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RARE. REMARKABLE. April 16, 2014

(800) 937-3880 | www.RRAuction.com


It’s the perfect spot for

gallery

The North End is steeped in history The Old North Church, the Paul Revere House, key stops along the Freedom Trail—Boston’s venerable North End is home to some American history heavyweights. Now it’s our home, too. Here, collectors and consignors can attend special auction events, preview featured items, and schedule professional appraisals—just as they’ve done for years in our New Hampshire office, where it’s still business as usual. RR Auction has a long history of achieving record-shattering results; with our new gallery situated in one of America’s most historic communities, we see a future filled with even more remarkable results.

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MA/Lic. #3214

RARE. REMARKABLE. MARCH 21 - APRIL 16 Bidding begins as soon as the catalog is posted online (Friday, March 21). At 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 16th, the one-hour extended bidding period begins followed immediately by the 30 Minute Rule. All times in RR Auction guidelines an instructions are stated according to the Eastern (U.S.) time zone. www.RRAuction.com

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(800) 937-3880


AUTHENTICATORS AND CONSULTANTS BOB EATON AND BILL WHITE, RR AUCTION

AUCTION

After 30 years in business, during which time well over 1,000,000 signed items have crossed their paths, no one has had more daily exposure to autographs than Bob Eaton and Bill White. To date, RR Auction has published more than 400 consecutive monthly catalogs. Several award-winning, in-depth published studies have earned Bill a reputation as a trusted authenticator. Bob, a PSA/ DNA authenticator, is well established as one of the foremost authenticators in the autograph industry. Certificates of Authenticity are complimentary with every lot sold.

JOHN REZNIKOFF, UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES John is the founder of University Archives, a leading firm specializing in the appraisal and authentication of documents and manuscripts. He is affiliated with multiple professional organizations dedicated to the autograph industry, was a contributing editor for Autograph Collector magazine, and is a PSA/DNA authenticator. Letters of Authenticity are available on certain lots.Priced upon request*

PSA/DNA PSA/DNA is the world’s leading third party autograph authentication company. Using state of the art technology, PSA/DNA created a security system to prevent counterfeiting, forgery and piracy. As the most respected service in the industry, PSA/DNA’s years of expertise and knowledge have established an impeccable reputation for providing professional, unbiased, expert opinions. Letters of Authenticity are available STEVE ZARELLI

on certain lots. Priced from $25 to $200*

STEVE ZARELLI Steve has been collecting and closely studying space and aviation autographs for over 15 years. He has been at the forefront of identifying deceptive forgeries and his findings have been published in the definitive space collecting reference, Relics of the Space Race, as well as the UACC’s Pen & Quill magazine. Steve was also a contributor to the UACC signature study, Neil Armstrong: The Quest for His Autograph. Letters of Authenticity are available on certain lots. Priced from $30 to $150*

ROGER EPPERSON SIGNED, SEALED, AND DELIVERED/REAL Roger has an extensive background as a full-time dealer in autographs and collectibles, and is a trusted authenticator in all areas of contemporary music. When supported by the REAL logo and Roger’s name, music-related autographs assume an added value. Letters of Authenticity are available on certain lots. Priced from $30 to $150*

PHIL SEARS For over 20 years Phil Sears has been the recognized world authority on Walt Disney’s autograph habits. Included among Phil-sears.com customers are the Walt Disney Company and the Walt Disney Family Museum. Sears’s items have been featured in Autograph Collector magazine, E Ticket magazine, Collect! magazine, and the biography Walt Disney’s Missouri. Letters of Authenticity are available on certain lots. Priced upon request*

FRANK CAIAZZO beatles autographs

Frank is the world’s leading authority on Beatles signed and handwritten material. Since he began his study in 1986, he has amassed the largest file of signed examples on the planet. Through decades of focused and diligent research, he has acquired great skill in identifying authentic Beatles autographs, and also has gained the insight necessary to accurately approximate the era in which they were signed.

RENATO SAGGIORI With more than 50 years in the European autograph market, Renato is considered an expert on the manuscripts of European royalty, scientists, painters, and writers. He is also considered the leading authority on papal autographs and manuscripts. His 2006 book, The Popes - Five Centuries of Signatures, is an indispensible reference tool.

BRIAN GREEN AND MARIA GREEN, BRIAN AND MARIA GREEN CIVIL WAR SIGNATURES Civil War Signatures

With more than 45 years combined experience in the field, Brian and Maria are two of the nation’s leading experts in Civil War autographs and manuscripts.

JAMES CAMNER, LA SCALA AUTOGRAPHS James is a leading classical music autograph dealer. With more than 35 years experience, he is a founding member of PADA, an authenticator for PSA/DNA, a member of the ABAA, and an author of over ten published books on related subjects.

RICH CONSOLA Rich has studied Elvis Presley’s handwriting and signature for nearly 20 years, which has placed him in the forefront of Presley authenticators worldwide. * For more information on Letters of Authenticity call (800) 937-3880


Contents Presidents & First Ladies ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 4 Notables ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 40 Civil War ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 106 Weapons, Uniforms, & Artifacts �������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 162 Military ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 165 Space Artifacts ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 174 Space & Aviation ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 179 Art & Literature ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 192 Comic Art & Animation ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 223 Classic Music ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 227 Contemporary & Modern Music �������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 231 Ron Nevison Collection ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 250 Classic Entertainment ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 260 Costumes ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 278 Sports ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 285 Terms & Conditions ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 301

Bob Eaton CEO, Acquisitions bob.eaton@rrauction.com

Kelly Daniell Consignment Representative kelly.daniell@rrauction.com

Mike Nelson Senior Catalog Writer mike.nelson@rrauction.com

Carla Eaton Owner, Auctioneer carla.eaton@rrauction.com

Stephen Lago Consignment Representative stephen.lago@rrauction.com

Dan McCarthy Catalog Writer, Researcher dan.mccarthy@rrauction.com

Bobby Livingston Executive Vice President, Public Relations bobby.livingston@rrauction.com

Linda Hernandez Consignor Customer Service linda.hernandez@rrauction.com

Adam Karr Shipping Supervisor shipping@rrauction.com

Bobby Eaton Vice President of Operations Auctioneer, MA/Lic. #3214 bobby.eaton@rrauction.com

Erika Rosenfeld Managing Editor erika.rosenfeld@rrauction.com

Joe Doucette Inventory Executive joe.doucette@rrauction.com

Tricia Eaton Editor, Authenticator tricia.eaton@rrauction.com

Sue Recks Customer Service Executive sue.recks@rrauction.com

Bill White Lead Authenticator bill.white@rrauction.com

Sarina Carlo Creative Director sarina.carlo@rrauction.com

Mandy Eaton-Casey Finance Manager amanda.casey@rrauction.com Elizebeth Otto Consignment Director elizebeth.otto@rrauction.com Jon Siefken Consignment Director jon.siefken@RRAuction.com

Robert S. Eaton Sr. 1940–2001

Annie Nichols Junior Art Director annie.nichols@rrauction.com


presidents & first ladies Exceptionally scarce, crisply signed letter from Mount Vernon seeking a Miller 1. George Washington. ALS signed “Go:

Washington,” one page both sides, 7.25 x 11.75, Mount Vernon, May 25, 1785. Letter to Major Robert Lewis and Sons. In full: “In consequence of your letter of the 5th of last month, I discharged Willm Roberts from his attendance at my Mill. It now is, & has been for some times past without a Miller—and as Mr. Davenport from your acct would be ready to take charge of it in about three, not seven, weeks, and not yet come, and nor any acct of him, I am apprehensive of some disappointment. If this is the case, I should be glad to know it as soon as possible, One Baker who referred to you for a character, & was employed by Col. Biddle at his Mill near George Town (Maryland) has applied to me; but considering myself under an engagement I gave him no encouragement. A person who writes the enclosed letter has also offered; but I gave him no answer, and some others have likewise made applications; but as I depended upon Davenport I asked for no character, nor enquired into their qualifications. If Davenport should have disappointed me, would Baker answer my purpose? Would Reynolds do better? Or have you any other in view which you may think preferable to either? I am sorry to give you so much trouble with my affairs but hope you will excuse it.” A small note of provenance is affixed to the inside of the partial second integral page. Note reads, “This letter was found many years ago, among the papers of my grandfather Robert Lewis. I desire my son Robert will take charge of it. Laurence Lewis, February [22, 1849].” A second included slip slip traces the Lewis genealogy from Ellis Lewis (1680–1750) to Robert S. Lewis (b. 1919). Partial separations along the very fragile intersecting mailing folds, with one archival repair to separated lower right panel (not affecting any text), a few trivial areas of paper loss along folds, moderate toning, old tape repairs, a few small areas of paper loss along edges and page, one area affecting last number in date, and scattered light soiling, otherwise good condition. As the British evacuated the last of their troops from the newly independent United States at the close of 1783, Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief and returned to Mount Vernon. Though his retirement was brief, returning to Philadelphia in the summer of 1787 to take his place as president of the Constitutional Convention, the break did enable him to set straight affairs at his beloved plantation. Built in 1771 to increase the production of flour and cornmeal for export, his enormous stone gristmill had remained little utilized while he was at war. In this letter, he seeks out the proper Miller to run it. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from PSA/DNA. RR Auction COA.…(MB $1500)

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Adams requests a favor from his longtime acquaintance and future co-father-in-law in London 2. John Adams. ALS, one page, 4.75 x 7, no date [but

circa 1790s, likely during his vice-presidency]. Letter to Joshua Johnson at Great Tower Hill. In full: “The Bearer is represented to me as an American Prisoner. He is informed that you have a Vessel bound to Baltimore, and desires to engage on board of her if you have a place for him. I would pray you to admit him.” Reverse of second integral page bears an address panel in another hand. Attractively double-cloth-matted and framed with a portrait of Adams and a small plaque to an overall size of 25 x 18.25. In very good to fine condition, with intersecting folds, a couple passing through single letters of signature, some brushing of ink to recipient’s name in lower left, and scattered toning and soiling, mostly to second integral page. Sent to France on behalf of the colonies to negotiate a treaty of alliance in 1778, John Adams made the acquaintance of agent Joshua Johnson for the first time; twelve years later, Johnson was appointed US consul at London, a position that kept him in contact with Vice President Adams. The two would become significantly more familiar during Adams’s presidency, when his son, John Quincy—who had joined him on the initial trip to France, as well as subsequent diplomatic visits to Johnson in London—married Johnson’s daughter Louisa in 1797. Despite his reservations about his son marrying a non-American-born woman, he quickly welcomed his new in-laws to the family. A handsome letter with interesting family and diplomatic association. Oversized. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

Exceptional ship’s pass issued to an important merchant vessel 3. Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. Partly-printed vellum DS, signed “Th: Jefferson” as president and “James Madison” as secretary of state, one page, 10 x 15.25, April 17, 1805. Scalloped-top ship’s pass issued for “the Ship Friendship of Salem, Israel Williams master or commander…mounted with ten guns, navigated with twenty two men to pass with her Company, Passengers, Goods and Merchandise without any hindrance, seizure or molestation of the said Ship.” White paper seal affixed to lower left remains intact with loss of a couple corner tips. Intersecting folds and Madison’s signature somewhat light, otherwise fine condition. The Friendship was a 171-foot long merchant vessel completed in 1797 by Master Shipbuilder Enos Briggs of Salem, Massachusetts, and Israel Williams became its first captain. On a trade mission bound for Batavia in 1798, Williams found the supplies for his crew running low—most crucially, fresh water. Luckily, Williams was able to improvise a method of distilling saltwater from the ocean, which allowed his crew to survive the rest of the journey. The Friendship made 15 voyages during its years in service, traveling throughout the world to India, China, South America, the Caribbean, England, Germany, the Mediterranean, and Russia, until its ill-fated final voyage in 1812—the captain, then Edward Stanley, was unaware of the declaration of war against England, and his ship was captured as a prize of war by the British HMS Rosamond. A choice example of a document issued for a ship with a particularly fascinating history, featuring an especially bold Jefferson signature. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

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4. James Monroe. Partly-printed scalloped-top vellum DS, one page, 10.5 x 15, June

12, 1817. Ship’s pass reads, in part, “Suffer the Schooner Vestal of New York, Elisha Mix master or commander…mounted with no guns navigated with eight men to pass with her company passengers goods and merchandise, without any hindrance, seizure or molestation.” Signed at the conclusion by Monroe and countersigned by Acting Secretary of State Richard Rush. In very good condition, with intersecting folds, one through a single letter of signature, irregularly trimmed edges, and some light creasing and wrinkling. The white wafer seal is intact, but cracked. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Historic Madison and Monroe passport for a schooner that would be captured by the British—a leading cause of the War of 1812 5. James Madison and James Monroe. Partly-printed vellum DS signed by Madison as president, “James Madison,” and Monroe as secretary of state, “Jas. Monroe,” one page, 10 x 15, December 28, 1811. Scalloped-top ship’s pass issued for “the Schooner Arrow, Pearl Durkee master and commander…mounted with four guns navigated with twenty men to pass with her Company Passengers Goods and Merchandise without any hindrance seizure or molestation of the said Schooner.” Bright white seal affixed to the lower left remains clean and intact but for two of the tips. In fine condition, with barely visible intersecting folds, light foxing and staining to edges (heaviest to upper right), and writing and signatures a shade or two light. The Arrow was used as a cargo vessel trading between the United States and France, a hazardous task as Britain had imposed restrictions on such trade—they were at war with Napoleon and desired an all-out embargo to prevent supplies from reaching him, while also weakening the French economy. On May 8, 1812, the Arrow was returning from France laden with goods such as brandy, champagne, silk, nuts, and toys when the 38-gun frigate HMS Andromache, commanded by Captain Sir George Tobin, seized Arrow and her cargo. The British then took the Arrow to Plymouth Dockyard where between June 1812 and January 1813 she was re-fitted to be used by the Royal Navy. These types of trade restrictions and aggressive actions against US ships were a leading cause of the War of 1812. In addition to being signed by two presidents, the historical context of this document makes it a truly exceptional piece. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Adams forwards a resolution to a political rival and former ‘Kitchen Cabinet’ member of Jackson’s, now Printer to Congress 7. John Quincy Adams. ALS signed “J. Q. Adams,

Chairman of the Committee of Manufacturers,” one page, 7.25 x 9.5, no date, but 1833. Letter to “Duff Green, Esqr., Printer to Congress,” sent from the “Committee Room of the Committee of Manufacturers of the House of Representatives of the United States.” In full: “I am directed by the Committee of Manufacturers to enclose to you a Copy of the Resolution of the House referred to them by the House on the 11th instt. and to request the information which will be necessary to enable them to report thereon to the House.” Accompanied by the copy of the resolution, signed by Clerk Matthew St. Clair Clarke, which reads, in part: “That the committee on manufacturers be requested to report to the House…directing the returns of the Agents employed by the Treasury Department to collect information in relation to the Manufacturers of the United States.” Both are matted and framed to an overall size of 20 x 13.5. In fine condition, with a single spot of mild toning and some mirroring of ink along lower portion of page. The accompaniment has scattered light toning and a pencil notation to lower blank portion. Appointed chairman of the Committee of Manufacturers just seven days after being elected to Congress, Adams served as a strong advocate for factories and manufacturing, highlighting their importance as a means of developing the nation’s economy and becoming less dependent on European goods. Duff Green, a businessman and journalist who owned and edited the United States Telegraph, had helped Andrew Jackson defeat Adams in the presidential election of 1826 by making his paper one of the strongest pro-Jackson publications in the country; following the election, Duff was rewarded for his support with an appointment as printer to Congress, joining Jackson’s ‘Kitchen Cabinet’ of unofficial advisors. A boldly penned letter with interesting association, as Adams addresses one of the men who played an instrumental role in his earlier defeat. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Senator Jackson forwards a doctor’s letter with his own, complete with free frank

8. Andrew Jackson. ALS, one page,

8 x 6, December 19, 1823. Letter to Henry Niles. In full: “I have this moment rec’d under cover from my friend Doctor J. R. Bedford the enclosed letter, with the request that I should forward it to you. I have the pleasure to comply with his request.” Reverse bears a partial free franked panel, addressed in Jackson’s hand to “Henry Niles, Baltimore,” and franked “Andrew Jackson.” Intersecting folds, a couple passing through single letters of signature, some fading to paper to lower right, mounting remnants to reverse, and a couple of pencil notations, otherwise very good condition. It seems true that Bedford was a close associate of Jackson, as he is mentioned on multiple occasions throughout his papers. A scarce, highly desirable format signed twice by the future president. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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9. Andrew Jackson. Partly-printed vellum DS as president, one page, 14

x 17, July 1, 1834. President Jackson grants a military promotion. In part: “I do hereby confer on Capt’n Thomas Staniford of the Army…the rank of Major by Brevet…for faithful service ten years in one grade.” Boldly signed at the conclusion by Jackson and countersigned by Secretary of War Lewis Cass. White paper seal affixed to left side remains fully intact. Affixed at top edge to an off-white sheet. In fine condition, with intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature) and uniform toning. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Bold and excessively rare signature from Harrison’s term as president

10. William Henry Harrison. Practically nonexistent ink signature as president, “W. H. Harrison,” on an off-white 5 x 2 slip, signed below by Daniel Webster as secretary of state. A uniform block toning over the signatures, otherwise fine condition. With his presidency lasting only one month, anything signed by Harrison as Chief Executive is extraordinarily rare: this is just the third of such that we have offered in over 30 years. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $1500)

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Excessively rare “Certificate of Merit” issued for bravery at the Battle of Cerro Gordo 11. James K. Polk. Mexican-American War–dated

partly-printed vellum DS as president, one page, 16 x 9.75, November 25, 1848. President Polk issues a “Certificate of Merit” to “Charles Hayes of Company F of the 2d Regiment of Dragoons having distinguished himself in the service of the United States, on the eighteenth day of April, 1847, in the Battle of Cerro Gordo on the recommendation of Colonel W. S. Harney…I do hereby award to the said Private Charles Hayes this Certificate of Merit.” Boldly signed at the conclusion by Polk and countersigned by Secretary of War William L. Marcy. In fine condition, with expected document wear. The ‘Certificate of Merit’ was established to allow the president to recognize the individual contributions of soldiers during the Mexican-American War, which also granted them a pay raise of two dollars per month. Only 545 of these were ever issued, and the award was discontinued after the war. On April 18, 1847, US troops encountered General Santa Anna’s army at Cerro Gordo, where he had prepared fortifications. William S. Harney led his troops—Hayes included—up a hill known as El Telegrafo, a position controlled by Santa Anna and key possession in the territory. With support from Bennett C. Riley’s troops, the United States easily took the hill and won the battle in decisive fashion, clearing the way for the American advance to Mexico City. An exceptional, clean document with direct association to one of the most important battles of the Mexican-American War. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

12. Millard Fillmore. Signed book: Universal History, Volume XVII. London: T. Osborne, 1748. Rebound hardcover, 5.25 x 8.5, 628 pages. Signed at the top of the title page with an ownership signature in crisp black ink, “Millard Fillmore, Dec. 1, 1862.” Autographic condition: fine. Book condition: VG+/None. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Desirable 1856 presidential appointment 13. Franklin Pierce. Partly-printed vellum DS as president, one page, 19 x 15.5, August

12, 1856. President Pierce appoints Samuel Babcock as “Collector of the Customs for the District of Middletown in the State of Connecticut.” Neatly signed at the conclusion by Pierce and countersigned by Secretary of the Treasury James Guthrie. White paper seal affixed to lower left remains crisp and fully intact. Intersecting folds and some foxing and toning to borders, otherwise fine condition. Pierce signed this shortly after being abandoned by his party, who just two months prior had nominated James Buchanan to run as the Democratic candidate for president in the 1856 election. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The future president supports “a sound Democrat” 14. Franklin Pierce.

ANS signed “Frank. Pierce,” one page, 7.75 x 9.75, April 3, 1845. Pierce endorses a letter of recommendation written to Marcus Morton, governor of Massachusetts. In full: “I fully concur in the above request with regards to Mr. Kimball who has been long known to me personally.” The main letter assures Morton of the qualifications of Mr. Perkins Kimball to a position as inspector at the Boston custom house office, emphasizing the fact that he is “a sound Democrat.” Intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature), wrinkling to the top, and a bit of toning, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“They tell me at the Department that so many soldiers have been enlisted for the term of the war”

16. Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis. One word in Lincoln’s hand, “sufficient,” and three words in Davis’s hand, “drawn on me,” on individual off-white slips clipped from larger documents. Mounted and matted together with images of both leaders to an overall size of 10 x 8. In fine condition. Accompanied by color copies of the original documents from which these were excised, as well as a copy of the PSA/DNA letter that accompanied the Lincoln. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Union ticket issued in San Francisco, depicting a decisive Union victory

15. James Buchanan. ALS, one page, 7.75

x 9.5, June 24, 1848. Letter to John M. Read, a founder of the Republican party and Chief Justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. In part: “I have again tried to obtain the discharge of W. Cromley; but this cannot at present be procured. They tell me at the Department that so many soldiers have been enlisted for the term of the war, the rank & file of the old regiments will be reduced to about 6000 men; & that they cannot discharge any of these without some good reason. They say, they have had to adopt this rule from necessity.” Affixed by the left edge to an off-white 10.25 x 12 sheet. In fine condition. The Mexican-American War had concluded a few months prior to this letter, on February 2, 1848. Precertified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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17. Abraham Lincoln. Original printed

Union ticket from Lincoln’s 1864 presidential campaign, 3 x 7.25, featuring an eagle vignette at the top and naming Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson as running mates. The ticket was issued for California’s first district and also lists the names of the district’s five electors as well as its congressman. The reverse features a detailed scene showing the CSS Alabama sinking after its naval battle against the USS Kearsarge during the Civil War. In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


Civil War naval commission associated with the James River blockade and battle of Charleston

18. Abraham Lincoln. Civil War–dated partly-printed vellum DS as president, one page, 15.5 x 19, June 30, 1862. President Lincoln appoints Charles Fairchild as “an Assistant Paymaster in the Navy.” Signed at the conclusion by Lincoln and countersigned by Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles. The orange naval seal affixed to the bottom remains fully intact with a crease through the right side. In very good condition, with intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of Lincoln’s signature), scattered toning and soiling, and a bit of irregular ink adhesion to signatures. Fairchild was stationed aboard the USS Mahaska and was involved in the James River blockade and battle of Charleston; his brother, Lucius, was wounded at Gettysburg and went on to become governor of Wisconsin. Lincoln’s Civil War naval commissions are among the most desirable presidential documents, as they feature attractive vignettes of a heraldic eagle at the top and Neptune with sea serpents at the bottom. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $1000)

Attractive National Union ticket from the 1864 campaign 19. Abraham Lincoln. Original printed

National Union ticket from Lincoln’s 1864 presidential campaign, 3 x 8.25, featuring an eagle vignette at the top and naming Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson as running for president and vice president. The ticket was issued for California’s second district and also lists the names of the district’s five electors as well as its congressman. The reverse features a detailed ornamental vignette with a patriotic theme and portraits of Lincoln and Andrew Jackson, who was the last president to have been elected to a second term. In fine condition, with three unobtrusive folds and a tiny tear to the left edge. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Comprehensive post-war album signed by over 200 politicians and military officials, including four presidents and Johnson’s entire cabinet

20. Andrew Johnson Administration. Hardcover autograph album, 5.5 x 8, featuring approximately 250 signatures of politicians and military officials, with multiple signatures to each page, with a few signatures back-toback. Highlights of the album include: four presidents—Andrew Johnson (as president), U. S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, and James A. Garfield; and Johnson cabinet members William Seward, Henry Stanbery, Orville Browning, Alexander Randall, Gideon Welles, Edwin Stanton, James Harlan, William Dennison, and Hugh McColloch. Other signers include: Winfield Scott Hancock, Ethan A. Hitchcock, Oliver O. Howard, members of the War Department, and members of the House and Senate. In fine condition, with some scattered light wear to covers and spine. A well-maintained and wide-ranging collection of the individuals who aided in the country’s reconstruction. Precertified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

President Grant tends to personal affairs on his farm: “The man I have there knows nothing about farming, but knows all about the care and training of horses” 21. U. S. Grant. ALS as president, two pages, 5.5 x 9, Executive Mansion letterhead, October 29, 1874. Letter to Samuel Sharp. In part: “My recent visit to my farm in Mo. demonstrated to me very clearly that I require there a practical farmer who not only knows how to direct farm work, but one who will go with his hands and make a hand himself. The man I have there knows nothing about farming, but knows all about the care and training of horses. My stock is getting to be so numerous that he has as much as he can attend to with three or four assistants. Now my object in writing this to you is to enquire whether Mr. Jackson, the brother of Bella who has lived with Mrs. Grant, would be a…person to give such a charge to.” In fine condition, with light toning and a chip to the top edge. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. Grant grew up on a farm himself, where he became an expert at managing unruly horses; after leaving the military, he built his own in Missouri. A boldly penned letter with unusual content from a sitting president. Precertified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Exceptional Grant presidential check to his wife 22. U. S. Grant. Treasury Deparment bank check, 8.25 x 3, filled out and signed by Grant, as president, payable to Mrs. U. S. Grant for $300.00, April 8, 1869. Reverse of the check is endorsed “Mrs. U. S. Grant.” A two-cent revenue stamp is affixed to the upper right corner. In fine condition, with a light vertical fold through a single letter of signature, cancellation cut above signature, and a small tear to bottom edge. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

23. U. S. Grant. Partly-printed DS as president, one page, 16.5 x 13, August 4, 1874. President Grant appoints Thomas Coggeshall “Postmaster at Newport, in the County of Newport, State of Rhode Island.” Signed at the conclusion by Grant and countersigned by Postmaster General Marshall Jewell. Matted and framed to an overall size of 20.75 x 17.25. In very good condition, with intersecting folds, with a horizontal fold passing through signature, uniform toning, with a slightly heavier circular area of toning to right side from seal, as well as a few heavier spots to bottom edge. The red seal is crisp and intact. Coggeshall spent 53 continuous years serving as an assistant postmaster or postmaster in Newport and New Bedford. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Scarce handwritten legal document from 1849

24. Rutherford B. Hayes. Choice ADS signed “R. B. Hayes, his atty.,” one page both sides, lightly-lined, 7.75 x 9.75, September 5, 1849. Legal document pertaining to the division of real estate. In part: “Margaret Dickinson as widow of Rodolphus Dickinson lately deceased is entitled to dower in said premises. Your petition therefore prays that partition of said lands be made and the dower of the said Margaret Dickinson assigned therein.” In fine condition. This is only the third Hayes document from the 1840s we have offered. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

25. Rutherford B. Hayes. Executive Mansion card neatly signed in black ink, “R. B. Hayes.” In fine condition, with a light paperclip impression to top edge, a couple of small bends, and some scattered light soiling to both sides. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Scarce Hayes ship’s papers for the whaling voyage of the Andrew Hicks 26. Rutherford B. Hayes. Partly-printed DS as president, signed “R. B. Hayes,” one page, 22 x 17, June 23, 1879. Four-language ship’s papers issued to “Edward E. Hicks master or commander of the Bark called Andrew Hicks…lying at present in the port of New Bedford bound for a whaling voyage and laden with provisions, utensils, and stores for a whaling voyage.” Signed in the third panel by Hayes and countersigned by Secretary of State William Everts. In very good to fine condition, with intersecting folds, with a horizontal fold passing through top of Hayes’s signature, a few old tape repairs to reverse top edge, a few small edge tears, and some slight mirroring of ink. Gone for almost two years, the Andrew Hicks would return with 1000 barrels of sperm oil. She would eventually sink of the Virginia Capes in 1917, after 50 years of service. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Early document by the 25-year-old lawyer, countersigned by his future father-in-law

27. Chester A. Arthur. Executive Mansion card signed in black ink, “Chester A. Arthur.” Some slight surface loss to corners, a bit of light soiling, and some mild toning to reverse, otherwise fine condition. Precertified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

28. Grover Cleveland. Executive Mansion card boldly signed in black ink, “Grover Cleveland.” A slightly trimmed top edge and a small ink notation on reverse, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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29. Grover Cleveland. Manuscript DS, two pages both sides, 8 x 12.5, February 3, 1862. Legal document pertaining to a lawsuit against John T. Noye, who had refused to pay the Bloomsburg Iron Company and Bank of Buffalo the sum of $1030. Signed at the conclusion by Cleveland below an 11-line statement in his own hand, in part: “Oscar Folsom being duly sworn says that on the 10th day of January 1862 at the city of Buffalo he served the foregoing summons & complaint on John T. Noye.” Also signed by Oscar Folsom, who would become Cleveland’s father-in-law when he married his daughter, Frances Folsom. Partial edge separations to horizontal folds, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


30. Grover and Frances Cleveland. Choice pair

of Executive Mansion cards, individually signed “Grover Cleveland” and “Frances F. Cleveland.” Lower left of the Grover Cleveland card bears an 1893 date notation. In overall fine condition, with mild toning to both. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

31. William McKinley. Partly-printed vel-

lum DS as president, one page, 15.25 x 19.25, June 1, 1901. President McKinley appoints Edward McCauley as “a Lieutenant, junior grade, in the Navy.” Boldly signed at the conclusion by McKinley and countersigned by the Acting Secretary of the Navy Frank W. Hackett. Blue seal affixed to the bottom remains fully intact with scattered creases. In fine condition, with overall wrinkling. Precertified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

32. William McKinley. TLS signed “W.

McKinley,” one page, 5.5 x 9, personal letterhead, March 10, 1896. Letter to Nebraska Governor John M. Thayer. In full: “I have not been unobservant of the good work you have been doing and your many manifestations of partiality and support. I want to thank you. My friend Mr. Dawes has told me of your service and devotion, which I assure you are greatly valued.” Some mirroring of text from folding, and some scattered light soiling and toning, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The young McKinley’s personally owned book—Cicero’s treatise on political morality

33. William McKinley. Signed book: Cicero’s Three Books of Offices

and Other Moral Works, translated by Cyrus R. Edmonds. NY: Harper and Brothers, 1855. Hardcover, 5 x 7.5, 343 pages. Signed on a first free end page at age 12 or thereabout with an ownership signature in black ink, “Wm. McKinley Jr.’s Book.” Autographic condition: very good, with scattered foxing and tape to left edge of the signed page. Book condition: G-/None. In the book, Cicero offers his analysis of the political and ethical values of the Roman governing class in the late Republic, and the ideas contained within had a profound impact upon subsequent political thinkers—a great association, given McKinley’s future career. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

34. William McKinley. Ex-

ecutive Mansion card boldly signed in black ink, “William McKinley.” In very good condition, with scattered toning and soiling, and mounting remnants to reverse. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Cavalry appointment for the nephew of a well-respected general killed at Gettysburg 35. Theodore Roosevelt and William H. Taft. Partly-printed DS, signed

“Theodore Roosevelt” as president and “Wm. H. Taft” as secretary of war, one page, 20 x 15.25, July 6, 1906. President Roosevelt appoints J. F. Reynolds Landis a “Major of Cavalry in the service of the United States.” Signed at the conclusion by Roosevelt and countersigned by Secretary of War William H. Taft. Matted and framed to an overall size of 27 x 22.5. In fine condition, with light vertical folds passing through a few letters of signatures, and Roosevelt’s signature a shade or two light. The seal is intact and only slightly worn. Landis was the nephew of famed Civil War General John F. Reynolds, killed during the first day’s fighting at Gettysburg while commanding part of the Army of the Potomac. A desirable pairing of chief executives with great relation to the most costly battle of the Civil War. Oversized. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“To Master Roger Shaw from a fellow lover of nature, Theodore Roosevelt” 36. Theodore Roosevelt. Signed book: The Wilderness Hunter. Later printing. NY: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1893. Hardcover, 6.25 x 9, 472 pages. Signed and inscribed on the first free end page, as president, “To Master Roger Shaw from a fellow lover of nature, Theodore Roosevelt, June 15th 1908.” A letter from Roosevelt’s secretary on White House stationery, dated June 16, 1908, is affixed to the front pastedown, and reads, “By direction of the President I send you the accompanying copy of The Wilderness Hunter for your son.” Affixed to the rear pastedown is a 1939 TLS from Eleanor Roosevelt (addressed to the same recipient) on White House stationery giving thanks for sympathy expressed over the death of Roosevelt’s nephew. Autographic condition: very good, with areas of blotting to ink of signature and inscription, affecting portions of both first and last names. Book condition: VG-/None. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Virtually unobtainable 1910 limited edition African Game Trails set in remarkable condition, complete with printed dust jackets, sleeves, and slipcase 37. Theodore Roosevelt. Highly sought-

after signed book: African Game Trails, Volumes I and II. Limited edition, numbered 79/500. NY: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1910. Hardcovers with their hard-to-find original dust jackets and slipcase, 7 x 10, 529 total pages. Signed on the colophon of Volume I in fountain pen. Autographic condition: fine, with a small stain to colophon far from the signature. Book condition: NF/NF. Both volumes half-bound in brown leather; title on spines slightly darkened and some scattered discoloration, otherwise fine condition, with strong, tight binding and crisp, clean interiors. Dust jackets have some slight sunning/discoloration and few minor spots of soiling, but are otherwise in fine condition. Also included are the original cardboard sleeves (in VG+ condition, with discoloration and waterstain to spines) and the original slipcase. Finding this set in its complete form—with dust jackets, sleeves, and slipcase—is incredibly difficult in any condition; this set, complete and exceptionally well-preserved, is one of the finest ever to come to market. RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

Endorsing his Bull Moose Party friend for magistrate 38. Theodore Roosevelt. TLS, one page, 7.75 x 9.25, personal letterhead,

March 19, 1915. Letter to judge William L. Ransom. In part: “I entirely agree with what you say about the Municipal Courts and with the special professional and personal qualifications of Michael Schaap for appointment as Magistrate. As Assemblyman, Police Commissioner, Governor and private citizen, I have been brought into peculiarly close contact with the problems presented in the work of these courts; and I have also seen much of Schaap on rather intimate terms. I know a number of men who would make good magistrates; but if at the moment I were asked to state among all the men I know the one best fitted to be such a Magistrate, I would name Michael Schaap.” In very good condition, with intersecting folds, scattered creases, the typed text a couple shades light, and moderate spreading to signature. Schaap had joined Roosevelt’s ‘Bull Moose’ Party in 1912 and was Progressive Party floor leader in the 1913 and 1914 sessions of the New York legislature. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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39. Theodore Roosevelt. TLS, one page, 6.5 x 7.5, Outlook letterhead, May 26, 1911. Letter to Senator E. J. Burkett. In part: “I cannot accept another invitation. I wish I could. If I went to any Chautauqua it would have to be the one in this State; and if I went to the Chautauqua in Nebraska, it would mean that I should have to speak all the way out and all the way back, and I would be literally deluged with other invitations. I am obliged to refuse all invitations at present. You have no idea of the drain they have been upon me.” In fine condition, with a couple slightly rusty paperclip impressions to top edge, and some slight mirroring of letterhead along bottom edge. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

40. Theodore Roosevelt. White House card signed in black ink, “Theodore Roosevelt.” In fine condition, with a trivial spot near top edge and a small area of adhesive remnant to reverse, along with a small pencil notation. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“The League to Enforce Peace is prepared now to declare for the ratification of this treaty with these reservations” 41. William H. Taft. TLS signed “Wm. H. Taft,” three pages, 8 x 10.5, personal letterhead, November 8, 1919. Letter to newspaper correspondent Gus Karger. In part: “I was in the throes of preparing my article for for the Ledger, which appeared this morning, and also an address which I delivered today at Carnegie Hall in New York before the League for Political Education. Carnegie Hall was crowded with women…I don’t think they liked my statement that we must consent to the reservations in order to get the League through. They are all for the League, and they are of course bitterly disappointed that the Senate resists ratification… The League to Enforce Peace is prepared now to declare for the ratification of this treaty with these reservations, but we have some Democrats in the Executive Committee, and they keep postponing the action. My own impression is they are just like the Democrats in the Senate.” Taft adds a lengthy handwritten postscript at the conclusion of the letter: “Since dictating above, the senate has adopted the first reservation and insisted on retaining the ‘concurrent’ resolution. I regret this first because though Wilson personally deserves such a rebuke for his ignoring the senate, I hate to see men so little as to try to repay a personal affront at the expense of the country, second because it may serve to make Wilson beat the treaty for anger, and third because the executor has always been more level headed in foreign affairs than the two houses who are often duly set to…hasty action. However there will be two years to think about and take it back.” A carbon copy of Karger’s three-page response is attached with a paperclip. Irregular blocks of toning to edges and a rusty paperclip to upper left, otherwise fine condition. Taft’s League to Enforce Peace was established in 1915 to promote the formation of an international body for world peace, formed in response to the outbreak of World War I in Europe. Following the conclusion of World War I, President Woodrow Wilson helped to establish the League of Nations, for which Taft and his organization supported and lobbied. It was officially established via the Treaty of Versailles on June 28, 1919, and 44 different countries joined. Despite this wide international success and influential bipartisan support—led by the former president Taft, a Republican, and President Wilson, a Democrat—the United States never joined, primarily due to opposition in the Senate, as Taft mentions in his letter. One main figure in this opposition was Republican Majority Leader Henry Cabot Lodge, who penned twelve ‘reservations’ regarding the treaty. Taft believed the symbolic membership in the League was more important than the exact nature of the organization, and so supported the measure when Lodge brought it up for a vote on November 19. Many of Lodge’s Republicans were against it to begin with, and many Democrats were upset by the compromises made in the newly adopted reservations, preferring Wilson’s original plan. As a result, both of these groups voted against joining the League of Nations, effectively ending the possibility of US affiliation. A letter with terrific content in anticipation of this historic vote. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 18 | April 16, 2014 | PRESIDENTS & FIRST LADIES


42. William H. Taft. TLS signed “Wm. H. Taft,” one page, 6.5 x 6.5, personal letterhead, January 9, 1917. Brief letter of thanks to a supporter. In full: “I thank you for your approval of my address, and for the interesting discussion contained in your letter.” Matted and framed with an engraved portrait to an overall size of 17.5 x 11.5. In very good condition, with mild toning along horizontal folds, one fold passing through signature, and pencil remnants to left edge. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

43. William H. Taft. Personal check, 8.5 x 3, filled out in another hand and signed by Taft, “Wm. H. Taft,” payable to Joseph Chadwick for $6.00, November 27, 1917. Cloth-matted and framed with a photo of Taft posing outdoors to an overall size of 13 x 20.75. In fine condition, with cancellation holes to upper portion. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Wilson informs Congress of his ultimatum on German submarine warfare 44. Woodrow Wilson. Printed speech in booklet form, “Address of the President of the United States, Delivered at a Joint Session of the Two Houses of Congress, April 19, 1916,” 6 x 9.25, seven pages, issued by the Government Printing Office. Signed on the final page of text in black ink by Wilson. In fine condition, with uniform mild toning to inside pages, and a bit of light bowing to covers. Less than a month before Wilson delivered this address to Congress, Germany sparked an international diplomatic crisis when one of their submarines sank the French cross-channel ferry Sussex, resulting in 80 casualties, 25 of which were American civilians. Referring back to the disastrous sinking of the Lusitania in World War I—“so singularly tragical and unjustifiable as to constitute a truly terrible example of the inhumanity of submarine warfare as the commanders of German vessels have...been conducting it”—Wilson passionately condemned the German actions, threatening to sever diplomatic relations between the two nations if it continued. Five days later, Germany abandoned its U-boat campaign around Britain and the Mediterranean in response. When they reintroduced the policy the following February, Wilson made good on his threat, declaring war on April 2, 1917. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Historic Harris and Ewing portrait of Wilson delivering his War Message to Congress in 1917 45. Woodrow Wilson. Important vintage matte-finish 9.75 x

6.5 Harris and Ewing photo of Wilson delivering his request for a declaration of war against Germany to a joint session of Congress on April 2, 1917, affixed to its original 12.75 x 10 photographer’s mount, signed on the mount in fountain pen by Wilson and also signed by Vice President Thomas Marshall and Speaker of the House Champ Clark. Mount has been inlaid to a 17.5 x 14.5 offwhite mount. Scattered silvering to edges and darker portions of the image, mild toning and foxing to mount, and a few creases to top left corner of mount, otherwise fine condition. In early 1917, Germany increased attacks on neutral shipping interests in the Atlantic, resulting in ten American-registered vessels sunk during that time, including the steamer Aztec, which lost 28 crew members when she went down. In his powerful and solemn address, Wilson spoke of the rampant submarine warfare and the possible infiltration of spies across the country. While acknowledging the high stakes of war, he nonetheless asked for a formal declaration of war, declaring that not only had America’s rights as a neutral country been violated but also that, ‘The world must be made safe for democracy.’ Congress overwhelmingly passed the declaration two days later by a vote of 373 to 50, with the president approving it on April 6, 1917, which formally entered the United States into the first World War. A powerful portrait which captures the hushed and tense drama of Wilson’s momentous address. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

46. Warren G. Harding. Partly-printed DS, twice-signed “W. G. Harding,” one page, 7.75 x 4, April 17, 1897. Proof of publication document filled out in Harding’s hand. In full: “W. G. Harding, of lawful age, being sworn, says that a printed notice, a copy of which is hereunto attached, was published for five consecutive weeks in The Marion Star, a newspaper published and in general circulation in said Marion County, immediately previous to the 17 day of April A. D., 1897, and that at the time he was Prest. of said paper.” The notice, which remains stapled to the left side, is regarding a Marion County sheriff’s sale. In fine condition, with expected document wear. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

47. Warren G. Harding. Partly-printed DS as president, one page, 16.75 x 13.75, November 28, 1921. President Harding appoints Mrs. Letitia H. Wardwell “to be Notary Public for the District of Columbia,” with the five-year term crossed out on the document and replaced with “ending December 6, 1922.” Signed at the conclusion by Harding and countersigned by Attorney General Harry M. Daugherty. Matted and framed to an overall size of 24.25 x 21.5. In fine condition, with light central horizontal and vertical folds. The red seal is crisp and intact. Oversized. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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48. Warren G. Harding. TLS

signed “W. G. Harding,” one page, 5.25 x 6.75, US Senate letterhead, September 3, 1920. Letter to John C. Shaffer of Chicago’s Evening Post. In part: “Senator Watson has just sent to me the cordial commendation and clipping of your editorial…I appreciate very much your approval…I think you are really justifiable in your assumption of my absolute sincerity of purpose.” In fine condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

49. Calvin Coolidge.

Signed book: The Autobiography of Calvin Coolidge. Limited edition, numbered 673/1000. NY: Cosmopolitan Book Corporation, 1929. Hardcover, 6.25 x 9.5, 247 pages. Boldly signed on the colophon in black ink. Autographic condition: very fine. Book condition: VG+/None. Precertified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

50. Calvin Coolidge.

White House card neatly signed in black ink, “Calvin Coolidge.” Encapsulated in a plastic PSA/ DNA authentication holder. In very good condition, with a couple light creases and mounting remnants to corners. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Scarce presidential appointment of the “Minister Resident and Consul General of the United States of America to Liberia” 51. Herbert Hoover. Partly-

printed DS as president, one page, 22 x 17.5, September 10, 1930. President Hoover appoints Charles E. Mitchell as “Minister Resident and Consul General of the United States of America to Liberia.” Signed at the conclusion by Hoover and countersigned by the acting secretary of state. White paper seal affixed to lower left remains fully intact. Scattered creases and a few small stains to the left side, otherwise fine condition. Official presidential documents from Hoover are quite scarce, as his signature was often printed rather than hand-signed—this is just the sixth we have offered. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

52. Herbert Hoover. Signed book: Fish-

ing for Fun—And to Wash Your Soul. First edition, first printing, limited issue, numbered 90/200. NY: Random House, 1963. Hardcover with slipcase, 5.75 x 8.5, 86 pages. Boldly signed on the colophon in black ink. Autographic condition: fine, with Hoover signing shakily at age 89. Book condition: VG+/None. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Hoover submits The Challenge to Liberty to the Saturday Evening Post 54. Herbert Hoover. TLS,

one page, 7.25 x 10.5, personal letterhead, September 7, 1934. Letter to T. B. Costain of the Saturday Evening Post. In part: “I am sending you herewith the proofs of the second article. In some of the cuts proposed there are some necessary reservations on a subject so complex as this which would be dangerous to eliminate. In some others of the cuts proposed the continuity of thought is destroyed. I have, however, cut some places which seemed to me to be less damaging, and therefore this is a sort of compromise.” An area of toned adhesive remnants to the upper left, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by a carbon file copy of the response to Hoover, agreeing with his suggestions. This letter is in reference to two chapters from Hoover’s book critical of the New Deal, The Challenge to Liberty, which would be published in the Saturday Evening Post on September 8 and 15, 1934. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

55. Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover. Two items: vintage matte-finish 7 x 9.75 photo of Hoover as president, signed in the lower border in fountain pen, “Herbert Hoover”; and a White House card, signed in black ink, “Lou Henry Hoover.” Some foxing and discoloration to edges of the photo, otherwise overall fine condition. Accompanied by their original letters of transmittal from White House offices, dated 1931 and 1932. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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56 . Herbert Hoover.

White House card signed in black ink, “Herbert Hoover.” In fine condition, with a couple traces of trivial soiling. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

57. Eleanor Roosevelt.

Signed book: It’s Up to the Women. Autographed edition, limited issue, numbered 1 4 1 / 2 5 0 . N Y: Frederick A. Stokes, 1933. Hardcover with dust jacket and slipcase, 5.5 x 7.75, 263 pages. Signed on the colophon in fountain pen. Autographic condition: fine. Book condition: VG+/VG. Rarely seen with its dust jacket and slipcase, this is an especially desirable book from the popular First Lady. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

58. Eleanor Roosevelt. White House card

signed in fountain pen, “Eleanor Roosevelt.” In fine condition, with a uniform shade of mild toning and a thin strip of mounting remnant on reverse. Precertified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


Exquisite print of the Winslow-designed East Wing, framed in wood from the White House Roof 59. Franklin D. Roosevelt. Very nice and detailed print, 18 x 13.25, entitled ‘The East Wing of The White House,’ with the architect’s name, Lorenzo Simmons Winslow, printed in the lower border, signed and inscribed in the lower border in fountain pen, “For Isador Lubin—one of the first ‘inmates’ from Franklin D. Roosevelt.” Framed to an overall size of 20.5 x 15.25. A plaque affixed to the bottom edge of the frame reads, “This wood was part of the White House roof erected about 1817 and removed in 1927.” In fine condition. As Commission of Labor Statistics, Lubin served as FDR’s unofficial labor economist, a position which may have led to a play on the word ‘inmates’ in the inscription. The wood in which the engraving is framed comes directly from the 1817 renovation, carried out by James Madison after the British gutted the executive mansion in 1814, leaving a hollow shell for original architect, James Hoban, to work with. In 1927, Calvin Coolidge also lent a hand to some repair work, after experiencing a less than leak-proof roof during a heavy rain storm. He took to replacing the roof and attic in 1927, using steel girders to add a third floor, improving the structure and solidarity of the White House. This beautiful engraving of the White House is aptly supported by the wood which provided the framework for America’s political leaders for 110 years. Provenance: William E. Simon Collection; Christies, 2005. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

60. Franklin D. Roosevelt. TLS as presi-

dent, one page, 7 x 8.75, White House letterhead, February 4, 1941. Letter to Ferdinand Pecora, a justice of New York State’s supreme court. In part: “I want to thank you for that nice message you sent me on my birthday.” In fine condition, with a light paperclip mark to the upper left. Accompanied by the original White House mailing envelope. Precertified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Hand-corrected first edition of his ‘New Deal’ 61. Franklin D. Roosevelt. Signed

book: On Our Way. First edition. NY: John Day Company, 1934. Hardcover with dust jacket, 5.5 x 5, 300 pages. Signed and inscribed as president on the first free end page, “For Dorothy M. Stanley, Merry Christmas from Franklin D. Roosevelt 1934.” Autographic condition: fine, with some mild toning to edges of signed page. Book condition: VG+/VG-. The two mistakes corrected in later printings (on pages x and 162) have been hand-corrected. Precertified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

62. Franklin D. Roosevelt. Mailing envelope, 6.5 x 3.5, bearing a September 17,

1930, New York postmark, signed in the upper left corner “Franklin D. Roosevelt,” and addressed in another hand to a residence in Pennsylvania. In fine condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Newly-elected Roosevelt presents a complete story of his ‘New Deal’ as a Christmas gift

Oversized Harris and Ewing portrait of Truman’s cabinet

63. Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Signed book: Looking Forward. Later printing. NY: John Day Company, 1933. Hardcover with dust jacket, 5.5 x 7.5, 279 pages. Signed and inscribed as president on the first free end page, “To Dorothy M. Stanley with a Merry Christmas from Franklin D. Roosevelt 1933.” Autographic condition: fine. Book condition: VG+/VG-. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Distinguished Underwood and Underwood portrait

64. Franklin D. Roosevelt. Matte-finish 8 x 10.5 Underwood and

Underwood photo, signed and inscribed in the lower border in fountain pen, “For Alfred J. Oeth from Franklin D. Roosevelt.” In fine condition, with a bit of light silvering to edges of image and Roosevelt’s signature a couple of shades lighter than inscription. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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65. Harry S. Truman and Cabinet. Very nice matte-finish 10.25 x 10.75 Harris and Ewing photo of Truman and his cabinet seated around their table, signed in the lower border in blue and black ink by eleven members: Harry S. Truman, George C. Marshall, Lewis Schwellenbach, John W. Snyder, Clinton P. Anderson, Robert Hannegan, Tom C. Clark, Averell Harriman, James Forrestal, Robert P. Patterson, and Julius Albert Krug. Matted and framed with a small portrait of Truman and an image of the presidential seal to an overall size of 21 x 16. Clark’s signature very faded and legible only as an impression, and a few scattered light edge creases, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from PSA/DNA. A crystal-clear portrait of Truman’s post-war cabinet as they worked to transition the country back to peace. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

66. Bess Truman. White House card neatly signed in black ink, “Bess W. Truman.” In very fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


In eulogizing labor leader Philip Murray, Truman articulates his definition of “democracy” and praises Murray’s fight against “communism at home and abroad” 68. Harry S. Truman. TLS as president, one page, 8 x 10.5, White House letterhead, November 26, 1952. Typed statement as president, one page, 8 x 10.5, White House letterhead, November 26, 1952. Statement to the Congress of Industrial Organizations eulogizing labor leader Philip Murray. In part: “I wish that I could be with you in person to honor the memory of Philip Murray, but since I cannot come, I will try to make my words carry the message of my heart. Philip Murray’s life was dedicated to the dignity of man. He fought for the freedom and welfare of the individual. While he represented millions of workers, he always was able to think in terms of each worker…He gave inspiration to the great organizing movement of the CIO…He worked for the cause of labor so that every working man might have better food and clothing, a better home and a place of honor and respect in his own community…He regarded unions not as ends in themselves but as means in which union members could achieve their rights and fulfill their responsibilities as citizens. He had deep faith in democracy. He believed the labor movement should be the servant of its individual members just as I believe the Government should be the servant and not the master of our people…May we all continue valiantly in his spirit.” In fine condition, with mild toning. Murray began his career at age ten as a coal miner and steelworker, and later emerged as an influential leader in organizing his coworkers in the United Mine Workers of America. He went on to become the first president of the United Steelworkers of America, and the longestserving president of the CIO, a federation of various unions. Shortly before Murray’s death, the steelworkers initiated a major strike that had a widespread impact on the US economy and efforts in the Korean War; Truman went to significant lengths to protect the union during the 53-day strike, and Murray and other union leaders emerged victorious. A fantastic statement from the sitting president during the strongest period for organized labor in the country’s history. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

68. Harry S. Truman.

World War II–dated TLS signed “Harry,” one page, 8 x 10.5, US Senate letterhead, January 12, 1944. Letter to John W. Snyder. In part: “I am sorry the Ambassador is leaving Mexico City at the time you are going to be there, but he certainly will make arrangements for your proper reception…It looks as if I am not going to make the dinner on the Twenty Second. There are about twenty Missourians coming to Washington for the Jackson Day dinner and it is imperative that Bob Hannegan, Clark and I entertain, especially for Clark’s benefit.” In a handwritten postscript, Truman adds: “Drucie will have that invitation I was telling you about in a day or two.” In fine condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

69. Harry S. Truman. TLS,

one page, 7.25 x 10.5, personal letterhead, July 15, 1965. Letter to entertainer George Jessel. In part: “Your thoughtful telegram came at just the right time to bring me consolation in the death of my brother.” In fine condition, a couple stray marks t o t h e b o tto m. Pre-certified John R e z n i k o ff / P S A / DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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“Best wishes for the success of the study of the ‘Problems in American History’” 70. Harry S. Truman.

ANS, one page on a 5 x 3 card, March 10, 1961. Note conveying good wishes. In full: “Best wishes for the success of the study of the ‘Problems in American History.’” In fine condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

74. Harry S. Truman.

Two items: a glossy 3.5 x 5.5 portrait of Truman, signed and inscribed in black ink, “James J. Argyris from Harry S. Truman 8/5/65”; and a TLS signed by Truman acknowledging the photo. Both are matted and framed together, along with the original mailing envelope bearing a pre-printed franking signature, to an overall size of 18.5 x 15. In fine condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“Sworn in as President by Chief Justice Stone, Harry S. Truman” 71. Harry S. Truman. Signed books: Memoirs: Year of Decisions

and Years of Trial and Hope, in two volumes. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1955 and 1956. Hardcovers with dust jackets, 6 x 8.5, 596 and 594 pages. Each volume is signed and inscribed in fountain pen on the half-title page. Autographic condition: fine. Book conditions: VG+/VG-. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

75. Harry S. Truman. Historic glossy 10 x 8 photo of Truman

72. Harry S. Truman. TLS, one page, 6.5 x 8.25, personal letter-

head, no date. Brief letter to a collector. In full: “Enclosed, herewith, is a small photograph autographed to you. I am glad to send it to you as requested in your recent letter.” Matted and framed with a color print of Truman bearing a printed signature to an overall size of 20 x 15.5. In fine condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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taking the Oath of Office in the Cabinet Room, signed in black ink, “Cabinet Room, Apr. 12. 45, sworn in as President by Chief Justice Stone, Harry S. Truman.” Reverse of photo bears a Harry S. Truman Library stamp and a collector’s pencil notation along the bottom edge. In fine condition, with a few scattered light creases and rubbing to finish, and a small tape remnant to vertical edges. Truman had spent only 82 days as vice president when Franklin D. Roosevelt died in the late afternoon of April 12. An urgent message pulled Truman away from the Capitol building to the White House, where he was informed of FDR’s passing. Justice Stone was summoned to administer the oath in the hastily arranged ceremony, beautifully captured in this one-of-a-kind image. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


Truman’s come-frombehind victory 76. Harry S. Truman. Glossy 10 x 8 photo of Truman taking the Oath of Office at his second inauguration, signed in black ink, “Sworn in as elected President 1949 by Chief Justice Vinson, Jan. 20, 1949, Harry S. Truman.” Reverse of photo bears a Harry S. Truman Library stamp and a collector’s pencil notation along the bottom edge. In fine condition, with a few minor surface marks, a couple of light brushes to Truman’s writing, and slight surface loss to vertical borders. Truman’s second inauguration was the first to be broadcast on television, giving him more witnesses than all previous inaugurations combined. A oneof-a-kind identified image of Truman taking the oath for an election in which he was widely expected to lose. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Presidential order for a trusted advisor to assume the role of secretary of state, should the need arise 77. Harry S. Truman.

DS as president, one page, 10 x 13, March 17, 1948. Document states, in full: “In conformity with the provisions of Sections 177 and 179 of the Revised Statutes, and of the Act of Congress approved February 6, 1891, Willard L. Thorp, as Assistant Secretary of State, is hereby authorized and directed to perform the duties of Secretary of State during the absence or sickness of the Secretary of State and the Under Secretary of State.” Signed at the conclusion by Truman. Matted and framed with a photo of Truman waving from a window to an overall size of 17 x 29. In fine, clean condition. Thorp was an economist who worked as an advisor in both domestic and foreign affairs not only to Truman but also to his predecessor, Franklin D. Roosevelt. Under the Truman Administration, Thorp helped develop the Marshall Plan after World War II, and also served as a special adviser on economic matters at the Paris Peace Conference. He resigned in 1952 during Senator Joseph McCarthy’s investigations into alleged Communists in the federal government. Oversized. Precertified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Great image of the five-star general 78. Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Vintage matte-finish 6 x 8 photo of Eisenhower in his five-star general uniform, signed and inscribed in the lower border in fountain pen, “To Dr. E. N. Bowles, with best wishes & warm regard, Dwight D. Eisenhower.” In fine condition, with a couple unobtrusive creases to corners. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

79. Dwight D. Eisenhower. TLS signed “D.

E.,” one page, 6.75 x 8.75, White House letterhead, December 2, 1954. Letter to Allan R. Phipps. In part: “I meant to thank you for your very able work and fine results achieved as Republican State Finance Chairman during the last campaign. Certainly I have become well aware in my brief acquaintance with practical politics of the tremendous investment of time and energy it requires for success.” In fine condition, with subtle toning from the envelope. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) www.RRAuction.com | 27


80. Dwight D. Eisenhower.

TLS signed “D. E.,” one page, 7 x 10.25, personal letterhead, March 26, 1964. Letter to actor Robert Montgomery. In part: “I am writing to you as a fellow trustee of People-to-People to add my voice to Joyce Hall’s in affirming the increasing importance of our purpose and our program. What a tremendous force for the good it would be if, say, millions of conscientious Americans could be put in personal contact with their counterparts abroad through some People-to-People activity!” In fine condition, with a rusty paperclip impression and office notation to the top. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“We appreciate the spirit of friendship that prompted you to wait just outside the gate as we left our Gettysburg home a week or so ago” 81. Dwight D. Eisenhower. TLS as presi-

dent, one page, 6.75 x 9, White House letterhead, May 18, 1959. Ike responds to Mrs. Grant L. Brunner of West Lawn, Pennsylvania, who saw Eisenhower as he was leaving his farm in Gettysburg. In full: “Thank you for your heartwarming letter. I do, of course, feel a deep sense of gratification, even humility, that so many people, like yourself, are willing to go to considerable personal inconvenience just to wave a greeting to Mrs. Eisenhower and me. We appreciate the spirit of friendship that prompted you to wait just outside the gate as we left our Gettysburg home a week or so ago. I wish we could have spoken personally to you.” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope and a photocopy of Brunner’s original letter to Eisenhower. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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82. Dwight D. Eisenhower.

TLS signed “Ike,” one page, 7 x 10.25, personal letterhead, July 2, 1965. Letter to Robert Cutler. In part: “Mamie and I deeply appreciate your thought of us on our Anniversary…we are looking forward to publication of your book and are delighted that you are happy with the arrangements for its ‘debut.’” In fine condition. Cutler was the first person appointed to the newly created position of National Security Advisor during the Eisenhower’s administration. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

83. Dwight D. Eisenhower. Air mail envelope,

with postage stamps commemorating Eisenhower’s state trip to the Philippines, bearing a December 30, 1960, Manila postal cancellation, signed in black ink by Eisenhower. Envelope is affixed to a matted engraving of Eisenhower and framed to an overall size of 11.5 x 16. In fine condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

84. Dwight D. Eisenhower. TLS as president, one

page, 6.75 x 9, White House letterhead, October 16, 1957. Letter to publisher James S. Copley. In full: “I am grateful to you and Mrs. Copley for your message of good wishes on my birthday anniversary. It was a truly ‘happy’ occasion, made the more so by the presence of all the grandchildren at dinner last evening.” Eisenhower adds a handwritten postscript below, signed “D. E.” In fine condition, with light uniform toning. Copley was the publisher of the San Diego Union, Union-Tribune, and Evening Tribune, and was a good friend of many Republican leaders. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


“I have been almost ashamed to face my caddy at the 18th hole” 85. Dwight D. Eisenhower. Three TLSs,

signed “Ike Eisenhower,” “Dwight D. Eisenhower,” and “Ike,” each one page, Columbia University letterhead, dated between 1948 and 1950. One letter, in part: “I can certainly use the ‘eagles’ you hoped for my golf game. The last two times I have been out, I have been almost ashamed to face my caddy at the 18th hole. However, I hope to improve my game before weather prevents and possibly you golf balls will do the trick.” In overall fine condition, with some scattered light staining. Accompanied by one original mailing envelope. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“Soon I will have a beautiful rare book to show you”

Postmarked Washington, November 22, 1963 87. John F. K e n n e d y.

Official White House mailing envelope, 10.5 x 6.5, postmarked Washington, November 22, 1963. In very good condition, with a few edge tears and tape to edges. Also includes a typed letter from Evelyn Lincoln signed with autopen, dated November 21, 1963, and the originally enclosed unsigned photos of JFK (bearing a pre-printed signature) and Jackie with their children. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

86. Jacqueline Kennedy. ALS signed

“Jackie,” one page, 5.75 x 7.75, personal letterhead, [April 1976]. Letter to Vava Adelberg. In full: “Thank you for my beautiful Easter Violets. How thoughtful you are. Soon I will have a beautiful rare book to show you—that Viking Press (mon editeur) has bought to reproduce for the illustrations of Russian folk tales—by an artist called Zworkine— of whom we know almost nothing—When I can bring it home—may I call you and hope you will come for tea—a lovely excuse to see you.” Toning and a couple trivial chips to edges, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by a 1964 Kennedy mourning card. After leaving the White House, 1040 Fifth Avenue, the address on this letterhead, was Kennedy’s home in New York. Her book, In the Russian Style, was published in January 1977. The recipient of the letter, Vava Adelberg, was the son of the governor general of St. Petersburg and lived in the last court of the Czar. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

88. John F. Kennedy: John Lattimer. Collection of 18 original

first generation glossy photos, all 7 x 5 and 5 x 7, of test results of experiments done by Dr. John K. Lattimer for his book Kennedy and Lincoln: Medical and Ballistic Comparisons of Their Assassinations. Photos show the results of test wounds fired through clothing, spatter results, an X-ray, and targets, all used by Lattimer to prove Oswald killed Kennedy. In fine condition. Lattimer fired countless rounds of similar ammunition through skulls with simulated brains as well as necks and bodies constructed of pork to simulate human skin. Highly important photos attempting to finally determine if Oswald acted alone. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Magnificent Halsman portrait inscribed to a CBS newsman 89. John F. Kennedy. Exquisite, crystal-clear vintage glossy 8.5 x 11 portrait of Kennedy as a Massachusetts senator, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Rod and Diana MacLeish, with the very warmest regards of their friend, John Kennedy.” Originally taken by renowned photographer Philippe Halsman in 1952. Affixed to a same-size mount. Paper loss to lower right which could mostly be matted out, otherwise fine condition. Rod MacLeish was an accomplished journalist who was news director for WBZ radio in Boston in the early 1950s, going on to be a commentator for CBS News, National Public Radio, and the Christian Science Monitor. Halsman’s photographs are highly collectible even unsigned, and the association with an important political commentator makes this example a unique and exceptionally desirable portrait. Precertified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Four reels of film from the events of November 22, 1963, including a second-generation Zapruder film 90. John F. Kennedy: Zapruder, Nix, and Muchmore Films. Collection of four reels of film first, a second-generation true copy of the historic Abraham Zapruder film of the assassination of John F. Kennedy, originally obtained directly from New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison, and made for use in the trial of Clay Shaw. Color 8mm film is housed in its original box, and signed on the outside by long-time Kennedy researcher, J. Gary Shaw, who obtained the film directly from Garrison. Accompanied by a notarized letter of provenance from Bob Cochran, which states, in part: “I attest to the authenticity of this copy of the Zapruder film came directly from Jim Garrison and was copied by him from the true original…I received three of these films… This film is signed by Gary Shaw who obtained it directly from Jim Garrison,” and also by a notarized letter from Chris Gallop relaying the sale of the film to Cochran. Next, a second-generation copy of the black-and-white film by Orville Nix, containing the final six seconds of the assassination, as well as a slow-motion replay. Third, a second-generation copy of a portion of the Orville Nix color 8 mm film containing the final shot which struck Kennedy and the crowd reaction during the immediate aftermath. Finally, a secondgeneration copy of the color Super 8 mm Marie Muchmore film showing Kennedy’s limousine entering Dealey Plaza, with a brief image of the final shot fired at the motorcade, and a brief shot of the limousine racing away towards Parkland Hospital. One of the Nix films is also accompanied by a notarized certificate of authenticity from Cochran. An incredibly rare offering including one of the most widely viewed and studied pieces of film in American history, as well as seldom-seen other vantage points from the tragic day in Dallas. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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“Your many contributions in the field of mental health and your interest in the well-being of older persons has come to my attention”

91. Lyndon B. Johnson. TLS signed “LBJ,” one page, 7 x 8.75, personal letterhead, September 8, 1970. Letter of thanks for a gift. In full: “‘The Drifter’ is beautiful. It’s a gift I’ll treasure a long, long time. But even longer I’ll treasure your dedication and loyalty and what these wonderful assets have meant to me over the years. Thank you for brightening a lot of birthdays.” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

92. Lyndon B. Johnson. TLS as president, one page, 6.75 x 9, White House letterhead, September 28, 1964. Letter of commendation reads, in part: “Your many contributions in the field of mental health and your interest in the well-being of older persons has come to my attention. Resolution of the problems of aging and mental health is one of our noblest objectives and commands the aid and support of capable and dedicated men like you. Your services on the Panel of Consultants on Aging…your testimony before Congressional committees, and your consistent support for programs designed to help enrich the lives of older persons and to cure mental disease is in our best tradition. I am pleased to commend you for these efforts.” In fine condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Four Republicans assemble in Washington to help right their party’s ship after the 1964 elections 93. Richard Nixon, Barry Goldwater, and Thomas Dewey. Matte-finish 10 x 8 United Press International photo

of Barry Goldwater, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Richard Nixon, and Thomas Dewey engaged in conversation at a meeting of G.O.P. leaders in Washington, signed in black ink and felt tip by Goldwater, Nixon, and Dewey. Some diagonal creases to both lower corners (one right above Dewey’s signature), and small creases to top corner tips, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by three clipped newspaper and magazine articles, all featuring the image. The four were meeting along with the Republican Coordinating Committee to discuss the party’s election platform, and in particular Representative John Lindsay’s attempt to distance himself while running for mayor of New York City. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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“America is the strongest economic power in the world” 94. Richard Nixon. Scarce ALS signed “Dick Nixon,” one page, 7.25 x 10.5, personal letterhead, September 13, 1977. Letter to publisher Helen Copley. In full: “Just a note to tell you that I thought your speech before the Comstock Club was superb. You said what needed to be said articulately & eloquently. America is the strongest economic power in the world because we have had the philosophy of increasing the wealth of all by sharing increased productivity. Current policies in Sacramento and Washington are based on a dangerously false premise—that we should now learn to conserve & share scarcity. Keep up the good work!” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope, bearing a pre-printed free frank. A scarce, lengthy handwritten letter with unusually desirable content from a president whose administration was characterized by the economic crisis of ‘stagflation’ and a crippling oil embargo. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Scarce oversized portrait of Reagan and his cabinet 95. Ronald Reagan and Cabinet.

