the War of 1812. The historical significance of presidential porcelain from a well-known collection in such truly superb condition is not to be understated.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 185


Official plate from Madison’s White House, the rarest of all presidential china 331 James Madison

Official White House China Dinner Plate

ESTIMATE: $10,000-$12,000 Incredibly rare James Madison White House nine-inch china dessert plate, made for the Madisons in 1806 by Nast of Paris, and used in the White House beginning in 1814. The plate features an undecorated center with the orange-ground rim painted in black and thick white enamel with a neoclassical border of nine floral and foliate medallions alternating with fern and scroll devices between gilt bands. Plate is marked on the bottom, “Nast a Paris.” In fine condition, with a few light surface marks and a few light marks to bottom of plate. This china was pressed into service in 1814, after the British ransacked and burned the Executive Mansion in 1812. A total of 231 pieces were ordered in 1806, with research indicating only 30 original pieces known to still exist intact. Almost half of the remaining pieces reside in either the White House (8 pieces), or at Madison’s home in Montpelier (3 pieces). Five of the originals are part of the distinguished Raleigh DeGeer Amyx collection. This particular pattern ranks as the rarest of all presidential china, and the plate here offers an extremely rare chance to acquire one of the few privately-owned pieces still available. A significant, seldom-seen offering.

332 Abraham Lincoln

Pattern Dessert Plate

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$2,000 An original dessert plate from President Abraham Lincoln’s White House china pattern, circa 1876. Plate measures 9.5˝ in diameter and was produced by Haviland and Company in Paris. The china was imported and decorated by E.V. Haughwout and Company, New York. Mr. Haughwout and staff hand-painted the Eagle and clouds in the center of the plate, the intricate gilt decoration, as well as the color of Solferino (purplish-pink). Reverse of the plate is marked, “Administration Abraham Lincoln.” This designation would indicate that this particular piece was manufactured in 1876. In fine condition, with a bit of light wear to bottom edge. The Lincoln administration china had the distinction of being the first service to be chosen entirely by a First Lady. Mary Todd Lincoln ordered this pattern, with the additional hand-painted eagle and shield, to show her husband’s strength and control, especially during the Civil War. A scarce and elegant piece associated with one of the greatest presidents in American history.

186 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


333 Benjamin Harrison

Official White House China Plate

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 One of President Benjamin Harrison’s beautiful official White House china plates by Tressemanes and Vogt of France. Plate measures 6˝ in diameter, features a beautifully-colored eagle and shield in the center, and a border of goldenrod and corn husks on the blue border. Reverse is marked, “T. V. France, Decore pour M. W. Beveridge. Washington, D C., Harrison 1892.” In fine condition, with a few scattered light surface marks. A significant historic example.

334 Woodrow Wilson

Official White House Dinner Plate

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$2,000 Stately Woodrow Wilson White House Lenox china dinner plate. Plate measures 10.5˝ in diameter, with two decorative gold borders, and the United States seal at the top of the plate. Bottom of the plate is marked, “Exhibit Collection for Lenox, Inc. The White House 1918,” with a Lenox label also affixed to the bottom of the plate. Plate is from the Exhibit Collection, a specially-issued edition used in Lenox corporate displays and other public showcases of presidential china, such as when a presidential library requests one for special temporary display. In splendid condition.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 187


335 Woodrow Wilson

Plate

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 President Wilson’s personally-owned Wedgwood Queen’s Ware Liberty China plate. Plate measures 8˝ in diameter, The pattern, designed by Mrs. Lillian Taylor, contains the shield of the United States flanked by the flags of 11 Allied nations. Reverse bears several impressed markings. In fine condition. These pieces were a private order and were never advertised or sold to the public. Select clientele who ordered and received Liberty China included President Woodrow Wilson, former President Theodore Roosevelt, and Great Britain’s King George V and Queen Mary. Such a plate is illustrated in American Presidential China, a book featuring the well-known collection of Robert McNeil. The McNeil Collection has since been donated to the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

336 Harry S. Truman

Official White House China Dinner Plate

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Elegant Harry S. Truman White House Lenox china dinner plate. Plate measures 10.5˝ in diameter, with decorative green and gold borders, and the United States seal at the top of the plate. Bottom of the plate is marked, “Exhibit Collection for Lenox, Inc. The White House 1951.” Plate is from the Exhibit Collection, a specially-issued edition used in Lenox corporate displays and other public showcases of presidential china, such as when a presidential library requests one for special temporary display. In splendid condition.

188 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


337 Ronald Reagan

White House China Plate

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Original Ronald Reagan White House Fitz and Floyd china service plate. Plate measures an impressive 12˝ in diameter with a blue, red, and gold border around the rim, and the United States seal in the center in gold. Bottom of the plate is marked, “White House Service by Robert C. Floyd, Fritz and Floyd, Inc. Fine China, 1983.” Accompanied by copies of two photos of these plates in use, one of a cabinet meeting in the White House, and one of President Reagan, Vice President Bush, Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, and other dignitaries dining at Camp David—photographic proof that these plates were used, not only at Camp David, but also for many functions within the White House short of a state dinner. Also included is a photocopy of a 1983 letter from President Reagan thanking the manufacturer Mr. Floyd for making the china “to be used in the White House, at Camp David and aboard Air Force One.” In fine condition, with Mr. Amyx’s collector’s felt tip notation to bottom of the plate.

338

339

Ronald Reagan

Ronald Reagan

ESTIMATE: $400-$600

ESTIMATE: $400-$600

Very attractive Lenox china signature plate. 10.5˝ in diameter, featuring a blue and gold border, and an image of the White House and facsimile signatures of Ronald and Nancy Reagan printed in gold in the center. Reverse is marked, “Lenox, The White House.” This plate was used by the President and Mrs. Reagan for presentation to their personally invited White House luncheon guests. In splendid condition.

Striking Lenox china signature plate, 10.5˝ in diameter, featuring a scarlet red border and an image of the White House and facsimile signatures of Ronald and Nancy Reagan printed in gold in the center. Reverse is marked, “Lenox, The White House.” Plate comes in its original Lenox box. In very fine condition. At times, President and Mrs. Reagan would present these quality Lenox plates to their personal White House luncheon guests.

Signature Plate

Signature Plate

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 189


340 Ronald Reagan

Signature Bowl

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 Very nice Lenox china signature bowl, 8.5˝ in diameter and 3.5˝ high, featuring a blue and gold border and an image of the White House and facsimile signatures of Ronald and Nancy Reagan printed in gold on the outside. Reverse is marked, “Lenox, The White House.” In splendid condition. A very scarce piece of porcelain likely intended as a gift to a distinguished guest of President or Mrs. Reagan.

341 Bill Clinton

Official Presidential Fish Entree Dinner Plate

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$2,500 Rare original Bill Clinton official White House Lenox china fish entree dinner plate. Plate measures 10.5˝ in diameter (same as the Clinton dinner plate), with a decorative embossed gold border of raised flowers and laurels along the yellow rim. Bottom is marked, “The White House 200th Anniversary 1800–2000 Lenox.” In very fine condition. Each Clinton piece is of a unique border design, which can not be said about any other president’s White House china. This example was part of the 300 12-piece place settings ordered by the Clintons, an order totaling approximately $500,000. An alluring offering as official Clinton china is practically nonexistent outside of the White House.

342 Bill Clinton

Official Presidential Rim Soup Bowl

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Original Bill Clinton official White House Lenox china rimmed soup bowl. Bowl measures 9˝ in diameter, with a decorative embossed gold border and white flowers. Bottom is marked, “The White House 200th Anniversary 1800–2000 Lenox.” In fine condition. Each Clinton piece is of a unique border design, which can not be said about any other president’s White House china. This eye-catching example was part of the 300 12-piece place settings ordered by the Clintons, an order totaling approximately $500,000. An enticing offering, as examples of official Clinton china are practically nonexistent outside of the White House.

190 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


343 Bill Clinton

Official Presidential Salad Plate

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Original Bill Clinton official White House Lenox china salad plate. Plate measures 9.25˝ in diameter, with a decorative embossed gold border of raised flowers and laurels along the yellow rim. Bottom is marked, “The White House 200th Anniversary 1800–2000 Lenox.” In very fine condition. Each Clinton piece is of a unique border design, which can not be said about any other president’s White House china. This example was part of the 300 12-piece place settings ordered by the Clintons, an order totaling approximately $500,000. An enticing offering, as examples of official Clinton china are practically nonexistent outside of the White House.

344 Bill Clinton

Official Presidential Cup and Saucer

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Original Bill Clinton official White House Lenox china coffee cup and saucer. Saucer measures 5.75˝ in diameter, with a decorative embossed gold border and white flowers, with the matching cup having the same border and floral print. Bottom of each piece is marked, “The White House 200th Anniversary 1800–2000 Lenox.” In splendid condition. Each Clinton piece is of a unique border design, which can not be said about any other president’s White House china. These two examples were part of the 300 12-piece place settings ordered by the Clintons, an order totaling approximately $500,000. A scarce offering to be appreciated by an advanced collector.

345 Bill Clinton

Appreciation Plate

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Striking limited edition presentation Lenox china plate, 10.5˝ in diameter, featuring an attractive band using colors from five previous official White House dinner services: President’s Wilson, Roosevelt, Truman, Reagan, and Clinton. In the center of the plate, in gold, is “With appreciation for your service,” with the American seal in the center and facsimile signatures of Bill and Hillary Clinton below the seal. Reverse of the plate bears a printed presentation from Lenox. In very fine condition. Such a limited number of these stunning Clinton gifts were presented by the President and Mrs. Clinton that it is doubtful even a few have reached private collections.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 191


346 White House

Butter Knife

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Official White House butter knife, measuring 7˝ long, emblazoned with a patriotic eagle at the bottom of the thick handle and “The White House” on the other side. This most likely would have been used with official White House china and in the presidential living quarters, staff dining room, or large receptions where more important silverware would not have been used. White House flatware rarely ever reaches the hands of coveting collectors.

347 White House

Tea Spoon

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Official White House iced tea spoon, measuring 7.5˝ long, emblazoned with a patriotic eagle at the bottom of the handle and “The White House” on the reverse. This most likely would have been used with official White House china and in the presidential living quarters, staff dining room, or large receptions where more important silverware would not have been used. White House flatware rarely ever reaches the hands of coveting collectors.

348 White House

Demitasse Spoon

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Official White House silver demitasse spoon, measuring 4.5˝ long, emblazoned with a patriotic eagle at the bottom of the handle and “The White House” on the reverse. This most likely would have been used with official White House china and in the presidential living quarters, staff dining room, or large receptions where more important silverware would not have been used. White House flatware rarely ever reaches the hands of coveting collectors.

192 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Session Two

The Live Auction begins on September 18, 2014 at 11 AM ET AUTOGRAPHS & MANUSCRIPTS ��������������������������������������������������������� 194 THE OLYMPIC GAMES ��������������������������������������������������������������������������� 202 SPORTS ......................................................................................................... 236

Session Two of the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection covers Lots 350–454 and is comprised of three sections: Autographs and Manuscripts, The Olympics, and Sports. Autographs and Manuscripts covers a broad range of categories and contains several important pieces from Daniel Boone through Princess Diana. The Olympics section spans nearly a century, from the 1900 Paris Olympics—the second modern games ever held— all the way up to the 1980 Lake Placid Olympics. Several desirable official Olympics Winners Medals highlight this impressive portion of the catalog.


Autographs & Manuscripts W

ith an exquisite eye for fine examples of historically significant autographs and manuscripts, Raleigh DeGeer Amyx meticulously acquired the following pieces over the last 40 years. Spanning the 18th through 20th centuries, notable items in his collection include: a 1787 Daniel Boone handwritten survey, stunning Thomas Edison and Mark Twain signed photos, and a rare Custer handwritten note penned during the ferocious Battle of Antietam. An impressive diversification of categories are represented here including royalty, military, invention, literature, space and aviation and even contemporary music with handwritten notes from the King of Pop.

194 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Exceptionally rare fully handwritten

1787 land survey by the Kentucky frontiersman 350 Daniel Boone

Handwritten Survey

ESTIMATE: $12,000-$14,000 Remarkable land survey entirely in Boone’s hand, signed as deputy surveyor, “Daniel Boone DS,” one page, 7.75 x 5.5, June 11, 1787. A boldly handwritten survey for 487 acres of land undertaken by Boone with the assistance of Septimus Davis and William Brooks as chain-men and William Hill as marker. In part: “Survaid for Benjamin Gibss 487 acres of Land by virtue of a tresury warrant…Situate Lying and being in the County of Madison on Sturgan Crick adjoining James Dickey on the North & John Dickey on the West.” Boone adds a precise and crisply-penned survey map of the tract to the upper left. Impressively archivally cloth-matted and framed with two biographical plaques and an image of the legendary outdoorsman to an overall size of 24 x 23. In very fine condition, with expected intersecting folds. Beautifully archivally framed, by Showcase Portfolios, with handsome suede matting and historically detailed plaque. Any autographic material by this American pioneer is excessively rare, with this being a particularly lengthy example highlighted by the phenomenal 1787 Daniel Boone sketch of the actual parcel surveyed. This land is located in Madison County, Kentucky, which is an area of exceptional importance within the context of Boone’s biography, as it is where he settled in 1775 after blazing his Wilderness Road through the Cumberland Gap in the Appalachian Mountains. There he founded one of the first American settlements west of the Appalachians, the village of Boonesborough, where he constructed his famous Fort Boonesborough. Immensely desirable, this extraordinary holographic offering is an astounding piece of early American frontier history worthy of the finest historical collections.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 195


351 Sam Houston

Autographed Quote Signed

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$2,000 Unusual AQS on an off-white 5.5 x 4.5 sheet, prominently signed at the conclusion, “Sam Houston.” “Woman is lovely to the sight, / as gentle as the dews of even[ing], / as bright as morning’s earliest light, / and spotless as the snows of Heaven.” Beautifully archivally suede-matted and framed with an impressive color image, engraved biographical plate, and transcriptive plaque to an overall size of 21 x 21. Light toning, a small tear to the top edge, and brushing to one word and the first letter of his signature, otherwise fine condition. Interestingly, Houston recited this exact verse on multiple occasions while speaking on the campaign trail when running for governor of Texas in 1859. An authentic legend of American history.

“We have captured another gun—a 12 pdr. brass howitzer” 352 George A. Custer

Battlefield Communication

ESTIMATE: $4,000-$6,000 Rare Civil War–dated ANS signed “Custer,” one page, 3.5 x 5, Head Quarters, Army of the Potomac letterhead, [circa September 18], 1862. Battlefield communication sent to Colonel Colburn. In full: “We have captured another gun—a 12 pdr. brass howitzer.” Tastefully archivally suede-cloth-matted and framed with an image, engraved and historically detailed biographical plate, and transcriptive plaque to an overall size of 19.75 x 23.75. In fine condition, with scattered creases. Accompanied by the original period envelope in which this note was found, which was among the papers of Col. Henry Jackson Hunt; in a similar letter found among Hunt’s papers and sold by Christie’s in 1991, Custer instructs Colburn to relay his message to Hunt. Custer quickly jotted down this note at the scene of the ferocious Battle of Antietam, just as the Confederates were retreating from the Union attack led by General George B. McClellan. Custer, then serving as a captain under the general—made evident by this stationery imprinted along the bottom with “By Command of Major General McClellan”—overstepped his authority and led a company of the 8th Illinois Cavalry westward through a weak point of the Confederate lines. He and his men swept across the Hagerstown Pike and along the flanks of D. H. Hill’s brigade through to the outskirts of Sharpsburg, where General Lee had established his headquarters. Along the way from Hagerstown to Sharpsburg, they captured some Confederate ordnance—first a three-inch rifle on a caisson, and later the Howitzer here mentioned. Unable to take the artillery with them, Custer sent messages to Colonel Colburn, instructing him to tell Colonel Henry Jackson Hunt to dispatch troops to secure the guns. Custer material is scarce in any form, and such battlefield communiques are exceptionally desirable—referencing one of the most well-known field artillery weapons used during the Civil War and scrawled during one of its bloodiest battles, this is a piece of the utmost desirability and historical importance. 196 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


353 William F. ‘Buffalo Bill’ Cody

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Superlative matte-finish 3.5 x 5.5 postcard photo of Cody wearing his cowboy hat in a classic three-quarter-length pose, boldly signed across the top in black ink, with his desirable nickname included, “W. F. Cody, ‘Buffalo Bill.’” Suede-matted and framed with a brass nameplate to an overall size of 12 x 17. In excellent condition. Doubtlessly one of the finest examples extant.

Immaculate oversized portrait of the greatest American inventor

354 Thomas Edison

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Remarkable matte-finish 6.5 x 8.5 portrait of Edison in a threequarter-length pose seated in his study with his hands gently clasped in his lap, affixed to its original 9.25 x 11.25 mount, boldly signed on the mount in black ink with his instantly recognizable ‘umbrella’ signature, “Thos. A. Edison.” Expertly archivally silk-matted and framed with a descriptive plaque to an overall size of 18 x 27. In fine to very fine condition. An oversized, crystal-clear photograph of the legendary ‘Wizard of Menlo Park’—undoubtedly one of the finest extant.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 197


355 Samuel L. Clemens

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 Crystal-clear matte-finish 6.5 x 9 photo of Twain in a seated threequarter-length pose, wearing one of his classic white suits, affixed to an 8 x 11.75 mount, signed on the mount in fountain pen, “Mark Twain.” Archivally cloth-matted and framed with a descriptive plaque to an overall size of 16.75 x 29. In fine condition, with really insignificant dampstaining visible to the extreme bottom edge of the mount. Samuel Clemens was known for his all-white suits, which he claimed made him ‘the only cleanly-clothed human being in all Christendom north of the Tropics.’ This image came from a series of photographs taken of Clemens in 1907, which were then autographed and sold to raise funds for those affected by the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco. Clemens himself regarded them as the best ever taken of him in his life, and they remain some of the most iconic photos of the author extant. An impressive offering.