Color satin-finish 23.25 x 16.25 photo of Reagan and his cabinet posing together below a portrait of Eisenhower, signed in the lower border in black felt tip by by Ronald Reagan, George Bush, George P. Shultz, Frank Carlucci, Bill Verity, Jim Burnley, Lauro Cavazos, Don Hodel, Ken Duberstein, Ann McLaughlin, Richard Lyng, John S. Herrington, Joseph Wright, Vernon Walters, Clayton Yeutter, Nicholas Brady, Dick Thornburgh, Samuel Pierce, Otis Bowen, and Beryl Sprinkel. Attractively double-matted and framed to an overall size of 28.25 x 24.5. In fine condition, with some light soiling to the right border, slightly affecting one signature. The photo is affixed to an identical size piece of foamcore, with dampstaining and light foxing to the right border, of which has been matted out for an attractive presentation. A highly desirable and scarce example—just the second we have encountered. Oversized. Precertified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300) 32 | April 16, 2014 | PRESIDENTS & FIRST LADIES


Rare original drawing by the conservative icon 96. Ronald and Nancy Reagan. Original signed and inscribed felt tip sketch

of a horse drawn by Ronald Reagan on an off-white 6.25 x 8.5 sheet of personal stationery, signed and inscribed in black felt tip, “Merry Christmas to Stephanie— Ronald Reagan” and “Nancy.” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original recipient’s White House identification badge. Reagan had a vacation home known as Rancho del Cielo in the Santa Ynez Mountain range, where he kept horses of his own, including favorites named Little Man and El Alamein. A one-of-a-kind sketch with great provenance. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Astounding letter from 1999: “America is confronted with some serious terrorist threats from elements abroad” 97. George W. Bush. Remarkable TLS, one page, 8.5 x 11, State

of Texas letterhead, April 5, 1999. Letter to a constituent. In part: “I agree with you that we have made successful strides to make Texas a safer place to live, but I also share your concerns that America is confronted with some serious terrorist threats from elements abroad. I believe that Washington leadership needs to do everything in its power to make our world a more peaceful place. I fear they have failed to do so. I can’t think of a better legacy for an Administration than to say ‘we kept the peace, we kept ourselves out of war,’ which requires, however, a realistic view of the world…There are people who resent our freedoms, resent our successes, people who want to threaten our alliances. I feel it’s the obligation of leaders to defend us against those who threaten freedom-loving people…we must start by strengthening our U.S. military.” In fine condition. Bush would declare his candidacy for president within two months of writing this letter, with a platform echoing the content in this letter—he criticized past administrations for being too interventionist, rejected the concept of ‘nation building,’ and sought to redesign the military with an emphasis on supermodern hardware and flexible tactics. Much of this would be abandoned following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, executed by the very “elements abroad” that Bush mentions here, two years prior. A letter with amazing content within its historical context, with Bush extensively commenting on the subjects that would go on to define his presidency. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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34 | April 16, 2014 | PRESIDENTS & FIRST LADIES


The laptop used to send the first-ever presidential email—to outer space! 98. Bill Clinton. Extremely welldocumented Toshiba Satellite Pro laptop computer used by Bill Clinton to transmit the first-ever presidential email, sent to John Glenn while he was in outer space during NASA’s STS-95 mission. The laptop is complete with its external floppy drive, a floppy disk, and power cords. While orbiting Earth aboard Space Shuttle Discovery on November 6, 1998, Glenn sent President Clinton an email that read, in part: “This is certainly a first for me, writing to a President from space, and it may be a first for you in receiving an E mail direct from and [sic] orbiting spacecraft. In any event, I want to personally thank you and Mrs. Clinton for coming to the Cape to d/see [sic] the launch. I hope you enjoyed it just half as much as we did on board. It is truly an awesome experience from a personal standpoint, and of even greater importance for all of the great research projects we have on Discovery. The whole crew was impressed that you would be the first President to personally see a shuttle launch and asked me to include their best regards to you Hillary. She has discussed her interest in the space program with Annie on several occasions, and I know she would like to be on a flight just like this one. We have gone almost a third of the way around the world in the time it has taken me to write this letter, and the rest of the crew is waiting.” On the morning of November 7th, Clinton responded, in full: “Thanks for your message. Hillary and I had a great time at the launch. We are very proud of you and the entire crew, and a little jealous. We can’t wait for you to get home so we can have a first hand report. Meanwhile back on earth, we’re having a lot of fun with your adventure. At a camp rally in Queens, I asked an 83 year old lady what she thought of your trip. She replied that it seemed like a perfectly fine thing for a young man like you to do! I hope your last few hours go well. Give my best to the rest of the crew.” Both of these emails are preserved on the laptop’s hard drive and backed up on the included floppy disk, and remain accessible via the AOL application on the computer. This laptop belonged to White House physician Commander Robert G. Darling of the United States Navy Medical Corps, and includes a color satin-finish 10 x 8 official White House photo of Clinton and Darling together with the computer, signed and inscribed in the lower border as president, “To Rob Darling—with thanks not only for keeping me healthy but for getting my message into outer space!—Bill Clinton.” With this is Darling’s letter to Clinton on White House letterhead, September 4, 1999, requesting that he sign the photo. The extensive accompanying documentation consists of a two-page typed memo on White House letterhead by Darling explaining the circumstances that led to the email exchange on his computer, a copy of a letter from the Department of the Navy advising Darling that it is legal for him to sell the computer, a typed letter by Darling explaining various specifics about the computer itself, and instructions on how to access the email files. In early 2000 President Clinton commented that he did not use email because of security concerns, and was quoted in an interview with a New York reporter: ‘I e-mailed John Glenn in space. And I e-mailed some Marines and sailors on a ship at Christmas. That was it.’ This is a remarkable museum-worthy collection that represents the dawn of a new age, combining America’s greatest technological achievements—space travel and the internet—in spectacular fashion. RR Auction COA.…(MB $10000) www.RRAuction.com | 35


Historically important set of chairs used by Obama, Peres, and Netanyahu during his first presidential visit to Israel

99. Barack Obama. Set of three chairs used by Barack Obama,

Shimon Peres, and Benjamin Netanyahu during a state dinner held at the Israeli president’s residence in Jerusalem on March 21, 2013. The ornate white wooden chairs measure 42˝ tall and feature white leather upholstery for both the elaborately carved back and seat cushions. Each is marked on the back near the bottom to identify which leader sat in it. Expected general wear from use, otherwise overall fine condition. Accompanied by a photocopy of a letter from the furniture rental facility hired to outfit the dinner, describing the event and how the chairs were marked; also includes images of Obama at his chair during the dinner. This was a tremendously important historical event as it came during President Obama’s first visit to Israel, the United States’ most reliable ally in the turbulent region. At the dinner, President Shimon Peres of Israel presented Obama with the Presidential Medal of Distinction for his ‘unique contribution to the security of the State of Israel.’ This gesture marked the first time that an Israeli president bestowed an honorary decoration upon the sitting president of the United States, reinforcing ties between the countries. During the trip, President Obama mended his sometimes volatile relationship with Prime Minister Netanyahu and offered assurance that his administration remained committed to preventing Iran from becoming a nuclear power. The chairs from this internationally significant occasion represent once-in-a-generation pieces of history—a history still unfolding. RR Auction COA.…(MB $1000)

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100. Andrew Jackson

101. Martin Van Buren

102. James K. Polk

103. Millard Fillmore

104. Andrew Johnson

105. Rutherford B. Hayes MB $200

106. James and Lucretia Garfield

107. Benjamin Harrison

109. Theodore Roosevelt

110. John F. Kennedy MB $200

111. Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford

114. Pat Nixon

115. Richard Nixon

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108. William McKinley MB $200

112. Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford MB $200

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113. Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew MB $200

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116. Richard Nixon

117. Richard Nixon

118. Richard Nixon

119. Richard Nixon

120. Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter

121. Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter

122. Gerald Ford and Shirley Temple

123. Gerald Ford

124. Gerald Ford

125. Gerald Ford

126. Gerald Ford

127. Gerald Ford

128. Gerald and Betty Ford

129. Fords and Carters

130. Jimmy Carter

131. Ronald Reagan and Gerald Ford

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38 | April 16, 2014 | PRESIDENTS & FIRST LADIES

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132. Ronald Reagan and Jimmy Carter

133. Ronald Reagan MB $200

134. Ronald and Nancy Reagan

135. Ronald and Nancy Reagan

136. George Bush

137. George Bush

138. George Bush

139. George Bush

140. George Bush

141. George W. Bush

142. George W. Bush

143. George W. Bush

144. Barack Obama

145. First Ladies

146. Fords, Carters, and Bushes

147. Nixon, Ford, and Carter

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Detailed description & condition statements are available at www.RRAuction.com or (603) 732-4280 | 39


notables The rarest of the polar explorers, Swedish balloonist Andrée 148. Salomon August Andrée. ALS in French signed “S. A. Andrée,” one lined page, 5.5 x 8.75, August 16, 1895, to the great French balloonist Gaston Tissandier. In full: “Please accept my sincerest thanks for the interesting works you sent me. Your book on the great captive balloon of Giffard has already been ordered by the bookseller to complete my collection.” In fine condition, with some light creasing. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope, addressed in Andrée’s hand. Since Andrée died at 42 and was little known before his doomed flight, his letters are very rare. An interesting letter associating the names of three great balloonists: Andrée, Giffard and Tissandier. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Seething from his non-promotion and threatening to resign, Benedict Arnold demands “One hundred hogsheads Rum, & Spirits” 149. Benedict Arnold. Revolutionary War–dated ALS signed “Bt Arnold Br Genl,” one page, 6.5 x 8.25, March 20, 1777. Letter to Captain Asa Waterman, a commissary general for the Continental Army throughout the entire Revolutionary War, responsible for procuring food and supplies for troops. In full: “You are hereby Ordered to make Strict Inquiry, & Search for W[es]t. India Rum, Spirits, & Molasses in the States, of Massachusetts Bay, or Rhode Island, & Apply to Such Persons as you find have such articles on hand, and Purchase One hundred hogsheads Rum, & Spirits & One hundred Hhds Mollasses. If any Person having the Above Articles bargain to sell the same for the Use of the Army, you Are to marke such goods where they are Deposited for the Use of the Army, forbid their being removed & make an imediate return to me of the Same for which this shall be your Sufficient Warrant. Given Under my hand at Swansey March 20th 1777.” Removably encapsulated in a Mylar sleeve. In very good condition, with light scattered toning and soiling, and professionally infilled paper loss to the center with a few missing words and letters expertly restored. Also includes an ALS by Jonathan Trumbull, Jr., signed “Jona Trumbull Junr,” one page, 7 x 9.5, March 21, 1777. Letter to Waterman penned the day after Arnold’s. In full: “I will be much obliged if you can procure me One H[ogs]h[ea]d of good Stone Lime & send it to Norwich pr some Return Team as soon as you have Opportunity. The Expence shall be repaid to you or your Order on Sight—please to inform whether to be had & what Opportunity sent by.” Also removably encapsulated in a Mylar sleeve. Scattered staining, otherwise fine condition. Having just been overlooked for a promotion, at the time Benedict Arnold penned this letter he was contemplating resignation—during the period between March 11 and 26, 1777, he also wrote two letters to George Washington stating as much. In response, Washington refused to accept his resignation, explaining that it must have been a mistake, and petitioned Congress to elevate Arnold to major general. Although he was given the rank, his seniority was not restored over those promoted before him, upsetting Arnold all over again; because of this, he threatened resignation for a second time in July. This situation was among the first of a number of events causing Arnold’s dissatisfaction and ultimate defection to the British. A scarce letter from this important date in Arnold’s career. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500) 40 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES


“We hope your interest in politics includes knowing about the legitimate struggle of our Palestinian people”

150. Yasser Arafat. Color satin-finish 5.25 x 3 candid photo of Arafat on television, signed on the reverse, “With best wishes, Y. Arafat 6.4.78”; and a TLS, signed “Y. Arafat,” 8.5 x 11, dated June 4, 1978, which reads, in part: “We hope your interest in politics includes knowing about the legitimate struggle of our Palestinian people for peace, freedom and justice. You’ll find enclosed our signature on the picture you sent.” In fine condition, with some stray ink marks to reverse of photo. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

151. John Jacob Astor. Busi-

ness magnate and m e r c h a n t (1763–1848) who became the first multi-millionaire in t he U n i t e d States. ALS, one page, 8 x 9.75, May 27, 1805. Letter to his partner in the fur trade Peter Smith. In full: “I have your favor of 22 inst. with check for one thousand dollars to credit of your bond. I am indeed sorry to find that your [sic] unwell with the fever & ague of which I hope you’ll soon get relieved. I have been unwell for several weeks but am getting better. Mrs. Astor is also unwell.” Reverse of second integral page bears an address panel in an unknown hand and the page retains its original intact paper seal. In fine condition, with intersecting folds, one through a single letter of signature. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“Wasn’t it splendid that they got that incidental dose of First-Aid?”

152. Clara Barton. ALS, one page both sides, 5 x 6.75, no date. Letter to her secretary. In part: “They tell us that the Washington papers published the Globe article—picture & all—wasn’t it splendid that they got that incidental dose of First-Aid? And saw that I did not criticise their President? But wasn’t that a splendid interview that we had?—and so good that we all had a hand in it?” In fine condition, with a small toned adhesive remnant below the signature. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Scientific notes by the Nobel Laureate who discovered radioactivity 153. Henri Becquerel. French

physicist (1852– 1908) whose experiments with uranium salts led to the discovery of spontaneous radioactivity; for this breakthrough he shared the 1903 Nobel Prize for Physics with Marie and Pierre Curie. Autograph notes in French written in pencil by Becquerel, one page, lightly lined, 8.75 x 13.5, no date. Notes contain a few mathematical notations, a table, and mentions of ohms. Intersecting folds and a few mild blocks of toning, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Handwritten draft of Beecher’s emphatic message to the Republican Party: “It has had that supreme virtue of parties—courage—courage—courage!” 154. Henry Ward Beecher. Prominent and sometimes controversial American clergyman, orator, and abolitionist (1813–1887) who was the brother of Uncle Tom’s Cabin author Harriet Beecher Stowe. Autograph manuscript draft in the form of a letter to an editor, nine pages, 5.75 x 8.75, undated but circa early 1884, titled at the top by the recipient, “Mr. Beecher and the Tariff, A Pungent Letter from the Great Prophet on the Tariff.” Lengthy handwritten manuscript by Beecher with both authorial and editorial corrections throughout. In part: “My personal views and political conduct are of little value to the public except so far as they are supposed to represent the views and purposes of a larger and daily increasing number of silent voters...In short, the Republican Party has had the courage to meet every issue which has arisen for twenty-five years, without shuffling or evasion. It has had a clean policy, and it has had that supreme virtue of parties—courage—courage—courage! The Republican Party inaugurated a policy of High Tariff. The necessities of a period of gigantic war, is the only palliation of such a policy—But when Protection of American industry was grafted upon the Tariff, no excuse could be found for the blunder. It is an insult to American Enterprise to assume that it need protection—American Industry is no decrepit thing, needing crutches.” Signed at the conclusion by Beecher, who also pinned to the first page a clipping of the newspaper article he was responding to. Intersecting folds with some slight edge separations and a bit of soiling, otherwise fine condition. As an ardent abolitionist and outspoken supporter of the war against the Confederacy, Beecher associated strongly with the Republican Party. Later in life, however, his disillusionment with the party grew and in 1884—the year he penned this letter—he endorsed Grover Cleveland, a Democrat, for president. A fantastic letter that demonstrates both Beecher’s political inclinations and his renowned eloquence. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

155. Menachem Begin. TLS signed

“M. Begin,” one page, 8.25 x 10.25, State of Israel letterhead, December 17, 1975. Letter to Simon Bloom at the Jewish Ledger. In part: “It is a most interesting idea but I suppose that a great authority on international law like Professor Morgentau or Professor Oppenheim should be considered. The first question is of jurisdiction. We must also consider the composition of the International Court.” In very good condition, with central horizontal and vertical folds, a couple of small tears and staple hole to top edge, and a uniform shade of mild toning. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

42 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES

156. Menachem Begin. Vintage glossy 10 x 8 Handy and Boesser

press photo of Begin sitting around a table with nine other men, signed in blue ink, “With thanks for friendship, M. Begin,” and also signed in English and Hebrew by three others. In fine condition, with a few scattered light creases and surface marks. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


“A defective American would have less tendency to reproduce the defect, by marriage with a foreigner of a different race” 157. Alexander Graham Bell. TLS, two

pages, 8 x 10.5, January 25, 1912. Letter to Edwin Elsbach, advocating marriage practices among young deaf persons that can decrease the risk of handing down their genetic defect to their offspring. In part: “There is always a strong tendency in offspring to revert to the normal type of the race; and if marriages are so contracted that the tendency to the inheritance of the defect exists in the family of one of the partners, the tendency to inheritance is diluted, so to speak, by the influence of the other, if he belongs to a family which is free from the defect...A defective American would have less tendency to reproduce the defect, by marriage with a foreigner of a different race. The further apart in blood the marriage partners are, the greater the tendency in the offspring to revert to the normal type of the race. Defective persons should especially, be careful to avoid marrying blood relations. This class of union tends to increase, the offspring, the family peculiarities, whatever they may be. Where a defective strain exists the defect is more liable to be increased, than in cases where there are no common ancestors. I send by separate mail, a copy of my paper entitled ‘Marriage, an Address to the Deaf’, in which I try to explain to young deaf persons those conditions of marriage that would be liable to increase any tendency they may have to hand down their defect to their offspring, and those conditions that would lessen the tendency.” Intersecting folds, one through a single letter of signature, and light overall haloing to signature, otherwise fine condition. The son of a deaf mother, and later husband to a deaf wife, Bell’s interest in communication and sound was deep-rooted. While experimenting on his ‘harmonic telegraph’ at the start of the 1870s, Bell opened his School of Vocal Physiology and Mechanics of Speech in Boston, attracting a large number of deaf pupils, including his most famous, Helen Keller. While he did a great deal of good in teaching the deaf community, he also believed that deafness was something to be eradicated and became a major figure in the American eugenics movement. At the time of this letter, he was the newly appointed chairman of the board of scientific advisers to the Eugenics Record Office, encouraging people deemed to be ‘a defective variety of the human race’ to avoid reproducing and promoting the compulsory sterilization of such ‘defective’ people. An incredibly interesting letter involving one of the most complex and controversial subjects in Bell’s life. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

158. Judah P. Benjamin. British-born American politician and

lawyer (1811–1884) who, after serving in the US Senate and rejecting nomination to the Supreme Court, served variously as attorney general, secretary of war, and secretary of state for the Confederacy. Civil War–dated partly-printed DS, signed “J. P. Benjamin,” one page, 8.25 x 10.25, December 31, 1861. Benjamin informs James H. Holman that “the President has appointed you Lieutenant Colonel 1st Tenn Regt PA In the Provisional Army in the service of the Confederate States…Report for duty to Col. Turney.” Signed at the conclusion by Benjamin as secretary of war of the Confederate States of America. Repaired separations to horizontal folds (not affecting the signature), scattered staining and soiling, and a bit of paper loss to lower horizontal fold, otherwise very good condition. Oversized. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The Bloomingdale’s founder cites his Civil War service 159. Lyman Bloomingdale. Busi-

nessman (1841–1905) who, along with his brother Joseph, founded Bloomingdale’s Department Store. Partly-printed DS, signed “Lyman G. Bloomingdale,” one page, 8.5 x 14, February 11, 1841. Bloomingdale’s application to Lafayette Post, No. 140, of the Grand Army of the Republic, listing personal information including his “occupation as a merchant,” and stating, “I served during the late rebellion as follows: I enlisted on the 9 day of Oct 1864, as 1st Sgt in Co. A First Regiment Kansas S. M.” Partial edge separations to storage folds, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by a certificate indicating his acceptance into the GAR (separations to folds) and a 1905 letter from a chairman of the organization informing the post of his death. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

160. Lucien Bonaparte.

Younger brother of Napoleon (1775–1840) who served in various official capacities. Third-person ALS in French, one page, 4.25 x 7, no date but circa 1835. In full (translated): “The Prince of Canino makes his compliments to Mr. Editor of the Court-Journal and begs him to accept a copy of his response to the Tribune on the eighteenth Brumaire.” In fine condition. In 1835, Bonaparte published Résponse de Lucien Bonaparte Prince de Canino aux Mémoires du Général Lamarque, for which an advertisement appeared in an April 25, 1835, issue of the Court Journal. The eighteenth Brumaire was the coup d’etat by which Napoleon overthrew the French Directory in 1799. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Glasses worn by the Mafia don

161. Joseph Bonanno. Mobster (1905–2002) who became boss of one of the most

prominent crime families in the world. A pair of Bonanno’s personally-owned and -worn eyeglasses made by American Optical, featuring translucent gray plastic frames and bifocal lenses. The left temple is imprinted in white “AO American Optical 5 3/4,” and the right temple is imprinted “5 3/4.” Also includes a personal check, 6 x 2.75, filled out and signed by Bonanno, payable to Keller’s Drug for $15.58, May 25, 1973. In addition to signing the check, Bonanno initialed the memo field. In overall fine condition. Accompanied by a photocopy of a certificate of authenticity from Rosalie Bonanno, his daughter-in-law, certifying the “pair of plastic rimmed American Optical bifocal glasses worn by Mr. B.” Rosalie Profaci, niece of crime boss Joseph Profaci, married Bonanno’s son, Salvatore ‘Bill’ Bonanno, in 1956, uniting two Mafia dynasties. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

44 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES


162. Josephine Bonaparte. Empress

of France, born Marie Josèphe Rose Tascher de La Pagerie (1763–1814), who married Napoleon in 1796 and was divorced in 1810, unable to produce an heir. Handwritten endorsement, in French, signed “Josephine,” at the bottom of a one page manuscript document from the head of her household Count Casimir Guyon de Montlivault, one page, 7.25 x 9, November 1, 1813. A close friend of Napoleon’s and Josephine’s, Montlivault was in part responsible for Josephine’s enormous debts, despite the three million francs settled on her by the Emperor. His statement reads, in part (translated): “Presented and approved by Her Majesty… Labor costs for the restoration of the stables…the chimneys in the linen room…the floor of the Corps de garde [Josephine’s bodyguard]…repairing of water pipes… total of 924 francs and 95 centimes.” At the bottom, Josephine writes: “Approval to pay from the large reserve the sum of nine hundred twenty-four francs and 95 centimes. At Malmaison this November 1, 1813.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds and a couple of light creases. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

163. John Burroughs. Famed American naturalist (1837–1921) best known for his writings on nature and travel. Matte-finish 8.25 x 6.75 photo of an elderly Burroughs looking over a book while sitting at his cluttered desk, signed in the lower border in black ink. Photo is affixed to a 10 x 9 mount. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

San Franciscan gold rush scene sketched by a firsthand observer 164. J. D. Borthwick. Scottish artist and journalist (1824–1892) who spent three years in San Francisco during the American gold rush. Original signed pencil sketch of a scene in a Californian gold rush town on an off-white 8.5 x 5.75 sheet, signed in the lower right, “J. D. Borthwick.” Affixed to a 9.5 x 6.75 mount. In fine condition, with subtle overall foxing and toning to edges. Borthwick set out from Scotland to see North America in 1847, where, like most adventurous young men of the period, he caught gold fever and moved to San Francisco in 1851. He spent the next three years traveling throughout gold country, observing and sketching the people he encountered before venturing to other parts of the world and returning to Scotland. In 1857, he described his gold rush experience in a book called Three Years in California, excerpts from which were published in the popular Harper’s Weekly magazine. It is considered one of the most entertaining and accurate depictions of the early Gold Rush period, and remains one of the classic first-person accounts of the ‘Age of Gold.’ As this sketch features a building labeled “Adams & Co. Express,” a courier company established in San Francisco in 1849 to send gold dust to the east coast, it is most likely a scene drawn from life by Borthwick during his time in the city. A fabulous, rarely encountered primary source depiction of the gold rush phenomenon. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Sending thanks for a new dressing gown “so superior to the other, that ‘Old Red’ is now thrown aside with contempt”

165. John C. Breckinridge.

ALS as Vice President, one page, lightlylined, 7.25 x 9, January 5, 1859. Letter to J. Hanson Thomas. In part: “Accept my cordial thanks for the dressing gown you sent me the other day. I had forgotten our conversation on taste in the the matter of gowns…your present which fits me well, and is so superior to the other, that ‘Old Red’ is now thrown aside with contempt. Come to Washington some evening—Stevenson, Clay and myself are keeping house together.” Double-matted and framed with an engraved portrait to an overall size of 20 x 16.5. In fine condition, with intersecting folds, one through a single letter of signature, and some scattered light toning to upper portion of page. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The Secretary of War hands down regulations 167. John C. Calhoun. Prom-

inent American politician (1782– 1850) who served as vice president under John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson and later wielded great power and influence in the Senate as a champion of Southern causes, including slavery. LS signed “J C Calhoun,” one page, 8 x 9.5, July 22, 1824. Letter to the Commissary General of Subsistence. In full: “It is intended to revive the general regulations of the Army: you will repost as soon as practicable whether any and what parts of the regulations above mentioned require in your opinion, alteration or amendment.” In very good condition, with uniform toning, a few small edge tears, several ink and pencil notations, and some light mirroring of ink. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Scarce railroad certificate from the renowned brewery magnate

166. Adolphus Busch. Co-founder of Anheuser-Busch (1839–1913). Rare partly-printed DS, signed “Adolphus Busch & Co.,” one page both sides, 11.25 x 7.25, June 29, 1868. Certificate for one share of stock in the St. Louis, Vandalia, and Terre Haute Rail Road Company issued to “Adolphus Busch and Co.,” signed on the reverse by Busch transferring the stock to George Dausmause. A portion of the receipt is affixed to the left edge of the certificate. In very good condition, with intersecting folds, one through a single letter of signature, machine cancellations, a cancelled stamp and ink notation to front, and some scattered light toning. Uncommon in any form, this is the first Busch autograph we have ever offered. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

46 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES


168. Simon Cameron. Lincoln’s con-

troversial first secretary of war (1799–1889). Short ALS, one page, 7.75 x 9.5, December 18, 1846. Brief letter to Mr. Dickens reads, in full: “Will Mr. Dickens oblige me by bringing the specimen mentioned in the accompanying letter to Mr. Lescure at Harrisburg, Pa.” In fine condition, with a horizontal fold passing through upper portion of signature. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Acknowledging appreciation for his hardline approach on the Oregon dispute with the British

Six hundred-year-old document from Catherine of Lancaster 170. Catherine of Lancaster.

Queen of Castile (1373–1418) as the wife of King Henry III of Castile. Manuscript DS, in Latin, signed “Yo la Reyna,” one page, 13.25 x 12.75, 1407. Untranslated document signed as Regent for her son Juan II. Document has been professionally silked on the reverse. Intersecting folds, some scattered paper loss along folds affecting some of the text, scattered toning, and some reinforcement to folds on reverse, otherwise very good condition. The reverse retains its paper seal. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

169. Lewis Cass.

LS signed “Lew. Cass,” one page, 7.75 x 10, March 19, 1846. Letter to Silas B. Gridley. In part: “thank you for the favorable sentiments you are pleased to express in relation to my course on the Oregon Question. The approbation of his countrymen is the highest reward to which a public man can look.” Accompanied by the original free franked mailing envelope, franked in the upper right, “Free, Lew. Cass.” In very good condition, with intersecting folds, scattered toning and soiling, and pencil notation remnants to top of letter. The envelope shows scattered toning and soiling, with a tear to front panel. In 1844, the Oregon boundary dispute (or Oregon Question) arose as a result of competing British and American claims to the territory, with both nations holding lucrative commercial aspirations in the area. While serving as Senator of Michigan, Cass was a leading voice for American control of the area, honing in on the invigorating popular sentiments of expansionism and manifest destiny, going so far as to threaten war against the British if they did not give up the territory completely. A rare letter from the long-standing American politician regarding one of his most aggressive calls to action. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

171. Catherine the Great. Empress of Russia from 1762 to 1796, who came to power following a coup d’état and the assassination of her husband, Peter III. LS in Cyrillic, signed “Yekaterina,” one page, 7.75 x 12.25, February 21, 1788. Untranslated. In fine condition, with unobtrusive central vertical and horizontal folds passing through the signature. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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Outstanding military appointment by Catherine the Great 172. Catherine the Great. Partlyprinted vellum DS in Russian, signed “Caterina,” one page, 15.5 x 10.5, April 30, 1785. A military order promoting Captain Ivan Shennert to major, featuring an ornate pictorial border. Beautifully signed at the conclusion in bold ink by the czarina. Traces of a red wax seal remain in the lower left. A central vertical fold, a few insignificant stains, and mounting remnants to edges, otherwise fine condition. An always desirable autographic piece made particularly appealing by the large, bold signature and attractive border design. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.… (MB $300)

African-American contemporary of Paul Revere who, in 1775, made a similar midnight ride from Boston to warn his town of the impending British invasion 173. Wentworth Cheswill. African American teacher, assessor, auditor, selectman, and Justice of the Peace (1746-1817); considered the first African-American elected to public office, as well as the first archaeologist in New Hampshire. ADS, signed “Wentworth Cheswill Jus. Peace,” one page, 7.25 x 12, July 31, 1813. Cheswill orders a judgment to be made to settle “divers controversies” between a Trader and a Yeoman. In part: “Walter Smith of Newmarket in the County of Rockingham Trader and Joseph Durgin Junr. of Durham in the County of Strafford Yeoman having diverse Controversies between them under the Value of two hundred Dollars; have this day applied to me, and agreed, and entered into a Rule, to submit the same (being all demands between them) to the determination of Nathaniel Kidder Esq, Valentine Smith, Esq. and Mr. Benjamin Loveren,...Judgment thereon to be final” Beneath Cheswill’s writing is a related ADS signed by Valentine Smith, who wrote: “Pursuant to this Rule the undersigned, referees therein named, have met and fully hears the parties; have agreed, and do hereby report that the above named Joseph Durgin Junr. recover against the above named Walter Smith the sum of two dollars and sixty three cents debt or damage and cost of Rule, Cost of Reference being paid,” also signed “Nathl Kidder” and “Benja Loveren.” In fine condition, with toning along intersecting folds, with one vertical fold through a single letter of the signature, and some scattered light foxing. As Paul Revere was chosen messenger for the Boston Committee of Safety, Wentworth Cheswill was elected messenger for the Exeter Committee of Safety which entrusted him to carry news to and from the Provincial Committee. After Revere rode into Portsmouth to alert the town of the impending arrival of the British frigate Scarborough and the Canseau sloop of war, Portsmouth asked for help from neighboring communities, prompting Newmarket to hold a town meeting. There it was decided that 30 men be sent to Portsmouth to help. Cheswill rode to Exeter to receive instructions from the committee on where the men were to be sent. In April 1775, he also made an all-night ride back from Boston to warn Exeter of the impending British invasion. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

48 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES


Chinese heads of state including a superlative Chiang Kai-shek 176. Chinese Politicians. Collection

174. Prince Charles. Uncommon ALS signed “Charles,” one page

both sides, 4.75 x 7.5, Balmoral Castle letterhead, October 12, 1978. Letter to “Mollie.” In full: “Contrary to instructions—many thanks for the photograph! Looking at my position I can’t imagine how we beat your team in that race! It is very sad to hear you won’t be ‘on the circuit’ again this year—I was so impressed by your dashing performance last season.” In fine condition. Handwritten letters from the Prince of Wales are quite rare, this being just the third we have ever offered. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

of nine items consisting of a signature and signed photos, each signed by a different politician, some in English and some in Chinese. Signers are: Chiang Kai-Shek (on an embossed President of the Republic of China card); Hsieh Tung-Min; Li Yuan-tsu; Yen Chia-kan; Chiu Chuang-huan; Y. S. Sun; Lin Yang-Kang; Yu Kuo-hwa; and Hau Pei-tsun. Most of the photos are accompanied by letters from the Government Information Office. In overall fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Praising the humanitarian works of Pearl S. Buck 177. Park Chung-hee.

The Founding Fathers’ legal advisor 175. Benjamin Chew.

Prominent Philadelphia lawyer (1722–1810) and friend of George Washington who provided pro bono his knowledge of substantive law during the creation of the Constitution and Bill of Rights. Partlyprinted DS, signed “Benjamin Chew Reg’r Gen’l,” one page, 8.25 x 13, August 11, 1768. Document regarding the last will and testament of Joseph Redman, ordering his executors to “administer the Goods, Chattles, Rights and Credits of the said Deceased and make a true and perfect Inventory thereof, and exhibit the same into the Register General’s Office at Philadelphia.” A manuscript true copy of the will, also signed by Chew, is affixed to the document by the seal to the upper left, and the document is accompanied by a related seven-page document that includes a diagram. Partial separations to horizontal folds and paper loss to left edge (affecting no text), otherwise in very good condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

South Korean military leader (1917–1979) who seized power in a 1961 coup d’etat; he was assassinated by the director of his own security force. TLS in Korean, one page, 8 x 10.5, office letterhead, June 9, 1965. Letter to Pearl S. Buck. In part (translated): “During my recent state visit to your country, it was really gratifying and encouraging to see that there are good friends of Korea like you wherever I went. The happy events I had with your people and the warm welcome and hospitality I received from the American citizens still linger in my memory and will be remembered always with a sense of abiding appreciation.” In fine condition, with some scattered light foxing and a staple hole to top left. Already well-known for her humanitarian efforts—especially on the topic of Asian and mixed-race adoption—Buck left a lasting mark on South Korea in 1965 when she opened the Opportunity Center and Orphanage. ‘The purpose,’ she said, was ‘to publicize and eliminate injustices and prejudices suffered by children, who, because of their birth, are not permitted to enjoy the educational, social, economic and civil privileges normally accorded to children.’ Two years later, Chung-hee would present Buck with the Order of Merit–Moran Medal for ‘recognition and appreciation for distinguished service to the cause and welfare and friendship.’ RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The unfortunate but necessary omission of a “half-tone plate of the portrait of General Sylvester Churchill” 178. Winston Churchill. TLS signed “Winston S. Churchill,” one page, 7.5 x 9.5, personal letterhead, January 15, 1951. Letter to Desmond Flower. In part: “I quite understand the circumstances which make it impossible for you to include in Volume IV a half-tone plate of the portrait of General Sylvester Churchill.” In fine condition, with central vertical and horizontal folds and a punch hole to upper left corner. Flower was a publisher, book-collector, and scholar who headed the Cassell & Co. publishing house, through whom Churchill published his works. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

179. Winston Churchill. ALS

signed “Yours ever, W,” one page both sides, 6.75 x 4.5, Middlesex Hospital letterhead, no date. Letter to “Norman,” written from the hospital after suffering his stroke. In full: “I was deeply touched at your letter of today & at the the [sic] amount of personal sorrow which…struck you. Let us be all the better friends in our future together and let us keep our our [sic] enduring friendship & show that this at any rate will hold.” In fine condition, with Churchill’s writing understandably a bit shaky, and a central vertical fold. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“The rail-roads have usurped all the Powers of Sovereignty— They must be owned by the People—or our Liberty is lost forever!” 180. Cassius M. Clay. Prominent abolitionist leader (1810–1903) known as the ‘Lion of Whitehall.’ An ardent supporter of Lincoln, he served as American Minister to Russia from 1862 to 1869, in which capacity he was instrumental in negotiations for the purchase of Alaska. AQS, signed “Cassius Marcellus Clay,” on an off-white 4.75 x 3 card, dated January 14, 1891. Clay writes, in full: “The rail-roads have usurped all the Powers of Sovereignty—They must be owned by the People—or our Liberty is lost forever!” In fine condition, with a bit of light toning and mounting remnants to reverse. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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181. Henry Clay. Distinguished statesman (1777–1852) who

became known as the ‘Great Compromiser’ for his support of the Union prior to the Civil War. LS signed “H. Clay,” three pages on two adjoining sheets, 4.75 x 7.75, February 28, 1848. Letter to a gentleman. Clay politely declines an invitation to visit “the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church at Princeton.” Lightly toned intersecting folds and slight show-through from docketing to reverse of last page, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

182. George Clinton. American soldier and statesman (1739–

1812) who served as governor of New York and vice president in the Jefferson and Madison administrations. Partly-printed DS, signed “Geo: Clinton,” one page, 13 x 8, September 28, 1793. Governor Clinton appoints Andrew Suffern a “1st Lieutenant of a Troop of Horse in the Brigade of Militia in the County of Orange whereof John Hathorn Esqr.is Brigadier General.” Signed in the left border by Clinton and countersigned by Secretary Lewis A. Scott. Matted and framed to an overall size of 18.5 x 14. Intersecting folds, some light show-through from writing on reverse, and a circular spot of toning from seal, otherwise fine condition. The pointed paper seal is toned, but intact. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

183. John J. Crittenden. Politician (1787–

1863) who served as governor of Kentucky, and attorney general under Harrison, Tyler, and Fillmore. War-dated ALS signed “J. J. Crittenden,” one page, lightly-lined, 7.75 x 10, June 10, 1862. Letter to Kentucky Governor Beriah Magoffin. In part: “In my last I informed you that agreeably to your request, I had laid before the Secretary of War, your communications to me, complaining of certain acts of the military as violations of the laws & authorities of the State of Kentucky & of the rights of citizens…I received last evening, from the Secretary of War, the reply which I herewith enclose to you.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

184. Clarence Darrow. Signed book: Farmington. Later printing. NY: Boni and Liveright, 1925. Hardcover with dust jacket, 5.5 x 7.75, 255 pages. Signed and inscribed on the first free end page, “Inscribed to Mrs. Betty MacDonald, with best wishes from Clarence Darrow, Dec. 29th–1930.” Autographic condition: fine, with a bit of light toning to edges. Book condition: VG+/VG. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Darwin sends thanks for a book on Tertiary flora, a “subject [that] has always seemed to me a most interesting & important one” 185. Charles Darwin. ALS, one page both sides, 5 x 8, personal letterhead, April 20, [1861]. Letter to fellow scientist Oswald Heer. In full: “I am extremely much obliged for the honour & kindness which you have done me by sending your ‘Untersuchungen &c’—The subject has always seemed to me a most interesting & important one; & I hope soon to read your valuable Memoir.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature). Published in The Correspondence of Charles Darwin: Volume 9, Cambridge University Press, 1994. In the aftermath of Darwin’s publication of On the Origin of Species in late 1859, the controversial celebrity scientist remained for the most part behind closed doors, suffering from chronic poor health. Eagerly scrutinizing the scientific community’s response to his work, he carried out extensive correspondences around the world, discussing reviews, articles, and emerging work that found a kinship with his own. One such work was Swiss biologist and paleontologist Oswald Heer’s “Untersuchungen &c” (Examination of the climate and of vegetation conditions of the land in the Tertiary period); the presentation copy that Heer sent to Darwin remains in the Darwin Library at Cambridge, with annotations indicating that Darwin did in fact read the work. A friendly letter with interesting scientific association, written less than two years after publication of his legendary Origin of Species. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

187. Jefferson Davis. Ink signature, “Re-

186. Charles de Gaulle. Ink signature, “C. De Gaulle,” on an

off-white 5.25 x 3.25 card with a Nicaraguan postage stamp affixed to the center. In fine condition, with some light contrast to beginning of signature over stamp. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

52 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES

spectfully, Jefferson Davis,” on an off-white 4 x 1.5 lightly lined slip. Tastefully matted and framed with an image of Davis to an overall size of 10 x 13.5. In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


The adopted “godmother” of a tank receives instructions from de Gaulle on meeting her new “godson” 188. Charles de Gaulle. Early LS in French, signed “C. De Gaulle,” one page both sides, 5.25 x 3.5, 507 Regiment de Chars, Le Colonel letterhead, June 22, 1938. Letter to an unidentified woman. In full (translated): “The 507th thank you heatedly to have accepted to be the godmother to the tank ‘Indefatigable.’ Please find herewith the insignia for your function which will be at the same time a reminder of our gratitude. The event committee hopes to have, Madame, the honor to welcome you, bearing your insignia, on June 26 before 3:45 PM at the Lizé quarter. So it can introduce your godson on time at his spot in the order of battle and inform you of the small formalities to fill out.” In fine condition, with small red spot along bottom edge of first page. Assuming command of the 507th Tank Regiment in October of 1937, de Gaulle strongly believed that the fundamental weakness of the French tanks was in their deployment, not the machines themselves. Extensively training and drilling his troops, he accelerated the separation of tanks from the infantry and into specialized armored divisions. In 1934, he wrote the book Towards a Professional Army, which favored an army based on mobile armored divisions; the book sold poorly in his home country, but was rather successful in Germany, even being read to Hitler. A particularly early example of the future general’s strong advocacy of a strong and mobile army. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

189. Declaration of Independence: George Clymer. Signer of the Dec-

laration of Independence, and founder and president of the Bank of Philadelphia (1739–1813). ADS, signed “Geo. Clymer,” one page, 8 x 3.25, July 6, 1802. Handwritten promissory note by which Clymer agrees “to pay to Samuel Meredith… fourteen hundred and forty dollars” within 60 days. Signed at the conclusion by both Clymer and Meredith. In fine condition, with numerous but unobtrusive cancellation cuts and a few tiny stains. After serving as a delegate for Pennsylvania to the Continental Congress, President Washington appointed Meredith Treasurer of the United States, a position that he held until the close of 1801. An interesting note connecting two notable early American figures. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The Massachusetts signer appoints a justice of the peace 190. Declaration of Independence: Elbridge Gerry. Partly-printed DS, signed “E. Gerry,” one page, 8.75 x 14, February 9, 1811. Gerry, as governor of Massachusetts, appoints Moses Townsend “to be one of our Justices of the Peace, and of the Quorum within and for the county of Essex.” Signed in the left border by Gerry, and countersigned at the bottom by the commonwealth’s secretary. Double-matted and framed with a printed dictionary definition of his name and ‘gerrymander’ to an overall size of 25.5 x 31.5. Matte features an attractive print of the famous 1812 political cartoon of Gerry’s bizarrely redistricted Essex County with wings and a dragon’s head; likened to the shape of a salamander, the scandalous new electoral districts—formed to favor his own Democratic-Republican candidates over the Federalists—gave rise to the still-popular term ‘gerrymander,’ a combination of the governor’s last name and the twisting creature. In fine condition, with intersecting folds and some slight show-through from docketing on reverse. The paper seal is crisp and intact. Oversized. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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191. Declaration of Independence: Robert Treat Paine.

Massachusetts lawyer (1731–1814) who served as one of the prosecutors of British soldiers during the Boston Massacre trial; he later signed the Declaration of Independence. ADS, signed “R. T. Paine Esq,” one page, 3.75 x 6, September, 1769. Bill for his legal services in the amount of £1.18.2, covering “writ & fee,” “service of writ,” “entry & dues,” and “attendance 10 days.” In fine condition, with mild mirroring of ink and toning to bottom edge. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

192. Declaration of Independence: Roger Sherman. Signer of the

Declaration of Independence from Connecticut (1721–1793) who was the only man to also sign the Articles of Association, Articles of Confederation, and US Constitution. Partly-printed DS, one page, 7.5 x 12.25, November 4, 1763. Unsigned document filled out in Sherman’s hand, incorporating his name four times, in which he sells a tract of land in New Haven to Lydia and Sarah Painter for £15. Signed at the conclusion by the Painters. Complete tape-repaired separations to intersecting folds, a few small edge tears, and scattered staining, otherwise very good condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Superlative Buckingham Palace thank-you letter following Diana’s royal wedding 193. Diana and Charles. Choice TLS signed “Yours

most sincerely, and Diana” and “Charles,” one page, 7.5 x 11.75, Buckingham Palace letterhead, October 7, 1981. Letter to Miss Harding. In full: “We would like to thank you very much indeed for your most kind contribution to the wedding present which the Duchy has given us. We really are delighted with the mahogany library table which will look splendid in our home at Highgrove and is exactly the right period for the house. We were also most touched to receive the balance of the gift in the form of a cheque with which we shall probably buy some more furniture. As you can well imagine, with two houses to equip from scratch we have quite a difficult task ahead of us! We have been completely overwhelmed by the kindness and generosity which so many people have shown to us, but, as you will know we have a very special affection for the Duchy and all those who live and work in it and we therefore particularly appreciate your gift. We look forward very much to visiting the Duchy together in the future.” Beautifully double-matted and framed with a wedding photo and plaque to an overall size of 24.75 x 21. In very fine condition. A magnificently displayed letter sent after the fabled royal wedding, which took place at St. Paul’s Cathedral on July 29, 1981, before an invited congregation of 3,500 and an estimated worldwide television audience of 750 million. Oversized. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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“Marshall’s Companions” whose 1848 discovery sparked the California Gold Rush

194. Discoverers of Gold in California. Excessively rare ink signatures of Henry W. Bigler, William J. Johnston, Azariah Smith, and James S. Brown on an off-white 4 x 6 sheet also bearing a notation from the original collector, “The above are the autographs of ‘Marshall’s Companions’ who were with M at the Sutter Saw Mill when gold was first discovered Jan. 24th 1848—I personally obtained them. Abraham B. Ford, January 28th 1898, San Francisco, California.” In fine condition, with light toning. Accompanied by an unsigned 10 x 8.25 cabinet photo of the four men together in San Francisco. By 1898 Bigler, Johnston, Smith, and Brown were the last remaining survivors of those who had been working at Sutter’s Mill under the supervision of James W. Marshall when he discovered gold in the riverbed, and this was signed when they gathered together for a ‘Golden Jubilee’ put on by the Society of California Pioneers to celebrate the semi-centennial of the day they struck gold. The earliest documentation of the find is found in diaries kept by Bigler and Smith, and Brown was the first person Marshall showed his discovery to. Brown played a major role, as he helped Marshall by testing the mineral’s hardness with his teeth and observing it over a flame, because he had heard that gold ‘could not be burned up.’ Once satisfied they had discovered gold the men returned to the river, where Bigler was the third to find a flake in the bedrock, scooping it out on the point of his jackknife. Although men at the camp agreed to keep it a secret, word of the fortune buried in the hills spread quickly and soon the area was overwhelmed by prospectors. None of ‘Marshall’s Companions’ became wealthy from their discovery, but the impact of these four pioneers on American history is undeniable, and their autographs—even individually—are extremely rare. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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195. Porfirio Diaz. President

of Mexico from 1877 to 1880 and 1884 to 1911. LS in Spanish, one page both sides, 8.25 x 10.5, gold and silver embossed personal letterhead, November 23, 1894. Untranslated letter to E. P. Gaston accepting an invitation to attend an athletic exhibition. Central horizontal and vertical folds, one through a single letter of signature, punch holes to top edge, and a horizontal fold along top edge, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The Nobel-winning codiscoverers add their names to an image of a double helix

198. Frederick Douglass.

Partly-printed DS, signed “Fred’k Douglass,” panel measuring 3.5 x 8.5, February 28, 1885. Deed for a transfer of $2,000 from Henry M. Trundle and his wife to Catharine V. Ridgway, signed on the front panel by Douglass as recorder of deeds. Main panel in fine condition with expected document wear, and remainder of document present with complete separations to most folds. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

196. DNA: Watson and Crick.

Printed signed sketch of a double helix on an off-white 8.5 x 11 sheet, signed at the bottom in black ink, “Francis Crick,” and “James D. Watson.” In fine condition. A quintessential DNA-related item—this rare signed image symbolizes one of the greatest discoveries in biology. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

197. Frederick Douglass. Crisp ink signa-

ture, “Very truly yours, Frdk. Douglass,” on an off-white card. Matted and framed with an engraved portrait, bearing a pre-printed signature and sentiment, to an overall size of 11.5 x 17. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

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199. Joseph Francois Dupleix. Governor general of the French establishment in India and rival of Robert Clive (1697–1763). Rare manuscript DS, in French, signed “Dupleix,” one page, 8 x 12.5, July 3, 1749, Pondichery (French capital of India). Untranslated financial document regarding the accounts of the ship “The Centaur.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds and a few mild creases. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


Uncommon letter by the photography innovator 200. George Eastman. American inventor and entrepreneur (1854–

1932), founder of the Eastman Kodak company, whose invention of roll film revolutionized photography and helped make the once-specialized art and craft a popular pastime. TLS signed “Geo. Eastman,” one page, 8.5 x 7.25, Eastman Kodak Company letterhead, March 18, 1911. Letter to E. R. L. Gould of the City and Suburban Homes Company. In part: “I received your letter last evening too late to answer it before I left for Rochester. The next time I am down I shall telephone you and endeavor to make an appointment to call at your office as proposed.” Intersecting folds (unobtrusively passing through signature) and a PSA/DNA label affixed to the lower left. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from PSA/DNA. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

201. Thomas Edison. Endorsement in pencil, “TAE,” at the top of a handwritten memo from his son Charles, two pages, lightly lined, 5 x 7.5, June 13, 1923. Memo regarding an employee’s promotion. In part: “Stringfellow will be here sometime today. I still believe he should go in as acting sales mgr. until he proves himself worthy of having himself confirmed as sales mgr.” In fine condition, with moderate uniform toning. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

202. Thomas Edison.

Vintage pencil ‘umbrella’ signature, “Thos. A. Edison,” on the reverse of a 5.5 x 3.5 postcard depicting his summer home in Chautauqua, New York. Some subtle yellow discoloration to edges, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by three unsigned postcards related to Edison’s life. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The 21-year-old Edison sells the rights to his very first successful invention— the electro-magnetic printing telegraph

203. Thomas Edison. ADS, signed “Thomas A. Edison,” one page, 5 x 3.5, Boston, February 3, 1869. Document related to his first suc-

cessful invention, an improvement for telegraphs. In full: “Received of Samuel W. Ropes Jr the sum of Thirty 30 dollars—being full amount received from him.” In fine condition, with mild soiling and expected document wear. Accompanied by copies of other documents associated with the transaction. After saving three-year-old Jimmie MacKenzie from being struck by a runaway train, Edison was rewarded by the boy’s father, a station agent, with his first job as a telegraph operator. This job set the stage for Edison’s lifetime of tinkering and inspired most of his earliest projects—nearly all of his first 100 patents were related to the telegraph. The document at hand relates to Edison’s second patented invention: an improvement in electro-magnetic printing telegraphs, US Patent No. 91,527, executed on January 25, 1869, and issued on June 22, 1869. On January 21, Edison sold the rights to his printing telegraph to financiers Joel Hills and William Plummer for $1300, advanced through Samuel Ropes. Hills and Plummer agreed to pay the expenses of procuring the patent, and Ropes was to be responsible for introducing it to the public and into personal use. Edison’s novel device used two electromagnets, one for rotating the type wheel and one for actuating the printing hammer, enabling it to print at a receiving station without an attendant present. No power source was necessary to run the mechanism on the receiving end, as it was relayed through lines from the transmitting station. These qualities made it a very versatile instrument, designed ideally for transmitting messages from a central station to many receiving stations—a complex application for such a device would be an accurate, real-time stock ticker, which Edison went on to develop. This brief handwritten document not only represents the 21-year-old Edison’s first successful invention that jump started his prolific career, but is also the earliest Edison document we have ever seen enter the marketplace. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $1000)

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The inventor and chemistry enthusiast specifies hiring requirements while experimenting with concrete: “Cement chemist are quite different from regular chemists” 204. Thomas Edison. ALS in pencil, signed “TAE,” two pages, lightly-lined, 5 x 8, August 28, 1924. Letter to his son Charles. In part: “A regular chemist such as Hal would get would be [sic] of little use to us…Cement chemist [sic] are quite different from regular chemists. All cement chemist [sic] are specially educated at Lehigh University in special courses…There is only one way for us & that is to hire a chemist now in charge to a big cement works who has held position for long time & who has made good & pay the salary required 5000 to $7500—after thorough investigation.” Moderate uniform toning and a few small edge chips and tears, otherwise fine condition. In addition to his more famous ventures, Edison was a pioneer in the use and manufacture of cement, devising a method to put to use waste sand generated during the manufacturing process used by his Edison Ore-Milling Company—this led him to found the Edison Portland Cement Company in 1899. He experimented with many applications of the strong material, including experiments in its use as an affordable housing material, envisioning a future of concrete houses filled with concrete furniture, refrigerators, and pianos. The company barely survived financially, with the exception of the period during which he wrote this letter—in 1922, they won the contract to provide the cement for the construction of Yankee Stadium. Shortly thereafter they returned to financial strife, exacerbated by the Great Depression, and never fully recovered. An interesting letter showing Edison’s deep understanding of chemistry, his favorite scientific subject. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Einstein’s autograph equations 205. Albert Einstein. De-

tailed scientific and mathematical calculations on both sides of a 2.5 x 5.5 off-white slip. On one side Einstein writes nine lines of an intricate mathematical formula, with four additional lines of a longer equation on the reverse, along with a three-word German notation. Professional repair to paper loss of one corner (not affecting any of the writing), and a block of toning over portion of both formulas, otherwise fine condition. A fantastic, and complicated-looking, example of Einstein’s greatest working tool: mathematics. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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Color portrait from the year of his momentous efforts on a ‘unified field theory’ 206. Albert Einstein. Vintage color glossy 5.25 x 7.25 candid photo of

Einstein surrounded by bookcases in what appears to be his study, signed in the lower border in fountain pen, “A. Einstein ’50.” The image and still-legible signature are both somewhat faded, otherwise fine condition. In 1950, Einstein published an article in Scientific American entitled ‘On the Generalized Theory of Gravitation,’ describing his pursuit of a ‘unified field theory’—a field of study that remains active today. An outstanding photo that portrays Einstein in a casual, yet intellectual, setting. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Extraordinary 1943 Einstein letter, helping a Jewish advocate with naturalization in his escape to America 207. Albert Einstein. TLS in German, signed “A. Einstein,” one page, 5.25 x 6.25, Princeton Institute for Advanced Study letterhead, March 5, 1943. Letter to Lionel M. Ettlinger. In full (translated): “Please find attached the required statement for your naturalization.” In very good condition, with overall foxing and a tear to the upper right. After leaving Germany himself before the start of the war, Einstein became a tremendous advocate for Jews seeking to escape Hitler’s reach and find asylum elsewhere—credited with saving hundreds of lives, he even joked that he ran an ‘immigration office.’ Like Einstein, Ettlinger was an activist in aiding Jewish refugees, and is said to have spent 80% of his personal wealth in finding safe havens for them. The two maintained correspondence over the course of many years, beginning in 1933. Ettlinger left Germany before 1939 and spent the war in the United States—it seems that Einstein submitted a supporting statement for Ettlinger, as he had done for countless others, to aid in the long legal process of immigration. A fantastic letter directly related to the genius’s humanitarian work in the face of the atrocities of World War II. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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208. Albert Einstein. Choice vintage green fountain pen signature, “A. Einstein,” on an off-white 3.25 x 5.25 card with a small clipped photo of Einstein affixed above the signature. In fine condition, with a bit of trivial toning along two edges of card. Precertified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Visiting the California Institute of Technology in 1933, Einstein recommends German intellectual Leo Frobenius: “Use my name when you write to him” 209. Albert Einstein. TLS in German, signed “A. Einstein,” one

page, 8.25 x 11, California Institute of Technology letterhead, January 30, 1933. Letter to Hans Dose in Chicago. In full (translated): “I have read your letter but unfortunately I am in no position to make a judgment. There are no philologists I am close to. What can I do then to help you to keep your work on the agenda? You probably know better certain philologists than I do. The one I like most is a gentleman called Frobenius from Frankfurt [with “University” added in his own hand], who, in my opinion, is open-minded. Use my name when you write to him, and he will probably seek to make a judgment.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds, and a small spot of adhesive remnant to bottom edge. At the time of this letter, Einstein was in the midst of his third visiting professorship at the California Institute of Technology, where he made his final decision to not return to Germany, as the Nazi party was growing in power under Adolf Hitler. He would formally renounce his citizenship in March of the same year. Referring Dose to renowned German archeaologist and ethnologist Leo Frobenius, a professor at the University of Frankfurt and a major figure in the academic realm, this is an excellent letter connecting two star intellectuals. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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Magnificent Halsman portrait of the revered genius

210. Albert Einstein. Exquisite limited edition art-

ist’s proof semi-glossy 10.5 x 13.5 gelatin silver photo of Einstein seated and writing on a notepad, originally taken by Philippe Halsman during a 1947 sitting, bearing his blindstamp in the lower right. Reverse bears an ink stamp reading: “Copyright © Philippe Halsman All Rights Reserved 1978 This photograph is of exhibition quality having been produced according to the highest archival standards. It has been printed by a master printer under Philippe Halsman’s control and approval in a strictly limited edition. Limited Edition # A. P.” Expertly matted and framed with a window on the reverse for viewing of the Halsman stamp to an overall size of 20 x 23. In fine condition, with an insignificant flaw to the right of Einstein’s face. Halsman’s defining images of Einstein are some of his most recognizable, with another from this sitting being used for a postage stamp and the cover of Time magazine. A superlative, exhibition quality image of Einstein as he is best remembered—a wild-haired academic jotting down notes in his study. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

“Peace is a growth and not a manufacture; which simply means you can not ‘make’ a lasting peace” 211. Edward Filene. Businessman and philanthropist (1860–1937) who founded the

eponymous department store. AMS signed “Edward A. Filene,” one vellum page, 11 x 16, Geneva, September 19, 1927. Statement for an anthology put together by George Dejean, containing comments on peace by a variety of notable figures. In full: “Contrary to popular belief Peace is a growth and not a manufacture; which simply means you can not ‘make’ a lasting peace. Such a peace will be brought about only by conditions that are just to all—just to the rich as well as to the poor. Above all conditions that give every man the certainty of getting enough properly paid work to make an adequate living for his wife, his children, and himself; and to keep him and the masses of his fellow-men from supporting war or revolution in the belief that any change is preferable to existing conditions.” In fine condition, with light foxing to the left side. The anthology was entitled Pax Mundi: livre d’or de la paix, and other contributors included Queen Elisabeth of Belgium, Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, Arthur Conan Doyle, Guglielmo Marconi, and Robert Baden-Powell. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The influential cosmetics giant 212. Max Factor.

Polish businessman (1872–1938) who largely developed the modern cosmetics industry as founder of Max Factor & Company. Pearl-finish 8 x 10 three-quarterlength portrait of Factor, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Pauline King, with best regards, Max Factor.” In fine condition. This is the very first Factor item we have ever offered. RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

The Detroit industry leader comments on his treasured “King and Queen Bowl” 213. Edsel Ford. Son of auto pioneer Henry Ford (1893–1943) who succeeded his father as head of the Ford Motor Company. TLS, one page, 7.25 x 10.5, personal letterhead, January 5, 1925. Letter to Charles Hughes of the Detroit Athletic Club. In part: “Thank you for the reproduction of the color photograph of our King and Queen Bowl which is to appear in the February issue of the D.A.C. News. The photograph turned out exceedingly well I think…be very glad to have you bring Dr. Valentiner up to the house…would be very glad to meet him and explain to him what I can about the bowl.” In fine condition. Like his father, Ford was a collector—of art, rather than industry—and the bowl referenced, also known as the ‘Rhages Bowl,’ was said to be the finest polychrome pottery in the world, dated to 11th century Persia. Dr. Wilhelm Valentiner, mentioned in this letter, was a German art historian and director of the Detroit Institute of Arts museum. Unfortunately, the bowl—back then valued at $50,000—was smashed when a repairman at Ford’s house accidentally knocked it off of the pipe organ where it was displayed. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

214. John T. Ford. American theater manager (1829–1894) most famous for operating Ford’s Theatre at the time of Abraham Lincoln’s assassination. Partly-printed DS, signed “J. T. Ford,” one page, 8.5 x 7, July 28, 1883. Receipt from H. Sander & Son, Patentees and Manufacturers of the Patent Burial Casket, for a purchase of $124 by Elizabeth Bachmann and her daughter. Ford signs in the lower left for a $100 payment toward the invoice, which included two burial caskets and other funerary accoutrements. In fine condition, with expected document wear. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

215. Joseph Fouche.

French statesman (1759–1820) who famously served as Minister of Police under Napoleon. Scarce LS in French, one page both sides, 7 x 9.25, Minister of Police letterhead, October 8, 1799. Letter to the administration of the Department of the Seine regarding Citizen Seguy who had not rendered an account of the different services with which he was charged and was now trying to leave Paris, and even the country, to avoid being followed by his creditors. Most of these were in the service of military provisioning, and Fouche orders that Seguy’s passport be seized and asks if he has presented himself to the municipal administration. In fine condition, with several pencil notations to both pages, scattered light toning, and show-through from writing on opposite side. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

216. Otto Frank. Father (1889–

1980) of Jewish World War II diarist Anne Frank, and the only member of his family to survive the concentration camps. TLS in German, one page, 5.75 x 8, December 25, 1958. Letter to “Frau Losa,” in part (translated): “I was very impressed that Mr. Navarro has them printed and I asked him in my name to express heartfelt thanks, especially for the personal dedication of his poem in such a beautiful form....I also thank you for your report on the theater performance and for sending the Image. You know, I collect everything, because all the material will be preserved later in Amsterdam in Anne Frank House. The short story in the ‘Time’ I read at that time, of course, and I wrote you about it.” In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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217. Frederick the Great. King of Prussia (born 1712) from 1740 until his death in

1786, known for his political prowess and enlightened attitudes toward religion, learning, and the humanities. LS in French, signed “Federic,” one page, 7.25 x 9, December 15, 1783. Untranslated letter to Sr. Madeweis at Sonicard, stating simply that he has received his report of the current month; he has already for the past 15 days been given the news which the letter reported and therefore has nothing further to add. In fine condition, with central horizontal and vertical folds, pencil notation under signature, and some scattered light toning. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“Though Keynes was a great thinker, his interest in theory was not for its own sake but ‘as a base’ for designing policy” 218. Milton Friedman. Rare autograph manuscript, one page, lightly lined, 8.5 x 11, signed

and inscribed at the top, “For Mark Gruber, Milton Friedman.” A copiously hand-corrected page from a draft of one of his works. In part: “Inflation, and unemployment, continued to be the major economic problem after the war, as it was during the war. Keynes’…flexibility would have led him to turn his attention increasingly to the themes of Monetary Reform…Though Keynes was a great thinker, his interest in theory was not for its own sake but ‘as a base’ for designing policy.” In fine condition. A remarkable working draft with terrific content, with the Nobel Laureate commenting on his greatest rival in the field of economics. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Treasury matters regarding “Light Houses in Connecticut” 219. Albert Gallatin. Politician and financial genius (1761–1849) responsible for the formation of what is now known as the Ways and Means Committee. LS as secretary of the treasury, one page, 7.75 x 9.25, November 6, 1805. Letter to Jedediah Huntington. In part: “Your account as Superintendent of Light Houses in Connecticut for the quarter…has been received and handed to the Auditor for adjustments.” Intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature) and moderate edge toning, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

64 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES


Desirable uninscribed Gandhi portrait

221. Mohandas Gandhi. Very scarce print by The Challenge Ltd.,

7.75 x 10, of a head-and-shoulder pencil sketch of Gandhi done by Yuping Wong in 1931, boldly signed in black ink, “MK Gandhi,” and also bearing a pre-printed signature. Light overall foxing, otherwise fine condition. Gandhi is highly sought-after in any signed image. Provenance: Sotheby’s, 2000. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

Extremely rare Ghirardelli document from 1853— the year after founding his famous San Francisco chocolate company 222. Domingo Ghirardelli. Chocolatier (1817–1894) who

in 1852 founded the Ghirardelli Chocolate Company in San Francisco. ADS, signed “D. Ghirardelli,” one page, 8.25 x 6, August 4, 1853. Customs document regarding the import of “Brasil wood” at a total cost of $22.03. In part: “Invoice of the following goods bought for my account at Mazatlan in May last and shipped on board the Mexn. Bg. Cornelia, NY master for San Francisco.” Boldly signed at the conclusion by Ghirardelli and approved by the appraiser’s office two days later. A docketing panel affixed below is stamped by the San Francisco Customs House as “Duty Paid.” In fine condition, with expected document wear and trivial paper loss to upper left corner. Having found almost immediate success in the chocolate business, Ghirardelli imported 200 pounds of cocoa beans during 1852, the year he founded his company. As business expanded, Ghirardelli relocated within the city to the corner of Jackson and Mason streets in September 1853—the month following this document. Ghirardelli probably visited the San Francisco Custom House quite often, as his cocoa bean imports rose to 1,000 pounds a year by 1865—still minuscule compare to the 450,000 pounds the company would be importing by 1885. An excessively rare autograph—the first we have ever encountered—of the man who founded one of world’s premier confectioners and the second-oldest chocolate company in the United States.RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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223. Giuseppe Garibaldi. Ital-

ian patriot and soldier (1807–1882) best known for leading the attack of the ‘Red Shirts’ on Sicily in 1860. Uncommon sepia 2.25 x 4 carte-devisite photo by an anonymous studio, signed below the image in black ink, “G. Garibaldi,” with “A Graneda,” written under the signature, possibly in Garibaldi’s hand. Bottom of image is also stamped “Dal Vero 1866.” In fine condition, with a small tack hole to center of top edge and a few trivial spots. Garibaldi is particularly desirable in signed photos. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

224. David Lloyd George. British statesman (1863–1945) and the

only Welsh Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Choice matte-finish 6 x 9 Harris and Ewing portrait of George in a stately pose, signed in fountain pen, “D. Lloyd George.” Blindstamped in the lower left by the renowned photography studio. Affixed by the top edge to a slightly larger mount. In fine condition. A magnificent image with deep, rich tones. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

66 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES

“On the eve of our National Holiday, I give thanks for the opportunity for a worker’s world”

225. Samuel Gompers. Key figure in the labor movement (1850–1924) who founded the American Federation of Labor in 1886. Bold AQS on an off-white 5 x 3 card, signed at the conclusion, “Sam Gompers, Nov. 23, 1921.” Gompers pens an appropriate laborrelated quote in anticipation of Thanksgiving. In full: “On the eve of our National Holiday, I give thanks for the opportunity for a worker’s world.” Mounting remnants to corners and some running to ink in the lower left, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

226. Jay Gould. Financier (1836–1892) known for his stock market manipulation of railroad securities; he also tried to corner the gold market, causing the ‘Black Friday’ stock market crash of September 1869. Manuscript DS, six pages both sides, 8.5 x 14, December 18, 1872. Lengthy indenture document between Gould and Peter H. Watson transferring ownership of a “certain lot of land situate in the Township of Texas in the County of Wayne and State of Pennsylvania,” containing four acres. Signed at the conclusion by Jay Gould as well as his wife, Helen D. Gould. Pages are bound with their original gold ribbon at the top. In very good condition, with three horizontal storage folds with partial edge separations and light areas of toning to first page. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


The President of the Continental Congress embraces the support of France, enlisting two French soldiers into the Continental Army 227. John Hancock. Beautiful

Revolutionary War–dated ADS, signed “John Hancock, Presdt,” one page, 8 x 9.5, “In Congress” March 31, 1777. Resolution reads, in full: “A letter from George Chardin Nicholson & one from the Chevr. de Celeron was read. Resolved, That the said George Chardin Nicholson and Chvr. de Celeron be referr’d to Major General Gates, who is empower’d to employ them in such manner as he shall judge most for the Interest of the United States. That One hundred & fifty Dollars be Advanc’d to the Chevr de Celeron to be deducted out of his future pay. That Major General Gates be impower’d and Directed to take with him, and employ under him in the Northern Department Brigadier general De Fermoy and such other of the French Officers in the Service of the United States as he shall think proper. By order of Congress.” Document is affixed by the reverse of its left edge to a slightly larger off-white sheet. In very good to fine condition, with well-done repairs to separations along horizontal folds, a few other small repairs, and a few pinhole size areas of ink erosion. Previously sold as a part of the collection of renowned Abraham Lincoln collector Oliver R. Barrett. When armed rebellion broke out in the colonies in 1775, many in France sympathized with the revolutionary cause. Their aid to the American patriots began quite early in the war, sending supplies like gunpowder, arms, and uniforms. Shortly thereafter, French soldiers began to enlist in the Continental Army—of those mentioned in this document, Matthias Alexis Roche de Fermoy was the fist to join, becoming one of several foreign officers appointed to command positions in 1776, along with the likes of the Marquis de Lafayette. The other two—George Chardin Nicholson and Louis de Celeron—were assigned to separate but important brigades, with Nicholson leading a detachment of French cadets in Livingston’s Battalion and Louis de Celeron eventually joining Pulaski’s Legion, one of few cavalry regiments. Also of note is that Hancock penned this document as president of the Continental Congress, a body instrumental in securing French aid during the war. Most importantly, they negotiated the Treaty of Alliance in 1778, by which France officially recognized the sovereignty of the United States and promised military support. With these numerous associations, this is a remarkable document representing this crucial partnership between nations during the American Revolution. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $1000)

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Scarce letter from Garfield’s assassin 228. Charles Guiteau. American lawyer (1841–1882) who, frustrated in his attempt to secure an ambassadorship, assassinated President James Garfield in 1881. ALS signed “Charles J. Guiteau,” one page, 7.5 x 9.75, personal attorney and counselor letterhead, February 16, 1872. Letter to a fellow attorney. In part: “Can’t you find Robert Clarence Arnold? He must be in your place. Please find him much oblig I will give you $100 if you can collect the claim.” Intersecting folds (a vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature) and moderate feathering to ink, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Penned in 1776: “We have very little to fear from the Nations in general—unless the scale should turn against us in our dispute with Great Britain” 229. Thomas Hartley. Pennsylvania lawyer, sol-

dier, and politician (1748–1800) who commanded the 6th Pennsylvania in the Continental Army and led a 1778 expedition against the Iroquois to avenge the Wyoming Massacre. Revolutionary War–dated ALS signed “Thos. Hartley,” one page both sides, 8 x 13, May 5, 1776. Letter to Pennsylvania jurist Jasper Yeates. In part: “I shall proceed to Morrow or next Day at furthest with this detachment on the Quebec— where they say we have about 3500 men—General [William] Thompsons Brigade is at this time on the Lakes. General Sullivans Brigade in which I am is now all here or on the North River; together we shall make up a considerable Body in Canada. I hope we may arrive there before Howe. Should there be a probability of Howes arriving there before us—the Town will be stormed by our Troops there. God grant us success. Quebec is now of great consequence—there has been a treaty with the Indians here—their Chiefs solemnly engage to preserve a Neutrality—this is of consequence—a few Southern Indians may give us some trouble—but we have very little to fear from the Nations in general—unless the scale should turn against us in our dispute with Great Britain…I understand there are 10,000 additional troops to be taken into Cont. Service...I am confident I could get them armed better than half of the eastern troops I have seen. I shall take particular notice of all the fortifications that I shall meet on my way—and exert myself to become acquainted with the Duty of an Officer. I hope to share in the honour of taking the Capital of Canada—in case I should be appointed to the Command proposed.” In very good condition, with unobtrusively repaired partial separations to horizontal folds. The following month, the Continental Army, under command of those mentioned in this letter, drastically underestimated British troop strength and attacked them at Trois Rivieres. After being easily defeated, the American troops retreated, marking the last major battle in the US invasion of Quebec. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Oversized formal presentation portraits of Hirohito and Nagako 230. Hirohito and Empress Nagako. Emperor of Japan (born 1901) from

1926 to his death in 1989. Following the devastating result of the atomic bombs dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima in World War II, he renounced his divinity in favor of a democratic constitutional monarchy. Incredibly scarce set of vintage matte-finish 8.5 x 12.75 three-quarter length portraits of Hirohito and Empress Nagako, beautifully signed in thick black ink in Japanese by the emperor and empress. In fine condition, with a small tear to the upper border of the Hirohito photo that could be easily matted out for pristine display. Accompanied by the original presentation folder, bearing an embossed Imperial Seal of Japan on the front. Few Hirohito portraits are made available to the collecting public, particularly those of this quality and size—this the largest Hirohito photo we have ever offered. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $1000)

Upon the release of his 1957 memoir: “I am confident now as I have always been of eventual vindication” 231. Alger Hiss. American government official (1904–1996) famously

accused of being a Soviet spy. ALS, one page both sides, 5 x 8, April 24, 1957. Letter to editor William Cole. In part: “my attorneys tell me that in certain circumstances the development of new evidence might make it possible to reopen my case. All leads possible to this end are being pursued as far as available money and man power will permit… Your judgment would be as good as mine on whether there has been any change in the climate of public opinion and on whether I would now obtain the fair trial I was denied in 1949–1950 and 1952…I am confident now as I have always been of eventual vindication. How far my book will help to bring this about is scarcely for me to say.” In fine condition. Two weeks after writing this letter, Hiss released his memoir, In the Court of Public Opinion, challenging in detail the prosecution’s case against him. Indicting him for perjury in connection with a prior accusation of espionage, their strongest evidence came in the form of documents traced to his typewriter—in his book, Hiss argued that these documents had been forged. On May 7, the day of the release, International News Service correspondent Irwin Safchik published a column describing the book, directly quoting from this letter. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Desirable book personally owned by the Holmes family, signed by both father and son 232. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and Sr. Signed book: The Old Sergeant and Other

Poems, by Forceythe Willson. Later printing. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1867. Hardcover, 4.75 x 7, 115 pages. Signed on the first free end page in pencil with an ownership signature by the literary elder, “O. W. Holmes from J. T. Fields April 10th, 1869, Please return to OWH, 297 Beacon St, Boston,” and on a presentation bookplate affixed to the rear pastedown in black ink by his jurist son, “Oliver Wendell Holmes.” Autographic condition: light foxing to first free end page and a few wrinkles to bookplate, otherwise fine. Book condition: VG-/None (Ex-Library). A rare pairing of the father and son, appropriately found in a book of poetry. The poem ‘Old Sergeant’ was a favorite of both Holmes men—Holmes, Sr. was even known to recite it during the Civil War at poetry lectures. This was almost certainly presented to Holmes, Sr., by James Thomas Fields—the “Fields” in Ticknor and Fields—who published some of Holmes’s work. A terrific association between these influential figures. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“Mr. Wolcott was a man of cheerful and ever playful disposition”

233. Joseph Hopkinson. Congressman from Pennsylvania who later served as a federal judge (1770–1842). ALS signed “Jos. Hopkinson,”

four pages on two adjoining sheets, 7.75 x 10, October 6, 1839. Letter to the grandson of Oliver Wolcott, Jr., former Secretary of the Treasury and Governor of Connecticut. In part: “I am glad you have undertaken to give the public a biography of your grandfather. He was so intimately connected with the administration of the federal government in its most crucial and difficult situations, that his correspondence and other papers cannot fail to disclose facts and opinions of great interest…Mr. Wolcott was a man of cheerful and ever playful disposition; his conversation was interesting and earnest…He had a good taste in literature, with one exception, about which we often disputed, and in which his New England attachments, or prejudices, controlled his judgment. He had an excessive admiration of Dr. Dwight: Conquest of Canaan, a great part of which he had in his memory, and used to recite with great spirit, always insisting that it was the best epic that had ever been written. I am not sure that he did not except Homer, but I well remember that he put it before Vergil and all the moderns attempts, except Milton.” In fine condition. Hopkinson’s career as a jurist was marked by prudence and his opinions characterized by clarity and literary skill—gifts certainly evident in the present letter, praising an important figure in early American history. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 70 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES


Thirteen Illinois congressman endorse John Hay for judicial seat 234. House of Representatives. LS signed

by the thirteen Illinois Republican members of the House, one page, lightly-lined, 7.5 x 9.5, House of Representatives letterhead, December 17, 1881. Letter to President Chester A. Arthur reads, in full: “We, the Republican members of the Illinois delegation of the 47th Congress, cordially and heartily commend to your favorable consideration the application of Hon. John B. Hay of Illinois for the position of Judge of the Court of Claims. We endorse him fully for that or any other desired.” Signed at the conclusion by William Aldrich, George R. Davis, Charles B. Farwell, John C. Sherwin, Robert M. A. Hawk, Thomas J. Henderson, William Cullen, Lewis E. Payson, John H. Lewis, Benjamin F. Marsh, Dietrich C. Smith, Joseph G. Cannon, and John R. Thomas. Reverse bears two endorsements, one from former Union General Green B. Raum, and the other from former General John A. Logan, both recommending Hay for the position. Scattered mild toning and soiling, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Excessively rare signature of the German philosopher

236. Immanuel Kant. Ink signature, “Ihr gantz ergebener Freund und Diener, I. Kant,” on an off-white 7.25 x 1.25 slip clipped from the close of a letter. Ink notation to left side reads, “Konigsberg, 1795.” In fine condition, two vertical folds (one touching the first letter of his signature; slight separations professionally repaired on the reverse). Originates from the collection of the German theologist Hermann Dembowski. Of the utmost rarity, this is the first Kant autographic material we have ever offered. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

237. Joseph P. Kennedy.

TLS, one page, 8 x 10.5, May 2, 1938. Letter to artist and journalist S. J. Woolf. In part: “I told her all of the secretarial positions in the Embassy are subject to Civil Service regulations and I can be of no help to her in obtaining Civil Service status…I am glad you liked the speech before the Pilgrims I am going ahead with this outspoken policy and I believe they appreciate it here.” In fine condition, with a bit of show-through from a doodle to the reverse and a tiny stain near the signature. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

235. Joseph II. Holy Roman Emperor (1741–1790) from 1765 until his death, and ruler of the Habsburg lands. Manuscript DS in Latin, signed “Josephus,” one page, 23.75 x 17.5, December 9, 1766. Large untranslated document regarding The Adventures of Telemaque by John Conrad Wohler. Signed at the conclusion by the Emperor and countersigned by two others. A few small separations along intersecting folds, with one fold through a single letter of signature, scattered toning, and a couple of small pencil notations, otherwise fine condition. The large royal seal of the Emperor is crisp and intact. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Reactions to a charity screening of her life’s biopic, Helen Keller in Her Story 238. Helen Keller. TLS, one

page both sides, 7.25 x 10.5, personal letterhead, September 8, 1954. Letter to actress Katharine Cornell. In part: “O the delight of the sail on the Viking ship that was the dream of Goering, and O, the delicious fun of the sparkling spray! O, the touching welcome of the dogs, and the cheery fire at Chip Chop… How wonderful everything was!—the warm-hearted reception of the film, the delightful compliments I received, the delectable weather and the next day’s lunch with David and Adele Levy and Mrs. Roosevelt. I wish we might all have been together longer, and nothing could have meant more to me than a real talk with Mrs. Roosevelt, but as it was our visit at Chip Chop was most refreshing to Polly’s and my spirits and bodies…I have reread parts of ‘The Darkness Is Light Enough.’ The more I understand the ideas expressed in Christopher Fry’s beautiful language, the more I appreciate the play and enter into the rich thoughts filling your role.” In fine condition, with uniform toning to top half of the reverse. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope and a snapshot of Cornell, Keller, and Polly Thomson, notated on the reverse that it was taken by Nancy Hamilton, showing the group going “across Vineyard Sound for a hospital benefit showing of ‘Helen Keller in Her Story.” Earlier in the summer of 1954, this group had released a documentary entitled The Unconquered, later renamed Helen Keller in Her Story, which was narrated by Cornell and directed by Hamilton. Eleanor Roosevelt attended the benefit showing on Martha’s Vineyard, along with a star-studded list of guests, including Billie Burke, Noel Coward, Lillian and Dorothy Gish, Mary Martin, Tallulah Bankhead, Henry Fonda, and Richard Rodgers, many of whom helped promote the film and provided blurbs for advertising. Though the film was never a commercial success, the critical acclaim it received culminated in its receiving the 1955 Academy Award for Best Documentary. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Scarce decree from British ruler Charles II 239. King Charles II. British monarch (1630–1685) who ushered in the Restoration of 1660 and ruled until his death. Manuscript DS, signed “Charles R,” one page, 9.5 x 14.5, May 26. Document issued to Lord Finch commanding that “you forthwith deliver up to us the Bill remaining in your hands which was prepared to have passed our great seal for a grant in…the Office of Our Auditor of Our Revenue of the Excise and new Import unto Samuel Birch.” Signed at the top by the King. Double-cloth-matted and framed with two portraits of Charles to an overall size of 25.5 x 25. In fine condition, with intersecting folds, one through a single letter of signature, and a bit of scattered light toning and foxing. Oversized. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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240. King Christian VII.