The 16-year-old Grissom’s Boy Scout membership card 356 Gus Grissom’s

Boy Scout Card

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,000 Original Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo astronaut Gus Grissom’s personal Boy Scouts of America membership card, unfolded to a size of 7 x 3.75, May 5, 1942, filled out in type and in his own hand, signed inside in fountain pen, “Virgil Grissom, 715 Baker St.” Grissom also lists his age as “16,” height as “5´ 6.5˝,” weight as “125,” along with the date. He also fills out the dates he attained two different ranks within the Boy Scouts, as well as his troop number. His troop information is also typed, placing him in Troop 46 in Mitchell, Indiana. In fine condition. The front of this graphically stunning official card is printed with an illustration of various scouting deeds behind a banner that reads, “Loyalty, Patriotism, Service”—certainly three of the most important traits for any NASA astronaut. A one-of-a-kind item from Grissom’s youth, directly related to an organization that helped to establish the values that he and many other astronauts—most notably Neil Armstrong—held dear. This movingly personal Gus Grissom relic reminds us of the ideals of the tragic Apollo 1 fire victim and merits serious consideration from an accomplished collector.

198 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


357 Neil Armstrong

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,500 Highly desirable uninscribed official color 8 x 10 NASA lithograph of Armstrong posing in his white space suit against a lunar background, signed in black felt tip. In near pristine condition. Accompanied by a 1999 authentication from space expert Adam Harwood. Uninscribed photos of Armstrong represent one of the most coveted prizes in the entire field of space collecting.

Satchmo begs an admirer for a hand-drawn portrait: “Send me one—‘Wilya?’ ‘PLEASE?’” 358 Louis Armstrong

Signed Sketch and Letter Display

ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 Fabulous pairing of an original pencil sketch of Armstrong drawn by an admirer on an off-white 4.75 x 8 sheet, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “Best wishes to Raymond A. Swainston, From Louis Armstrong, 24/11/33”; and a cordial ALS to Swainston by Armstrong, two pages, 4.75 x 6.75, The Midland Hotel letterhead, October 20, 1932, in full: “Just received the wonderful drawing you made of me and I must tell you, it’s ‘marvelous’ ‘and how’ I autographed it, and here it is. And would you be so kind as to draw one more like this one and autograph it to me? ‘Gee’ I must have one of these for my ‘scrap book.’ So first chance you ‘have’—Send me one—’Wilya?’ ‘PLEASE?’” Archivally suede-matted and framed together with a biographical plaque to an overall size of 20.5 x 33. In overall fine condition, with light creases to the letter. Based on the discrepancy between the date Armstrong signed the sketch and the date of the letter, he and Swainston must have corresponded and exchanged sketches at least a few times during the early 1930s. An exquisite and unusual set of items sent from an iconic celebrity to his admirer, assembled in a handsome museum-quality display.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 199


359 Michael Jackson

Signed Sketch

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,200 Unique and important assemblage of three original ballpoint sketches and several small doodles on an 8.5 x 13 yellow sheet of legal paper. Two large images appear to be over-exaggerated self-portrait caricatures, with a third smaller image appearing to be a bald woman. Both the larger sketches are signed, “M. J.,” and dated 1985. Sheet also bears several handwritten notes, a number, and the quickly written name of George Lucas. Reverse bears one more unsigned caricatures of Jackson sporting a pompadour. Scattered creases, a couple of small tears, and a piece of tape over phone number, otherwise fine condition. Potentially subconscious insight into Michael Jackson’s inner thoughts, especially considering the extreme steps ventured to alter his own appearance. A compelling offering that would make for a notable display.

“Order more Stooges posters!” 360 Michael Jackson

Autographed Note Signed

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 ANS signed “M. J.,” one page, 8.5 x 11, on attractive watermarked Michael Jackson personal letterhead, March 4, 1985. Short note to an assistant named “Candy.” In full: “Order more Stooges posters! Find–3–Thanx.” Jackson has also crossed out two lines of text along the bottom, which reads: “And Candy where are all my Stooges tapes.” In fine condition, with a uniform shade of very mild toning from previous display. A rare content piece as it relates to the King of Pop and his clear expression of interest in the iconic comedic celebrities—The Three Stooges.

200 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


purchasing the Beatles’ song catalog 361 Michael Jackson

Autographed Note Signed

ESTIMATE: $800-$1,200 Rare ANS signed “M. J.,” on the reverse of a 10 x 8 color cardstock personal publicity photo, May 5, 1985. Notes of historical significance, to an assistant named “Candy.” In full (with grammar and spelling retained): “Have Robert Hilburn to find me 3 copies of the Beatles Illustrated Book, its about their songs and how they were written, also 3 copies of the Beatles in their own words this is a book also. Also get John lennon Rolling Stone interview.” There are also several pencil notations Candy’s hand, as Michael Jackson’s assistant. In fine condition, with scattered light toning, a few creases, and a small spot near top, not particularly detracting from the integrity of this historical piece from the King of Pop. Jackson had spent the past year in negotiations to acquire the publishing rights to ATV Music Publishing, which included the majority of the Beatles’ songs. He finally bought the rights in August of 1985 for a price of $47.5 million dollars. In 1997, Jackson licensed the song ‘Revolution’ to Nike for $500,000, infuriating McCartney. An impressive piece of musical history, bringing together the King of Pop and the Fab Four.

362 Diana and Charles

Christmas Card

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Christmas card from 1983, 10.25 x 7 open, bearing an affixed charming satin-finish 4 x 5.5 color casual family photograph of Prince Charles, Diana and baby William at Balmoral, with, heir to the thrown, William sitting on Diana’s lap on a swing as Prince Charles looks on. Printed opposite the photograph is the sentiment “With all good wishes for Christmas and the New Year.” The future king, Charles, has inscribed the card at the top, “To you both,” and signed at the bottom, “Charles and,” after which Diana has signed “Diana.” Handsomely archivally suede-matted and framed with a nameplate to an overall size of 15 x 12.5. Includes the original mailing envelope, postmarked December 17, 1983, an impressive full page letter of provenance on White House letterhead from the original recipient, Captain James Perowne of the Royal Navy, in part: “This 1983 Christmas card was received by me from the Prince and Princess of Wales. It was my good fortune to have served with Prince Charles onboard HMS Jupiter 1974–75 and to have been invited to be an usher at his wedding in 1981.” Accompanied by two candid photos, one of Raleigh DeGeer Amyx with Captain James Perowne and another of Perowne’s family.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 201


The Olympic GameS T

he portion of the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection dedicated to the Olympics features an astounding array of material dating back to the Summer Olympics of 1900, the second modern Olympic Games to ever be held. Official gold, silver, and bronze winners medals headline the collection, including a rare bronze winners medal from the 1936 Winter Games in Germany and a 1980 Winter Games bronze winners medal for ice hockey, which became one of the most memorable events in sports history as the USA defeated Russia in the ‘Miracle on Ice.’ The Amyx offering is filled out by an assortment of scarce official pins, badges, and souvenirs, many of which are from the earliest Games of the 20th century and thus extremely rare. Raleigh DeGeer Amyx served as executive director and president of United States Gymnastics Safety Association, and is a member of the International Society of Olympic Historians and The Olympian Club. Mr. Amyx’s collection of winners medals and memorabilia has been considered one of the finest in the world.

202 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


366 Paris Olympics

1900 Silvered Bronze Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $600-$800

This beautiful 1900 Summer Games silvered bronze medal, p re s e n t e d fo r rowing, measures a p p rox i m a t e l y 60mm x 42mm and was designed by F. Vernon. One side of the medal features a victorious athlete standing on a podium inscribed “Regates a la Voile,” in raised letters along the bottom, with the reverse showing a winged goddess scattering laurel branches over the Paris Exposition grounds, and reads, “Paris 1900, Republique Francaise Exposition Universelle,” and the artist’s name along the bottom edge. In extra fine condition. Stunning display piece from the 2nd Olympiad.

367 Paris Olympics

1900 Silvered Bronze Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $600-$800 This 2nd Olympiad 1900 Summer Games silvered bronze medal, presented for shooting (”Tir”), measures approximately 60mm x 42mm and was designed by F. Vernon. One side of the medal features a victorious athlete standing on a podium inscribed “Concurs de Tir, VII Concours National,” in raised letters along the bottom, with the reverse showing a winged goddess scattering laurel branches over Paris exposition grounds, and reads, “Paris 1900, Republique Francaise Exposition Universelle,” and the artist’s name along the bottom edge. In extra fine plus condition. The only Olympic winners medal to ever be rectangular in design.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 203


368 Paris Olympics

1900 Silvered Bronze Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $600-$800 This 1900 Summer Games silvered bronze medal measures approximately 60mm x 42mm and was designed by F. Vernon. One side of the medal features a victorious athlete standing on a podium inscribed “Exercises Physiques et Sports” in raised letters, with the reverse showing a winged goddess scattering laurel branches over the Paris Exposition grounds, and reads, “Paris 1900, Republique Francaise Exposition Universelle,” and the artist’s name along the bottom edge. In extra fine plus condition. These 2nd Olympiad medals are the only Summer Olympics medals to have been rectangular in design.

369 Paris Olympics

1900 Bronze Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $500-$700 This attractive 1900 Summer Games bronze winners medal measures approximately 60mm x 42mm and was designed by F. Vernon. One side of the medal features a victorious athlete standing on a podium inscribed “Concurs Scolaires de Jeux Athletiques” in raised letters, with the reverse showing a winged goddess scattering laurel branches over the Paris Exposition grounds, and reads, “Paris 1900, Republique Francaise Exposition Universelle,” and the artist’s name along the bottom edge. In extra fine plus to near uncirculated condition. These medals are the only Summer Olympics medals to have been rectangular in design and this example is now well over a century old. 204 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Gorgeous Olympic judge’s plaque

from the 1900 Paris Olympics 370 Paris Olympics

1900 Silver Judge’s Plaque ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Rare and extraordinarily stunning sterling silver plaque from the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle and 2nd Olympic Games, measuring 3 x 5, featuring a raised artistic rendition of a Greek goddess seated on a throne, holding a long horn which rests on her knee and clutching a palm of victory near her breast, engraved below, “Jury,” with raised numerals at the top indicating the year, “1900.” The engraved maker’s marks on the front read, “L. Botte’e, No. 163, Christofle,” and the reverse is blank. This rare and spectacular plaque would have been presented to one of the judges presiding over the Exposition Universelle and Olympic Games. Nicely displayed in its original customfitted 4 x 6.5 suede mat. In choice to uncirculated condition. The 1900 Summer Olympics were held in Paris as a part of the Wolds’ Fair and were the first Games to admit women athletes. With the beautiful relief portrait of the Greek goddess—an appropriate image, considering the origin of the Olympics—and elegantly curved and sculpted edges, this is a magnificent and early 1900 Olympic display piece.

371 Paris Olympics

1900 Judge Pin ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Original 1900 Paris Summer Olympics judge’s pin. Gold-plated silver pin, manufactured by Christofle, measures 23mm x 41mm, weighs approximately 10 grams, and has a ‘button-hole’ closure on the back. Front of the badge depicts Fame seated on a throne, a palm branch in her right hand and a trumpet in her left, with the artist’s name along the right edge, “1900” printed at the top, and “Jury,” at the bottom. Condition is very fine. These badges are recognized as the first metal Olympic Games participation badges.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 205


372

Official 1900 Jury Gold Plaque

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Stunning gold-plated bronze plaque, 3.25 x 5.5, featuring an impressive raised relief of Fame seated on a throne, a palm branch in her right hand and a trumpet in her left, with the artist’s name along the right edge, “1900” printed at the top, and “Jury,” at the bottom. Reverse bears a hand-engraved presentation, in French, which reads, “A Lucien Layus, affectuex souvenir, G. R. S.” Plaque rates extra fine plus. Plaque was presented by Gustave Roger Sandoz, General Secretary of the French Committee of Expositions, to Layus, who was a prominent member of the prestigious 1900 World’s Fair Committee. He was also reported to have been the president of Director of Judges for the Olympics and other exposition events. To the best of our knowledge, this gilt gold example is the only one of its 1900 format to ever be offered.

373

Silver Pentathlon 1904 Columbia University Medal ESTIMATE: $300-$500 This gilt plus silver 1904 “Missouri University—Columbia” medal measures approximately 1.25˝ in diameter and 1.5˝ long from the top of the bar to bottom of medal. The hanging bar is engraved, “Pentathlon,” with the medal marked “Sterling,” on the reverse and engraved, “James E. Landon 2318 points.” This scarce medal would have been Landon’s 1904 predecessor to medals he would win in the 1904 Summer Olympics. A highly regarded athlete, Landon competed in AAU and collegiate Olympic events, medaling in both the hammer throw and discuss. Condition is extra fine plus. A scarce 1904 format indeed.

206 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Very rare 1904 official’s badge

374 St. Louis Olympics

1904 YMCA Official’s Gold Badge ESTIMATE: $4,000-$5,000 This gilt ‘gold’ 1904 Olympic official’s YMCA badge measures 2.5˝ in length and 1.5˝ wide. Crossbar at the top reads, “1904–Official Olympic Games,” with the ornate circular body, 1.75˝ in diameter, reads, “YMCA–Spirit–Mind–Body.” Reverse is handengraved, “G. T. Hepron, Secretary A.L. Y.M.C.A., N.A.” Medal comes with its original leather case. Condition is near mint. A most unusual and seldom-seen 1904 official Olympic format.

375 St. Louis World’s Fair

1904 Lapel Pin, Pendants, and Certificates ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Collection of five items from the 1904 World’s Fair held in St. Louis, Missouri, the same venue as the third modern Olympics. Collection consists of: a small fleur-de-lis lapel pin; two identical 1˝ diameter pendants, with raised relief images of Napoleon and Thomas Jefferson; and two unissued Louisiana Purchase Exposition certificates. In overall fine condition. An appealing offering relating to America’s third Olympics, which took place 110 years ago.

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First place team winners medal from the 1906 Games 376 Athens Olympics

1906 Silver Team Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,500 This 1906 Summer Games team silver winners medal is approximately 32mm in diameter, 2.1mm in thickness, and weighs approximately 18 grams. The winners medal was designed by Jules Chaplaint. One side of the medal features a seated Nike, from Ancient Stater of Hilias, with “Olympia,” in Greek, printed underneath. The reverse has a raised inscription, in ancient Greek, which reads, “B [meaning 2nd Athens Olympic Games]—International Olympic Games in Athens 1906.” Medal has a blue and white ribbon which was added later. Condition is extra fine. Though this particular type of medal was originally presented with a similar blue and white ribbon, the attractive one offered here is, to our knowledge, not original to the piece, though it is circa 1906. Teams that finished in first or second place in their events were presented medals like these. Silver was awarded for first place, bronze for second place, and no award at all for the third place team. Team 1906 winners medals are seldom seen.

Rare 1906 Olympic official’s badge presented by AAU founder and president James Sullivan 377 Athens Olympics

1906 US Committee Badge ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 Very scarce 1906 United States Olympic Committee badge. Stunning 3D badge measures approximately 27mm x 35mm and weighs 11.4 grams. Medal is attached to its attractive original gold and blue ribbon and crossbar marked “Official,” with an overall length of 3.25˝. Front of the medal bears a raised relief of an eagle holding the American and Greek flags, with the AAU emblem underneath, and “Olympic Games 1906,” in raised letters above the eagle. Reverse bears a presentation engraving which reads: “Compliments of Jas. E. Sullivan, Sec’y American Olympic Committee,” and is also stamped by maker Dieges & Clust of New York. In near mint condition, with a small vertical tear to ribbon, but still retaining its beautiful display properties. Sullivan was one of the founders of the Amateur Athletic Union in 1888, serving as its secretary from 1889–1906, and president from 1906–1909. An uncommon and truly elegant badge presented by one of the most influential people in the early Olympic movement.

208 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


378 Pastime Athletic Club

NYC 1906 Medal

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 A 1906 Pastime Athletic Club medal, representing New York City. Gold-finished medal measures approximately 1˝ in diameter and is attached to its original blue and black ribbon for an overall length of 3.25˝. Front of the medal bears a raised relief of a runner, with “Olympic Games, Pastime Athletic Club 1906,” in raised letters. Reverse is stamped by makers Dieges & Clust of New York. In extra fine plus condition.

Handsome silver winners medal for the only Olympic appearance of racquets 379 London Olympics

1908 Silver Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $4,000-$6,000 This 1908 Summer Games silver winners medal was presented to Henry Leaf. Medal is approximately 33mm in diameter, weighs approximately 19 grams, and was designed by Bertram Mackennal. One side of the detailed raised relief medal features two young women crowning an athlete with a laurel wreath with “Olympic Games London 1908,” in raised letters, with the reverse showing St. George, the patron saint of England, slaying a dragon as a goddess looks on. Medal comes in its stunning original black leather presentation case, embossed on the top in gold, “Olympic Games, Second Prize, Racquets Singles, London 1908,” and was presented to Henry Leaf. Condition is uncirculated. Racquets, a precursor to squash, made its only Olympic appearance at the 1908 games in London. Henry Leaf, the odds on favorite, may well have won the gold instead, but he injured his left hand in the semi-final match against John Jacob Astor, and had to sit out the finals, with the gold medal going to Evan Baillie Noel by default. Leaf would also win a bronze medal in 1908 in doubles. A particularly stunning and beautifully engraved example, complete with its splendid original leather and gilt presentation case.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 209


380 London Olympics

1908 Swedish Swim Club Badge ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Quality original 1908 Swedish swim club badge presented to a swimmer that participated in the 1908 Summer Olympics in London, England. Badge measures 3˝ long with the ribbon, and approximately 1˝ in diameter. Medallion portion bears a six-pointed color star with “SSC [Swedish Swim Club]” in the middle. Reverse is hand-engraved, “Presented by the Swedish Swimming Club to the Swedish swimmers taking part in the Olympic Games in London 1908.” In fine condition, with some light wear to medallion and some very light fading and soiling to ribbon. A seldom offered Olympiad related item.

Personal IOC badge of famed Harvard athlete Evert Jansen Wendell 381 Evert Jansen Wendell’s

International Olympic Committee Badge

ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Rare International Olympic Committee (IOC) badge, circa 1912, which was personally owned and worn by noted Harvard athlete and Olympic Committee member E. Jansen Wendell. Gold-plated badge, enameled in silver, green, and red, measures an impressive and eyecatching approximate 2˝ in diameter. Printed around the outside edge is “Comite International Olympique,” with the Olympic motto in the center of the badge, “Citius, Altius, Fortius [Swifter, Higher, Stronger].” Badge is marked on the reverse by Birmingham maker Vaughton and Sons and bears the appropriate hallmarks. In choice condition. Scarce in its own right, the desirability of this piece is heightened by the athletic fame of its original owner. As an athlete, Evert Jansen was the first human ever clocked at 10 seconds or better in the 100. Even more impressive when one considers that they used no starting blocks when young Wendell accomplished such a feat back in 1880. A stunning IOC badge and Olympic collecting rarity.

210 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


First prize medal presented to Harvard runner Evert Jansen Wendell, the first collegian to break 10 seconds in the 100 yard dash 382 Evert Jansen Wendell’s

1882 Harvard First Prize Medal ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Harvard Athletic Association first prize medal presented to Evert Jansen Wendell in 1882. Medal measures approximately 1.25˝ in diameter, with the HAA [Harvard Athletic Association] emblem on the front below its Latin motto, and is engraved on the reverse, “E. J. Wendell 82, 57 sec.” Medal is attached by a loop to a ribbon and crossbar, with “1/5 mile hurdle race,” engraved on the crossbar, with the upper cross bar reading, “First Prize.” Condition is extra fine. Wendell (1860–1917) athlete at Harvard, winning titled in the 100, 220, and 440 yard races, as well as the 1/5 mile hurdles during his senior year. Evert Wendell also holds the distinction of being the first college sprinter to run the 100 yard dash in 10 seconds. He also participated in boxing, crew, and baseball. After his college career, Wendell was a member of the American Olympic Committee in 1904 and 1908, and served as a member of the International Olympic Committee from 1911–1917. The remainder of his life was spent assisting the youth of America and other philanthropic endeavors. One of America’s pioneering athletes, long before the first modern day Olympics, Wendell went on to a lifetime of amazing achievements, eventually becoming a founding father of the IOC Olympic movement.

383 Olympian George H. Breed

AAU 1911 Fencing Medal

ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Striking amateur Athletic Association medal presented to Olympian fencer George H. Breed, captain of the 1912 USA team. Gold-plated medal measures approximately 1.75˝ in diameter and is attached to its original red, white, and blue ribbon, with the crossbar reading “Championship,” for an overall length of 5.75˝. Engraved around the edge of the medal is “Foils,” and “G. H. Breed 1911.” Front of the medal bears a raised image of a fencer and “Amateur Fencers League of America MDCCCXCI,” in raised letters around the edge, and the AAU emblem on the reverse. Condition is extra fine, with some light fraying to ribbon. Breed was an expert fencer who competed in the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm, and was set to return to the games in 1920 before unexpected business developments forced him to pull out of the competition only two days before leaving for Antwerp. Handsome display piece focused on an elite athlete from long ago.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 211


384 Stockholm Olympics

1912 NY Welcome Badge ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Very nice and artistically created gold-gilted New York welcome badge for athletes returning from the 1912 ‘Jim Thorpe’ Summer Olympics in Stockholm. Scarce gold-plated pin, manufactured by Dieges & Clust of New York, measures approximately 1.25 x 1.75, with the front featuring a raised image of a woman holding laurels in her hand, and the words, “New York’s Greeting to Olympic Team 1912,” with the maker’s name stamped on the reverse. Badge retains its original American flag-style silk ribbon, but is missing the crossbar and pin. Condition is extra fine. Scarce and highly sought-after.

385

386

Stockholm Olympics

Stockholm Olympics

ESTIMATE: $200-$300

ESTIMATE: $300-$500

Original 1912 ‘Jim Thorpe’ Summer Olympics participation badge. Attractive silvered lapel pin badge, made by Sporrong & Co. of Stockholm measures 25mm x 37mm with a Greek athlete’s head at the top, and “Olympiska Spelen, Stockholm 1912,” in raised letters at the bottom. Reverse bears an impressed maker’s mark. In fine condition.

Two 1912 ‘Jim Thorpe’ Summer Olympics participation badges. Attractive silvered lapel pin badge, made by Sporrong & Co. of Stockholm measures 25mm x 37mm with a Greek athlete’s head at the top, and “Olympiska Spelen, Stockholm 1912,” in raised letters at the bottom. Reverse bears an impressed maker’s mark of C. C. Sporrong & Co. In fine condition.

1912 Participation Badge

1912 Competitor’s Pins

212 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Olympic trials 10k winners medal presented to a famous Harvard athlete 387 Stockholm Olympics

1912 Gold Qualifying Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 Elegant 10k yellow gold winners medal. Medal measures approximately 1.5˝ in diameter, weighs approximately one ounce, and is attached to its beautiful original ribbon and crossbar for an overall length of 3.5.˝ Reverse of the medal bears raised letters that read, “EAA Field Day, Olympic Trials, June 1, 1912,” with the front showing several athletes waving the Banners of Victory. Condition is extra fine plus. This medal would have been presented at the Eastern Athletic Association Field Day, with this particular medal going to Evert Jansen Wendell, regarded as the ‘Father of Harvard Athletics,’ and would have qualified Wendell to compete in the 1912 Summer Olympics. An impressive display piece emanating from a pioneer American track and field star and future International Olympic Club (IOC) member.

Uncommon team gold winners medal from the 1912 ‘Jim Thorpe’ Olympics 388 Stockholm Olympics

1912 Gold Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 This 1912 Summer Games team gold (gilt silver, as is appropriate) winners medal is approximately 33mm in diameter, was designed by Erik Lindberg and Bertram Mackennal and minted by C.C. Sporrong & Co. of Stockholm. One side of the medal features two female figures crowning a young victor in the Olympic Games with a laurel wreath, with the reverse showing a herald, proclaiming the Olympic Games and standing close to a bust of Ling, the founder of the Swedish system of gymnastics. Condition is extra fine. Only 2547 athletes participated in these games, with this first place medal being one of only 200+ awarded to the winners.

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389 Stockholm Olympics

1912 Discus Pin ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Original bronze discus pin from the 1912 ‘Jim Thorpe’ Summer Olympics held in Stockholm, Sweden. Pin measures an imposing 1.75˝ in diameter, with a raised figure of an ancient discus thrower in the center, with “Olympiska Spelen 1912,” in raised letters around the outside edge. Reverse is stamped “Import.” In fine condition.

390 Stockholm Olympics

1912 Gray Wrestling Cup

391 Stockholm Olympics

1912 Black Wrestling Cup

ESTIMATE: $300-$500

ESTIMATE: $300-$500

Original porcelain commemorative cup for the 1912 ‘Jim Thorpe’ Summer Olympics held in Stockholm, Sweden. This handsome cup, now over a century old, stands 3.5˝ high with a 2.75˝ diameter opening. One side features a large image of an ancient wrestling match with “Minne Fran Olympiska Spelen, Stockholm 1912,” printed around the outside of the image. Bottom of the cup is stamped “Import.” In fine condition, with a few trivial chips to bottom edge and traces of a gold border painted around rim.

Scarce original porcelain commemorative cup for the 1912 ‘Jim Thorpe’ Summer Olympics held in Stockholm, Sweden. Cup stands 3.5˝ high with a 2.75˝ diameter opening. One side features a large image of an ancient wrestling match, set against a solid black background, with “Minne Fran Olympiska Spelen, Stockholm 1912,” printed around the outside of the image. Bottom of the cup is stamped “Import.” In fine condition, with a few tiny chips to bottom edge. A piece of Olympiad porcelain now over a century old.

214 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


392 Stockholm Olympics

1912 Letter Opener ESTIMATE: $300-$400 Letter opener from the 1912 ‘Jim Thorpe’ Summer Olympics in Stockholm. Metal opener measures 6.75˝ long, with the handle having a raised relief of a Greek athlete, with “Olympiska Spelen, Stockholm 1912,” at the base of the handle. In fine condition, with some of the letters worn off from handle and expected light wear—a handsome piece from 1912.

393 Stockholm Olympics

1912 Silver and Glass Jar ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Original commemorative glass jar with silver cover from the ‘Jim Thorpe’ 1912 Summer Olympics held in Stockholm, Sweden, over 100 years ago. Attractive glass jar measures 4˝ in diameter with a beautifully etched design around the side. Cover bears a raised medallion in the center featuring a Grecian male surrounded by laurel leaves, with “Olympiska Spelen Stockholm 1912,” along the bottom. In fine condition.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 215


395

396

Stockholm Olympics

Stockholm Olympics

1912 Wrestling Bowl ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Uncommon original porcelain lidded bowl from the 1912 ‘Jim Thorpe’ Summer Olympics held in Stockholm, Sweden. Bowl with lid measures 4˝ in diameter, with gold borders to the edges of the lid and bowl, and image of an ancient wrestling match to the center of the lid, and “Minne Fran Olympiska Spelen, Stockholm 1912,” printed around the image. In fine condition. A desirable porcelain Olympiad piece, now over a century old.

1912 Vase ESTIMATE: $400-$600

Original commemorative bud vase from the 1912 ‘Jim Thorpe’ Summer Olympics held in Stockholm, Sweden. Vase stands 5.5˝ high, with gold borders, a green base, and an image of an ancient Grecian discuss thrower on one side. Bottom of the vase is stamped “Import.” Some wear and fading to paint along top and bottom edges, otherwise fine condition.

Belgian national medal presented to a multi-medal winning archer at the 1920 Antwerp Games 397 Belgium Olympics

1920 Gold Winners National Medal ESTIMATE: $300-$500 This National Gold winners medal was presented to Hubert Van Innis, who was selected to represent Belgium as an archer in the 1920 Antwerp Olympics. Medal measures approximately 27mm x 38mm and is an archer championship medal. Front features a raised rendering of a bow and arrow inside a laurel leaf, with a crown at the top with a hanging loop. Reverse bears raised letters, in Flemish and French, which read, “Great National Championship—7th Olympiad 1920—Great National Championship.” Condition is extra fine plus. Belgium ranks quite high in overall Olympic medals won, and in 1920, the country took gold in all of the archery events, with Van Innis capturing six medals total (four gold and two silver) at the Games, to accompany his three medals from the 1900 Olympics. A very attractive gold medal representation.

216 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


398 R. Earl Johnson’s

Amateur AthletiC Union 1921 Gold Medal

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 A m a t e u r A t h le t i c Union gold medal presented to renown trend setter R. Earl Johnson in 1921 for winning the five-mile run. Medal measures 1.75˝ in diameter, with a woman presenting a laurel on the front, and “Amateur Athletic Union of the United States MDCCCLXXVIII,” in raised letters around the edge. Reverse is engraved, “–5 Mile– Run, July 4, 1921, R. Earl Johnson.” Medal retains its original red, white, and blue ribbon and pin. In fine condition. R. Earl Johnson was the first nationally prominent African-American distance runner. He made his Olympic debut in 1920, and in 1924 he placed eighth in a field of 43, and led the US to the silver medals in the cross-country team event. Johnson was the AAU champion at five miles for three straight years from 1921–1923 and won the 10 mile event in 1924. An artifact from a prominent African American in sports history.

399 R. Earl Johnson’s

Amateur Athletic Union Cross Country 1922 Medal

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Amateur Athletic Union medal presented to renown trend setter R. Earl Johnson in 1922 for the individual cross-country event. Medal measures 1.75˝ in diameter, with a woman presenting a laurel on the front, and “Amateur Athletic Union of the United States MDCCCLXXVIII,” in raised letters around the edge. Reverse is engraved, “Individual Cross Country 1922, R. Earl Johnson.” Medal retains its original blue and gold ribbon and pin. In fine condition. R. Earl Johnson was the first nationally prominent African-American distance runner. He made his Olympic debut in 1920, and in 1924 he placed eighth in a field of 43, but then went on to lead the US to the silver medals in the cross-country team event. Johnson was the AAU champion at five miles for three straight years from 1921–1923 and won the 10 mile event in 1924. An impressive early African-American sports relic.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 217


1924 silver winners medal awarded to the first nationally-known African-American runner after his battle against Paavo Nurmi

400 R. Earl Johnson’s Paris Olympics

1924 Silver Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $4,000-$6,000 The 1924 Summer Games silver winners medal presented to one of the very first African-Americans to ever compete in the Olympics, runner Richard Earl Johnson. Medal is approximately 55mm in diameter and weighs approximately 76 grams. The winners medal was struck by the Paris mint, was designed by Andre Rivaud, and is stamped along the edge “2Argent.” One side of the medal features a winning athlete helping up his defeated foe and the artist’s signature along the bottom, with the reverse having a raised relief of various pieces of sporting equipment, with the artist’s initials below them, and “VIII eme Olympiade Paris 1924,” in raised letters. In extra fine plus condition. African-American trailblazer Johnson was the first finisher in the team event, finishing third behind the legendary Paavo Nurmi and Ville Ritola, with his teammates Arthur Studenroth and August Fager finishing fifth and sixth respectively. This winners medal represents the most prestigious award of Earl Johnson’s Olympic career, the first nationally prominent African-American runner.

218 | September 17, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Earl Johnson’s bronze winners medal from the punishing 1924 cross-country race, the last ever held in the Olympics

401 R. Earl Johnson’s Paris Olympics

1924 Bronze Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $3,000-$5,000 The 1924 Summer Games bronze winners medal presented to groundbreaking African-American US runner R. Earl Johnson. Medal is approximately 55mm in diameter and weighs approximately 76 grams. The winners medal was struck by the Paris mint and was designed by Andre Rivaud, and is stamped along the edge “Bronze.” One side of the medal features a winning athlete helping up his defeated foe and the artist’s signature along the bottom, with the reverse having a raised relief of various pieces of sporting equipment, with the artist’s initials below them, and “VIII eme Olympiade Paris 1924,” in raised letters. In extra fine plus to near uncirculated condition. Included is an expansive photo album full of photos and postcards from the 1924 Olympic Games, complete with Earl Johnson’s own handwritten captions, including a photo of Johnson posing with other members of the track team. The men’s cross-country event of these Olympics was run on one of the hottest days in Parisian history, with temperatures soaring to around 103 degrees. These grueling conditions turned the event from a race into a survival test. Only 15 of the 38 participants who started the race managed to cross the finish line. The race was won by the famed Paavo Nurmi, with Johnson finishing third, some three minutes behind the winner. Following the carnage, the International Olympic Committee discontinued this particular event. Johnson would also capture a bronze medal as a member of the cross country relay team with Arthur Studenroth and August Fager. Earl Johnson was, especially as an African-American, a successful pioneer of Olympic glory. A beautiful relic from one of the Games’s most brutal races ever run. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 219


Remarkable sweater from the 1924 Paris Summer Olympics 402 Henry Farrell’s Paris Olympics

1924 Sweater ESTIMATE: $2,000-$3,000 A navy blue wool shawl-collared knit sweater bearing the official 1924 Olympic shield on the left breast, presented to American Olympic soccer player Henry Farrell while on the SS America en route to the 1924 Olympic Games in Paris. The heavy sweater is of the highest quality construction and features eight buttons up the front and two pockets. Mr. Amyx obtained this directly from Farrell’s granddaughter, and it is accompanied by a detailed packet of provenance including images of Henry Farrell wearing the sweater. In 1924, Farrell played forward for the US National Olympic Team, which scored a 1–0 victory in the preliminary round against Estonia. Their next match resulted in a 3–0 defeat by Uruguay, who went on to become the surprise gold medalists in the event. Early sports–related sweaters such as this are extremely scarce, highly desirable, and rarely seen in such fine condition.