King of Denmark and Norway (1749–1808) who ruled from 1766 until his death. Manuscript DS in Danish, signed “Christian R,” one page both sides, 8.5 x 13, 1802. Untranslated document beautifully signed at the conclusion by Christian and countersigned by six of his ministers. A related untranslated one page document is bound to this document with its original red and white chord. Intersecting folds, with a horizontal fold passing through signature and an area of circular toning to pages from the red wax and paper seal, otherwise fine condition. The large wax and paper seal is crisp and intact. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“London herself has emerged triumphant from the great world-struggle”

241. King Christian VIII.

King of Denmark and Norway (1786–1848) who ruled from 1839 until his death. ALS in Danish, signed “Christian Frederick,” four pages on two adjoining sheets, 8.25 x 10, June 4, 1826. Neatly-penned and lengthy untranslated letter. In fine condition, with central horizontal and vertical folds. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope which retains almost all of its red wax seal on the reverse. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

242. King Ferdinand I. Ruler

of Bulgaria from 1887 to 1918. Printed broadside in Hungarian, signed at the conclusion, “Ferdinand,” one page, both sides, 9 x 13.5, no date. The untranslated broadside is headed at the beginning, “Befejezes,” neatly signed at the conclusion by the king, and countersigned by two others. Intersecting folds, several small pencil notations, and some scattered toning, primarily from seal, otherwise fine condition. The large paper seal is crisp and intact. Accompanied by the original Paul C. Richards folder. Precertified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

243. King Edward VIII. Hand-corrected typed draft of a speech, five pages, 7.5 x 9.5, no date but circa June, 1919. Speech delivered by Edward, Prince of Wales, on becoming a Freeman of the City of London, extensively edited by Edward in pencil, making many corrections and word changes, as well as adding an entirely new paragraph. In part: “It is difficult for me adequately to express my appreciation of the honour you have just done me in welcoming me as a Freeman of this great City…By this time a year ago the enemy had, as a result of the March offensive, though solely through their superiority in numbers, forced the Allies to retire on the Western Front. Those were dark days for England. Now, though the clouds have not wholly lifted on the horizon, we do know that the B.E. has once again weathered the storm and London herself has emerged triumphant from the great world-struggle…Mr. Chamberlain…you spoke of the period which I spent at the front. The part I played was, I fear, a very insignificant one, but from one point of view I shall never regret my time of service over-seas. In those four years I mixed with men. In those four years I found my manhood. When I think of the future and the heavy responsibilities which may fall to my lot, I feel that the experience gained since 1914 will stand me in good stead.” The additional handwritten paragraph, preceding his address to Chamberlain at the conclusion, reads: “In all the opperations [sic] in which they took part throughout all the long & trying months of trench warfare the London divs showed an incomparable spirit & more than upheld the noble traditions of the city of London.” The ceremony was held at Guildhall, London, on June 2, 1919. In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The King asks for an examination of funds “for the General War Cash” 244. King Frederick I. First King of Prussia (1657–1713) who ruled from 1701 until his death. LS in Old German, signed as Elector of Brandenburg, one page both sides, 8.25 x 12.25, April 15, 1692. Frederick sends his greetings to the councillors at Sohren, and states “Our General Receiver Krautt has notified us that he has set his accounts for the year 1690 for the General War Cash. The King then orders an examination and justification of all income and expenses and asks to have this certified.” Signed at the conclusion by Frederick and countersigned by Bergins. Reverse of second integral page bears an ornate address panel. In very good condition, with intersecting folds, some creasing and tears to right edges, a few small pencil notations, and circular toning from seal on second page. The ornate wax and paper seal is crisp and intact. Accompanied by the original Paul C. Richards folder. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

246. King Frederick William II. Nephew of Frederick the Great

and King of Prussia from 17861797. LS in German, signed as Crown Prince, “Frd. Wilhelm,” one page, 7.25 x 9, February 6, 1776. Untranslated letter to Bushing in Berlin, possibly regarding military matters. Intersecting folds, some light pencil notations and remnants, and a small caption affixed to reverse, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by engraved portraits of the prince and the Royal Palace in Potsdam. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

247. King Frederick William III. King of Prussia during the Na-

245. King Frederick William I. King of Prussia (1688-1740) and

Elector of Brandenburg from 1713 until his death. LS in Old German, signed “Fr. Wilhelm,” one page, 7.25 x 9, January 10, 1740. Letter to the merchant Saturgus, in part (translated): “Our most gracious lord, accepts the New Year’s wishes which the merchant Saturgus sent him…and is much obliged to him for the sentiments of loyalty which he expressed in it and for his good intentions; and (his Majesty) wishes him in turn continued prosperity and good luck. And, since his Majesty was not displeased at the shipment of Leppitz honey which accompanied the letter the king assures him of his continued affection.” Central horizontal and vertical folds and a uniform shade of toning, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

74 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES

poleonic wars (1770–1840) who ruled from 1797 until his death. Manuscript DS in German, signed “Friedrich Wilhelm,” one page, 8.5 x 10.25, July 12, 1827. Document issued to merchant E. Solly reads, in full: “In accordance with the results reported to me of the investigations to which your petition gave rise, I have authorized the Minister of State and Count von Danckelmann to inform you of further developments.” In very good condition, with fragile central horizontal and vertical folds, scattered toning and soiling, and several small pencil notations. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


248. King Frederick William IV. King of

Prussia (1795– 1861) who ruled from 1840 until his death. ALS in French, signed as Crown Prince, one page both sides, 8 x 9.75, July 10, 1839. Untranslated letter to General Doyle on military matters they had apparently discussed in person. In fine condition, with central horizontal and vertical folds, some light show-through from text on opposite side, and a small caption pinned to top of first page. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

249. King Gustav V.

King of Sweden (1858– 1950) who ruled from 1907 until his death. He holds the record for being the oldest monarch of Sweden. Distinguished 7.5 x 9 magazine photo of an elderly Gustav looking out a window, boldly signed in fountain pen, “Gustav 1945.” In fine condition, with some light rippling to corners from adhesive on reverse. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

After years of controversy over his claim to the throne, Parliament defeats the Exclusion Bill and the heir presumptive brings his staunchest opponent to the bar 250. King James II. The last Catholic monarch (1633–1701) to reign over the Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, crowned in 1685. Some of his subjects distrusted his religious policies and alleged despotism, leading a group of them to depose him in the Glorious Revolution. ALS written as Duke of York, signed “James,” one page both sides, 6.75 x 9, February 22, [1681]. Letter to a minister of state. In part (spelling and grammar retained): “his Ma: is very well satisfied with you;...as for yours by Godolphin he has not yet sayd any thing of it to me, so that I do not know what it is, but you may be sure, I shall always be very glad, to further any of your concerns, and lett you see I shall always be very kind to you, for newse you will have it from others, by the next post you will heare what will become of the E. of Shaftsbury, he being brought to the bar of our house on Monday next.” Professionally inlaid into a larger off-white sheet, and beautifully bound within a vintage limp brown Morocco leather 9 x 12.5 presentation folder. An engraved portrait of James is inlaid into another sheet within the folder. In fine condition. Convinced that the Roman Catholic heir presumptive Duke of York would transform England into an absolute monarchy upon his brother, King Charles II’s death, Anthony Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, actively attempted to thwart the Duke’s ascent in the early 1670s. Although he endorsed a variety of proposals—including Charles II remarrying a Protestant princess to produce an heir, or legitimizing Charles’s illegitimate Protestant son the Duke of Monmouth—he became best known for his outspoken support of the Exclusion Bill, which would prevent James’s crowning strictly on the basis of his religion. (A crucial piece of British history, the bill led to a major division in the entire political system, with its supporters becoming the Whig party, and its opponents developing into the Tories.) When it was finally defeated in the House of Lords at the start 1681, Shaftesbury was arrested for high treason: “By the next post you will heare what will become of the E. of Shaftsbury, he being brought to the bar of our house on Monday next.” The charge was dropped months later, and Shaftesbury, fearing a second prosecution that would mean certain death under the now Tory-filled Parliament, fled to Holland. A fascinating letter from the future king, fully consumed with the controversy over his claim to the throne. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) www.RRAuction.com | 75


251. King George III. King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1760 until his death in 1820, whose reign was marked most notably by the loss of British control over the American colonies. Manuscript DS, signed “George R,” one page both sides, 7.75 x 12, December 18, 1807. Document ordering that the seal of the United Kingdom be affixed to a document appointing Joseph Smith as “Secretary to Our Legation to Our good Brother the King of Sardinia.” Boldly signed at the top by King George and countersigned at the conclusion by George Canning as secretary of state for foreign affairs. Bound to the document with its original ribbon is a four-page copy of the order, in Latin. Paper seal affixed below George’s signature remains fully intact with corners folded. In fine condition, with expected document wear. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

252. King Louis XVI. King of France (born 1754) from 1774 to 1792. In the wake of increas-

ing unrest that developed into full-fledged revolution, Louis and his queen, Marie Antoinette, were executed in 1793. Uncommon manuscript DS in French, signed “Louis,” one page, 9.75 x 13.5, December 20, 1779. An order for the Treasurer Royale to pay 3,283,828 livres for the use of the King. Signed at the conclusion by the King and countersigned by four of his ministers, including Gayle and Herrion. A central horizontal fold, some tape repairs to reverse, and a few small tears and toning to edges, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Early and uncommon signature of the future French king 253. King Louis XVIII. King of France and Navarre (born 1755) from 1814 until his death in

1824 (save a brief interruption in 1815 while fleeing Napoleon during the Hundred Days). Louis himself claimed that his reign dated from the death of his nephew, the Dauphin Louis XVII, in 1795. Manuscript DS in French, signed “Louis Stanislas Xavier,” one page, 9 x 13, December 31, 1778. An untranslated financial document authorizing the transfer of 23 livres from the National Treasury to reimburse a French government official for his services to the royal government. Document is affixed to a slightly larger off-white sheet. Slightly trimmed edges, intersecting folds, a few trivial spots, and light pencil remnants to lower right, otherwise fine condition. A much earlier and scarcer version of Louis’s signature than typically seen. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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254. King Ludwig II. King of Bavaria (1845–1886) whose extravagant tastes led him to commission lavish artworks and architecture, including Neuschwanstein Castle, the basis for Disneyland’s Sleeping Beauty Castle. Manuscript DS in German, signed “Ludwig,” one page, 8 x 13.25, January 19, 1867. Legal appointment for Otto Behr. White paper seal affixed to center remains crisp and fully intact. In fine condition, with expected document wear. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

255. Horatio Kitchener. British military officer and statesman (1850–1916) who served as Victoria’s aide-de-camp in the Sudan, commanded the British forces during the Boer War, and was appointed secretary of state for war at the outbreak of World War I. He and more than 600 others were killed when his vessel, the HMS Hampshire, hit a mine and sank west of the Orkney Islands on June 5, 1916. ALS, one page both sides, 4.5 x 7, personal letterhead, no date. Letter to “my dear Lady Jeanne.” In part: “I am sorry to say I am engaged for Saturday to Monday…and every day of the week of the 21st for dinner. Might I lunch with you on Saturday the 26th.” In fine condition. Accompanied by an unsigned postcard portrait. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The maligned member of the Krupp steel family 256. Friedrich Alfred Krupp. German steel manufacturer (1854–1902) who took over leadership of the family business in 1887. He committed suicide after a magazine article accused him of being a homosexual. Uncommon matte-finish 4.5 x 6.75 photo of an artist’s portrait of Krupp by Reichard & Lindner of Berlin, affixed to its 8.25 x 10.75 mount, signed under the image in fountain pen, “S. A. Krupp 1900.” In fine condition, with some scattered light toning and foxing to background. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The rumbles of revolution in Berlin 259. Robert Koch. German medical scientist (1843–1910) regarded as the father of bacteriology. He isolated the tuberculosis bacillus and the anthrax virus, and received the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in 1905. ALS in German, signed “R. Koch,” three pages on two adjoining sheets, 4.5 x 7, April 5, 1892. Letter to his Privy Counsellor, possibly Rudolf Virchow, at the Institute for Infectious Diseases. In full (translated): “On this journey of my sick leave the weather has been so abominable that I have not been able to recover very well. I still feel quite weak and I would like to request a few weeks of additional vacation time—something you hinted at as a possibility before I left. I am taking the liberty of sending this letter to your home address directly so that my request might get into your hands more speedily. I would be very grateful if you could obtain a positive answer for me. I have followed the frequently skimpy newspaper accounts regarding the events taking place in Berlin with growing astonishment. At times I thought I was reading fairytales! I hope that the direction that has apparently been taken will be continued for a long time.” In fine condition. At this time, Berlin was in turmoil. The undercurrent of Socialism which Wilhelm I tried to suppress began to take hold with the people, threatening not only the German Empire, but all the royal crowns of Europe. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Receiving first prize awards in medicine and surgery at his famed school, Laennec juggles the busy life of a student 260. Rene Laennec. French physician (1781–1826) who

invented the stethoscope in 1816 and pioneered its use for diagnosing chest problems. ALS in French, one page both sides, 8 x 9.75, August 25, 1803. Letter to his father regarding the presentation of his first prize awards in both medicine and surgery, in part (translated): “Don’t talk about the event yet. It will be public in Paris 16 fructidor [September 3]. The day before yesterday the Monitor announced it. It will take place with the greatest pomp. Don’t forget…to send 300 francs or at least 150…it is very important that I be properly outfitted so that I can introduce myself to various persons who could be useful to me.

I would like very much to go to Nantes to see you because that would be of great benefit to my health. But it will be difficult to find the time because the Competition for the prizes established by M. de Lapeyronie for students of the Ecole Pratique will take place at the beginning of vendemiaire [late September]. I could return to Paris at the beginning of brumaire [late October] and take my introductory examinations, do my thesis, and my course in anatomical pathology.” Reverse of second integral page, trimmed to a size of 7.5 x 6, bears an address panel in Laennec’s hand which retains most of its red wax seal. In very good to fine condition, with intersecting folds, a couple small spots of ink erosion and paper loss to edge (not affecting legibility), and some scattered mild toning. Upon entering the École Pratique in Paris at the turn of the century, Rene Laennec immediately thrived as a student; publishing his first major scientific paper in 1802, describing a series of six cases of peritonitis (now considered the first description of this disease entity), he was recognized by the medical community as a leading scholar in the nature of disease before even receiving his diploma. The following year, he was awarded the school’s first prizes in both medicine and surgery. Sharing the news with his father just days after the event was announced in the Monitor, the official government newspaper, he stresses the importance of looking the part, “so that I can introduce myself to various persons who could be useful to me.” With such key figures as Minister of the Interior Jean-Antoine Chaptal, who presented the awards, and François Gigot de la Peyronie, the famed surgeon of both Louis XIV and Louis XV, the event held major networking opportunities. Balancing the heavy load of his studies with his own fragile health—constant respiratory difficulties, which he typically relieved by visiting Nantes for its rejuvenating fresh air—this is an extraordinary letter from the start of Laennec’s distinguished career. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300) 78 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES


“The life of Galleri has been saved, but he has not yet returned to French soil” 261. Marquis de Lafayette. ALS in French, signed “Lafayette,” one page, 7.25 x

8.75, January 20, 1830. Letter to General Guglielmo Pepe. In full (translated): “Here I am, back in Paris with my family; we shall await the second of March here, except for several brief trips which I will make on my own to La Grange, and at the time of the 2nd of March the struggle between the Chamber and the Ministry will begin. I have reason to believe that the vote will not be favorable for them; we are assured that they will not give in. It is difficult to foresee what a Chamber made up of several shades of opinion will be able to do against a government more stubborn than skillful. Friends of liberty will try to profit from the circumstances, and if the profit is of a certain importance, the two peninsulas will not lost by it. The life of Galleri has been saved, but he has not yet returned to French soil. The Royal Family of Naples is still expected in Paris in the spring. I shall try to see what can be done to interest them in your country and in the exiles. That would be easy with a liberal minister; today I would not hope for any satisfaction from them. One ought to be able to find some help at least from the Duke of Orleans and through his intercession. I am carefully keeping the copy of your earlier letter. Receive, my dear General, the assurances of friendship which I send you with all my heart.” Intersecting folds and subtle foxing, otherwise fine condition. During the chaotic years of Charles X’s reign as King of France, a string of Prime Ministers were appointed and dismissed, quickly heightening tension in the already unstable government. When newly appointed Prime Minister Jules de Polignac quickly lost his parliamentary majority, he refused to recall the Chambers until March 2, 1830—the date that Lafayette looks forward to in this letter—determined to hold on to his power. When the date arrived, a bill was introduced and quickly passed requiring the backing of Chambers for the appointment of new ministers. Charles quickly disregarded the decision, suspended Chambers once again, and called for another general election. When the elections finally took place with results displeasing to the government, he and his ministers suspended the constitution, censored the press, dissolved the newly elected chamber, and called for new elections in September, sparking the July Revolution that would result in Charles’s overthrow. A remarkable letter from a crucial and frenzied time in French history. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

262. Gordon W. ‘Pawnee Bill’ Lillie. American

showman (1860–1942) who began his career as a trapper and Pawnee interpreter and later became a partner in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. Printed poem entitled ‘A Toast to Pawnee Bill’ on a woodgrainpatterned 7.25 x 10.75 cardstock sheet, featuring an image of him and a lasso border, signed at the top in fountain pen, “G. W. Lillie, ‘Pawnee Bill.’” In fine condition, with a few creases to corners and a tiny edge tear to lower left. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Pristine leatherbound edition of Mandela’s autobiography 263. Nelson Mandela.

Signed book: Long Walk to Freedom. Collector’s edition. Norwalk, CT: Easton Press, 2000. Leatherbound hardcover, 6.5 x 9.5, 558 pages. Signed on the colophon in black ballpoint, “N. Mandela.” In very fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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264. Guglielmo Marconi. Ital-

ian physicist and inventor (1874– 1937) who devoted his life to experiments in wireless communication, and was awarded with the Nobel Prize in 1909. Very nice 5.5 x 3.5 postcard photo of Iglesia de Capuchinos in Spain, signed vertically along the right edge in black ink. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

McNamara’s Legion of Merit Legionnaire medal

The future empress implores a sea captain to look after a young sailor

265. Empress Marie Feodorovna of Russia (Dagmar of Denmark). Empress consort of Czar Alexander III (1847–1928).

ALS, written as a child, signed “Marie Guise Valdemar of Denmark,” three pages on two adjoining sheets, 4.5 x 7, personal letterhead, no date. Letter to an unidentified sea captain. In full: “I don’t know you but I have heard so much of you, that I take the liberty of asking you to be kind to my friend Lieutenant Fritsche, he is very young, but a very good sailor and I think that you will like him, but I have often spoken to him and help him and now that he is far away I have the trust that you will be so good as to care a little for him and help him in the beginning and I hope that you won’t be angry that I write so openly and so badly to you.” In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

267. Robert McNamara. McNamara’s Legion of Merit Legionnaire medal awarded to him by the Department of Defense, measuring 1.75˝ in diameter, featuring a beautiful design of gilt metal, an enamel wreath of green laurel joined at the bottom by a gold bow-knot, a five-pointed white enamel star bordered in crimson, and a blue enamel disk in the center with 13 white stars arranged in the pattern appearing on the Great Seal of the United States. The medal is suspended from a crimson ribbon edged in white, and presented in its original satin and velvet lined box, gilt stamped “Legion of Merit, Legionnaire” on the top. In fine condition. Accompanied by the tag from Sotheby’s sale of the McNamara estate held in October 2012, where this was acquired. The Legion of Merit, established to recognize ‘exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements,’ was awarded to McNamara in 1946 after leaving active duty in the Air Force. During World War II, he had conducted analysis on costs and operations of the air fleet, particularly with regard to B-29 bombers. A terrific, one-of-a-kind military award belonging to one of the most influential figures in the American defense and policy in the latter half of the 20th century. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

266. Marie Louise. Second wife of Emperor Napoleon I of France (1791-1847).

Partly-printed DS in French, signed “Louise,” one page, 12.75 x 9, December 29, 1812. Appointment naming Mme. de Roose a council member of the Society for the City of Brussels. Signed at the conclusion by Louise and countersigned by Louis, Bishop of Versailles as Secretary General of the Society of Maternal Charity. In fine condition, with intersecting folds, and a bit of scattered light toning. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Extraordinary letter on Elisabeth of Valois’s smallpox, the death of Francis II, and Mary, Queen of Scots, returning to Scotland

269. Catherine de Medicis: Lois de Bretagne. Bretagne (died 1602) was governess and lady-in-waiting to Elizabeth of Valois, the eldest daughter of Catherine de Medicis and Henry II. Medicis (1519–1589) was Queen of France from 1547 until 1559 as the wife of King Henry II, and mother of French kings Francis II, Charles IX, and Henry III, which granted her sweeping power over the kingdom. ALS in French, signed “Lois de Bretaigne,” three pages on two sheets, 8.5 x 12, Toledo, Spain, February 20, 1561. Letter to Catherine de Medicis. In part (translated): “The health of the Queen your daughter grows better and better since I wrote to you. The King has not come to sleep with her yet, for which I am very glad for she is not quite well enough. The journey to Monzon is becoming less practicable and they say it will not be made this summer, which we will again spend here; therefore I assure you that the Queen is much grieving because of the hope she had of seeing you there. The Prince has his fever again rather badly, the cause being I think the great army which they say the Turks are preparing to bring this summer to Goletta [port of Tunis] and to the forts which they lost there this year, in order to take something else. From the last couriers who came from Don Juan Manrique there is much comment here about the story that the funeral of the late King [her son, 16-year-old Francis II, died December 5, 1560] was conducted with one little candle, which is thought very strange. It is also said for about a fortnight, that Monsieur the Cardinal of Lorraine is going to Metz after Easter, and Queen Mary either to Joinville or to Scotland.” Beautifully housed in a custom-made black leather-bound presentation folder. Mounting remnants to edges, show-through from writing to opposing sides, and an unobtrusive area of paper loss to the second sheet, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by a full translation. At the time Bretagne penned this letter, Elizabeth of Valois was the 15-year-old Queen of Spain—having married Philip II by proxy a year earlier—and suffering from a case of smallpox, which Bretagne comments on at the beginning, assuring her mother that she is recovering. She goes on to predict an invasion of the Turks into Tunisia, which did occur later that year—in May 1860 at the Battle of Djerba, the Ottoman Empire’s navy overwhelmed the large joint European fleet stationed there, sinking half its ships. Finally, she mentions the passing and unusual funeral of Francis II, Medicis’s son and husband of Mary, Queen of Scots. Upon his death, the throne transferred to Francis II’s ten-year-old brother, Charles IX, granting Medicis a tremendous amount of power as regent due to his young age. Mary, no longer Queen of France, returned to Scotland nine months after her husband’s death, arriving in Leith on August 19, 1561. A fantastic letter packed with content about European royalty in the 16th century. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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Uncommon letter from the Confederacy’s treasurer

270. Golda Meir. Two items: an untranslated TLS, in Hebrew, one page, 6.25 x 8, State of Israel letterhead, dated 1974, signed in Hebrew by Meir; and a commemorative cover, bearing several colorful postage stamps, signed in Hebrew in blue ballpoint. In fine condition, with intersecting folds and a bit of scattered light toning to letter. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Early and particularly lengthy letter from the future Prime Minister 271. Golda Meir. ALS

in Hebrew, four pages, 6 x 9, Morrison Hotel, Chicago letterhead, May 23, 1937. Boldly-penned untranslated letter. In fine condition, with punch holes to right edges, official stamp and rusty paperclip mark to top of first page, and a uniform shade of mild toning. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

273. Christopher G. Memminger. Politician (1803–1888) who

served as the first secretary of the treasury for the Confederate States of America. ALS signed “C. G. Memminger,” one page, lightly-lined both sides, 5.5 x 9.25, personal letterhead, October 29, 1881. Letter to Governor Johnson Hagood of South Carolina. In part: “I understand that you will be called upon to appoint a Master for Charleston…I take leave to recommend Mr. Sass as eminently fitted for the office.” In fine condition, with a pair of small filing holes at the top. The gentleman recommended, George Herbert Sass, was appointed a ‘Master in Equity’ in 1883, an office in which he served throughout his life. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

272. Andrew Mellon. Financier and philanthropist (1855–1937) who helped found the Gulf Oil Corporation; he also served as treasury secretary under Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover. Matte-finish 7.75 x 10 Harris and Ewing portrait of Mellon on lightweight stock, signed in the lower border in fountain pen, “A. W. Mellon,” with a collector’s date notation of February 28, 1922. Blindstamped in the lower left by the renowned photography studio. In fine condition, with mild bands of silvering to dark areas of the image. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Rare letter by the ‘discoverer’ of animal magnetism, who lends his name to ‘mesmerize’ 274. Franz Anton Mesmer. Excessively rare ALS in French, signed “Mesmer,” one page, 6.75 x 8.25, October 3, 1795. Letter to Madame Cardon of Versaille. In full (translated): “I haven’t been able to resist any longer my desire to travel and seek some asylum against the boredom caused by this huge city [Paris]. I will leave tomorrow morning for Lyon and will be back in 15 days. I have the honor of warning you about the situation in the hope that I will find you in good health, and continue to testify my affectionate attachment with which I greet you.” He also adds a handwritten postscript, in full: “All my friendly remembrances to madame your mother.” In fine condition, with mild overall foxing. Part of Mesmer’s theory of ‘animal magnetism’ was its healing powers, and that he was able to cure people of their ailments by correcting the flow of their magnetism. He had arrived in Paris in February of 1778, which at the time was riddled with disease and epidemic, smallpox in particular. As patients and curiosity-seekers flocked to him desiring to be cured, the people of Paris divided into two factions—those who believed in his unorthodox treatment and those who considered him a charlatan. By 1784, his methods had become wildly popular but just as controversial—King Louis XVI arranged a Royal Commission, headed by Benjamin Franklin, to investigate Mesmer’s claims, publishing their findings—essentially, that it was nonsense—shortly after and causing Mesmer to lose influence in the community at large. He lost all of his money during the French Revolution and withdrew from the public spotlight; very little is known about the final 20 years of his life—the period during which he wrote this letter, expressing his “boredom” with the city that no longer supported him. An exceptionally rare autograph that seldom enters the marketplace, this is the first we have ever offered.RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

276. Samuel F. B. Morse. Ink signa-

275. Benito Mussolini and Vittorio Emanuele III. Partlyprinted DS in Italian, four pages on two adjoining sheets, 9.5 x 14.5, November 22, 1937. An untranslated lengthy five-article decree boldly signed at the conclusion, “Mussolini” and “Vittorio Emanuele.” Expected stamps, notations, and document wear, some light toning and soiling, and marginal binding holes to left edge. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

ture and sentiment, “Wishing you health & happiness, Yr. Ob. Sevt., Sam. F. B. Morse, New York, March 23, 1870,” on a light blue 4.75 x 2.5 slip clipped from the closing of a letter. Signature is affixed to a matted engraved portrait of Morse and framed to an overall size of 10 x 15. In fine condition, with a paperclip impression to top edge and a few spots of mild soiling. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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“Labor for Elec. Mag. Telegraph”—Morse builds America’s first long-distance telegraph system in 1843 277. Samuel F. B. Morse. ADS, signed “S. F. Morse Sup. Elec. Mag. Tel.,” one page, 8 x 12.5, July 10, 1843. Morses’s retained copy of a bill to the US government for construction of a telegraph, penned in his own hand, headed “Copy 4th Report, Abstract C. of exp. On acct of Labor for Elec. Mag. Telegraph for month ending July 10th 1843.” The document lists eight employees and their wages. In fine condition., with two trivial stains to left edge. On March 3, 1843, Congress had passed an act appropriating $30,000 for construction of an experimental 38-mile telegraph line between Washington and Baltimore along the right-of-way of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, specifically naming Morse as the superintendent of the project. This document represents Morse’s fourth monthly report of his laborer’s wages, following April, May, and June of 1843, after President Tyler had approved the bill. Of the men listed, Ebenezer Chase supervised covering of the telegraph wire with cotton twine for insulation; his son, E. E. Chase, soldered and covered the joints of the wire, assisted by Benjamin F. Taylor and Lewis O. Wood; and Gilbert Smith worked on an embossing register that would record the dots and dashes on paper tape. Construction of the telegraph finished in May of the following year, and it was officially opened on May 24, 1844, when Morse sent the now-famous words, ‘What hath God wrought,’ from the Supreme Court chamber in the Capitol to Mount Clare Station in Baltimore. This was the first long-distance telegraph system set up to run overland in the United States—the first step of a communications revolution. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

278. Napoleon. LS in French, signed “Np,” one page, 7 x 9, October 28, 1808. Letter to General Clarke. In part (translated): “I told you yesterday to send two captains, two lieutenants and two second lieutenants in all haste to Rennes to be employed in the 5th batallion of the 1st Legion of the Reserve.” In fine condition, with central horizontal and vertical folds, some stray ink marks near bottom, and a three-line notation, in French, under the signature. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

84 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES


Napoleon instructs his son on mountain warfare, suggesting sleds “similar to those I used in my War in the Alps” 279. Napoleon. LS in French, signed “Napol,” one page both sides, 7.25 x 9, April 5, 1809. Letter to his adopted son Eugene reads, in part (translated): “I strongly approve of your having prepared 6 canons on 6 mountain gun carriages for following the army. But here is what has to be done to complete this plan; organize a mountain team…on sleds used as gun carriages…and two howitzers…In Mantua these gun carriage sleds, similar to those I used in my War in the Alps, will be built in 6 days…That way you will have 12 pieces of mountain artillery…they will be able to go anywhere that a horse can pass…The canons should be able to fire 150 shots…600 shots for the 4 pieces…and 300 for the two howitzers. To implement this it is necessary to have 10 small caissons (ammunition carts) pulled by mules…It is also necessary to organize two brigades of pack mules, each consisting of 36 mules, 20 of them loaded with caliber 6 cartridges, 30 loaded with howitzer cartridges and 22 loaded with infantry cartridges. That way you will be able to launch a division of 8,000 to 10,000 men into the campaign and be sure that neither artillery nor cartridges will be lacking.” In fine condition, with a central vertical fold. While in Egypt during his 1798 Campaign, Napoleon received news that Austrian forces had retaken Italy, demanding his return to Paris; in order to launch a surprise assault on the Austrian army stationed in the Cisalpine Republic, Napoleon led his army of 40,000 on the now-legendary trek through the Alps. Referring to his epic action, he here offers his son Eugene, one of the ablest of his relatives, advice. The advice seemingly did not help, as Eugene was defeated by the Austrian army at the Battle of Sacile less than two weeks later. An outstanding letter rife with strategic military content. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

After a soldier loses a leg in Italy, Napoleon approves his medal of the iron wreath 280. Napoleon. Quick ink endorsement, signed “Np,” along the left edge of an undated letter to Napoleon from a wounded soldier, 8.25 x 13. Letter reads, in part, (translated): “Your Majesty’s justice makes me bold and supports my hopes. I lost a leg in Italy. I ask, Sire, that the medal of the iron wreath, honoring my wound, console my memory and be for my sons a model of obligation to serve your Majesty with the enthusiasm in which honors me and crowns Him until my last day.” Approved and signed by Napoleon in the left border. Cloth-matted and framed with a portrait of Napoleon and a small plaque to an overall size of 21.25 x 19. In fine condition, with central horizontal and vertical folds, with horizontal fold passing through signature. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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282. Napoleon: Jean-Pierre Chazal. Scarce printed broadside in French, one page,

12.75 x 15, June 10, 1808. Announcement issued by Jean-Pierre Chazal. In part (translated): “I learn, Mr. Mayor, by several reports that have been made to me, that a large number of deserters and refractory of this department, have taken refuge in Aragon, have refused to enlist amongst insurgents of this Spanish province, and are returning to their homeland, braving all the perils and all the sorrows, rather than to be useful against it.” In fine condition, with a central horizontal fold. Jean-Pierre Chazal (1766–1840) was a lawyer at the Parlement of Toulouse before the French Revolution and subsequently supported Napoleon’s coup d’etat in 1799, later serving as a member of the commission which drafted the French Constitution. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Rare signature of the man who brought down Al Capone 284. Eliot Ness. Leader of a special Prohibition squad (1903–1957),

known as the Untouchables, which led to the downfall of Al Capone and his successor Frank Nitti, and the capture of John Dillinger. Very uncommon ink signature, “Eliot Ness, City of Cleveland,” and dated “2/2/37,” by Ness in the left column on an off-white lined ledger page trimmed to a size of 8 x 5.25. In fine condition. At the time of signing, Ness was serving as Cleveland’s Safety Director. Ness is quite scarce in any form. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The Czar offers assurance to a count who has raised a contingent of soldiers 285. Nicholas I. Czar of Russia (born 1796) who reigned from 1825 until his death in 1855. By crushing the Decembrist Uprising, he confirmed the autocracy of czarist rule, but disastrous losses in the Crimean War marked the collapse of his foreign and domestic policies. LS in Russian, signed “Nikolai I,” one page, 7.5 x 8.75, January 11, 1826. Letter to Count Peter Khristianovich. In part (translated): “I could not have expected feelings from you other than those which I found, with particular pleasure, in your letter to me…I am thoroughly convinced that the troops you have raised will be inspired by the example of the leader who is respected by them, to distinguish themselves zealously and strictly performing their required duties.” In fine condition, with a couple of small pencil notations to top left. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The Khodynka Cup of Sorrows—named for the catastrophic riots at the 1896 coronation of ‘Bloody Nicholas’ 286. Nicholas II. Original

enameled cup made for the coronation of Czar Nicholas II and Czarina Alexandra Feodorovna on May 18, 1896, featuring an elaborate design with the initials of the royal couple in Cyrillic below an Imperial crown. The opposite side bears an image of the Imperial Russian Eagles surmounted by the crown. In very good condition, with various chips and scuffs to the surface, most noticeably affecting the year and golden rim. On the morning of the coronation, hundreds of thousands of revelers gathered at Khodynka Field in Moscow to observe the ceremonies and receive these commemorative cups, a great novelty for the period. A false rumor swept through the crowd that the cups contained gold coins, causing a riot to ensue as people tried to obtain cups before the limited supply ran out. Over a thousand people were trampled to death in the chaos—an omen of things to come during Nicholas’s reign—and these souvenirs thus became known as the ‘Khodynka Cup of Sorrows.’ A superb relic that breathes history with its association to the last Romanov leader. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The judiciary committee that impeached Nixon 287. Nixon House Impeachment Committee. Collection of 39 items, consisting of photos, business cards, letters, and signatures, each signed by a congressman or senator involved with Nixon’s impeachment. Most notable are three items signed by chairman of the committee, Peter W. Rodino, including: a photocopy of the House of Representatives resolution impeaching President Richard Nixon, signed on the first page in black felt tip; a souvenir typescript of the resolution impeaching Nixon, signed in black felt tip; and a TLS transmitting the autographs. Other signers include: M. Caldwell Butler, William S. Cohen (3), John Conyers, George E. Danielson, Robert F. Drinan, Don Edwards, Joshua Eilberg, Elizabeth Holtzman, William L. Hungate, J. Edward Hutchinson, Daniel Inouye, Barbara Jordan (2), Robert Kastenmeier, Trent Lott (2), James R. Mann, Robert McClory (2), Edward Mezvinsky (3), Joseph Montoya, Tom Railsback (2), Charles Rangel, Charles W. Sandman, Jr., Paul Sarbanes (2), Henry P. Smith, Ray Thornton, Lowell P. Weicker, Jr., and Charles E. Wiggins (2). In overall fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Official Warren Commission exhibit (No. 186): “Merry Christmas Dear Mother, from us both. Lee”

288. Lee and Marina Oswald. Christmas card from 1961, signed “Lee,” measuring 5.5 x 4 closed, with a color image of pine boughs on the front. On the inside Oswald has written, “Merry Christmas Dear Mother, from us both. Lee,” after which his wife Marina has signed her name in Cyrillic. This letter was an official exhibit (No. 186) in the Warren Commission investigation into JFK’s assassination and, like most of the exhibits, is protectively soft-laminated, with a label affixed to the back of the card. Accompanied by an ink signature of Edwin A. Walker, whom Oswald had previously attempted to assassinate. In fine condition, laminated as described and with a few small creases. A few days earlier, Oswald had written to the American Embassy requesting their assistance in leaving the country, after they were both denied exit visas by the Soviet government. Shortly after sending this card, Oswald was fired by the Belorussian Radio and Television Factory in Minsk, citing careless and unsatisfactory work and a negative attitude as reasons for letting him go. Almost miraculously, two weeks later on Christmas Day, the Oswalds were granted passports and exit visas, and within a few short months they were on their way to Texas. Anything signed by both Lee and Marina is incredibly rare, making this a highly desirable piece. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

Grand larceny indictment from the ‘Hanging Judge’ 289. Isaac C. Parker. Fearless and determined justice (1838–1896) of the Indian Territory

in western Arkansas who earned the nickname ‘The Hanging Judge’ because of the great number of convictions he secured against criminals, renegades, and fugitives from justice. ADS, signed “I. C. Parker, Circuit Attorney,” one page, 8 x 12.5, May 2, 1865. Legal document for the case between the state of Missouri and Sebastian Richards, Peter Schnider, and Anthony Bergan on a count of grand larceny. In part: “The grand jurors in the state of Missouri…being duly empowered and sworn upon their oaths present that Sebastian Richards, Paul Schnider and Anthony Bergan…appraised twelve hogs of the balance of fifteen dollars…of one John Jackson then and there being found feloniously did steal take and carry away contrary to the form of the state.” Intersecting folds, expected document wear, two small holes to top border, and some light show-through from docketing on reverse, otherwise fine condition. Anything signed by Parker is uncommon, with this being the first completed entirely in the hard-nosed justice’s hand we have ever offered. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Expressing his gratitude for help against the “unspeakable campaign of that presumptuous fellow who never set foot in a laboratory” 290. Louis Pasteur. Autograph note in French on one of Pasteur’s printed visiting

cards, 4 x 2.5, imprinted “Louis Pasteur, de l’Academie Francaise et de l’Academie des Sciences.” At the bottom Pasteur writes (translated): “With you my thanks for your so very authoritative intervention in the unspeakable campaign of that presumptuous fellow who never set foot in a laboratory.” In fine condition, with light mounting remnants to reverse. A strongly worded message from the devout scientist. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Pauling thanks the man who introduced him to Vitamin C 291. Linus Pauling. Collection of three signed

items consisting of two short TLSs and a signed photo. The letters are both one page, both to Dr. Irwin Stone, and dated March 1981. First letter reads, in part: “I am glad to express my thanks to you for having written to me in 1966. Your letter and the reprints of your papers changed my life.” The second letter, sent three weeks later, reads, in part: “It was good of you to write to me again about your inexpensive ascorbate product, C-Salts. I have not yet gotten around to bringing it home, in order to try it out, but I shall do so. I have been adding potassium hydrogen carbonate to my ascorbic acid.” The final item is a color glossy 10.5 x 13.5 photo of Pauling and Australian pathologist Glen Dettman, signed in the large bottom border in black felt tip by both, and framed to an overall size of 14 x 17. Also included are three of Pauling’s own paperback editions of The Chemist Analyst, with notations on each cover, most likely by Pauling, identifying articles inside for Stone. In fine condition, with a uniform shade of toning to one letter from previous display. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

292. Linus Pauling. Collection of nine items, including three TLSs from Pauling, including two to Oscar Falconi, both dated from 1971. One letter reads, “I thank you for your interesting booklet on Vitamin C.” The third TLS is signed by Pauling and Raxit J. Jariwalla, sent to Father Henri Barlage, and dated April 16, 1992. Letter reads, in part: “We are very pleased by his progress in the promotion of a controlled clinical study of vitamin C in the treatment of AIDS…it is more likely that the future results of this study will be published in a reputable, refereed scientific journal. This in turn would mark an important step in clinical AIDS research using vitamin C and would serve as a reference point in this Institute’s advocacy of vitamin C in AIDS research and treatment. Such research would be of great interest for the treatment of AIDS in Africa…This Institute, for its part, promises collaboration and scientific advice to support this project in Zaire.” Also included are two birthday programs; two printed articles; a short TLS signed by Linus Pauling, Jr.; and a program from Pauling’s memorial service. In overall fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The Arctic explorer prepares a trophy for display at the Smithsonian 293. Robert E. Peary. TLS

signed “Peary,” one page, 7.25 x 10, personal letterhead, April 1, 1912. Letter to Albert Operti. In full: “I am thinking of depositing in the National Museum in Washington, for the summer, the beautiful Canadian Camp trophy, which you designed two years ago, and I want to accompany it with a brief descriptive label. Will you kindly send me a description of the significance and allegorical meaning of the wreath, the maple leaf, the star, etc., which make up the design?” In very good condition, with slightly trimmed edges, intersecting folds, one through a single letter of signature, a couple pencil notations, small edge tears to bottom, and some mild toning and creasing. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

294. Robert E. Peary. Two TLSs signed “R. E. Peary,” each one

page, spring of 1905. Both letters written to Tice & Lynch Ship Brokers regarding the import of 75 pounds of compressed English tea. Also includes an ALS from his wife, Josephine, related to a bill for the tea. Intersecting folds, a few adhesive remnants to edges, and a few office notations, otherwise overall fine condition. Accompanied by a letter from a member of the Arctic Club to Tice & Lynch, as well as an unrelated letter by a government secretary about a medal given to Isaac Israel Hayes. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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295. Pedro I of Brazil. Founder

and first ruler of the Empire of Brazil (1798–1834). Scarce LS in Portuguese, signed “D. Pedro,” one page, 7.75 x 9.75, July 19, 1834. Letters to Messrs. Samuel and Philips in London offering a letter of recommendation and credit. Reverse of second integral page bears an address panel in another hand, with the letter of credit written on the front of the page. In fine condition, with intersecting folds, several creases, and some mild soiling. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

296. Pedro II of Brazil. Popular and much admired emperor of

Brazil who ruled for nearly sixty years (1825–1891). Uncommon LS in Spanish, signed “Imperador,” one page, 9 x 13.25, May 1855. Letter to Cardinal Sinola acknowledging and reciprocating Christmas greetings, stating that he is happy to have a reason to express the esteem he holds for the Cardinal’s virtues. Intersecting folds, a uniform shade of toning, a couple of small pencil notations, and a slight brush to end of signature, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


297. St. John Perse.

Pseudonym of Alexis Leger (1887–1975), French poet and diplomat who was awarded the 1960 Nobel Prize for Literature. ALS in French, signed “Alexis Leger,” one page, 8.25 x 10, Ministere des Affairs Etrangers letterhead, July 6, 1937. Letter to an unidentified general. In full (translated): “Mr. Laude has been awarded the dignity of officer of the Legion of Honour. I am happy to let you know this good news very quickly and to tell you my pleasure in having used your recommendation to give this mark of recognition to a good friend of France.” In fine condition, with central horizontal and vertical folds and a rusty paperclip mark to top edge. One of the most difficult to find Nobel winners, this is only the second Perse we have offered. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

299. Prince Philip. Husband and Prince Consort of Elizabeth II

(born 1921). Matte-finish 5.75 x 8 photo, affixed to a 7.25 x 10 mount, signed on the mount in fountain pen, “Philip, 10 March 1966,” with a small coat of arms affixed to bottom border of mount. Framed with two invitations sent to Colonel Robert Pentland, and a 1966 TLS to Pentland from Christopher Bonham-Carter to an overall size of 22.75 x 11. A uniform shade of mild toning to mount, a bit of light silvering to image, and scattered toning and foxing to accompaniments, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Rare letter from Louis XV’s chief mistress 300. Madame de Pompadour. Mem-

298. Charles C. Pinckney. Signer of the US Constitution from South Carolina and a South Carolina governor, senator, and representative. ALS signed “Charles Cotesworth Pinckney,” one page both sides, 7.5 x 9.5, July 15, 1819. Letter to Mr. Petit de Viller. In part: “Commercial concerns are highly applauded & has been successfully exerted in the cities. I enclose you a letter which I received in her favour from Mr. Gilmore of Baltimore; & I solicit your patronage in behalf of this Lady, & I do it more freely, as I know you not only delight in the melody of sweet sounds, but possess in an exquisite degree the true harmony of feeling, the genuine music of the mind.” Matted and framed (so only second page is visible) with a color portrait to an overall size of 18.25 x 14.5. In fine condition, with some light show-through from writing on opposite side. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

ber of the French court (1721–1764) who was the chief mistress of Louis XV from 1745 to her death. Rare partial autograph letter, in French, one page, 4.25 x 6.5, June 30. Portion of a larger letter to the Duke d’Aiguillon. In part (translated): “Several attacks of very severe fever, and the unhappy event that happened, Monsieur, have afflicted me in every respect, so that I have not had the strength to write you. The memorandum that you sent me has been transmitted to the Council of Commerce, I am very glad of that, because I have friends there who will take interest in the cause of the Malouns [the inhabitants of Saint-Malo]; tell them, I pray you, that their zeal for the King makes me strongly desire the success of their enterprise; if I think about them with so much concern, judge, Monsieur, of the sentiments that your courage, your intelligence, and your attachment to the service of the King have inspired in me on your behalf; they do not leave anything to be desired.” Reverse of second integral page bears an address panel in another hand as well as a mostly intact red wax seal. In fine condition, with a pencil notation along bottom edge. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Impressive 1754 Papal broadside regarding the fate of King Louis’s soldiers 301. Pope Benedict XIV. Rare printed broadside in French and Latin, one page, 20.75 x 31.25, circa 1754. A letter from Pope Benedict XIV to Paul Passionei, vice-legate in Avignon, concerning “Les Immunités,” June 18, 1754. In part (translated): “We, initially, endeavored to direct this part of our Pontificate to the Provinces which are subjected to us…distant from our City of Rome…less with range of our vigilance, as are our Town of Avignon, our Comtat Venaissin, & the Cities & Lieux…where you must go without delay to fill the Ministry there…The Soldiers of the Troops of our very dear…Louis Very Christian King of France, while deserting from its Armies, or making some contrary offence with the military discipline, refuge themselves in the Grounds & Lieux of the aforesaid City & Comtat, with all the more ease, that the subjected Places aforesaid City & Comtat are surrounded by all parts of the States of the Very Christian King, &; that generally these guilty Soldiers withdraw themselves, for greater safety, in the Churches & other places of Immunity.” Passionei’s response of October 16, 1754, is printed in French at the bottom. Central vertical and horizontal folds, a few edge tears, and a small tape-repaired tear to the left side, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The first Pope from the Americas 302. Pope Francis. Color satin-finish 5.75 x 8.25 photo of the future

Pope as a cardinal kneeling at the feet of Pope John Paul II, signed in black felt tip, “J. Bergoglio, Erzbischof von Buenos Aires.” In very fine condition. Accompanied by a photo taken at time of signing at a Cardinals reunion in Rome in 2012. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Blessing granted by the last Pope to be cannonized 303. Pope Pius X. Born Giuseppe Melchiorre Sarto in 1835, Pius X served as pope from 1903 until his death in 1914. Known for his conservative, anti-modernist philosophies, he became, in 1954, the first pope to be elevated to sainthood since Pius V in 1712. Apostolic blessing, signed “Pius PP. x,” 8 x 13.25, with a 4.25˝ diameter portrait of Pius at the top, issued to Reverend John A. Thompson, signed at the conclusion by the Pope, dated March 3, 1911, with Pius adding one line in Latin above his signature granting the blessing. In fine condition, with a bit of scattered light toning and soiling to edges, and a staple hole to bottom edge. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The head of the Catholic church sends an inspirational message to the newly-married Prince of Portugal 304. Pope Gregory XVI. Born Bartolomeo Alberto Cappellari (1765-1846), he was Pope of the Catholic Church from 1831 to 1846. Strongly conservative and traditionalist, he opposed democratic and modernizing reforms in the Papal States and throughout Europe, seeing them as fronts for revolutionary leftism, and sought to strengthen the religious and political authority of the papacy. LS in Italian, signed “Gregorio PP. XVI,” one page, 8 x 10.5, January 31, 1835. Letter addressed to “His Royal Highness Duke August de Leuchtenberg” [son of Eugene de Beauharnais]. The pope congratulates him on his marriage to Queen Maria II da Gloria, thanks him for the fervent religious sentiments he expresses, sentiments which he absorbed “With his mother’s milk” since she was such an extremely pious princess who never ceased to instill Catholic Principles in him by word and example, “we could not have expected anything other than your declaration that in whatever situation you may be in your sentiments of unfailing and respectful devotion to the Holy Sea will never change.” In fine condition, with central horizontal and vertical folds. Accompanied by the original mailing panel retaining its fine red wax seal with the papal arms. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

305. Prince Louis II of Monaco. Prince of Monaco (1870–1949) who ruled from 1922 until

his death. Matte-finish 4.75 x 7 three-quarter length photo of the Prince in full-dress uniform, signed in purple fountain pen, “Louis II, Prince de Monaco 1929,” with a photographer’s pencil notation in the lower border. Photo is affixed to a 7.25 x 9.75 off-white mount. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

306. Queen Victoria. Partly-printed DS, signed “Victoria R,”

one page, 15.75 x 11.5, February 16, 1894. The Queen appoints Roland Murray Bourne “to be an Officer in Our Militia Forces… You are therefore carefully and diligently to discharge your Duty as such in the Rank of 2nd Lieutenant.” Signed above the blue paper seal by Victoria. Double-matted and framed with a portrait of Victoria to an overall size of 28 x 17.25. Some repaired separations to a couple of the intersecting folds, and a uniform shade of overall toning, with a few slightly heavier spots, otherwise fine condition. The blue paper seal is only slightly worn and toned and remains intact. Oversized. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The Queen consoles a widow and extols Victorian morality 307. Queen Victoria. ALS signed “VRI,” three

pages on two adjoining sheets, 4.25 x 7, blackbordered personal letterhead, February 28, 1884. Letter to “Dearest Lady Southampton,” (Lady Isrnay Southampton, Lady of the Bedchamber to Victoria from 1878 till the Queen’s death in 1901). In full: “I cannot go to bed without saying how truly, deeply I feel you, a widow myself & like me without at the present moment at least, anyone to turn to for help or advice. [John Brown whom some say she married died a year earlier in 1883]. I do feel for you, as I have suffered as you have from things being done behind my back. I own I can’t find words to say what I think of a middle aged Clergyman taking advantage of a young girl under the guise of religion! It is disgraceful. I can only pray that you may see some daylight soon. As to what you can do—I would be too happy to help you in any way.” In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The Queen appoints a diplomat to be stationed in Rio 308. Queen Victoria. Partly-printed DS, signed “Victoria R,” one page, 20.5 x 13.25, March 13, 1875. The Queen, “with a view to conclude a Postal Convention between Us and our good brother the Emperor of Brazil,” appoints “Victor Arthur Wellington Drummond Esquire, Our Acting Charge d’Affaires at Rio de Janeiro… and appoint him Our undoubted Commissioner Procurator.” Signed along the top by Victoria. In fine condition, with intersecting folds, one through a single letter of signature, and a bit of scattered light foxing around signature. Document retains its original red and silver braided chord. Drummond held several notable posts throughout his life, including Secretary of the Embassy in Vienna; Minister Resident to Kings of Bavaria and Wurttemberg; and Secretary to British Legation in Washington, DC. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

309.

Queen Victoria.

Autograph letter (unsigned), four pages on two adjoining sheets, 4.5 x 7, blackbordered Balmoral Castle letterhead, November 2, 1887. Letter to an unidentified recipient in the Queen’s difficult to decipher hand. In part: “I wrote to you…but fear you never got it unless it was forwarded…to christen thy little…granddaughter who was born here on the 24th…(a good deal later than was expected).” In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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As the war draws to a close, the future Queen of England is quarantined with the mumps 310. Queen Elizabeth II. Very early ALS signed “Elizabeth,” one page both sides, 4.75 x 7.5, Windsor Castle letterhead, February 19, 1945. Letter to H. I. Tanner. In full: “I do want to thank you so much for your letter, it was very kind of you both to think of us. I am feeling much better now, though I still have to be in quarantine for some time yet. Margaret was very unlucky in having mumps during the holidays, but she had them very slightly indeed. Mine were not really bad, but it was very difficult eating for several days. We have had some very good laughs over the gags you wrote in your letter, and Margaret loved the old lady with knobs on! We have tried without success, I’m afraid, to think of some ideas for your Centenary, but if we have any brainwaves, we’ll let you know. The total sum for the Pantomime was a very satisfying one, don’t you think? I was thrilled about it—£300 is easily our best effort. Once again thanking you for your letter.” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

311. Edmund Randolph. Statesman and

politician (1753–1813) who variously served as aide-de-camp to Washington, member of the Continental Congress, the first attorney general, and Aaron Burr’s lawyer during his notorious trial for treason. Partly-printed vellum DS, signed “Edm: Randolph,” one page, 13.25 x 13, April 12, 1787. Randolph grants 5000 acres of land in Harrison County, Virginia to Frederick Farlamb. Nicely signed at the conclusion by Randolph. In fine condition, with intersecting folds, one through a single letter of signature, and a bit of scattered light toning. The paper seal is lightly toned, but intact. Accompanied by the original Paul Richards folder. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Scarce photo of the Standard Oil billionaire 312. John D. Rockefeller.

Crystal-clear glossy 7 x 10.5 photo of Rockefeller signing documents at his desk, signed below the image in pencil on a sheet affixed to the reverse. Trimmed vertical edges and a bit of trivial surface loss affecting the top of the “R” in his signature, otherwise fine condition. Consignor notes that this originates from the family of a gentleman who at one time managed Rockefeller’s dairy farm and received this as a gift. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

313. Wilhelm Rontgen. Scarce ALS in German,

signed “W. C. Rontgen,” on a 4 x 3.5 gilt-edged card, September 2, 1911. Letter of condolence to atomic physicist Rudolf Ladenburg on the death of his father. In full (translated): “Only now have I received news of the death of your dear father. Please accept my sincere condolences. In so far as I know, the deceased endured great physical suffering in the last few months. Therefore death may have been a deliverance for him. For you the passing of your father will always mean a great loss!” In fine, bright condition. Ladenburg studied with Rontgen, who was his doctoral adviser. He later went on to work with Einstein and John von Neumann in the US where he was involved in the Manhattan Project and was also in charge of placing exiled physicists in jobs. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Boldly penned wartime letter from the Secretary of War to General McClellan 316. Edwin M. Stanton. Civil War–dated

314. William H. Seward. American statesman (1801–1872) who

served as secretary of state in the Lincoln administration. LS, one page, lightly-lined, 7.75 x 9.5, Department of State letterhead, August 12, 1867. Letter to Senator Cornelius Cole of California. In part: “I have the honor to…inform you that the peculiar and unsettled condition of affairs in Mexico renders it of great importance that the Consular officers be at their posts.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds and a bit of feathering to ink. Just two months before Seward sent this letter, Austrian Archduke Ferdinand Maximilian—who had been installed as emperor of Mexico by Napoleon after President Juarez failed to pay his debts to France—was captured and executed, ending once and for all Napoleon’s attempt to carve out an empire on Mexican territory. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

315. William H. Seward. ALS, one

page, 7.75 x 9.75, March 27, 1847. Letter to a college treasurer to whom Seward submitted his bills, which were apparently protested as too high. In part: “But if the College is in your judgment more needy than I you may draw through Clarence on his return for the three bills or such part of them as you think right…Do what you find necessary and I shall be satisfied, I regret exceedingly the embarrassment attending your appropriation bills.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds, one through a single letter of signature, and a bit of scattered light foxing. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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ALS, one page, lightlylined, 4.75 x 6.5, March 27, 1862. Letter to Major General George McClellan. In full: “I have requested Mr. Garrett to confer with you briefly on the OH Baltimore R Road to save time & trouble of communication.” Nicely matted and framed to an overall size of 10.25 x 12.25. In fine condition, with a couple trivial stains. John W. Garrett was president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, which, as the main rail connection between Washington and the northern states, was instrumental in supporting the federal government during the Civil War. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Cardinal and former rightful heir to the British throne 317. Henry Benedict Stuart, Cardinal Duke of York. One

of the longest serving Catholic cardinals and the final heir to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1725–1807). The papacy did not recognize him as the lawful ruler, instead referring to him as Cardinal Duke of York. LS in Italian, signed “Errico Cardinale,” one page, 8 x 10.5, December 10, 1801. Letter reads, in part (translated): “Messrs. Busoni, Goupy… have kindly agreed to pay off the draft of £10000, which was made to them by our Treasury, as per the agreement made with them by us, and debited on our current account, in line with the [document] which they hold in their hands.” Intersecting folds, several areas of ink erosion to text, not affecting overall legibility, and some scattered light toning, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


Spectacular mammoth portrait of the 1916 White Court 318. Supreme Court. Amazing matte-finish 31 x 23.5 photo of the justices of the 1916 White Court dressed in their judicial robes, affixed to its original 35.5 x 28.5 mount, signed on the mount in black ink by William R. Day, Louis Brandeis, Joseph McKenna, Mahlon Pitney, Edward Douglass White, James Clark McReynolds, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., John Hessin Clarke, and Willis Van Devanter. Bears a copyright notation to the lower right of the image, “Clinedinst Studio, 1916.” Framed to an overall size of 42.5 x 35. A few professional repairs to mount (most noticeably to upper left corner and below Pitney’s signature), otherwise fine condition. Elevated to chief justice in 1910 by President Taft, Edward Douglass White headed this distinguished group of justices from 1916 to 1922— with Brandeis and Clarke both in their first year as justices in 1916. The year of this photo, the court made two especially notable decisions; the first upholding the 16th amendment, declaring it constitutional for Congress to levy a federal income tax, and the second controversially overturning a law that would have limited child labor. The latter decision was 5-4, with Justice Holmes leading the opposition in an eloquent dissent, saying, ‘If there is any matter upon which civilized countries have agreed—it is the evil of premature and excessive child labor.’ These decisions—along with the White Court’s earlier ruling in the famous Standard Oil v. US case, which found Rockefeller’s company guilty of monopolizing the petroleum industry and broke it into several separate firms—would impact commerce for years to come. This crystal-clear portrait of these influential justices is far larger than most of the period—the expense of producing such images makes them quite rare—and many of the jurists pictured, Holmes and Brandeis in particular, are among the greatest in American history, making this a truly remarkable piece. Oversized. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

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319. Charles Sumner. Two letters: ALS, four pages on two adjoining sheets, 5 x 8, October 31, 1856, discussing political philosophy, in part: “Vico, Michelet, & others who teach mankind climbs up a length only to fall back again, err”; and an LS, two pages, 5 x 8, March 30, 1863, in part: “The work was distributed at once, and now I have not a single copy remaining.” In overall very good condition, with various staining and soiling. Accompanied by two related letters from publishing bureau Curtis Brown, Ltd. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

320. Supreme Court. Collection of 26 items, each signed by a Supreme Court Justice. Items are signed by Fred Vinson (TLS), Earl Warren (TLS), Warren Burger (2; program and TLS), William Day (signature), William O. Douglas (2; sketch and program), Harlan Stone (signature), John McLean (ALS), Hugo Black (signature), Harold Burton (TLS), Lewis Powell (5; three TLSs, signature, and article), Potter Stewart (TLS), M. R. White (signature), William Brennan (2 TLS), Arthur Goldberg (TLS), James Byrnes (2; TLS and signature), Charles Hughes (signature), and Frank Murphy (signature). In overall fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

321. Supreme Court: Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. Neatly penned ALS signed “O. W. Holmes,” one page, 5 x 8, Supreme Court letterhead, April 7, 1903. Letter to a gentleman. In part: “This is the Introduction to the Esprit de Lois published by Appleton. I am not responsible for the title…I fear on reflection that it is not a mode of thought that will appeal to you, but I keep my word and am glad to mark the great pleasure I have had.” In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

98 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES

322. Supreme Court: Roger B. Taney. Fifth chief justice of the Supreme Court, he handed down the Dred Scott decision and upheld federal supremacy over state authorities (1777–1864). ADS, signed “R. B. Taney,” one page, 7.75 x 3.25, February 2, 1813. Brief legal document related to a suit brought by Kimball & Albert against Little. In fine condition, with intersecting folds. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


Dignified Harris and Ewing portrait of the highly regarded Justice 323. Supreme Court: Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. Associate justice of the Supreme Court (1841–1935) from 1902 to 1932. Mattefinish 6.75 x 10.25 Harris and Ewing photo of Holmes posing in his judicial robe, signed in the lower border in black ink, “Oliver Wendell Holmes, March 24, 1931.” Double-cloth-matted and framed (in what appears to be the original frame) to an overall size of 16 x 20. In fine condition, with a bit of scattered mild silvering and some surface impressions to background of top right. Holmes is uncommon in signed photos, particularly formal portraits. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The most famous French privateer and slave trader requests lumber for his ship “The African” 324. Robert Surcouf. LS in French, one page, 8 x 10, May 9, 1821. Letter to

Marion Pleudihen, in full (translated): “I need for my ship ‘The African’ ten logs of wood to burn. The ship is anchored in Saint-Malo. Please send the lumber and be careful it is the right weight, as I will not weigh it again on board, as it comes from you.” Intersecting folds, one through a single letter of signature, scattered toning and dampstaining, a few small areas of ink erosion to signature, and show-through from address panel on reverse, otherwise very good condition. After a lucrative career as an officer and privateer in the Indian Ocean, during which he captured over forty vessels and amassed a fortune from his illicit dealings, including frequent slave trading, Surcouf returned to his home at Saint-Malo. Serving as a ship owner, a colonel in the National Guard, a chief of Legion during the Hundred Days, and finally a successful merchant, he never strayed from the sea. This letter, with its poignant reference to his early dealings in the slave trade with his ship name ‘The African,’ is an incredibly rare piece—the first Surcouf we have ever offered. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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325. Texas: Benjamin Lundy.

New Jersey abolitionist (1789–1839) who served as a leading critic of the Texas Revolution. LS, one page both sides, 7.75 x 4.5, November 5, 1836. Letter to an unidentified gentleman on behalf of the Anti-Slavery Office in Philadelphia. In part: “The friends of the Immediate Emancipation in Pennsylvania, have taken measures to hold a Convention, with the view of organizing a State Anti Slavery Society…We the undersigned…have been instructed to correspond with prominent individuals residing in other states, who are friendly to our cause, and to request their attendance.” Signed at the conclusion by Lundy and two other committee members. A notation at the conclusion by Lewis C. Gunn reads, “I sent this because it bears the signature of Benjamin Lundy—the indefatigable philanthropist who did more than any other man to prevent the annexation of Texas to these United States.” In fine condition, with two vertical folds, one through first letter of signature. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

326. Leon Trotsky. Rus-

sian Communist leader (1879– 1940) who, with Lenin, organized the Bolshevik seizure of power during the October Revolution of 1917. Large ink signature, “Leon Trotsky, 1 Apr. 1932” on a 4.75 x 7 sheet. In fine condition. An exceptionally large and bold example of the powerful leader’s signature. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

New York’s famous purveyor of corruption 328. William M. ‘Boss’ Tweed. Politi-

cian (1823–1878) most notable for being the ‘boss’ of Tammany Hall, the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in the politics of 19th century New York City. Partlyprinted DS, signed “W. M. Tweed,” one page, 8.5 x 10.5, June 12, 1869. Receipt for payment of $2205.84 to Edward Marrenner for the purchase of spikes for the Corporation Yard, Rivington Street, signed at the bottom by Tweed as deputy street commissioner. In fine condition, with expected document wear and a punch hole to upper left. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“All is not gold that glitters” 327. Andrew J. Volstead. Politician (1860–1947) who introduced the Volstead Act, passed in 1919 to establish Prohibition. TQS, signed “A. J. Volstead,” on a 5 x 3 card, dated June 30, 1936. Quote reads, in full: “During an industrial depression hesitate to change old and tried forms of Government; such periods are not favorable to clear thinking and gives the self-seaking [sic] demagogue the vantage ground for destroying human liberty. All is not gold that glitters.” In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

100 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES


The man who served both Washington and Benedict Arnold requests the return of his papers

Rare document from the inventor of the battery

329. Richa r d Va r i c k .

American soldier and statesman (1753–1831) who was aide-decamp to Benedict Arnold prior to the latter’s defection to the British. Varick later served as Washington’s private secretary, mayor of New York, and a New York state legislator. ALS signed “Richd. Varick,” one page, 4.75 x 7.75, November 30, 1826. Letter to S. Jones, Esquire requesting documents in his possession. In part: “Being very desirous of having my original Accounts & Vouchers in my own possession, I went from your Office to Anthony Bluehere, & he informed me that they were delivered.” In fine condition, with light show-through from a docketing notation on reverse. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

330. Alessandro Volta. Italian physicist (1745–1827) best known for his epochal investigations into the nature and uses of electricity, leading him to invent the battery. The unit denoting the potential difference or electromotive force was named the volt in his honor. Partly-printed DS, in Italian, one page, 7.5 x 11.25, July 19, 1791. A receipt for Volta’s brother fees as a university professor. Intersecting folds and a couple small tears to the top edge, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The Nobel Prize recipient clarifies a statement made in his biography 331. Selman Waksman. Inventor, biochemist, and microbiologist (1888–1973) who discovered streptomycin, the first antibiotic effective against tuberculosis; for this he was awarded the 1952 Nobel Prize in Medicine. Three one-page TLSs, 8.5 x 11, all on Rutgers University letterhead, dating from 1949–1955, all to Simon Bloom of the Jewish Ledger, all pertaining to a proposed biography of Waksman which was published in 1954. His final letter, dated January 3, 1955, concerns the Ledger’s review of the biography. In part: “My reference to the Jews as a ‘race’ does not signify any definite attitude on my part to this question. You may consider it as a ‘slip of the pen.’ Actually, I would hardly agree with the concept that the Jews are a distinct race. I am quite familiar with the way the races in Europe have originated as a result of the mixing of so many complex racial stocks. It is indeed quite incorrect and certainly not scientific to speak at this time of any one group of people, especially one that has undergone so many historical ramifications as the Jews, as representing a ‘race.’” Intersecting folds and scattered mild toning, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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332. Daniel Webster. Full hand-addressed free frank, measuring 9.75 x 7.75 unfolded, with center panel measuring 5.25 x 3, addressed by Webster to “Hon. Leverett Saltonstall, Salem,” and franked in the upper right, “Dan’l Webster.” A vertical fold passing through a single letter and toning over half of the signature, otherwise fine condition. Saltonstall was a Massachusetts congressman and the first mayor of Salem. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

333. Daniel Webster. Thirdperson ALS, one page, 4 x 6.5, December 12, 1850. Letter reads, in full: “Mr. Webster presents his compliments to Honble Mr. Nelson & would be glad to see him at the Department of State, this morning at 1/2 past 10 o’clock.” Intersecting folds and light overall wrinkling, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

334. David Wilmot. Senator (1814–1868) best known for sponsoring the Wilmot Proviso, which aimed to ban slavery in land gained from Mexico in the Mexican-American War. Very rare ALS, one page, 6 x 4.75, April 4, 1857. Brief letter responding to a collector. In full: “I cheerfully comply with your request for my autograph.” Edge toning from adhesive remnants to reverse, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

335. Duke and Duchess of Windsor. Ink sig-

natures, “Edward, Duke of Windsor,” and “Wallis, Duchess of Windsor,” on an off-white 5.5 x 3.25 embossed card. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

336. World Leaders. Collection of 33 items, each signed by a notable world leader, including: Sheikh Mohammed Abdullah (TLS), Sirimavo Bandaranaike (SP), Madame Chiang Kai-shek (SP), Morarji Desai (SP), Ton That Dinh (TLS), Duke of Alba (TLS), Luigi Einaudi (SP), Ferdinand of Bulgaria (signature), Pierre Mendes France (program), Ernesto de la Guardia (TLS), Junius Richard Jayewardene (SP), Joseph Kasa-Vubu (TLS), Urho Kekkonen (SP), Ayub Khan (SP), Mahendra of Nepal (SP), Makarios III (SP), Marque de Torres de Mendoza (TLS), Serge Obolensky (TLS), Giorgio Borg Olivier (TLS), Souvanna Phouma (SP), Lauri Kristian Relander (signature), Saud bin Abdulaziz Al Saud (print), Adolf Scharf (signature), Simeon II and Margarita (SP), Adolph Thiers (SP), Nguyen Ngoc Tho (TLS), Umberto II (FDC), Eamon de Valera (FDC and souvenir typescript), Georges Vanier (signature), Fulbert Youlou (two TLS), and Mohammed Zahir Shah (signature). In overall fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 102 | April 16, 2014 | NOTABLES


337. Spiro Agnew

338. Judah P. Benjamin

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339. John C. Breckinridge MB $200

340. British Prime Ministers MB $200

341. John C. Calhoun

342. Andrew Carnegie

343. Andrew Carnegie

344. Nicolae Ceausescu

345. Eldridge Cleaver

346. DeWitt Clinton

347. DeWitt Clinton

348. Charles A. Dana

349. Moshe Dayan

350. John DeLorean

351. DNA: James D. Watson

352. DNA: James D. Watson

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353. Abba Eban MB $200

354. Elizabeth, Queen Mother MB $200

355. Oliver Ellsworth

356. Eugenie

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357. Edward Everett

358. Francisco Franco

359. Indira Gandhi

360. Otto Hahn

361. Conrad Hilton

362. J. Edgar Hoover

363. Ernest Jones

364. Ted Kennedy

365. Ted Kennedy

366. Horatio Kitchener

367. Huey P. Long

368. Massachusetts Bay

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369. Mother Teresa

370. Mother Teresa

371. Mother Teresa

372. Jawaharlal Nehru

373. Marina Oswald

374. Harry Gordon Selfridge

375. Vilhjalmur Stefansson and Rockwell Kent

376. Supreme Court Justices

377. Supreme Court: Louis D. Brandeis

378. Margaret Thatcher

379. Margaret Thatcher

380. Margaret Thatcher

381. Titanic Survivors

382. Titanic: Marshall Drew

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383. Titanic: William Logan Gwinn MB $200

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civil war The Collection of James W. Suggs Lots 384 - 459

Born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia, James W. Suggs grew up with the Civil War as a backdrop to daily life, fostering a deep passion for the subject that continues to this day. The great-grandson to five Confederate soldiers—three of whom served in Cutts’s artillery—and part of a large family that lived in Georgia going back generations, he grew up hearing firsthand accounts of life during the war. Mr. Suggs went on to transform this childhood interest into a remarkable collection of Confederate history. Beginning with his first investment—a three-volume set of Freeman’s masterpiece, Lee’s Lieutenants—his library has since grown to hundreds of volumes, meticulously cultivated to bring to life the stories of the Civil War through a myriad of different perspectives. Exploring old courthouses throughout the south in search of lost information, he discovered the war’s indelible stamp on each individual community; forever shaped by a lost generation of males and the experience of being conquered and occupied, the views and fortunes of the south’s inhabitants continue to reflect the hard lessons of the war. Decades of in-depth research, carefully committed to memory, enabled Mr. Suggs to identify rare, new content by obscure and often overlooked soldiers. He has painstakingly gathered letters and documents that contain eyewitness accounts of countless notable participants, providing undocumented perspectives and new insights into the Confederacy’s most important battles and generals. Hoping to preserve the memory of the war that shaped America and capture the interest of a new generation, Suggs has developed an outstanding assemblage of documents that let the modern observer meet the figures of the war not only as valiant, devoted soldiers, but also as regular men, frightened and uncertain at times. The remarkable items that follow have been personally arranged by Mr. Suggs, with the five gems of the collection beginning the tale, including a firsthand account of Lee at Spotsylvania, a tense letter from Jefferson Davis to Gideon Pillow, revisiting one of the greatest examples of incompetency in the War—Pillow’s decision to abandon his command at Fort Donelson—and an ironic letter from the South’s most controversial general, Braxton Bragg. Next come a choice selection of letters related to the Gettysburg Controversy, written by the men whose names remain eternally linked to the battle. Next are pieces from some of Robert E. Lee’s finest lieutenant generals, followed by the core of exemplary war-dated items. After that, a fantastic selection of recollections and remembrances put to paper following the war to ensure that the legacy of the Confederacy was written with the utmost accuracy. Next are the letters and documents tackling the subject of post-war politics—including an excellent letter from John S. Mosby tracing the “negro policy” through the presidencies of Cleveland, McKinley, and Roosevelt—and finally a unique selection of interesting stories and notable characters. Mr. Suggs’s collection is one of the finest and most insightful representations of the rebel cause that we have ever come across, and we are thrilled to present it in the following pages.