403 Henry Farrell’s Paris Olympics

1924 Welcome Home Badge ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Scarce and attractive 1924 welcome home medal presented to US soccer pioneer and Olympian Henry C. Farrell. Gilt/sterling medal measures approximately 1.25 x 1.75, and is attached to its original red, white, and blue ribbon for an overall length of 3.75˝. Front of the medal features a victorious athlete holding a palm branch, with a presentation in raised letters, which reads: “On behalf of the City of New York to the victorious American athletes on their return from the Olympic Games at Paris, France,” with “Presented by Hon. John F. Hylan Mayor,” around the raised figure. Reverse is engraved, “Henry C. Farrell,” and is stamped by the makers Dieges and Clust,” and bears a sterling hallmark. In extra fine condition. Henry Farrell was an American pioneer in the development of soccer as a major sport in the US. This is an uncommon piece, indicative of the major effort New York City made for our 1924 Olympians. Additionally offered in the Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection is a dramatic sculpture of a soccer player in motion (Lot 404), which was also presented to Mr. Farrell.

220 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Impressive oversized sculpture presented to an American soccer pioneer 404 John Farrell

Soccer Statue

ESTIMATE: $3,000-$5,000 Impressive and very detailed soccer sculpture, of an artistic action-style workmanship, presented to John B. Farrell. Statue measures 26˝ tall on its stunning green marble and wood base, and depicts a young boy kicking a soccer ball. Work is signed in the base, “Carher,” and is also stamped, “Made in Paris, France.” Black wooden base has a hand-engraved presentation plaque, which reads: “Presented to John B. Farrell by the Football Association of E. P. & D., in appreciation of his services to soccer.” In fine condition, with some minor dings and chips to bottom portion of wooden base, but not to the marble or artwork itself. Sculpture was presented to Farrell in the late 1800s. A highly skilled player, Farrell was an avid promoter of soccer in the United States. His son, Henry C. Farrell, was a member of the 1924 US Olympic soccer team. Sculpture was later presented to Raleigh DeGeer Amyx by John B. Farrell’s great grand-daughter, Susan Farrell Beatrice. A truly accomplished piece of art regardless— the unique historical background only adds to its appeal.

405 Paris Olympics

1924 Ashtray ESTIMATE: $300-$400 Very attractive ashtray from the 1924 Summer Olympics held in Paris, France. Highly polished, as manufactured, brass oval-shaped ashtray measures 5.25 x 3.25, was designed by P. Lasserre, and features a raised image of a victorious athlete in the Olympic stadium, with the artist’s name in the lower left corner. In fine condition, making for an impressive display.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 221


406 Paris Olympics

1924 Cigar Case ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Very nice hand-engraved brass cigar holder from the 1924 Summer Olympics held in Paris. Holder measures 4.5˝ long, and is hand-engraved on one side, “Paris 1924,” and “VIII Olympiad,” on the other side. Some scattered light surface marks and tarnishing to the inside from use, which may very well polish out, otherwise fine condition. Olympic items of such quality are seldom offered for sale.

407 Paris Olympics

1924 Pocket Knife ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Handsome gilt pocket knife from the 1924 Summer Olympics held in Paris, France. Knife measures 2.75˝ long with two small fold-out blades. One side of the handle features a raised image of a female swimmer, with “Jeux Olympiques, Paris 1924,” in raised letters, with the reverse featuring a male athlete holding a spear, and “VIII Olympiade, Paris 1924,” in raised letters around image. In fine condition, with expected light wear.

408 Amsterdam Olympics

1928 Competitor’s Badge ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Official Olympian participants badge from the 1928 Summer Olympics held in Amsterdam. Metal and attractive enamel badge measures approximately 1.25˝ in diameter, with “IX Olympiade Amsterdam,” on the three bars at the top, with the center having the five Olympic rings and “1928 Concurrent [Competitor],” around the rings in raised letters. Badges were struck at the works of the Royal Begeer at Voorschoten. In fine condition. Handsome display piece.

222 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


409 Amsterdam Olympics

1928 Glass and Souvenir Pin ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Original commemorative glass from the 1928 Summer Olympics held in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Attractive blue glass measures 4.5˝ high, with a 2.5˝ diameter opening, with two rows of carefully etched information around the outside; and an original 1.25˝ commemorative pin for the 1928 Summer Olympics Czechoslovakian team, most likely for fencing. In fine condition, with a bit of light paint loss to a few letters of etching.

411 Amsterdam Olympics

1928 Cups

ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Two original quality commemorative porcelain cups for the 1928 Summer Olympics held in Amsterdam, Netherlands, made by Societe Ceramique, Maastricht. Cups measure 4˝ high, with 3˝ diameter openings, one with an image of a soccer player, the other of a runner, and both with impressive background images of oak leaves. Both are labeled on the bottom, “Societe Ceramique, Maastricht, Holland.” In fine condition, with a bit of tiny light paint loss to a few letters of etching—the minor flaws do not detract from the overall aesthetic appeal.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 223


412 Amsterdam Olympics

1928 Lavender Glass ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Attractive engraved quality lavender glass measuring 4.75˝ tall and 3.75˝ diameter at the top. Glass is elaborately engraved with “Olympische Spelene Amsterdam 1928,” on one side. In fine condition. An attractive Olympiad display piece.

413 Amsterdam Olympics

1928 Pocket Knife ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Pocket knife from the 1928 Summer Olympics held in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Knife handle measures 3.25˝ long, with two fold-out blades, each marked “Rich. A. Herder, Solinger.” One side of the handle has silver inlays of a runner, and “Amsterdam 1928,” at one edge of the handle. One inlay slightly peeling from handle, and some wear to the blades, as to be expected, otherwise fine condition.

414 Amsterdam Olympics

1928 Handkerchief ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Original commemorative silk handkerchief from the 1928 Summer Olympics in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Purple-bordered handkerchief measures 8.5 x 8.5 with a monogram of the interlocking Olympic rings in blue, black, red, yellow, and green, and “IX Olympiade 1928, St. Moritz—Amsterdam,” embroidered below the rings in the lower right corner. In fine condition, with several expected storage folds. A most attractive Olympiad display piece.

224 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Incredibly rare 1928 bronze winners medal, one of only 25 presented at the Winter Games 415 St. Moritz Olympics

1928 Bronze Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $4,000-$6,000

This scarce 1928 Winter Games bronze winners medal is approximately 50mm in diameter, 3.3mm in thickness, and weighs approximately 61 grams. This winners medal was minted by the Huguenin Freres of Locle, and was designed by Arnold Hunerwadel. One side of the medal features a female figure skater, with her arms outstretched, surrounded by ice crystals, with the reverse featuring the Olympic rings and five lines of raised letters, in French, which read, “II. Jeux Olympiques D’ Hiver, St. Moritz 1923.” In extra fine condition. The Olympics at St. Moritz were just the second Winter Games held, with only 495 athletes participating. This was one of only 25 bronze medals issued at the 1928 Winter Games, and one of only 80 total winners medals that were presented during the entire proceedings. A paramount example.

416 British Figure Skating Championships

1930 Gold Winners Medal

ESTIMATE: $200-$400 S t r i k i n g Na t i o n a l Skating Association 9k gold medal presented to Gertrude Kathleen Shaw for her first place victory in the 1930 British Championship. Medal is approximately 38 mm in diameter, and weighs approximately 21 grams. One side of the medal features a male figure skater performing, with the reverse beautifully engraved, “National Skating Association, Figure Skating Championship International Style, 1930 Winner Miss G. K. Shaw, Manchester,” with several proof marks stamped to the lower portion of the medal. Winners medal actually comes in its original handsome burgundy leather presentation case made by the Alexander Clarke Company of London. Condition is near mint. Shaw competed in the 1924 and 1928 Winter Olympics, but failed to medal. She would win the British Championship a total of three times, winning the inaugural competition in 1927, and twice more in 1929 and 1930. A beautiful display piece.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 225


417 Los Angeles Olympics

1932 Silver Bracelet

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Commemorative bracelet from the 1932 Summer Olympics held in Los Angeles, California. Silverplated bracelet measures approximately 2.25˝ across and features a raised image of a discuss thrower and the Olympic rings. Inside is hand-engraved, “Babe D. 2 golds +,” [Babe Didrikson] with a small arrow next to the engraving, and a figure of a javelin thrower. In overall extra fine condition. A nice memento honoring the greatest female athlete of the 20th century.

418

419

Berlin Olympics

Berlin Olympics

ESTIMATE: $200-$400

ESTIMATE: $300-$500

Attractive gilt bronze presentation plaque. Plaque measures 1.5 x 2.5 and features a raised relief of a victorious athlete raising a laurel, and engraved underneath with the Olympic rings and “1936 U.S.A. Team.” In fine condition. Although not positively identified as a presentation piece, this plaque may have been a prototype, or a presentation piece to one or more of the American Olympic athletes. A striking display piece.

Quality original commemorative glass from the 1936 Summer Olympics held in Berlin, Germany. Stem glass measures 6˝ high, with a 3.25˝ diameter at the top. One side has impressive raised lettering which reads, “Berlin 1936,” with the five Olympic rings, and “XI Olympiade,” in raised letters along the base. In fine condition, with some light wear.

1936 USA Team Member Plaque

1936 Crystal Glass

226 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


421 Berlin Olympics

1936 Porcelain Vase ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Superior quality porcelain vase, made for the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany, and issued by the authority of the German Propaganda Minister, Josef Goebbels, rendering it extremely uncommon. Vase stands almost 9˝ tall, with a 5.25˝ diameter opening at the top, with gold trim applied to the top and bottom. One side is painted with the five Olympic rings below a large gold eagle, with “Olympia 1936,” printed under the image. Bottom of the vase is marked, “Genehmigt—Vom Propaganda—Ausschuss—Der Olympischen Spiele 1936.” In fine condition, with some light surface loss to the gold borders. This vase was manufactured specifically for the 1936 Olympics for presentation to various dignitaries, and perhaps a limited quantity for sale, although no records have been found on this fact. An exemplary Olympic offering.

422

423

Berlin Olympics

Berlin Olympics

ESTIMATE: $100-$200

ESTIMATE: $200-$300

Quality original commemorative silk handkerchief from the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany. Exquisite handkerchief measures 8 x 8 with a monogram of the interlocking Olympic rings in blue, black, red, yellow, and green, and “XI Olympiade, Berlin 1936,” embroidered below the rings in the lower right corner. In fine condition, with expected central horizontal and vertical folds.

Commemorative bracelet from the 1936 Summer Olympics held in Berlin, Germany. Silver-plated brass bracelet measures approximately 2.25˝ across and features raised images of the Olympic rings. Inside is engraved, “H. Stephens, 100M 11.5” with a small arrow alongside the engraving. Overall in very fine to extra fine condition. Ms. Stephens was a world famous athlete and well-known as the world’s fastest female during the 1936 ‘Jesse Owens’ Olympics.

1936 Handkerchief

1936 Silver Bracelet

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 227


424 Berlin Olympics

1936 Boxing Pin ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Original 1936 Summer Olympic boxing stick pin. Pin measures 2˝ long, with a gold image of a boxer, and “Olympiaden 1936,” across the top. Most likely a pin for the Swedish Boxing Team. Reverse of the pin is stamped, “Sporrongace, Stockholm.” In fine condition.

429 Berlin Olympics

1936 Encased Comb ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Original hair comb from the 1936 Summer Olympics held in Berlin, Germany. Ivory-colored comb measures 4.5˝ long, with a silver-plated handle. Comb comes (unexpectedly) in its original leather case with the Olympic rings and “Berlin 1936,” printed in gold on one side. In fine condition, with some very light wear to case.

430 428 Berlin Olympics

Berlin Olympics

1936 Pocket Knife

1936 Silver Watch Fob

ESTIMATE: $100-$200

ESTIMATE: $100-$200

Handsome celluloid pocket knife, with inlaid black lettering, from the 1936 Summer Olympics held in Berlin, Germany. Uncommon knife handle measures 3˝ in length with two small fold-out blades, each marked at the bottom, “Rostfrei.” One side of the handle is marked with the Olympic rings and “Olympiade Berlin 1936.” In fine condition, with very mild handling wear. Impressive display potential.

Attractive original souvenir watch fob from the 1936 Summer Olympics held in Berlin, Germany. Watch fob measures 5.5˝ in overall length, with a small clip attached to a black ribbon, with a bell-shaped medallion at the bottom. Medallion features a gold eagle on top of the Olympic rings, with the reverse engraved, “XI Olympiade, Berlin 1936.” In fine condition.

228 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Incredibly rare 1936 Winter Olympics bronze medal, one of only 36 made

431 Garmisch Olympics

1936 Bronze Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $18,000-$20,000

This rare 1936 Winter Games bronze winners medal is approximately 100mm in diameter, ranges from 4mm to 5mm in thickness, and weighs approximately 298 grams. The winners medal was minted and struck by Deschler and Sohn of Munich, Germany, and designed by Richard Klein. One side of the medal features a figure in a chariot holding a wreath and illustrating winter sports equipment below, with the artist’s initials along the right side, with the reverse showing the Olympic rings, and “IV Olympische, Winterspiele 1936,” in raised letters around the edge. Condition is near mint. Only 755 athletes competed in these games, with a total of only 36 gold, 36 silver, and 36 bronze medals minted, making these large medals virtually unobtainable. This example is one of the two largest Olympic winners medals ever awarded. A truly significant offering.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 229


432 Berlin Olympics

1936 Pencil

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Mechanical pencil from the 1936 Summer Olympics held in Berlin, Germany. Impressive looking pencil measures 4.25˝ long, with a silver pocket clip and a beautiful silver inlaid design on one side incorporating the Olympic rings and the Brandenburg Gate. In fine condition.

433 Garmisch Olympics

1936 Badge and Lapel Pin ESTIMATE: $300-$500 Two impressive items: original 1936 Winter Olympics badge, with color ribbon featuring the five Olympic rings and “HerrnSlalom,” printed near the bottom, with “IV Olmp. Winterspiele 1936, Garmisch–Partenkirchen,” on the metal at the top; and a 1.25˝ diameter metal and colored enamel competitor’s badge, with an image of the Olympic rings and the Alps on the front, with “Teilnehmer 899,” engraved on the reverse. In overall fine condition. The silk badge is actually a ticket to the Men’s Slalom event and this is the only Olympic Games where admission tickets were made of silk, for skiing and bobsled. Garmisch 1936 items are scarce in comparison to that year’s summer games in Berlin.

434 Golden Gloves

1936 Gold Medal ESTIMATE: $200-$400 Original 1936 Golden Gloves official’s medal. Gold-finish medal measures approximately 1.25 x 1.25 and is affixed to its original red, white, and blue ribbon and crossbar for an overall length of 3.75˝. Front of the medal bears a raised relief of a boxer, with “Golden Gloves 1936 Olympic Tournament in raised letters, with the reverse stamped “Chicago Tribune,” and bearing a Wm. Schridde maker’s mark. Condition is extra fine plus. In earlier Olympic days, the Golden Gloves tournament served at the launch pad for US boxers. An important representation of early boxing history.

230 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


435

436

London Olympics

Oslo Olympics

1948 Pin

ESTIMATE: $200-$300 Very appealing pin from the 1948 Summer Olympics held in London, England. Oval-shaped goldplated pin measures approximately 31mm x 21mm, and shows the Olympic rings in color surrounded by an artistically appealing white enamel oval border, with “XIV Olympiad, London 1948,” in raised letters around the edge. In fine condition. Few pieces were made for these 1948 Olympics due to the economy after the end of World War II.

1952 Participant Badge ESTIMATE: $400-$600 Scarce original 1952 Oslo Winter Olympics participant’s badge. Badge measures approximately 1.25 x 1.5, with the Olympic rings in color on the medallion, with “Deltager, [Participant]” stamped in the area below. Reverse of the badge is stamped, “R Gaudernack, Sandvika/Oslo, Norway.” In fine condition with expected light wear.

437

Olympic Pins:

Helsinki, Grenoble, and Barcelona ESTIMATE: $100-$200 A nice assemblage of three colorful enamel pins, including: one honoring the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Finland; one USSR delegation badge from the 1968 Winter Olympics in Grenoble, France; and an official Great Britain pin from the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain. Some light wear, otherwise fine condition.

438 Melbourne Olympics

1956 Tickets Signed By Al Oerter ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Three tickets to the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, each 4.5 x 3.5, two for the main stadium and one for West Melbourne stadium, each boldly signed in black felt tip by 1956 gold medal winner Al Oerter, adding “Discus Gold 56.” In fine condition. Al Oerter was the gold medal discus winner three consecutive times in the Olympic games. Truly a hall of fame American athlete. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 231


439

441

Rome Olympics

Montreal Olympics

ESTIMATE: $400-$600

ESTIMATE: $100-$200

1976 Competitor’s Pin

1960 Competitor’s Badge

Scarce competitor’s badge from the 1960 Summer Olympics held in Rome, Italy. Attractive colored enamel and bronze pin measures approximately 1.5 x 2, with “Atleta [Athlete],” printed along the bottom bar. In fine condition.

Participant pin from the 1976 Summer Olympics held in Montreal, Canada. Pin measures approximately 1.25 x 2.25, with elongated Olympic rings at the top, “Concurrent,” printed in the middle, and “XXIe Olympiade, Montreal 1976,” at the bottom. Scattered light surface wear, otherwise fine condition.