106 | April 16, 2014 | CIVIL WAR


“Gen. Lee rode up and down the line rallying our troops not more than 50 yards from the Yankees. I look for him to fall every minute” 384. Confederate Courier Robert P. McPheeters. Young

Confederate courier (1845–1921). ALS signed “Bobbie,” eight pages, lightly-lined on two sets of adjoining sheets, 5 x 8, May 9 and 11, 1864. Letter to his aunt regarding the bloody Spotsylvania Virginia Campaign of May 1864, penned on the 9th in ink and 11th in pencil. In part: “Since I wrote last I have seen terrible times. Went on courier yesterday morning, and on our relay I heard the first bullets whistle. We went down about the middle of our lines to Gen. Ewell’s headquarters and the Yankees shelled our men, some while I was there. We were about 100 yards from our line at a house but they were not long before they sent one to Gen. Early…[he] was sent to head them with a portion of A. P. Hill’s command. Hill’s Division and I rode about 10 miles around and found him just fixing his men in line of battle. I gave him the dispatch and he read and told me to stay with him awhile, so I followed him in. He lead the sharpshooters and the minnie balls rattled around us like hail...the Yanks throw grapeshot and shell, but our men drove them back so Old Jubal sent me back with the news to Lee, and that was at two o’clock. I hardly got back here until the shells commenced coming like fury and made the air hideous with their noise and the ground fairly shook. Some of the shells came very close, but most went over us into a piece of woods behind us. One shell struck within 15 feet of Gen. Lee ...and one minnie struck a peach tree just over our heads and hit Gen. Lee’s horse’s saddle, but did not go in...if it had not been that Gen. Lee was so close and rallied our men, the day would have been lost and dear knows what would of been the consequence, as that was the middle of our lines. Gen. Lee rode up and down the line rallying our troops not more than 50 yards from the Yankees. I look for him to fall every minute. Col. Taylor had his horse wounded under him twice and the shells and minnie balls flew thick as hail. Oh, it was an awful time…but our men took the works again and also a stand of colors and killed a Yankee General between our two lines. Our loss was not much compared with the times…This is the 7th or 8th day of the fight…Some old soldier said yesterday evening’s fight was the hottest they ever was in. I hope the fight will be over soon.” In fine condition, with a few small edge tears and creases. While countless articles, books, and analyses have been written regarding the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, this outstanding firsthand account by Lee’s courier provides an entirely new perspective on the general’s actions at the ‘horseshoe.’ Placing him at the center of the action, riding up and down the line, fearlessly rallying the troops under intense gunfire, it gives previously undocumented detail into his location and behavior during the fight. A remarkable and highly important new look at the awe-inspiring General Lee. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

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Lashing out at an incompetent former general for his “accusations or disparaging reflections” made against the Confederate leader 385. Jefferson Davis. ALS, one page, 5 x 7, Memphis, December 20, 1870.

Letter to General Gideon Johnson Pillow. In full: “Your remarks of last evening suggested that you had accusations or disparaging reflections to make in regard to me, which were suppressed for the occasion; I therefore invite you to the full expression of whatever you have to say against me.” In very good to fine condition, with light dampstaining affecting the left side of the page, not impacting the boldness or legibility of any words. Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope, addressed in Davis’s hand. Pillow replied the same day, declining to discuss past events and assuring Davis that he must have misunderstood—the response concluded with Pillow telling Davis, ‘It seemed to me then, as it does now, that your manifestation of temper did me injustice.’ After abandoning his command during the Battle of Fort Donelson, surrendering over 12,000 troops to Grant, Pillow was suspended by Davis for ‘grave errors in judgment in the military operations which resulted in the surrender of the army’—the pointed “then” that Pillow referred to in his reply. At the time of this letter, Pillow was embroiled in a lawsuit in Memphis, having been sued for confiscating a coal mine owned by northern businessmen in 1861, even before Tennessee had seceded—the coal yard was quickly sold for $125,000 and used to arm and equip Tennessee troops. After the war, the firm brought suit against Pillow for damages, and the case was pending for five years—on December 27, 1870, a week after Davis’s letter, Pillow was ordered to compensate them in the amount of $35,000. A great piece of testy correspondence between the controversial Confederates. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

The rebel general looks back on the war, seeking Lee’s, Jackson’s, and Longstreet’s accounts of Second Manassas, Antietam, and Gettysburg 386. John Bell Hood. Scarce ALS signed “J. B. Hood,” three pages

on two sheets, 5.25 x 8, The Ebbitt letterhead, January 12, 1878. Letter to a general sent while amassing information for his memoirs. In part: “I would be glad to have copies of the following papers & extracts... Extract from Generals Lee & Jackson in regard to port taken by my troops in the battle of Gaines Mill, & date of same. Extracts from Lee & Longstreet reports of the battle of 2nd Manassas. Extracts from Lee’s, Longstreet’s & Jackson’s of the battle of Sharpsburg or Antietam, & date thereof, also the date of the battle of Boonsboro Gap just prior thereto. Extract from Lee’s & Longstreet’s reports of the battle of Fredericksburg with date of battle. Extracts from Lee’s & Longstreet’s reports of the battle of Gettysburg with date.” Professionally inlaid into larger off-white sheets. In fine condition, with various office notations. Hood’s memoirs were entitled Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate States Armies, which he wrote in part to justify his actions during the war and refute misleading remarks by Joseph E. Johnston and William T. Sherman. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

108 | April 16, 2014 | CIVIL WAR


“When the great battle of Armigeddon comes on, if we conquer you, I will protect you” 387. John C. Breckinridge. Following his term as vice president under James Bu-

chanan, Breckinridge served nine months as a senator from Kentucky before declaring his loyalty to his state and the Confederacy in December of 1861. He later became the Confederacy’s final Secretary of War, promoting Lee to commander of all Confederate forces as his first act. Fantastic ALS, one page, 7.5 x 9.75, May 13, 1856, just two weeks before he would accept the nomination as Buchanan’s running mate. Letter to Governor James Grimes of Iowa. In part: “My nephew, Walter R. Bullock, has settled as a lawyer in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, and desires to be commissioner to take acknowledgements on deeds in and for Iowa. He is a young man of good attainments, rather superior talents and fine character. If you can send him a commission…I will regard it as a personal favor to myself…When the great battle of Armigeddon [sic] comes on, if we conquer you, I will protect you on the score of old acquaintance. If you conquer us, I expect the same conduct on your part, for the same reason.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds. An amazing letter penned a year prior to Breckinridge taking office as vice president, anticipating a forthcoming war between the states as inevitable—a surprising acknowledgment, given that he was generally considered an opponent of secession and inclined to compromise. Most chilling, however, is his accurate prediction of the apocalyptic, bloody warfare yet to come, as the Civil War would be the bloodiest in American history. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

“I abhor a controversy” 388. Braxton Bragg. ALS, one page, lightly-lined both sides,

5 x 7.75, no date but circa 1872. Letter to Henry B. Dawson, editor of Historical Magazine. In full: “Renewing my thanks for your courtesy and recalling my letter of 27th June ’72, I beg to enclose copies of some records calculated to remove erroneous impressions produced by Gen. Hill’s letter to Gen. Breckinridge dated 26 Oct. 1863 and published by you in June ’72. I regret the long delay and hope Gen. Hill’s letter may be republished so as to put the whole case together. I have many other valuable documents which should see the light but have not the time to copy and prepare them. These papers are submitted for your use and in your way—and not by me—for of all things, and especially in our present condition, I abhor a controversy.” A noticeable vertical fold, trivial area of paper loss to one corner, and some mild foxing, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by an unsigned portrait. Following the Civil War, Historical Magazine began to feature previously unpublished letters which disclosed internal intrigue, feuds, controversies, and general discord within the Southern ranks—a tabloid-esque, firsthand depiction of the generals that had not been seen before by the public. In the letter from Hill to Breckinridge referred to here (actually published in February 1872), Hill addresses issues that arose between him, Bragg, and Leonidas Polk following the Battle of Chickamuga. Despite a Confederate victory, Bragg suspended Polk from command because of a delay in attacking the Union line; Polk, in turn, laid the blame on Hill. Meanwhile, Hill and other officers under Bragg’s command criticized him for failing to pursue Union troops as they retreated, submitting a statement to Jefferson Davis that Bragg was unfit to lead. The end result was that Bragg retained his position, Polk was reassigned, and Hill was left without a command. In the published letter, Hill writes that he had made amends with Polk, but Bragg was just trying to please President Davis and account for his own failures. Bragg, who was one of the Confederacy’s least-liked and most controversial generals due to his argumentative nature and generally sour disposition, making his claim that he “abhors a controversy” especially interesting. He clearly disagreed with Hill’s assessment and sought to set the record straight—even a decade later he continued fighting battles with his detractors, making this a perfectly characteristic letter by the hardheaded Confederate. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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The Gettysburg Controversy A caustic and pointed remark attributed to the soft-spoken General Lee, who seldom addressed the Gettysburg controversy 389. Jubal A. Early.

ALS signed “J. A. Early,” two pages, lightly-lined both sides, 7.5 x 9.75, March 17, 1872. Letter to General Fitz Lee. In part: “The great point which I wished to enforce was that General Lee was not responsible for the failure to gain a decisive victory at Gettysburg, and that if his plans had been carried out on the second day, after he decided to fight there, we would have had the victory. I had no hesitation in intimating that Longstreet’s delay lost us the battle, because he has deserted to the enemy, and he has made some statements…that are exceedingly unjust to General Lee. It is but fair retaliation on him. I did not care to be the critic of others…Many persons seem to think that if we had gone on to the heights the first evening, the victory would have been won at once…It would have been an advantage to us certainly to have gained those heights on the 1st day, but not such a one as generally supposed—whether the position stated by Meade would have been more favorable to us, I do not know, as I know nothing of the grounds. Some officer once undertook to say to General Lee, that it was a great mistake to fight at Gettysburg according to his opinion, and the general in that peculiar and quiet way of his, said: ‘Why didn’t you tell me that before—even as stupid a man as I am can see that now.’ This was a very just and telling criticism on all those prophets, who could so well foretell things—after they had happened.” Tape-repaired partial separations to intersecting folds, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

“It was just another case of Longstreet’s failure, just as he did frequently—notably at Seven Pines, where he did nothing and claimed everything” 390. Frank Huger. Confederate artillerist (1837–1897) directly responsible for the bombardment that preceded Pickett’s Charge. TLS, one page, 8.25 x 11, Norfolk and Western Railroad Co. letterhead, April 28, 1896. Letter to General Fitzhugh Lee. In part: “I have all the authorities you refer to, and have noted them just as carefully as I did that the battle of Gettysburg, as far as I know, which was the 2nd and 3rd day, was the most disjointed I was ever in. I do not know what time it was when I walked to our right and returned with Genl. Lee and when he told me that Hood’s Division would not remain in line of battle on our front during the attack that it would be made by us in the center, but my impression is that it was about an hour and a half or two hours before the attack commenced, by the opening of the artillery fire. There was nothing said, as far as I heard, about hurrying Longstreet up, but rather that the attack was determined upon and was so announced. But why it was not made in greater force was a mystery to me then, and I felt that a great mistake had and must have been made by somebody, and that such was the case has to my mind been abundantly demonstrated since. It was just another case of Longstreet’s failure, just as he did frequently—notably at Seven Pines, where he did nothing and claimed everything, in which he was backed up by Genl. Johnston, who should have known, and I will always think did know, better when he wrote his report.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature). Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. Longstreet was held as one of the main scapegoats for the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg—common opinion was that he failed to attack as strongly as General Lee intended on July 2, just as Huger recalls in this letter, and Pickett’s Charge occurred under Longstreet’s command the following day. An exceptional letter with content about both Gettysburg and Longstreet, whose legacy remains one of the most controversial of the war. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 110 | April 16, 2014 | CIVIL WAR


Huger addresses the postwar “Gettysburg controversy” in a lengthy recollection of the battle’s events

391. Frank Huger. Confederate artillerist who most notably served at the Battle of Gettysburg, supporting Longstreet’s attack and taking

control of the guns preceding Pickett’s Charge. TLS, three pages, 8.25 x 11, Norfolk and Western Railroad Co. letterhead, April 24, 1896. Letter to General Fitz Lee. In part: “Your reference to that old Gettysburg matter makes me recall that on the morning of the 3rd day Genl. Lee seemed to have been advised that he should extend our right. He came to the vicinity of the peach orchard in the morning and sent a courier in to me, (I was then in command of Alexander’s battalion), to say he would like to see Genl. Alexander. I sent him word that Genl. Alexander had left me between 4:00 and 5:00 oclock [sic] that morning and I had not seen him since. The courier then returned with the request that I would join Genl. Lee and party, which I did—on the Emmettsburg road back of the peach orchard. There were quite a number in the party besides Genl. Lee, and I recall Genl. Longstreet and Genl. A.P. Hill. I am not sure about Walter Taylor, but I think either he or Talcott were there, and a good many others….I advised Genl. Lee not to go into the ‘open,’ because the picket lines at that point were running disagreeably near to the road. Genl. Lee then said ‘Gentlemen we will dismount here and I will go a little on the right with Col. Huger.’ This he did, made a careful reconnaissance…and remarked to me that the condition of affairs he found on the right were different from what he had been led to expect, and, after a few minutes, returned to the group of officers. Longstreet was partially lying on the ground, and A.P. Hill was sitting on the top rail of a dilapidated fence, and the others were scattered about. Genl. Lee seemed in a very serious mood…and remarked…‘Gentlemen we will mount now and return to our post and carry out our original intention of attacking these people in the center.’ I…kept a close watch on Longstreet and A.P. Hill’s face when Genl. Lee made this announcement, and I did not discover that either of them were anxious or spoiling for the prospective fight. They then mounted their horses, and I on foot accompanied them…until I got to the path that turned off to my battalion, when I bade Genl. Lee and the other gentlemen good bye. The General very kindly extended his hand to me, and while shaking me by the hand remarked that he was going to attack these people in the center, and ‘I hope you won’t let us get in any trouble while this is going on’; to which I replied that we were in a good position, had a strong line of defense, and supported by Hood’s and McLaw’s Division they could not make any impression on us and that we would not get in any trouble in that vicinity; to which he replied by a kind of gesture throwing off my hand, that ‘you are not going to have Hood’s Division, as that will be used to assist in the attack’…he told me in the presence of several people that he was going to use Hood’s Division…about an hour and a half or two hours before the attack took place…I have been watching with a great deal of interest this Gettysburg controversy in all its phases, and have read Longstreet’s book,—a tissue of nonsense, that he had better have died before ever having written.” In fine condition, with the text a shade or two light. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. Longstreet had published his autobiography, From Manassas to Appomattox, earlier in 1896, which invigorated discussion of the ‘Gettysburg controversy’—namely, who was responsible for the Confederate defeat. Huger’s detailed account of the planning stages for Gettysburg offers an exceptional behind-the-scenes view of Confederate tactics and decision making in anticipation of what became the Civil War’s most famous battle. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) www.RRAuction.com | 111


A vivid firsthand account of Gettysburg: “Gen’l. Lee’s Army was not ‘crushed,’ nor was it de-moralized—It was repulsed with very heavy loss of life” 392. John D. Imboden.

Lawyer, teacher, and Confederate officer (1823–1895) most active in the Virginia area. ALS signed “J. D. Imboden,” four pages both sides, lightly-lined, 8.5 x 11, Damascus Enterprise Company letterhead, August 4, 1891. Letter to S. O. Dounde. In part: “I will here state… that Gen’l. Lee’s Army was not ‘crushed,’ nor was it demoralized—It was repulsed with very heavy loss of life, and had to retire to the South Side of the Potomac…we retired in perfect order, taking all of our unexpended material of war—and all our artillery and small arms, that had escaped the casualties of battle, together with our transportation which was under my immediate escort to Williamsport on the Potomac. On the night after the great battle, July 3rd, 1863, General Lee sent for me…I was then with him till perhaps 2 AM of the 4th discussing the order of our retreat, and receiving his instructions for the part I was to perform….Lee undoubtedly felt most keenly his disappointment in failing to defeat Genl. Meade and drive him back upon Washington. But that he felt that either he, or his army were ‘crushed’ never entered my mind then, nor afterwards...As he dismissed me, he followed me out of his tent to tell me confidentially that he would prepare & send to me by a Staff Officer early next morning a sealed package for President Davis, for me to carry on my own person, till I reached the river, and then to forward it by a trusted officer, with all expedition possible to Richmond—and said he ‘at the risk of your life it must not fall into the hands of the enemy. If you are attacked, as is probable, and if you are in danger of being over powered destroy the package.’ That paper was his first brief report of the battle—and I put it safely through. On the 7th 8th & 9th being unable to cross the swollen river till a bridge was prepared, I was repeatedly at Genl. Lee’s Hd. Quarters…and there met many of his leading Generals—notably Genl. Longstreet…Genl Lee arose to greet him by extending his hand and cordially exclaiming ‘Well how is my old war horse this wet morning?’… [Then] I withdrew, feeling exhilarated by the cheerful spirits of my distinguished superior officers, one of whom I regarded as invincible and unconquerable—our adored Genl. Lee—and the other as his then Chief Lieutenant, since the death of the matchless ‘Stonewall’ Jackson. I felt, as we all did, that final triumph was only delayed by temporary failure at Gettysburg—and I think our whole army shared these feelings of absolute confidence.” In fine condition, with mounting remnants to edges. While on this mission to deliver the first report on the Battle of Gettysburg to Jefferson Davis, Imboden was also in charge of escorting the wagon trains of thousands of wounded soldiers back to Virginia. As mentioned in the letter, they encountered the flooded Potomac River, leaving them trapped and vulnerable. When Union cavalry generals John Buford and Judson Kilpatrick attacked, Imboden’s cavalry fought a rear-guard action to save the Confederate wagon train, earning him high praise from Robert E. Lee, who spoke of the way in which he ‘gallantly repulsed’ the Union cavalry. A positively exceptional letter brimming with content regarding the war’s greatest generals and battles. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

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Longstreet agrees to share recollections of the legendary battle 393. James Longstreet. Superb ALS, one page, lightly-lined, 5.5 x 9, August

26, 1875. Letter to T. H. Davis & Co. of Philadelphia. In full: “I have just received your favor of the 19th instant with inclosure [sic], and your [account of] Gettysburg. I shall take pleasure in looking carefully over your account of it, and if I find that I may, will say how far my recollection agrees with yours.” In fine condition, with central vertical and horizontal folds (vertical fold passing through the last letter of his first name). Letters from Longstreet with direct reference to Gettysburg, the battle with which his name is eternally linked, are incredibly scarce and highly sought after. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“He seems obsessed with the idea that it is necessary to make a scapegoat of Longstreet at Gettysburg to save the reputation of Lee” 394. Helen Dortch Longstreet. Second wife (1863–1962) of

Confederate General James Longstreet. TLS, one page, 8.5 x 11, April 17, 1951. Letter to Kenneth E. Crouch of the Bedford Democrat. In part: “This will thank you for the copy of the Bedford Democrat containing the thrilling description of the dedication of the McLean House at Appomattox. General Longstreet was appointed by Lee, Senior Commissioner to arrange terms of surrender in that house now historic. It would have given me a patriotic thrill to witness the brilliant ceremonies. But the Committee forgot to invite me. It is observed that Douglas Freeman was a shining figure in the dedication. For a number of years Dr. Freeman has been circulating diatribes against General Longstreet’s military reknown [sic] which are false. He seems obsessed with the idea that it is necessary to make a scapegoat of Longstreet at Gettysburg to save the reputation of Lee. But Lee’s great fame has never needed the sacrifice of the Commander of the First Corps of his mighty Army.” A political ad for Mrs. Longstreet’s gubernatorial campaign is printed on the reverse of the letter. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Addressing controversy surrounding Pickett’s Charge: “Gen. Lee said that the responsibility & blame were all his own” 395. Charles Marshall. Aide-de-camp to Robert E. Lee during the Civil War (1830–1902) and author of General Order No. 9, Lee’s famous farewell address. Exceptional ALS, five pages on three sheets, 5 x 8, personal letterhead, no date but circa 1880s. Letter to C. C. Buel, an editor of Battles and Leaders, refuting a claim regarding where Lee was at the time of Pickett’s Charge. In part: “Gen. Lee’s position at the time of the attack of July 3rd was on a ridge in rear of the line of battle…until it became evident that his troops were retiring from the attack. He then rode forward and met them. The first man nearly he encountered was General Kemper (afterwards Gov. Kemper) of Va. who was being borne to the rear very badly wounded, and it was to Gen. K. that Gen. Lee said that the responsibility & blame were all his own. He occupied himself & all his staff unengaged after the retreat of the attacking force (which was composed in part of Pickett’s division) in rallying…expecting that the enemy would pursue...He went in the morning of July 2nd (I think, but) possibly July 3rd into a building that was called a ‘College’ to make an observation of the field. At that time, there was no fighting going on, beyond an occasional shot in the patrol line, and whether it was the 2nd or 3rd of July, Pickett’s division had not then reached the battlefield. Gen. Lee took the position in rear of the line of battle before our artillery fire opened, and did not leave it until he saw that our men were falling back…what [Mr. Clegg] writes does not seem new to me, and as far as it concerns Gen. Lee, and as far as it undertakes to describe the advance of Pickett, it is a pure fiction.” In a lengthy postscript, signed “C. M.,” Marshall continues his attack on Clegg’s claims, in part: “What he writes is such trash.” A few trivial stains and some slight surface loss to edges of the second sheet, otherwise fine condition. Lee ordered Pickett’s Charge on the last day of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863, in what ended up being a catastrophic defeat for the Confederacy. He gambled everything on the ‘charge,’ and the disastrous result—with a 50% casualty rate for the Confederates—effectively decided the outcome of the bloodiest engagement in American history. This marked not only a definitive moment in the battle, but a turning point in the war—the Confederate advance at Gettysburg is considered the ‘high-water mark of the Confederacy,’ and Lee’s strategic decisions have been a source of controversy and scrutiny ever since. Pickett never forgave Lee for ordering the assault, and even Lee himself immediately recognized his grave tactical error—the ‘mistake of all mistakes’—as Marshall describes here. An amazing letter addressing this most famous event, penned by a confidant of the South’s commander and a direct participant in the battle.Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

War-Dated 396. Robert H. Anderson. Confederate cavalry and artillery officer (1835–1888). Civil War–dated manuscript DS, signed “R. H. Anderson,” one page, lightly-lined, 6.75 x 9.5, April 3, 1865. A report on Confederate casualties during the first quarter of 1865, tallying the soldiers killed, wounded, or missing from Anderson’s brigade, which was comprised of the 3rd, 8th, and 10th Confederate regiments, and 5th Georgia regiment. Boldly signed in the field by Anderson as the commanding brigadier general. In very good condition, with the table counting casualties very light but mostly legible, uniform toning, and a rough left edge. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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“The President is very desirous that the companies furnish their own Mountain rifles” 397. Henry Heth. Confederate

general (1825–1899) generally blamed for inadvertently starting the Battle of Gettysburg. Civil War–dated ALS signed “H. Heth,” three pages on two adjoining sheets, 5.25 x 8, Richmond, Virginia, June 26, 1861. Letter to General John B. Floyd. In part: “I shall be compelled to remain here for a few days longer…I hope for the good of the cause…I can get medical supplies, not before I have made out to-day, and get approved, requisitions for clothing & garrison equipage, drums, &c for Reynold’s Regt. Please send to me by telegraph the names of the parties you desire appointed Regimental Commissaries of Subsistence, one for each Regiment…I will follow up the nominations and get them appointed…Tent cloth can not be furnished, but new tents will. No chance of getting up a Band. Fering will come up with me, some difficulty about Hood. I sent a reliable person all over town yesterday to hunt up bakers…the best chance will be at Lynchburg…The President is very desirous that the companies furnish their own Mountain rifles. I wrote to Maj. Ramseur… whom Banks informs me had a fair Company of Artillery horses, cannon & all the necessary equipments. I told him you would accept his Company in your brigade…Ramseur says a fight is now going on near Yorktown.” Heth adds a brief postscript, signed “H. H.,” on the reverse of the last page, in full: “Plan to telegraph me, say when and I will try and hurry them up.” Second integral page is professionally inlaid into a slightly larger sheet. In fine condition, with central vertical and horizontal folds. Heth resigned his commission in the US Army when Fort Sumter was attacked, defecting to the CSA where he was was immediately employed by General Robert E. Lee as acting quartermaster general for the Virginia Provisional Army. Although he only served in this capacity for about a month—until May 1861—he made a lasting impression on Lee, who personally looked out for him for the rest of the war. He was then promoted to colonel of the 45th Virginia regiment, serving under John B. Floyd as inspector general in addition to leading his own regiment. It was during this time that Heth penned this letter to his superior about gathering supplies for the brigade, which was comprised of the 45th Virginia—led by Heth—and 50th Virginia, led by Alexander W. Reynolds, as mentioned here. It is especially interesting to note that Heth is still playing the role of quartermaster, responsible for distributing supplies and provisions, even though he had already been promoted to command his own regiment—it is clear from this letter that he had already established connections in Richmond, dropping the names of various people he had enlisted for help in acquiring the supplies needed. An excellent letter offering insight into the formation of the Confederate armies, as Heth scurries to gather troops, uniforms, guns, tents, and food in preparation for the impending fight. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Relaying orders to ready the cavalry for Manassas 398. Thomas Jordan. Confederate general and major operative in the network of Confederate spies during the Civil War (1819–1895). Civil War–dated LS, one page, lightly-lined, 7.75 x 9.75, July 10, 1861. Letter to General Richard S. Ewell. In part: “The General commanding desires that Officers…shall give particular and immediate attention to the drill, discipline, organization and administration of their respective commands….care must be taken against harassing the Cavalry force by scouts, for that arm of the service the General wishes kept in condition for the most efficient service in the field.” In fine condition, with light toning and slight show-through from docketing to reverse. An interesting war-dated circular sent from Beauregard’s camp at Manassas Junction just eleven days before the First Battle of Bull Run. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Johnston looks forward to an 1861 meeting with Longstreet in Northern Virginia, hoping to build “an efficient reserve for the army” 399. Joseph E. Johnston. Civil War–dated ALS signed “J. E. Johnston,” one page both sides, 5.25 x 8.25, September 17, 1861. Letter to a general. In full: “You asked for Calhoun’s battery this morning—I promised it. A promise must be kept, but for the efficiency of our organization, an equal (proportional I should have said) distribution of our artillery will be necessary. I want to separate an efficient reserve for the army—including what is available for that purpose, you have now almost twice as much as the Shenandoah Troops—Let us arrange this matter systematically & deliberately. I would like to visit Longstreet with you—if it would suit you. If so, when will you go—perhaps Col. Miller would like the ride.” Johnston also adds a brief postscript, in full: “I send for your perusal two notes from Genls Holmes & Trimble.” Intersecting folds, trivial adhesive remnants to one edge, and slight show-through from writing to opposing sides, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by an unsigned portrait. In August 1861, Confederate forces under James Longstreet pushed toward Washington, extending their position to Munson’s, Upton’s and Mason’s hills, which offered ideal panoramic views of the entire area, including the federal capital and Bailey’s Crossroads. They erected an earthworks there, which is likely where Johnston desired to have his strategic meeting with Longstreet. A great letter from early in the war, associating Generals Johnston, Longstreet, Holmes, and Trimble. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

The general declines a visit to the Confederacy’s notorious Andersonville prison: “As soon as the campaign opens in Western Virginia I have to return to my Brigade” 400. John D. Imboden. Civil War–dated ALS signed “J. D. Imboden,” one page, 8

x 10, March 1, 1865. Letter to Colonel George C. Gibbs, a commander at the post of Andersonville Prison. In part: “I thank you cordially for your kind invitation should I be able to go to Andersonville, that pleasure I fear will be denied to me. Mrs. Imboden’s health is very precarious...Should she improve with the advance of spring I will try and take her on a journey further South, for change of scene and air for a week or two previous to our return to Virginia. In that event I shall have great pleasure in making upon personal acquaintance and that of Mrs. Gibbs to whom please make my compliments,” adding a brief postscript, “As soon as the campaign opens in Western Virginia I have to return to my Brigade now in winter quarters in Pendleton County in the depths of the mountains.” Intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature), and writing a few shades light but legible, otherwise fine condition. Andersonville, known for the horrific conditions for the prisoners held there, was liberated in May of 1865 by Union forces. The recipient of this letter, George C. Gibbs, was responsible only for the troops assigned at the prison, while General Henry Wirz controlled the actual prison operations—following the war, Wirz became the only Confederate official to be tried and convicted of war crimes, for which he was hanged. Uncommon war-dated content referencing the infamous prison.Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Four Confederate generals sign off to replace a “horse having been killed in action” 401. Fitzhugh Lee, W. C. Wickham, G. Moxley Sorrel, and Thomas T. Munford. Civil War–dated ink endorsements

of Fitzhugh Lee, W. C. Wickham, G. Moxley Sorrel, and Thomas T. Munford on the reverse of a document, one page, 7.75 x 5, August 31, 1864. Document requesting a replacement for a “horse having been killed in action.” In very good condition, with intersecting folds and light staining. All four generals were significant contributors to the Confederate cause—Lee was a top cavalry commander, Wickham was a politician and important cavalry general who fought in the Virginia campaigns, Sorrell was an officer under Longstreet and historian of the Confederacy, and Munford was a key leader in the Maryland Campaign. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

On Fredericksburg: “The casualties was terrible & their loss heavier than in any fight I have seen—they have completely riddled the town”

402. Thomas T. Munford. Farmer and soldier from Virginia (1831-1918), he became a brigadier general in the Confederate Army during

the war, serving most notably at the Battle of Five Forks. Civil War–dated ALS, six pages on two adjoining lightly-lined sheets [a crossed letter, with both sides of the first sheet containing vertical and horizontal writing], 5 x 8, December 22, 1862. Letter to his sister-in-law. In part: “We were not in the fight at Fredericksburg. My Regt was on the Right Flank & under fire all day. Had one man wounded from their sharpshooters.—I am still in hopes the Sect of War will give my Regt. a place where it will be more agreeable to us all—I like Genl. Lee very well, he is certainly a gentleman & a good officer but would greatly prefer being on detached service than to be cramped & starved to death. I am sorry not to be able to give you my account of the fight at Fredericksburg, we could only see a small portion of their Army during the Fight there, the casualties was [sic] terrible & their loss heavier than in any fight I have seen—they have completely riddled the town…Rumor says Burnside has been superseded & Hooker in command.—They are much demoralized and I do not believe will fight as hard again—but the Powers that be think differently.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope and a modern typed transcript. At the time of writing, Munford was leading the 2nd Virginia Cavalry in Fitzhugh Lee’s brigade but, as he mentions in the letter, saw little action at Fredericksburg. Despite his poor view of the action, his assessment of Union casualties was correct—it was one of the most lopsided battles of the Civil War, with the Confederate Army inflicting over 12,000 casualties while suffering just over 5,000. In addition to its superb content, this is an especially interesting example of a ‘crossed’ letter, a technique employed due to the scarcity of paper at the time. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) www.RRAuction.com | 117


403. Walter Taylor. Confederate officer (1838–1916) who served as an aide to Robert E. Lee. Civil War–dated ink signature, “W. H. Taylor, A. A. G.,” on an off-white 6 x 2.5 slip clipped from a larger document issued by the command of J. E. B. Stuart and approved by Robert E. Lee, April 25, 1864. In very good condition, with two vertical folds (one passing through a single letter of the signature) and a few light stains. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Transfer of a cavalryman under Hardee’s command 404. Army of Tennessee. Civil War–dated document, one page,

7.75 x 9.75, December 14, 1863. Special Orders No. 320 issued by the headquarters of the Army of Tennessee under Lieutenant General Hardee. In full: “Private Jack Lipscomb 51st Ala. Cav. being a dismounted cavalry man is transferred to Co. ‘G’ 22nd Ala. Regt.” In fine condition, with expected document wear. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

405. Robert H. Chilton. Confederate brigadier general who served as the Chief of Staff for the Army of Northern Virginia under Robert E. Lee (1815–1879). Partly-printed DS, signed “R. H. Chilton,” one page, 7.75 x 10, April 28, 1862. Special Orders No. 92 issued by the Adjutant and Inspector General’s Office, accepting the resignation of “Rev’d T. D. Witherspoon, Chaplain 2nd Mississippi Volunteers.” In very good condition, with partial edge separations to storage folds and irregular overall toning. After this, Witherspoon became chaplain of the 42nd Mississippi and fought alongside them at Gettysburg, where he was captured by Union forces and subsequently imprisoned at Fort McHenry. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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“You will relieve the officer from duty at once” 406. Alexander Lawton. Lawyer,

politician, and Confederate general from Georgia (1818–1896). Wardated LS signed “A. R. Lawton,” one page, lightly-lined both sides, 7.5 x 9.5, November 18, 1864. Letter to Major Smith at Augusta, Georgia, ordering him to dismiss a soldier. In part: “This bureau has been furnished with the information from adjutant and inspector general’s office of the charges against Captain S. S. Walker, an officer under your orders, and the order of the assistant Sec’y of War referring the papers to the department commander, with directions for the officer to be brought before the military court for trial, with an endorsement from Genl. Hardee, the present Dept commander, stating that after, under those directions, charges had been prepared and referred to the military court for trial, the case had to be indefinitely continued, owing to the non-attendance of the accused, caused by yourself, calling attention to your conduct in suspending orders from his headquarters…A more proper course would have been to obey the order under protest, and to have forwarded those facts to this office, since, if the proceeding was contrary to law or regulations, it was far more proper for the chief of this bureau to have taken the necessary action to correct the error….You will relieve the officer from duty at once, if not already done, so that he may be held to meet the charges proposed against him by the department command.” Slight paper loss to one corner and light toning, otherwise fine condition. A harsh letter demonstrating disarray and dissension within the Confederate army as the war neared its conclusion. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Just six months before leading Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg 407. George E. Pickett. Virginia-born Confederate of-

ficer (1825–1875) who famously led the eponymous ill-fated charge at Gettysburg. Civil War–dated ink endorsement signature, “G. E. Pickett,” on an off-white 3 x 2.5 slip clipped from a larger document, filled out in another hand, “#246, Hd. Qrs. Picketts Divis., Jany. 14, 1863, Appvd & respectfully forward[ed].” Intersecting folds and toned adhesive remnants (affecting the last few letters of the signature) and some scattered soiling, otherwise very good condition. At the time this was signed, Pickett and his division were encamped in the rear of Lee’s army on the Rappahannock River, below Fredericksburg, where they saw little action. Pickett is scarce in any form, and war-dated examples are particularly sought after. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

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Scarce letter from the governor killed at Second Manassas 408. John Hugh Means. Governor

of South Carolina (1812–1862) and Confederate infantry colonel killed in action at the Second Battle of Manassas on August 30, 1862. ALS signed “J. H. Means,” one page both sides, 7.75 x 9.75, May 20, 1860. Letter to General Jones. In part: “I have ordered the necessary alterations to be made, which I hope will be finished in time for our next services. Mrs. M. says that you ought to have consulted your wife about taste, in the arrangement of colours, that you ought not to have given me a red scarf, with yellow sash…They are certainly much more showy, & will add to the ‘pomp & circumstance’ of glorious ‘peace’…In respect to the memory of Gen. Noble I have an idea of ordering all my officers to appear on a parade with crape on their sword hilts.” In very good condition, with significant tape-repaired separations to intersecting folds and light show-through from writing to opposing sides. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Extremely rare autograph predicting “great loss and detriment” to troops in North Carolina 409. William Henry Whiting. US Army officer (1824–1865) who resigned after 16 years of service to join the Confederate States Army in the Civil War. Civil War–dated ANS signed “W. H. C. Whiting, Maj. Genl.,” one page, 6.75 x 8, August 16, 1864. Whiting forwards a request for a detail of 100 carpenters to be sent to Wilmington, North Carolina, for building shelter. In full: “Respt. forwarded to the War Dept. Maj. Cameron is entirely right and his request is approved. It is the more necessary now for the extraordinary demands for more housing due to the quarantine. Great loss and detriment must ensue between now and Novem. next unless these facilities are extended.” James Seddon also adds an initialed ANS beside Whiting’s note, in full: “These men cannot be spared from the active army. They may be detailed from the reserves, if to be found.” In very good condition, with intersecting folds, docketing notations over Whiting’s signature, and a few small stains. Whiting material is rare in any form, and this wartime document—signed just six months before he would suffer fatal wounds at the Battle of Wilmington, as he and his troops attempted to defend the Confederacy’s last port on the Atlantic coast—is an especially desirable format. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Rare discharge certificate endorsed by the general shot from his horse during the Battle of Atlanta 410. William H. T. Walker. Career

United States Army officer (1816–1864) who went on to serve as a Confederate general. He was severely wounded many times in combat, and was killed in action during the 1864 Atlanta Campaign. Civil War–dated handwritten endorsement, “Respectfully forwarded and approved, W. H. T. Walker, Brig. Gen. A. S. G.,” on the reverse of a partly-printed DS, one page, 7.75 x 9.75, February 6, 1864. A certificate of disability for discharge issued to John W. Shaw, as “during the last two months said soldier has been unfit for duty forty days.” In fine condition, with a small edge separation to one fold and expected document wear. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Lee’s Lieutenant Generals To the editor of Southern Magazine, requesting “my reports of the taking of Morris Island and of the Battle of Drewry’s Bluff and my review of Pollard’s Lost Cause” 411. P. G. T. Beauregard. ALS signed “G. T.

Beauregard,” one page, lightly-lined both sides, 7.75 x 9.75, September 12, 1872. Letter to William Hand Browne, editor of Southern Magazine. In part: “My brother, misunderstanding my letter, sent to me instead of yourself the biographical sketch or the portion of it which he was able to furnish… My friend, William J. Marrin of New York, also has been spending the season with me, in the course of which he proposed that I should furnish him the material from which to write out such a sketch as you require for your purpose…I would ask you to send…the copies of your magazine containing my reports of the taking of Morris Island and of the Battle of Drewry’s Bluff and my review of Pollard’s Lost Cause, to aid him in his work.” Intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature), mild oval area of toning to reverse, and a tiny tape repair to one trivial edge separation, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Early mentions his stunning loss at the Battle of Cedar Creek 412. Jubal A. Early. Choice ALS signed “J. A. Early,” one page, 5.25 x 8.25, September 8, 1890. Letter to Ernest S. Park. In part: “General L[unsford] L. Lomax was commanding a division of cavalry at the time of the Battle of Cedar Creek, but being in the Luray valley he did not reach the battlefield, nor did any portion of his command do so. His address is now Blacksburg, Virginia. General John B. Gordon is now living and is governor of Georgia.” In fine condition. The Battle of Cedar Creek was the culminating battle of the 1864 Valley Campaigns, taking place on October 19, 1864, when Early launched a surprise attack against the encamped army of Philip Sheridan across Cedar Creek. The Union forces struggled to repel Early’s troops and took heavy losses until Sheridan dramatically rode in from Winchester and was able to rally his troops, leading them to a remarkable victory. This marked the last time the Confederacy was able to threaten Washington, DC, and the crushing defeat effectively ended their invasion of the North. A stunning letter from Early, mentioning what became one of the most important battles in ending the Civil War—the Union’s success brought Sheridan nationwide fame and was a significant factor in securing Lincoln’s reelection one month later. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

413. John B. Gordon. Confederate general (1832–1904) who

surrendered Lee’s army to Union General Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain at Appomattox Courthouse. After the war, he served as a senator from Georgia, as well as the state’s 53rd governor. TLS signed “J. B. Gordon,” one page, 8 x 10, US Senate letterhead, January 24, 1896. Letter to General Marcus Wright. In full: “I have yours of January 22nd. I shall be out of town for two or three days—until Monday. On my return I will be delighted to see you and your friend.” Intersecting folds and a few unobtrusive light stains, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The origins of the devastating ‘Apple Jack Raid’ 414. Wade Hampton. Confeder-

ate military officer and politician (1818–1902) who replaced J. E. B. Stuart as Lee’s Chief of Cavalry following Stuart’s death on the battlefield. A decade after the war, he was elected Governor of South Carolina, and later served as the state’s senator. ALS, eight pages, lightly-lined two sets of adjoining sheets, 4.75 x 8, September 14, 1867. Letter to Reverend John William Jones, former chaplain of the Army of Northern Virginia, who published The Personal Reminiscences of General Robert E. Lee in 1875. In part: “[Major Starke] was under the same impression that you were, getting it from the same source, that Hill changed his route on my advice not on discussing the matter, he supported the solution of the whole error. Gen. Lee wrote to me, to say that Hill had been ordered to move his command either in the direction of Stony Creek Depot or that of Bellefield, as he found necessary, & directing me to cooperate with him against the enemy. When he wrote this letter the movement of the enemy was not developed, & I did not receive this communication until Warren had passed Stony Creek & I was engaging him on the Halifax Road. About this same time the letter reached me, two of Hill’s staff joined me & I gave them full information of the position & movement of the enemy, telling them that I was sure that the movement was against Bellefield. I wrote too to Gen Hill to this effect & urged him to push on to Bellefield, saying that I should go there at once to check Warren. I have no doubt the mistake you were led into arose, & very naturally so, from this communication of mine to Hill. I did advise him go to Bellefield, but not until the enemy had passed the other point Stony Creek, & when indeed Hill himself was en route towards Bellefield. I thought that it was due to you to let you know these facts which explain fully how the misapprehension as to my advice to Hill came about, & which show that neither you or Hill’s staff were to blame in the slightest degree for the mistake. As you have done me the honor to select my name for a sketch, I give you some…which may assist you. After Gettysburg, l was promoted Maj. Gen. & I had command of the 1st Div. Cavy. of which I assumed cmd. just as the enemy attacked the 7th Jn. near Stevensburg. My Div. was engaged in all the subsequent movements of that campaign. On the 1st Mar. 64 Kilpatrick with 5000 men made his raid on Rd. We attacked him at him at Atlee’s Stn. with 275 men…drove him from his camp & took prisoners from 5 Regts. This attack was made at 12 o’clock at night in a snow-storm. When Grant crossed the Rapidan I moved up to Shady Grove & we participated in all the fights in Spotsylvania Co. After Stuart’s death his divisions were kept separate till the 11th when I was placed in cmd of the corps. On the 28th May, we had a very hard fight at Hawe’s Shop, where our loss was heavy & that of the enemy over 1000. Fought on the same ground on 3rd June & drove the enemy out.” In fine condition, with light toning. On December 7, 1864, Union general Gouverneur K. Warren was marching toward Stony Creek along the Weldon Railroad, destroying it along the way to disrupt the important Confederate supply line. Upon hearing of the Union’s movements, Hampton dispatched two divisions of his cavalry in pursuit; at the same time, General Lee sent the telegram that Hampton mentions in this letter, informing him that he had sent A. P. Hill out to intercept Warren before reaching Bellefield and Hicksford, two towns held by the Confederacy on opposite banks of the Meherrin River. Hill’s command could not catch up to Warren, but Hampton managed to engage him at Hicksford and prevented them from crossing the bridge to Bellefield, and Warren decided to withdraw. As the Union troops marched toward Petersburg they burnt everything in sight, often under the influence of ‘Apple Jack whiskey’ stolen from the townspeople, leading this skirmish to be informally known as the ‘Apple Jack Raid.’ Even though he had ultimately been repulsed, Warren did considerable damage to the Confederate supply line, which was not fully repaired until March 1865. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300) www.RRAuction.com | 123


“The ‘State’ asks me for a Christmas war song & I have told them of Dahlgren & Kilpatrick” 415. Wade Hampton. ALS, two pages, lightly-lined

on two adjoining sheets, 5 x 8, December 7, 1901. Letter to General Bradley Tyler Johnson. In part: “What has become of you? You have not written…I am nearly blind…The ‘State’ asks me for a Christmas war song & I have told them of Dahlgren & Kilpatrick & of your efficient aid in saving Richmond.” A vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature and some surface loss to left edge of the first page (slightly affecting some words), otherwise fine condition. An unusual piece of correspondence between elderly generals, reminiscing about their successes in battle—near the end of February 1864, Bradley Tyler Johnson was able to intercept a dispatch between Union generals Dahlgren and Kilpatrick, and led his small Confederate unit—outnumbered 50 to 1—in repelling their advance toward Richmond, forcing the Yankees to retreat. For this success, Johnson was lauded as ‘the savior of Richmond’ and at the time Hampton wrote to General Lee saying he was convinced that ‘the enemy could have taken Richmond, and in all probability would have done so, but for the fact that Colonel Johnson intercepted a dispatch from Dahlgren to Kilpatrick, asking what hour the latter had fixed for an attack on the city, so that both attacks might be simultaneous.’ Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“It is said that many of the Republican leaders are much displeased with the president’s deliberation” 416. Joseph E. Johnston. ALS signed “J. E. John-

ston,” two pages, lightly-lined, 5 x 8, March 18, 1889. Letter to the son of a “Mr. Halsey,” presumably fellow Confederate soldier Edwin Lindsley Halsey. In part: “I am very glad that [your father] writes to you often and cheerfully. Please tell him that he forgot to reply to my last letter. I hope that something else may turn up for him with all my heart. And that it may be where I can see him often. It is said that many of the Republican leaders are much displeased with the president’s deliberation in the matters of removing democrats. You will certainly see me the next time I visit New York.” In fine condition, with a trivial chip to lower right corner of the second page. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The ex-Confederate dreams of getting a high office appointment, but “nothing in my position in the South gives me a hope of ever doing so” 417. Joseph E. Johnston. ALS signed “J. E.

Johnston,” three pages on two sheets, 4.5 x 6.75, December 16, 1884. Letter to Julius L. Brown. In part: “I am very far from being indifferent to high office. On the contrary, I should like exceedingly to occupy one. But nothing in my position in the South gives me a hope of ever doing so. Then it seems to me that the president will not be much influenced by expressions of the wishes of communities in selecting the member of his Cabinet, but will be more guided by eminent friends. Would it not be well to postpone moving in such a matter while it is known what southern men are thought for the cabinet, and if they should be unsatisfactory to the south, then to suggest such as would be cheerfully accepted by our people? For myself, the Senior Georgia Senator would be my choice for the highest place.” In fine condition, with a small edge separation to one fold on the first page. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope, addressed in Johnston’s hand. After moving to Richmond, Johnston served two years as a Democratic congressman, but failed to secure a nomination for reelection in 1880. Despite his distinguished military career, favorable opinions from both Grant and Sherman, and strong ambition to hold office, this was his final position in government. An insightful letter from one of the Confederacy’s most renowned generals, struggling to find his place in the post-war American government. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

418. Stephen D. Lee. Soldier, planter, and legislator (1833-1908) who became

the youngest lieutenant general in the Confederate Army upon his promotion in June of 1864. TLS signed “S. D. Lee,” one page, 8.25 x 10.75, The Mississippi Historical Society letterhead, April 1, 1901. Letter to a gentleman. In part: “I do not think any formal notice has been given to the commission as to mark positions of troops at Vicksburg….I suggest a formal and official call be made to meet at Vicksburg April 15, 1901. This is the day suggested by the Park Commission.” Intersecting folds and scattered creases, otherwise fine condition. Lee had served in Vicksburg, and after the war was head of the Vicksburg National Park Association and an active member of the United Confederate Veterans society. An interesting letter preserving the memory of one of his most notable campaigns. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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S. D. Lee describes Sherman’s March to the Sea in a letter to Jefferson Davis 419. Stephen D. Lee. Soldier, planter, and legislator (1833-1908) who became the youngest lieutenant general in the Confederate Army

upon his promotion in June of 1864. ALS signed “S. D. Lee,” eight pages on two sets of adjoining sheets, 5 x 8, August 19, 1873. Letter to Jefferson Davis regarding the history of his service. In part: “As you know I was in Miss. till Aug. 27th 64, when I reported to Genl Hood to command a corps—the Battles of the 21 & 22, had been fought before Atlanta & Sherman had commenced & his movement to our left flank & rear which caused the fall of the city. Two divisions of my corps were engaged on the 28th July & my entire Corps. & Hardee’s at Jonesborro [sic] soon after in trying to check the movement of Sherman—we were not successful & the city was evacuated the day after the Battle of Jonesboro [sic] . A short time followed, & Genl Hood put his army in motion from its position south of Atlanta on the Atlanta & Macon R. Rd. for Palmetto Station on the Atlanta & West Point R. Rd. west of Atlanta, & on Sherman’s right—his object as I understood was to move with his entire army on Sherman’s flank & rear & if possible cause him to detach some of his corps…as would enable him to strike with some success, as he felt confident he could not successfully resist Sherman’s army in his march further south, after the fall of Atlanta.” In very good condition, with intersecting folds, a rusty paperclip mark and impression, light overall foxing, and a War Records stamp over Lee’s signature. Lee had been promoted to lieutenant general on June 23, 1864, and assigned to lead the Second Corps of Army of Tennessee, under the command of John Bell Hood. The key battle he took part in, as mentioned here, was the Battle of Jonesborough—the Confederate loss that finally allowed the besieged city of Atlanta to fall into Union hands. On the first day of fighting, Lee led a frontal assault on John A. Logan’s line but was repulsed in short order, suffering heavy, disproportionate losses, with his own men suffering over 1,300 casualties to a Union total of 179. An altogether exceptional letter describing Confederate tactics in what became a defining campaign of the Civil War. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Setting the Record Straight “He was killed at Sharpesburg” 421. William R. Cox. Confederate general (1832–1919) who suffered at least eleven combat wounds and was a three-term member of the House of Representatives. DS, signed “Wm. R. Cox,” one page, 7.5 x 11.5, May 18, 1881. Official War Department document outlining Cox’s career and progression through the ranks in the CSA, filled out in another hand with a few corrections by Cox as well as a lengthy explanation in his own hand, in part: “I was appointed June, 2d N. C. S. T. at the organization of the Regt. Col Tew was Colonel. He was killed at Sharpsburg thereupon Lt Col Bynum became Colonel & myself Lt Colonel.” In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Early meticulously outlines his CSA resume, mentioning the Battle of Manassas, a wound at Williamsburg, and the important Valley Campaign 422. Jubal A. Early. ALS

signed “J. A. Early,” eight lightlylined pages on two sets of adjoining sheets, 5 x 8, March 7, 1872. Letter to a colonel interested in his history. In part: “I was commissioned Colonel in the Virginia service on the 2nd of May 1861…I was commanding a brigade of 3 regiments, the 7th and 24th Va, and 7th Louisiana at the 1st Battle of Manassas, my rank being then colonel. I was commissioned a Brigadier General in the Confederate service, to rank from the 21st of July 1861…On the 5th of May 1862, I was wounded at Williamsburg…On my return, the 1st of July 1862, I was assigned to the command of Elzey’s brigade, he being wounded…I was commissioned Major General to rank from the 17th of January 1863…I was made Lieut General with Temporary rank from the 31st of May 1864, and assigned to the command of Ewell’s…then composed of my division Rodes’, and Gordon’s. On the 13th of June 1864 I was detached from the Army of Northern Va, with the 2nd corps, and Breckinridge command of three brigades of infantry and five small brigades of cavalry were united with my command for the campaign into Maryland and the Valley. Subsequently, during the Valley campaign, Kershaw’s division of infantry, two brigades of cavalry under Fitz Lee and one under Rosser were united to my command.” In fine condition, with trivial mounting remnants to extreme edges, having been previously inlaid into a larger sheet. Early served under Stonewall Jackson and then Robert E. Lee for almost the entire war, and had risen to become a key Confederate leader by its conclusion, with some historians contending that he extended the war six to nine months because of his efforts near Washington, DC—“the campaign into Maryland and the Valley,” as he mentions here—during which his raids posed a serious threat to the federal capital. During the period that he wrote this letter, Early was also a significant contributor to popularizing the idea of the ‘Lost Cause,’ a movement that emphasized the tradition and nobility of the antebellum South. A remarkable, thoroughly detailed account of his own military career. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500) www.RRAuction.com | 127


Writing to General Beauregard: “At least two hours must have elapsed between the time when you were informed of Gen. Johnston’s death and your giving me the order to drive the enemy into the River”

423. Samuel W. Ferguson. ALS signed “S. W. Ferguson,” three pages, lightly-lined, 8.25 x 13.75, April 24, 1885. Letter to P. G. T. Beau-

regard, who had sent a manuscript to his former aide requesting him to verify the facts surrounding the death of their superior, General Albert Sidney Johnston, during the Battle of Shiloh. In part: “I do not know that I can add anything material to what I reported officially immediately after the battle of Shiloh…A staff officer had reported the Brigade in the condition named. You called me and told me to go with the officer and take Command. While you were giving me instructions what to do, you were interrupted by Colonel [Charles] Wickliffe of Genl. Johnston’s staff (whom I had known in the old Army…when he was an officer of Infantry…) [who] rode up in a very excited manner and interrupted you. He spoke in a low tone and I did not hear what he said but I heard you ask, ‘When did it occur’ and I heard his reply which was ‘about a half hour ago.’ After he rode off you completed your order to me and I went to execute it not knowing what had happened…That night at your own headquarters when of course Gen. Johnston’s death was known…I asked you if Wickliffe had not brought you the news…and you replied in the affirmative…In my official report I say...that you ‘ordered me to lead them in pursuit of the enemy.’ ...I remember that your words were ‘drive them into the River’ and when I changed posit[ion] to the rear to meet, as I supposed, and attack from that direction it was so dark that the flashes of the guns could be distinctly seen. At least two hours must have elapsed between the time when you were informed of Gen. Johnston’s death and your giving me the order to drive the enemy into the River. I suppose that when Govr. Harris informed you of Gen. Johnston’s death you did not let him know that the sad news had already reached you and so he believed you took it very coolly.” In very good condition, with tape repairs to partial edge separations and a few small edge tears. Prior to the Battle of Shiloh, Beauregard had strenuously protested against Johnston’s planned attack on Grant and urged a retreat to Corinth, but Johnston persisted. The struggle began at dawn on April 6th and lasted into the next day. Johnston received the mortal wound at about 2:30 p.m. while leading the final charge which crushed the left wing of the Union Army. Ferguson took an active part in the battle of Shiloh, on the second day being assigned to command a brigade of the Second Corps—however, despite the Confederate Army’s considerable success on the first day, they were ultimately defeated by the Union on the second. Reflecting on the loss after the war, Jefferson Davis proclaimed: ‘When Sidney Johnston fell, it was the turning point of our fate.’ Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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“It should be remembered that at the time I was wounded, Aug. 1862, divisions were the highest organizations known commanded by Maj Gen’l Longstreet, Jackson, A. P. Hill &c” 424. Charles W. Field. Career military officer (1828–

1892) who recovered from being severely wounded in the leg at the Second Battle of Bull Run, barely escaping amputation. ALS, one page, lightly-lined both sides, 7.5 x 9.5, Door-Keeper’s Office, House of Representatives letterhead, April 2, 1881. Detailed account of his Civil War experience. In part: “I was never in any division but A. P. Hill’s when I was dangerously wounded at 2nd Manassas and confined to my bed for many months afterwards. When reporting for duty in Jany 1864—being still on crutches—I was made Maj. Gen. and assigned to the division mentioned, Longstreet’s Corps…It should be remembered that at the time I was wounded, Aug. 1862, divisions were the highest organizations known commanded by Maj Gen’l Longstreet, Jackson, A. P. Hill &c, with Longstreet & Jackson exercising a supervisory and controlling power over all divisions. Lieut. Gen’ls and Corps were not established till 1863…PS. Heth did not I think serve as a line officer in the Army of Northern Virginia (Johnston & Lee’s army) till 1863.” This pointed postscript reveals the continued dislike that Field had for Heth, who was inexperienced when he commanded his brigade at Gettysburg, and frequently blamed for accidentally starting the battle by sending half his division in before the rest of the Army of Northern Virginia was prepared. In very good condition, with tape-repaired partial edge separations to mailing folds and an irregular band of toning to one side. Great content regarding many of the Confederacy’s top officers.Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“The fall of our little Confederacy was a sad blow to me” 425. John Horace Forney. Confederate officer (1829–1902) who

participated in the First Battle of Manassas and Battle of Vicksburg. ALS signed “John H. Forney,” one page, 8.5 x 10.75, State Normal School letterhead, March 28, 1896. Letter to William F. Aldrich. In part: “See if at this late day, you can have the official war records of both the Union and Confederate armies sent to the address of my son…I could easily have had my name enrolled for them, when they were first being prepared and sent out—but at that time I did not care to either read or talk about the war…The fall of our little Confederacy was a sad blow to me—being among the first to enter its service, was among the very last to lay down my arms—for I held in-tact and in discipline a magnificent division of Texas Troops—camped at Hempstead Texas—preparatory to running the blockade from Galveston to St. Marks Florida to join Gen’l Johnstons Army…this division was so far as I know the very last to disband.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds, a small tear to the upper left, and slight mirroring to ink. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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“That was unkind to put Polk’s & Hood’s sins on me” 426. Samuel Gibbs French. Solider and wealthy plantation owner (1818-1910) who served as a major general in the Confederate army, commanding a division in the Army of Tennessee in the Western Theater. ALS signed “S. G. French,” one page, 8.25 x 8.75, May 19, 1894. Letter to General M. J. Wright. In full: “Yours of Feb. 23rd last missent to Mr. Harris returned to you has reached me today. In as much as the Picayune article was published in the S. H. Society Papers I have sent them my reply asking that it may be published by them—and I presume they will comply with my request. I have seen no notice of my reply from anyone except one who considered it of such historical value that he sent it to the Count de Paris in Spain, where he then was. If you have anything let me know because that was unkind to put Polk’s & Hood’s sins on me. Johnston nor Polk never once mentioned the subject to me after that night. In fact no one seemed to care anything about it then.” French adds a postscript at the conclusion: “It is hard at this day to go behind a diary without coming to grief.” In very good condition, with intersecting folds, ragged edges (slightly affecting a few words), brittle overall toning, and a brush to ink affecting a portion of the signature. The Southern Historical Society Papers was a publication in the late 19th century dedicated to telling the story of the South, featuring articles written by Southern soldiers, officers, politicians, and civilians. In 1893 they reprinted an article originally published in the New Orleans publication Picayune, which was critical of French’s actions while serving under Leonidas Polk at Cassville, Georgia, in May 1864. General Johnston had a set a plan to ambush one part of Sherman’s army before reinforcements could arrive, with Hood attacking on the flank and Polk and Hardee attacking from the front. Once in place, however, French expressed concern that his position was compromised from a defensive standpoint and he was not confident that they could hold it—this in spite of the other generals clamoring for battle. After a meeting of the generals, they decided to retreat from Cassville without engaging Sherman’s troops, who continued toward Atlanta. This became a controversial decision because of the failed potential—Johnston later said he considered it the best opportunity he saw during the war, and it was squandered. The article published in the Southern Historical Society Papers harshly placed the blame entirely on French, painting him as an annoying coward; however, they did comply with French’s wishes and published his reactions to the critical piece in the following issue.Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Transmitting his own report on the Battle of Allatoona 427. Samuel Gibbs French. ALS signed “S. G. French,” one page, lightly-lined, 5 x 8, July 20,

1881. Letter to General Marcus Wright. In part: “In this package will be found my report of the battle of Allatoona, embracing a few words of explanation...I also inclose [sic] a letter to Maj. D. W. Sanders who was my assist. adj. genl. that was published by him in Louisville. I do not know that you can file such letters, but if so place it on record as it corrects a material error of General Hood’s.” Professionally inlaid into a slightly larger off-white sheet. In fine condition. The Battle of Allatoona was fought on October 5, 1864, when a division led by French attacked a Union garrison held by Brigadier General John M. Corse in an attempt to take the fortified position that protected the railroad through Allatoona Pass. Corse’s forces sustained a bloody two-hour long attack with heavy casualties, and French seemed poised for victory—however, he received a false report from his cavalry that a strong Union force was approaching and withdrew. An apocryphal tale stemming from this battle is that Sherman sent a signal to ‘hold the fort,’ a quote now attributed to him. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The Maryland commander cites “a letter from Genl Lee to Genl Early in which he says—‘If Genl Johnson is to blame, relieve him’” 428. Bradley Tyler Johnson. Mary-

land lawyer and soldier (1829-1903) who bucked his state’s allegiance to the Union to serve as a general in the Confederate Army, commanding the 1st Maryland Infantry, CSA. ALS signed “Bradley T. Johnson,” three pages on two sheets, 8 x 10.5, Maryland Line Confederate Soldiers’ Home letterhead, July 19, 1894. Letter to Colonel William Peters. In part: “I think the War Records settle the point that I was not relieved on account of Moorefield. In War Records Penal volume no. 90, p. 4, you will find my report. It contains my vindication of myself for having been surprized & of my command from complicity with the outrages of that assertion. In the same volume I think is a letter from Genl Lee to Genl Early in which he says—‘If Genl Johnson is to blame, relieve him’ & in as much as I retained the Brigade until Dec.—Early could not have considered me to blame. In 1875 I wrote him asking why he had not given me the Court of Inquiry which I demanded at the time. I have his answer saying he never could make up his mind who was responsible…& could not have the officers for a Court of Inquiry. In Vol 90 or 91 there is a correspondence between Lee and Early about breaking up my Brigade. Ransom had recommended a reorganization of the Cavalry & my Brigade to be distributed around. I think the 8th brig had been assigned to Fitz Lee in the spring & in carrying out this order, the Brigade was broken up. The Moorefield disaster is the one spot on my military career. But it certainly was not my duty to picket & scout independent of my commanding officer. I did what I was ordered & my command did the only fighting there was. Your regiment was the only one that named officer [in] perfect command in the division. I always felt that McCausland had ungenerously shifted the blame to me which he ought to have met himself & hence on August 10, I wrote the report which you see printed.” Intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature) and a few toned tape remnants to edges, otherwise fine condition. While Johnson was a capable commander, he began to make careless mistakes at the end of the war—at Moorefield, John McCausland warned him of approaching Union troops led by William W. Averell, but Johnson failed to pass the warnings on to his regimental commanders. Averell surprised the camp in the middle of the night while Johnson’s soldiers were asleep and easily taken as prisoners. A fantastic letter in which Johnson defends his legacy even three decades after the fact, directly addressing the most controversial moment of his military career. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Senior Major General of the Army of Northern Virginia 429. Lafayette McLaws. Confederate general (1821–1897) praised by General

Lee for his service early in the war, but later court-martialed for inefficiency by James Longstreet. ALS signed “L. McLaws,” one page, 8 x 9.5, April 19, 1881. Letter to General Marcus Wright. In part: “I have made some additions, and could make others, but suppose you have enough to cover the most important. I have a great many reports, maps, memoranda…I can, should circumstances make it desirable, get access to them, or get them again temporarily.” A mild block of toning to right side and show-through from mounting remnants to reverse, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The Gray Ghost recounts his daring capture of General Stoughton and being “mentioned in a general order by Gen: Lee...announcing Stuart’s ride around McCleIlan” 430. John S. Mosby. ALS signed “Jno.

S. Mosby,” one page both sides, 7.75 x 10, October 13, 1900. Letter to Samuel Houston Letcher, son of the former governor of Virginia, John Letcher. In part: “I am glad to hear that you are collecting material for a biography of your father, as his life covered an interesting and momentous period in Virginia history. I never met him privately but once. I was first a private in the 1st Va. Cavalry, when Gen. J. E. B. Stuart was its Colonel: When Stuart became brigadier general, Gov. Letcher appointed W. E. Jones—my captain—to be Colonel of the regiment. Jones on Feby. 14th, 62 made me his adjutant. The regiment retired as rear guard of Johnston’s army from Centreville & went to the Peninsula. Just as we got there the Confed. Conscript Act passed...Fitz Lee—who had been lieutenant colonel—was elected over Jones...assuming that Fitz Lee wanted to select his own adjutant, within an hour after the election was over, I wrote & handed him my resignation. He promptly accepted it & did me an unintentional favor—If he had retained me in the regiment I would have been over shadowed & never heard of...On my way home l called on Gov. Letcher about getting a commission in the State troops under FIoyd—This was in May 62. But nothing came of it. I returned to the army the day of the battle of Seven Pines—Stuart invited me to serve as a scout (not as a spy) for him at his headquarters—Wh[ich] I did...On the night of Mch: 8th-63 we captured Gen. Stoughton at Fairfax C. H. & brought him to Culpepper C. H. When I went to the telegraph office to send a telegram to Stuart the operator told me that he was on the train due in a few hours from Richmond...I met him at the depot when the train arrived. He was overjoyed—& handed me a Captains Commission from Gov: Letcher: he had been to Richmond—had applied to the Confederate Government for one for me—& although I had been mentioned in a general order by Gen: Lee in announcing Stuart‘s ride around McCleIlan, the commission was refused. He then got a commission for me from Governor Letcher. Stuart—seeing my disappointment when he handed me the commission, remarked—‘l think you can get the Confederate government to recognize it’—I rather curtly replied—‘I don’t want any recognition from them.’ ...It is clear that I have never been one of Virginia’s ‘favorite sons’—‘Sparta has many a worthier son than he.’” In fine condition, with intersecting folds, a trivial chip to one edge, and some slight show-through from writing to opposing sides. An extraordinary letter with Mosby mentioning in particular his initial struggles—while he loved being in the field, he showed little interest in the day-to-day routines of military life, and most saw him as an indifferent soldier. This conflicted with the style of the born-and-bred military man Fitzhugh Lee—who Mosby detested in the first place—leading him to resign from his position as adjutant (he hated the paperwork involved), as well as his commission as lieutenant. Knowing J. E. B. Stuart from some previous scouting missions, Mosby was able to attach to his staff despite the lack of a commission. Following one of his most daring raids resulting in the capture of General Edwin Stoughton, Governor Letcher desired to recognize him and issued a captain’s commission in the Provisional Army of Virginia, even though it had long ceased to exist—still, Mosby was indignant at having not been legitimately commissioned by the Confederate government. Clearly, however, he appreciated the gesture, having kept the commission with his papers for the rest of his life. A positively exceptional letter with this autobiographical sketch of Mosby’s early service and military career, along with the association of being written to the governor’s son. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300) 132 | April 16, 2014 | CIVIL WAR


“I saw Genl. R. E. Lee on the 8th of April at Appomattox CH when we moved out to attack Genl. McKinsey” 431. Thomas T. Munford. Farmer and soldier from Virginia (1831-1918), he became a brigadier

general in the Confederate Army during the war, serving most notably at the Battle of Five Forks. ALS, one page, 6.5 x 9, [1915]. Letter regarding the command of Turner Ashby’s brigade. In part: “After the death of that superb officer, my regiment was transferred to Fitz Lee’s Brigade. I saw Genl. R. E. Lee on the 8th of April at Appomattox CH when we moved out to attack Genl. McKinsey [Ranald S. Mackenzie] on road to Lynchburg. We drove his command to one side—and escaped, and I disbanded Fitz Lee’s Division upon the ground.” Removably encapsulated in a Mylar sleeve. In fine condition, with intersecting folds and mild ink transfer from being laid on a typed transcript. An incredible recollection of the last days of the war, as the Robert E. Lee’s army was defeated in the Battle of Appomattox Court House on April 9—later that day, Lee officially surrendered, signaling the end of the bloodiest war in American history. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“It was hardly an exaggeration when you speak of that fatal punch as the ruin of the Confederacy” 432. Thomas T. Munford. Handwritten copy of a letter sent to him

by Jefferson Davis, one page both sides, 8 x 10.5, Grand Camp Confederate Veterans letterhead, May 2, 1889. Munford transcribes a letter from Davis for his personal records. In part: “I read the statement of Rosser…I know that Genl. Lee did not anticipate the necessity for claiming Petersburg as soon as he did and had heard of his dissatisfaction with Pickett for the affair at Five Forks but I had no idea that the case was as bad as Rosser presents it…The purpose to reach the Roanoke River was defeated by the success of the enemy on our right flank—and it was hardly an exaggeration when you speak of that fatal punch as the ruin of the Confederacy. It certainly did hasten the catastrophy [sic].” In fine condition, with intersecting folds and some slight brushing to ink. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“I commanded Fitz Lee’s division from Five Forks near Petersburg, to Appamattox” 433. Thomas T. Munford. ALS, one page, lightly-lined both sides, 8.5 x 11, Febru-

ary 22, 1911. Letter to Elizabeth Fairfax Ayers. In part: “I am sure he was in full dress uniform when he went to meet Genl. Grant and his ‘sash’ & sword that would be a part…He says he had the secret service money & gave Genl Fitz Lee & Genl Rosser each $2500. I doubt if either of them ever saw that much United States money at one time before in their lives. I commanded Fitz Lee’s division from Five Forks near Petersburg, to Appamattox, and I never saw or heard of a cent…Your uncle was on my staff, & with me all the time & knows all about what happened with the cavalry.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature) and a tiny tape-repaired tear to top edge. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Attempting to right a wrong with the Virginia State Seal 434. Thomas T. Munford. ALS, two pages,

lightly-lined both sides, 8.25 x 10.75, personal letterhead, September 4, 1910. Letter to Captain John S. Wise. In part: “It does seem that Virginia was turned upside down by the war, and that every effort was made to dishonor the old commonwealth…the governor…his conception of the dignity of the seal is manifest in his acts, Virginia having her own banks, her own arsenals…I have two forged seals by Pierpoint differing from each other and from the present seal and the seal your father sent to Washington to Genl Montgomery Meigs… who had it placed upon the ceiling of the Hall of Congress with the Coat of Arms of the other states…they did not confirm the seal of the Commonwealth and Governor Wise allowed no liberties…Your father’s management of the John Brown Raid and its termination muzzled the honest press…I do not wish to open old sores…and if you would forget he was your father and forget politics but come down to clear clean cut history, you could make your grandchildren think you had as good blood in your heart.” Small tears and toning to edges, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Incredible letter to Mosby on the loss at Five Forks: “That battle was the Waterloo of the Confederacy” 435. Thomas T. Munford. ALS, one page both

sides, 8.25 x 11, personal letterhead, February 11, 1905. Letter to John Mosby, attempting to set the record straight on his actions at the Battle of Five Forks, his greatest embarrassment. In part: “I would be greatly obliged if you will give me any information you may recall about your orders and movements about the last week in March 1865. I found in the War Records about what I quoted in my paper on the Battle of Five Forks. I had determined to publish my papers after remodeling it and I wish to fortify it with facts. That battle was the Waterloo of the Confederacy. Gen R. E. Lee wrote Gen Hampton ‘had you been there with all of your cavalry, the disaster would never have occurred.’ That shad dinner was the bottom of the disaster. If you will read Rosser’s letter published in Phil. Weekly Times and copied in my paper you will be amazed to see he has told the truth this time—and it exhibits a picture of shame which Virginia will never forgive. You are a lawyer and a soldier, and I can generally take in at a glance the surroundings, but if you can extricate these officers from their ‘shad dinners’ and can reconcile Gen’l Fitz Lee’s testimony at the Warren Trial and Rosser’s letter, and Gen Fitz’s letters to Gen. R. E. Lee you have the ability of a ‘Philadelphia Lawyer.’” Intersecting folds, a few mild bands of toning passing through signature, and three binder dings to one edge, otherwise fine condition. General Pickett had led the Confederate forces at the Battle of Five Forks, losing in decisive fashion to General Sheridan in the battle that triggered Robert E. Lee’s decision to surrender a week later. A wonderful letter associating many of the most well-known Confederates of the war. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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“His death from wounds received when Wilmington fell, was deeply lamented by all Federal as well as Confederate officers who knew him” 436. Gustavus W. Smith. Confederate

general from Kentucky (1821–1896) who took command of the Army of Northern Virginia for one day in 1862 before being replaced by Robert E. Lee. TLS, ten pages, 8 x 13, April 26, 1895. Letter to C. B. Denson defending the military services of William H. C. Whiting at the Battle of Seven Pines, in part: “On the 30th of May, 9.15 p.m., General Johnston sent direct to General Whiting an order preparatory for battle: and at the same time sent the order to me: ‘If nothing prevents, we will fall upon the enemy in front of Major-General D.H. Hill, who occupies the position on the Williamsburg road from which your troops moved to the neighborhood of Meadow Bridges.’ Should there be cause of haste, General McLaws, on your approach, will be ordered to leave his ground for you, that he may reinforce General Longstreet.’…[After a series of delays], movements of the division under Whiting were directed by General Johnston in person. He was with it the whole day until he was wounded a little before sunset. Whoever may be responsible for the most unfortunate delay on the part of the Confederates in attacking the Federal Corps, badly isolated at Seven Pines, on the morning of the 31st of May; no blame can fairly attach to General Whiting, or to the division he commanded. Without entering upon a description of the battle of Seven Pines, it may be mentioned here, that, as second officer in rank in the Army of Northern Virginia, I took command, at dark, on the 31st of May; General Johnston having been, a short time before, removed from the field, very seriously wounded. About 2 p.m. on the 1st of June, by order of President Davis, I turned over the command, on the field, to General R.E. Lee. On the 2nd of June I was suddenly struck down by disease and was taken to Richmond.” He continues with a lengthy quote from a letter by Whiting, describing the severely weakened state of his division, “constantly in contact with the enemy,” fighting two battles—York River and Seven Pines—and requesting relief, which was granted. Whiting went on to command two brigades in “Lee’s operations against McClellan in front of Richmond.” Smith then returned to duty, ended up in command of Whiting, and “urged and repeatedly insisted” that Whiting’ be promoted to Major-General. “The protracted and uncalled for delay, of President Davis, in promoting General Whiting to the rank of Major-General did gross injustice to one of the ablest and best officers of the Confederate States Army and was an injury to that service.” After detailed praise of Whiting, Smith concludes: “His extraordinary skill as a military engineer was fully exemplified in the defensive works he planned and constructed for the defense of the approaches to Wilmington; and I am convinced that, in the final attack of the Federals upon that place. President Davis, by superseding General Whiting, at the eleventh hour, and depriving him of supreme control over the defenses he had created—made a sad mistake…His death from wounds received when Wilmington fell, was deeply lamented by all Federal as well as Confederate officers who knew him.” In fine condition. An incredible and detailed account of a heroic soldier’s career, with many notable references to some of the Confederacy’s biggest names. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The controversial Texan 437. Felix H. Robertson. The only native-born Texan to serve as a general in

the CSA (1839–1928) involved in the ‘Saltville Massacre’ of wounded Union soldiers. Neatly penned ALS, one page, lightly-lined, 8 x 10.5, personal letterhead, June 30, 1881. Letter to General Marcus Wright. In part: “I regret that I am not able to give you exact dates—but all my papers are destroyed and I must depend on memory. I am not able to give you the name of the division to which my cavalry brigade was attached for immediately upon my promotion I was temporarily assigned to the command of the Confederate Brigade in Kelly’s Division, and was absent from my own brigade for several weeks arising from separation by different fields of duty, and was wounded the first day of service with my own brigade. So I am unable to fill that blank.” In very good condition, with an irregular band of toning and mounting remnants to left edge. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Detailed account of the days leading up to Appomattox 438. Isaac M. St. John. Engineer

and Confederate officer (1827–1880). LS signed “I. M. St. John, late Com. Genl. C. S. A.,” two pages, lightly-lined, 8.25 x 13.75, February 9, 1877. Transcript of a September 1865 letter to him from Thomas G. Williams. In part: “On the 1st April 1865 the Subsistence Bureau of the Confederate states, had available for the Army of N. Va. at Richmond 300,000 Rations Bread & Meat, Danville 500,000 Bread, Danville 1500,000 [sic] Meat, Lynchburg 180,000 Bread & Meat, Greensboro N.C. and the vicinity of Danville. There was in addition not less than 1,500,000 Rations of Bread & Meat…These supplies were held ready for distribution upon the requisition of the Chief Commissary of Genl Lee’s Army. No requisitions were then on hand unsupplied. On the evening of 2 April 1865, the Chief Commissary of Genl Lee’s Army was asked by telegram what should be done with the stores in Richmond. No reply was received until night. He then suggested that if Richmond was not safe, they might be sent up on the R. and Danville R Road, as the Evacuation of Richmond was then actively progressing…On the morning of April 6th, the Secty of War, accompanied by the Q. M. Genl., Chf of Engr Dept, and the undersigned met Genl Lee…In reply to the question of the Commg Genl—‘where shall be placed this army’…Genl Lee said in substance ‘I can not now name the place’…On the morning of April 8th, these rations were either captured at Pamphlins Station, or burned on the track to avoid capture.” In fine condition. This letter provides a strong response to St. John’s critics, who believed that the commissary had failed in its duty to feed the army; the main problem—in his opinion—was in fact Lee’s inability to provide a location. An interesting, lengthy description of some of the problems and miscommunications that the Confederacy faced in its final week. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 136 | April 16, 2014 | CIVIL WAR


Longstreet’s top staff officer 439. G. Moxley Sorrel. Confederate officer and historian of the Confederacy (1838–1901).

ALS signed “G. M. Sorrel,” one page, 5 x 8, July 15, 1881. Letter to General Marcus Wright. In full: “I recently returned the brief attached to my name in the Confederate records, as Brig. Genl Mahone’s Div’n, A. P. Hill’s Corps. Army N. Virginia but could not then comply with request for a photograph. I have a card now and enclose it for such place among the records as may be thought fit.” Affixed by the left edge to a slightly larger sheet. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

440. Marcus Wright. Confederate general (1831–1922) who was wounded at Shiloh and fought at Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge. He was instrumental in the publication of the War of the Rebellion: Official Records. ALS signed “Marcus J. Wright,” one page, 8 x 10, July 29, 1901. Letter of recommendation. In part: “Mr. Young…was in the 47th Va regt. infty. Walker’s Brigade, commanded afterwards by Genls. Field and Barton, Heth’s division, A. P. Hill’s Corps.” In very good condition, with intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature), a tear to the right edge, light foxing, and piece of tape affixed to the top. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Sending a “photograph of the Brig. Genl. to one of my friends for identification” 441. George Washington Custis Lee. Eldest son of Robert E. Lee,

who served as a Confederate general and aide-de-camp to Jefferson Davis (1832–1913). ALS signed “G. W. C. Lee,” three pages on two adjoining sheets, 5 x 8, December 13, 1894. Letter to Robert Caster. In part: “I…had sent the photograph of the Brig. Genl. to one of my friends for identification. The enclosed letter from Col C. S. Venable contains the latest account that I have of it.” In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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“He and his friends felt it keenly when I was made a Major Gen just after the battle of Murfreesboro” 442. Joseph Wheeler. Confed-

erate major general (1836–1906), known as ‘Fightin’ Joe,’ who served as the senior cavalry general in the Army of Tennessee, fighting most of its battles in the Western Theater; he was shot and wounded three times during the war. Choice ALS, three pages on two adjoining sheets, 5.5 x 8.5, July 14, 1904. Letter to his daughters. In part: “I am glad you are having a nice time and improving your health. I have always been very careful to never speak of Sen Forrest except in the highest terms of praise. He and his friends felt it keenly when I was made a Major Gen just after the battle of Murfreesboro and his friends sought to criticize me.” In fine to very fine condition, with a mailing fold passing through a single letter of the signature. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope, addressed in Wheeler’s hand. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

With mentions of General Lee and “Old Stonewall,” the officer recalls the “raid of the old fanatic, horse thief and murderer John Brown into Virginia at Harpers’ Ferry” 443. John D. Imboden. Lawyer, teacher, and Con-

federate officer (1823–1895) most active in the Virginia area. Boldly penned ALS signed “J. D. Imboden, ex-Brig. Genl Cavalry, C. S. A.,” five pages, lightly-lined, 8 x 10.5, September 5, 1888. Letter to an admirer. In part: “All my papers were burned in April 1865—even my commissions and private letters, and what I prized more highly, many autograph letters of Gen. R. E. Lee, Genl. T. J. Jackson (’Old Stonewall’), and other distinguished generals on our side…I was commissioned a Captain by Gov. Henry A. Wise to command ‘the Staunton Artillery,’ a splendid field battery…The then recent raid of the old fanatic, horse thief and murderer John Brown into Virginia at Harpers’ Ferry, to incite a servile insurrection of the negroes had greatly aroused the young men of the State to form themselves into military volunteer companies to repel that, or any more momentous, invasion of our peaceful homes…we found him [Brown] out in 1859, and hung him for his crimes committed on our soil, should have prepared to defend ourselves…I was in Richmond on April 16th 1861, and learning that the State would certainly secede from the Union the next day, I that night wired the first order, so far as I know & believe, for the movement of troops in Va. in the great war bursting upon the Country. I ordered out my men & guns…We participated in the capture of Harpers’ Ferry with its armory & arsenal…a conspicuous part in the battle of Bull Run separated from my dearly beloved battery by promotion…sent by Pres. Davis to the mountains of North Western Virginia…to raise and command volunteers…In Jany. 1863 I was made a Brigadier general of Cavalry…Gen. R. E. Lee by special orders assigned me to the command of ‘The Valley District’…The ‘District’ had been created for ‘Stonewall’ Jackson…and was the scene of that great soldier’s most brilliant exploits. Greatly his inferior in rank, and almost infinitely his inferior in ability, and with but a tenth of the troops he had there in 1862, I was, as above stated, assigned to command the ‘Valley District,’ an honor I prize above all others…My military career was a simple earnest effort on my part to perform my highest duty to my State.” In fine condition. A remarkable letter rife with content related to the birth of the Civil War in Virginia. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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“I esteem it the highest honor to be remembered among those who, for four long years, bore the flag of the Confederacy so gallantly” 444. William Henry Fitzhugh ‘Rooney’ Lee. Second son of Robert E. Lee who served as a Confederate cavalry general during the Civil War (1837–1891). ALS signed “W. H. F. Lee,” two pages on two adjoining sheets, 5 x 8, June 14, 1885. Letter to Edgar Warfield. In part: “I have the pleasure of acknowledging…my election as honorary member of your camp of Confed. veterans…Be assured I esteem it the highest honor to be remembered among those who, for four long years, bore the flag of the Confederacy so gallantly; and only yielded when resistance to the great odds opposed to them ceased to be possible.” In fine condition, with a horizontal mailing fold passing through the center of the signature and light mirroring to ink. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“I wrote to many of our Confederate friends for their war papers” 445. Dabney H. Maury. Confederate

general and military author and historian (1822–1900) who fought at Corinth, Vicksburg, and Mobile. ALS, three pages, lightly-lined on two adjoining sheets, 5 x 8, War Records Office letterhead, September 26, 1891. Letter to General Marcus Wright. In part: “I found on visiting the Capitol with Mr. Brock that no war records remain in the Southern Historical Society, you had long ago gathered them all…I wrote to many of our Confederate friends for their war papers. And thus far have been assured of a considerable amount. Viz from Gen Early, the firsthand records covering his whole administration from 1861 to 1868—all of General M. L. Smith, which had been prepared for publication by his adjutant General Devereux—Col. McDonald’s papers—Hon. A. H. H. Stuart’s papers prepared for publication I expect to get…It is important for us to confer.” In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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“We shrink not! We quail not—and shall be prepared to meet our enemies with the disposition of men who know there is no quarter, and also fight for life, for home, country & liberty!” 446. Philip St. George Cocke. Confederate officer

(1809–1861) best known for organizing the defense of Virginia along the Potomac River after the state’s secession, and briefly commanding troops before committing suicide. Extremely rare ALS signed “Philip St. Geo. Cocke,” five pages, 6.5 x 8.5, January 12, 1860. Letter to Reverend S. B. S. Bissell. In part: “What think you of the present unhappy political and social relations between the North & the South? You know the people of both sections and you are too enlightened & too just I know to sympathize with the extremists in either section. But do you know how much danger & how imminent that danger is to the peace of the country! I assure you that we are thinking of little else in Virginia just now but of preparations for defense against the crusade which for thirty years has been cruelly waged against our property, our lives and our sacred honor, by that mad faction at the North which…is marshaling its forces to attack us…seeking to place us between two fires that of our slaves on the one side & of our abolition enemies at the North. We have accepted the issue as inevitable, and are preparing to meet it, with a full sense of all the dangers that surround us—but we shrink not! We quail not—and shall be prepared to meet our enemies with the disposition of men who know there is no quarter, and also fight for life, for home, country & liberty!” In fine condition, with a few light stains and slight show-through from writing to opposing sides. A remarkable letter with Cocke’s evaluation of the war as inevitable—it was not until well over a year later, on April 17, 1861, that Virginia officially decided to secede from the Union. His fervor for the fight, however, was quashed soon after the war began—his rank as general was downgraded and his position lost during a bureaucratic shuffle, and he then failed to receive credit for his skillful leadership during the First Battle of Bull Run, seeing all the recognition go toward P. G. T. Beauregard. Shortly thereafter he returned home, feeling ‘shattered in body and mind,’ despondent from his unappreciated service, and shot himself in the head on December 26, 1861. An exceptional letter that captures the fever pitch of the South as it prepared to fight, as well as a stark reminder of the psychological and physical tolls of warfare. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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Post-War Politics “As for what is called the negro policy, I can see no difference between Cleveland, McKinley and Roosevelt— except that Cleveland invited Fred Douglas and his white wife to mingle on a footing of social equality” 447. John S. Mosby. Carbon TLS

signed “Jno. S. Mosby,” three pages, 8 x 12.5, August 13, [1904]. Letter to Captain S. F. Chapman in support of Theodore Roosevelt’s 1904 presidential campaign. In part: “I notice in the Southern papers—notably in the Richmond Times-Dispatch—a disposition to make comparisons of the policy of Mr. McKinley and of Mr. Roosevelt toward the South to the disparagement of the latter. Some of them say that a continuation of McKinley’s policy would have dissolved the Solid South. I can see no evidence of it or difference in their policies. McKinley appointed a great many more negroes than Roosevelt has...It is as idle now to question the wisdom of the policy that made the negro a citizen as to arraign the Power that made him a man...I have never heard of a single negro appointment by Mr. Roosevelt either in Alabama or Virginia. Yet the politicians are trying to scare people with the bogie of negro ascendancy...White supremacy cannot be made an issue although the Democrats are trying to persuade people that it is. That is the only way to keep the South Solid. You know how nurses keep children quiet by telling them ghost stories; this is a ghost story.” He continues with a lengthy discussion of the elections of 1896 and 1900: “As for what is called the negro policy, I can see no difference between Cleveland, McKinley and Roosevelt—except that Cleveland invited Fred Douglas [sic] and his white wife to mingle on a footing of social equality with white people at his exclusive card receptions; white Roosevelt lunched alone with Booker Washington who had called to ask him to appoint two old Confederates to office in Alabama...I have just received a letter from Frank Pemberton who says, ‘I hate the modern negro’—which implies that he loves the original African. He says that,—‘Our otherwise estimable President is crazy upon the negro question.’ Now I really don’t think there is anything heroic in abusing a negro; and must confess that I prefer the educated negro to the savage. He is the most docile of all races; his labour has created the prosperity of the South. It will not make him any worse to teach him to read the Lord’s Prayer. Frank is against educating the negro and seems to hold Roosevelt responsible for his education. I have always given the Southern people the credit for it. They certainly claim it. There were negro schools all over the South long before Roosevelt was President. Free schools came with reconstruction and the abolition of slavery. The educated negro produces several times more cotton than his illiterate ancestors...Frank wants Jeff Davis for President—and is waiting for the Resurrection…Mr. Roosevelt is not the first President who has been accused of being too fond of the negro. Tom Moore came to the United States when Jefferson was President and wrote a series of poems in the form of letters…rather worse than lunching with Booker Washington.” Mosby also added a number of ink corrections and additions throughout. In very good condition, with scattered foxing and staining. Mosby’s politics following the Civil War differed from many of his southern compatriots—he became a Republican and actively supported his former enemy, U. S. Grant, in the first presidential election after the war’s end, saying that he believed the transition to be the best way to help the South—writing in 1904, his support of the Republicans continued as they tried to break into the political sphere of the “Solid South,” a term Mosby claimed to have invented in 1876. This letter demonstrates Mosby as an independent thinker—just as he had been in his military years—with the ability to persuasively appeal to Southern sensibilities while supporting a progressive platform. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

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“The Cubans will be allowed to attempt the experiment of a separate and independent Republic” 448. Fitzhugh Lee. American soldier and politician (1835–1905), and nephew of Robert E. Lee. He notably served as a Confederate cavalry general during the Civil War, the 40th Governor of Virginia, and a general during the Spanish-American War. TLS, two pages, 8 x 10.5, November 23, 1901. Letter to George C. Wilcox on the political situation in Cuba. In part: “If the United States had not promised the Cubans self government, to-day that Island would occupy the same position to our Government as Porto Rico does; the pledge however, will be kept and the Cubans will be allowed to attempt the experiment of a separate and independent Republic. It is not generally believed the experiment will be successful; in that case the affairs of the Island will be permanently managed by the United States. Its future prosperity will depend upon the entrance into our ports…” In fine condition, with intersecting folds and a paperclip mark and impression to upper left. At the start of the Spanish-American war in 1898, McKinley appointed Lee as consul-general of the US to Havana, Cuba; a strategic political move, McKinley made it a point to place a few well-known Confederate officers in key commands to reunite the nation. After the war, Lee was charged with the restoration of order on the island. An especially interesting letter that mirrors some of the same concerns leading up to the Civil War regarding the ability of the South to survive as a separate republic, if secession from the Union was successful. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Praising northern charity, Toombs cites “the munificence with which Boston provides for her own poor & unfortunate” 449. Robert Toombs. First

secretary of state for the Confederacy, Toombs was a bitter rival of Jefferson Davis’s, and ran against him in the presidential election; he was later wounded at the Battle of Antietam. ALS signed “R. Toombs,” two pages, lightly-lined, 7.75 x 9.75, July 12, 1856. Letter to James Stone, thanking him for a donation. In part: “Knowing the munificence with which Boston provides for her own poor & unfortunate, I thought the destitute foreigner who landed on your shores might possibly stand most in need of the small aid.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature). Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Scarce letter offering advice on Annapolis 450. Thomas L. Rosser. Confederate major general (1836–1910) who com-

manded New Orleans Washington Artillery at 1st Manassas and later Early’s Cavalry in the Shenandoah Valley. ALS signed “Thos. L. Rosser,” one page, 7.75 x 10.5, personal letterhead, March 29, 1901. Letter to General Bradley T. Johnson. In full: “I sign with very great pleasure and herewith return to you the letter to the President recommending your Grandson for a Cadetship at our Naval school at Annapolis. If you could get a strong Senator or the Vice President to go with you to see the President it would be well. I sincerely hope you may succeed.” In very good condition, with partial edge separations to intersecting folds and toning and small tears to edges. Accompanied by an unsigned portrait. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Recommending a diplomat to Fillmore’s administration

451. Alexander Stephens. Vice president of the Confederacy (1812–1883) under Jefferson Davis. ALS signed “Alexander H. Stephens,” three pages on two adjoining sheets, 7.75 x 9.75, August 30, 1850. Letter to John Pendleton. In part: “I had an interview with Mr. Crittenden upon the subject mentioned in your letter. He seemed to take…interest in your future—and I am satisfied he will do all he can…I did not see any other members of the cabinet upon the subject…Toombs and Dawson also saw him upon the same subject…Whether a letter from me to the President would do you any good I very much doubt.” In very good condition, with intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature), overall creases and wrinkles, light foxing, and show-through from writing to opposing sides. At the time, Crittenden was serving as attorney general in President Fillmore’s cabinet, and Fillmore appointed Pendleton, a Virginian lawyer, as Chargé d’Affaires to Argentina in 1851. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Interesting Stories and Notable Characters Concerning a raid on Confederate gold en route to Richmond 452. Edward Porter Alexander. Military

engineer (1835–1910) who rose to the rank of brigadier general in the Confederate army. ALS signed “E. P. Alexander,” two pages, lightlylined on two adjoining sheets, 5 x 8, February 23, 1894. Letter to General Marcus Wright. In part: “At the break-up in Washington Geo May 1865 a lot of specie belonging to Richmond Va banks was left in a ‘Wash’ bank until sometime in the summer when the bank officers started to carry it by wagon to Abbevelle SC—en route to Richmond. Some Confederate stragglers raided it & I was concerned in the efforts to recover. A portion recovered was carried back to Wash’n & again stored in the bank. Gen. Wilde afterward seized it & sent to to [sic] the US Treasury in Wash. The banks I have heard afterward sued for it & recovered the whole or a part. I am trying to collect all the details relating to the affair & it has been suggested to me that you might ‘send a volume containing all that was developed by the trials in the Court of Claims.’ Possibly too you can find some report by Gen. Wilde of his action in the matter. There was said to be great cruelty & outrage perpetrated by some of his troops in endeavoring to get up this money.” Second integral page is professionally inlaid into a larger off-white sheet. In fine to very fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“I will take ‘Stonewall Jackson’s Valley Campaign of 1862’” 453. Jedediah Hotchkiss. The most famous cartographer of the Civil War (1828–1899) whose detailed maps of the Shenandoah Valley are often credited as principal factors in Stonewall Jackson’s victories. Very rare ALS signed “Jed. Hotchkiss,” one page, 8.25 x 10.25, personal letterhead, September 30, 1886. Letter to Clarence H. Bell. In part: “Your favor of the 27th inst. asking if I will deliver a lecture in Fremont Temple, Boston...is at hand. The reception I had from Boston audiences last spring was so very pleasant and every way agreeable, and the company of lecturers you name is such a goodly one, I am glad to accept your invitation...as you kindly give me a choice of subjects I will take ‘Stonewall Jackson’s Valley Campaign of 1862.’ This I will illustrate upon a large blackboard, which I suppose you will furnish. Please inform me what war regiments are represented in your Post” Intersecting folds with two small tape-repaired separations to edges and slight mirroring to ink, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Amazing story of a Union soldier’s humanity: “I rescued a confederate officer who had been wounded in a charge on our lines on the previous night”

454. Eppa Hunton and John Wainwright. ALS signed “John Wainwright, late Col. 97th Pa. Vols.,” three lightly-lined pages on two adjoining sheets, 5.5 x 8.5, March 15, 1879, with the response, signed “Eppa Hunton,” penned on the reverse of the final page. Wainwright’s letter, in part: “In August or September 1864 while in command of the picket line in front of the union forces at Bermuda Hundred Va. I rescued a confederate officer who had been wounded in a charge on our lines on the previous night, and left on the field between the picket lines of the opposing forces…After dark…I crawled out and secured him, after carrying him to the rear of my line of pickets I made an effort to discover the character of his wounds, but was unable to do so on account of the darkness and the delirious condition of his mind…I saw him delivered to the surgeons at the field hospital in the rear of our lines, expecting to inquire further about him the next day but was ordered on to the north of the James before morning and had no opportunity of knowing anything further of him since. If he survived I would take great pleasure in hearing from him and if possible making his acquaintance. Genl Wm Mahone tells me that Gen Picketts Division occupied that front at the time I speak of and that you were connected with his command. Can you give me the information I ask? Who were your regimental commanders at that time? Who were the other Brigade commanders then?” Hunton replies with a list of the brigades that made up General Pickett’s Division at the time, continuing, “I recollect no such incident as you described. I feel very much gratified at the kindness shown by you to one of our soldiers and the interest you still take in him.” Intersecting folds with a few tape-repaired separations to edges, otherwise fine condition. On August 25 of 1864, the 38th Virginia advanced on the picket line at Bermuda Hundred, carrying out a quick but bloody attack. The following morning, Union Colonel John Wainwright spotted a wounded rebel soldier on the field. Risking his own life, he brought the man to safety before leaving him behind the following day. In this extraordinary letter, written fifteen years later, Wainwright is still hoping to ascertain the identity and fate of the poor soldier. Despite Hunton’s inability to name him, Wainwright later discovered that the man was the 38th’s Captain Richard J. Joyce, who died from his wounds suffered that day. This touching account of one soldier’s courage and compassion illustrates the agony suffered by those men left lying wounded on the battlefield, and offers a rare glimpse of the unexpected kindness shown by an enemy. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Rare signatures of the Confederate brothers, one killed at Waynesboro under Early’s command 456. Elisha F. Paxton. Confederate general (1828–1863) killed in 455. William and Asher Harman. Confederate brothers, Asher

(1830–1895) a Staunton railroad executive, and William (1828–1865) a soldier killed in action near Gallagher’s Mill in Waynesboro. Very rare ink signatures, “A. W. Harman & Lady, Staunton” and “W. H. Harman,” on an off-white 7.5 x 1.5 slip clipped from a guest book. In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

action while leading the famed Stonewall Brigade during the Battle of Chancellorsville. Very rare ink signature, “Franklin Paxton, Rockbridge County, State of Virginia,” on an off-white 4 x 2.25 clipped slip. In very good condition, with moderate overall toning and a wrinkle to upper right (affecting no writing). A highly desirable Civil War autograph, exceedingly rare in any form. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“He had no equal, either North or South,” a veteran praises General Lee, “and no superior either in ancient or modern years, in military genius and in the splendor of his achievements” 457. Channing Smith. Scout for J. E. B.

Stuart who served under John Mosby. ALS signed “Channing M. Smith,” one page both sides, 6.5 x 9, [1922]. Letter recalling his experiences with Robert E. Lee. In part: “I knew Gen. Robt E. Lee very well during the war between the States. The first time I met him was at the battle of Sharpsburg-Antietam. I was introduced to him by my uncle, Genl. R. H. Chilton, his Adjutant Genl, and was also introduced to Gen Stonewall Jackson at the same time, and had the honor of carrying his orders to the Genl’s of his Corps to withdraw their respective commands from the enemies front during the night (18th Sept.) and cross to the So. side of the Potomac. I was with Gen Lee when he started to lead his men in their charge upon Grant’s lines in 1864, but was restrained by the remonstrances and interception of his men and of the members of his staff. I saw him many times afterwards and had the honor of being sent by him several times into Grants army, to get information as to the movements of his troops.—Lastly, I met him in April 1865, after the surrender at Appamattox, in Richmond VA, at the house of my uncle, then Gen Chilton. And my recollection of him demonstrates more and more clearly that he had no equal, either North or South, for all the great qualitys [sic] which go to make up the character of the honorable, high-toned, Christian Gentleman, and no superior either in ancient or modern years, in military genius and in the splendor of his achievements.” A light block of toning over most of the writing and a few chips to one edge, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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458. William Smith. Confederate general who served as the governor

of Virginia from January 1864 until the end of the Civil War (1797–1887). ALS signed “Wm. Smith,” one page, lightly-lined, 7.5 x 6, October 1, 1881. Letter to General Marcus Wright. In part: “I am in receipt of your esteemed favor…and the day thereafter of the book you kindly forwarded to me. I today, as you request, return it…I really obliged [sic] to you for your prompt and kind attention to my wishes.” Smith also adds a postscript, signed “W. S.,” on the reverse. Affixed by the top edge to a slightly larger sheet. In fine condition, with slight show-through from docketing to reverse. Accompanied by an unsigned portrait. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“In all the history of the world there has never been any more brave and noble soldiers than those who gave the brightest and best of their lives to our cause from ’61 to ’65”

459. Joseph Wheeler. Confederate major general (1836–1906), known as ‘Fightin’ Joe,’ who served as the senior cavalry general in the Army of Tennessee, fighting most of its battles in the Western Theater; he was shot and wounded three times during the war. TLS signed “Jos. Wheeler,” one page, 7.25 x 9.5, US House of Representatives letterhead, April 27, 1898. Letter to former Confederate soldier G. G. Lilly, thanking him for his services in the Spanish-American War. In full: “Your letter touched me to the heart; I am so proud and glad to see the gallant way in which our brave and dauntless Confederate soldiers are offering their services to the Country. In all the history of the world there has never been any more brave and noble soldiers than those who gave the brightest and best of their lives to our cause from ’61 to ’65; and now after all these years that same noble spirit prompts them to again enter the field of battle. I have not had any commission as yet, if I should have one I would love to have me with you, but of course I do not know how the appointments will be made.” In very good condition, with tape-repaired partial separations to mailing folds, a few chips to edges, and overall toning and soiling. Precertified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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civil war 460. Simon Bolivar Buckner.

Confederate general (1823–1914) best remembered for submitting to Grant’s famous demand for unconditional surrender at the Battle of Fort Donelson. ALS signed “S. B. Buckner,” one page, lightly-lined, 7.25 x 5.5, September 14, 1896. Brief letter to Wallace Young reads: “Please accept my sincere thanks for your kind letter.” Matted and framed with a carte-de-visite of Buckner to an overall size of 11.5 x 17. In fine condition, with intersecting folds, one through a single letter of signature. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

461. Hiram Burnham.

Union general (1814–1864) who was killed while assaulting Confederate positions near Richmond, Virginia, during the Battle of Chaffin’s Farm. Wardated partly-printed DS, signed “Hiram Burnham Col,” one page, 8 x 10, March 9, 1863. Special requisition for “Use of Capt. Geo. Fuller—Company H,” for “10 Ten Pairs Trousers, 10 Ten Pairs Drawers, 20 Pairs Stockings.” Signed near the bottom by Burnham authorizing the Quartermaster to issue the items. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

462. Benjamin Butler. LS signed “Benj. F. Butler,” one page, 5.5 x 8.75, November 30, 1891. Letter to John Davenport. In full: “I am waiting for your letter to be printed in the appendix of Chapter XV. Everything else is completed. Please send it at once. Also send your photograph at once as time is short.” Matted and framed with a color portrait of Butler in uniform to an overall size of 17.5 x 14.5. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

463. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. Maine-born Union major

general (1828–1914) who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his defense of Little Round Top at Gettysburg. Bank check, 6.25 x 3, filled out and signed by Chamberlain, payable to Chief of Ordnance, USA for $50.10, March 22, 1880. A two-cent revenue stamp is affixed to the upper left and is initialed by Chamberlain. Reverse bears two government endorsements. In fine condition, with a small cancellation hole to center and a few small areas of light discoloration, not affecting the overall appearance. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 148 | April 16, 2014 | CIVIL WAR


“I am becoming accustomed to the strict discipline, and have escaped with but few demerit marks,” writes Custer upon arriving at West Point in 1857, “military law is very severe and those who overstep its boundaries must abide the consequences” 464. George A. Custer. ALS signed “G. A. Custer,” eight

pages, lightly-lined on two sets of adjoining sheets, 5.25 x 8, West Point, August 7, 1857. Letter to Minnie St. John, a young lady in Custer’s hometown of Monroe, Michigan. In part: “I like West Point as well if not better than I did at first. I think it is the most romantic spot I ever saw. I am becoming accustomed to the strict discipline, and have escaped with but few demerit marks, though some find it difficult to avoid getting their number as one hundred & fifty marks would dismiss a person…as some offences [sic] give five demerit a person has to be very careful in his conduct. We have permission to go on public lands but there are limits which must not be crossed, but occasionally some of the cadets have the boldness to cross the sentinels posts at night and go to a small village two or three miles down the river for the purpose of getting things which are not allowed, such as ice cream, candies, fruit, and (I am sorry to say) some even go for wines and other liquors. They always change their cadet clothes for citizen’s to prevent detection for the punishment of this offense is very severe and occasionally persons are dismissed and if not dismissed are confined in a light prison for three or four months. Night before last one of my classmates in company with two elder clansmen left camp about 11 o’clock at night went to the town and were seen by an officer who caught two of them, one of whom is my classmate, and both are now in confinement in their tents. One is in the tent next to mine and neither of them can leave their tents, and when they go to their meals they are marched under a guard of eight cadets. They will be courtmartialed and it is very probable that the ‘old’ cadet will be discharged and my classmate will be confined in prison for a few months… This seems hard but military law is very severe and those who overstep its boundaries must abide the consequences. We have two prisons here. One is a ‘light’ one and the other is a ‘dark’ one. The first one is a comfortable room and the only inconvenience is that the prisoner is allowed no hours for recreation and is marched to meals under a guard. But the dark prison is nothing more than a dungeon underground with not one ray of light and no furniture except a bed. It is seldom however that it is used, only in case of a very bad offence and then but for a short time.” In fine condition, with some mild staining. As evidenced by the fantastic content, Custer penned this letter very shortly after beginning his education at West Point—he had arrived in June 1857, and this letter from just two months later demonstrates his adjustment to the military life. While Custer did behave at first, his famous personality began to show through after the cadets returned from camp and began classes in September, where he began earning demerits for his rowdy behavior—‘trifling in ranks marching from parade,’ ‘calling ‘Corporal’ in a loud & boisterous voice,’ ‘hair out of uniform at guard meeting,’ ‘throwing snowballs on barrack steps,’ and ‘making noises at the sink’ were among his infractions. All together, he amassed an amazing 726 demerits by the time he graduated, which actually occurred a year early in June 1861, because of the need for trained officers at the outbreak of the Civil War—in keeping with his character, Custer ranked dead last in his class of 34 graduates. In content alone this is an exceptional letter, describing the conditions experienced by the cadets at West Point in the years leading up to the war—that it is penned by one of the most legendary, recognizable names in military history elevates it to a phenomenal, historically significant piece. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $1000)

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Doubleday inspects Fort Brown in Texas 465. Abner Doubleday. Docketing panel for the inspection report of Fort Brown in Texas, 3 x 7.75, commanded by Doubleday, dated June 1, 1873, consisting of 278 troops present, signed at the bottom by Doubleday forwarding the report to the Assistant Adjutant General. Matted and framed with a carte-de-visite of Doubleday, in an unusual Anthony and Scovill Company camera print hinged wood plate holder frame, with a stamped 1890 patent date, to an overall size of 12 x 14. In fine condition, with expected notations. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

466. Robert S. Granger. Ma-

jor General in the Union Army during the Civil War (1816–1894). War-dated partlyprinted DS, signed “R. S. Granger,” one page, 8 x 10, August 6, 1862. Certificate of discharge issued to Private Matthew A. Watt “of Captain Ferguson’s Company (‘J’) of the 23rd Regiment of Foot Volunteers of the State of Indiana…by reason of Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability.” Signed at the conclusion by Granger. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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467. Winfield Scott Hancock. Ink signature, “Truly yours,

Winfd. S. Hancock,” on an off-white 2.5 x 1.25 lightly-lined slip, clipped from the closing of a letter and affixed to a 3.25 x 2.25 off-white card. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


468. Winfield Scott Hancock. ALS signed “Winf’d S. Hancock,”

one page, lightly-lined, 4.75 x 7.75, June 6, 1866. Letter to a gentleman. Letter in his difficult to decipher hand regarding his plans and travels, mentioning Philadelphia and Gettysburg. Nicely matted and framed to an overall size of 10.25 x 13.25. In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

470. William Joseph Hardee. Confederate general known for his writings on military tactics and strategy (1815–1873). Civil War–dated ink signature, “W. J. Hardee, Lieut. General,” on an off-white 3 x 3 slip clipped from a larger document, dated February 12, 1864. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“The ‘Halleck’ paper to which you refer, I have not received”

469. Winfield Scott Hancock. LS signed “Winf’d S. Hancock,” one page, both sides, 4.75 x 7.75, February 27, 1880. Letter to General James Grant Wilson. In part: “I regret that I shall not be able to be at the meeting of ‘The Genealogical and Biographical Society’ tonight… The ‘Halleck’ paper to which you refer, I have not received, I think; I can not find it.” In very good condition, with light overall foxing and soiling. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

471. O. O. Howard. One-armed Union general (1830–1909) who

participated at Gettysburg and commanded the Army of Tennessee during Sherman’s March to the Sea. Bold ink signature, “Oliver Otis Howard, Major-General, U. S. Army (Retired),” on an off-white card. Matted with an engraved portrait to an overall size of 11.5 x 17. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Stonewall has “the secret police” infiltrate a covert Union meeting

472. Thomas J. ‘Stonewall’ Jackson. Civil War– dated ALS signed “T. J. Jackson, Mj Genl,” one page, lightly-lined, 7.25 x 4.75, Winchester, Virginia, March 6, 1862. Letter to a captain. In full: “This note will be handed to you by Mr. Kinser who is a member of the secret police.” Gorgeously suede-matted and framed with a descriptive plaque and portrait of Jackson to an overall size of 26 x 17.5. An overall block of toning from previous display, otherwise fine condition. Late in 1861, Brigadier General John H. Winder was appointed as provost-marshal for the State of Virginia, where he established a ‘secret police’ unit tasked with disrupting Unionist organizations rumored to have infiltrated the Confederate Army—one, called ‘Heroes of America,’ was the key group that they sought to dismantle, having reportedly taken over nearly the entire 54th Virginia. Winchester was a key position for the Confederacy, as it was well-connected by rail and road and served as a base of operations for several of their incursions into the North—a prime target for a covert Unionist group to target. By March 1862, several of members of this group had been apprehended, and the Confederate officers were said to have a list of 150 suspects. Jackson ordered a raid on a Unionist meeting on the evening of March 10, 1862, conducted by Captain John Q. A. Nadenbousch—likely the recipient of this letter. A fantastic and scarce war-dated letter with this extremely intriguing content. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA..…(MB $1000)

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The highest ranking officer to be killed in action 473. Albert Sidney Johnston. American military officer (1803–1862) who, upon hearing of the secession of Texas in 1861, became Confederate commander of the Western Department. ALS signed “A. S. Johnston, Col 2d Cavly & Bvt Brig Genl,” one page, 7.5 x 9.75, October 31, 1860. Letter to Major Hill. In full: “I have this day transferred to my pay accounts for the month of October 1860 to Mr. S. H. Bullen Cashier of the Bank of Kentucky or order, which you will please do me the favor to pay.” In fine condition. The day before penning this letter, Johnston was offered the position of commander of the Department of California, promptly accepting; two days later, uniting California and Oregon, he was appointed Commander of the Department of the Pacific and began preparations to move his family from Kentucky to San Francisco. Five months later, hearing that his adopted state of Texas had seceded (he had served in the Texas Army and as Secretary of War of the Republic of Texas), he resigned his post to become a general in the Confederate army. He would only fight for one year before falling at the Battle of Shiloh on April 6, 1862, becoming the highest-ranking officer, Union or Confederate, killed during the entire war. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

474. Fitzhugh Lee. American soldier and politician (1835–1905), and nephew of Robert E. Lee. He notably served as a Confederate cavalry general during the Civil War, the 40th Governor of Virginia, and a general during the SpanishAmerican War. ALS, two pages, lightly-lined on two adjoining sheets, 4.75 x 8, February 24, 1870. Letter to Violet Blair. In part: “My eyes have been hurting me so much Miss Violet B. Blair, that my seeing you Saturday has become quite doubtful.” In fine condition, with a couple tiny stains. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

475. James B. McPherson. Career US Army officer (1828–1864) who served as a general in the Union Army and was killed in action at the Battle of Atlanta—the second highest ranking Union officer killed during the war. Ink signature, “J. B. McPherson, Maj. Genl,” on an off-white 5.25 x 1.5 slip clipped from a document. In fine condition, with three vertical folds, two passing through single letters of the signature. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Filled with idealism before becoming the first Union general killed, Lyon writes on the course of study at West Point “by which alone we can escape the errors of past ages & render ourselves useful in Society and the World”

476. Nathaniel Lyons. Outspoken career army officer (1818–1861) who became the first Union general killed in the Civil War. Scarce ALS signed “N. Lyon,” four pages on two adjoining sheets, 7.75 x 10, West Point, May 17, 1840. Letter to George Work. In part: “While yet engaged in elementary pursuits, and subjected to the privations and hardships of a Cadet, I cannot prehaps [sic] duly appreciate the advantages the advantages afforded by the Military Academy…I deeply sympathize with you in having been unsuccessful in attaining an appointment…You must consider yourself as one among the sufferers in the general catastrophe, brought about by the unprincipled servants of the People…I expect no more appointments can be made from Ct, unless as you suggest some vacancy should accidentally occur…I fear you will not receive much encouragement in this respect, there being considerable strife throughout the country for admittance to the Academy…The advantages afforded by this Institution, are of course best known to those who have experienced them…I trust you will agree with me that, to divest ourselves of the prejudices of our Country, to be able to discriminate [sic] between right and wrong, and arrive at transcendental truth, are objects worthy of our attention—, by which alone we can escape the errors of past ages & render ourselves useful in Society and the World. We admit that these objects are in some measure obtained at many of the Literary Institutions of our country, while I humbly assert that the Military Academy possesses a superiority in this respect unparalleled in the world.” Lyon goes on to describe his course of study for the year. In fine condition, with intersecting folds and some mild staining. While Lyon’s strong moral convictions expressed in this letter would indicate an unfettered opposition of slavery—the “the errors of past ages”—he did not consider himself an abolitionist, finding them too radical for his tastes. As the years progressed his antislavery stance grew stronger, particularly as conflict erupted in the western part of the country with the admission of new states, in which the decision to allow or outlaw slavery needed to be made. He witnessed these arguments firsthand after being assigned to Fort Riley in Kansas, where the slavery question was to be determined by ‘popular sovereignty,’ spawning horrific violence in the territory. Lyon began to pen antislavery and proRepublican manifestos for the Western Kansas Express newspaper, denouncing what he called the ‘slavocracy.’ This experience made him a strong supporter of the Union cause, and in February 1861 he was made commander of the Union arsenal in St. Louis. In a valiant effort to rally his troops at the Battle of Wilson’s Creek on August 10, 1861, Lyon was wounded twice and his horse killed underneath him, leading him to commandeer an infantryman’s horse and ride back into battle, only to be shot through the heart on Bloody Hill at 9:30 a.m.—the first Union general to be killed in the war. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA..…(MB $300)

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“There is nothing you can do for me unless you can make Mr. Lincoln give up the ridiculous notion about not exchanging prisoners”

477. John Pegram. Confederate officer (1832–1865) who fought with distinction at Murfreesboro and Chickamauga; he was killed in action

in a skirmish at Hatcher’s Run, Virginia, in February of 1865. Civil War–dated ALS signed “Jno. Pegram,” one page, 9.75 x 7.75, Fort McHenry, September 4, [1861]. Letter to H. L. Abbot, a Union general and Pegram’s former classmate at West Point. In part: “That was a noble letter you sent me whilst I was at Bedford…My most sincere thanks…When the sectional bitterness is at its height, it is delightful to know that there are some who do not intend to allow it to influence their old friendships, or make them forget the duty of man to man. I hope that your wound has ceased to give you any trouble [Abbot was wounded at Bull Run]…I trust that you will not receive another during this cruel war. Of course I cannot wish success to your arms, but…I am far from having any bitterness to any of the Regulars who, like yourself, are led by their duty to take part in invading the Old Dominion. I heartily enter into your feelings about our poor friend Greble [John Trout Greble, also a West Point classmate, was the first regular army officer to die in action]…I do especially regret that he fell on Virginia soil, and deeply sympathize with his poor wife and family…he had not a single enemy…Thank you for your delicate offer of assistance. I really have no excuse for accepting… although I am a prisoner…I am very comfortable…there is nothing you can do for me unless you can make Mr. Lincoln give up the ridiculous notion about not exchanging prisoners. Remember me to any of my friends.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds (two vertical folds passing through letters of the signature and a tiny hole at one intersection). Pegram resigned his lieutenant’s commission in the US Army as soon as his native Virginia seceded, joining the CSA where he was given command of the 20th Virginia Infantry in Robert S. Garnett’s brigade. The brigade was met by George McClellan’s Union forces at Rich Mountain, Virginia, on July 9, 1861. With the support of of William Rosecrans and Thomas A. Morris, the Union troops attacked, splitting the Confederates in two—while one half managed to escape, Pegram controversially surrendered his entire regiment to the Federals on July 13. The rest of his troops were paroled but Pegram was taken as prisoner, making him the first Confederate officer captured during the war. He was held at Fort McHenry until September 11, 1861, which is where he wrote this letter. Lincoln had a generally strict policy on prisoner exchange during the war, disallowing the practice because every prisoner they released would simply increase the manpower of the Confederacy. This was relaxed for a period, and in January 1862 Pegram was paroled in Baltimore and allowed to travel to Richmond while awaiting a formal exchange for a captive Union officer. Penned near the beginning of the conflict, this exceptional letter demonstrates a level of respect and humanity between sides that would wane as the “cruel war” trudged on for the next four years. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA..…(MB $ 1000) www.RRAuction.com | 155


478. George E. Pickett. ALS signed “G. E. Pickett,” one page, lightly-lined, 7.75 x 9.75, November 14, 1853. Letter to Colonel Henry K. Craig, chief of ordnance in Washington, DC. In full: “I herewith have the honor to forward the Return of Ordnance & Ordnance Stores pertaining to Compy ‘I’ 8th Infy for the 3d Qr 1853.” In fine condition, with toning to mailing folds. A boldly penned letter with desirable military content. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

479. Winfield Scott. Union

general (1786– 1866) who was a hero of the War of 1812 and the Mexican War, and became Generalin-chief of the US Army in 1841, a position he still held at the start of the Civil War. A Virginian, he was the only nonWest Pointer of Southern origin in the Regular Army to remain loyal to the Union. ALS, one page, 4 x 5.25, September 11, 1850. Letter to a gentleman. In full: “After carefully reading the papers in the case of Mr. Stafford, I have placed near the bottom of the petition (under the name of H. Dennis) my recollections &c.” A small edge separation to one fold, horizontal fold passing through a portion of his first name, and light soiling, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by an unsigned engraved portrait. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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480. Winfield Scott. Bank check, 6 x 2.5, filled out and signed by

Scott, payable to Claget, Newton & May for $94.41, no date. Affixed to a mat with an engraved portrait of Scott and framed to an overall size of 11.5 x 17. In very good condition, with some small areas of paper loss to edges, a light vertical fold through a single letter of signature, dampstaining along bottom edge, cancellation cut to body, and some show-through from endorsement on reverse. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


Superior twice-signed 1886 cabinet portrait 481. William T. Sherman. Choice 4.25 x 6.5 cabinet bust portrait of Sherman in uniform, signed in the lower border in black ink, “W. T. Sherman, General, 1886,” and signed and inscribed on the reverse, “To Miss Carmelita Ferres, with best compliments of W. T. Sherman, General. San Francisco, Cal., Aug. 5, 1886.” Reverse also bears a light Kuhn Bros. of St. Louis photographer’s stamp. In fine condition. At the time of signing, Sherman was in San Francisco to deliver an address to the ‘National Encampment’ of the Grand Army of the Republic, in which he reflected on America’s wars to that point and concluded by saying that ‘the civil war demonstrated that we, its citizens, could defend the Government against the greatest of all enemies—ourselves.’ A beautiful photograph with a poignant association. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

482. William T. Sherman. ALS signed “W. T. Sherman, General,” one page, lightly-lined both sides, 5 x 8, Headquarters, Army of the United States letterhead, August 9, 1876. Letter to an acquaintance reads, in part: “I was at Oakland Sunday and Monday. All well there. Mrs. Dr. Alexander of St. Louis with two of her children are there also. Tunstalotte is back. So I have Whippin & Tunstalotte and you can take your ease. I have never seen a copy of the Galaxy unless I bought it at the store and wish you could write to Church and say if he collects the Rise he should be certain to have the pamphlets mailed.” In fine condition, with an almost complete split to hinge and blank second integral page. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“Your favor inviting me to deliver the address at Gettysburgh on Decoration Day has been rec’d” 483. Henry W. Slocum. Union general (1827–1894) who fought at

Gettysburg and accompanied Sherman on his March to the Sea. ALS signed “H. W. Slocum,” one page, 4.5 x 7.5, April 3, 1885. Letter to C. H. Bucklin. In full: “Your favor inviting me to deliver the address at Gettysburgh [sic] on Decoration Day has been rec’d, and I regret that another engagement made sometime since will prevent my acceptance.” Matted and framed with a portrait of Slocum in uniform to an overall size of 20.5 x 15.5. In fine condition, with a light paperclip impression to top edge. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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484. Edmund Kirby Smith. American military officer (1824–1893) who, after serving as lieutenant and captain in the Mexican-American War, became an officer in the Confederate Army. A key participant at Bull Run and Richmond, he was placed in charge of the TransMississippi Department in 1863 and ultimately reached the rank of full general. ALS signed “E. Kirby Smith,” one page, 4.75 x 7.75, January 31, 1890. Letter to an admirer. In part: “The first battle in which I was engaged was ‘Palo Alto,’ Mexico. If you refer only to the Civil War, the first battle was the ‘1st Manassas, or Bull Run’ and the last was ‘Jenkins’ Ferry’ Ark.” Matted and framed to an overall size of 10.25 x 13.25. A couple edge tears and lightly toned adhesive remnants to top and bottom, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Unique hand-colored presentation for a 19-year-old Massachusetts Volunteers captain 485. Ezra Jackson Trull. Union officer from Mas-

sachusetts (1843–1886) who went on to become one of the largest distillers in New England. Attractive and vibrantly-colored engraved lithograph, 18.25 x 22.25, by Forbes and Co. of Boston, presented to Captain Ezra J. Trull. Ornate lithograph lists Trull’s military service, including Cedar Mountain, Spotsylvania, and Petersburg, his regimental badges and stripes, and his six months as a POW at Libby Prison after his capture at Weldon Railroad. Framed to an overall size of 23.25 x 27.25. Some scattered toning and foxing to borders, otherwise fine condition. Oversized. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The Union’s highest-ranking “Pr of War” seeks supplies: “Our poor fellows here, many of whom are entirely destitute, would be most happy”

486. George Stoneman. Union cavalry officer (1822–1894) who was later elected the governor of California; during the Civil War, he was captured during a July 1864 attempt to free prisoners from the infamous Andersonville prison, becoming the Union army’s highest-ranking prisoner of war. Civil War–dated ALS, signed “George Stoneman, Maj. Gen’l, Pr of War,” one page both sides, 8 x 9.75, Mily Prison, Charleston, South Carolina, September 16, 1864. Letter to adjutant of the Sanitary Commission. In full: “I am informed by Gen’l Jones that he will receive and allow the prisoners of war to receiving sanitary stores and clothing whenever Gen’l Foster ‘thinks proper to send them.’ If you have any stores or clothing in hand for distribution our poor fellows here, many of whom are entirely destitute, would be most happy to receive them, and I know of no way in which the generosity of their relatives and friends can be better applied than in relieving the unfortunate Fed-prisoners now confined in this city. Should you think proper to make me your agent I will see that everything is properly applied and that the most needy and destitute are first supplied, which is not always the case. Gen’l Foster informs me that you have ‘a large lot of clothing’ and which you will send to Charleston if Gen’l Jones will receive them, which he says he will do an the prisoners here are anxiously expecting them.” Stoneman adds a brief postscript at the conclusion: “Will Gen’l Foster please forward this to its proper destination and oblige many prisoners.” Attractively triple-matted and framed with the back visible to an overall size of 21.5 x 15.5, hinged onto a lovely triple-matted display featuring two images and descriptive plaque, framed to an overall size of 28.5 x 34.5. Intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature), and a central band of toning to the first page, otherwise fine condition. By the summer of 1864, the population at Andersonville prison grew to over 33,000 inmates—overcrowded, severely lacking in food and medical supplies, and fighting against horrendous sanitary conditions, hundreds of prisoners were dying daily. In late July, having almost completely surrounded Atlanta, General Sherman sent Stoneman to destroy the railroads in Macon, hoping to cut off the Confederate supply lines. When given his assignment, he requested permission to—if successful—move east and attempt to release the prisoners at Andersonville. After a chaotic and disorganized effort to cut off Macon, Stoneman and his aide were captured on July 31, 1864. He was exchanged at General Sherman’s specific request in October 1864 for Confederate Brigadier General Daniel C. Govan and returned to duty. Written during his brief period as prisoner of war, this letter is characteristic of Stoneman’s concern for his fellow man—because of the poor conditions at Andersonville he volunteered for the risky task of freeing them, and, upon encountering a similar state once held captive himself, he aimed to obtain supplies for the other prisoners. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA..…(MB $500) www.RRAuction.com | 159


Fantastic letter written in the prelude to the Civil War— an event that would tear his family apart 487. J.E.B. Stuart.

ALS signed “J. E. B. Stuart, 1st Lt., 1st Cav,” one page both sides, 7.5 x 10, December 4, 1857. Letter to Virginia Senator R. M. T. Hunter, marked “Private” at the top. In part: My father-in-law Lieut. Col. Cooke 2nd Dragoons is now en route to Utah, and if not already arrived there, is no doubt struggling through the Canons of the Rocky Mountain passes, whilst the operations of the army are such as to urge upon Congress an increase particularly of the mounted force of our army. In such an event his just claims for preferment might possibly be set aside as they were in ’55 by one on the spot, and now as then he be left to plod his way through the very slow stages of regular promotion, unless some friend be able and willing to urge his claims to a successful issue. From a knowledge of your public character during the whole of your Senatorial career, not to omit the esteem in which you were held by my father the late Archibald Stuart of Patrick, I have felt secure in writing to you as such a friend, without Col Cooke’s knowledge or consent—to ask you to secure for him a Colonelcy in one of the new mounted Regts. I do not scruple to say that the record shows him eminently qualified for a higher position. Still I fancy that unless the army is increased beyond all expectations that any position beyond the grade of COL. has been already promised. I will not descant upon Col C.’s merits. His history is identified with our frontier history for the last 20 years. In the Sec’y War’s reports concerning Indian warfare in New Mexico in the Spring of ’54. the Souix Campaign ’55, and the most important and delicate trust of Kansas matters in ’56 (Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov.) as shown in Colonel Davis’ last report abundantly show more than I could say.” Letter is beautifully double-cloth-matted and framed, so both sides may be viewed, with a printed map of various trail routes and an image of a wagon train, to an overall size of 21 x 18.5. That frame is in turn affixed by hinges to its left edge to a larger mat and frame, which bears a small plaque, an oval portrait of Stuart, and a transcription of the letter, to an overall size of 28.5 x 34. In fine condition, with intersecting folds and a couple of trivial edge tears. Here, Stuart writes to the Virginian senator on behalf of his father in law, Philip St. George Cooke, an Army cavalry officer. At the time, Cooke, who was acquainted with Brigham Young, was taking part in the Utah expedition of 1857-58. Stuart’s letter advocating for his promotion may have worked, as Cooke was made a colonel following the expedition, taking command of the 2nd U.S. Dragoons. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Stuart would not have such kind words for his father-in-law, who sided with the Union. ‘He will regret it but once,’ Stuart said of Cooke’s decision, ‘and that will be continually.’ So great was this schism that in 1861 Stuart changed the name of his year-old son from Philip St. George Cooke Stuart to James Ewell Brown Stuart, Jr. Embarrassed by his son-in-law’s audacious raid encircling the Union army, Cooke left active field service after the Peninsular Campaign. An uncommon and lengthy letter revealing the nepotistic politics of the early American army, neatly penned by the future Confederate general. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA..…(MB $1000)

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Stuart mourns the death of his trusted adjutant at the 1863 Battle of Chancellorsville: “It becomes my painful duty to announce to the Division the death, from wounds received in action, of Major Channing Price”

488. J. E. B. Stuart. Manuscript DS, signed “J.E.B. Stuart, Major Genl Comdg,” one lightly-lined page, 7.75 x 9.75, May 10, 1863. This General Order No. 15 was written from Cavalry Division Headquarters in Northern Virginia and concerns the death of his right-hand man, Channing Price. In full: “It becomes my painful duty to announce to the Division the death, from wounds received in action, of Major Channing Price, Asst: Adjt: General, Cavalry Division. This gallant officer while at the post of duty near the Furnace, in Spottsylvania County, on the 1st of May, received a fatal wound, which in a few hours deprived the Division staff of its most efficient member, the country, of a faithful and gallant defender, and an afflicted family, of its brightest ornament. Surely Death loves a shining man. The purest and best have fallen: let their spirits animate those of us who survive. In token of respect for the memory of the deceased, the Division Staff will wear the usual military badge of mourning for thirty days.” Beautifully double-suede matted and framed with a color portrait of Stuart, and a descriptive plaque, to an overall size of 30 x 27. In fine, clean condition. Price’s demise came at the Battle of Chancellorsville, one of the many lives lost to secure a surprising Confederate victory. At one point during the fight, Stuart, Price, and General ‘Stonewall’ Jackson followed a small path in the dense growth of Catharine Furnace and came upon a Union encampment. Their initial round of artillery fire gave away their position, however, and resulted in a barrage of Northern return fire. In the heat of the battle, Price was wounded by shrapnel...and without a tourniquet to bind his wound, the piercing shortly turned fatal. Describing Price as a “gallant officer” whose death “deprived the Division staff of its most efficient member, the country, of a faithful and gallant defender,” Stuart immediately bought tourniquets for every member of his staff to carry. Ten days later, the general wrote General Order No. 15... and exactly one year to the day later, was himself mortally wounded. Oversized. RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

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weapons, uniforms, & artifacts Fragment of the Confederate battle flag of the 2nd South Carolina Infantry Regiment, captured at Cedar Creek 494. Confederate Battle Flag. This is a small, irregularly shaped piece of fabric that was neatly cut from a somewhat coarsely woven flag, consisting of a swatch of blue from one of the legs of the saltire, a single white five-pointed star, a section of white cloth tape edging, and a portion of the red field with the smudged remnants of the “...LL” of the stenciled Malvern Hill battle honor. The fragment is encased in a finely crafted modern frame that measures 28.5 x 20.5, and also houses a November 17, 1864, letter written by Colonel Horace G. Thomas, US Veterans Reserve Corps. Writing to the officers of the Eagle Hose Company of Buffalo, New York, (a volunteer fire company), Thomas presents the fragment, describing how he cut it from the flag while it was at the War Department under the care of the “officer who has charge of ‘Captured Rebel Flags’ and other trophies of the war.” Also housed in the frame is a carte-de-visite of George Maltby Love in the double-breasted frock coat of a Brigadier General and wearing his Medal of Honor. George Maltby Love was credited with the capture of the battle flag of the 2nd South Carolina at the battle at Cedar Creek on October 19, 1864, and was subsequently awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions. Love was affiliated with the Eagle Hose Company and evidently Colonel Thomas (either on his own or at Love’s request) wanted to send a piece of the famous flag to Love’s friends as a memento. Attached to the rear of the frame is an 1899 letter from Pierce & Zahn of Denver, Colorado, to noted Civil War veteran and collector James W. Eldridge offering the fragment for sale and relating that the Eagle Hose Company had disbanded and presented the fragment to an “R. Le Bert” (or “Le Beuf”). Also included are a copy of a William H. Murray sale catalog in which this item was sold, and Eldridge’s original collection tag and calling card. This is the only known surviving fragment of the 2nd South Carolina battle flag and is a fabulous, well-documented Civil War rarity. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Scarce Confederate navy cutlass built by Mole

495. Confederate Navy Cutglass. Courtney and Tennant,

Charleston SC. marked Confederate navy cutlass. This piece was built by Robert Mole in England and acquired for the Confederacy by George Tennant who was the agent for the Confederate Navy. This piece shows an 18.75˝ excellent blade. There is one area of fine pitting on both sides of the blade and some staining. The original washer is in place. Mole is correctly stamped as is the Courtney and Tennant marking. The black checkered grips are original and rate very good to excellent. The black leather scabbard is complete and rates excellent with only some age and surface crazing. The seams are solid with unpolished brass fittings. The uppermost 2.5˝ of the scabbard is in perfect condition, as it was protected by the frog. This piece is overall 24˝ and is one of the scarcer cutlasses as fitted with the full iron guard. This piece is in its as found condition, it has not been cleaned or polished. An excellent example for the serious Confederate naval collector. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300) 162 | April 16, 2014 | Weapons, Uniforms, and ArtifactS


496. James W. Eldridge. Excellent grouping of items from Sergeant James W. Eldridge. First, a November 1, 1862, document confirming the promotion of Private James W. Eldridge to the rank of Sergeant in Company A, 127th New York Volunteer Infantry, signed by Lt. Colonel Stewart L. Woodford (in lieu of the commanding officer, Colonel William Gurney) and countersigned by the regimental adjutant, 1st Lieutenant John L. Little, in well-executed Spencerian script. The document has a uniform shade of overall toning, not affecting its legibility, and several intersecting folds, otherwise fine condition. Archivally matted and framed (so both sides may be viewed) to an overall size of 26 x 16.5, along with a large, double-sided bronze medallion depicting the arms of the state of New York on the obverse; and an engraved presentation on the reverse. The shield-shaped medallion has a rich red-ochre patina throughout with some faint trace of brighter metal visible within the engraving itself. Also included is a carte-de-visite of Eldridge wearing a federal enlisted frock coat. On the front of the card is written in pencil, “Eldridge, James W.”, while on the reverse is: “1864/July 11/James W Eldridge/Sergeant/Co A/127th NYSVol/Infantry/Morris Island/SC.” James William Eldridge was 21 when he enlisted as a private on August 8, 1862, mustering into Co. A, 127th N.Y. Infantry on September 8. He was promoted to Corporal on October 6, and to Sergeant on November 1 (as noted in the framed certificate). Eldridge was discharged for promotion on August 12, 1864, and was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in Co. I, 23rd U.S. Colored Infantry the same day; just prior to the war’s end, he was promoted once more to 1st Lieutenant, and finally mustered out on May 5, 1865. After the war he embarked on a quest to preserve and document the struggle between the states by collecting artifacts and through his correspondence with participants on both sides of the conflict becoming one of the first serious collectors of Civil War memorabilia and items. The bulk of Eldridge’s collection today forms a part of the Henry E. Huntington Library collection in San Marino, California, but deaccessioned portions (of which these items were a part) were sold in October of 1910 by Walter H. Murray of Providence, Rhode Island. Also included with the items are copies of documents relating to Eldridge’s life and service. Oversized. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Civil War-era Maine-built Ramsdell percussion target rifle

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497. Maine-Built Ramsdell Percussion Target Rifle. This 20-pound percussion target/sharpshooter rifle was built by Charles V.

Ramsdell, Bangor, Maine, circa 1861. Ramsdell was perhaps the best known and highest-quality gun maker in Maine before the Civil War, working from 1850 to around 1870. This rifle has a back action lock and appears to be a cross-over between the 2nd and 3rd variations of the Ramsdell built rifles. The bore rates as bright, excellent and is approximately 48 caliber. The barrel measures 33.75˝ without the false muzzle. The front face of the nipple guard shows stylized serrations with a heart at the base. Both the barrel and lockplate show the maker’s name and the Bangor address. The barrel retains most of its original finish turning to patina. The top shows two screw hole plugs which may well have been mounting bases for a full telescopic sight. The under side shows a similar plug which probably accommodates a barrel rest. All of the fittings show a strong case color. The stock is rather plain and may lead to speculation of military use. The tang wood shows a small crack behind the hammer and a wood repair on the right side. The piece is mounted with a tang lollypop rear adjustable sight and a tunnel target sight with a fold-down protector. This piece is an excellent example of one of the Ramsdell target/sharpshooter rifles. This is an antique and transfers with no federal restriction. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300) www.RRAuction.com | 163


More photos available online at www.RRAuction.com

498. Indian Trapdoor Carbine Little Bighorn Range, 1873. Serial #13814, 45-70, 22″ barrel with a dark bore with moderate pitting along its length and faint traces of the original rifling still visible. This is a great looking carbine which has an attractive mottled gray/plum-brown patina with even, pinprick pitting throughout. Original model 1873 parts are still present: the high-arch breech-block, narrow receiver, 500 yd carbine rear sight with 1200 yd. ladder; pinned front sight blade; and the original low comb, long wrist stock. There is dusting of minor surface rust on both the front and the original low comb, long wrist stock. There is a dusting of minor surface rust on both the front and rear sights with some heavier oxidation on the triggerguard. The hammer is from a later gun and has the finely checkered thumb-print but the lock is still the original two-click type and the breechblock latch shows surface damage from being struck by the original hammer which was either misshapen or broken. The stock has a still-visible cartouche with a not-uncommon repaired break through the wrist, which runs from the top center of the wrist forward along the grain to just underneath the front sling bar mount. The wood is held by a series of small irregular sized metal brads and the impression of an earlier wire wrap repair can still be seen midway down the wrist. The wood has an old added oil finish applied during the period of use over numerous small handling marks and blemishes and has a line that has been worn away to raw wood by the sling ring. Many years ago this carbine was found on a ranch southeast of the Cypress Hills area of Saskatchewan (not far from Wood Mountain where Sitting Bull and his band fled in 1877 to escape the US Army, which was determined to exact revenge following the Little Bighorn). The ranch was established in the 1870s and has been occupied by three generations of the same family, whose understanding was that the gun had been left in Canada when Sitting Bull and his band had returned to the US to surrender. This is a fabulous early trapdoor which has spectacular eyeappeal and a terrific connection to the Plains Indians. This is an antique and transfers with no federal restriction. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Sharps new model 1863 carbine issued to Private Edward Carpenter, 6th Illinois Cavalry

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499. Sharps New Model 1863 Carbine. Serial #76700, .50-70, 22˝ barrel with a fair, three-groove bore that has dark freckling, heaviest about midway down. Predominantly plum-brown patina mixing with some original blue along the barrel and some gray fading at the muzzle. The frame likewise has a dull brown patina throughout with some bright gray along the raised edges and projections. The sling bar and ring have a mottled gray patina with spots of dark plum-brown freckling and pinprick pitting on the rear mount. The correct walnut buttstock without patchbox has numerous minor handling marks in the original oil finish as well as some with-the-grain drying cracks at the toe of the butt. The walnut fore-end matches the condition of the buttstock with a single straight crack running up from the frame and through the screw bolster. The action lock-up is still tight and functions flawlessly. Prior to its conversion to cartridge, this was a Civil War-issued carbine, and is listed in Coates & McAuley’s book as having been issued to: Carpenter, E.W., Co. C. Edward Carpenter, a resident of Jacksonville, Illinois, enlisted on September 3, 1861, as a private and mustered into Co. C, 6th Illinois Cavalry on November 19. He served throughout the war but died on June 17, 1864, just three months shy of the end of his enlistment. This is an antique and transfers with no federal restriction. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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military 503. Edmund Allenby. British

soldier and administrator (1861–1936) most famous for his role during World War I, in which he led the Egyptian Expeditionary Force in the conquest of Palestine and Syria in 1917 and 1918. Matte-finish 6.25 x 8.75 photo of Allenby, dressed in his full military uniform, casually sitting in a patio chair on grass in front of a building, signed in black ink, “Allenby.” Photo is affixed to an 8.75 x 11 mount. In fine condition, with a stray ink mark to lower left corner. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“Don’t forget that the children of a poor Army officer must eat” 504. Hap Arnold. Scarce ALS signed “H. H. Arnold,” one page, 5.25 x 8, War Department letterhead, May 11, 1936. Letter to Tom Mahoney, an editor. In full: “In my letter to you today enclosing the article—I did not mention price. Let your conscious [sic] be your guide but don’t forget that the children of a poor Army officer must eat.” In fine condition. Quite scarce, this is the first Arnold ALS we have offered. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 505. Pierre Augereau. Marshal of France and Duke of Castiglione (1757–1816). Partly-printed DS in French, signed “Augereau,” one page, 8 x 10.5, March 17, 1804. Augereau, as commander of the Army at Brest, orders Brigadier General Donzelot of the same army to leave at once within 24 hours, with this order serving in lieu of a passport, crossing all barriers in the Empire.” Central horizontal and vertical folds, missing seal, a small pencil notation, and a thin caption affixed to bottom edge, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“I’m afraid I haven’t managed to crack Princess Grace’s record for speed of reply” 506. Douglas Bader. British pilot

(1910–1982) who lost both his legs in 1931 but continued to fly in WWII with the use of artificial limbs. TLS, one page, 5.75 x 8, personal letterhead, February 6, 1979. Letter to a collector. In part: “I am returning the First Day Cover, duly signed, for your collection. I’m afraid I haven’t managed to crack Princess Grace’s record for speed of reply, but as I only returned from abroad a few days ago, I feel sure you won’t hold it against me!” In fine condition. The FDC is not included. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Remarkable content advocating the release of Rudolf Hess 507. Mark W. Clark.