Distinctively ornate official olive leaf chain for a 1960 winners medal 440 Rome Olympics

1960 Bronze Medal Necklace ESTIMATE: $1,500-$2,000 Very rare bronze necklace from the ‘Muhammad Ali’ 1960 Summer Olympics held in Rome, Italy. Necklace consists of 18 individual bronze olive leaf links, each measuring approximately 1.5˝ long, that connect with ‘hook and eye’ closures. With a single circular piece in the middle. In fine condition. Winners medals from the 1960 Olympics were the only ones to feature an olive leaf chain and those offered to collectors over the years are usually missing this coveted chain, making this a rare offering. Here you have the opportunity to add this official chain to the gold, silver, or bronze 1960s winners medal in your collection now, or in the future—potentially doubling the overall value of your medal ensemble.

232 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


1972 bronze winners medal presented for 300 Meter Free Rifle

442 Munich Olympics

1972 Bronze Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $4,000-$6,000 This 1972 Munich Summer Games bronze medal is approximately 66 mm in diameter, 4.2 mm in thickness, and weighs approximately 140 grams. The medal’s edge is engraved with the winner’s name and sport and comes with its original bronze-plated chain and presentation case. The winners medal was minted by the Bavarian mint in Munich and was designed by Gerhard Marcks. One side of the medal features Victory seated above a stadium, with “XX Olympiade Munchen 1972,” in raised letters, with the reverse showing Roman twins Castor and Pollux, patrons of competitive sport and friendship, with the artist’s initials below them. In extra fine condition. This winners award was presented to Lajos Papp of Hungary for the Free Rifle (three positions) event. He competed in three consecutive Games from 1968–1976, with this medal being the only one he was awarded for placing third in the Mixed Free Rifle, Three Positions, 300 meter event. This was the final time that free rifle was contested at the Olympics. These Olympics were also the first time that chains replaced the usual ribbon which, some thought, too easily became wrinkled and soiled. For reasons unknown, 1972 Munich winners medals have long been one of the most challenging for advanced collectors to obtain.

Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 233


Gold winners medal presented to Nikolai Kruglov, the 1976 Games’s most dominant biathlete

443 Innsbruck Olympics

1976 Gold Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $7,000-$8,000 The 1976 Winter Games gold winners medal presented to the Soviet Union’s Nikolai Kruglov, Sr., for the biathlon relay. Medal is 72mm in diameter, 4.2 mm in thickness, and weighs approximately 164 grams. Medal retains its original red and white ribbon and is housed in its original red leather presentation box emblazoned with the Games’s official logo on the cover in gold. The winners medal was minted by the Austrian Mint and was designed by M. Coufal. One side of the medal features a relief of the Olympic flame and the Bergisel ski jump and Alps in the background, with “Biathlon–Staffel [relay]” in raised letters, as well as the artist’s name. Other side features the official 1976 Olympics emblem, with raised letters around the outside border. Edge is marked “A925” on the outside edge by the ribbon’s loop. In extra fine condition. This very medal was presented to Nikolai Kruglov who was one of four members of the Soviet biathlon relay team which captured the gold in the 4 x 7.5km relay, with a winning time of 1:57:55:64, beating second-place Finland by over three minutes. Kruglov would also win an individual gold for the 20km individual biathlon, as well as several medals in the World Championships from 1977–1979. This rare medal is one of only 71 issued in Innsbruck, due to the fact only 1128 athletes competed in the Games. A very handsome and complete medal from the best biathlete in the 1976 Games. Gold winners medals such as this are highly coveted by the most advanced of Olympiad collectors.

234 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Bo Berglund’s bronze hockey winners medal

from the historic 1980 Winter Olympics

444 Lake Placid Olympics

1980 Bronze Winners Medal ESTIMATE: $7,000-$8,000 This 1980 ‘Miracle on Ice’ Winter Games bronze winners medal was presented to Swedish hockey player Bo Berglund. Medal is a very large 80 mm in diameter and weighs approximately 180 grams. The medal’s edge is stamped with “Tiffany & Co. Bronze ©1979.” One side of the medal features a raised image of a hand holding the Olympic torch against a mountain backdrop, with the Olympic rings and “XIII Olympic Winter Games,” in raised letters. Reverse bears a fir tree and pine cone design, with “Lake Placid 1980,” in raised letters, and engraved underneath, “Ice Hockey.” Medal retains its original blue and white ribbon. Condition is near mint. Bo Berglund was a standout player in the Swedish League and won bronze medals in both the 1980 and 1988 Games, tallying one goal and three assists during the Games at Lake Placid. Originally drafted by the Boston Bruins, Berglund would spend parts of three seasons with Quebec, Minnesota, and Philadelphia. Medals from the 1980 Winter Olympic Games are quite rare, as only 73 bronze were presented, coupled with its relation to the ‘Miracle on Ice’ performance of the US Hockey Team, widely regarded as the greatest sports triumph of the 20th century, elevate this medal to an elite status for collectors. An ice hockey medal from the iconic 1980 ‘Miracle on Ice’ Olympiad is a prize any advanced Olympic collector would aspire to own. Visit www.RRAuction.com for full lot descriptions, additional photographs, and provenance material | 235


MASSIVE bust of Jim Thorpe, originally destined for display at the US Capitol 446 Jim Thorpe

Bust

ESTIMATE: $3,000-$4,000 Huge terra cotta bronzed bust of Jim Thorpe. Large original bust measures approximately 16 x 14, has a bronze-like finish, and stands on a handsome 10 x 10 square base with a height of six inches, with a plaque affixed to the front which begins, “Jim Thorpe, Native American Indian, The Greatest Athlete of the Century.” Bust is signed in the mold by wellknown Oklahoma artist Andrew M. Lester. This artistic bust bears a truly remarkable resemblance to this storied Native American athlete. Jim Thorpe was not only one of the greatest Olympians in history, but also a Major League Baseball player and founding player and member of the National Football League. The bronzed bust is accompanied by an impressive binder full of associated material, including correspondence between Raleigh DeGeer Amyx and artist Andrew Lester, with Lester answering an incredibly detailed fourpage questionnaire from Mr. Amyx, filled out in detail by the artist, Andrew Lester, recounting his meeting with Thorpe, the techniques used in creating the bust, and information on his artistic career. Also included is correspondence between Mr. Amyx and Thorpe’s granddaughter Gail, as well as information on Lester, photos of the bust, and photos and photocopied newspaper articles on Thorpe’s major athletic accomplishments. Created by Lester in 1976, the origin of this bronzed bust dates back to a meeting between the artist and Thorpe at Sears store in Oklahoma City in 1932. The violent weather outside prevented a large crowd, and Lester and Thorpe spent over two hours alone, with Thorpe saying at one point, ‘I know you will make a bust of me.’ The original bronze bust was made in 1972 for Lester’s one man show which debuted in 1976, and was later donated to the Miwok Mountain Tribe near Yosemite Park. The bust offered here was originally intended to be presented by Thorpe’s son, Carl Thorpe (who lived within one mile of Raleigh DeGeer Amyx and served President Ronald Reagan in the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington), to Speaker of the House Thomas ‘Tip’ O’Neill for permanent display in the US Capitol. However, Carl’s sudden death prevented the delivery of this original signed bust to the Capitol. A truly remarkable piece of art, complete with unparalleled provenance, which pays tribute to one of the greatest athletes of all time. This offering is deserving of a place in the most discriminating collection or institution. 236 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Exquisite memento from 1932—

the year Sarazen won the British and US Opens

448 Gene Sarazen’s

1932 Silver Box ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 Gene Sarazen’s personally-owned hinged silver case, measuring 3.5 x 3 x 1, featuring an impressive raised golf bag full of clubs on the cover, hand-engraved in a lovely artistic script on either side of the bag, “1932” and “Gene Sarazen.” Nicely displayed in a 7.5 x 5.5 x 2.5 shadowbox. In very fine condition. This gorgeous silverbox is particularly noteworthy as the hand-engraved year, “1932,” was one of the greatest of Sarazen’s career—he won both the Open Championship and US Open, and was named Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year. At the Open Championship, he debuted one of modern golf’s premier innovations—the sand wedge.

For further details go to www.RRAuction.com or call (800) 937-3880 | 237


Rare and elegant solid gold PGA president’s ring

449

PGA

President’s Ring ESTIMATE: $1,000-$1,200 Extremely scarce solid 10K gold ring of the president of the PGA, manufactured by Jenkins, displaying a green stone on top diagonally emblazoned with “PGA” in gold lettering. The words “President” and “PGA” are prominently raised in 3D relief surrounding the perimeter of the stone, with the meticulously detailed PGA logo emblem engraved on each shank. Beautiful to behold, the ring is of the finest workmanship and the first of its kind we have ever offered.

450 International Ryder

Cup Dinner Plate

ESTIMATE: $100-$200 Original Ryder Cup dinner plate believed to be from the 1979 Ryder Cup Champions Dinner held at The Greenbrier in West Virginia. This colorful and impactful plate measures 10.25˝ in diameter, with “International Ryder Cup Matches,” and “The Greenbrier” in gold along the rim, with the Cup and American and British flags in the center. Bottom of the plate is marked, “Shenango China, New Castle, PA USA.” In fine condition. Ryder Cup presentation pieces are seldom encountered.

238 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


The Yankee legend practices his worldfamous swing in 1928

451 Babe Ruth

Signed Photograph

ESTIMATE: $3,000-$5,000

Classic glossy 7 x 9 photo of the ‘Sultan of Swat’ taking a practice swing in a white shirt and his Yankee pinstripe pants, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Jack Schweitzer Jr., From Babe Ruth.” Archivally double-suede-matted and framed with a biographical plaque to an overall size of 16 x 25. A notation to the lower left dates the photo to July 1928. In very good condition, with scattered creases, some slight tears and small areas of paper loss to edges, and a bit of flaking to ink in inscription and signature. A classic pose of the Babe in his iconic pinstripes.

For further details go to www.RRAuction.com or call (800) 937-3880 | 239


The former Yale first baseman along with the ‘Splinter’ and ‘Joltin’ Joe’ 452 George Bush, Ted Williams, and Joe DiMaggio

Signed Baseball

ESTIMATE: $600-$800 Official Rawlings American League baseball signed in black ballpoint on the sweet spot by Ted Williams and on a side panel by Joe DiMaggio, and signed on another side panel in black felt tip by George Bush, adding “7-9-1991,” under his signature. In very fine condition, with the date under Bush’s signature unobtrusively traced over. Accompanied by a copy of a photo of Williams and DiMaggio at the White House with Bush, bearing pre-printed signatures of the three. The president had invited Williams and DiMaggio to the White House to honor: the 50th anniversary of their incredible 1941 season; DiMaggio’s 56th consecutive game hitting streak; as well as Ted William’s still record standing .406 batting average. Both men were also presented the Medal of Freedom during this visit. This historic baseball is the only known example signed and dated as president on that specific day, “7-9-91.” It came to Raleigh DeGeer Amyx directly from George H. W. Bush’s long-time secretary, who was with the president daily for twelve years—the most important of his long and distinguished career. Any president’s signature on a baseball is uncommon, with these three signers sharing a common bond for the nation’s pastime.

453 Muhammad Ali

Pair of Two Boxing Trunks

454 Carl Lewis

Signed Jersey

ESTIMATE: $400-$600

ESTIMATE: $100-$200

Two pairs of white and black silk Everlast boxing trunks, circa 1970s, each signed on the front in blue ink by Muhammad Ali. Light overall haloing to both signatures, otherwise fine condition.

Former US Olympian who won 10 medals in the Games, including nine gold. Official Nike United States track jersey signed by Carl Lewis vertically in blue felt tip on the front. In fine condition.

240 | September 18, 2014 | Boston, Massachusetts | Raleigh DeGeer Amyx Collection


Terms and Conditions of Sale TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE - AGREEMENT BETWEEN R&R AUCTION COMPANY, LLC AND BIDDER BY EITHER REGISTERING TO BID OR PLACING A BID, THE BIDDER ACCEPTS THESE CONDITIONS OF SALE AND ENTERS INTO A LEGALLY, BINDING, ENFORCEABLE AGREEMENT WITH RR AUCTION. The following terms and conditions constitute the sole terms and conditions under which R&R AUCTION COMPANY (“RR Auction”) will offer for sale and sell the property described in the Catalog. These Conditions of Sale constitute a binding agreement between the Bidder and RR Auction with respect to the auction. By bidding at auction, whether in person, through an agent or representative, by telephone, facsimile, on-line, absentee bid, or by any other form of bid or by any other means, the Bidder acknowledges the thorough reading and understanding of all of these Conditions of Sale, all descriptions of items in the Catalog, and all matters incorporated herein by reference, and agrees to be fully bound thereby. NO BID MAY BE PLACED IN ANY MANNER UNLESS THE BIDDER HAS FULLY REVIEWED AND AGREES TO ALL OF THE “CONDITIONS OF SALE” EITHER PRINTED IN THE CATALOG OR ONLINE, AS WELL AS THE TERMS OF THE REGISTRATION FORM. BY PLACING ANY BID, THE BIDDER REPRESENTS AND WARRANTS TO RR AUCTION THAT HE OR SHE HAS FULLY REVIEWED AND AGREES TO BE BOUND BY ALL OF THESE “CONDITIONS OF SALE” AND THE TERMS OF THE REGISTRATION FORM. WITHOUT SUCH REPRESENTATION, WARRANTY AND AGREEMENT, RR AUCTION WOULD NOT PERMIT THE BIDDER TO BID. Bidder and RR Auction agree that any agreements between the Bidder and RR Auction including but not limited to these Conditions of Sale are entered into in Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County, which is where the agreements are to be performed and the auction to take place, no matter where Bidder is situated and no matter by what means or where Bidder was informed of the auction and regardless of whether catalogs, materials, or other communications were received by Bidder in another location. Both RR Auction and the Bidder agree that any disputes under these Conditions of Sale, the subject matter hereof, the entering into, or any aspect of the auction, shall be exclusively governed by Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County law, and that any and all claims or actions shall be brought and maintained only in Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County. THE PARTIES EXPRESSLY WAIVE ANY RIGHT TO TRIAL BY JURY. The Bidder hereby consents that any dispute shall be presented in confidential binding arbitration before a single selected Arbitrator selected by the American Arbitration Association. The Bidder and RR Auction herby agree that the dispute shall go to binding arbitration in accordance with the commercial rules of the American Arbitration Association. The American Arbitration Association arbitration shall be conducted under the provisions of the Federal Arbitration Act and the Bidder consents to jurisdiction in The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Any dispute, claim, cause of action must be brought within one (1) year of the alleged breach, default or misrepresentation or the claim is waived. After one (1) year, the Bidder hereby releases and discharges RR Auction from any and all legal, equitable, administrative and/or other claims, counterclaims, demands, setoffs, defenses, accounts, suits, debts, dues, actions, causes of action, proceedings, arbitrations, damages, executions, judgments, findings, controversies and disputes, whether known or unknown or suspected or unsuspected, whether in law or equity, that the Bidder have or may have had against RR Auction arising from or relating to any claim whatsoever. Both Bidder and RR Auction agree that these provisions are intended to be binding on all parties in the event of any dispute specifically including third party claims and cross-actions brought by either RR Auction or Bidder, and that absent such agreement, RR Auction would not permit Bidder to bid hereunder. Any violation of the terms of this Paragraph shall entitle RR Auction to reasonable attorney fees and litigation costs in addition to all other available remedies, all of which remain reserved. The Bidder hereby agrees that RR Auction shall be entitled to present these Conditions of Sale to a court in any jurisdiction other than set forth in this paragraph as conclusive evidence of the parties’ agreement, and the parties further agree that the court

shall immediately dismiss any action filed in such jurisdiction. An award granted in arbitration is enforceable in any court of competent jurisdiction. The arbitrator’s award may be enforced in any court of competent jurisdiction. This agreement and any claims shall be determined and construed under Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County law. RR Auction is in compliance, to the fullest extent possible, with Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County procedures regarding the bonding of auctioneers. Auctioneer and Auction: 1. This Auction is presented by RR Auction, a d/b/a/ of R&R Auction Company, LLC, as identified with the applicable licensing information on the title page of the catalog or on the www.RRauction.com Internet site (the “Auctioneer”). The Auction is conducted under these Terms and Conditions of Sale and applicable state and local law. Announcements and corrections from the podium at live auctions and those made through the Terms and Conditions of Sale appearing on the Internet at RRauction.com supersede those in the printed catalog. Bidder/Bidders: 2. “Bidder” or “Bidders” shall mean the original Bidder of the property from RR Auction and not any subsequent owner or other person who may acquire or have acquired an interest therein. If Bidder is an agent, the agency must be disclosed in writing to RR Auction prior to the time of sale, otherwise the benefits of the warranty shall be limited to the agent and not transferable to the undisclosed principal. 3. The rights granted to Bidders under these Terms and Conditions of Sale are personal and may not be assigned or transferred to any other person or entity, whether by operation of law or otherwise. Any attempt to assign or transfer any such rights shall be absolutely void and unenforceable. No third party may rely on any benefit or right conferred on any Bidder by these Terms and Conditions of Sale. 4. Bids will not be accepted from minor persons under eighteen (18) years of age without a parent’s written consent containing an acknowledgment that the Terms and Conditions of Sale herein and indicating their agreement to be bound thereby on behalf of the Bidder. 5. Any person participating or registering for the Auction agrees to be bound by and accepts these Terms and Conditions of Sale. 6. All Bidders must meet Auctioneer’s qualifications to bid. Any Bidder who is not a client in good standing of RR Auction may be disqualified at RR Auction’s sole option and will not be awarded lots. Such determination may be made by RR Auction in its sole and unlimited discretion, at any time prior to, during, or even after the close of the Auction. RR Auction reserves the right to exclude any person from the auction. 7. If an entity places a bid, then the person executing the bid on behalf of the entity agrees to personally guarantee payment for any successful bid. 8. By accepting the Terms and Conditions of Sale, Bidder personally and unconditionally guarantees payment. If the Bidder is a corporation, the officers, directors, and principals of the corporation hereby agree to personally and unconditionally guarantee payment as part of the corporation’s agreement to bid. The authorized representative of any corporate Bidder who is present at the sale shall provide RR Auction or its agent, prior to the commencement of the bidding (or at the time of registration), with a statement signed by each principal, director and officer that they each personally and unconditionally guarantee any payment due RR Auction Credit: 9. In order to place bids, Bidders who have not established credit with the Auctioneer must either furnish satisfactory credit information (including two collectibles-related business references) or supply valid credit card information, well in advance of the Auction. Bidders who are not members of RRAuction.com should pre-register before the close of the Auction to allow adequate time to contact references. Credit will be granted at the discretion of Auctioneer. Additionally Bidders who have not previously established credit or who wish to bid in excess of their established credit history may be required to provide their social security number or the last four digits thereof so a credit check may be performed prior to Auctioneer’s acceptance of a bid. Check writing


privileges and immediate delivery of merchandise may also be determined by pre-approval of credit based on a combination of criteria: RRAuction.com history, related industry references, bank verification, a credit bureau report and/or a personal guarantee for a corporate or partnership entity in advance of the auction venue. Buyer’s Premium: 10. The Bidder acknowledges and agrees that a twenty-five percent (25%) buyer’s premium for the first $250,00 and twenty percent (20%) of any amount over will be added to the hammer price on all individual lots. RR Auction will only accept cash, check, money order, or wire. Unless otherwise agreed in writing, signed by RR Auction, payment in full is due within thirteen (13) calendar days of the auction or within twelve (12) calendar days of the invoice date, whichever is later. Bidding: 11. By submitting a bid, whether online, in person, by mail, by phone, by facsimile or through an employee or agent, the Bidder acknowledges (i) receipt of the catalogue, (ii) that the Bidder has read the Terms and Conditions of Sale and the descriptions for the lots on which they have bid, and (iii) that they agree to adhere to these Terms and Conditions of Sale. 12. Each Bidder’s determination of its bid should be based upon its own examination of the item(s), rather than the strict reliance as to what is represented in this Catalogue, online or elsewhere. In any purchase or sale, the value of the item(s) is determined by the price. THE BIDDER HEREBY ASSUMES ALL RISKS OF VALUATION CONCERNING ANY AND ALL PURCHASES. 13. RR AUCTION IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ERRORS IN BIDDING. A Bidder should make certain to bid on the correct lot and that the bid is the maximum (plus the 25% Buyer’s Premium) that the Bidder is willing and able to pay. Since other Bidders (by mail, facsimile and in person) will be present, and since a re-offering could damage the momentum of the sale, once the hammer has fallen and the Auctioneer has announced the winning Bidder, such Bidder is unconditionally bound to pay for the lot, even if the Bidder has made a mistake. 14. If the description of any lot in the catalogue is incorrect (e.g. gross cataloging error), the lot is returnable if returned within five (5) calendar days of receipt, and received by RR Auction no later than twenty-one (21) calendar days after the sale date. NO RETURN OR REFUND OF ANY AUCTION LOT WILL BE CONSIDERED EXCEPT BY REASON OF LACK OF AUTHENTICITY, UNLESS OTHERWISE PROVIDED IN THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE. 15. All prospective Bidders who examine lots in person prior to the sale shall personally assume all responsibility for any damage they cause in so doing. RR Auction shall have sole discretion in determining the value of the damage caused, which shall be promptly paid by the prospective Bidder. 16. Title to any lot remains with Consignor, any secured party of the Consignor, or assignee of Consignor, as the case may be, until the lot is paid for in full by Bidder. RR Auction reserves the right to require payment in full before delivering any lot to the successful Bidder. 17. It is the Bidder’s responsibility and obligation to have the lots fully insured while in their possession. Bidder assumes any and all RISK OF LOSS once the lot(s) is in Bidder’s possession. 18. Bidder grants to RR Auction or its assigns the right to offset any sums due, or found to be due by RR Auction, and to make such offset from any past, subsequent or future consignment, or items acquired by Bidder in possession or control of RR Auction or from any sums due to Bidder by RR Auction. Bidder further grants RR Auction a purchase money security interest in such sums or items to the extent applicable, and agrees to execute such documents as may be reasonably necessary to grant RR Auction such security interest. Bidder agrees that RR Auction and its assigns shall be a secured party with respect to items bought by Bidder and in the possession of RR Auction, to the extent of the maximum indebtedness, plus all accrued expenses, until the indebtedness is paid. 19. By bidding in this sale, Bidder personally and unconditionally guarantees payment. If the Bidder is a corporation, the officers, directors, and principals of the corporation hereby agree to personally and un-

conditionally guarantee payment as part of the corporation’s agreement to bid. The authorized representative of any corporate Bidder who is present at the sale shall provide RR Auction or its agent, prior to the commencement of the bidding (or at the time of registration), with a statement signed by each principal, director and officer that they each personally and unconditionally guarantee any payment due RR Auction. 20. RR Auction may at its sole and absolute discretion, make loans or advances to Consignors and/or prospective Bidders. 21. If a dispute arises concerning ownership of a lot that has been bid upon during the course of the sale, RR Auction reserves the right to commence a statutory interpleader proceeding at the expense of the Consignor and successful Bidder and any other applicable party, and in such event shall be entitled to its reasonable attorney’s fees and costs. 22. In the event of a successful challenge to the title to any goods purchased, RR Auction agrees to reimburse any Bidder in an amount equal to the successful bid price actually paid by Bidder at auction plus any Buyer’s Commission actually paid, in full and complete satisfaction of all claims, which once tendered by RR Auction, relieves and releases RR Auction from any responsibility whatsoever to the Bidder, even if the instrument is not cashed or is returned. Bidding Options: 23. Non-Internet bids (including but not limited to podium, fax, phone and mail bids) are treated similar to floor bids in that they must be onincrement. Any podium, fax, phone, or mail bids that do not conform to a full increment will be rounded up or down to the nearest full increment and this revised amount will be considered your high bid. 24. When identical mail or FAX bids are submitted, preference is given to the first received. To ensure the greatest accuracy, written bids should be entered on the standard printed bid sheet and be received at RR Auction’s place of business at least twenty-four (24) hours before the Auction start. Auctioneer is not responsible for executing mail bids or FAX bids received on or after the day the first lot is sold, nor Internet bids submitted after the published closing time; nor is Auctioneer responsible for proper execution of bids submitted by telephone, mail, FAX, e-mail, Internet, or in person once the Auction begins. 25. In internet only Auctions, bids on an item must raise the current high bid by at least 10%. Bids will be accepted in whole dollar amounts only. No “buy” or “unlimited” bids will be accepted. In a live sale, bids on an item can change at the discretion of the auctioneer. 26. RR Auction reserves the right to accept or decline any bid. Bids must be for an entire lot and each lot constitutes a separate sale. All bids are per lot unless otherwise announced. Live auction lots will be sold in their numbered sequence unless the Auctioneer directs otherwise. It is unlawful and illegal for Bidders to collude, pool, or agree with another Bidder to pay less than the fair value for lot(s). Bidders participating in both live and online auctions acknowledge that the law provides for substantial penalties in the form of treble damages and attorneys’ fees and costs for those who violate these provisions. For live auctions the auctioneer will have final discretion in the event that any dispute should arise between bidders. The auctioneer will determine the successful bidder, cancel the sale, or re-offer and resell the lot or lots in dispute. RR Auction will have final discretion to resolve any disputes arising after the sale and in online auctions. If any dispute arises our sale record is conclusive. Payment: 27a.Subject to fulfillment of all of the Terms and Conditions of Sale set forth herein, at the close of the Auction, title to the offered lot will pass to the highest bidder acknowledged by RR Auction, and such bidder thereupon (a) assumes full risk and responsibility (including without limitation, liability for or damage to frames or glass covering prints, paintings, photos, or other works), and (b) will immediately pay the full purchase price or such part as we may require. In addition to other remedies available to RR Auction by law, RR Auction reserves the right to impose from the date of sale a late charge of 1.5% per month of the total purchase price if payment is not made in accordance with the conditions set forth herein. All property must be removed from RR Auction’s premises by the Bidder at his/her expense not later than thirteen


(13) business days following its sale and if it is not so removed, (i) a handling charge of 1% of the total purchase price per month from the 13th day after the sale until its removal will be payable to RR Auction by the Bidder, with a minimum of 5% of the total purchase price for any property not so removed within 60 days after the sale, and (ii) RR Auction may send the purchased property to a public warehouse for the account, at the risk and expense of the Bidder. 27b. All purchases are subject to the Massachusetts 6.25% sales tax unless the purchaser possesses a Massachusetts sales tax exemption number. Exemption numbers from other states are accepted in Massachusetts if presented with a business card or letterhead. Dealers, museums, and other qualifying parties can apply for a Massachusetts exemption number prior to the auction by contacting the Massachusetts Department of Corporations and Taxation at 100 Cambridge Street in Boston. 28. Payment is due upon closing of the Auction session, or upon presentment of an invoice. Auctioneer reserves the right to void an invoice if payment in full is not received within thirteen (13) calendar days of the auction or within twelve (12) calendar days of the invoice date. In cases of nonpayment, Auctioneer’s election to void a sale does not relieve the Bidder from their obligation to pay Auctioneer its fees (seller’s and buyer’s premium) on the lot and any other damages pertaining to the lot. 29. All sales are strictly for cash in United States dollars (including U.S. currency, bank wire, cashier checks, eChecks, and bank money orders, and are subject to all reporting requirements). All deliveries are subject to good funds; funds being received in RR Auction’s account before delivery of the Purchases; and all payments are subject to a clearing period. RR Auction reserves the right to determine if a check constitutes “good funds”: checks drawn on a U.S. bank are subject to a ten (10) business day hold, and ten (10) days when drawn on an international bank. Clients with pre-arranged credit status may receive immediate credit for payments via Check, personal or corporate checks. All others will be subject to a hold of five (5) days, or more, for the funds to clear prior to releasing merchandise. 30. In the event that a Bidder’s payment is dishonored upon presentment(s), Bidder shall pay the maximum statutory processing fee set by applicable state law. If Bidder attempts to pay via Check and the financial institution denies the transfer from Bidder’s bank account, or the payment cannot be completed using the selected funding source, Bidder agrees to complete payment. 31. If any Auction invoice submitted by Auctioneer is not paid in full when due, the unpaid balance will bear interest at the highest rate permitted by law from the date of invoice until paid. Any invoice not paid when due will bear a one and one-half per cent (1.5%) late fee on the invoice amount. If the Auctioneer refers any invoice to an attorney for collection, the buyer agrees to pay attorney’s fees, court costs, and other collection costs incurred by Auctioneer. If Auctioneer assigns collection to its house counsel, such attorney’s time expended on the matter shall be compensated at a rate comparable to the hourly rate of independent attorneys. 32. If any applicable conditions herein are not complied with the Bidder will be in default and in addition to any and all other remedies available to RR Auction and the Consignor by law, including, without limitation, the right to hold the Bidder liable for the total purchase price, including all fees, charges and expenses more fully set forth herein, RR Auction, may (a) cancel the sale of that, or any other lots sold to the defaulting Bidder at the same or any other auction, retaining as liquidated damages all payments made by the Bidder, or (b) resell the purchased property, whether at public auction or by private sale, or (c) effect any combination thereof. In any case, the Bidder will be liable for any deficiency, any and all costs, handling charges, late charges, expenses of both sales, RR Auction’s commissions on both sales at our regular rates, legal fees and expenses, collection fees and incidental damages. RR Auction may apply any proceeds of sale then due or thereafter becoming due to the Bidder from RR Auction or any affiliated company, or any payment made by the Bidder to RR Auction or any affiliated company, where or not intended to reduce the Bidder’s obligations with respect to the unpaid lot or lots, to the deficiency and any other amounts due to RR Auction or any affiliated companies. In

addition, a defaulting Bidder will be deemed to have granted and assigned to RR Auction a continuing security interest of first priority in any property or money of RR Auction’s owing to such Bidder in RR Auction’s possession, and RR Auction may retain and apply such property or money as collateral security for the obligations due to RR Auction. Payment will not be deemed to have been made in full until RR Auction has collected good funds. In the event the Bidder fails to pay any or all of the total purchase price for any lot and RR Auction elects to pay the Consignor any portion of the sale proceeds, the Bidder acknowledges that RR Auction shall have all of the rights of the Consignor to pursue the Bidder for any amounts paid to the Consignor, whether at law, in equity, or under these Terms and Conditions of Sale. 33. Auctioneer shall have a lien against the merchandise purchased by the buyer to secure payment of the Auction invoice. Auctioneer is further granted a lien and the right to retain possession of any other property of the buyer then held by the Auctioneer or its affiliates to secure payment of any Auction invoice or any other amounts due the Auctioneer or affiliates from the buyer. With respect to these lien rights, Auctioneer shall have all the rights of a secured creditor, including but not limited to the right of sale. In addition, with respect to payment of the Auction invoice(s), the buyer waives any and all rights of offset he might otherwise have against the Auctioneer and the consignor of the merchandise included on the invoice. If a Bidder owes Auctioneer or its affiliates on any account, Auctioneer and its affiliates shall have the right to offset such unpaid account by any credit balance due Bidder, and it may secure by possessory lien any unpaid amount by any of the Bidder’s property in their possession. 34. Title shall not pass to the successful Bidder until all invoices are paid in full. It is the responsibility of the buyer to provide adequate insurance coverage for the items once they have been delivered to a common carrier or third-party shipper. 35. All checks, cashiers checks or money orders are payable to R&R Auction Company, LLC. Orders paid by cashier check, money order, wire are shipped upon receipt. Delivery; Shipping; and Handling Charges: 36. Bidder is liable for shipping and handling. Auctioneer is unable to combine purchases from other auctions or affiliates into one package for shipping purposes. Lots won will be shipped in a commercially reasonable time after payment in good funds for the merchandise and the shipping fees is received or credit extended, except when third-party shipment occurs. Bidder agrees that Service and Handling charges related to shipping items which are not pre-paid may be charged to the credit card on file with Auctioneer. Unless otherwise specifically indicated, all merchandise is stored at Auctioneer’s facilities in Amherst, New Hampshire. The purchases shall be shipped from that facility unless bidder makes arrangements to take possession at the facility. 37. Successful international Bidders shall provide written shipping instructions, including specified Customs declarations, to the Auctioneer for any lots to be delivered outside of the United States. NOTE: Declaration value shall be the item’(s) hammer price together with its buyer’s premium and Auctioneer shall use the correct harmonized code for the lot. Domestic Buyers on lots designated for third-party shipment must designate the common carrier, accept risk of loss, and prepay shipping costs. Title: 38. On the fall of the auctioneer’s hammer, title to the offered lot will pass to the highest bidder acknowledged by RR Auction but fully subject to Buyer’s compliance with all of the terms of the Conditions of Sale and the Registration Form. Rights Reserved: 39. RR Auction reserves the right to withdraw any lot before or at the time of the auction, and/or to postpone the auction of all or any lots or parts thereof, for any reason. RR Auction shall not be liable to any Bidder in the event of such withdrawal or postponement under any circumstances. RR Auction reserves the right to refuse to accept bids from anyone. Conducting the Auction: 40. RR Auction reserves the right to postpone the auction sale or any