American general during World War II and the Korean War (1896–1984). TLS, one page, 8.5 x 11, The Citadel letterhead, April 5, 1977. Response to an inquiry about convicted Nazi war criminal Rudolf Hess. In part: “I note your question about the imprisonment of Rudolph [sic] Hess. I think he should be released. I see no useful purpose in punishing him in his declining years. He has had sufficient punishment already.” In fine condition, with unobtrusive creases. Hess was found guilty at the first and most famous of the Nuremberg Trials in 1946, sentenced to life, and sent to Spandau Prison, where he remained until committing suicide in 1987. Despite numerous appeals from his family and prominent politicians, all petitions for an early release were blocked by the Soviet Union. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) www.RRAuction.com | 165


508. Omar Bradley. ALS signed “Omar N. Bradley,” one page, 7.25 x 10.5, personal five-star letterhead, November 28, 1967. Letter to Ken Browne. In part: “I appreciate your kind remarks concerning our article in Look Magazine, and I am glad that you agree with our general ideas. Thank you for the invitation to look you up if we get to Arizona. We do go back and forth to California once in awhile but we usually take a direct flight. It was nice of you to invite us anyway.” In fine condition, with a tiny tear to the left edge. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

509. George A. Custer. Hand-addressed mailing envelope, 8.25 x 3.75, addressed by Custer to, “Mrs. Genl. G. A. Custer, Gross Isle [sic], Care of K. C. Barker, Mich,” bearing two postal cancellation stamps. Custer had initially written “Monroe,” but crossed it out. In fine condition, with one cancellation affecting three letters of the first line, a mild ink blot near the bottom, and a rough left edge from opening. Kirkland C. Barker was mayor of Detroit from 1864–65 and a close friend of George Custer; his wife, Elizabeth Custer, stayed at Barker’s home on Grosse Isle in Michigan for periods of time while her husband was deployed to Kansas in 1868–69. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Property stamp for the 7th Cavalry— plus a scarce autograph of its illustrious commander

510. George A. Custer. Large letterpress-style

hand-held stamp with three lines of metal letters typeset on an 18 x 10 x 0.5 block of wood, reading: “US ARMY, 7TH CAVALRY, TRP H.” A 3˝ tall solid brass spherical knob and two metal handles are attached to the reverse, as well as a label lightly written in pencil that reads: “U. S. Army, 7th Cavalry Tp. H, Fort Lincoln, D. T.” This belonged to Captain Frederick W. Benteen, and would have been used to stamp boxes, trunks, and other property belonging to his troop. Benteen was assigned to Custer’s 7th Cavalry Regiment in 1867, and commanded Troop H for the next 16 years. Most notably, he was in command of a battalion (Companies D, H, and K) of the 7th Cavalry at the Battle of the Little Bighorn on June 25 and 26, 1876. Also includes a hand-addressed mailing envelope, 5 x 3, addressed by Custer to “Mrs. Genl. G. A. Custer, Monroe, Mich,” with the town struck through and changed in another hand to “Fort Lavenworth [sic] Kans.” Envelope also bears a pair of canceled three-cent George Washington postage stamps. Stamper is in very good condition, with general expected wear and soiling from age and use, and the envelope is in fine condition, with a few small stains and a torn right edge. A fantastic pairing of items, each scarce on its own. RR Auction COA.…(MB $500) 166 | April 16, 2014 | MILITARY


Thanking Pach Bros. for the “group photograph of Admiral Farragut, General Sheridan, and others” 511. George Dewey. American admiral (1837–1917) best known for his fabled victory at the Battle of Manila Bay during the Spanish-American War. LS, two pages on two adjoining sheets, 4.75 x 8, Flagship Olympia letterhead, June 29, 1899. Letter to the Pach Bros. photography studio in New York. In part: “My aide, Mr. Scott, has just given me the group photograph of Admiral Farragut, General Sheridan, and others, that you sent to me through him and I beg to express my appreciation of your remembrance.” In fine condition, with toning to edges. Accompanied by an unsigned vintage photo of Dewey. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Oversized Karsh portrait of the Medal of Honor recipient 512. James Doolittle. Matte-finish 10

x 13 Karsh photo of Doolittle in full uniform as a three-star general, signed and inscribed in the lower border in black ink, “To Greta and Eric Heckett: In sincere appreciation of their many kindnesses and valued friendship. J. H. Doolittle.” In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

513. Enola Gay.

Three signed photos: color satin-finish 10 x 8 photo of the Enola Gay, signed in blue felt tip, “Paul Tibbets, Pilot, 6 Aug. 1945”; cardstock 8 x 10 head-andshoulders portrait of Tibbets in uniform, signed in blue felt tip; and a cardstock 8 x 10 photo of George Caron, signed in black felt tip, “George R. Caron, Tail Gunner—Enola Gay.” In overall fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“We dropped Little Boy from an altitude of 30,060 feet on August 6, 1945 at 9:15 AM Tinian time” 514. Enola Gay: Dutch Van Kirk. Amazing satin-finish 14 x 11 photo of the atomic bomb’s devastating aftermath in Hiroshima, signed with a lengthy message in black felt tip, “The skies were clear as I helped Tibbets and Ferebee locate our aiming points in Hiroshima. We dropped Little Boy from an altitude of 30,060 feet on August 6, 1945 at 9:15 AM Tinian time. The 9400 lb bomb detonated 43 seconds later at an altitude of 1800 feet over the city of Hiroshima. There was a bright flash followed by two shock waves measured at 3.5 G’s. This mission was necessary to end the war with minimum loss of life. It saved the large casualties that would have resulted from an invasion of Japan. Dutch Van Kirk, Navigator—Enola Gay, Hiroshima, 6 Aug. 1945.” In fine condition, with Van Kirk using two different pens to accomplish the long statement. A terrific firsthand account from the Enola Gay navigator, providing great insight into the actions and mindset of the crew. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The important Californian, rarely found signed in full 515. John C. Fremont. ALS signed

“John Charles Fremont,” one page, 7.25 x 9.25, January 21, 1852. Letter to Thomas King. In full: “I have to acknowledge the receipt of your note of Dec’r 10th, and take pleasure in complying with a request so agreeably made.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature), a tear to the bottom edge, and a couple small stains. Accompanied by an unsigned engraved portrait. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Exceedingly early endorsement while serving at Annapolis

516. William F. Halsey. Endorsement signature, “W. F. Halsey,” on the reverse of a midshipman’s complaint, one page, 7.75 x 10, October 13, 1904. The complaint, in full: “I respectfully request permission to say that I was charged twice for my trunk and dress suit, amounting to $11.25.” In fine condition, with mounting remnants to the panel beside Halsey’s signature. Halsey had just graduated from Annapolis in February 1904, after which he was assigned to the USS Missouri. For a period of time while the Missouri was being repaired, Halsey was detached to the Naval Academy for temporary duty as assistant backfield football coach; it was during this time that he endorsed this letter. This is the earliest Halsey example we have ever encountered by a significant margin—over three decades. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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517. Joseph Joffre. Commander in

chief of the French army from 1914– 1916; hailed as the savior of France for his victory at the Marne. Matte-finish 5.5 x 8 photo of Joffre in his full dress uniform, signed and inscribed in the lower border in fountain pen to writer and poet George Sylvester Viereck, “A M. George Sylvester Viereck, J. Joffre.” An affixed monogram label to lower right, single tack hole to three corner tips, paperclip impression to left edge, and a bit of light silvering, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

518. Jean Bapt i s t e K l e b e r.

French Revolutionary general (1753– 1800) who was left in command of the French forces in Egypt when Napoleon returned to Paris. He was assassinated by a student in Cairo on June 14, 1800. Scarce LS in French, signed “Kleber,” one page, 8 x 12, engraved Kleber General en Chef letterhead, March 1, 1800. Untranslated letter ordering the pay master to make a payment of 4500 livres. Signed at the conclusion by Kleber and countersigned by four others. In very good condition, with intersecting folds, scattered light toning and soiling, heavier to top portion, rough left edge, and a couple of small pencil and typed notations to edges. Accompanied by an engraved portrait. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

519. Ferdinand de Lesseps.

French diplomat (1805–1894) who spearheaded the project to build the Suez Canal. ALS in French, signed “Ferd. de Lesseps,” one page, 5 x 7, February 3, 1868. Untranslated letter to an unidentified woman from whom he accepts a dinner invitation. In fine condition, with a few spots of trivial toning. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)


Continuing his advance in the Pacific, MacArthur takes time to comply with a young boy’s request 520. Douglas MacArthur. War-dated fountain pen signature, “Douglas MacArthur,” on an

off-white 4 x 5.25 photostat of a young boy’s letter asking for his autograph dated November 30, 1943. In fine condition, with a horizontal mailing fold. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

521. Douglas MacArthur. De-

sirable matte-finish 8 x 10 portrait of MacArthur in uniform, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Col. Rider, with cordial regard, Douglas MacArthur, Tokyo—1946.” Corner tip creases and inscription and signature light but legible, otherwise fine condition. After WWII, MacArthur’s headquarters were located in Tokyo, from where he helped Japan to rebuild itself following the devastation of war; overseeing this redevelopment, MacArthur was effectively the interim leader of Japan from 1945 until 1948. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Uncommon oversized Harris and Ewing image 522. George C. Marshall. Crystal-

clear vintage mattefinish 11.25 x 14.5 Harris and Ewing portrait of Marshall in a suit and tie, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Willis Mahoney, with warm regards—G. C. Marshall.” In fine condition, with mild toning around borders of the image and slightly trimmed edges. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

523. George C. Marshall. TLS signed “G. C. Marshall,” one page, 6.5 x 8.5, American National Red Cross letterhead, no date, but postmarked December 30, 1949. Thank you letter reads in full: “Mrs. Marshall and I appreciate your Season’s Greetings which were expressed so cleverly, but what we especially appreciate is your gracious thought of us. With our best wishes to you both for the New Year.” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Important World War II commanders including Omar Bradley, Ernest King, and ‘Hap’ Arnold 524. Military Leaders. Collection of seven postal covers, two with cachets, dated from the 1930s–40s, each signed in fountain pen by a World War II military leader(s). Signers are: Omar Bradley; David Sellers; Ernest J. King (2); Mark W. Clark; H. H. Arnold; and Omar Bradley and Ralph Royce. Several of the covers have small affixed photos and captions, and the Sellers, Bradley, and one of the King’s are also postmarked with locations that match the signers’ names. In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

525. Nelson A. Miles.

American soldier (1839– 1925) who is the only man to serve as an officer in the Civil War, Indian Wars, and Spanish-American War. Ink signature, “Nelson A. Miles, Major General, U. S. Army,” on an off-white card. Card is affixed to a mat with a portrait of Miles, and framed to an overall size of 11.5 x 17. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

526. Mountbatten of Burma. TLS, one page,

6.5 x 8.5, personal letterhead, February 17, 1975. Letter to Colonel Pentland, with the greeting and closing written in Mountbatten’s hand. In part: “Unfortunately, I shall have just left your part of the world as I have to be back in England for the annual Burma Star Reunion at the end of April. I will, however, show your letter to the Prince of Wales with whom I am flying to India and Nepal on Wednesday.” Framed to an overall size of 7.75 x 8.5. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Presenting a formal portrait to a well-known Florida philanthropist 527. Mountbatten of Burma. Matte-finish 6 x 7.25 photo of Mountbatten in full dress uniform, affixed to a 7.25 x 9.25 mount, signed and inscribed on the mount in black ink, “To Colonel Bob Pentland, with best wishes, Mountbatten of Burma A. F., April 1967”; and a TLS, one page, 7 x 9.5, on his personal letterhead, dated March 3, 1968. The letter to Pentland, with a handwritten greeting and closing by Mountbatten, reads, in part: “My first action is to write a letter to you to thank you very much indeed for all your kindness and hospitality to me during my short but exciting visit to Miami…The Variety Children’s Hospital is the best thing I have so far seen in Variety and as it owes much to you personally you must indeed feel proud of it.” Both are framed together to an overall size of 15.75 x 10.5. Signature and inscription fairly light, but mostly legible, and uniform toning and scattered light soiling to letter, otherwise very good condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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528. Chester Nimitz. Glossy

6.5 x 8.25 photo of Nimitz in front of a submarinethemed weather vane, signed and inscribed in fountain pen “To the Cummings—of Buckland Abbey—Aloha— from California, C. W. Nimitz.” Matted to an overall size of 10 x 12.5. In fine condition, with a couple of trivial creases to top left corner. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Nimitz receives an honorary Harvard degree 529. Chester Nimitz.

TLS signed “C. W. Nimitz,” one page, 8 x 10.5, Navy Department letterhead, June 12, 1946. Letter to attorney H. S. J. Sickel. In part: “Your congratulations on my receiving an honorary degree from Harvard University and your good wishes are sincerely appreciated.” In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

530. Pierre de Riel. French general during the French Revolutionary Wars and later a marshal of France (1752–1821). ALS in French, signed “Le Genl. Beuronville,” one page both sides, 7 x 9.25, October 14, 1805. Letter to Prince Ferdinand of Spain (later Ferdinand VII), whom he acknowledges the receipt of a letter permitting a certain gentleman to remain in Paris to be near his family, despite a Royal Decree ordering all Spanish travelers recalled.” Central horizontal and vertical folds, a couple of small pencil notations, and a bit of trivial foxing, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

531. John Sherman.

American politician, longtime United States Senator and author of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act (1823–1900). Sherman also served as secretary of the treasury to President Hayes and secretary of state to President McKinley. Two bank checks, both filled out and signed by Sherman, dated from 1863 and 1864. Both have revenue stamps affixed to the front, one initialed by Sherman. Central vertical folds to both, as well as cancellation cuts to bodies, neither affecting the signatures, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

532. Martial Valin. French Air

Force officer (1898–1980) who commanded the Free French Air Force from July, 1941, to June, 1944. Glossy 6.5 x 8.25 photo, signed and inscribed in fountain pen in French to Platoon Sergeant Burke and dated May 11, 1962. Photo is affixed to a 9.5 x 13 mount, along with a small caption in the collector’s hand. In fine condition, with some light silvering to darker areas of image, visible only at an angle, and foxing to the mount. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Historic archive regarding War Criminal Prison No. 1 533. Nuremberg Trial: War Criminal Prison No. 1. Archive of four reports and publications on Landsberg Prison, known following World War II as War Criminal Prison No. 1, where convicted Nazi war criminals were held and executed, most having been convicted at the Dachau or Nuremberg Trials. Consists of:

Brief typed description of the history of War Criminal Prison No. 1 headed “Draft,” 7.25 x 11.5, two pages, bearing a few handwritten notations. In part: “After the 1st World War and during the period of the German Republic the Prison was operated by the State of Bavaria and it was in this Prison during 1923–1924 that Adolf Hitler was confined after being convicted of High treason against the State of Bavaria. It was during this confinement that Hitler wrote his book ‘Mein Kampf’…The American Army took over the prison early in 1946…The Prison was formally designated WCP No 1 in Feb 1947. Many convicted War Criminals were sentenced to serve at this prison. Most of the war criminals who were sentenced to death were executed here. A total of 286 executions were completed here.” Detailed typed outline entitled “Operation of War Criminal Prison No. 1,” 8 x 10.5, 27 pages, November 1, 1949, notated “File” at the top of the first page. The document provides the specifics of everything from the construction of the building to a breakdown of meal rations provided for prisoners. Publication entitled Landsberg: A Documentary Report, released by the Office of the US High Commissioner for Germany, 8 x 10.5, 30 pages, stamped on the front cover, “Received, 5 Feb. 1951, WCP No. 1.” The report consists of information related to the evaluations conducted by US High Commissioner for Germany John J. McCloy regarding requests for the clemency of war criminals. Typed draft of a report entitled ‘The Life and Death of the Last Seven Red Jackets,’ by Alfred Heinrich, 8 x 10.5, 50 pages. The manuscript offers biographical information of the last seven men hanged at Landsberg, on June 7, 1951, and offers criticism of the decision to hang them rather than grant them clemency. Material is in overall good to very good condition, with moderate to significant dampstaining of most items, covers of the publication and first page of the Heinrich manuscript detached, and various creases and tears. During the occupation of Germany by the Allies after World War II, the US Army designated Landsberg Prison, located in in the town of Landsberg am Lech in Bavaria, Germany, as War Criminal Prison No. 1, where they held and executed convicted Nazi war criminals. The first prisoners arrived in December 1945 after being convicted in the Dachau Trials, which preceded the Nuremberg Trials. The Dachau Trials were conducted in 489 separate proceedings over the course of three years, and a total of 1,416 were convicted as war criminals, all of whom were sent to War Criminal Prison No. 1. The ‘Subsequent’ Nuremberg Trials—held after the first, most well-known trial of major Nazi figures—sentenced an additional 110 to the prison. The prison became especially controversial with the foundation of the Federal Republic of Germany in May 1949, which abolished the death penalty. Germans of all types—politicians, church leaders, businessmen, and artists—called for clemency of the prisoners and closure of the prison. It was at this point that John McCloy agreed to review the sentences of 28 convicted war criminals on death row, ultimately commuting the sentences of 21—this is what is described in Landsberg: A Documentary Report. The death sentences for the remaining seven were upheld, as described in Heinrich’s ‘The Life and Death of the Last Seven Red Jackets.’ Overall this is a historic archive of period items related to these most important postwar trials. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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Extraordinary near-complete set of the USS Pueblo crew 534. USS Pueblo. On January 23, 1968, the USS Pueblo, a Navy intelligence ship, was captured by North Korean forces, taking the crew as prisoners. The prisoners were released 11 months later, but the ship remains captive to this day. Amazing assemblage of 79 felt tip and ballpoint signatures of the USS Pueblo crew on three off-white sheets. Signers include: Lloyd M. Bucher, Monroe O. Goldman, R. Harris, Timothy L. Harris, James F. Kell, Gene Lacy, Wendell G. Leach, William Thomas Massie, Donald R. McClarren, Edward R. Murphy, Jr., William D. Scarborough, F. Carl Schumacher, and Dunnie R. Tuck, Jr. In overall fine condition, with punch holes and some surface loss to the magazine cover. A complete list of signers is available online at rrauction.com. An extremely rare set of autographs as it features 79 of the 82 members of the crew, including the especially rare William D. Scarborough, who passed away in 1970. A fantastic and likely unique item related to one of the most dramatic incidents of the era. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Scarce 1795 uniform requisition following his last great achievement 535. Anthony Wayne. Revolutionary War general (1745–1796) whose daring tactics earned him the nickname ‘Mad Anthony.’ Manuscript DS, signed “Anty. Wayne,” one page, 7.75 x 5.5, Greensville, Ohio, October 2, 1795. Requisition document for various supplies. In full: “Please to issue three coats, four vests, eight pair of woolen overalls (Serg’ts), one tunic coat, twelve caps, twelve coats, two vests, thirty two shirts, twenty pair woolden overalls, fourteen stocks, fourteen clasps, & sixteen pair of shoes (Privates).” Signed at the conclusion by Wayne and countersigned by his adjutant general, John Mills. Professionally silked on the reverse. In very good condition, with various blocks of toning and a few previous tears and separations to folds. After distinguishing himself during the Revolution, Wayne returned to civilian life before being called back into service by George Washington to lead an expedition in the Northwest Indian War in 1793. Until that point the war had been disastrous for the American forces, suffering tremendous casualty rates and making little progress. Wayne was able to turn the war around and lead troops to victory at the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794, the last major battle of the war. He negotiated the Treaty of Greenville the following year, on August 3, 1795—two months prior to this requisition document—which ceded large portions of Ohio territory to the US. Although the treaty was in place when Wayne requested these uniforms, hostilities continued as white settlers crossed the line established by the treaty, encroaching upon Native American lands. A significant official request from the early American military hero. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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space artifacts Beaulieu camera that spent three years in space

540. Cosmonauts. Extensively flown Beaulieu movie camera flown to the Salyut 6 space station on board Soyuz 26 in 1977 and returned to

earth three years later on board Soyuz T-3. This 16 mm camera is fitted with a semi-automatic P. Angenieux (Paris) 120 mm zoom lens that is designed for outdoor use only. During the period this was on board the space station it was available for use (during EVAs only) by a total of 29 cosmonauts who served aboard Salyut 6, including Yuri Romanenko, Georgi Grechko, Vladimir Dzhanibekov, Oleg Makarov, Aleksei Gubarev, Valery Bykovsky, Leonid Kizim, and Gennady Strekalov. Camera is accompanied by a counterbalance and battery which screws into the bottom. Also accompanied by a typed letter of authenticity from Valery Bykovsky, listing the 29 cosmonauts who had access to the camera while it was in space. In fine and apparent working condition. A total of three space walks were conducted on Salyut 6 from 1977–1979, although it is unknown if this camera was used during any of the EVAs. Provenance: Ex-Valery Bykovsky; Superior Auction. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Glove used in the vacuum of space during “construction of special structures on the exterior of Space Station MIR”

541. MIR EO-9 Glove: Anatoli Artsebarski. Cosmonaut Anatoli Artsebarski’s flown Soyuz TM-12/Mir EO-9 extra vehicular activity glove. Left-handed glove is numbered and lettered in Russian and is complete with the locking coupling. Glove consists of an outer thermal-insulated nylon canvas, pebbled rubber palm and finger pads, rounded blue rubber fingertips, two Velcro flaps above the knuckles, and a mirror strapped around the wrist. Inner Velcro flap is signed by Artsebarski and dated October 10, 1991, the day that the Soyuz TM-12 mission returned to Earth. Includes a signed letter of provenance from Artsebarski dated February 9, 1994, in full: “This glove was only used in the vacuum of space. I used this very glove for 3 Extra Vehicular Activities during my 5 month stay aboard the Russian Space Station MIR in 1991. My activities in vacuum wearing this glove included construction of special structures on the exterior of Space Station MIR.” In fine condition, with expected wear from use. Provenance: Superior, Fall 2001. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 174 | April 16, 2014 | SPACE ARTIFACTS


Cosmonaut mirror worn in space for a four-hour space walk outside of Mir 542. Flown Cosmonaut EVA Mirror.

Flown and used mirror #133 worn by cosmonaut Aleksandr Volkov during a four-hour-and-twenty -minute space walk outside the Mir Space Station on February 20, 1992, during his 175-day stay aboard the station. Mirror measures 2.25 x 3 and is housed in a simple plastic frame. A multi-colored elastic loop is attached to both sides to be worn over the bulky sleeve of the space suit. Reverse of the mirror is stamped “133,” and signed in blue ballpoint by Volkov. Accompanied by a letter of provenance, in Russian, signed by Volkov, which reads (translated): “Mirror No. 133 used during a space walk. It was worn on the sleeve of the ‘Orlan DMA’ space suit of Mission Commander Volkov during his 4 hour and 20 minute space walk, on 20 Feb 1992.” In fine condition, with several small cracks and separations to plastic frame. The purpose of Volkov’s space walk was to dismantle external experimental equipment and clean camera lenses. The session had been cut short because of a fault in a heat exchanger in Volkov’s spacesuit. Provenance: Superior Space Memorabilia Auction; Fall 1996. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

543. Liberty Bell 7. A limited edition presentation containing a 1.5˝

long segment of film from Liberty Bell 7’s pilot observation camera, recovered from the Atlantic Ocean on July 20, 1999, from a depth of 16,043 feet. Strip is housed in a triangular acrylic, numbered 666/1000, with an image of the space craft and Gus Grissom, and two explanatory plaques on the reverse, stating that the film contained the only in-flight images of Grissom and the harrowing moments after splashdown, and was issued in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of Grissom’s flight by the Kansas Cosmosphere. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

544. Guenter Wendt. Flown soft white cloth wipe from the Mercury-

Atlas 9 mission sealed in its original clear laminate film packaging, 2.75 x 3.25, bearing a piece of red Velcro to reverse. In fine condition. Originates from the collection of pad leader Guenter Wendt. Provenance: Superior, Spring 1999. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Launch day gag pulled on Schirra 545. Wally Schirra ‘Gotcha’ Ignition Key. Launch day ‘gotcha’ prank

executed by space craft technicians on Schirra the day of his Mercury launch. This practical joke consists of the Hand Controller Lock Safety Pin, which measures 6˝ long with a small push-button release at the top. This pin has been fitted with a key ignition system taken from an old automobile, including a key attached to a leather carrying case, monogrammed with Schirra’s initials on one side and the Mercury 7 logo on the reverse. The safety pin retains its red fabric flag with the metal McDonnell/NASA parts tag at the top, labelled “Pin Hand Controller Lock Safety.” In fine condition. Well-known for his ‘gotchas,’ including smuggling a corned beef sandwich onto Gemini 3, this time the joke was on Schirra. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Comical coupon and ‘fare’ for Cooper’s “Ride of Your Life” 546. Guenter Wendt and Gordon Cooper. Two

items comprising of a gag coupon and fare payment for Cooper’s Mercury flight: a handwritten gag coupon, signed “G. F. Wendt, Proprietor,” 3 x 2, given to Cooper before his flight, which reads, “You are the winner of our ‘Around the World’ contest. Present this ticket and 25¢ at Pad #14 at your convenience for the ‘Ride of Your Life.’” Coupon is laminated to a slightly larger size; and a presentation plaque given to Wendt by Cooper, 3.5 x 3.5, containing the 1963 US quarter given by Cooper to Wendt for his ‘fare’ and an engraved plaque which reads, “To the Proprietor of Pad 14, Guenter Wendt, the fare for the ‘Ride of My Life’ Gordo Cooper.” Plaque features a Lucite covering. Accompanied by a clipped 5.25 x 7 newspaper photo from May 17, 1963, of Wendt holding both the coupon and the quarter, and recounting the story stating that Wendt gave Cooper the coupon when he was named pilot for his Mercury flight. In fine condition, with uniform toning to laminate and Lucite. A great gag which shows the mutual admiration and respect the legendary pad leader had for Cooper and the rest of the Mercury astronauts. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 176 | April 16, 2014 | SPACE ARTIFACTS


547. LR-101 Thruster Nozzle.

LR-101 thruster nozzle, the type used on the Mercury Atlas as the Vernier Thruster, intended for application on the Atlas, Thor launch system. Nozzle measures 14.25˝ long, with the nozzle having a diameter of 5˝. Nozzle appears unused, with stamped assembly number on the rim of the base. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

548. Project Mercury. Extremely rare original operations manual titled “Project Mercury Spacecraft 16 Flight Operations Manual,” contract NAS 5-59, basic date August 1, 1962, and revision date August 10, 1962. Manual is in its original three-ring binder, measures 10.25 x 11.5, and contains over 100 pages. The title page states, “This document contains astronaut and ground controller information,” and bears printed signatures of four officials, including Sigma 7 astronaut Wally Schirra. Manual is full of flow charts, check lists, and procedures towards the lift-off of the vehicle. In very good condition, with scattered soiling (heavier on the first page) and toning, and expected light handling wear. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

550. Dave Scott. Engine actuator, 27˝ long and weighing almost

43 pounds. Actuator bears a maker’s label which reads, “Moog Servocontrols, Inc. Actuator Serial No. 21, Model No. 17–189A.” Part comes with a 30 x 12.5 wooden display stand, with a handpainted presentation which reads, “Presented to D. R. Scott, Cmdr., Apollo 15 by Dr. J. C. Houbolt and the ‘Back Room Boys’ at NASA…4/1/72… (Navigational Actuator #5). ‘It Worked.’” In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

551. KSC Fire Patch. Flown John F. Kennedy Space Center Fire Department patch, 4˝ in diameter, carried on board the shuttle Discovery on STS-70 by Don Thomas, and signed on the reverse of the patch in black ballpoint by Thomas, listing all four of his shuttle missions. Accompanied by a copy of a certificate of authenticity from NASA for 40 flown patches, with Thomas adding in blue ink, “I flew this with great pleasure on STS-70/Discovery. Don Thomas.” In fine condition. Accompanied by an unsigned fire department commemorative cover and window decal. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

549. Gemini. Set of 20 different blueprints for various systems of the Gemini Capsule, 17 x 11, including power systems, “retrograde sequential system,” “post impact sequential system,” “communications system,” “ASCS thrust control and sequencing,” “instrumentation system,” “periscope system,” “clock system,” and “bio-medical system.” A central vertical fold, toning to the borders, and a rusty binding staple to the upper left corner, otherwise fine condition. Provenance: Aurora Auction, November 2003, The Deke Slayton Estate collection. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Remarkable cue card—personally certified by Aldrin as “Flown to the Moon Apollo XI”

552. Apollo 11. Two adjoined Velcro-backed cue cards from the Apollo 11 mission. First card measures 2.5 x 8 and is headed at the top, “EMS–AV to 7000 fps, Boost,” and starts at T -3:00, continues to lift-off, and ends at “11:50 Insersion.” This card is signed at the top in black felt tip, “Buzz Aldrin,” and signed again on the reverse with the confirmation “Flown to the Moon, Buzz Aldrin, Apollo XI.” Attached to the bottom of the first card is laminated 2.5 x 8 cue card, printed primarily in red, headed “Mode I,” and “Mode II–III–IV,” with both modes starting with “Abort.” In fine condition, with some scattered light toning and soiling. The cue card details contingency abort activities (automatic and crew initiated) during the critical boost phase of flight from launch through earth orbit insertion which would allow the crew to effect an early return or achieve orbit in the event of a critical launch vehicle or Command Service Module (CSM) anomaly. The card addresses four abort modes. Mode 1 (enabled up to 19 miles altitude) leveraged the Launch Escape System (LES) to separate and ferry away the Apollo Command Module from the booster; Mode II (after jettison of the LES) utilized the Service Propulsion System (SPS) and Command Module Reaction Control Engines (RCS); Mode III (Contingency Orbit Insertion or COI) employs the Saturn V third stage (S-IVB); and Mode IV uses the SPS to achieve CSM orbit in the event the S-IVB is unable to do so. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $1000)

553. Space Shuttle Tile. Available

to US bidders only. Triangular-shaped black thermal protection system tile measures 8˝ at its widest point, with NASA identification numbers stenciled on one side, “V070395903-053.” Tile has also been decommissioned with red paint “Scrap.” In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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554. STS-91. Printed

fabric flag, 5.5 x 3.75, flown to the Mir space station on board the Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-91 in June of 1998. Flag is affixed to an 11 x 14 certificate presented to Janet S. Lavender in commemoration of the Phase 1 Shuttle-Mir program. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


space & aviation Ultra rare oversized and uninscribed ‘Flag Deployment’ crew signed photo 555. Apollo 11. Rare oversized color satin-finish 14 x 11 photo of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin deploying the American flag on the lunar surface, signed in black felt tip by Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins. Creasing to all four corner tips and bottom edge, most of which could be matted out, otherwise fine condition. A coveted photograph of Neil Armstrong on the moon signed by the complete Apollo 11 crew. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

Extremely desirable Type 3 insurance cover from Aldrin’s personal collection 556. Apollo 11.

Apollo 11 ‘Type 3’ insurance cover with a cachet of the mission insignia, bearing a July 16, 1969, Kennedy Space Center cancellation, numbered on the reverse “BA04,” signed in blue felt tip by Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins. The cover is lightly affixed by two corners to a printed informational sheet signed by Buzz Aldrin, which reads, in part: “This Manned Spacecraft Center Stamp Club postal cover… is one of the ‘insurance covers’ signed by the Apollo 11 crew before our launch on July 16, 1969…The cover displayed above has been in my private collection since 1969 and has an identifier of BA04 written on the reverse side. It was signed by the Apollo 11 crew—Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and myself prior to launch.” In fine, bright condition. The ‘Type 3’ cover rates as the least commonly found of the three Apollo 11 insurance covers and is highly sought after by collectors; this one is further enhanced by its impeccable provenance from the second man on moon. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $1000)

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The Apollo 11 and 8 crews sign off on an important Atlas rocket briefing 557. Apollo 11 and Apollo 8. DS, two pages, 8.5 x 11, March 27, 1968. A printed “Agenda for Astronaut Briefing on S-II Stage,” signed in various inks on the first page by Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, Buzz Aldrin, James Lovell, Frank Borman, Bill Anders, and Jerry Carr. Each astronaut’s signature has been identified in another hand; the second page also bears several descriptive notations, evidently made at the time of the briefing. Light soiling and handling wear (including staple holes), creases to lower right blank area, and slightly irregular ink flow to Anders’s signature, otherwise fine condition. On this day, the astronauts were briefed on the status of the S-II, the second stage of the Saturn V rocket built by North American Aviation. The topics included the emergency detection system, structures and insulation, propulsion and mechanical systems, as well as instrumentation and electrical systems. Among those in attendance—the complete crews of Apollo 8 and Apollo 11—was Neil Armstrong. Each astronaut would eventually rely on the S-II, which used liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen, to propel them through the upper atmosphere. Based on the date of this document, this agenda specifically referred to S-II-2, which carried cameras to record first stage separation and identify any potential problems, with enhanced versions of the same system used throughout Apollo. The dangers of space flight and aviation were brought home to the astronauts on the same date as this document, as it was the same day cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin was killed in a training accident. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

558. Neil Armstrong. Highly-desirable uninscribed color 7.75 x 10 NASA photo, signed in black felt tip. In fine condition, with slightly trimmed right edge, small tape remnants to reverse, and the image and signature a shade light. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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559. Neil Armstrong. Color 4 x 4.5 book photo of Buzz Aldrin on the lunar surface, taken by Armstrong, signed in blue felt tip. In fine condition, with a few scattered light creases. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


560. Neil Armstrong. Glossy 10 x 8 photo of Armstrong’s Learjet in flight, signed

in blue felt tip. Light intersecting lines to finish, visible only at an angle, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

563. Neil Armstrong. Two-

page color pamphlet, 8.25 x 11, printed as part of a shuttle launch viewing promotional campaign by Thermalite, signed and inscribed in blue felt tip on the color shuttle image, “To Serena, Neil Armstrong.” In fine condition. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

561. Neil Armstrong. Perfect ballpoint signature, “Neil Armstrong,”

on a light peach 5 x 3 card. In very fine condition. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

564. Michael Collins. TLS

562. Neil Armstrong. NASA facts booklet on Project Apollo, 8.5 x 11, eight pages, featuring a summary of the Apollo missions, as well as photos of each crew. Signed on the front cover in black felt tip by Armstrong. In fine condition. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

signed “M. Collins,” one page, 7 x 9, National Air and Space Museum letterhead, May 17, 1977. Short letter of thanks. In full: “Thank you kindly for sending me the photographs. I very much appreciate your thoughtfulness.” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Beautiful seascape from the Command Module Pilot

565. Michael Collins. Original 15.5 x 12 watercolor painting

done by Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Michael Collins, entitled ‘Guarding the Crab Pot’ depicting a seagull perched atop a crab pot on an empty beach, signed in black ink, “Michael Collins III ’03.” Double-matted and framed to an overall size of 21.75 x 18. In fine condition. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Novaspace. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Individual portraits of the ill-fated Challenger crew 566. Challenger. Superb collection of seven color individual portraits of each member of the ill-fated crew, including six official color 8 x 10 NASA lithographs, each signed in black felt tip by the astronaut pictured. Signers are: Ellison Onizuka (ins), Christa McAuliffe, Greg Jarvis, Judy Resnik, Mike Smith, Dick Scobee (ins), and Ron McNair (ins). In fine condition. A magnificent collection of the tragic heroes—including the first teacher to be selected for the space program— whose deaths brought the shuttle program to a halt for almost three years. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

567. Hindenburg: Herb Morrison. Radio announcer (1905–1989) best known for his vivid eyewitness broadcast from the site of the Hindenburg disaster on May 6, 1937. ANS signed “Herb,” one page, 5.5 x 5, no date. Brief note to a collector, written at the bottom of the letter sent to Morrison, who sent the announcer a copy of a newspaper article on the Hindenburg. In full: “Thanks for the extra copy. Keep up the interest.” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope, postmarked September 30, 1980, signed “Herb Morrison,” in the return address area, and a photocopy of the sent article, signed, “Kindest regards, Herb Morrison.” RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Assisting the Smithsonian on “my husband’s and my survey flights to the Orient and across the Atlantic” 568. Anne Morrow Lindbergh.

Collection of three items consisting of an ALS, a TLS, and a signed book. The letters date from 1983, and are to David McCullough, who was attempting to interview Lindbergh for a Smithsonian television series. The typed letter, dated February 15, 1983, reads, in part: “I do not usually give interviews and do not wish to be interviewed on camera for the new Smithsonian television series which has a segment on some of our early pioneer flights in the 30s. However, I have already had several letters from the Smithsonian Institution about the project and have seen a proposed draft of the segment of the series that deals with my husband’s and my survey flights to the Orient and across the Atlantic in our Lockheed Sirius plane (now happily housed in the Air and Space Museum in Washington)…I would be glad to help those engaged in this project.” The hardcover copy of Listen! The Wind, is signed and inscribed on the first free end page, “For Elizabeth Brownstein, Gratefully, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, November 25th, 1983, Washington, D. C.” The page is detached from the book. Also included is a copy of a McCullough letter to Lindbergh, and a photocopy of another Lindbergh letter. In overall fine condition, with signed page detached from book, as well as some toning to pages, and a weak spine. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“This article contained some facts mixed with a good deal of fiction and rumor. I felt that, on the whole, it was quite inaccurate, trivial, and rather silly” 569. Charles Lindbergh. TLS signed “Charles A. Lindbergh,” one page, 8.25 x 11, August 16, 1967. Letter to publishing executive Cass Canfield of Harper & Row. In part: “I am under the impression that the book by Mr. Ross, which you say you plan to publish, is not of a kind I want to have anything to do with directly or indirectly. Several years ago, friends brought to my attention an article Mr. Ross had written about me, which was published in Esquire magazine. This article contained some facts mixed with a good deal of fiction and rumor. I felt that, on the whole, it was quite inaccurate, trivial, and rather silly…I told him that I preferred not to have a biography published. Since I found he was contacting members of my family and friends in an attempt to obtain information about me, I advised against cooperation. In view of the above, I hope you will understand when I say I do not want to give my approval to Mr. Ross through authorizing quotations or otherwise. In regard to a biography in general, I would rather not lay out publicly the details of my life. Without my cooperation or at least access to my papers, it seems obvious to me that a biography of much quality cannot be written, and I do not see why a responsible author would want to write or publish one” In fine condition, with a couple light handling creases and pencil office notations to the top. Accompanied by a 1983 letter from Ross regarding a revised edition of the book. Ross and Canfield had gone through with the publication despite Lindbergh’s requests, releasing The Last Hero in 1968. While Lindbergh generally did not read books written about him, he did read this book, making a 76-page list of inaccuracies he found within it. Ross had recently gotten access to the list, and was preparing a revised edition of The Last Hero. Despite Lindbergh’s worldwide fame, he was intensely private about his personal life, a trait seen here. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Extremely early Lindbergh letter, written at age 12 570. Charles Lindbergh. ALS signed “Charles,” one page

on a 5.25 x 3.25 postcard depicting the battleship USS Illinois, Washington, DC, May 29, 1914. Letter written to his friend, Alick Johnson. In full: “Hope to be with you soon now it was 95 in the shade here yesterday.” In very good condition, with unobtrusive creases and light overall soiling. Lindbergh’s father served as one of Minnesota’s congressmen from 1907 to 1917, leading Charles to split time between Little Falls, Minnesota, and Washington, DC. It was in Washington two years earlier that Lindbergh had seen his first airplane, sparking his interest in aviation and his ambition to fly. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Sending apologies for missing “the Dedication of the Daniel Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory” at MIT 571. Charles Lindbergh. TLS signed “C. A. Lindbergh,” one page, 7.25 x 7.75, Charles A. Lindbergh c/o the Daniel Guggenheim Fund letterhead, June 25, 1928. Letter to “President Stratton.” In full: “I am very sorry that I was in the West and did not receive your kind letter of May twenty-eighth until long after June fourth, the date of the Dedication of the Daniel Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. I thank you for your invitation and am sorry that my absence from the city did not permit a prompt answer.” In fine condition, with horizontal fold through top of signature, a few creases and wrinkles, and a trimmed lower edge. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

On the day of Shepard’s historic flight, astronauts and engineers toast the program’s success 572. Mercury Astronauts. Invitation for a cocktail party by McDonnell Aircraft

Corporation “in honor of the First Successful United States Manned Space Flight,” 5 x 4, held on “the date of the flight” at the Holiday Inn at Cocoa Beach, Florida. Signed in blue and black ballpoint by 16 attendees: M. Scott Carpenter; Leroy Cooper, Jr.; John H. Glenn, Jr.; Walter Schirra; William S. Augerson (flight physician); Walter F. Burke (General Manager, Project Mercury—McDonnell Corp.); Edward M. Flesh (Engineering Manager, Project Mercury—McDonnell Corp.); Robert R. Gilruth; J.T. Heard (McDonnell Corp.); Gilbert B. North (engineering test pilot); John F. Yardley (Chief Project Engineer, Project Mercury—McDonnell Corp.); and five others. Some light contrast to a few signatures over printed information and some scattered toning, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by a 2006 letter from the National Air and Space Museum assisting in identifying the signers. After years of design changes, delays, testing, and training, the success of Shepard’s Freedom 7 flight on May 5, 1961, was a major cause for celebration by both the astronauts and the company that developed the capsule. A remarkable souvenir from one of the greatest moments in American space achievement. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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573. Reaching for the Stars. Limited edition color 27 x 34 textured canvas print entitled ‘Reaching for the Stars’ by Alan Bean, numbered 106/1500, stretched over a wooden frame, signed in blue felt tip by 24 astronauts from the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab programs. Signers are: Alan Shepard, John Glenn, Scott Carpenter, Gordon Cooper, Jim McDivitt, Wally Schirra, Richard Gordon, Walt Cunningham, Rusty Schweickart, Buzz Aldrin, Charles Conrad, Alan Bean, James Lovell, Fred Haise, Edgar Mitchell, Al Worden, Charlie Duke, Tom Stafford, Paul Weitz, Owen Garriott, Jack Lousma, Jerry Carr, Ed Gibson, and Bill Pogue. In very fine condition. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Honoring the most famous golf shot in history 574. Saturn 1B Model.

Very nice wooden Saturn 1B rocket model. Multistage rocket measures 42.5˝ tall, including its square wooden base, with each stage labeled accordingly and a small figure of a pad worker on the base to give rocket some scale. Some chipped paint, surface marks, and a couple missing small accessories which have broken off from the edges, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

575. Alan Shepard.

Scarce color 24 x 20 poster commemorating the 25th anniversary of Shepard’s historic golf shot on the moon during the Apollo 14 m i ssi o n i n 1971, signed and inscribed in black felt tip, “To Fran & Conor, Alan Shepard.” The dynamic image was created by Robert Goetzl solely for this poster. Rolled and in fine condition, with a few scattered light creases. Accompanied by its 1996 mailing tube addressed to a New Jersey PGA professional. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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576. Deke Slayton and Scott Carpenter. Dinner theatre photo folder

from a luncheon in honor of the Mercury Astronauts held at the Waldorf Astoria on March 1, 1962,, 8.5 x 11, signed and inscribed in blue ballpoint on the inside, “Best wishes to Danielle—from the Astronauts, Donald K. Slayton,” and “M. Scott Carpenter.” Two original glossy candid photos of John Glenn and a table of guests are stapled to the inside back cover of the folder, with two Empire Room “Checker” stamps to the inside cover also. In very good condition, with partial separation to hinge, scattered light toning and handling wear, staples to covers, and some creases and light surface loss to photos. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Von Braun’s 1950 application to join the American Rocket Society, including his complete work history for the Germans 577. Wernher von Braun. DS,

signed “Dr. Wernher von Braun,” three pages on two adjoining sheets, 8.5 x 11, February 23, 1950. Von Braun’s application for membership in the American Rocket Society, filled out entirely by von Braun, who prints his name two additional times in the application. He provides his detailed background, all the way back to his time in school from 1919–1930, then on to the Institute of Technology at Berlin and Zurich, his Ph.D. work in Physics in 1934, and his work as a “Research Professor, German Gov’t, July 1943.” Von Braun also adds his special technical qualifications: “Development of large liquid fuel rockets, guidance systems pertaining thereto, and ramjets.” The third page contains his handwritten resume spanning from 1930 up to April of 1945, and includes: “Assistant to Prof. Hermann Oberth, Charter member of the ‘Raketenflugplatz Berlin’…Group leader, liquid fuel rocket development, German Ordnance Dep’t. Chief rocket experimental station Kummersdorf near Berlin…development of liquid fuel rocket plants for rocket planes…1937 (May) to 1945 (April) Techn. Director Rocket Research Center Peenemuende. Development of A-4 (V-2) and A-9 long range rockets; AA guided missile ‘Wasserfall.’” A pencil notation at the top of the first page by von Braun indicates this application is a duplicate, as the original was sent to the Society. In fine condition, with expected document wear. Accompanied by a TLS, in German, signed in pencil, “V. Braun,” and dated September 10, 1945. His application provides an incredibly detailed background of von Braun’s work history in Germany, from his time with Oberth, when he was just 18 years old, to his time at Peenemuende, working for the Nazis in developing the A-4 ballistic missile, designed as a ‘vengeance’ weapon capable of reaching London. After his surrender to the Allies in 1945, he and over 100 of his associates were removed from Germany and relocated to Fort Bliss, where they provided training to military and academic personnel on rockets and missiles, and from where von Braun sent this application. Founded in 1930, the American Rocket Society did pioneering work in testing the design requirements of liquid-fueled rockets. Arguably one of the most significant von Braun items to ever be offered. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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In an amazing letter to Sikorsky, von Braun expresses his reverence “of a man who determinedly and faithfully followed his star. For a younger man like myself it sets an inspiring example” 5 7 8 . We r n h e r v o n Braun. Incredible draft

autograph letter in pencil, unsigned, three pages, 8 x 10.5, no date. Letter to Igor Sikorski. In part: “Upon return…I find a letter from our friend Henry J. White in the mail. Enclosed was your letter to Henry [White], dated November 17, wherein you invite him and myself to come to Bridgeport. I am very sorry indeed not to have known this prior to my trip. In spite of a very tight schedule I would certainly have called off everything in order to use this opportunity of making your acquaintance. Another and even greater surprise in my mail was your autobiography with the kind dedication. I began to read the book immediately and am profoundly impressed. Your name and pioneering work in the fields of aviation in general and helicopters in particular was well familiar to me, of course, but & most of the finest details and particularly the incredible odds you had to cope with were new and fascinating reading indeed. The book is the story of a man who determinedly and faithfully followed his star. For a younger man like myself it sets an inspiring example. I can only hope and pray that my life shall be equally blessed and that I too shall live to see the day when my boyhood dream has become reality.” In fine condition, with punch and staple holes to top edge. Most likely written in the mid-1950s, this letter reflects von Braun’s respect and admiration for Sikorsky, as he states that he “would have called off everything” for a chance to meet. At this point is his career, von Braun was studying the potential of his rocket design, particularly the V-2, for both military and research purposes. This work eventually paved the way for America’s manned space program. Henry White was acquainted with both men, acting as Sikorsky’s sales manager and occasional test pilot, while serving as a translator for von Braun and helping with his 1950 novel, The Mars Project. An outstanding letter that provides a small glimpse into one of the great minds behind the space program, praising the an aviation pioneer whose accomplishments he aspired to emulate. Pre-certified Steve Zarelli and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

579. Konstantin Tsiolkovsky. Russian physicist (1857–1935) who pioneered the study of rocketry and cosmonautics and whose discoveries were of crucial importance in the development of manned space travel. Very scarce partial ALS in Russian, four pages, lightly-lined on two adjoining sheets, 4.25 x 7, May 25, 1921. Letter to science writer Yakov I. Perelman. Letter thanking Perelman for a letter, book, and proposal to publish Tsiolkovsky’s articles in a journal. In fine condition, with punch holes to left side. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Orville issues a check from his famous “Wright Cycle Co.” 580. Orville Wright. Winters National Bank check, 8 x 3, filled out and signed by Wright, “Wright Cycle Co., O. W.,” payable to John V. Lytle for $38.34, January 10, 1908. A cancellation hole affecting the “C” in the signature and a few other unobtrusive cancellation cuts, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

581. Orville Wright. Bank check, 8.5 x 3, filled out in another hand and signed by Wright, “Orville Wright,” payable to The Dayton Power & Light Co. for $27.26, January 29, 1946. In fine condition, expected bank stamps and cancellation holes. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Rare and exceptional 1909 Wilbur Wright check, twice-signed “Wright Brothers, W. W.” 583. Wilbur Wright. Winters National Bank check, 8.25 x 3, filled out and signed by Wright, “Wright Brothers, W. W.,” payable to cash for $100, December 6, 1909, and endorsed by Wright on the reverse in the same manner. In fine condition, with an expected cancellation hole slightly affecting the top of the “t” in the signature and a couple other unobtrusive cancellation cuts. Wright is rare in any form, and this is an especially desirable variation of his signature. This check also marks one of the most important years in the Wright Brothers’ career—it was in 1909 that they circled the Statue of Liberty, toured Europe, and sold their first aircraft to the US Army. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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584. Buzz Aldrin

585. Buzz Aldrin

587. Buzz Aldrin MB $200

588. Apollo 11: Aldrin and Collins

591. Apollo 17

592. Alan Bean

594. Gene Cernan

595. Gene Cernan

MB $200

MB $200

MB $200

586. Buzz Aldrin

MB $200

MB $200

MB $200

589. Apollo 11: Aldrin and Collins MB $200

MB $200

593. Alan Bean

MB $200

MB $200

590. Apollo 13 Mission Control

MB $200

596. Challenger: Mike Smith MB $200

597. Michael Collins MB $100

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598. Donn Eisele

599. Female Astronauts

MB $200

MB $200

602. Jim Irwin

601. John Glenn

MB $100

MB $200

604. Joe Kittinger

190 | April 16, 2014 | SPACE & AVIATION

MB $200

MB $200

608. Alexei Leonov

MB $200

603. Gene Kranz and Sy Liebergot

606. Gene Kranz

MB $200

607. Alexei Leonov and Valeri Kubasov

600. John Glenn and Scott Carpenter

MB $200

MB $200

609. Alexei Leonov MB $200

610. James Lovell and Tom Stafford MB $200


611. Glynn Lunney

612. Bruce McCandless

MB $200

614. NASA Astronauts MB $200

MB $200

615. Alan Shepard and Mrs. Robert Goddard MB $200

618. Skylab 2 MB $200

621. STS-7 MB $200

MB $200

MB $200

616. Alan Shepard

617. Alan Shepard

619. Space and Aviation

620. Tom Stafford

623. Jack Swigert

624. Guenter Wendt

MB $200

MB $200

622. STS-95

613. Edgar Mitchell

MB $200

MB $200

MB $200

MB $200

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art & literature 625. Authors and Illustrators. Collection of 100 items consisting primarily of signatures and bookplates, with a few letters, prints, checks and other items mixed in. Signers include: James Montgomery Flagg, Carl Sandburg, Zane Grey, Alex Haley, Paul Cowan, John B. Ford, James Moore, Paul Theroux, James Parton, Edwin Abbey, A. B. Frost, Mary Higgins Clark, Carl Rowan, Steve Lopez, Ray Ellis, Newt Gingrich, Ted Key, Tony Bennett, W. D. Howells, Clive Barker, Alan Dershowitz, June Havoc, Fergie Jenkins, Eartha Kitt, Ralph Nader, Joyce Carol Oates, Oliver North, Lynn Redgrave, Tom Wolfe, Dean Koontz, Simon Lake, Anne Rice (2), Doro Bush Koch, George Charney, John Fiske, Percy Crosby, Goldie Hawn, Mark Hellinger, Edwin Markham, Wendell Phillips, Dan Piraro, and John Sartain. In overall fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Provocatively granting a young lady a “certificate of admission” 626. Honore de Balzac. Prolific and important French novelist and playwright (1799–1850)

best known for his complex ‘cycle’ La Comédie humaine. Very scarce ALS in French, signed “de Balzac,” one page, 4.5 x 6.5, no date. Letter to a female acquaintance. In part (translated): “If you forget me, admit that you will be a heartless person because I am sending you an autograph which seems to me to be a certificate of admission…and which should also please Madame. A thousand gracious compliments and respectful homage of your love.” Matted to an overall size of 8 x 11. In very good condition, with horizontal fold passing through the signature, overall creases and wrinkling, a stain to the upper left, and writing light but legible. This is just the third Balzac we have ever offered, and boasts the most complete version of his name we have seen thus far. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

627. Bernard Berenson. Art historian (1865–1959)

specializing in the Renaissance, he established the market for paintings by the ‘Old Masters.’ ALS, one page both sides, 8.25 x 10.5, July 14, 1951. Letter to Dr. Martin Gumpert. In part: “I returned two or three days ago from wandering around Italy for nearly two weeks & find your ‘Anatomy of Happiness.’ Let me thank you & assure you that I expect to profit greatly by reading it…I keep fairly alive. Of course I get tired more easily…My only annoying trouble is a running nose, sneezing, coughing & spitting—disgusting to myself & I fear others.” In fine condition, with a few edge chips and tears, as well as some mild toning to vertical edges. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope addressed in Berenson’s hand. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Magnificent image of Mount Rushmore under construction 628. Gutzon Borglum. Exceptional matte-finish 7.75 x 10.25 photo of workers rappelling the face of George Washington while carving Mount Rushmore, signed in the lower right in fountain pen, “Official, Gutzon Borglum.” In fine condition, with irregularly trimmed edges (trivially affecting the paraph below his signature). Originates from the estate of Camille Yuill, who was the city editor of the Deadwood Pioneer-Times, and had met and befriended Borglum when he first visited the Black Hills; he presented her with this signed photo circa 1938. Unquestionably the most desirable subject for a Borglum photo. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

629. Dan Brown. Signed book: The Da Vinci Code. First edition, first printing.

NY: Doubleday, 2003. Hardcover with dust jacket, 6.25 x 9.5, 454 pages. Signed on the title page in blue ink. In very fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Fantastic document for the American premiere of the play that introduced the word ‘robot’ 630. Karel Capek. One of the most influential Czech writers of the 20th

century (1890–1938) who introduced and made popular the word ‘robot,’ which first appeared in his 1921 play R.U.R. (Rossum’s Universal Robots). DS, two pages, 8 x 13, December 2, 1922. Contract between Capek and The Theatre Guild of New York granting performing rights “concerning a play by the author entitled R.U.R.” Signed at the conclusion by Capek and also initialed on the first page, “K. C.” Both pages neatly cut in half, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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“I am at the racetrack in the day time and drunk at night” 631. Charles Bukowski. TLS signed “Buk,” one page, 8.5 x 10.75, July 11, 1978.

Letter to R. Soring. In full: “Thanks for your review, I mean thanks for sending the reviews. The trip to Germany was…well, I’ll see what it was…I am in the process of writing about it to go along with photos taken by one Micheal Munfort [sic]. Lutz intends to print the book, he’s my German publisher; that is, he says he will, but of course, he hasn’t seen the writing yet. So? Well, it’ll probably be alright…I’ve lost your letter but remember you saying something about somebody you knew who might come by in July. I am at the racetrack in the day time and drunk at night. It might help if he has my phone #, which is: (213) 462-5001. But please don’t give it out to anybody—it’s unlisted. I’ve got to get onto the fucking picture book.” In fine condition. During his trip to Germany and other parts of Europe in 1978, Bukowski gave a live reading in Hamburg, which was recorded and later released as a double album. Montfort, renowned for his portraits of the writer, took hundreds of photos during the trip, many of which were published the following year in the book Shakespeare Never Did This. Bukowski also published his novel Women in 1978, starring his semi-autobiographical character Henry Chinaski in his later life as a respected poet and writer. A scarce offering of Bukowski correspondence written with the author’s trademark curtness and charming vulgarity. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“I have been working, and working steadily and single-mindedly, on a new book for the past five, almost six years. Now it is almost finished. The title is: ‘In Cold Blood’” 632. Truman Capote. ALS signed

“T. Capote,” one page both sides, 7 x 10, personal letterhead, no date, but postmarked November 25, 1964. Letter to William Gray. In full: “Bless you for writing me such a kind letter! I greatly appreciate your interest and tender concern. The fact is, I have been working, and working steadily and singlemindedly, on a new book for the past five, almost six years. Now it is almost finished. The title is: ‘In Cold Blood’; it is quite a long book (for me), and I think it is good—and I hope you will too. Again, thank you. I am a most fortunate writer to have a reader-friend like you.” In fine condition, with a few scattered spots of light toning. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope, addressed in Capote’s hand. Inspired by a short mention of a multiple-murder in rural Kansas, Capote devoted nearly six years of his life to researching and writing his groundbreaking ‘non-fiction novel.’ Upon its publication in 1966, In Cold Blood achieved worldwide literary acclaim, making Capote one of the most highly sought writers of his day. A superb letter with explicit reference to his most famous work, written as he labored to finish it. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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633. Francis Bicknell Carpenter. Amer-

ican painter (1830– 1900) who resided with Lincoln at the White House for six months and is best known for his 1864 painting, ‘First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln.’ Ink signature and inscription, “To Mrs. Eudora Brittingham, with the compliments and best wishes of the author, Frank B. Carpenter, New York, Nov. 30, 1891,” on an off-white 4.25 x 7 book page. In fine condition, with a bit of mild edge toning and small chip to bottom edge. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Desirable Pach Bros. image of the writer at his desk

Supremely bold check from the year before Tom Sawyer

635. Samuel L. Clemens. Bank check, 7.75 x 2.75, filled out and signed by Clemens, “Samuel L. Clemens,” payable to John Welch for $117.75, June 28, 1875. In fine condition, with a bank stamp subtly affecting a few letters of his last name. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

636. James Fenimore Cooper. ADS, signed “J. Fenimore Cooper,”

one page, 7.75 x 1.5, May 6, 1846. Receipt reads, in full: “Rec’d of W. A. Comstock & Co., Forty three 75/100 dollars, in full for rent on the store they occupy in Second Street, up to April 1st 1846. Cooperstown.” In fine condition, with a central vertical fold. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Hand-pressed Native American photogravure by the renowned Western photographer 637. E dw ard S. Curtis. Photographer

634. Samuel L. Clemens. Crystal-clear vintage matte-finish 4 x 5.75 portrait of Clemens seated at his desk and holding a cigar, signed in the upper right in fountain pen, “Mark Twain, April/06.” Blindstamped in the lower right by the Pach Bros. photography studio of New York. Encapsulated in a plastic PSA/DNA authentication holder. In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

(1868–1952) known for his photos of the American West and stylized portraits of Native Americans. Fabulous original hand-pressed photogravure entitled ‘Wishham Female Type,’ 9.25 x 12.5 with an image size of 4.75 x 7.25, captioned along the bottom, “From Copyright Photograph 1910 by E. S. Curtis.” Blindstamped at the top by the University of Oregon Library. In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Excessively rare letter by the author of The Red Badge of Courage 638. Stephen Crane. American author and journalist (1871–1900) best known

for his novels Maggie: A Girl of the Streets and The Red Badge of Courage. ALS, one page, 5.25 x 8.25, personal letterhead, February 2, [1900]. Letter to Arthur J. Harrihill. In full: “I trust your injury will not compel you to remain indoors for much longer and to this event you have my most cordial wishes.” In very good condition, with intersecting folds, a light central block of toning, and scattered staining. After serving as a war correspondent for the New York Journal during the Spanish-American War, Crane returned to England from Havana on January 11, 1899. He and his common-law wife Cora Taylor began to move their household from their previous residence at Ravensbrook to Brede Place shortly after, establishing their permanent residence there on February 19, 1899; with the printed personal letterhead, this letter certainly dates to February of the following year, just four months before his tragically early death at age 28. An exceptionally rare letter from this influential figure in American literature, with only a handful appearing at auction the last four decades. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Stunning, vividly illustrated Alice in Wonderland portfolio by the surrealist master 639. Salvador Dali. Signed book: Alice’s Adven-

tures in Wonderland. Limited edition, numbered 1346/2500. NY: Maecenas Press-Random House, 1969. Loose portfolio-style softcover in original clasped clamshell case, 11.5 x 17, 151 pages. Signed on the title page in pencil by Dali. In very fine condition.

This remarkable book features twelve vibrantly colored heliogravures from Dali’s original gouaches, one for each chapter of Carroll’s celebrated book, and an original etching in four colors as the frontispiece, which is opposite the signed title page. It was released as a ‘book of the month’ in 1969 and has become one of the most sought-after Dali suites ever produced. Its gorgeous heliogravures, scarcity, and wonderful association between two of the preeminent artists of the modern era—both renowned interpreters of the surreal—come together to make this a museum-quality piece of the utmost desirability. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

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643. Theodore Dreiser. Signed book: Jennie

640. Alphonse Daudet. French novelist (1840–1897) known for his controversial political and social views. ALS in French, signed “Alph. Daudet,” one page, 3.75 x 6, no date. Letter declining an invitation to dinner, as he planned to have company over on the same evening. Ink stamp over the first few lines, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

641. Madame de Stael. Anne Louise

Gerhardt. First edition. NY: Harper and Brothers, 1911. Hardcover, 5.25 x 7.5, 433 pages. Signed and inscribed on the second free end page, “Inscribed for George A. Van Nosdall by Theodore Dreiser.” First free end page bears a lengthy presentation inscription from a previous owner which reads, in part: “Theodor Dreiser inscribed this first edition for my friend Van Nosdall who gave it to me. I now present it to you. I own the original manuscript of Jennie Gerhardt, having purchased it direct from Dreiser.” Autographic condition: fine. Book condition: VG/None. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Germaine de StaelHolstein (1766–1817), known as Madame de Stael, was a Swiss author who lived in Paris among various other locations abroad, and played an integral part in directing the literary tastes of Europeans at the turn of the 19th century. Untranslated ALS in French, one page, 4.5 x 7.25, no date. In fine condition, with central vertical and horizontal folds and some mirroring to ink. Accompanied by an unsigned carte-de-visite portrait. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

642. Charles Dickens.

ALS, one page, 4.5 x 7, Gad’s Hill Place letterhead, November 29, 1864. Letter to General C. B. Phipps. In full: “I have been in France this last twelve days, and found your note on returning last night. Immediately reffered its enclosures to Mr. Wills, who will return them with his own observations therefore.” Suede-matted and framed with a cartede-visite of Dickens and a small biographical plaque to an overall size of 21 x 18.5. In fine condition, with a light horizontal fold through signature. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

644. Alexandre Dumas, fils. Five untranslated ALSs in French, each signed “A. Dumas,” totaling nine pages, ranging in size from 4.5 x 3.5 to 4 x 5.25, no dates. In overall fine condition. One accompanied by its original mailing envelope. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Vivid ‘Letter W’ from his Alphabet Suite 645. Erte. Scarce color limited edition 13.5 x 19.5 lithograph entitled ‘Letter W’ from his Alphabet Suite, 303/350, signed in the lower border in pencil. Doublematted and framed to an overall size of 22.5 x 28.5. In fine, bright condition. Oversized. Precertified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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646. Ian Fleming. Ballpoint signature, “Ian Fleming,” on an off-white 5 x 3.5 sheet. In fine condition with a light crease along the right side and paperclip impression to the upper left corner. Accompanied by a 1964 letter from the author’s secretary that reads in part: “Mr. Ian Fleming (one m!) has asked me to thank you for your charming letter of April 2nd, and to say that he is so glad his books give you pleasure.” Also accompanied by an unsigned glossy photo. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Extraordinarily rare book painted by Sam Francis and given to the author Corman 647. Sam Francis. Signed book: YEA. First edition. Culver City, CA:

The Lapis Press, 1989. Hardcover, 5.25 x 8.25, 25 pages. Signed on the first free end page with an ownership signature in black felt tip by Cid Corman, and painted on the front and back covers by Francis. An extremely limited issue, only 25 copies of this specially painted edition were released, and this example has a particularly remarkable association—YEA was written by Corman and published by Francis, who founded The Lapis Press. This particular book remained unsigned by Francis, who retained it for personal use and sent it as a gift to Corman prior to publication. Includes a letter penned by Corman’s wife, Konishi Shizumi, following his death, transmitting this book as a gift to a friend. In part (spelling and grammar retained): “I’d like I have a surpris for you it little too early to X’mas gift of you. I fond sam of book and franko of peace card. I can’t find out sam paint bout I look for cid and sam made book gift for X’mas from cid to you.” A remarkable association with regard to an already excessively rare book. Book is in VG+ condition, with rubbing along edges; slight yellowing; and light scattered foxing (mostly to exterior and first/last few pages). Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Rare portrait of the acclaimed Victorian realist 648. Thomas Hardy. Author (1840–1928) who takes a place among the towering figures

of British literature with classic novels such as Far from the Madding Crowd and Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Original 4.25 x 6.5 cabinet photo of Hardy, signed at the bottom of the image in black ink, “Thomas Hardy.” Published by Elliott & Fry of London and captioned in the lower border, “Mr. Thomas Hardy, Author of ‘Far From The Madding Crowd.’” Adhesive remnants and some light surface loss to edges of the mount, otherwise fine condition. Just the second Hardy signed photo we have ever offered, featuring a sharp image and bold signature. Precertified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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“Your old colleague but implacable enemy on this terrain, Ernie” 649. Ernest Hemingway. ANS signed “Ernie,” at the conclusion of an 8 x 5.75

Western Union telegram dated April 1, 1950. Note in response to the telegram. In full: “I challenge you Crouse you louse or I will defend yours without mercy Your old colleague but implacable enemy on this terrain, Ernie.” The telegram, sent by Russel Crouse to Leonard Lyons, in full: “Where does Ernie Hemmingway [sic] get off claiming title of worst-dressed man which I have held since the day Heywood Broun relinquished it. When there is a new wrinkle in clothes you could always find it in mine.” Intersecting folds and scattered creases, otherwise fine condition. Taking a job at the Kansas City Star immediately after graduating from high school in 1918, Hemingway met and quickly befriended Russel Crouse, a journalist six years his senior. Both would later befriend Leonard Lyons, one of the most famous columnists of his era. Another journalist of the period—Heywood Broun—was undoubtedly one of the worst-dressed newspapermen in American history, with a style that can only be described as ‘haphazard.’ After he passed in 1939, the title was up for grabs—and Hemingway and Crouse scrambled to claim it. In this witty and playfully worded response to Crouse’s claim to the throne, Hemingway reveals a side of himself seldom seen by his admirers, and uses the rare “Ernie” to sign off, as he was known to his early colleague. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“Scribners ordered another 25000 printed the day it came out” 650. Ernest Hemingway. Western Union telegram sent by Hemingway to Leonard Lyons, two pages, 8 x 6.5, stamp-dated September 10, 1950. In full: “Dear Lennie please kill the letter about Clare and neither use nor show any of it stop They apologized for coverage and why boot something like that when you are winning stop Will write something else for you sometime stop Scribners ordered another 25000 printed the day it came out making one seven five without bookclubs which never submitted to and Cape in London sold thirty thousand before publication has printed thirty more and is ordering more paper stop Old Hemingstein motto quote They say query What do the say query Let them say period unquote Good luck Papa.” Intersecting folds and scattered creases, otherwise fine condition. Hemingway published Across the River and into the Trees in 1950, which was universally panned by the critics. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Farewell to Arms signed while covering the Spanish Civil War in 1937 651. Ernest Hemingway. Signed book: A Farewell to Arms. Vol-

ume 4935 of the Collection of British and American Authors series. Liepzig: Bernhard Tauchnitz, no date. Hardcover, 4.5 x 6.25, 320 pages. Signed and inscribed in ink on a front blank page, “To Ed Kennedy with very best wishes, Ernest Hemingway, Valencia, 1937.” Autographic condition: very good, with scattered toning and foxing to signed page, as well as a Hebrew stamp along top edge. Book condition: VG-/None, in an attractive custom-made case, covered in navy cloth with a leather spine, gilt titles, and five raised bands. Precertified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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Beautifully signed presentation copy of Men Without Women 652. Ernest Hemingway. Signed book: Men

Without Women. First Living Library edition, first printing. Cleveland: The World Publishing Company, 1946. Hardcover with dust jacket, 5 x 7.5, 164 pages. Signed and inscribed entirely in Hemingway’s hand on the first free end page in fountain pen, “To Helen Bamberger, with Christmas Greetings, from Charles Sweeny (and Ernest Hemingway).” Autographic condition: very fine. Book condition: VG+/VG-. Hemingway first met Col. Charles Sweeny—a mercenary soldier who was said to have fought in seven wars for five different countries—in 1922 during the Greek-Turkish War. The two became fast, close, and lasting friends, and would often see each other in war zones, at the bicycle races in Paris, and on hunting expeditions and fishing trips. Later in life, they would sit and trade old war stories and compare their collections of battle scars. Hemingway wrote in a 1940 letter that Sweeny had ‘one of the most brilliant military brains I have ever known.’ A wonderful association between Hemingway’s life and work, as Men Without Women contained some of his most well-known short stories, including ‘Hills Like White Elephants’ and ‘The Killers.’ Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

654. William Dean Howells. American

653. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. ALS signed “O. W. Holmes,” one page, 4.25 x 6, November 10, 1886. Letter to an unidentified woman, marked at the top by Holmes “Private.” In full: “I thank you for your pleasant letter, but if you knew how I am oppressed with all means of applications you would not lay one additional straw on my already overloaded back.” Matted and framed with an engraved portrait of Holmes to an overall size of 18 x 13. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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author and editor (1837– 1920) best known as the editor of the influential periodical Atlantic Monthly from 1871 to 1881 and as the author of the novel The Rise of Silas Lapham (1885) and the short story Editha (1905). Matte-finish 6 x 9 photo of Howell on a porch lovingly watching his two grandsons share a tender moment on their mother’s lap, signed and inscribed in the lower border in black ink, “Miss Macdonald’s old friend, W. D. Howells, with his grandsons and their mother. September 9, 1919.” In fine condition, with a thin pencil line under last line of Howell’s writing. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


Page from the draft of Irving’s biography of Christopher Columbus on the topic of “Deliverance of Columbus from the Island of Jamaica” 655. Washington Irving. Autograph manuscript leaf, one page, 4.25 x 7.5, no date. Page from a working draft of Irving’s A History and Voyages of Christopher Columbus, headed: “Chapter 41, Voyage of Diego Mendez to Hispaniola—Deliverance of Columbus from the Island of Jamaica.” The body, in part: “It is proper here to give some account of the mission of Diego Mendez and Bartholomew Fiesco…When they had taken leave of the Adelantado east end of the island of Jamaica, they continued all day in a direct course; there was no wind, the sky was without a cloud, and the sea was…like a mirror reflecting the burning rays of the sun. The Indians who paddled the canoes would often leap into the water to cool their glowing bodies and refresh themselves from their toil. At the going down of the sun they lost sight of land…During the night the Indians took turns.” Affixed at corners to a slightly larger sheet. Small tears to corners on the right side (affecting the page number and a couple words), otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by a printed page that reads: “The following sheet contains a page of the Original Manuscript of Washington Irving. G. P. Putnam’s Sons. January, 1895.” Irving spent two years working on the book, which was an elaboration on a work in Spanish that he had been commissioned to translate, and it was published in 1828 in four lengthy volumes. A fantastic, boldly penned page from what is considered the most painstaking effort of Irving’s life. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“I have just had a good break by having sold six pictures at top prices to a rich guy”

Extraordinary oversized portrait of the Jungle Book author

656. Rockwell Kent.

TLS signed “Rockwell,” one page, 8.5 x 11, personal letterhead, October 28, 1950. Letter to Ned Travis. In part: “We became acquainted with a neighbor of ours—a summer visitor who was staying on after the season—a psychiatrist, and in talking about psychiatry in general she attacked the whole procedure of psychoanalysis as one that puts the analyst in a god-like role that calls for the subject’s abject surrender of will…We can’t help being a little amused at the charge that you were ‘stealing’ Charlotte’s personality. With all due respect and affection for Charlotte I would as soon try to steal the personality of a wild-cat…I have just had a good break by having sold six pictures at top prices to a rich guy who is a hundred per cent for me because of my politics.” In fine condition, with central vertical and horizontal folds. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

657. Rudyard Kipling. Distinguished vintage matte-finish 5.5 x

7.5 portrait of Kipling in profile, affixed to its original 9.25 x 12.5 J. Russell photographer’s mount, signed on the mount in fountain pen. In fine condition, with mount edges slightly trimmed. Kipling is scarce in signed photos of any type, and this is by far the largest we have ever offered. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Back in Italy, Lawrence prepares for a walking trip with artist Earl Brewster 658. D. H. Lawrence. ALS, one page, 7.25 x 10.5, January 9, 1926. Letter to his publisher Curtis Brown. In part: “I am not sure now when exactly I shall go south; may take a walking tour with Brewster in Capri—which island, by the way, is only two hours by boat from Naples. But you might send me a p.c. C/o E. H. Brewster, Torre Quatro Venti Capri (Napoli). When you are in that region, and if I am anywhere about, I’ll run over to see you.” In fine condition, with light intersecting folds, one through a single letter of signature, and a bit of mild edge toning. Lawrence made several trips through the region with artist Earl Brewster, resulting in the author writing a collection of essays published together as Sketches of Etruscan Places, published posthumously in 1932. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

659. Harper Lee. Signed book: To Kill a Mockingbird. First edition (stated explicitly on the copyright page). Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1960. Hardcover with dust jacket, 5.75 x 8.25, 296 pages. Signed and inscribed later on in black felt tip, “To Jean and Bill, With best wishes, Harper Lee, Christmas 1988” on a similarly-sized page which has been inserted and affixed into the front of the volume. Autographic condition: fine, with some light staining to edges of signed page and an authentication label affixed to the reverse. Book condition: VG-/VG-. A rare opportunity to acquire a scarce first edition of a modern classic. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

London pays tribute to California poet George Sterling, “the biggest, truest poet to-day on the Pacific Coast” 660. Jack London. Signed book: The Testimony of the Suns and

Other Poems by George Sterling. First edition. San Francisco: W. E. Wood, 1903. Hardcover, 5.5 x 7.75, 142 pages. Signed and inscribed on the first free end page, “Dear Mr. Harrison, Find herein the biggest, truest poet to-day on the Pacific Coast. Jack London, Jan. 5, 1904.” In very good condition, with irregular toning to signed page, not detracting from the large signature, light surface wear to covers and some bumps to cover corners and spine just a touch loose. Sterling was a poet who became a significant figure in Bohemian literary circles in northern California in the early 1900s and was close friends with London. Precertified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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Scarce Longfellow check payable to Edward Everett Hale, endorsed by Hale and fellow author Phillips Brooks 661. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Personal check, 7 x 2.75, filled out and signed by Longfellow, “Henry W. Longfellow,” payable to E. E. Hale or Order for $50.00, February 1, 1882. Check is endorsed on the reverse by Hale who has made the funds available to clergyman and author Phillips Brooks, who has also endorsed the reverse. Three vertical folds, two passing through single letters of Longfellow’s signatures, two punch holes to body, one through Hale’s middle initial of endorsement, and a small separation to top of one of the vertical folds, otherwise fine condition. A desirable trio of notable American literary figures. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Rare working manuscript for “The White Czar”

662. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Original manuscript draft of Longfellow’s poem “The White Czar,” three pages on two sheets, lightly

lined, 7.75 x 9.75, signed at the conclusion, “Henry W. Longfellow.” Early secretarial draft to which Longfellow adds an emendation, explanatory note, and additional stanza in his own hand. Poem begins: “Dost thou see on the rampart’s height / That wreath of mist, in the light / Of the midnight moon? O, hist! / It is not a wreath of mist; / It is the Czar, the White Czar, / Batyushka! Gosudar!” Below the first stanza, Longfellow adds, “Second stanza on last page.” On the final page, Longfellow pens the second stanza: “He has heard, among the dead, / The artillery roll o’erhead; / The drums and the tramp of feet / Of his soldiery in the street; / He is awake! the White Czar, / Batyushka! Gosudar!” An explanatory note above reads: “The White Czar is Peter the Great. Batyushka, Father dear, and Gosudar, Emperor, are titles the Russian people are fond of giving to the Czar.” Repaired full separations to three horizontal folds, toning and small tears to edges, and main writing, Longfellow’s signature, and explanatory note light but legible, otherwise fine condition. This version of the poem differs somewhat from the finished product, which was published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1878—the most significant being changes from “Dwina” to ‘Volga’ and “Through forest” to ‘Over desert.’ A remarkable poem typical of Longfellow’s style and subject, featuring a set meter and rhyme scheme and incorporating historical themes with natural ones. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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An invitation for a literary lunch at Boston’s Parker House 663. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. ALS signed “Henry W. Longfellow,” one page

both sides, 4.5 x 7, November 2, 1858. Letter to Reverend T. S. King. In full: “Will you do me the favor to dine with me at Parker’s on Friday Nov. 5 at half past two?” In fine condition. An interesting association, as Boston’s famous Parker House was established in 1855 and became the home of the ‘Saturday Club,’ an informal monthly gathering of intellectuals that counted Longfellow, Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Oliver Wendell Holmes among its members. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Exceptional sketch by the psychedelic master 664. Peter Max. Un-

common original signed felt tip sketch of a woman’s face in profile on an off-white 8.75 x 10.75 sheet, signed in the upper left, “Max, 2007.” Attractively matted and framed with a block of Max-designed stamps to an overall size of 13.75 x 24.25. In very fine condition. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from PSA/DNA. An appealing work of art larger than typically seen. Oversized. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

665. Peter Max. Official Dale Earnhardt commemorative baseball signed in black felt tip on a side panel, with Max adding a sketch of three stars inside a circle, along with an “L.” In very fine condition. An uncommon format for the vibrant artist. Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from James Spence. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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666. Peter Max. Signed book: The Art of Peter Max. First edition, later printing. NY: Harry N. Abrams, 2002. Hardcover with dust jacket, 10 x 12.5, 240 pages. Signed and inscribed on the reverse of the first free end page, “4 Gregg & Wes, love Max 2007,” with Max sketching two hearts, with the letters of the book’s recipients inside each one, on the adjacent page. In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

667. Peter Max. Color

12 x 25 poster of Max‘s painting of the Statue of Liberty for a 1981 exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, signed in black felt tip, “Max 1986.” Framed to an overall size of 13.25 x 26. In fine condition. Oversized. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


Original Max artwork of Sailing at Sunset 668. Peter Max. Amazing and beautiful original artwork by Max, oil on paper, 10.75 x 11, entitled ‘Sailing at Sunset,’ depicting a small sailboat in front of a brilliant sunset, signed in the top right in oil paint, “Max.” Nicely framed to an overall size of 18.25 x 18.5. In very fine condition. A stunningly vibrant example of Max’s use of vivid colors and bold brushstrokes. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Exceptional 1937 letter and press clippings on a Danish artist’s interpretations of Gone With the Wind 670. Margaret Mitchell.