session thereof for a reasonable period of time for any reason whatsoever, and no Bidder or prospective Bidder shall have any claim as a result thereof, including consequential damages. 41. RR Auction reserves the right to withdraw any lot at any time, even after the hammer has fallen, until the Bidder has taken physical possession of the lot. No Consignor who has registered to bid at the sale (or at any other time unless otherwise provided in the consignment agreement), or any Bidder or prospective Bidder shall have a right to claim any consequential damages if a lot is withdrawn, even after the sale. 42. The highest qualified Bidder recognized by the Auctioneer shall be the Buyer. In the event of a tie bid, the earliest bid received or recognized wins. In the event of any dispute between any Bidders at an Auction, Auctioneer may at his sole discretion reoffer the lot. Auctioneer’s decision and declaration of the winning Bidder shall be final and binding upon all Bidders. Bids properly offered, whether by floor Bidder or other means of bidding, may on occasion be missed or go unrecognized; in such cases, the Auctioneer may declare the recognized bid accepted as the winning bid, regardless of whether a competing bid may have been higher. Auctioneer reserves the right after the hammer falls to accept bids and reopen bidding for bids placed through the Internet or otherwise. 43. Lots bearing bidding estimates shall open at Auctioneer’s discretion. In the event that no bid meets or exceeds that opening amount, the lot shall pass as unsold. 44. All items are to be purchased per lot as numerically indicated and no lots will be broken unless decided by RR Auction. Auctioneer reserves the right to withdraw, prior to the close, any lots from the Auction. 45. Auctioneer reserves the right to rescind the sale in the event of nonpayment, breach of a warranty, disputed ownership, failure to execute the reserve, auctioneer’s clerical error or omission in exercising bids and reserves, or for any other reason and in Auctioneer’s sole discretion. 46. Auctioneer occasionally experiences Internet and/or Server service outages, and Auctioneer periodically schedules system downtime for maintenance and other purposes, during which Bidders cannot participate or place bids. If such outages occur, RR Auction may at our discretion extend bidding for the Auction. Bidders unable to place their Bids through the Internet are directed to contact Client Services at 1-603-732-4280. 47. The Auctioneer has the right to sell certain unsold items after the close of the Auction. Such lots shall be considered sold during the Auction and all these Terms and Conditions shall apply to such sales including but not limited to the Buyer’s Premium, return rights, and disclaimers. Internet Auction – Extended bidding & the 30 Minute Rule: 48. Any bidder may bid on any lot prior to 6 pm. At that time, the Extended Bidding goes into effect. If you have not bid on a lot before 6 pm, you may not bid on that lot after 6 pm. Only those bidders who have placed bids on a lot before 6 pm will be allowed to bid on that lot after 6 pm. If you are the only bidder on a lot at 6 pm, that lot is awarded to you. During the extended bidding period, a lot will remain open only to those who bid on that lot prior to 6 pm. All lots WITHOUT an opening bid at 6 pm will remain OPEN to ALL bidders until 7 pm or until they receive their first bid. These lots will close immediately upon receipt of a bid or at 7 pm, whichever comes first. For all lots that are active after 7 pm, bidding will remain open until 30 minutes pass without a bid being placed on THAT lot. The 30 Minute Rule is applied on a PER LOT BASIS; each lot in the auction closes individually based on bidding activity after 7 pm. On a PER LOT BASIS, the 30 minute timer will reset each time a bid is placed after 7 pm. If you are the high bidder, raising your maximum bid will NOT reset the timer. RR Auction reserves the right to close the auction at any time at its sole discretion. Auctioneer’s Discretion: 49. RR Auction shall determine opening bids and bidding increments. The auctioneer has the right in its absolute discretion to reject any bid

in the event of dispute between bidders or if the auctioneer has doubt as to the validity of any bid, to advance the bidding at its absolute discretion and to determine the successful bidder in the event of a dispute between bidders, to continue the bidding or to reoffer and resell the lot in question. In the event of a dispute after the sale, RR Auction’s record of final sale shall be conclusive. The auctioneer also may reject any bid and withdraw the lot from sale if the auctioneer decides either that any opening bid is below the reserve of the lot or article or that an advance is insufficient. Unless otherwise announced by the auctioneer at the time of sale, no lots may be divided for the purpose of sale. Reserves: 50. Lots may be subject to a reserve which is the confidential minimum price below which the lot will not be sold. Consignors may not bid on their own lots or property. Off-Site Bidding: 51. Bidding by telephone, facsimile-transmission (fax-in), on-line, or absentee bidding (advance written bids submitted by mail) are offered solely as a convenience and permitted subject to advance arrangements, availability, and RR Auction’s approval which shall be exercised at RR Auction’s sole discretion. Neither RR Auction nor its agents or employees shall be held liable for the failure to execute bids or for errors relating to any transmission or execution thereof. In order to be considered for off-site bidding in any manner, Bidders must comply with all of these Conditions of Sale and the terms contained on the Registration Form. RR Auction’ Remedies: 52. Failure of the Bidder/Buyer to comply with any of these Conditions of Sale or the terms of the Registration Form is an event of default. In such event, RR Auction may, in addition to any other available remedies specifically including the right to hold the defaulting Bidder/Buyer liable for the Purchase Price or to charge and collect from the defaulting Bidder/Buyer’s credit or debit accounts as provided for elsewhere herein: (a) cancel the sale, retaining any payment made by the Buyer as damages (the Bidder/Buyer understands and acknowledges that RR Auction will be substantially damaged should such default occur, and that damages under sub-part (a) are necessary to compensate RR Auction for such damages; (b) resell the property without reserve at public auction or privately; (c) charge the Bidder/Buyer interest on the Purchase Price at the rate of one and one-half per cent (1.5%) per month or the highest allowable interest rate; (d) take any other action that RR Auction, in its sole discretion, deems necessary or appropriate to preserve and protect RR Auction’ rights and remedies. Should RR Auction resell the property, the original defaulting buyer shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs and expenses associated there with, including but not limited to warehousing, sales-related expenses, reasonable attorney fees and court costs, commissions, incidental damages and any other charges due hereunder which were not collected or collectable. In the event that such buyer is the successful bidder on more than one lot and pays less than the purchase price for the total lots purchased, RR Auction shall apply the payment received to such lot or lots that RR Auction, in its sole discretion, deems appropriate. If RR Auction does not exercise such discretion, the lots to which the payment shall be applied will be in descending order from the highest purchase price to the lowest. Any buyer failing to comply with these Conditions of Sale shall be deemed to have granted RR Auction a security interest in, and RR Auction may retain as collateral such security for such buyer’s obligations to RR Auction, any property in RR Auction’ possession owned by such buyer. RR Auction shall have the benefit of all rights of a secured party under the Uniform Commercial Code (U.C.C.) as adopted by The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Warranties: 53. RR Auction does not provide any warranties to Bidders or Buyers, whether expressed or implied, beyond those expressly provided for in these Conditions of Sale. All property and lots are sold “as is” and “where is”. By way of illustration rather than limitation, neither RR Auction nor the consignor makes any representation or warranty, expressed or implied, as to merchant ability or fitness for intended use, condition of the property (including any condition report), correctness of description, origin, measurement, quality, rarity, importance, exhibi-


tion, relevance, attribution, source, provenance, date, authorship, condition, culture, genuineness, value, or period of the property. Additionally, neither RR Auction nor the consignor makes any representation or warranty, expressed or implied, as to whether the Buyer acquires rights in copyright or other intellectual property (including exhibition or reproduction rights) or whether the property is subject to any limitations or other rights. RR Auction does not make any representation or warranty as to title. 54. All descriptions, photographs, illustrations, and terminology including but not limited to words describing condition (including any condition reports requested by Bidder, see also Generally Terminology), authorship, period, culture, source, origin, measurement, quality, rarity, provenance, importance, exhibition, and relevance, used in the catalog, bill of sale, invoice, or anywhere else, represent a good faith effort made by RR Auction to fairly represent the lots and property offered for sale as to origin, date, condition, and other information contained therein; they are statements of opinion only. They are not representations or warranties and Bidder agrees and acknowledges that he or she shall not rely on them in determining whether or not to bid or for what price. Price estimates (which are determined well in advance of the auction and are therefore subject to revision) and condition reports are provided solely as a convenience to Bidders and are not intended nor shall they be relied on by Bidders as statements, representations or warranties of actual value or predictions of final bid prices. 55. Bidders are accorded the opportunity to inspect the lots and to otherwise satisfy themselves as to the nature and sufficiency of each lot prior to bidding, and RR Auction urges Bidders to avail themselves accordingly. 56. FIREARMS. Auctioneer complies with all Federal and State rules and regulations relating to the purchasing, registration and shipping of firearms. A Bidder is required to provide appropriate documents and the payment of associated fees, if any. Bidder is responsible for providing a shipping address that is suitable for the receipt of a firearm. Important Notice: Many identical versions of props and costumes are created for film and television productions in the normal course of a production. RR Auction does not warrant or represent that the screen shots referenced are exact images of the offered item (unless specifically noted in the written description). Use of a screen shot does not constitute a warranty or representation of authenticity or provenance. There is not a right of return or refund based upon a claim arising out of or pertaining to any reference to a screen shot. 57. Lots and property are not returnable to RR Auction for any reason except under Buyer’s limited Remedies set forth in Sections 58 and 59 below and under the express terms and conditions of Section 58. Limitation of Damages: 58. In the event that RR Auction is prevented for any reason from delivering any property to Buyer or Buyer is otherwise dissatisfied with the performance of RR Auction, the liability, if any, of RR Auction, shall be limited to, and shall not exceed, the amount actually paid for the property by Buyer. In no event shall RR Auction be liable for incidental, special, indirect, exemplary or consequential damages of any kind, including but not limited to loss of profits, value of investment or opportunity cost. Unauthorized Statements: 59. Under no circumstances is any employee, agent or representative of RR Auction authorized by RR Auction to modify, amend, waive or contradict any of these Terms and Conditions of Sale, any term or condition set forth on the Registration Form, any warranty or limitation or exclusion of warranty, any term or condition in either the Registration Form or these Terms and Conditions regarding payment requirements, including but not limited to due date, manner of payment, and what constitutes payment in full, or any other term or condition contained in any documents issued by RR Auction unless such modification, amendment, waiver or contradiction is contained in a writing signed by all parties. Any statements, oral or written, made by employees, agents or representatives of RR Auction to Bidder, including statements regarding specific lots, even if such employee, agent or representative represents that such statement is authorized, unless reduced to a writing signed by all parties, are statements of personal opinion only and

are not binding on RR Auction, and under no circumstances shall be relied on by Bidder as a statement, representation or warranty of RR Auction. Buyer’s Remedies: 60. Under no circumstance will RR Auction incur liability to a Bidder in excess of the purchase price actually paid. The terms and conditions of sale herein described shall be enforced in accordance with, and governed by the laws of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 61. This section sets forth the sole and exclusive remedies of Buyer in conformity with Sections 51-55 (“Warranties”) and 56 (“Limitation of Damages”) herein, and is expressly in lieu of any other rights or remedies which might be available to Buyer by law. The Buyer hereby accepts the benefit of the consignor’s warranty of title and any other representations and warranties made by the consignor for the Buyer’s benefit. In the event that Buyer proves in writing to RR Auction satisfaction that there was a breach of the consignor’s warranty of title concerning a lot purchased by Buyer, RR Auction shall make demand upon the consignor to pay to Buyer the Purchase Price (including any premiums, taxes, or other amounts paid or due to RR Auction). Should the consignor not pay the Purchase Price to Buyer within thirty days after such demand, RR Auction shall disclose the identity of the consignor to Buyer and assign to Buyer all of RR Auction’ rights against the consignor with respect to such lot or property. Upon such disclosure and assignment, all responsibility and liability, if any, of RR Auction with respect to said lot or property shall automatically terminate. RR Auction shall be entitled to retain the premiums and other amounts paid to RR Auction - this remedy is as to the consignor only. The rights and remedies provided herein are for the original Buyer only and they may not be assigned or relied upon by any transferee or assignee under any circumstances. 62. All Lots sold by RR Auction are accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity. On any lot presented with a Certificate of Authenticity (“COA”) issued by RR Auction, that warranty insures only to the original Bidder (as shown in Auctioneer’s records) “Bidder”. Bidder may not transfer the rights afforded under the COA and it is null and void when Bidder transfers or attempts to transfer the lot. The COA warranty is valid from date of the auction in which Bidder was awarded the lot to five (5) years after its purchase. The COA warranty is valid as to its attribution to the person or entity described or to the lot’s usage. The Bidder as well as their heirs, successors and assigns is also given an unconditional lifetime guaranteed that allows the present owner of any lot purchased through RR Auction the right to consign with RR Auction. When the lot is accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity (or its equivalent) from a third-party authentication provider, buyer has no right of return. On lots not accompanied by third-party authentication or under extremely limited circumstances not including authenticity (e.g. gross cataloging error), a Bidder who did not bid from the floor may request Auctioneer to evaluate voiding a sale; such request must be made in writing detailing the alleged gross error, and submission of the lot to Auctioneer must be pre-approved by Auctioneer. A Bidder must notify the appropriate department head in writing of the Bidder’s request within three (3) days of the non-floor bidder’s receipt of the lot. Any lot that is to be evaluated for return must be received at the office of RR Auction within 35 days after Auction. AFTER THAT 35 DAY PERIOD, NO LOT MAY BE RETURNED FOR ANY REASONS. Lots returned must be in the same condition as when sold and must include any Certificate of Authenticity. If a bidder wishes to challenge the Letter of Authenticity within the five (5) year warranty period, Bidder must present with the claim, authoritative written evidence that the lot is not authentic as determined by a known expert in the field. If Auctioneer concurs that the lot is not as represented, Bidder shall be refunded their purchase price. If the Auctioneer denies the claim, the Bidder may file the dispute with the American Arbitration Association with locale in Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County, before a single selected Arbitrator selected by the American Arbitration Association. The American Arbitration Association arbitration shall be conducted under the provisions of the Federal Arbitration Act and the Bidder consents to jurisdiction in The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The challenge to Authenticity must be brought within one (1) year if the Auctioneer denies the claim. After one (1) year, the Bidder hereby releases and discharges RR Auction from any and all legal, equitable, administrative and/or other claims, counterclaims, demands, setoffs, defenses, ac-


counts, suits, debts, dues, actions, causes of action, proceedings, arbitrations, damages, executions, judgments, findings, controversies and disputes, whether known or unknown or suspected or unsuspected, whether in law or equity, that the Bidder have or may have had against RR Auction arising from or relating to any claim whatsoever. Specifically, the COA provided by RR Auction, does not provide for incidental or consequential damages or other indirect damages. Any lot sold with a certificate of authenticity or other warranty from an entity other than Auctioneer is subject to such issuing entity’s rules and such conditions are the sole remedy afforded to Bidder. For information as to third party authentication warranties the bidder is directed to contact RR Auction. RR Auction’ Additional Services: 63. For Buyers who do not remove purchased property from RR Auction’ premises, RR Auction, in its sole discretion and solely as a service and accommodation to Buyers, may arrange to have purchased lots packed, insured and forwarded at the sole request, expense, and risk of Buyer. RR Auction assumes no and disclaims all responsibility and liability for acts or omissions in such packing or shipping by RR Auction or other packers and carriers, whether or not recommended by RR Auction. RR Auction assumes no and disclaims all responsibility and liability for damage to frames, glass or other breakable items. Where RR Auction arranges and bills for such services via invoice or credit card, RR Auction will include an administration charge. Headings: 64. Headings are for convenience only and shall not be used to interpret the substantive sections to which they refer. Entire Agreement: 65. These Conditions of Sale constitute the entire agreement between the parties together with the terms and conditions contained in the Registration Form. They may not be amended, modified or superseded except in a signed writing executed by all parties. No oral or written statement by anyone employed by RR Auction or acting as agent or representative of RR Auction may amend, modify, waive or supersede the terms herein unless such amendment, waiver or modification is contained in a writing signed by all parties. 66. If any section of these Terms and Conditions of Sale or any term or provision of any section is held to be invalid, void, or unenforceable by any court of competent jurisdiction, the remaining sections or terms and provisions of a section shall continue in full force and effect without being impaired or invalidated in any way. 67. These Terms and Conditions of Sale and the auction shall be construed and enforced in accordance with, and governed by, the laws of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, whether or not the auction is and these Terms and Conditions of Sale are fully performed in Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County.

AUCTION GENERAL GUIDELINES Conditions of Sale: Before you bid, you must read the Terms and Conditions of Sale, immediately preceding these pages. They represent a contract between RR Auction and you, and they contain important terms and conditions such as jurisdiction, payment terms, warranties and remedies. The Conditions of Sale are controlling over these general guidelines in the event of any conflicts between their respective terms. Estimate Prices: In addition to descriptive information, each item in the catalog sometimes includes a price range which reflects opinion as to the price expected at auction. In other instances, estimate prices can be obtained by calling RR Auction at (603) 732-4280. The Estimate Prices are based upon various factors including prices recently paid at auction for comparable property, condition, rarity, quality, history and provenance. Estimates are prepared well in advance of the sale and subject to revision. Estimates do not include the buyer’s premium or sales tax (see under separate heading).