TLS signed “Margaret Mitchell Marsh,” one page, 7 x 11, personal letterhead, November 2, 1937. Letter to Danish cartoonist and illustrator Axel Mathiesen. In part: “I am enclosing clippings from the Atlanta newspapers which I promised to send you…I had lent copies of the illustrations...to our large Library and to the Atlanta Historical Society…crowds of people have come to see them. Already, other organizations have begged the Library and Historical society for the loan of the illustrations…I am delighted that Atlanta people agree with me as to the excellence of your drawings.” Also includes the clippings referenced, totaling 12 pieces, as well as a translation of Mitchell’s letter on Mathiesen’s personal letterhead, and a retained copy of his response to Mitchell. In fine condition, with mild foxing and a couple of creases and tiny edge tears to letter. Denmark became the third country to receive a foreign language edition of Gone With the Wind, released by Copenhagen publisher Steen Hasselbalch with illustrations by Mathiesen. It was initially published in the fall of 1937 with a print run of 10,000 copies and sold out in a mere eleven days; by the next year, 90,000 copies had been sold, making ‘Borte med Blaesten’ one of the most successful Danish books to have ever been published. A remarkable letter discussing the reception of Gone With the Wind at home and abroad, enhanced by the inclusion of the enclosures mentioned—clipped by the author herself. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300) www.RRAuction.com | 205


“In some countries they may or may not like Clark Gable or Vivien Leigh, but they all shout for Hattie McDaniel” 670. Margaret Mitchell. TLS signed “Margaret

Mitchell Marsh,” two pages, 7.25 x 10.5, personal letterhead, August 9, 1940. Letter to psychiatrist Dr. C. E. Mayos. In part: “You must know by now how much I enjoy your letters, and I must confess that I have always felt flattered that a psychiatrist complimented me on the ‘behavior patterns’ of my characters, so thank you for your last letter. I believe I wrote you many months ago that I intended to undergo an operation which I had needed for some time but had postponed from month to month waiting for the premiere showing of ‘Gone With the Wind’ here in Atlanta. I realized that the premiere would be the most exciting occasion this city had known since that day in the 1880’s when Jefferson Davis, then an old man, came here to unveil the Ben Hill statue. I didn’t intend to miss that premiere, sick or well!…It is a wonderful feeling to be back in circulation after four years at a desk…My husband and I hope that the film of ‘Gone With the Wind’ will return to Atlanta at least once more before it is cut for the smaller theatres at cheaper prices. It is such a long picture that it takes several views to really get it all. I am just now beginning to get a trickle of clippings about the film from England and its colonial possessions. (On account of the war and the difficulties of getting money out of many foreign countries, the picture is showing only in British possessions.) It may interest you to know that in Australia, South Africa and India, Hattie McDaniel’s portrayal of Mammy is unanimously acclaimed. In some countries they may or may not like Clark Gable or Vivien Leigh, but they all shout for Hattie McDaniel. In fact, in Calcutta, where Vivien Leigh spent her childhood, the reviewers praised Mammy above Scarlett.” In fine condition, with a rusty paperclip mark and tack hole to upper left corner. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. The Atlanta premiere of Gone With the Wind was an incredible event—one million people descended upon the city, which hosted three days of various festivities in anticipation of the premiere. Mitchell was correct in her belief that it would be the biggest event since Jefferson Davis’s unveiling of a statue; Jimmy Carter would later call it the biggest event to happen in the South in his lifetime. With the discussion of the premiere and the film’s main actors, this is one of the most remarkable Mitchell letters we have encountered. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

“I have not done any more etching but be sure that when I do I will return the plates to you for printing” 671. Henry Miller. ALS, one page, 8.5 x 11, personal letterhead,

February 18, 1964. Letter to German art dealer and gallery owner Rudolf Springer. In part: “I have not done any more etching but be sure that when I do I will return the plates to you for printing. I did not put the year (1962) after my signature. Only on the ones I kept. I hope you have luck selling them”; and a booklet containing Miller’s review of Quest by George Dibbern, 6.25 x 9.5, six pages, signed at the top in fountain pen, “Greetings! Are you still alive? Henry Miller.” Letter in fine to very fine condition; booklet has horizontal folds, partial separation at spine, and blocks of toning, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope for the letter, addressed in Miller’s hand. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Charming ‘Snowballing’ scene sent to her discoverer

672. Grandma Moses. Christmas card featuring one of Moses’s idyllic winter scenes entitled ‘Snowballing’ on the front and a printed Christmas sentiment inside, 5.25 x 6.5, signed inside in fountain pen. Includes the original transmittal envelope, addressed in her own hand to her first patron, “Louis J. Calder, New York City.” In fine condition. Moses was unknown until she was discovered in 1938—at the age of 78—by art collector Louis J. Calder; a year later her works were featured in an exhibition called ‘Contemporary Unknown American Painters’ at the Museum of Modern Art, and she was quickly elevated to nationwide fame. A nice behind-the-scenes association from one of the more unusual stories in recent art history. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

675. Emil Nolde. Early

German Expressionist painter and printmaker (1867–1956) known for his vigorous brushwork and expressive choice of colors. TLS in German, one page, 8.25 x 11.5, September 21, 1952. Letter to Galerie Alex Voemel in Dusseldorf. In full (translated): “Following your wish, I am sending you with the same mail three small watercolors. The amounts for all the previous sales have been received.” Small creases and tears to edges, filing holes to left edge, and significant spreading to ink in the signature, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

673. Grandma Moses. Presen-

tation folder displaying a photo of Moses with a gentleman, measuring 5.25 x 3.75 closed, signed opposite the photo in fountain pen, “Feb. 28, 1960, Grandma Moses.” A stray mark near the signature and the photo toned and faded, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

676. Pablo Picasso. Two Polish postage stamps, each 1.25 x 1,

both affixed to a 3.5 x 2.25 off-white card, and both boldly signed in blue ballpoint, “Picasso.” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope, postmarked November 13, 1957. Two exceptional signatures from the master, who would later be commemorated himself on one of the country’s stamps in 1981. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

674. Nobel Prize in Literature. Fantastic collection of 33 items, consisting primarily of signatures with a couple postcards, each signed by a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature. Signers are: Bertrand Russell, Sully Prudhomme, Rudyard Kipling, Samuel Beckett, William Golding, Knut Hamsun, Selma Lagerlof, Maurice Maeterlinck, Grazia Deledda, Paul Heyse, Heinrich Boll, Seamus Heaney, Halldor Laxness, Nadine Gordimer, Czeslaw Milsosz, Ivo Andric, Mario Vargas Llosa, Harold Pinter, Derek Walcott, Salvatore Quasimodo, Luigi Pirandello, Eugenio Montale, Patrick White, John Galsworthy, Dario Fo, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Odysseus Elytis, Elias Canetti, Naguib Mahfouz, Claude Simon, Miguel Angel Asturias, Toni Morrison, and Vincente Aleixandre. In overall fine condition. This collection represents nearly a third of all writers to ever win the Nobel Prize in Literature, including a number of scarcer examples with the likes of Russell, Beckett, and Hamsun. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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677. Joseph Pennell. Artist and author (1857–1926) who specialized in etchings and lithographs. ALS, one page, 9 x 13.25, August 23, 1883. Letter to an unidentified gentleman. In full: “Some time ago I sent you from Venice some drawings of Child Life in that place—did you get them—and if so and they are all right I should like to do some more—important ones—when I come home this fall—Shall return here in the Spring.” Pennell has highlighted the letter with two small ink sketches; one of a child added over a portion of text, and one of a young boy’s face next to his signature. Framed to an overall size of 10.25 x 14. In fine condition, with central horizontal and vertical folds, a green pencil mark to a single word of text, and some creasing to edges. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 678. Ezra Pound. Glossy 8 x 10 photo of Pound in profile, signed in the lower border in fountain pen, “Absent Dei from serendipity, Ezra Pound.” In very good condition, with some light irregular ink adhesion to signature and scattered creases to image. Signed portraits of Pound are quite uncommon, particularly in this size. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Original Plath sketch, identified by her husband

680. Sylvia Plath. Poet, novelist and short story writer (1932–1963), who committed suicide after her separation from her husband and a long bout with depression. Charming original vintage unsigned ink sketch of a tea kettle on an off-white 5.5 x 4.25 sheet, identified on the reverse in pencil by her husband, Ted Hughes, “By Sylvia Plath, Ted Hughes.” In fine condition. Plath was an accomplished artist, who developed what she called ‘a kind of primitive style of my own which I am very fond of.’ A major retrospective of her drawings took place in London in 2011. This is the first Plath sketch we have ever offered. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The great impressionist puts ‘Haystacks at Eragny’ up for sale 679. Camille Pissarro. ALS in French, signed “C. Pissarro,” one page both sides, 4.5 x 3.5, no date. Letter to his wife. In full (translated): “As soon as I’ve finished my pictures here I’ll go away…You can leave my frames in the studio. I’m going to need them. Write me when you plan to leave. I have things to do in Paris when I get there. People will have to learn that I don’t sell to just anybody. Tell Ruel [Paul Durand-Ruel, Pissarro’s principal dealer] that I’ll take along his pants [possibly a reference to Pissarro’s painting ‘L’enfant au pantalon bleu (Child in Blue Pants)’] and that I thank him for the information he gives me. There’s going to be a sale again where there’ll be some of my best pictures, ‘Rue de l’é-picerie a Rouen [Street in Rouen with a Grocery Story]’ and ‘Les Meules de Foin a Eragny [Haystacks at Eragny]’ and some old pictures.” In fine condition, with a central vertical fold and a missing lower corner tip. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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681. Pulitzer Prize in Biography. Collection of 61 items, consisting primarily of signatures with a few letters and photos, each signed by a winner of the Pulitzer Prize in Biography, including: Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., David McCullough (6), Edward Bok, Robert A. Caro, Frank McCourt (2), Debby Applegate (2), Mary Wells Ashworth, Russell Baker, Walter Jackson Bate (2), A. Scott Berg (3), Margaret Louise Coit, David Donald (2), Leon Edel, David Garrow (2), Katharine Graham (3), Louis R. Harlan, Joan D. Hedrick (4), Justin Kaplan, Joseph Lash, David Levering Lewis, R. W. B. Lewis, Carleton Mabee, John Mack (2), Robert Massie, William S. McFeely, Jack Miles, Samuel Eliot Morison, Edmund Morris, Allan Nevins, Russel Blaine Nye, Merlo J. Pusey, Benjamin Lawrence Reid, Ernest Samuels, Martin J. Sherwin (2), Kenneth Silverman, W. A. Swanberg, William Taubman, Lawrence Thompson, Arthur Walworth, William S. White, T. Harry Williams, and Ola Winslow. In overall fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

682. Pulitzer Prize in History. Collection of 65 items, consisting

primarily of signatures with a few letters and photos, each signed by a winner of the Pulitzer Prize in History, including: Dean Acheson, Daniel Boorstin, Bruce Catton, Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., Rick Atkinson, Bernard Bailyn (2), Taylor Branch (3), Robert V. Bruce, Paul Buck, James MacGregor Burns, Alfred Chandler, Lawrence Cremin, Merle Curti, George Dangerfield, Carl Degler, Don E. Fehrenbacher, Herbert Feis, David Hackett Fischer (3), Samuel Flagg Bemis, William H. Goetzmann, Doris Kearns Goodwin (2), Constance Green, Steven Hahn (2), Oscar Handlin, Paul Horgan (2), Daniel Walker Howe, Rhys Isaac (2), Michael Kammen, Stanley Karnow (2), George F. Kennan, David M. Kennedy (2), Edward J. Larson (2), Margaret Leech, Leonard W. Levy, Leon Litwack, Dumas Malone, Walter McDougall, Louis Menand, Mark E. Neely, Roy Franklin Nichols, David Oshinsky, Sumner Chilton Powell, Jack N. Rakove (2), Gene Roberts, Alan Taylor (2), Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, Irwin Unger, Mike Wallace, Gordon S. Wood (2), and C. Vann Woodward. In overall fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

683. Arthur Rackham. British artist and illustrator (1867–1939) best known for his Art Nouveau–influenced illustrations. Signed book: Goblin Market. Limited deluxe edition of 410 copies (this being No. 354). London: George G. Harrap, 1933. Softcover with slipcase, 6 x 9.25. Signed on the colophon in black ink by Rackham. Autographic condition: fine. Book condition: VG+, in VG slipcase. Book originates from the collection of noted Oklahoma book collector Larry Owens. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Gorgeous miniature sugar bowl hand-painted by Renoir 684. Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Miniature white porcelain

two-handled sugar bowl painted by Renoir with a magnificent pink and green floral design on the front and gilt accents to rims of the bowl and lid. The bowl measures approximately 1˝ in diameter and .75˝ tall. In fine condition. This was originally part of the Pierre Auguste Renoir Personal Artifacts and Archives Collection consigned to Hantman’s in 2005 by Renoir’s grandson, Paul Renoir (1924–2005), son of his youngest child Claude (1901–1969). As part of his inheritance, Claude received Renoir’s home, Les Collettes, in Cagnes-sur-Mer in the south of France. Pierre-Auguste Renoir began working in a porcelain factory at age 13, where his drawing talents led to his being chosen to paint designs on fine china, and his skillful work earned a good income and the nickname Monsieur Image is larger than actual size. Rubens. In his book ‘La Vie et l’Oeuvre de Pierre-Auguste Renoir,’ his agent, Ambroise Vollard, describes seeing a miniature service in Renoir’s dining room: ‘I saw on the sideboard shelf of the dining room, a small coffee service and two candlesticks made out of porcelain, decorated by hand, well applied…‘Those are the only pieces I still have from my old career as a porcelain decorator,’ Renoir told me.’ This is also mentioned in ‘Renoir in Time’ by noted French art dealer Paul Durand-Ruel. A beautiful and exceptionally rare piece of original art from the French master. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

A stunning portrayal of Shaw’s Saint Joan: “This artist, so pure, spends the whole evening’s performance in the center of her own transparent fire which consumes everything around her” 685. Rainer Maria Rilke. Influential poet (1875–1926) who takes a place among the most highly regarded figures in early modern literature. ALS in French, signed “R. M. Rilke,” one page both sides, 7 x 9, no date. Letter to prominent Jewish author Edmond Fleg. In part (translated): “I am so sorry...not to see the Pitoeffs. I have so admired Madame Ludmilla Pitoeff in her role of St. Joan where she gave not only a full measure of her art but also of all her being, entirely devoted to the requirements of this major art. Legend has it that the salamander lives at the center of the flame. Likewise this artist, so pure, spends the whole evening’s performance in the center of her own transparent fire which consumes everything around her in order to create a burning space that is essential and intangible.” Central horizontal and vertical folds, mild toning to edges and fold, and show-through from writing on reverse, otherwise fine condition. Pitoeff was a well-respected French stage actress known for her extraordinary stage presence—an attribute which clearly impressed Rilke, leading him to compose this poetic description of her performance as Joan of Arc in George Bernard Shaw’s Saint Joan, one of her most lauded roles. Rilke’s use of fire as an image throughout the letter is particularly interesting—burnt at the stake, it was fire that led to St. Joan’s death, and the extended metaphor is a superb example of a literary technique Rilke often employed. In fact, his poem ‘The Spanish Dancer’ is very similar in its use of fire to describe an especially invigorating performance. Exceptional in literary style and rarity, this is an especially desirable Rilke letter. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300) 210 | April 16, 2014 | ART & LITERATURE


686. Robert Ripley. Signed book: Ripley’s Big Book: Believe It or Not! Later printing. NY: Simon & Schuster, 1934. Hardcover, 6.25 x 9.5, 361 pages. Signed in fountain pen on the first free end page, “Ripley.” In very good condition, with toning to page and an ownership signature along bottom edge. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Striking and highly sought-after proof print of the Queen of Clubs 687. Larry Rivers. Important American artist (1923–2002) best

known for his works melding abstraction with proto-Pop imagery. Impressive color 21 x 29 proof print of Rivers’s Queen of Clubs, signed along the bottom in pencil by the artist. Matted and framed to an overall size of 28 x 36. In fine condition. Painted circa 1979, this is one of Rivers’s most readily identifiable pieces; these proof prints are much scarcer than the limited edition of 200 released. Oversized. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Signing his illustrated editions of the Twain classics 688. Norman Rockwell. Two hardcover books, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, each signed and inscribed on the half-title page by Rockwell. Autographic condition: fine. Book conditions: G+/None (Tom Sawyer) and VG-/None (Huck Finn). RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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689. Norman Rockwell. Three hardcover books each signed on the half-title page in black ink by Rockwell. In fine condition, with clipped dust jackets. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Popular image of his beloved Stockbridge 690. Norman Rockwell. Color 29.25 x 9.5 print entitled ‘Stockbridge Main Street at Christmas,’ signed along the bottom in blue ballpoint, “sincerely, Norman Rockwell.” Matted and framed to an overall size of 34.75 x 15.5. In fine condition. Oversized. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“I am unwilling to write further on the matter you mention as my time is entirely occupied with the struggle to avert war” 691. Bertrand Russell. TLS, one page, 8 x 10, Plas Penrhyn letterhead, June 9,

1964. Letter to William Gray. In part: “I am unwilling to write further on the matter you mention as my time is entirely occupied with the struggle to avert war. I enclose some literature concerning the recently formed Peace Foundation. It is our hope that we shall be able to secure very widespread individual financial support in the form of covenants of a set amount for a set period of time. This will be sought simultaneously with our accumulation of large sums. In this way, I am confident that we shall advance quickly towards the achievement of our more ambitious aims. I hope you can assist this and contribute. If you are able to suggest other people who might be willing to support the Foundations financially, we shall be pleased to send them brochures.” Scattered creases and wrinkles, otherwise fine condition. After years of advocating on his own, Russell launched his Peace Foundation in 1963 to advance his work in the areas of peace, social justice, and human rights, with a specific focus on the dangers of nuclear war. Promoting research into disarmament and threats of war, the Foundation published and distributed their findings worldwide, and continues to do so today. An excellent letter highlighting his intense focus on the task at hand. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The master sculptor writes to his one-time model

One of the finest students of the expressionist discipline

692. Auguste Rodin.

ALS in French, signed “A. Rodin,” one page, 4.5 x 7, personal letterhead, March 23, 1903. Letter to his longtime friend, fellow artist, and one-time model, Emilia Cimino. In full (translated): “I am with you in New York, and I hope that you have nice weather now. Your trip has been terrible if I can judge by the storms that were in Meudon. Thank you for being so cordial! Prepare your conference or conferences for later, and see you soon.” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original hand-addressed mailing envelope. In 1895, Rodin purchased his villa in Meudon, a town about five miles outside of Paris, where he would carry out his most essential creative work. A bold, choice letter from the renowned sculptor. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Arranging a “discussion of certain antiquarian articles” 6 9 3 . S i r Wa l t e r Scott. Scottish novelist

and poet (1771–1832) best known for such classics as Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, and Waverley. ALS signed “Walter Scott,” one page, 5 x 7.75, June 25, no year. Letter to a gentleman. In part: “Our committee of Bannatynians are to meet in Castle Street on the 4th of July…for the discussion of certain antiquarian articles as hotchpotch fish and sauce and so forth… attend us at both if possible, at least at the last patriotic undertaking.” Light toning and a circular stain to the upper right (far from any writing), otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

694. Egon Schiele. Influential, forward-looking Austrian artist (1890–1918) who takes a place among the leading figures of the Expressionist movement of the early 20th century. Schiele was among the millions of Europeans who succumbed to the Spanish flu during the epidemic of 1918. German postcard, 3.75 x 5.75, bearing a printed sketch of a child, signed in pencil, with his block signature, “Ego Schiele 1917.” Printed on the reverse of the postcard, in German, “Ink Drawing From the Egon Schiele issue of Die Aktion.” In fine condition, with a bit of scattered light soiling and some trivial surface loss to reverse. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

695. Dr. Seuss.

Original signed felt tip and colored pencil sketch of one red fish on a 6.5 x 3.5 First Day Cover with a cachet honoring the 50th anniversary of the conservation movement in the United States. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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696. George Bernard Shaw. ALS signed “G. Bernard Shaw,” one page, 7 x 4.5, personal letterhead, December 3, 1935. Letter ordering stationery. In part: “I want a parcel of 225 embossed 1.5 envelopes…Also a packet of 12 registered envelopes size G…for which I enclose cheque.” In fine condition, with a central vertical fold. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

697. George Bernard Shaw. ANS

signed “G. B. S.,” one page on a 4.5 x 3.5 printed correspondence postcard, March 14, 1928. Response to an interview request on a pre-printed card declining requests to author a preface. Following the printed message, Shaw writes, in full: “Shew the lady this. An interview would only waste her time.” Addressed on the reverse in Shaw’s own hand. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

After the failure of a WWI ban on German art, “the names of Wagner, Beethoven, and Strauss appeared all over the programmes”

“If it is not too late, you can play Arms & the Man & You Never Can Tell from August” 698. George Bernard Shaw. ALS signed “G.

Bernard Shaw,” one page, 3.5 x 4.5, The Guilford Hotel postcard, August 9, 1913. Letter to actor Dore Lewin Mannering, Jr. In part: “I have been away from London and…could not ascertain whether W. Algernon Grieg’s tour of You Never Can Tell was over or not. In fact, I don’t know now; but I conclude the theatres you mention… have not booked Y. N. C. T., or they would not take you on with it. So if it is not too late, you can play Arms & the Man & You Never Can Tell from August…until October.” Addressed on the reverse in Shaw’s hand. A bit of dampstaining affecting the last few lines and portion of the signature, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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699. George Bernard Shaw. TLS signed “G. Bernard Shaw,” one page, 8 x 6.25, personal letterhead, April 11, 1918. Letter regarding the influence of World War I on classical music. In part: “The other day, at the Church of St Clement Dane’s in London, Brahm’s German Requiem was sung to commemorate our fallen heroes. At the beginning of the war, the directors of the Autumn Promenade Concerts at Queen’s Hall in London announced that no music by German composers would be played. Everyone applauded this step; and nobody went to the concerts. At the end of the week the names of Wagner, Beethoven, and Strauss appeared all over the programmes. The concerts immediately filled up again; and we have not since heard of the boycott. These facts may interest Dr. Karl Muck.” Intersecting folds, overall creases, and a chip to the top edge, otherwise fine condition. The German-born Karl Muck, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, had been arrested just two weeks before Shaw wrote this letter, on March 25, 1918—suspected of espionage, he was held in an internment camp before being deported in April 1919. A fascinating letter referencing the xenophobia—and, at times, hypocrisy—that pervaded both American and British society during WWI. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


“My country, ’tis of thee, Sweet land of liberty” 702. Samuel Francis Smith.

700. Paul Signac. French neo-impressionist painter (1863-1935) who, working with Georges Seurat, helped develop the Pointillist style. ALS in French, signed “P. Signac,” one page, lightly-lined, 5 x 8, Chalet des Peupliers letterhead, September 10, 1900. Untranslated letter to an unidentified recipient, with Signac crossing out two portions of the letterhead. Double-matted and framed to an overall size of 17.25 x 14.5. In fine condition, with central horizontal and vertical folds. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Amazing draft for “A Light in the Attic”

701. Shel Silverstein. Fantastic felt tip sketch of a house and handwritten draft on a 9 x 12 manilla envelope. A working draft of Silverstein’s famous poem “A Light in the Attic.” The main text, in full: “There’s a light on in the attic / Though the house looks dark and / shuttered / I can see it flicker and sputter / through a crinkle in the shade / with a whisper. / There’s a light on in the attic / I can see it from the outside / and I know somebody’s inside / in there / lookin out / through that dark & dusty window / and I know somebody’s in there.” On the front of the envelope, he wrote “Galley Proofs” in bubble letters. In addition to various changes and corrections, Silverstein added a few lines to the left of the poem, as well as a cryptic series of capital letters down the left side. In very good to fine condition, with various folds, overall creases, and office notations. A Light in the Attic, a collection of Silverstein’s poetry published in 1981, is arguably his most famous work. This one-of-a-kind draft of the title poem lends tremendous insight into his process as an artist and poet, a truly remarkable piece. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

AQS on an offwhite 3.75 x 2.75 card, signed “S. F. Smith,” and dated November 20, 1894. Smith pens the famous stanza from ‘America.’ In full: “My country, ’tis of thee, / Sweet land of liberty, / Of thee I sing; / Land where my fathers died, / Land of the pilgrims’ pride, / From every mountain side, / Let freedom ring.” In fine condition, with mild edge toning. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“We are now about as far apart as the limits of our twopenny planet will admit” 703. Robert Louis Stevenson. Scottish au-

thor (1850–1894) who takes a place among the most popular and durable literary figures of the nineteenth century. Uncommon ALS, one page, 9 x 11.25, Vailima Plantation, December 28, 1892. Letter to T. G. Leggatt. In full: “I was very gratefully affected by your remembrance of my birthday and the kindly verses you were so good to send me. A little while ago, when I had first the pleasure to hear from you, we were (in the proportion of the universe) near nieghbours [sic]. We are now about as far apart as the limits of our twopenny planet will admit. From so far away, I return your greeting, and reciprocate, both for yourself and your family, your friendly wishes.” A couple of small separations to intersecting folds (none through text or signature), a uniform toning from previous display, and a few small areas of repair and strengthening to folds on reverse, otherwise fine condition. A scarce and desirable literary autograph. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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“Barry Goldwater has promised to lead us out of Egypt and I believe he could do it. Trouble is—we’re not in Egypt” 704. John Steinbeck. ALS in pencil, signed “John,” four

pages, lightly-lined, 8 x 12.5, July 17, 1963. Lengthy letter to Howard Gossage. In part: “This is the first day I have been permitted reading or writing in over a month and it will have to be short. Two days after I brought the Rover out here, the retina of my left eye detached—then there was surgery and hospitalization and blinders…if you can’t read some of these words, I can’t even see them, I can see the page and what look like a parade of Dyonisic (Dionysic) earthworms…Next page for campaign slogan. Slogan—Barry Goldwater has promised to lead us out of Egypt and I believe he could do it. Trouble is—we’re not in Egypt…If all goes well with eyes, we are going to Finland, Poland, Russia and Czechoslovakia in October for State. Not to be spoken of yet because Russia has not been informed.” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope, addressed in Steinbeck’s own hand. Steinbeck was a close friend of Democrat Adlai Stevenson, and had hoped that he would be nominated in the 1960 campaign—he was weary of JFK as an untrustworthy ‘bed hopper,’ but voted for him and eventually they became friends. As he mentions in this letter, in 1963 he accepted an invitation to travel to the USSR, behind the Iron Curtain, as a cultural emissary from America. He was in Poland when he heard the news of Kennedy’s assassination, after which he detoured to Vienna for a funeral service and returned to Washington; shortly thereafter Jackie asked if he was interested in writing a biography of her late husband, but he did not feel ready for the project. A fantastic letter concluding with mentions—both humorous and serious—of the leftist political involvement that defined much of his life and work. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

705. John Steinbeck. Perfect ink signature, “John Steinbeck,” on a white 3.25 x 2.5 card. In very fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

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“I knew this presidential campaign was going to be dirty” 706. John Steinbeck. TLS signed “John,” one page, 8.5 x 11, September 18, 1964. Letter to Howard Gossage. In part: “We went to Washington for the medal bit and it was very simple and good…There is a new horror let loose in the world. People send books to be signed, no rewrapping, no return postage and they do not ask, they demand. It is always as a surprise for good old Uncle Bob. This is happening with such regularity that I think I am going to throw them in a corner and forget them. I knew this presidential campaign was going to be dirty. But I could not have foreseen the quality of the dirt. Mr. Miller is about as fur [sic] as you can go. And he is quite a lot like another man who got his start in Munich not so very long ago.” In fine condition, with a small mild circular stain to lower right. On September 14, 1964, Steinbeck had been in Washington to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom from Lyndon B. Johnson, as referenced in the beginning of this letter. At the time of writing, the 1964 presidential election was fast approaching, with the Lyndon B. Johnson/Hubert Humphrey ticket facing off against Barry Goldwater/ William E. Miller. Although Johnson ended up securing a lopsided victory, both sides were accused of running dirty campaigns—Johnson ran the controversial ‘Daisy’ ad, a watershed moment in the use of ‘negative’ campaigning, and Goldwater claimed to have taken Miller as his running mate simply because ‘he drives Johnson nuts.’ A fantastic letter in which Steinbeck comments on his books and his politics—the two driving forces in his life’s story. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“The chalice, artfully buried within a plaster cast of an antique bust, got over to England” 707. Booth Tarkington. TLS, four

pages, 7.25 x 10.5, personal letterhead, April 22, 1945. Letter to Ralph Knight at the Saturday Evening Post. In part: “On the point of the genesis of the present story, the new translation of the Ms. of Sugar, 12th Century Abbot of St. Denis and builder—or at least re-builder—of St. Denis is now about to be published…I don’t need to say that I read it with a profound interest…but that did happen to be the effect of a passage that quite suddenly stood out to me as the germ, so to say, of a possible ‘Rumbin story.’ This passage dealt with two objects of great value for centuries in the treasury of St. Denis. They were a chalice and a ‘Gondola,’ and already of long historical interest sacredly, they began to be a part of more modern history with a violent suddenness during the French Revolution when the Sansculotte government laid hands upon them. Then in 1804, As Napoleon became Emperor, thieves got them out of the Bibliotheque Nationale. The chalice, artfully buried within a plaster cast of an antique bust, got over to England and was surreptitiously sold to an English collector…Both the chalice and the ‘Gondola’ are described in detail by Sugar…The ‘Gondola,’ however, was either luckier or less lucky than the chalice because its whereabouts are a mystery…The ‘Gondola’ wholly disappeared from the knowledge of all honest men…maybe somebody’s using it for a butter-dish or perhaps it’s still inside a dirty old plaster cast in somebody’s cellar, maybe a bombed one.” In fine condition, with first two paragraphs crossed out in pencil by Tarkenton, a couple of other pencil notations on first page, area of mild toning to each page, and staple holes to top left corners. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Thurber’s unpublished “Of Time and the Ocean” manuscript 708. James Thurber. Scarce autograph manuscript of a work entitled “Of Time and the

Ocean,” 41 pages, 8.5 x 11, no date. In pencil, Thurber scrawls a poetic philosophical essay in very large and often nearly illegible script due to his poor eyesight, with some of the words transcribed above by an assistant. In part: “Man is no longer content to function in accordance with his design, like the jackrabbit or the farm rooster, but is impelled to reach far above and beyond it, like a very best of that has began to fill the skies with TV spectaculars instead of plain white light.” In fine condition. Accompanied by a single page in a secretarial hand with similar but apparently revised content. A choice item as it is characteristic of the quick, slice-of-life examinations of popular culture that Thurber was known for, often emphasizing the unusual or absurd. We can also find no record that “Of Time and the Ocean” was ever published, making this manuscript all the more interesting. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

709. Alice B. Toklas. ALS signed “Alice,” one page, 5.25 x 8.25, September 14, 1955. Letter to Saul Mauraker. In part: “Lately it has struck me so very strange that people are so good…Perhaps my experience has been fortunate. The winter was long—through June— my days were occupied indeed.” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope, filled out in Toklas’s hand and incorporating “Toklas” in the return address area. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“My drawings are too big to be carried, but I’ll be in my studio at 4 o’clock today”

711. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Important French

710. Tony Award Authors. Collection of 34 items, consisting of signatures and a single photo, each signed by a Tony Award–winning writer. Most notable are Edward Albee, Arthur Miller, Harold Pinter (2), Neil Simon (2), and Tom Stoppard (3). A more comprehensive list is available online at www.RRAuction.com. In overall fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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painter and printmaker (1864–1901) whose lively, colorful portrayals of the people and places of fin-de-siècle Paris take a place among the most iconic images of the era. ALS in French, signed “T-Lautrec,” one page, 5 x 3, no date. Letter to art critic Gustave Geffroy. In full (translated): “My drawings are too big to be carried, but I’ll be in my studio at 4 o’clock today and tomorrow the whole afternoon. Come and see them, if you please. All must be ready by December 2.” A few brushes to text as well as some scattered edge creases, otherwise fine condition. Geffroy was a staunch supporter of Lautrec’s works, particularly those dealing with vices. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)


Rearranging a display of his work— “place the portrait opposite the fire” 712. John Trumbull. American painter of well-known scenes of the American Revolution

(1756–1843). ALS signed “Jno. Trumbull,” one page, 7.75 x 9.5, May 6, 1827. Letter to arts patron and founder of the Wadsworth Atheneum art museum, Daniel Wadsworth. In part: “I have seen our friend Mr. Murray who says he made no request respecting silk worms. But he recollects, as you do, some one talking to him about them, and wishing to obtain some. But like you he cannot recollect who it was…I send a box containing the pictures of which you thought well. Be so good as to hang it in the place where the Portrait of Mrs. Trumbull now is, and a little higher than it. And place the portrait opposite the fire. The cloth seemed to me to be relaxed, as if some of the wedges had got out of place; when the picture is taken down, be so good as to examine it. Perhaps the wedges only want to be driven home. I think you will find the change every way advantageous.” Also addressed on the reverse of the second integral page in Trumbull’s hand. In fine condition, with intersecting folds and a small repaired tear to left edge. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Three original Vargas works including a titillating pin-up study 713. Alberto Vargas. Collection of three unsigned drawings by Vargas, ranging in size from 16.5 x 14.5 up to 29 x 22. The first is a pencil on paper preliminary study sketch for a pin-up girl painting. The second and third are interior scene drawings that may have been from Vargas’s time as an artist at Warner Bros. One is a pencil on paper drawing of a large room with a woman reclining on the sofa. The other is a mixed media on paper image of men in a cafe, which is affixed to a larger mount. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

714. Alberto Vargas. Ballpoint signature and inscription, “Best

wishes to ‘John’ Alberto Vargas,” on a light brown 4 x 2.5 slip. In fine condition, with a horizontal crease along bottom of signature, and a diagonal crease through the paraph. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

715. Andy Warhol. Signed book: Andy Warhol’s Exposures. First edition, first printing. NY: Andy Warhol Books/Grosset and Dunlap, 1979. Hardcover with dust jacket, 9.5 x 11.5. Signed on the half-title page in black felt tip. Autographic condition: fine. Book condition: VG+/ VG+. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Warhol’s personally-owned Elgin pocket watch 716. Andy Warhol. Warhol’s personally-owned Elgin pocket

watch, measuring 1.75˝ in diameter, featuring a face with Arabic numerals, blue hands, and a smaller subdial for seconds. The watch case is silver-colored with a beautiful, ornate art deco design, something Warhol showed a particular affinity toward. In nonfunctional condition with some tarnishing to edges of the face, and a couple slight dents to back of the case. Originally acquired through Sotheby’s sale of Warhol’s estate in 1988. The eccentric artist was known to frequent flea markets and auctions alike, purchasing items that caught his eye due to their design—his art, after all, elevated even the most everyday objects, a theme found in perhaps his most famous work, Campbell’s Soup Cans. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Fantastic drawing of his famous “Tomato Soup”

717. Andy Warhol. Original signed felt tip sketch of his famous soup can labeled “Tomato Soup” with a dollar sign above, signed vertically

on the right side, accomplished on the back cover of an off-white 8.75 x 11.5 glossy cardstock Studio 54 folder. Front bears an additional “$” above the Studio’s logo. In very good condition, with heavy overall creasing, some light stains, and foxing to the front cover. Studio 54 was an ultra-hip nightclub in New York that Warhol frequented, and at one point the owner presented him with a bin full of dollar bills as a birthday present—the artist is said to have called it the best gift he had ever received. This makes for a fitting association, with Warhol replacing what would typically be ‘Campbell’s Soup’ with “$” on an item from the venue; he also rarely adds “Tomato Soup” to these sketches, making it an especially scarce piece. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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718. Andy Warhol. Felt tip signature, “Andy Warhol,” on a white 8.25 x 11.75 sheet. In fine condition, with a central horizontal fold passing through a single letter of signature. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

719. Andy Warhol. Commemorative cover with a colorful cachet honoring UNDRO against hunger, designed by Warhol, signed near the bottom in black felt tip. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Webster provides copies of his iconic work for sale: “The dictionaries are partly in sheep & partly in calf & well bound” 720. Noah Webster.

ALS signed “N. Webster,” one page both sides, 7.5 x 9.75, October 5, 1841. Handwritten copy of a letter to T. N. Whiting. In part: “The account for the plates & advances will, I believe, stand thus. T. N. Whiting to N. Webster, to a set of plates…to premium on 500 copies printed at 4 cents… my expenses of concocting plates…$162.64. In this statement I have not allowed you interest on the 40 dollars you sent me last winter...I send with the dictionary in two boxes a number of Bibles & Testaments on sale. The Bibles a dollar single & 75 cents to the trade—The Testament 20 cents single, & 15 cents to the trade. I send a great number of Pamphlets for extensive distribution gratis, with recommendations of my books, which you may use for your benefit as you see fit. The dictionaries are partly in sheep & partly in calf & well bound...We have sold a few to friends at 15 dollars in calf & 14 in sheep, but we find booksellers sell them at 14. You will set your own price in Columbus. The two sums for which you are to give me a note at 6 months amount to $412.00.” On the second integral page, Webster writes out another invoice for $252.00, to “Mr. T. N. Whiting Bot of N. Webster, 25 sets of American Dictionary,” and a second account for the sale of Bibles for $26.10. On the reverse of the second integral page, Webster has docketed the letter, “Copy of a Letter to T. N. Whiting, Columbus Ohio.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds, one through a single letter of letter’s signature, and another passing through a single letter of another signature, and a brush to a single letter of text on second page. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from PSA/DNA. After publishing his first dictionary in 1806, Webster immediately began work on an expanded version, which would grow to over 70,000 entries—many of which had never appeared in any dictionary before—and take 26 years to complete. Plagued by debt from the relative failure of the first edition, which sold only 2,500 copies and forced him to mortgage his home, it was crucial that the second edition succeed. A year prior to this letter, 82-year-old Webster finally published the new edition to a much wider and more receptive audience. Boasting three signatures and excellent content regarding the much-needed sales of his masterful work, this is a remarkable piece from the man who helped shape and document the evolving American English language. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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722. Tennessee Williams. Scarce ALS signed

“Tennessee,” one onionskin page, 8.5 x 11, no date. Letter to “Marion.” In full: “I was afraid the book had disappeared—sorry about the delay. Am starting a new painting tomorrow!” In fine condition, with a single horizontal and vertical fold. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

724. Frank Lloyd Wright.

Appealing Wrightdesigned business check for the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, 8 x 3.25, filled out in type and signed by Wright, “Frank Lloyd Wright,” payable to Gladys Pete for $15.20, August 1, 1947. In fine condition, with expected cancellation holes and bank notations, and a toned piece of tape to the top edge. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Boldly penned letter from the year of La Fortune des Rougon 726. Emile Zola.

ALS in French, one page, 5.25 x 8.25, April 28, 1871. Letter to a colleague. In full (translated): “Will you be free Tuesday evening, the day after tomorrow? I shall be at your house at 8:15, and please be good enough to take me to Varietes. If you do not answer me, that will be a sign that you accept the appointment.” In fine condition, with central vertical and horizontal folds (vertical fold unobtrusively passing through first letter of the signature). Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The definitive study of the architect’s work

725. Frank Lloyd Wright. Signed book: In The Nature of Materials: the Buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright, 1898–1941 by Henry-Russell

Hitchcock. First edition, fourth printing. NY: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1942. Hardcover with dust jacket, 8.75 x 8.75, 143 pages plus unpaginated plates. Signed and inscribed on the title page in black ballpoint, “To Anne, FLLW 54.” Autographic condition: fine. Book condition: VG-/ G+. Originally purchased from a small collection of items that contained several pieces inscribed, ‘From Grandfather,’ the recipient of this book was most certainly Wright’s granddaughter, actress Anne Baxter. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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comic art & animation 727. Comic Artists. FDC with a cachet honoring family unity, signed in felt tip and ballpoint by Walter Lantz, Joe Barbera, Jim Davis, Jerry Siegel, Hank Ketcham, Bill Hanna, and Bob Kane. Matted and framed with images of comic book covers to an overall size of 19 x 13. In fine condition. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from JSA. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Incredible archive from the outset of Crumb’s cartoonist career 728. Robert Crumb. Archive of material related

to the publication of Crumb’s work from the files of editor William Cole, totaling approximately 130 pages of material dated between 1968 and 1972, including a document signed by Crumb, printed material used in the publication of his books, many carbon copies of letters to Crumb and publisher, and letters to Cole from various editors and publishing executives. The archive begins at the outset of his career, prior to the publication of his first book, Head Comix, and continues through his publication and the film adaptation of Fritz the Cat. Archive is highlighted by a DS signed “Robert Crumb,” four pages on two adjoining sheets, 8.25 x 14, January 2, 1968. Agreement between Crumb and Viking Press regarding royalties “respecting a work tentatively entitled R. Crumb: His Book consisting of cartoons.” Signed at the conclusion by Crumb as well as his wife Dana as a witness.

The other premier item is a printed design proposal labeled in the upper right, “back of jacket,” 11 x 14, featuring Crumb’s characters with speech bubbles for blurbs from critics praising his work. In a blank bubble, Allen Ginsberg penned his opinion, “Crumb Comix is inevitable underground comicstrip inaction of the post historic flower age,” signing at the conclusion. Balance of the lot primarily contains carbon copies of letters sent by Cole, as well as a few TLSs to Cole from publishers like Ballantine Books and Viking Press. In a carbon copy of a 1968 letter to a publisher in support of Crumb’s fledgling career, Cole writes: “I’ve been thinking all day yesterday and much of last night about the Crumb problem…I always come down to one point—I’ve got to do what I think is best for my author—who is also my friend. He’s twenty-four, extremely sensitive, and this book is the biggest thing in his life…I can certainly see where you and some others think Crumb is a little hairy for Viking—but he’s so obviously great, so obviously one of the geniuses of now, that any publisher should feel it his obligation to publish him.” In a 1972 carbon copy of a letter to Crumb, Cole writes: “I see that something good came from the movie. Ballantine finally got off their asses, as you know, and are doing the three Fritz books in cheaper editions…I thought the movie was a sack of shit. The only good things in it were the lines of yours that they left intact.” Includes a handful of TLSs to Cole from Ballantine’s notable editor-in-chief, Bernard Shir-Cliff, as well as a few other arts-world notables like David Amram and Laurie Colwin. Archive is in overall fine condition, with various toning to many of the letters and carbon copies. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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731. Walt Disney. Color 11 x 8.5 print of Chip and Dale carrying a model sailboat down a dock under the watchful eye of Donald Duck from the 1956 animation short Chips Ahoy, matted to an overall size of 15.5 x 14.5, and signed and inscribed in black artist’s pencil on the mat, “To Stephen, with best wishes of Walt Disney.” Written in pencil, in another hand, at mat edge beneath print, “Walt Disney’s Chips Ahoy,” at left. Framed to an overall size of 16.25 x 15.25. This print is apparently a replacement for a missing animation cel. In fine condition, with some mild toning to mat and a small vertical tear to top edge. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Phil Sears. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

Whimsical piece of Disney’s personal Mickey Mouse stationery 732. Walt Disney. Choice vintage brown ink signature, “Walt Disney,” on an off-white 5.5 x 4.25 sheet of his personal Mickey Mouse stationery. In very fine condition. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Phil Sears and an unsigned color photo of Disney. Disney kept a pad of this note paper on his desk and was known to sign them in advance and put them in his pocket to pass out to autograph seekers; as such, when these are found they are often folded or wrinkled, while this example is in superlative condition. Mickey Mouse items signed by Disney are also surprisingly scarce, making this piece of Disney’s personalized stationery an exceptionally desirable autographed piece. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

733. Disney: Jiminy Cricket. Original colored pencil

production drawing of Jiminy Cricket holding his umbrella on an off-white 12.5 x 15.5 sheet of animation paper, done for a Walt Disney Studios Jiminy Cricket program, with a studio artist’s signature of Walt Disney near the bottom. In fine condition, with notations to top edge and a central horizontal fold. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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734. Disney: Winnie the Pooh. Original colored pencil

production drawing of Winnie the Pooh walking with school books under his arm on an off-white 11.5 x 15.5 sheet, made for the early 1970s Winnie the Pooh Educational series, with a studio artist’s signature of Walt Disney. In fine condition, with artist’s notations to top border and a central horizontal fold. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


Choice 1960 WED Enterprises document 735. Walt Disney. DS, signed

“Walter E. Disney,” two pages, 8.5 x 11, February 15, 1960. Minutes of the 1960 annual meeting of the shareholders of WED Enterprises, Inc. In part: “Both of the corporation’s only shareholders, Walter E. Disney and William H. D. Cottrell, as voting trustees of WED Enterprises, Inc., were present…Royal Clark, Secretary of the corporation, was also present… by a unanimous vote, the following persons were elected Directors of the corporation to serve for the ensuing year…Walter E. Disney, William H. D. Cottrell, Royal Clark, Richard F. Irvine, Diane D. Miller, Sharon D. Brown, Loyd Wright, Sr.” Beautifully signed at the conclusion in ballpoint by Disney, and countersigned by the secretary, Royal Clark. In fine condition, with expected document wear. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Phil Sears and an unsigned color photo of Disney with Mickey Mouse. An interesting document in which Disney names his daughters, Diane and Sharon, as members of the board of directors of WED Enterprises, now called Walt Disney Imagineering, boldly signed by Disneyland’s mastermind. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

736. Walter Lantz. Extremely scarce original painting

by Walter Lantz, oil on canvas, 9.5 x 7.5, showing Woody Woodpecker next to a bowl of fruit. Painting is signed in black paint in the lower right, “Walter Lantz,” and signed and inscribed on the wooden canvas stretchers on the reverse, “To Russ and Sue—best wishes, Walter Lantz.” Reverse of the canvas also bears a partially affixed ‘Walter Lantz Happy Art’ label and a Lantz copyright stamp. Attractively cloth-matted and framed to an overall size of 14 x 12. In fine condition, with a few chips and marks to stretchers affecting a bit of the last name of signature. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from JSA. An outstanding and highly desirable painting of Lantz’s most famous character—only the second we have ever offered. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300) www.RRAuction.com | 225


737. Bob Kane. Original signed and inscribed ballpoint sketch of Batman on an off-white 5.5 x 7 card, signed and inscribed below, “To Tamee—‘Bats’ wishes—Always—Bob Kane.” In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

740. Scooby Doo. Two original unsigned hand-painted animation cels: an 11 x 9.25 of Shaggy; and a 12.5 x 11 of Scooby Doo, both set against color pre-printed backgrounds. The Shaggy is doublematted to an overall size of 18 x 15. In fine condition. RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

738. Peanuts. Adorable hand-painted animation cel of Lucy dressed as a

witch, 9.5 x 7.75, gouche on a full celluloid sheet. Attractively double-matted and framed to an overall size of 17 x 15. In fine condition. This cel was used in an early scene of the second network special, ‘It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown’ (1966), as the gang assembles to go trick-or-treating. A rare piece of artwork from the classic Halloween cartoon. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Fantastic 1950s sketch inscribed to “a real Snoopy!” 739. Charles Schulz. Signed sketch within a book: A New Peanuts Book Featuring Snoopy. First edition. NY: Rinehart & Co., 1958. Softcover, 5.25 x 8, unpaginated. Features an excellent original ballpoint full-figure sketch of Snoopy on the half-title page, signed “Schulz,” inscribed above, “To Tammy—a real Snoopy!” Autographic condition: fine, with uniform toning to page. Book condition: VG/None. Shortly after this time, Snoopy began walking upright on two legs, considered by many to be the turning point in his evolution. On all fours and displaying his original ‘long-nose’ design, this is an outstanding, early sketch with a charming inscription by the Peanuts creator. Precertified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 226 | April 16, 2014 | COMIC ART & ANIMATION


classic music 741. Pablo Casals. Revered

Spanish cellist and composer (1876–1973) widely regarded as the greatest player in the history of the instrument. ALS in French, one onionskin page, 5.25 x 8.25, January 1, 1953. Letter wishing a happy New Year to Dr. Arthur Briskier of New York. In part (translated): “I am preparing for the 1953 Festival and the execution of St. Matthew’s Passion will be my musical testament.” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope, filled out in Casals’s hand, incorporating his name in the return address area on the flap. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

742. Kirsten Flagstad. Highly regarded

Norwegian soprano (1895–1962) regarded by many as ‘the voice of the century.’ Vintage glossy 8 x 10 Paramount Pictures publicity photo, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “Douglas Craig, very sincerely, Kirsten Flagstad.” In very good condition, with scattered creases and some light contrast and irregular ink adhesion to inscription. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

744. Leo Delibes. Notable French composer of ballets and operas (1836–1891). ALSi french, one page both sides, 5.25 x 8.25, May 17, no year. Letter to a gentlemen, saying that he went away to the country for a few days but can now be reached in Paris. Central vertical and horizontal folds and toning to edges, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

745. Franz Lehar.

ALS in German, one page, 6.75 x 8.5, personal letterhead, April 5, 1938. Letter to Muhammad Tahir Pasha, the chairman of the Egyptian Olympic Committee. Lehar writes to tell Pasha that he is working on a composition for aviation and athletic events. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

743. Aloys Fuchs.

Musician (1799–1853) who was one of the greatest autograph collectors of worldrenowned musicians. ALS in German, four pages on two adjoining sheets, 5.5 x 8.5, August 22, 1843. Very neatly penned and lengthy untranslated letter, with many words and passages underlined in red ink. In fine condition, with some light show-through from text on reverse. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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His sons fighting abroad, the famed tenor sends thanks for “your darn fine singing of the Boheme and Don Juan arias” 746. John McCormack. World-famous Irish tenor and recording artist (1884-1945), celebrated for his performances of the operatic and popular song repertoires. ALS, one page both sides, 7 x 9, personal letterhead, June 29, 1944. Letter to singer/songwriter Lanny Ross. In part: “Your letter was one of the pleasant surprises we have had since we left California. It brought back so many happy memories of hours round the piano in our home in Hollywood and of your darn fine singing of the Boheme and Don Juan arias. And now what a change! My eldest son a Captain, my youngest in the South African army…He was wounded and taken prisoner in North Africa and then released by his own Division…Let us pray it will soon be over. I had a bit of a breakdown from overwork in the Red Cross.” In fine condition, with a bit of scattered light toning. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Superb portrait enhanced with a musical quote 747. Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. Eminent Russian composer (1844–1908) best known for such brilliantly orchestrated works as Scheherazade and for operatic staples like ‘Sadko,’ ‘The Tale of Tsar Saltan,’ and ‘The Golden Cockerel.’ Vintage matte-finish 3.5 x 5.5 Russian postcard photo, signed in fountain pen, with a four-bar AMQS in 2/4 time added under his signature. In fine condition, with some mounting remnants to reverse. An exemplary photo in pristine condition. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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Rossini celebrates the 500th performance of his masterwork, William Tell 748. Gioachino Rossini. Important Italian composer (1792–1868)

who became one of the seminal figures in the history of opera with such repertoire staples as The Barber of Seville and William Tell. Rare vintage 2 x 3.5 photo, affixed to a 4.25 x 6.25 mount, engraved in French, (translated): “February 10, 1868 / 500th Performance of William Tell / Grateful Remembrance,“ and inscribed in another hand to “Mr. Houstache,” and signed at the bottom, “G. Rossini.” In fine condition, with a mild block of overall toning from previous display. Rossini attended the 500th performance of his classic in 1868 at the Paris Opera. A magnificent tribute to Rossini’s grandest, and final, opera. Pre-certified John Reznikoff/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Beautifully penned musical quote shortly after his arrival in the States 749. Arnold Schoenberg. AMQS on an off-white 3.75 x 2.5 card. Penning four bars

from an unidentified work, Schoenberg signs and inscribes, “Autograph fur Herr Adolph Leichtle, Arnold Schoenberg 22.V.1934.” In fine condition. Schoenberg had immigrated to the United States in 1933 fleeing from the Nazis, settling first in Boston, and later in Los Angeles where he taught at both UCLA and USC. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

750. Arnold Schoenberg. Austrian-born composer (1874–1951) whose development of the ‘twelvetone’ system proved to be one of the most far-reaching innovations in the history of 20th century music. Rare 3.25 x 5.25 German postcard photo of the composer in a three-piece suit, signed in the lower border in black ink. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Choice portrait of the ‘Waltz King’ 751. Johann Strauss. Eminent Viennese composer (1825–1899), known as the ‘Waltz King,’ best known for such all-time favorites as ‘The Beautiful Blue Danube’ and the ‘Emperor Waltz,’ and for the operetta staple Die Fledermaus. Beautiful original 2.5 x 5 gilt-trimmed carte-de-visite photo by A. Moll of Vienna, signed in a special area in the lower border in black ink, “Johann Strauss,” adding a three-bar AMQS from ‘The Emperor Waltz Op. 437.’ In fine condition, with a small tack hole to bottom border. Strauss is uncommon in signed photos, particularly of this quality. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Choice musical quote in D-minor

752. Igor Stravinsky. Desirable AMQS on an off-white 5.25 x 3.25 card, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Mrs. Gladis Thompson, Igor Stravinsky, Dec 11/61.” Stravinsky pens two bars in D-minor. In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Scarce photo of the Brazilian genius at his piano 753. Hector Villa-Lobos. Brazilian composer and conductor (1887–1959) whose many compositions include twelve symphonies, as well as operas, large-scale symphonic poems, concerti, and ballets. Vintage glossy 7 x 9 photo of Villa-Lobos puffing a cigar while seated behind his piano, signed and inscribed in fountain pen in Spanish (translated), “To the fortunate and victorious Professor Kilas, patient friend of many works impatient, with grateful memories, Villa-Lobos,” adding a date of Rio, July 23, 1951. A noticeable crease to the upper right corner and a few light surface bends, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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contemporary music 1978 band signatures obtained after Bon’s debauchery in a record store 754.

AC/DC. Ballpoint signatures, “Bon AC/DC,” “Cliff Williams, AC/DC,” “Malcolm Young, AC/DC,” and “Phil Rudd, AC/DC,” on a 7 x 3.5 lightly-lined yellow triangular slip; and a ballpoint signature and inscription of Angus Young on an off-white 5 x 3 card. In fine condition. Accompanied by a letter of provenance from the original recipient of the multi-signed sheet explaining how he received the signatures at the record store Peaches in 1978, in part: “I wasn’t a fan yet but saw them just hangin’ there with a handful of fans and thought what the hell…I’ll say hello and chat them up some. They were promoting the Powerage album and performing that night somewhere. They were all very talkable and cool. I ended up talking the most with Malcom [sic] about tape recorders and making echo effects by rewiring them…he was really into it as was I and we had a great conversation about it. He even gave me a free Powerage T-shirt! Then…. from a corner room strays in Bon Scott and he’s swarmed in Rock Star fashion by 2 beautiful girls eventually taunting him to sign their [chest] with a magic marker… A classic scene for sure!…I made a comment about the [chest] signing and he said something I’ll never forget, ‘I’m on a highway to hell mate!’ and he scrawled his autograph for me.” Consignor notes that the Angus Young signature was obtained in person at the Charlotte Coliseum in Charlotte, North Carolina, on August 8, 1980. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from Roger Epperson/REAL. Scott is quite rare in band-signed items; an excellent example, coupled with a tremendous back story that encapsulates the front man’s excessive rock and roll lifestyle. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

1963 program from the tour where the Fab Four emerged as bona-fide headliners

755. Beatles. Vintage tour program photo from the band’s 1963 tour with Chris Montez and Tommy Roe, 8 x 10.25, 14 pages, signed on the back cover in blue ballpoint, “George Harrison,” “Ringo Starr,” “Paul McCartney,” and “John Lennon.” The original ticket stub from their show on March 15 is affixed to the first page. In very good condition, with three horizontal folds (most noticeable near Ringo’s face), overall handling creases, a few small stains, and cover detached from inner pages. Accompanied by a note of provenance from the mother of the original owner, stating that the autographs were obtained at their show in Bristol on March 15, 1963, as well as a letter of authenticity from noted Beatles expert Frank Caiazzo. Originally planned with Montez and Roe as the headliners—as indicated by the Beatles being listed 5th in the program—the Beatles slid into the headlining spot after the first night of the tour on March 9. With ‘Please Please Me’ on its third week at number one, and the highly anticipated release of the debut album of the same name just two weeks away, it was clear that Beatlemania had taken hold. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $1000) www.RRAuction.com | 231


The band, with Jimmie Nicol filling in, sign a photo in between their only shows in the Netherlands in 1964 756. Beatles. German postcard photo, 4 x 5.75, signed in pink ballpoint, “Paul McCartney,” “John Lennon,” and “George Harrison,” and in black ballpoint, “Jimmie Nicol.” In very good condition, with Nicol’s signature only partially legible due to irregular ink flow, with last name appearing only as an impression, some light skipping and a couple of brushes to the other signatures, some corner tip creases and some scattered light surface impressions. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Tracks. The signatures were originally obtained by a 16-year old female fan when the Beatles made their only stop in the Netherlands at the Veilinghal Op Hoop Van Zegen in Blokker on June 6, 1964, where they played two shows for a total of 9,000 fans. Photo is accompanied by a letter of provenance which states that her father was a festival organizer and managed to get the two of them into a dressing room against Brian Epstein’s wishes after he stuck his clog in the door. She placed the photo on a table and the band quickly signed it for her. Nicol replaced Ringo Starr from June 3–15, 1964, at the start of the Beatles’ World Tour, while Ringo was suffering from tonsillitis and pharyngitis. An extremely scarce combination as Nicol was with the Beatles for less than two weeks, playing a total of eight shows. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $1000)

Awesome set of Fab Four signatures obtained by an ITN London News reporter during a 1963 interview 757. Beatles. A superb set of vintage ballpoint signatures, “Paul McCartney,” “John Lennon,” “George Harrison,” and “Ringo Starr,” on an off-white 4.25 x 2.5 sheet, dating to mid-to-late 1963. In fine, clean condition. Accompanied by a letter of provenance from the original owner which reads: “My Father, a journalist on the Daily Herald was a friend of the reporter Michael Whale who worked at ITN London News who went to interview the Beatles in 1963 and gave my Father the autographs for me as I was an avid fan.” Also accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Tracks. A visually stunning set of signatures from the band whose success on the charts during 1963 made them the media sensation of the day. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $1000)

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First pressing of the Beatles’ debut album, boldly signed in April of 1963 758. Beatles. A mono black/gold first pressing of the Beatles’ Please Please Me album signed and inscribed on the back cover in blue ballpoint, “To Eve, Paul McCartney x,” “John Lennon to Evelyn xxx,” “Love from George Harrison to Evelyn xxx,” and “To Evelyn, Love Ringo Starr xxx.” In very good condition, with a partial separation to bottom flip over, scattered creases to both covers, primarily to edges, a couple small edge tears, and some light toning and foxing. All of the signatures are large and quite bold. The record is included. Accompanied by a laminated letter of provenance from the original recipient which reads, in part: “My first meeting with The Beatles was in February 1963 at the Television Studios in Broom Road, Teddington in Middlesex. I was introduced to them by Record Producer Alan Freeman, who I met up with several times over the next few months in the presence of The Beatles and many other Pop stars of the day. Parlophone rush-released the Please Please Me album the following month. I bought my copy at a record store in the North End Road, Fulham in South West London, where I lived—and took it with me to Teddington when I heard The Beatles would next be there—which was in the April of 1963. Again I met up with Alan Freeman who took me through to their dressing room where Paul McCartney was sitting on a divan bed strumming his guitar. John, George and Ringo were busy getting ready for rehearsal. In turn they happily signed the album for me. First to sign it was George Harrison, then Ringo, then Paul—and last but by no means least was John Lennon. Just as the album was passed to him, they were called for those rehearsals—which were for ABC TV’s hugely popular show ‘Thank Your Lucky Stars.’” Also accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Tracks. This would mark the band’s third appearance on the program, recorded on April 14, 1963, in which they performed just one song, ‘From Me To You.’ Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $2500)

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759. Beatles. A pair of original unused tickets from the Beatles last ever concert at Candle-

stick Park, San Francisco, held on August 29, 1966. Tickets measure 5.5 x 2.5 each, with red writing and head shots of each Beatle and are for “Lower Stand Admission,” for $4.50 each. Moderate fading to the color printing and border, and light mounting remnants to reverse, otherwise fine condition. This was the Beatles’ last concert tour appearance ever, a 33-minute performance in front of 25,000 fans. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

George signs for the band while visiting the Playhouse Theatre canteen in London 760. Beatles: George Harrison. A complete set of vintage ballpoint signatures of the Beatles, all in the hand of George Harrison on a 6 x 5.25 off-white album page. Harrison signs, “Love from the Beatles, George,” “Paul,” “John,” and “Ringo.” In fine condition. Signatures were originally obtained by a female worker at the Playhouse Theatre canteen in 1963; item is accompanied by a letter of provenance from one of her relatives as well as a certificate of authenticity from Tracks. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

John and George on board the ferry SS Maid of Kent 761. Beatles: Lennon and Harrison. Vin-

tage color 6 x 4 postcard of the British Rail Car Carrier SS Maid of Kent, signed and inscribed in blue ballpoint on the correspondence side, “To Jackie, John Lennon,” and “George Harrison,” circa 1966. Matted and framed with seven photos (three of John, three of George, and one of the ship), along with a printed caption explaining how the signatures were acquired which reads: “The postcard is from the SS Maid of Kent ferry, signed by John Lennon and George Harrison who were using the boat whilst Paul and Ringo flew to a gig in Germany…I understand from a former company director that 12 cards were signed in the captain’s office,” to an overall size of 26 x 23. In fine condition, with a light crease along the bottom edge, not affecting either signature. An excellent pair of signatures from the height of Beatlemania. Oversized. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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Superb John and Yoko signatures obtained in flight over the Atlantic 762. Beatles: Lennon and Ono. Exceptional ballpoint

signatures, “John Lennon,” and “Yoko Ono Lennon,” on the correspondence side of a color 6 x 4 postcard photo of a BOAC Rolls-Royce 707 Jetliner. In fine condition. The signatures were originally obtained by a British Overseas Airways Corporation air steward on a flight from New York to London, circa 1974. Accompanied by seven other similar postcards and sheets of stationery, each signed by a different celebrity, including: Alistair MacLean, Julian Bream, Stephanie Powers, Yehudi Menuhin, Patrick Moore, Ned Beatty, and Raymond Burr. A choice set of signatures obtained shortly after the couple reunited after Lennon’s 18-month long ‘lost weekend.’ Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

763. Beatles: Martin and Blake.

Color Sgt. Pepper’s promo card, 4 x 5, signed in the lower border in blue ballpoint by George Martin and in black ink by Peter Blake. Double-matted and framed with a photo of Martin in the studio with the Beatles to an overall size of 16 x 14.5. In fine condition. Precertified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

765. Beatles: Paul McCartney and Wings. Red felt tip sig-

natures, “Paul McCartney,” “Linda,” “Joe English,” and four others on an off-white 6.75 x 3.25 card. In fine condition, with a couple of small tape remnants to reverse. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Promo card obtained by a resourceful fan’s meeting with Mal Evans at Heathrow 764. Beatles: McCartney and Starr. Vintage Beatles fan club

promo card, 5.25 x 4.25, featuring a classic Dezo Hoffmann portrait of the band in their collarless suits, signed on the front in blue ballpoint by Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr. In fine condition, with a few trivial corner tip dings and a bit of minor foxing. Accompanied by a letter of provenance from the original recipient which states, in part: “These signatures were obtained in the early sixties. As a young fan I used to go to Heathrow Airport to try and get a glimpse of the Beatles when they were flying in or out. A family friend was a policeman at Heathrow and had inside information of when they were passing through. It was there that I met Mal Evans, their road manager, who gave me the postcards, apologising that they were only signed by two of the Beatles, but that was all he had on him at the time.” Also accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Tracks. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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766. Beatles: Paul McCartney. ALS signed “Paul (& Lin) McCartney,” one page, 8.25 x 11.5, illustrated pig letterhead, no date. Letter reads, in full: “Just a note to thank you for your sentiments expressed in your letter. Linda & I love to hear that people like yourself sympathize with our views, and are thus encouraged to go on talking about our ‘cranky’ thoughts!” In fine, clean condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope, addressed in McCartney’s hand, as well as a certificate of authenticity from Tracks. McCartney is notoriously scarce in handwritten letters, even more so with such interesting content. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Paul pays tribute to one of the band’s biggest influences, Buddy Holly

768. Beatles: Paul McCartney. Color 5.75

x 4.25 MPL postcard photo from 1990 of Paul and Linda McCartney, signed in blue felt tip. In fine condition. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Tracks. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

769. 767. Beatles: Paul McCartney. Signed book: Buddy Holly: His

Life and Music. Later printing. London: Granada Publishing, 1979. Paperback, 4.5 x 7, 258 pages. Signed and inscribed in blue ballpoint on a full page photo of Holly by McCartney, “To Rita, love, Paul McCartney.” Book is also signed by eight others including Wayne Fontana, Kenny Lynch, Bobby Vee, Bruce Welch, and Mike Sarne. Scattered creasing and handling wear to covers, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Tracks. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 236 | April 16, 2014 | CONTEMPORARY MUSIC

Beatles: Ringo Starr.

Color satin-finish 4 x 6 photo of Starr posing outdoors, signed in black felt tip, “Ringo.” In very fine condition. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


One-of-a-kind McCartney photo misplaced in his chaotic house 770. Beatles: Paul McCartney. Vintage glossy 3.25 x 3.25 candid photo

of McCartney on television performing with the Beatles, signed in blue ballpoint. Photo is affixed to an 8.5 x 6 scrapbook page, along with an unsigned glossy candid of George Harrison, presumably from the same performance. In very good condition, with trimmed top edge, tape toning to one vertical edge, with some surface loss to other vertical edge, and some slight toning from adhesive on reverse. Accompanied by a photocopy of a McCartney ALS, undated but written from his house at 20 Forthlin Road in Liverpool, to the scrapbook’s owner, which reads, in part: “I’ve heard that your photograph album was left at our house to be signed and you haven’t seen it for years or something. Well, at the moment, the house is chaos, but if you can wait a bit longer, I’ll have a thorough search, and when it turns up, I’ll give it to Di.” Now marked a historic site, McCartney’s childhood home at Forthlin Road is often referred to as the ‘birthplace of the Beatles,’ since it was there that they composed and rehearsed some of their earliest songs, including ‘She Loves You.’ An excellent pairing of unique and early images. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/ REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

771. Beatles: Ringo Starr.

Charming 6 x 4 postcard photo of the Beatles having their hair tended to by some young ladies, signed in black ballpoint. In fine condition, with some light contrast to portions of signature. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

772.

Beatles: Ringo Starr.

Limited edition Gartlan cold cast figurine of Starr in the famous Abbey Road pose, 294/1000. The 9.75˝ high figurine rests on a stand that looks like a portion of the crosswalk, cobblestones and all, and is signed on the front in black felt tip, “Ringo,” adding a star for his last name. Figurine comes in its original box. In fine condition. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

773. Leonard Bernstein. Collection of correspondence and notations from Bernstein, most in pencil, including several short notes, signed “L,” several lists of words, possibly for some type of game or puzzle, and a couple of small Christmas cards. One note reads, “Go, go all of you to Faery Land forlorn. I for one will stay at home and hear old Triton blow his wretched horn! Not so fast!!! Love, L.” Another note on Hotel Intercontinental Dusseldorf stationery reads, “Change mid-life (fifty)! Stretch ‘im out! Turn ‘im over! Then, insert if you dare!” Another note on the same letterhead headed at the top, “The Gauntlet (Mode D’Emploi),” reads, “Change, lunkhead! Spell ‘im out; turn ‘im over; then insert:—if you dare.” In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Stage-used maracas from the Byrds’ founder

Limited deluxe edition of Clapton’s Six String Stories

774. The Byrds: Gene Clark. A pair of maracas

personally-owned and -used on stage by Clark during his time with the Byrds in 1965-66. Deep purple-colored maracas measure 11˝ long, with a painted floral design to both. Accompanied by a 1999 letter of authenticity from Jimmi Seiter, a member of the band’s management, which reads: “Based upon my long-term association with and knowledge of The Byrds, I hereby certify that this pair of deep purple maracas was owned and used on stage by Gene Clark…This item…has been in my personal possession since the period of usage.” In fine condition, with scattered areas of paint loss to both maracas and wear to both handles. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

776. Eric Clapton. Signed book: Six String Stories: the Crossroads Guitars. Deluxe limited edition of 2000 copies (this being No. 140). Guildford, England: Genesis Publications, 2012. Leather and wood with veneer finish in a custom felt-lined case, 10 x 13, 376 pages. Signed in black ink on a bookplate affixed to the colophon and is accompanied by its unsigned Clapton print. Book is housed in its cloth bag and original shipping box. In very fine condition. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

777. Eric Clapton.

Signed book: Eric Clapton: The New Visual Documentary. Later printing. London: Omnibus Press, 1990. Softcover, 9 x 11.5, 127 pages. Signed on the front cover in gold ink. In fine condition, with a few light creases to cover and price label remnant on back cover. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Scarce letter from ‘Slowhand’ 775. Eric Clapton. TLS, one

page, 8.25 x 10.5, RSO Records letterhead, February 9, 1981. Letter to a gentleman at the Performing Rights Society. In part: “Please take this letter as authority to divulge any information relating to my statements etc. to Messrs. Coutts & Co.” In very good condition, with overall spots of staining, paper loss to upper border, and signature faded, but still legible. A scarce format with an unusually legible signature. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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778. Composers and Conductors.