Reserves: The reserve is the minimum price the seller is willing to accept and below which a lot will not be sold. Owned or Guaranteed Property: RR Auction generally offers property consigned by others for sale at public auction; in very limited occasion, lots are offered that are the property of RR Auction. Buyer’s Premium and Sales Tax: 10. The Bidder acknowledges and agrees that a twenty-five percent (25%) buyer’s premium for the first $250,00 and twenty percent (20%) of any amount over will be added to the hammer price on all individual lots. RR Auction will only accept cash, check, money order, or wire. Unless otherwise agreed in writing, signed by RR Auction, payment in full is due within thirteen (13) calendar days of the auction or within twelve (12) calendar days of the invoice date, whichever is later. All purchases are subject to the Massachusetts 6.25% sales tax unless the purchaser possesses a Massachusetts sales tax exemption number. Before the Auction: You may attend pre-sale viewing for all of our auctions at no charge. All property to be auctioned is usually on view for several days prior to the sale. You are encouraged to examine lots thoroughly. You may also request condition reports (see below). RR Auction’s staff are available at viewings and by appointment. Contact Information: 5 Rt 101A, Suite 5 • Amherst, NH 03031 Local/International: 1-603-732-4280 Local/Int’l fax: 1-603-732-4288 Website: www.RRAuction.com Email bidding: Bid@RRAuction.com Hours of Operation: Office hours are Mon-Fri, 9 a.m. -5 p.m. eastern standard time; hours on the last night of the auction are dictated by the 30 Minute Rule (see below). Any item in the auction can be viewed in our offices during normal business hours. Please call to set up an appointment. You must acknowledge having read your agreement with all of the Terms and Conditions of Sale prior to your registration and prior to your bidding on any lot. Bidding Live Auction: Property is auctioned in consecutive numerical order, as it appears in the catalog. The auctioneer will accept bids from those present in the salesroom or absentee bidders participating by telephone, internet or by written bid left with RR Auction in advance of the auction. The auctioneer may also execute a bid on behalf of the consignor to protect the reserve, either by entering a bid in response to salesroom, telephone or absentee bids. Under no circumstances will the auctioneer place any bid on behalf of the consignor at or above the reserve. The auctioneer will not specifically identify bids placed on behalf of the consignor to protect the reserve. Maximum Bids – Internet Auction Only: To maximize your chance of winning, we strongly encourage the use of maximum bids. For example, assume an item you want currently has a high bid of $100. Your bid would then be $110 (10% over $100), and you could tell us, “I’d like a maximum bid of $242 for that item.” We will enter your bid at $110, and we will then bid for you until the lot reaches your maximum of $242. If competitive bids only reach $148, you would win the item at $163—10% over the highest previous bid. To prevent tie bids, all maximum bids should be made in proper increments. Maximum bids are strictly confidential. Placing arbitrary, non-incremental bids on lots with prior maximum bids may result in these lots being sold for less than 10% above the under bidder’s bid. Bid Increments – Internet Auction Only: Bids on an item must raise the current high bid by at least 10% or at the discretion of the auctioneer. Checking Bids – Internet Auction Only: You can open, monitor, and/or raise bids as often as you wish. How-


ever, all bidding is governed by the 30 Minute Rule and extended bidding. Extended bidding always goes into effect at 6 pm on the last day of the auction. At 7 pm, the extended bidding ends and the 30 Minute Rule goes into effect. Callbacks – Internet Auction Only: RRAuction offers a callback service on auction night for any bidder who has the high bid on an item whose current bid is over $1,000 and who has placed a maximum bid. At your request, we will call you if your maximum bid is topped. We will need your correct telephone number(s) where you can be reached until the auction closes. Callbacks begin after 6 pm on auction night. You must request this service; it is not automatic. We make every effort to ensure that bidders who request a callback are contacted if outbid; however, we do not guarantee this service. Bidding - Internet Auction – Live Auction: To ensure proper registration, those Bidders intending to bid via the Internet must visit www.RRauction.com and register accordingly at least one full day prior to the actual auction. If you have questions about this feature, please call RR Auction well in advance of the auction. Winning bidders will be notified by RR Auction. RR Auction is not and cannot be responsible or liable for any problems, delays, or any other issues or problems resulting out of use of the Internet generally or specifically, including but not limited to transmission, execution or processing of bids. Bidding - Internet – Live Auction: During live Auctions, internet bids can be placed in real time through the following services: www.RRAuction.com, www.liveauctioneers. com, www.artfact.com and www.icollector.com. On some occasions beyond the control of RR Auction, the bid software or the Internet itself may not physically keep up with the pace of the auction. In order to help avoid disappointment, RR Auction recommends placing a realistic absentee bid now. Since Artfact and iCollector (hereinfafter referred to as “Third Party sites”) bids are not shown to RR Auction until RR Auction opens the lot on the floor, RR Auction treats those bids the same as floor or telephone bids. In most cases, however, the floor and/or telephone responds before the Third Party sites bid is presented, due to Live Internet bid software or Internet lag time, so for consistency it is RR Auction’ policy that floor bids and telephone bids are always considered first over Third Party sites bids with floor bids being considered before telephone bids. Also please note that all RR Auction lots purchased through the Third Party sites carry an additional Buyer’s Premium. RR Auction strongly urges the bidder to resolve any questions about these policies or their implementation PRIOR TO BIDDING. Successful Bids: The fall of the auctioneer’s hammer indicates the final bid. RR Auction will record the paddle number of the buyer. If your salesroom or absentee bid is successful, you will be notified after the sale by mailed or emailed invoice. Unsold Lots: If a lot does not reach the reserve, it is bought-in. In other words, it remains unsold and is returned to the consignor. The Auctioneer has the right to sell certain unsold items after the close of the Auction. Such lots shall be considered sold during the Auction and all these Terms and Conditions shall apply to such sales including but not limited to the Buyer’s Premium, return rights, and disclaimers. After the Auction - Payment: You are expected to pay for your purchases in full within thirteen (13) calendar days of the auction or within twelve (12) calendar days of the invoice date. (See Generally “Payment” §27 through 34 of the Term and Conditions of Sale). Shipping: After payment has been made in full, RR Auction may, as a service to buyers, arrange to have property packed, insured and shipped at your request and expense. For shipping information, please contact RR Auction at (603) 732-4280. In circumstances in which RR Auction arranges and bills for such services via invoice or credit card, we will also include an administration charge. Packages shipped internation-

ally will have full value declared on shipping form. (See Generally “Delivery; Shipping; and Handling Charges” §36 and 37 of the Term and Conditions of Sale). At our discretion, some orders of high value may be sent via overnight or two-day service. Insurance is added to each invoice, with a minimum of $2 for the first $200 of value and 55¢ per $100 of value over $200. Oversized orders will have additional postage added to their invoices. Within the United States, rates for shipping and handling only are: $0–$100..........................................$10 $101–$500.......................................$15 $501–$1,000....................................$20 $1,001–$3,000.................................$35 $3,001–$10,000...............................$45 Over $10,000.................................$100 Additional Cataloging, Warranties and Disclaimers: NO WARRANTY, WHETHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, IS MADE WITH RESPECT TO ANY DESCRIPTION CONTAINED IN THIS AUCTION OR ANY SECOND OPINE. Any description of the items or second opinion contained in this Auction is for the sole purpose of identifying the items for those Bidders who do not have the opportunity to view the lots prior to bidding, and no description of items has been made part of the basis of the bargain or has created any express warranty that the goods would conform to any description made by Auctioneer. Color variations can be expected in any electronic or printed imaging, and are not grounds for the return of any lot. Auctioneer is selling only such right or title to the items being sold as Auctioneer may have by virtue of consignment agreements on the date of auction and disclaims any warranty of title to the Property. Auctioneer disclaims any warranty of merchantability or fitness for any particular purposes. All images, descriptions, sales data, and archival records are the exclusive property of Auctioneer, and may be used by Auctioneer for advertising, promotion, archival records, and any other uses deemed appropriate. Release: In consideration of participation in the Auction and the placing of a bid, Bidder expressly releases Auctioneer, its officers, directors and employees, its affiliates, and its outside experts that provide second opinion, from any and all claims, cause of action, chose of action, whether at law or equity or any arbitration or mediation rights existing under the rules of any professional society or affiliation based upon the assigned description, or a derivative theory, breach of warranty express or implied, representation or other matter set forth within these Terms and Conditions of Auction or otherwise. In the event of a claim, Bidder agrees that such rights and privileges conferred therein are strictly construed as specifically declared herein; e.g., authenticity, gross cataloging error, etc. and is the exclusive remedy. Bidder, by non-compliance to these express terms of a granted remedy, shall waive any claim against Auctioneer. Some Property sold by Auctioneer are inherently dangerous e.g. firearms, and items that may be swallowed or ingested or may have latent defects all of which may cause harm to a person. Bidder accepts all risk of loss or damage from its purchase of these items and Auctioneer disclaims any liability whether under contract or tort for damages and losses, direct or inconsequential, and expressly disclaims any warranty as to safety or usage of any lot sold. Dispute Resolution and Arbitration Provision: Bidder and RR Auction agree that any agreements between the Bidder and RR Auction including but not limited to these Conditions of Sale are entered into in Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County, which is where the agreements are to be performed and the auction to take place, no matter where Bidder is situated and no matter by what means or where Bidder was informed of the auction and regardless of whether catalogs, materials, or other communications were received by Bidder in another location. Both RR Auction and the Bidder agree that any disputes under these Conditions of Sale, the subject matter hereof, the entering into, or any aspect of the auction, shall be exclusively governed by Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County law, and that any and


all claims or actions shall be brought and maintained only in Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County. THE PARTIES EXPRESSLY WAIVE ANY RIGHT TO TRIAL BY JURY. The Bidder hereby consents that any dispute shall be presented in confidential binding arbitration before a single selected Arbitrator selected by the American Arbitration Association. The Bidder and RR Auction herby agree that the dispute shall go to binding arbitration in accordance with the commercial rules of the American Arbitration Association. The American Arbitration Association arbitration shall be conducted under the provisions of the Federal Arbitration Act and the Bidder consents to jurisdiction in The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Any dispute, claim, cause of action must be brought within one (1) year of the alleged breach, default or misrepresentation or the claim is waived. After one (1) year, the Bidder hereby releases and discharges RR Auction from any and all legal, equitable, administrative and/or other claims, counterclaims, demands, setoffs, defenses, accounts, suits, debts, dues, actions, causes of action, proceedings, arbitrations, damages, executions, judgments, findings, controversies and disputes, whether known or unknown or suspected or unsuspected, whether in law or equity, that the Bidder have or may have had against RR Auction arising from or relating to any claim whatsoever. Both Bidder and RR Auction agree that these provisions are intended to be binding on all parties in the event of any dispute specifically including third party claims and cross-actions brought by either RR Auction or Bidder, and that absent such agreement, RR Auction would not permit Bidder to bid hereunder. Any violation of the terms of this Paragraph shall entitle RR Auction to reasonable attorney fees and litigation costs in addition to all other available remedies, all of which remain reserved. The Bidder hereby agrees that RR Auction shall be entitled to present these Conditions of Sale to a court in any jurisdiction other than set forth in this paragraph as conclusive evidence of the parties’ agreement, and the parties further agree that the court shall immediately dismiss any action filed in such jurisdiction. An award granted in arbitration is enforceable in any court of competent jurisdiction. The arbitrator’s award may be enforced in any court of competent jurisdiction. This agreement and any claims shall be determined and construed under Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County law. Miscellaneous: Agreements between Bidders and consignors to effectuate a non-sale of an item at Auction, inhibit bidding on a consigned item to enter into a private sale agreement for said item, or to utilize the Auctioneer’s Auction to obtain sales for non-selling consigned items subsequent to the Auction, are strictly prohibited. If a subsequent sale of a previously consigned item occurs in violation of this provision, Auctioneer reserves the right to charge Bidder the applicable Buyer’s Premium and consignor a Seller’s Commission as determined for each auction venue and by the terms of the seller’s agreement. Acceptance of these Terms and Conditions qualifies Bidder as a client who has consented to be contacted by RR Auction in the future. In conformity with “do-not-call” regulations promulgated by the Federal or State regulatory agencies, participation by the Bidder is affirmative consent to being contacted at the phone number shown in his application and this consent shall remain in effect until it is revoked in writing. RR Auction may from time to time contact Bidder concerning sale, purchase, and auction opportunities available. Rules of Construction: Auctioneer presents properties in a number of collectible fields, and as such, specific venues have promulgated supplemental Terms and Conditions. Nothing herein shall be construed to waive the general Terms and Conditions of Auction by these additional rules and shall be construed to give force and effect to the rules in their entirety. TERMINOLOGY Condition: Each item in the catalog is described with a statement of opinion indicating its overall condition. The condition of the items we offer generally falls into the following range: good—very good—fine—very fine. Treated as a scale of 1 to 4, good describes an item that has as many as several flaws, which are described in detail; very fine describes an

item whose condition and appearance may be regarded as flawless and superior in every respect. Most of the items we offer are in fine condition, meaning that there are no serious flaws. While we make every effort to describe flaws that materially affect appearance and value, we generally do not specify minor or routine flaws, such as (but not limited to) pencil or secretarial notations, mailing folds to letters, normal aging to paper, or tiny bends or creases from normal handling. We encourage prospective bidders to examine the image(s) of each item closely and to contact us with specific inquiries regarding condition. Group Lots: In descriptions of group lots of two or more items, every effort is made to mention any obvious flaws. Bidders should note that condition for group lots is given as a general statement or range, and that specific flaws to single items within the group may be omitted in the interest of catalog space. Questions about group lots, or specific items within a group lot, should be addressed before the close of the auction to Stacey Jordan (Stacey.Jordan@RRAuction.com). Matted and Framed: Many of the items offered for sale in our monthly auctions are described as matted and/or framed. We do not remove items from frames; the given dimensions of items housed in a frame and/or mat indicate sight size only. Photographs and other ephemera used with matted and framed items are not subject to description and condition statements, nor are they considered a reason for return. Condition refers only to the item and not the mat or frame. Our terms of return apply only to the item and not the matting and framing. Any item that is removed from the frame cannot be returned. Returns are only accepted when there is an authenticity question or the description of the item is incorrect. Abbreviations and Terms: ALS - Autograph Letter Signed (a letter entirely handwritten and signed by the given personality) ANS - Autograph Note Signed (a shorter ALS) AQS - Autograph Quotation Signed AMQS - Autograph Musical Quotation Signed DS - Document Signed Endorsement - A signature on the reverse of a check, or a signature on a document indicationg approval or further instructions Ephemera - An unsigned item FDC - First Day Cover Inscribed - “Personalized” ISP - Inscribed Signed Photograph LS - Letter Signed (a letter in a secretary’s hand, but signed by the given personality) Souvenir Typescript - An excerpt from a speech, book, film, etc. or an account of an incident, typed by a collector and signed by the individual noted SP - Signed Photograph Sweet spot - The area on the baseball where the stitched lines are closest together. TLS - Typed Letter Signed Book Grading: Fine (F) - unused, no damage Near Fine (NF) - one or two very minor flaws Very Good (VG) - some signs of wear, but overall sound Good (G) - well-worn but complete Poor (P) - heavily worn, sufficient as a “Reading Copy” All defects will be noted. For complete book grading guide, please check online.


RRAuction.com

(800) 937-3880

Auction gallery

OPERATIONS CENTER

236 Commercial St., Suite 100 Boston, Massachusetts 02109

5 Route 101A, Suite 5 Amherst, New Hampshire 03031

PRE-REGISTRATION FORM If you will be attending our sale for the first time and would like to expedite the registration process, you may fill out this form and forward it to our office prior to the sale and we will place your information on file.

Name _________________________________________________

Email ___________________________

Address__________________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ Telephone _____________________________________

State ____________ Zip ___________

Fax _____________________________________

Driver’s License Number________________________________________________ Issuing State _________ What associations do you hold membership with? (optional)

Visa

MasterCard

Manuscript Society

UACC

PADA

Discover

Credit Card Number* __________________________________________ Expiration Date _______________ *Credit Card information is to secure bid only.

I have read, fully understand and agree to the Terms and Conditions of Sale set forth in this catalog. It is recommended that you telephone us after mailing or faxing bids for confirmation of receipt.

Signature _______________________________________________

Date __________________________

PLEASE NOTE THAT YOU CAN ALSO REGISTER ONLINE AT www.RRAuction.com!


RRAuction.com

(800) 937-3880

Auction gallery

OPERATIONS CENTER

236 Commercial St., Suite 100 Boston, Massachusetts 02109

5 Route 101A, Suite 5 Amherst, New Hampshire 03031

ABSENTEE / TELEPHONE BID FORM Please check one:

ABSENTEE BIDS TELEPHONE BIDS __________________________ Telephone bidders: Please give us the number to call the morning of the sale

Name _________________________________________________

Mail / Fax absentee bids are due by 12:30 PM ET Tuesday, September 16. Please call our office should you wish to arrange a live phone bid the day of the auction. Absentee phone bids can be made by calling our offices at (800) 937-3880 up to 12:30 PM ET on Tuesday, September 16.

Email ___________________________

Address__________________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ Telephone _____________________________________ Lot Number

State ____________ Zip ___________

Fax _____________________________________

Lot Title

Max Bid Amount

It is recommended that you telephone us after mailing or faxing bids for confirmation of receipt. I have read, fully understand

and agree to the Terms and Conditions of Sale set forth in this catalog. Please place the following bids on my behalf in accordance with the Terms and Conditions of Sale.

Signature _______________________________________________

Date __________________________


It’s the perfect spot for

gallery

The North End is steeped in history The Old North Church, the Paul Revere House, key stops along the Freedom Trail—Boston’s venerable North End is home to some American history heavyweights. Now it’s our home, too. Here, collectors and consignors can attend special auction events, preview featured items, and schedule professional appraisals—just as they’ve done for years in our New Hampshire office, where it’s still business as usual. RR Auction has a long history of achieving record-shattering results; with our new gallery situated in one of America’s most historic communities, we see a future filled with even more remarkable results.

(800) 937-3880 | www.RRAuction.com


Raleigh DeGeer Amyx

AUCTION

LIVE SEPTEMBER 17 & 18 BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

www.RRAuction.com

|

(800) 937-3880

RR Auction: Historic Collection of Raleigh DeGeer Amyx  

Headquartered in Boston’s North End, RR Auction is a globally recognized and trusted source for rare documents, manuscripts, autographs, and...

RR Auction: Historic Collection of Raleigh DeGeer Amyx  

Headquartered in Boston’s North End, RR Auction is a globally recognized and trusted source for rare documents, manuscripts, autographs, and...