Collection of nine items, each signed by a notable composer or conductor, including: Irving Berlin (signature); Leonard Bernstein (SP); Aaron Copland (SP); Eubie Blake (SP); Percy Grainger (signature); Arthur Fielder, Walter Piston, and Hugo Norden (program); Irving Caesar (two SPs); and William Schuman (signature). In overall fine condition. Accompanied by an unsigned portrait of Berlin. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


The ‘Summertime Blues’ teenager explores the intricacies of sound 779. Eddie Cochran. Handwritten

homework assignment, one lined page, 8.5 x 11, signed at the top, “H. W. #5, Eddie Cochran, English VI, Nov. 3, 1953.” Headed “Diacritical Markings,” Cochcran writes 23 phrases to describe the pronunciation of various vowel sounds. In part: “1. a as in labor…8. e as in event…13. o as in old…17. u as in cube…23. oo as in foot.” Cochran did very well on the assignment, missing only one question for a score of 97. In fine condition, with a mild stain to upper left corner. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Unusual double musical quote for the Academy Award-winning ‘The Way We Were’ 782. Marvin Hamlisch and the Bergmans.

Dual AMQS on an off-white 8 x 7 musically-lined sheet. At the top, Hamlisch pens three bars of music and lyrics to ‘The Way We Were,’ writing the title at the top and signing below; followed by a five-bar quote of music and lyrics from the same song, signed “Alan & Marilyn Bergman.” Matted and framed to an overall size of 11 x 11. In fine condition. The title song for the 1973 film of the same name, ‘The Way We Were,’ won both the Academy Award and Golden Globe Award for best original song in 1973. A scarce and desirable offering of the song that help establish Barbra Streisand on the pop charts during the 1970s. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

780. J. Fred Coots. Matte-finish

8 x 10 photo of Coots in an overcoat and fedora, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To my pal Lou Frohman and the ‘Madison Madcap Melodists,’ Sincerely, ‘a non-Union Sucker’ J. Fred Coots, composer of ‘If I Had a Million Dollars I’d Be a Millionaire’ Words by Sammy the Pianist Marvel.” In very good condition, with missing lower right corner tip, light creasing and mounting remnants to other corner tips, some light border soiling and portions of inscription fairly light, but still legible. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

783. W. C. Handy. Vintage 8

x 10 cardstock photo of Handy thumbing through some of his sheet music, signed and inscribed in blue ballpoint, “Mr. Eugene P. Booze, William C. Handy, 5-3-1956.” In fine condition, with some creasing to corner tips. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope and an issue of ‘The Handy News.’ Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

Original Free line-up with Paul Kossoff

781. Free. Rare vintage 10 x 5.5 composite band photo, clipped from

the back of their 1969 sophomore self-titled album, signed in blue pencil by all four members, each under his image: Paul Rodgers, Andy Fraser, Paul Kossoff, and Simon Kirke. Signatures uniformly light due to irregular adhesion, but still completely legible, and some scattered light toning and soiling, otherwise fine condition. Consignor notes signatures were obtained in the summer of 1969 at a club gig in NewcastleUpon-Tyne while touring in support of their first two albums. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Superlative portrait of the composer at work, penning four bars of ‘Rhapsody in Blue’ 784. George Gershwin. Very nice vintage matte-finish 8 x 10

photo of Gershwin working on a composition while at his piano, signed and inscribed in the lower border in fountain pen, “To George McDevitt—all good wishes—George Gershwin,” adding four bars from ‘Rhapsody in Blue’ to the left of his signature. Beautifully double-matted and framed to an overall size of 15 x 16.75. In fine condition, with a couple unobtrusive surface creases. A magnificent image of the great American composer plying his craft. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

“You sang ‘Smoke’ so eloquently and the other members of your cast really went to town”

Hill’s stage-worn bustier from the Grand Ole Opry, with provenance direct from the singer

785. Otto Harbach.

786. Faith Hill.

Lyricist and librettist (1873–1963) of fifty musical comedies who served as Oscar Hammerstein II’s mentor. ALS signed “O. A. Harbach,” one page, 7.25 x 10.25, personal letterhead, April 15, 1959. Letter to singer/songwriter Lanny Ross. In part: “I’m still in a glow over what happened to me at the Dutch Treat Dinner the other night. I want to thank you again for what you did to make it such a success. You sang ‘Smoke’ so eloquently and the other members of your cast really went to town.” In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Hill’s stage-worn bustier. Custommade bright red polyester bustier is adorned along the top with red sequins, and is signed on the front in black felt tip, “Faith Hill ’98.” Accompanied by a handwritten letter of provenance on her touring letterhead, which reads, “I wore this one Christmas at the Grand Ole Opry, Faith Hill,” and also accompanied by a photo of Hill signing the bustier. In fine condition, with a few loose sequins. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


Hendrix signature obtained during one of his final shows with the Monkees 787. Jimi Hendrix. Vintage

ballpoint signature and inscription, “To Gail, Love always, Jimi Hendrix,” on an off-white 4 x 2.25 lightly-lined slip. In fine condition, with a diagonal crease through a single letter of signature, vertical fold to left side, mild wrinkling, and a bit of scattered light soiling. Consignor notes that the signature was obtained in July of 1967 at a Monkees concert in Forest Hill, New York, where Hendrix was the opening act. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from Roger Epperson/REAL. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Stylish copper bracelet owned and worn by Hendrix 788. Jimi Hendrix. Hendrix’s personally-owned and -worn handhammered copper cuff bracelet, featuring an ornately designed raised brass royal crest on the wrist area. The copper band measures 2˝ wide and the cuff has a diameter of just over 2.5˝ at its widest point. Includes a notarized letter of provenance from Mike ‘Limbo King’ Quashie, Hendrix’s friend and roommate, in part: “This hand hammered copper cuff bracelet with royal crest was owned and worn by Jimi Hendrix. I guarantee this to be 100% authentic. Jimi and I were best of friends for years. Jimi gave this item to me while staying at my Bedford Street apartment.” Also accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Walt Disney Attractions, LLC. The New York Times wrote a feature on Quashie in 2003, describing his glory days as a prominent entertainer in the city during the 1960s—the Trinidadian showman had a thrilling, exotic routine that helped popularize the limbo as a dance craze in the early 1960s. He performed with Led Zeppelin and counted the likes of Lou Reed, Todd Rundgren, and Billy Idol as friends—his show, which incorporated dramatic pyrotechnics, surreal light shows, and flamboyant costumes, was even said to inspire much of the performance style of the bigger acts of the day, including Hendrix’s infatuation with voodoo and on-stage guitar pyromania. When Hendrix left for London in August 1970, he left behind two trunks in Quashie’s apartment—the legendary guitarist never returned, passing away just a month later. This copper bracelet is a terrific representation of Hendrix’s eclectic style and showmanship—a truly one-of-a-kind rock relic. RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

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“If a tupenny–ha’penny bit from me will be of service to you and Fred, by all means count me in” 789. Jerome Kern. TLS

signed “Jerry,” one page, 7.25 x 10.5, personal letterhead, September 8, 1938. Letter to John Golden at the St. James Theatre. In part: “Of course I love Fred Stone and am rooting for a stupendous success for him in Lightnin. It certainly looks as if you, with your unerring showmanship, have lined up a pretty impressive ballyhoo for the venture—and if a tupenny-ha’penny bit from me will be of service to you and Fred, by all means count me in” Kern’s short postscript reads: “Are any of your authors going to send me my part? If so, I think it is only fair to mention, as you haven’t seen me in some time, that the old, debonair elan has, alas, mellowed. Something characteristic of Ferdinand Gottschalk would be more in my present line.” Letter is affixed to a mount by its top corners, and matted and framed (without glass) with a portrait of Kern and a hand-calligraphed presentation to an overall size of 20.5 x 19. In fine condition, with intersecting mailing folds. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

791. Roy Orbison. Promotional

poster, 7.75 x 10, for the release of Orbison’s single ‘Falling,’ signed and inscribed in black ballpoint. Matted to an overall size of 12 x 14. Some light contrast to portions of signature and inscription, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Early management contract for Parsons and the International Submarine Band

792. Gram Parsons. DS five pages, 8.5 x 11, May 1966. Management agreement between Parsons and Monte Kay for a period of three years for both himself and the International Submarine Band. Signed on the fourth page in blue ballpoint by Parsons, with the fifth page being the beginning of a longer rider, the remainder not included. In fine condition. Due to his tragic death at age 26, Parsons is rare in any form, and even more so in official documents. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

790. Led Zeppelin: John Bonham. Scarce Led Zeppelin II album signed on the front cover in blue ballpoint. In fine, bright condition. The record is included. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Tracks. An uncommon offering from one of the most important and influential drummers in rock history. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/ REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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793. Edith Piaf. Program for the gala premier of Piaf’s show at the Empire Room of the Waldorf Astoria on January 26, 1959, 5 x 6.5, two pages, signed and inscribed, in French, on the front cover in blue ballpoint by Piaf. Scattered creasing and handling wear, as well as some mild toning, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


In-depth questionnaires from Poco

794. Poco. Collection of five questionnaires, one single-page and four double-page,

each filled out by a member of the group: George Grantham, Timothy B. Schmit, Richie Furay, Rusty Young, and Randy Meisner. Each prints his full name at the top, and provides answers to questions about his physical appearance, family, influences, and a couple of philosophical questions. Asked what group he was in before Poco, Schmit responds: “I spent most of my musical years with three really great people—a group called Poco.” Asked about starting all over and playing the same clubs as Buffalo Springfield did, Furay responds: “Just like it never happened.” At the end of the double-page questionnaires, each describes the other band members in three words or less. Also included is a Christmas card signed in ink and felt tip by all five members, and a second Christmas card signed in print by the band. Scattered toning, some mild dampstaining, and staple holes to top left corners, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

795. Cole Porter. Uncommon bank check, 6.25 x 2.75, filled out in

another hand and signed by Porter, payable to Wm. Downing for $10, June 17, 1929. In fine condition, with three mild vertical folds (one vertical fold passing through a single letter of the signature) and expected bank stamps and cancellation holes. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Elvis strikes his trademark smirking smile 796. Elvis Presley.

Vintage 8 x 10 program photo from 1957 of Presley in a casual pose, signed in blue ballpoint. Staple holes to the left of his hairline and close to his ear, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by a copy of a letter of provenance from the widow of Jerry Ledford, Elvis’s Second Lieutenant while at Fort Hood, stating that her husband was in the Army and assigned to basic training at Fort Hood at the same time Elvis was there, and that he occasionally helped to ‘smuggle’ Elvis off of the base in an effort to evade fans and paparazzi; near the end of his training, Elvis signed pages of a souvenir photo booklet for them. A wonderful and classic image of the King with superb provenance. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Classic Jailhouse Rock image of the ‘King’

797. Elvis Presley. Vintage

3.5 x 5.25 German deckle-edge postcard photo for Presley’s film Jailhouse Rock, signed at the top in fountain pen. Photo also bears a stamped signature and sentiment to bottom portion. In fine condition, with signature uniformly light due to irregular ink adhesion, but still completely legible. Precertified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Beautiful acoustic guitar presented to Elvis in 1976

798. Elvis Presley. Presley’s stage-used 1976 NBN limited edition #0014 mahogany acoustic guitar, briefly played during his April 23, 1976, concert at the McNichols Sports Arena in Denver. He had received the guitar as a gift from two of the owners of NBN during a trip to Vail, Colorado, on January 8, 1976. The gorgeous six-string guitar has 21 frets, a dark pickguard, gold Grover tuners, and an intricate mother of pearl inlay decorating the frets, neck, base, and trim. There is some crazing to the guitar’s finish, a few trivial cracks to trim, and the high E string is broken. Elvis’s chipped off-white Fender guitar pick and the original hardshell case are also included. Accompanied by a notarized letter of provenance from Al Strada, dated August 18, 1979, in part: “This Guitar was given to Elvis Presley, as a gift, in Vail, Colorado, while vacationing there in 1976. The Guitar was later used, by Elvis, at a Denver Concert in 1976,” as well as a letter of provenance from Joe Esposito, describing its history, in part: “Some of the people present when the guitar was presented was, Joe Esposito, Al Strada, Billy Smith, Marty Lacker, Jerry Schilling and Linda Thompson… These NBN guitars were handmade and the manufacturer made only five or six per year. This guitar was given to Elvis’ chief of security, Al Strada. The guitar was sold to a gentleman in Oklahoma who in turn sold it to Jimmy Velvet’s Elvis Presley Museum in Memphis, Tennessee in 1982.” Also accompanied by certificates of authenticity from the Elvis Presley Museum for the guitar and original hardshell case. Though the abundant provenance confirms the guitar was briefly played at the Denver concert, likely due to Elvis’s utilizing multiple instruments during the show, we were unable to locate an image of him with this particular instrument. Oversized. RR Auction COA.…(MB $1000)

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Presley signs on with MGM in 1961

Superlative set of Stones signatures acquired at their Rock and Roll Circus 801. Rolling Stones.

Vintage ballpoint signatures of Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones, Bill Wyman, and Charlie Watts on individual 4 x 2.5 colored album pages, with Watts adding the band’s name above his signature. In very fine condition. Consignor notes that signatures were obtained at the now infamous Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus which took place at InterTel Studios, London, England, on December 10 and 11, 1968. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Tracks. Precertified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

802. Rolling Stones.

799. Elvis Presley. DS one page, 8.5 x 11, March 15, 1961. Final page of a 13-page agreement between Presley and Metro-GoldwynMayer, neatly signed at the conclsion in blue ballpoint and also signed by the assistant secretary of the studio. In fine condition, with expected light document wear. Presley’s first film for MGM would be It Happened at the World’s Fair, released in 1963. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/ REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Set of vintage ballpoint and pencil signatures of the original Stones on four 4.5 x 4 album pages. Individual pencil signatures of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards; an individual ballpoint signature of Charlie Watts; and a pencil signature of Bill Wyman and ballpoint signature of Brian Jones on the same page. In fine condition. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Early Stones promo card obtained at musical hotspot the Mecca Stevenage 800. Rolling Stones. Rolling Stones Decca promotional card, 5.5 x 4.25, signed in blue ballpoint by Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones, Bill Wyman, and Charlie Watts. Some scattered creases and some light contrast to Watts’s signature, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by a typed letter of provenance from the daughter of the original recipient which states: “It was given by the Rolling Stones to my father—who was doorman at the Mecca Stevenage where they appeared in the early sixties.” Also accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Tracks. A great set of original Stones signatures obtained at one of England’s musical hotspots of the ’60s and ’70s, which saw the likes of the Stones, the Who, and the Kinks among many others. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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Scarce Australian pressing of Out of Our Heads signed during the band’s stop in Sydney in 1966

803. Rolling Stones. Australian pressing of the Stones’ Out of Our Heads album signed on the back cover in blue ballpoint by Mick Jagger,

Keith Richards, Brian Jones, Bill Wyman, and Charlie Watts. Light overall dampstaining to back cover, scattered creases, album impression to both covers, some surface rubbing to back cover, and a slight brush to Richards’s signature, otherwise very good condition. The record is included. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Tracks. Signatures were obtained at the Commemorative Auditorium Showgrounds in Sydney, Australia, on February 18-19, 1966, and come with a letter from the nephew of the original owner which reads, in part: “The autographed copy of ‘Out of Our Heads’…was obtained by my wife’s auntie Betty Simmons…she attended one of the shows that the Rolling Stones performed on their 1966 tour of Australia and was able to obtain their autographs.” The band played four shows over these two days, including ‘19th Nervous Breakdown,’ and ‘Satisfaction.’ Foreign pressings signed by all five original members are rather uncommon. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

804. Rolling Stones: Keith Richards. Signed book: Life. First edition, first printing. NY: Little, Brown and Company, 2010. Hardcover with dust jacket, 6.25 x 9.5, 564 pages. Signed on the half-title page in black felt tip, “Keith Richards ’10.” In very fine condition. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The Ballad of the Green Berets composer strikes a lengthy deal with ASCAP

805. Sgt. Barry Sadler. Composer of ‘The Ballad of the Green

Berets’ (1940–1989) who died under mysterious circumstances. DS signed “Barry Allen Sadler,” four pages on two adjoining sheets, 8.5 x 11, June 29, 1976. Agreement between ASCAP and Sadler granting the society rights to “license non-dramatic public performances…of each musical work of which the Owner is a copyright proprietor…expiring on the 31st day of December, 1985.” Signed at the conclusion by Sadler. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

806. Sex Pistols. Collection of 10 items from the Sex Pistols’ 1978

US tour. Items include: three receipts for per diems for the band, one for $25.00 signed by Johnny Lydon, one for $50.00 signed by Paul Cook, issued “for Sid & Paul,” and one for $100.00 signed by Steve Jones. Other items include laminated luggage tags for Lydon, Cook, Jones, and Sid Vicious (under his given name, John Ritchie); two larger laminated tags, presumably for equipment, each with a large red number on one side; and a backstage guest pass. In fine condition. The band’s first and only US tour was plagued by problems of infighting and poor planning, culminating in Rotten walking off the stage in San Francisco after the group’s final date of the tour. Any item at all from this tour is quite desirable. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Ol’ Blue Eyes approves of the party hosted “in connection with the inauguration of President Kennedy” 807. Frank Sinatra. TLS, one page, 7.25 x 10.75, January 8, 1961. Letter to fellow ‘Rat Pack’ member Peter Lawford. In part: “I understand that as producer of the ‘Pre-Inaugural Gala’ of January 19, 1961 in connection with the inauguration of President Kennedy, you recorded and reproduced my appearances and performances. I also understand that you plan to use footage…at Democratic Party Rallies, Dinners and Clubs and perhaps for one commercially sponsored spectacular telecast and re-telecast. I also understand that proceeds which may be derived from such uses will be turned over to the Democratic National Committee…[and] none of such proceeds will be retained by the producers of, of [sic] any performers in the ‘Gala’…I agree that you may make and permit others to make the above uses of all or part of such footage.” In very fine condition. Originates from the collection of Hollywood mogul Milton Ebbins, Lawford’s manager and business partner. Sinatra and Lawford—JFK’s brother-in-law, since marrying Patricia Kennedy in 1954—took it upon themselves to organize a pre-inauguration gala, with Sinatra responsible for recruiting stars for the show. Sinatra sang ‘You Make Me Feel So Young’ and ‘That Old Black Magic,’ and had the job of introducing Kennedy before he spoke at the end of the night. A historic piece demonstrating the association between two of America’s most prominent cultural icons of the era. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) www.RRAuction.com | 247


808. Stephen Sondheim. Intricate and appealing AMQS on an off-white 8.25 x 7 musically-lined sheet. Sondheim pens five very detailed bars of music and lyrics from ‘Send in the Clowns,’ signed and inscribed along the top edge, “For Jim Weaver and his classes—with best wishes from: Stephen Sondheim 1/22/86.” Matted and framed to an overall size of 11.25 x 11.25. In fine condition, with a bit of mild edge toning. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The celebrated producer seeks assistance in John and Yoko’s battle with US immigration 809. Phil Spector. TLS signed “Phillip,” one page, 8.25 x 10, Phil Spector

Productions letterhead, no date. Form letter, with Spector writing the greeting to “Jay,” reads, in part: “Enclosed is a report of the Immigration Department’s proceeding against John Lennon and Yoko Ono. If you wish to write a short note on their behalf, I have written out and attached the wording that can be used…As concerns Yoko Ono, this is an unparalleled act of political inhumanity since the custody of her only child is involved. The courts have granted Yoko custody of her daughter only if she raises her in the United States—Yet the government of the United States is trying to deport her!” Double-matted and framed with a photo of Lennon and Ono posing outdoors to an overall size of 23 x 15. In fine condition, with an office stamp and notation to lower right. Precertified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

810. Three Tenors. Standard-size violin, signed on the body in black felt tip by Jose Carreras, Placido Domingo, and Luciano Pavarotti. In fine condition. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from PSA/DNA. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Sister Sister fan club photo for their 1981 October album

811. U2. Very early color 6.5 x 4.25 cardstock Sister Sister fan mail photo

for their October album, signed in blue ballpoint, “Bono 82,” “Edge,” and “Adam,” and signed in black ink, “Larry.” A note from a Sister Sister employee is written on the reverse. In very good condition, with a central vertical fold through a single letter of Clayton’s signature, Mullen’s signature very light, but still mostly legible, and mild handling wear. Signatures from this early in the band’s career are quite scarce. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Especially early fully-signed photo for October U2. Very early 5.5 x 8 magazine photo promoting their album October, signed in blue ink, “Bono 82,” “Edge,” “Larry,” and “Adam.” In very good to fine condition, with multiple horizontal folds (one passing through the Bono and Adam signatures), and toned tape remnants to edges. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from Roger Epperson/ REAL. Examples from this period are scarce and highly sought after, as October was just U2’s second album. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Zappa agrees to write a screenplay for $10,000

812.

815. Frank Zappa. DS two pages, 8.5 x 11, October 7, 1966.

Agreement between Zappa and Dorian Productions for Zappa to create a screenplay for a salary of $10,000 and to make “the ‘Mothers of Invention’ available for the film as called for in the script. Signed twice on the second page in red ballpoint by Zappa, and also signed by manager Herb Cohen and Ara Dorian. All three have also initialed the bottom of the first page. Scattered toning to both pages, including some over one of Zappa’s signatures, otherwise fine condition. Precertified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Large color image of the original Who line-up 813. The Who. Color vintage 9.75 x 6.5 magazine photo of the band with their instruments, signed in blue and black ballpoint by Roger Daltrey, Pete Townshend, John Entwistle, and Keith Moon, with a smaller clipped group photo affixed to the lower right corner. Matted and framed to an overall size of 12.25 x 9.5. Daltrey’s and Moon’s signatures overlapping, central horizontal fold and vertical folds, some old adhesive toning along top edge, and a few creases, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

814. The Who. Ballpoint signature, “Keith Moon,” on a 5.5 x 3.75 lightly-lined sheet; felt tip signature “John Entwistle,” on a 5 x 3 off-white card; and ballpoint and felt tip signatures of Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend on the reverse of the front cover of a program for Tommy. Light overall toning and a central vertical fold to Moon’s sheet and scattered edge tears to program cover, not affecting either signature, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified Roger Epperson/REAL and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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ron nevison collection

816. The Babys. Set of four Chrysalis Records acetates: the first, a double-sided 10˝ acetate of The Babys’ 1979 songs ‘Every Time I Think of You/Love Don’t Prove’—an especially interesting pairing, as these two songs were never released together as a single. Next, a doublesided 10˝ acetate of ‘Every Time I Think of You,’ featuring a stereo mix on one side and mono version on the other, with a pencil notation to the mono side’s label, “Noisy.” Finally, two single-sided 10˝ acetates of their 1977 hit ‘Isn’t It Time,’ one featuring a stereo version and one a mono version. Featuring vocals from the Babettes, this song closes with their chorus heard alternatively in the left and right channels a result of Nevison’s production work. All are identified in type on The Mastering Lab labels with the track listing and artist info, and are in overall very fine condition. All originate from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

818.

Chicago: 19.

Flower hologram-style RIAA platinum record award presented to legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison commemorating the sale of more than 1,000,000 copies of Chicago’s 19. Framed with its plaque, and a cassette to an overall size of 16.75 x 21. Small plaque mostly detached from cassette, otherwise fine condition. Produced by Nevison, this album had three top 10 hits, ‘I Don’t Wanna Live Without Your Love,’ ‘You’re Not Alone,’ and ‘Look Away,’ which reached #1. Originates from Nevison’s personal collection. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

819. Damn Yankees. Warner Bros. Records double-sided 12˝ acetate of Damn Yankees’ 1990 self-titled debut album, each side featuring five songs that correspond with those appearing on the final record. Identified in type on The Mastering Lab labels with relevant track listings and artist info, and dated January 31, 1990 (one month before the album’s release). In fine condition. Accompanied by the original sleeve from The Mastering Lab. Originates from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

820. Dave Mason: Let it Flow. Two Columbia Records single-sided 12˝ acetates of Mason’s 1977 album Let It Flow, each disc featuring one side of the final record. Both are identified in type on The Mastering Lab labels with relevant track listings and artist info. In overall fine condition. Accompanied by the original sleeve from The Mastering Lab. Originates from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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821. Dave Mason. Impressive collection of sixteen acetates: ten are singles, including, ‘Don’t It Make You Wonder’; ‘Let It Go, Let It Flow’ (3); ‘We Just Disagree’ (2); ‘Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow’ (2); ‘So High,’ ‘Let It Go, Let It Flow,’ and ‘Mystic Traveller’ (2, both featuring all three songs). The remaining six are 12˝ acetates of his 1976 double-LP album Certified Live (2 doublesided, 4 single-sided). All but one are attributed to Columbia or Columbia/Warner Bros. Records, and all are identified in type with the track listings and artist information (all but two on The Mastering Lab labels). In overall fine to very fine condition. All originate from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

822. Europe: Out of This World. Set of three acetates: first, a CBS Records double-sided 10˝ of the single ‘Open Your Heart,’ with a 4:02 “LP” version on side one and a 3:54 “Edit” version on side two. Identified in type on the Precision Lacquer labels with the track listing and artist info, and dated September 26, 1988 (one month before the song was released as a single). The other two are Epic Records single-sided 12˝ acetates of the album Out of This World, each disc featuring one side of the final record. Both are identified in type on The Mastering Lab labels with relevant track listings and artist info, and dated July 6, 1988 (one month before album’s release). There is one surface crack to side one of the single, otherwise all three are in fine condition. Originate from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

823. Europe: Out of This World. Set of three acetates: first, a CBS Records single-sided 10˝ of the 1989 single ‘Let the Good Times Rock,’ identified in type on the Precision Lacquer label with the track listing and artist info, and dated September 22, 1988 (six months before the song was released as a single). The other two are CBS Records single-sided 12˝ copper acetates of the album Out of This World, each disc featuring one side of the final record. Both are identified in type on Precision Lacquer labels with relevant track listings and artist info, and dated July 5, 1988 (one month before the album’s release). Single is in fine to very fine condition; Out of This World acetates are in overall very good condition, with tarnishing/oxidation to first disc and a few spots to the second. All three originate from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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824. Flo and Eddie: Moving Targets. Two Warner Bros. Records single-sided 12˝ acetates of sides one and two of their 1976 album Moving Targets, with each disc featuring a stereo version of one side. Identified in type on The Mastering Lab labels with the track listing and artist info. In fine condition. Disc is housed in its Mastering Lab sleeve. Originates from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

825. Heart: Self Titled. Two flower hologram-style RIAA platinum record awards presented to legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison commemorating the sale of more than 2,000,000 and 3,000,000 copies of Heart’s self-titled album. Each is framed with its plaque, a small reproduction of the album cover, and a cassette to an overall size of 16.5 x 20.75. In fine condition. Originates from Nevison’s personal collection. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

826. Heart: Bad Animals. Double-sided 12˝ vinyl test pressing of Heart’s 1987 album

Bad Animals, featuring both sides of the final record. White labels on both sides are handnotated in felt tip, “PJ-1-12546-25” and “PJ-2-12546-21.” In fine condition. Accompanied by the original Capitol Records sleeve, bearing a felt tip notation: “Heart–Test Pressing PJ-12546.” Originates from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

827. Heart: Bad Animals. A nice pairing of awards for Heart’s album Bad Animals: first, a flower hologram-style RIAA gold record award presented to engineer and producer Ron Nevison commemorating the sale of more than 500,000 copies, framed with a plaque, a cassette, and a small replica of the album cover to an overall size of 17 x 20.75; and second, an ‘R’ hologram-style RIAA platinum record award presented to Nevison commemorating the sale of 1,000,000 copies, also framed with a plaque, cassette, and images of the album artwork to an overall size of 17 x 21. In overall fine condition. Released in 1987, the Bad Animals produced three top 20 hits and eventually reached 5x platinum. Both originate from Nevison’s personal collection. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 252 | April 16, 2014 | Ron Nevison Collection


828. Heart: Bad Animals. An excellent pairing of ‘R’ hologram-style RIAA platinum record awards presented to engineer and producer Ron Nevison, one commemorating the sale of more than 2,000,000 copies of the album Bad Animals, the other commemorating 3,000,000 copies. Both are framed with a plaque, cassette, and images of the album artwork to overall sizes of 17 x 21 and 17 x 25 (the triple-platinum being the larger of the two, and also including a CD in the display). Both are in fine condition. Released in 1987, the album produced three top 20 hits and eventually reached 5x platinum. Both originate from Nevison’s personal collection. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

829. David Johansen: Live It Up. CBS Records double-sided 12˝ vinyl test pressing of

Johansen’s 1982 live album Live It Up, featuring sides one and two of the final record. White CBS Records labels on both sides of the disc are blank. In overall fine condition. Originates from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Test pressing of their critcally-acclaimed ‘Crazy, Crazy Nights’ 830. KISS: Crazy, Crazy Nights. Specialty Records 12˝ acetate of KISS’s 1987 single ‘Crazy Crazy Nights.’ Identified in felt tip on the label, as “Kiss,” and dated August 6, 1987, a month before the release of the album. In fine condition. Originates from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

831. Eddie Money. Two CBS Records single-sided 12˝ acetates of sides one and two of Money’s 1980 album Playing for Keeps. Each disc features a stereo version of the side, identified in type on Kendun Recorders, Inc. labels with the track listing and artist info. Both are housed in their original sleeve, with notations along top edge of front cover. This acetate differs from the final album version as the first two songs, ‘Running Back’ and ‘Trinidad,’ are in reverse order. In fine condition. Originates from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) www.RRAuction.com | 253


832. Eddie Money: Trinidad. Columbia Records double-sided 10˝ acetate of Money’s

single ‘Trinidad,’ featuring a stereo reference version of the track. Identified in type and felt tip on The Mastering Lab labels with the track listing and artist info. In fine condition. This song was the first track on Money’s 1980 album Playing For Keeps. Originates from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

833. Ozzy Osbourne: The Ultimate Sin. Two

Epic Records single-sided 12˝ acetates of Osbourne’s 1986 album The Ultimate Sin, each disc featuring one side of the final record. Both are identified in type on The Mastering Lab labels with relevant track listings and artist info, and dated December 9, 1985 (two months before the album’s release). In overall fine condition, with a couple tiny chips to upper edge of the first disc. Accompanied by the original sleeve from The Mastering Lab. Originates from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

834. Ozzy Osbourne: The Ultimate Sin.

Flower hologramstyle RIAA platinum record award presented to legendary engineer and producer Ron N eviso n co mmemorating the sale of more than 1,000,000 copies of Osbourne’s The Ultimate Sin. Framed with its plaque, a small reproduction of the album cover, and a cassette to an overall size of 16.75 x 21. In fine condition. Released in February of 1986, the album reached #6 on the Billboard chart, with ‘Shot in the Dark,’ released as a single. Originates from Nevison’s personal collection. RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

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835. Ozzy Osbourne: The Ultimate Sin. Collection of three items: first, a strip plate-style Epic Portrait Associated platinum record award presented to legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison commemorating the sale of more than 1,000,000 copies of Osbourne’s The Ultimate Sin. Framed with its one-piece plaque bearing a small replica of the album cover to an overall size of 16.75 x 21. The other two items are backstage passes, both issued to Nevison. One is “all access” for Osbourne’s 1986 Ultimate Sin world tour, the other for his 1986 North American tour. Each has a photo of Nevison affixed at the bottom. In overall fine condition. All three originate from Nevison’s personal collection. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


836. Survivor. Collection of four Survivor acetates: first, a Scotti Bros. Records single-sided 10˝ of ‘High on You,’ dated October 26, 1984; second, an Epic Records single-sided 10˝ of ‘I Can’t Hold Back,’ dated August 9, 1984; third, a CBS Records single-sided 10˝ of ‘Man Against the World,’ dated March 27, 1987; and fourth, a CBS Records double-sided 10˝ of ‘The Search Is Over,’ dated March 12, 1985. All are identified in type on The Mastering Lab labels with the track listings, artist info, and dates. In overall fine condition, with some scattered subtle marks to a couple of the discs. All originate from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

837. Survivor: Vital Signs and When Seconds Count. Collection of three Survivor acetates: one CBS

Records double-sided 12˝ of their album When Seconds Count, dated September 5, 1986; and two Scotti Bros. Records single-sided 12˝ acetates of their album Vital Signs, dated July 12, 1984 (two months before the album’s release). All are identified in type on The Mastering Lab labels with the track listings, artist info, and dates. In overall fine condition. All three originate from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

838. Thin Lizzy: Nightlife. Phonogram Records double-sided 12˝ acetate of Thin Lizzy’s 1974 album Nightlife, each side featuring five songs that correspond with those appearing on the final record. Identified in type on The Mastering Lab labels with relevant track listings and artist info. In fine condition. Accompanied by the original sleeve from The Mastering Lab. Originates from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

839. Ronnie Wood: Breathe on Me. Apple Records 7˝ acetate of Wood’s single ‘Breathe On Me,’ labeled in an unknown hand on the Apple label, “Breath on Me, 5:00 X16463-B, Ronnie Wood.” In fine condition. This song was the final track on his 1992 solo album Slide on This. Originates from the personal collection of legendary engineer and producer Ron Nevison. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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840. ABBA

841. ABBA

842. AC/DC

843. Aerosmith

844. Albums

845. Albums

846. Albums

847. Allman Brothers

848. Jackson Browne

849. The Carpenters

850. Sam Cooke

851. Cream

852. Crosby, Stills, and Nash

853. Crosby, Stills, and Nash

854. Sammy Davis, Jr

855. The Doors

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856. Duke Ellington MB $150

860. Marvin Gaye

857. Everly Brothers MB $200

858. Freddie and the Dreamers

859. Marvin Gaye

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861. Gerry and the Pacemakers

862. Dizzy Gillespie

863. Umberto Giordano

864. The Hollies

865. Whitney Houston

866. Michael Jackson

867. Michael Jackson

868. Michael Jackson

869. Jefferson Airplane

870. Elton John

871. B. B. King

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872. The Kinks: Ray and Dave Davies

873. The Kinks: Ray and Dave Davies

874. KISS MB $200

875. Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas

876. Kris Kristofferson

877. Lynyrd Skynyrd: Greg Walker

878. Manfred Mann

879. Metallica

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881. Musicians and Singers

882. Roy Orbison

883. Carl Orff

884. Poco

885. The Ramones

886. The Ramones

887. The Ramones

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880. Moody Blues

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888. The Ramones MB $200

889. Rolling Stones: Taylor and Wood

890. Sonny Rollins

891. Frank Sinatra

892. Frank Sinatra

893. Frank Sinatra

894. Grace Slick

895. Dusty Springfield

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898. Strawberry Alarm Clock

899. Them

901. The Troggs

902. The Turtles

903. Uriah Heep

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896. Cat Stevens MB $200

900. Traffic MB $200

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897. Leopold Stokowski

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Detailed description & condition statements are available at www.RRAuction.com or (603) 732-4280 | 259


classic entertainment Superb image of the legendary comedy team

904. Abbott and Costello. Vintage glossy 7.25 x 9.25 photo of Abbott and Costello clowning around, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Irwin, your pals, Bud Abbott” and “Lou Costello.” Double-matted and framed to an overall size of 13 x 15. Unobtrusive scattered surface creases, otherwise fine condition. Abbott and Costello are uncommon in signed photos, and this example has wonderfully bold signatures against the light background. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

905. Apocalypse Now: Alex Tavoularis. Original

ink sketch of a sign with the unit insignia for the 5th Special Forces, bearing Colonel Kurtz’s motto “Apocalypse Now,” across the top, on an 8.5 x 11 sheet, signed at the bottom by Tavoularis. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

906. Fred and Adele Astaire.

Vintage mattefinish 8 x 10 photo of Astaire doing a wild dance move, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Sylvia, Sincerely, Fred Astaire”; and a beautiful vintage matte-finish 8.25 x 10.75 portrait of his sister, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Joan, Sincerely, Adele Astaire.” In overall fine condition, with a few edge creases to the Adele photo. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Over 70 actors and musicians, including crisp exemplars of Bogart, Laurel, and Hardy 907. Autograph Album. Vintage hardcover autograph album, 6 x 4.5, signed inside in pencil and fountain pen by over 70 actors and musicians, some back-toback. Highlighted by Humphrey Bogart, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, Moe Howard (signing as all three Stooges), Louis Armstrong, Glenn Miller, and Bill Robinson. Other signers include: Patty and LaVerne Andrews, Bonnie Baker, John Boles, Cab Calloway, Kitty Carlisle, Johnnie ‘Scat’ Davis, Dennis Day, Jimmy Dorsey, Glen Gray, Erskine Hawkins, Harry James, Brenda Joyce, Danny Kaye, Gene Krupa, Edmund Lowe, Helen O’Connell, William T. Orr, Louella Parsons, Simone Simon, and Ted Weems. In overall fine condition. A terrific autograph book with a nice selection of big band musicians to complement the superlative examples of Bogart and Laurel and Hardy. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Lovely image of two comedy legends

Lovely full-length portrait 908. Josephine Baker. Vintage matte-finish

4.25 x 7 photo of Baker in a flowing checkered gown, signed in fountain pen, “Souvenir de Josephine Baker, 1932.” In very good condition, with scattered creases (most noticeable to upper right corner). Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

909. Theda Bara.

Lovely vintage mattefinish 5 x 7 photo of the silent actress in profile, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Capt. Ronald D. Soderberg, Greetings from Theda Bara, Oct. 26 ’53.” In fine condition, with mild irregular ink adhesion. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

910. Lucille Ball and Red Skelton. Scarce vintage glossy 10 x 7.75 photo of the pair posing together, neatly signed in fountain pen, “Lucille Ball” and “I dood it, Red Skelton.” Double-matted and framed to an overall size of 15 x 13.5. In fine condition, with a few trivial surface creases. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

911. Ingrid Bergman. Glossy 8 x 10 20th Century Fox promotional photo for Anastasia, signed and inscribed in the lower border in fountain pen, “Pour Pierre—Ingrid Bergman.” In fine condition, with mild scattered surface bends and creases. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

912. Ben Hur. Original ‘brown-line’ production sketch of a scene from Ben Hur, unsigned, 30 x 21, numbered “2” in the upper right, depicting a roughlysketched image of soldiers on horseback riding through a busy street, with a pencil notation to the lower right corner which reads, “Soldiers in Nazareth, 1st time.” In fine condition, with a bit of trivial soiling and a couple of torn punch holes to left edge. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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913. Ben Hur. Original and quite large ‘brown line’

production sketch of a scene from Ben Hur, unsigned, 46.5 x 19, showing a dark and detailed image of a figure skulking outside of the Ben Hur family home. In fine condition. Rolled. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“I found an old artist friend of Charlie’s who had been in Shelby with Charlie for the Gibbons–Dempsey fight” 914. James Cagney. Two ALSs, both signed “Jim Cagney,” both to singer/songwriter Lanny Ross on Verney Farm letterhead. One letter, dated May 16, 1971, reads, in part: “I had a Russell winter! I had an unsigned plasticine model of two fighters that I got along with some bronzes. Job was to get it authenticated Noah Berry, Jr., and Harry Carey, Jr., were in on it. Then I found an old artist friend of Charlie’s who had been in Shelby with Charlie for the Gibbons–Dempsey fight. He was with Charlie when he did the model. Joe DeLong is his name.” At the top of the front page of the letter, Ross has noted, “My old farm in Stanfordville from its present owner, James Cagney.” In fine condition, with some scattered light toning to both letters. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“Comedy, drama, war movie, documentary, western—you name it—and he did a damned fine job on every one” 915. George Cukor. Typescript of a tribute to Allan Dwan, two pages, 8.5 x 11, no date, signed at the conclusion in blue ballpoint by Cukor. In part: “I want to say a few words about Allan Dwan…Over a fifty year period, he directed more than 400 films—not to mention several hundred more that he either wrote, produced or supervised. Between 1911 and 1961, he directed every type of film—comedy, drama, war movie, documentary, western—you name it—and he did a damned fine job on every one…In fact, he was such a good director that when talkies came in, he became what no longer exists today, the studio contract director. A director on whom the studio could rely to direct whatever he was given with competence. Not an ‘arty’ director, but a sound and intelligent one.” In fine condition, with horizontal mailing folds. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Oversized portrait by Clarence Sinclair Bull 917. Marie Dressler. Be-

916. Montgomery Clift. Dashing vintage glossy 8 x 10 publicity

portrait of Clift in a suit and tie, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “George, from Montgomery Clift.” Scattered surface bends and some light contrast to the signature against his dark suit, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

loved Canadian actress (1868– 1934) who, as a middle-aged exvaudevillian, became one of the biggest screen draws of the silent and early sound eras, winning an Academy Award for her performance in Min and Bill. Vintage matte-finish 9.75 x 12.5 photo of Dressler wearing pearls, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To C. L. Caldwell—Best wishes—Marie Dressler.” Blindstamped in the lower right by famed photographer Clarence Sinclair Bull. Nicely double-matted and framed to an overall size of 17.5 x 20.5. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

From the collection of Bogart’s press agent 918. Jack Diamond Collection. Six items from the personal

collection of Hollywood press agent Jack Diamond, including: a TLS from Harry Truman, expressing happiness about the election of Pat Brown as governor of California; a TLS from Cary Grant, thanking Diamond for a book and mentioning Universal; a gorgeous vintage matte-finish 11 x 14 signed and inscribed portrait of Mary Pickford; vintage matte-finish 8 x 10 signed and inscribed photo of Joe Penner; vintage glossy 10 x 8 signed and inscribed photo of Gracie Allen and George Burns; and a vintage matte-finish 8 x 10 secretarially signed and inscribed photo of Bill Robinson and Shirley Temple. In overall fine condition, with a few creases to photos. Accompanied by a lengthy autobiographical account of Diamond’s relationship with Humphrey Bogart, for whom he acted as press agent. In this position, Diamond met and befriended a wide array of celebrities, enabling him to acquire this small but robust collection. A nice variety of items from a true Hollywood insider. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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919. Frankenstein: Hans Salter. Scarce

and unusually-detailed AMQS on an off-white 8.25 x 7 musically-lined sheet. Headed at the top by Salter, “Frankenstein Meets the Wolfman, Music by Hans J. Salter,” the composer pens four intricate bars of music from the work, signing at the bottom, “Hans J. Salter 1988.” Matted and framed to an overall size of 11.25 x 11.25. In fine condition. A desirable offering from the final Universal horror film in which the Monster played a starring role. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

922. Gone With the Wind: Vivien Leigh.

Nice fountain pen signature, “Vivien Leigh,” on a white 4.25 x 2.5 sheet. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Authorizing the use of a stand-in during the 1946 filming of Hitchcock’s Notorious

Rare Army pass issued to Hollywood’s biggest star

920. Clark Gable. Manuscript 6.25 x 3.75 pass issued to Gable while attending Officer Candidate School in the Army, with Gable writing prior to leaving “O/C Gable C., 9/1/42, Honor Committee, Out 15-27” and then upon his return, “Returned-17-32, O/C Gable C.” In fine condition. The pass represents a special dispensation Gable received to attend a meeting of the honor committee, a group charged with enforcing rules of honor and conduct that his classmates had elected him to. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

921. Gone With the Wind: Clark Gable. Vintage

pencil signature and inscription, “To Betty, Best wishes always, Clark Gable,” on a light green 6 x 4.25 album page. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

264 | April 16, 2014 | CLASSIC ENTERTAINMENT

923. Cary Grant. DS, one page, 8 x 10, January 16, 1946. RKO Radio Pictures informs Grant that “we desire to use a ‘double’ for you in connection with a ‘matte shot’ which we intend to photograph for our motion picture now entitled ’Notorious,’ and we hereby request your consent to the use of such ‘double’ in your stead.” Grant signs the bottom of the document agreeing to the use of the double; the studio’s assistant secretary has also signed. Suede-matted and framed with a handsome portrait of Grant to an overall size of 27 x 20. In fine condition, with expected document wear. Oversized. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

924. Harvey. Two photos: a 3.5 x 5.5 postcard photo of James Stewart in his earlier years, signed in blue felt tip; and a vintage 3.5 x 5.5 photo of an illustration of Josephine Hull, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “Formerly ‘Arsenic,’ now in ‘Harvey,’ 48th St. Theatre, N. Y. City. To Barry Conley, with appreciation of your kind letter and all good wishes, Sincerely yours, Josephine Hull.” In overall fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


Magnificent display from the bookends of her career—from “Cansino” to “Hayworth” 925. Rita Hayworth. Outstanding dis-

play of two items: a scarce vintage mattefinish 4.25 x 6 portrait of the actress in her early years, signed in fountain pen with her given name, “Sincerely, Rita Cansino”; and a DS signed “Rita Hayworth,” two pages, 8 x 10, October 26, 1971. Agreement between Hayworth and Metro-GoldwynMayer Inc., employing her to “portray the role of Senora de la Plata in the photoplay now entitled ‘Wrath of God.’” Document is initialed three times and signed at the conclusion by both Hayworth and an MGM executive. Beautifully double-matted and framed together to an overall size of 29.5 x 16. In overall fine condition. An excellent combination of both forms of her name, from the very beginning and very end of her career—she stopped using “Cansino” after signing a deal with Columbia in 1937, and The Wrath of God was her final film. Oversized. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

10-year ASCAP agreement for “James M. Henson” 926. Jim Henson. DS signed “James M. Henson,” four pages on two adjoining sheets, 8.5 x 11, November 11, 1975. Agreement between ASCAP and Henson granting the society rights to “license non-dramatic public performances…of each musical work of which the Owner is a copyright proprietor.” Signed at the conclusion by Henson using his full name. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

927. Audrey Hepburn. Choice vintage fountain pen signature, “Audrey Hepburn,” on an off-white 4.25 x 3 card neatly affixed to a 7.25 x 4.5 card bearing collector’s notations and an affixed image of the actress. In very fine condition. Accompanied by an unsigned magazine photo of Hepburn. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Exceptionally beautiful 1959 image 928. Audrey Hepburn.

Vintage glossy 3.5 x 5.5 postcard photo of Hepburn as she appeared in the 1959 MGM film Green Mansions, signed and inscribed in blue ink, “To Wolfgang, Best Wishes, Audrey Hepburn.” In fine condition, with significant irregular ink adhesion. Precertified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

929. Audrey Hepburn. Pearl-finish 9.25 x 7.25 photo of Hepburn from the 1967 film Wait Until Dark, signed and inscribed in black felt tip, “To Paul, Good luck, Audrey Hepburn.” In fine condition, with slightly trimmed edges. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“This is supposed to be what is left of Troy— I—Hecuba—say only smoke left where was Troy” 930. Katharine Hepburn. ALS signed “Kath,” two pages, lightly-lined, 8 x

12.5, Atienza, Guadalajara, Spain, September 7, [1970]. Letter to a friend. In part: “Here we are—about 2.5 hrs. north east of Madrid—in a tiny town—high—4000 ft—it is 7 am, dawn is breaking over this curious dried up valley—sheep bells roll their curious sound—the air is unpolluted by oil…later the sun will beat literally beat down—so hot—& the wind will beg to blow & the dust will fly…It is a high grey rock that this village is built upon—& at the top—in the early days there was a castle…This is supposed to be what is left of Troy—I—Hecuba—say only smoke left where was Troy—& that’s it—smoke dust sun.” In fine condition, with intersecting folds and water droplets affecting a couple words on the first page. At the time, Hepburn was shooting The Trojan Women, in which she played Hecuba, queen of the Trojans. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Accenting her thanks to Coco’s producer with a flower sketch 931. Katharine Hepburn. Two

ALSs to Coco producer Fred Herbert, one signed “K,” and one signed “Kate.” One letter reads: “You have really sailed right into this situation & I am so grateful to you. 1) For being willing & 2) for doing a real job on your own—Such a difficult thing to be asked to do—You have added some very nice things & you have saved my sanity—Thank you—Small word meaning a lot.” Both are accompanied by their original envelopes, both addressed by Hepburn, adding a small sketch of a flower to one of the envelopes. In very good condition, with light bleeding to text, heavier to one letter, and some scattered light toning. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 266 | April 16, 2014 | CLASSIC ENTERTAINMENT


Highly desirable vintage Hepburn photo 932. Katharine Hepburn. Vin-

tage glossy 8 x 10 photo of Hepburn, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Phyllis, gratefully, Katharine Hepburn.” In fine condition, with scattered surface creases and some light contrast to signature against the dark background. A scarce piece, as Hepburn famously refused to sign any type of photo except for friends and family. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Foreshadowing his award-winning role 933. William Holden.

Highly regarded American actor (1918–1981) who won the 1954 Academy Award for Best Actor in Stalag 17. Vintage pearl-finish 9.5 x 8 photo of Holden with a group of fellow soldiers during World War II, signed below his image in fountain pen, “Corp. Bill Holden.” Eight other soldiers also signed near their image. In fine condition, with slight brushing and irregular adhesion to a few of the other soldiers’ signatures. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from JSA. Consignor notes that this was originally obtained by his uncle, who served in the same unit as Holden. A unique, early photo of the actor during the war—an especially appropriate image, as his Oscar-winning role was as an American airman detained as a prisoner of war. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Wartime album from the bond drive that raised over one billion dollars, including Garland, Harpo, Lucy, and Cagney

934. Hollywood Bond Cavalcade 1943. Impressive vintage hardcover autograph album 10 x 11, from the 1943 Hollywood Bond Cavalcade stop in St. Louis, Missouri, signed inside in fountain by 41 participants. Some signatures are single page, with some pages bearing multiple signatures. Signers include: Judy Garland; Harpo [Marx], who adds a nice harp sketch and self-portrait; James Cagney, adding a well-done profile self-portrait; Fred Astaire (2); Lucille Ball; Greer Garson; Paul Henreid; Mickey Rooney; Betty Hutton; Dick Powell; Kathryn Grayson; Ish Kabibble; Kenneth Thomson; Muriel Goodspeed; Doris Merrick; Georgia Carroll (Mrs. Kay Kyser); Margie Stewart; Rosemary LaPlanche; Ruthe Bardy; Dorothy Merritt; Diane Pendleton; Harry Babbitt; Sully Mason; Kay Kyser; Stuart Ross; Edward Buzzell; and Jose Iturbi, who adds a detailed two-bar AMQS. All signed pages have been carefully and professionally laminated, which does not detract from the overall appearance of the album. In fine condition, with a mild shade of toning to pages. The caravan arrived in St. Louis on September 18, leading a parade to the Hotel Jefferson which included members from every branch of the armed forces. Met with over 300 fans, some of whom went to extremes to obtain an autograph, most were removed from the lobby, making this collection of signatures quite uncommon. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Portrait signed a week after the release of his feature film The Man from Beyond

935. Harry Houdini. Vintage matte-finish 4.5 x 4.5 close-up photo of Houdini

smiling pleasantly, signed in fountain pen, “Best wishes, Houdini, April 10/22.” Matted and framed to an overall size of 12.5 x 12.5. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Lock and key presented to Houdini after escaping the notorious Newgate Prison 936. Harry Houdini. Heavy

prison cell lock used by Harry Houdini during an escape from a Newgate Prison cell. Lock measures approximately 10 x 7.5 and has four holes for mounting on prison bars, keyhole, and solid rectangular lock protruding from left side. Lock is accompanied by its original skeleton key, as well as a letter of provenance from Sidney Radner, honorary curator of the Houdini Historical Center, which reads: “Houdini escaped from the cell on which this lock & key were used. The officials were so impressed with his escape that they removed the lock and presented it to Houdini for a souvenir. I know of no other cell lock that Houdini had in his collection.” Shadowboxed and framed to an overall size of 25 x 17 x 3.75. Houdini once proclaimed, ‘No prison can hold me,’ with this lock serving as proof. An absolutely remarkable piece from the master escapist’s own collection. Provenance: Butterfield and Butterfield, 1999; and Guernsey’s Pugliese Pop Culture Collection, 2008. Oversized. RR Auction COA.…(MB $1000)

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937. The Incredible Mr. Limpet. Original

pencil and crayon art for the 1964 film The Incredible Mr. Limpet, unsigned, on individual 7 x 5.5 off-white story board pages. One image features Don Knot‘s character in a confrontation with Crusty, another is of Crusty alone, with the remainder showing various fish. In overall fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

938. James and the Giant Peach. Original

hand-drawn pencil concept art of Spider Woman for the 1996 film James and the Giant Peach, unsigned, on an 8.5 x 5.5 off-white sheet, done by a production artist as per Tim Burton’s vision. A small circular label is affixed to the lower right corner. In fine condition, with a few tack holes to top corners. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Gorgeous Paramount promo of the stunning actress

940. Grace Kelly. Exceptional

vintage 3.5 x 5.5 postcard photo of Kelly sweetly leaning against Monaco on a large globe, signed in the lower border in fountain pen. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Beautiful oversized prints of a Kurosawa masterpiece 939. Akira Kurosawa. Limited edi-

tion portfolio of six colorful prints depicting characters from the 1985 film Ran, 23 x 28 and 28 x 23, numbered 214/250, each signed in the lower border in pencil by Kurosawa. Also includes two additional unsigned ‘title page’ prints of the same size. Housed in their original red linen clamshell portfolio box. In overall very fine condition. These exquisite prints are delightfully vivid and worthy portrayals of a film hailed for its powerful images and use of color—in addition to earning Kurosawa an Academy Award nomination for Best Director, Ran received nominations for Best Art Direction, Best Cinematography, and Best Costume Design, winning the latter. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The Universal founder adds his motto, “It Can Be Done” 941. Carl Laemmle. Film making pioneer (1867–1939)

and founder of Universal Studios. Laemmle and his son were responsible for the fantastic string of classic Universal horror films including Phantom of the Opera, Frankenstein, Dracula, and The Mummy. Fountain pen signature, “Carl Laemmle” on an off-white 5.5 x 3.25 card with a clipped photo of the director affixed to the left side. Accompanied by the very unique printed request letter from the consignor, with several cartoon characters and a list of signatures already obtained, and also asking Laemmle what his favorite motto is, with Laemmle writing, “It Can Be Done,” in the space provided. In fine condition. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

942. Laurel and Hardy. Vintage glossy 5.5 x 3.5 photo of the

comedic duo posing side-by-side in their bowler hats, boldly signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “Hello Wendy! Stan Laurel” and “Oliver Hardy.” In fine condition, with trivial corner tip dings. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

943. Laurel and Hardy. Ballpoint signatures, “Stan Laurel,” and “Oliver Hardy,” on a light blue 4 x 3.5 album page. In fine condition, with some mild toning to horizontal edges. Accompanied by an unsigned glossy 8 x 10 of the duo. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Comedy’s classic act 944. Laurel and Hardy. Vintage matte-finish 9.5 x 7.75 photo the comedic

duo posing side-by-side in their bowler hats, boldly signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “Hello ‘V. M.’? Stan Laurel” and “Oliver Hardy.” Nicely doublematted and framed to an overall size of 16 x 14.5. In fine condition, with a bit of silvering to dark areas of the image. A fantastic exemplar of this classic pose. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The comedic duo loan themselves to 20th Century Fox for A-Haunting We Will Go 945. Stan Laurel. DS,

two pages, 8.5 x 11, November 12, 1941. Agreement between 20th Century Fox Productions and Laurel and Hardy Feature Productions to lend the services of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy to Fox “in connection with one (1) additional motion picture production to be produced…upon the same terms and conditions as pertained to the first motion picture.” In fine condition, with multiple staple holes and paperclip impressions to the top, and a few light wrinkles. The resulting film must have been A-Haunting We Will Go, Laurel and Hardy’s only film released in 1942, which was produced by 20th Century Fox. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

946. Mimic. Original concept art of

a ‘Bug’ head for the 1997 film Mimic, unsigned, black and white gouache and pencil on an off-white 11 x 14 sheet, unsigned, labeled under the image in pencil, “concept head 3.” In fine condition. RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

947. Mimic. Original hand-

drawn story board pages from the ‘Clack Clack’ scene of the 1997 film Mimic, unsigned, 10 pages, 8.5 x 11, with each page having two panels, with images to 16 of the panels. Scene depicts Chuy’s meeting with the giant winged creatures in a dilapidated church, with several images of creatures included. In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Jun Fan Gung Fu Institute with four of Bruce Lee’s chop stamps 948. Bruce Lee. Unsigned printed membership card booklet for

Lee’s Jun Fan Gung Fu Institute, 2.5 x 3.5, filled out inside in type with the member’s information and his signature, with Bruce Lee’s chop mark stamp below as ‘president,’ and three of his chop mark stamps on the right side, indicating third rank. The translation of the mark is: “By the Name of Jun Fan Lee.” A couple creases and slight toning to the card, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Miranda’s 1941 Decca three-LP set, A Night in Rio 949. Carmen Miranda. A Night in Rio three-LP album prominently signed on the first sleeve in fountain pen, “Sinceramente, Carmen Miranda, 1941.” Housed in the original slipcase which bears an image of Miranda on one side. A few blocks of toning to sleeves and some light marks and staining to slipcase, otherwise fine condition. The records are included. That Night in Rio, starring Alice Faye, Don Ameche, and Carmen Miranda, was released on April 11, 1941. This was just Miranda’s second US film and this three-record album was her first which included songs from one of her motion pictures. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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DiMaggio’s receipt for an order of “24 long Red Roses” on Marilyn’s birthday 952. Marilyn Monroe: Joe DiMaggio. Receipt given

950. Marilyn Monroe. Eye-catching unsigned color proof of Monroe’s tastefully nude Golden Dreams portrait, 12 x 13.5, with the image identification in the lower left corner reading, “No. 1427—Golden Dreams—U. I. Co. N.Y.—Made in U.S.A.,” and captioned next to the image, “Posed by Marilyn Monroe.” In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Magnificent print of Monroe’s breathtaking poolside nudes 951. Marilyn Monroe. Stun-

ning limited edition triptych print of three negatives taken of Monroe at the 20th Century Fox swimming pool, 18.5 x 45, numbered AP 13/30, signed in the lower right by the photographer, William Woodfield. Rolled and in fine condition. Woodfield took these fabulous photographs during the filming of Something’s Got to Give on May 23, 1962, and used his original negatives to create this excellent print, capturing the allure that earned Monroe her status of international sex symbol. RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

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to DiMaggio by Goldfarb, a New York florist, for an order of roses to be sent to Marilyn Monroe on her birthday. The receipt is filled out in pencil by a Goldfarb clerk, one page, 4 x 5.5, June 1, [1961], for an order of “24 long Red Roses” by “Mr. Joe Di Maggio,” to be sent to “Miss Marilyn Monroe, Beverly Hills Hotel, Beverly Hills Cal,” along with the message, “Although I meant to be there personally my thoughts are all with you today. Love, Joe.” In very good condition, with a moderate block of toning to the right side, scattered creases, and a small tear to left edge. This receipt for Monroe’s 1961 birthday roses represents a one-of-a-kind piece from one of America’s heartbreaking love stories—following Monroe’s death, DiMaggio had a half-dozen red roses delivered to her grave three times a week. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The Nelsons secure representation shortly after hitting the airwaves

953. The Nelsons. Two documents: one signed “Ozzie Nelson”

and “Harriet Hilliard Nelson,” one page, both sides, employing MCA Artists Ltd. as their sole manager for a period of three years; and one signed “Ricky Nelson” and “David Nelson,” two pages, both sides, dated November 30, 1952, also employing MCA Artists as their agents for a period of three years. In fine condition, with expected document wear. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


954. Paul Newman. Uncommon eye-catching color limited edition 30.5 x

22.75 print entitled ‘Paul Newman as Butch Cassidy,’ numbered AP 50/50, signed in the lower border in black felt tip by Newman and by the artist, James Bama. In fine condition. An outstanding depiction of Newman in an iconic role, great for display. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

“Luke was a rather rich character and he actually played himself for me” 955. Paul Newman. TLS signed “PL,” one page, 7.25 x 10.5, personal letterhead, December 15,

1967. Letter to Bill Gray at LSU. In part: “Thanks considerably for the vote of confidence. Luke was a rather rich character and he actually played himself for me. I have been doing some kind of informal bull sessions at various colleges, but they have all been in the environs. I haven’t taken to the circuit yet.” In fine condition, with a horizontal fold passing through top of signature. Accompanied by the original mailing envelope. Newman is uncommon in letters, especially those making reference to his legendary role as Cool Hand Luke. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

956. Nightmare Before Christmas. Two original hand-drawn

storyboard portions, in pencil, by an NBC production artist as per Tim Burton’s vision, each 8.5 x 5. One shows an image of Jack Skellington and Santa Claus; the other of Sally pointing to a Halloween poster. In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Extremely desirable Star Trek theme musical quote 957. Star Trek: Alexander Courage. American composer and arranger (1919–2008) forever remembered for the theme music to the iconic science fiction television series Star Trek. Rare AMQS on an 8 x 7 musically-lined sheet. Courage pens 16 bars of music from the ‘Theme from Star Trek,’ writing the title at the top, signed and inscribed along the bottom, “Alexander Courage with best wishes to Jim Weaver and to the Woodland Hills School District,” and dated May 1988. Matted and framed to an overall size of 11.25 x 11.25. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Radiant image of the tragic early actress

958. Star Trek: Enterprise. Color limited

edition 27 x 36 print entitled ‘Enterprise Cast Portrait,’ numbered 53/325, signed in gold ink by all seven cast members pictured, including: Scott Bakula, Anthony Montgomery, Linda Park, Connor Trinneer, and Jolene Blalock. Light horizontal bends and creases, otherwise fine condition. Rolled. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

959. Thelma Todd. American actress (1906–1935) best remembered for her appearances in such comedy classics as Monkey Business, Horse Feathers, and Another Fine Mess. Though her death from carbon monoxide poisoning was ruled an accident, suspicious circumstances led to a number of theories of varying plausibility, including speculation that she was the victim of a ‘hit’ ordered by gangster ‘Lucky’ Luciano. Vintage tinted matte-finish 7.75 x 9.75 portrait of Todd looking over her shoulder, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Lara, Kindest regards, Thelma Todd.” In fine condition, fairly light contrast to the signature and inscription against the dark background. A nice example, uncommon in this size. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

A very touching gift to a young boy from the legendary ‘Great Imposter’ 960. The Great Impostor: Ferdinand Waldo Demara. Known as ‘The Great Imposter’ (1921–1982) he posed as many different professions from monks to surgeons to prison wardens. His life was made into a film entitled The Great Imposter, starring Tony Curtis. Demara’s personally-owned gold bracelet presented to a friend and former patient at the Good Samaritan Hospital in Anaheim, California, in the early 1980s. 14-karat gold bracelet measures 9.5˝ in length, has a weight of 22.1 grams, with “Rev. F. W. Demara,” engraved on the front. Accompanied by a letter of provenance from the recipient of the bracelet, which reads, in part: “I originally met Mr. Demara in 1978 due to a freak football injury requiring immediate surgery at Good Samaritan Hospital…my father was Chief of Staff there. My father had a very close personal friendship with Mr. Demara who was the active Chaplain at the hospital. He confided to Mr. Demara about me for some time and when I was admitted for surgery; I met him personally the evening prior to my surgery…Mr. Demara and I developed a very close personal friendship…The following year, 1979, I was admitted to Good Samaritan Hospital again to remove the hardware…Like my first stay, Mr. Demara was a daily and constant visitor and our friendship grew even stronger…At one of our last times together during the holidays in the early 1980s, Mr. Demara presented a beautiful gold bracelet to me with a nameplate bearing his name ‘Rev. F. W. Demara’ as a gift…I tried to return the bracelet to Mr. Demara to no avail. He refused to take it back and told me ‘there was no other person he would give it to other than me.” In fine condition. Accompanied by an original 10 x 8 Universal promotional photo from the film. A very personal gift, with impeccable provenance, from one of the most well-known imposters of the 20th century. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Attractive 2002 Tony Awards poster signed by 29 nominees, attendees, and Rodgers tribute performers 961. Tony Awards. Color 14 x 22 Broadway window card for the 56th annual Tony Awards in 2002, signed in silver ink by 29 attendess. Signers are: Jason Biggs, Kate Burton, Edie Falco, Ralph Fiennes, Gina Gershon, Joanna Gleason, Savion Glover, Whoopi Goldberg, Anne Heche, Gregory Hines, Hugh Jackman, Michelle Lee, John Leguizamo, Mary Tyler Moore, Liam Neeson, Cynthia Nixon, Chris O’Donnell, Jerry Orbach, Bernadette Peters, Bill Pullman, Hal Prince, John Raitt, Natasha Richardson, Chita Rivera, Paul Rudd, Lea Salonga, Elaine Stritch, Stanley Tucci, and Patrick Wilson. Framed to an overall size of 14.25 x 22.25. In fine condition. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The acclaimed Rocco and his Brothers, signed by the director and leading man 962. Luchino Visconti and Alain Delon. Signed book: Rocco et ses freres. Paris: Buchet/Chastel, 1961. Softcover, 5 x 8, 331 pages. Signed on the title page in blue ballpoint by Luchino Visconti and black felt tip by Alain Delon. In fine condition, with creasing to the spine. Pre-certified PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Rare letter from Visconti to an acclaimed cellist 963. Luchino Visconti.

Acclaimed director of Ossessione, Death in Venice, and The Damned (1906– 1976). ALS in French, one page both sides, 6 x 4.25, personal letterhead, May 13, 1973. Letter of thanks to Pierre Fournier, assuring him that he will think of him and his cello for his next film. In fine condition, with some brushing to signature. The next film he made was Conversation Piece, which starred an international cast of Burt Lancaster, Helmut Berger, and Silvana Mangano. Visconti is rare in any form, especially ALSs—this is the first we have offered. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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964. Waldorf Astoria Signatures. Collection of 29 items con-

sisting of Empire Room programs, signed photos, and menu covers, all obtained by a long-time waiter at the Waldorf-Astoria, signed in ink and pencil by 31 celebrities, some adding brief inscriptions, with a few of the items multi-signed. Signers include: Pearl Bailey (3), Maurice Chevalier, Nat King Cole, Marlene Dietrich, Jimmy Durante, Bob Hope, Lena Horne, Anna Maria Alberghetti, Harry Belafonte, Yogi Berra, William Boyd, Leo Carillo, Nelson Eddy, Whitey Ford, Sergio Franchi, Dorothy Kilgallen, Julius La Rosa, Liberace (2), The McGuire Sisters, Ricardo Montalban, Peter and Mary, Ginger Rogers, Dorothy Shay, Gale Sherwood, Kate Smith, and Ed Sullivan. In overall very good to fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

965. Wizard of Oz: Harold Arlen. TLS signed “Harold,” one page, 7.25 x 10.25, personal

letterhead, April 8, 1970. Letter to Irving Brown of Warner Bros. In full: “Life has been a bit unsettled and that is the only reason for this belated note of thanks. I feel certain you will understand.” In fine condition. Arlen’s wife, Anya Taranda, had passed away from a brain tumor one month prior, after which Arlen suffered from a deep depression, becoming reclusive and withdrawing from friends and family. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The Hollywood power couple

966. Natalie Wood and Robert Wagner. Glossy 8 x 10 photo of Wood playfully leaning over Wagner’s shoulder, signed and inscribed in black ink, “To Belle, with love, Natalie Wood” and “Robert Wagner.” In very good condition, with overall surface bends and creases, and toned adhesive remnants and a bit of surface loss to borders. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Decades-long correspondence from Woodward regarding her husband, family, and work: “I cried at my wedding, and when I accepted the Oscar—my emotions are inappropriate too” 967. Joanne Woodward. Collection of letters to

William Gray, comprised of seven ALSs and a Christmas card, all signed “Joanne,” dating from 1955 to 1989. A selection for the letters reads: “I’m back in Hollywood—this time to make a picture called ‘A Kiss Before Dying,’ with Robert Wagner, of all people…I’m terribly excited about going to Paris in August to do a film TV show with Charles Boyer —I don‘t know yet whether 20th [Century] will let me, but I‘m keeping my fingers crossed…as you know—we got married on Jan. 29th, went to Europe for three weeks, came back & I got the Oscar, moved into a new house, event back to N.Y., came back here & started another picture (Rally Round the Flag, Boys), had my family out for a visit, and now have Paul’s three children with us…but we each have another picture to do after this—mine is ‘The Sound and the Fury’—playing Quentin.” In another, she expresses her wish to be pregnant, “I have a baby (I hope)…isn’t it wonderful about the baby! I’m doing natural childbirth exercises, and enjoying the whole experience of being pregnant enormously”; and in another, depicts her emotions during important parts of her life, “I cried at my wedding, and when I accepted the Oscar—my emotions are inappropriate too.” Mentioning Tennessee Williams and his works, she writes “I’m reading ‘Hard Candy’ now and like some of the stories very much…Meade is writing the screen adaptation of ‘Orpheus Descending,’ and the producers are very pleased with it.” Also included is a color snapshot of her two young children swimming, notated on the back by Woodward, “Here are two of our daughters—Nell & Clea”; as well as a secretarially signed letter to Gray, and a letter from her assistant. In overall fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

969. Darryl F. Zanuck.

968. Joanne Woodward. Vintage glossy 7.5 x 9 head-andshoulders photo, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Bill—Even analyzed—I love you! Joanne.” In fine condition, with slightly trimmed edges and some scattered light creases. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Original “temporary” script for the 1940 Twentieth Century Fox film, The Blue Bird, starring Shirley Temple, Nigel Bruce, and Gale Sondergaard. The 153-page brad-bound script has its original cover, labeled “Temporary” at the top and dated August 16, 1939, with pencil notations on the front, and is quickly initialed on the front cover in pencil by Zanuck. The first page bears several pencil notations by Zanuck making reference to three pages torn out of the script, writing “Don’t act like animals—dog–cat,” with a couple of lines underlined by Zanuck on the removed pages. Also included is a 20th Century Fox inter-office correspondence from Jason Joy to Zanuck, explaining some of the revisions made to the story line, dialog, and other touches done to the script. In fine condition, with expected handling wear. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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costumes & props 970. Rex Allen. One of

Rex Allen’s personallyowned Stetson cowboy hats. Off-white hat has an attractive rhinestone hatband, with its black leather sweatband with “XXXXXX Stetson,” and Allen’s name printed around it, as well as a label of the world-renowned tailor to the stars, Nudie’s Rodeo Tailors. Accompanied by a letter of provenance from Nudie Cohn’s granddaughter, Jamie Nudie, which reads, in part: “This hat belonging to Rex Allen is a beauty…Rex and Nudie were very close friends over the years. In fact, Rex surprised Nudie on his 65th birthday hosting a birthday party at his home.” In fine condition.RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

971. Rex Allen. A three-piece outfit made for cowboy star Rex Allen. Suit consists of a bright blue single-breasted jacket with a two-button front, with a Nudie’s Rodeo Tailor label sewn into the inside of the lining; a pair of black slacks, with another Nudie’s tag sewn into the waistband; and a gold silk scarf. Accompanied by a letter of provenance from Nudie Cohn’s granddaughter, Jamie Nudie, which reads, in part: “This suit made for Rex Allen custom designed by Nudie. They were great friends over the years. In fact Nudie baptized Rex’s son.” In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Nudie’s Stetson presented to Iron Eyes Cody for his 80th birthday

972. Iron Eyes Cody. One of Cody’s personally-owned Stetson cowboy hats. Light brown hat has a Native American bead and feather pinned to the braided hat band, with its black leather sweatband with “XXXX Stetson,” “John B. Stetson Company 3X Beaver,” and Cody’s name and “Happy 80th Birthday,” printed around it, as well as a label of the world-renowned tailor to the stars, Nudie’s Rodeo Tailors. Accompanied by a letter of provenance from Nudie Cohn’s granddaughter, Jamie Nudie, which reads, in part: “This Stetson hat belonging to Iron Eyes Cody is a gem!…Iron Eyes loved Nudie. In fact when Nudie passed away in 1984 Iron Eyes asked my grandmother and I if it was okay to place one of his feathers on my grandfather’s chest before closing his casket. That feather is with him.” In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

973. Allan ‘Rocky’ Lane.

Custom-made suit owned by cowboy star Allan ‘Rocky’ Lane. Suit consists of a brown-striped single-breasted suit coat, with one of the inside pockets bearing the manufacturing label of the worldrenowned tailor to the stars, Nudie Cohn of Nudie’s Rodeo Tailors, with another label sewn into another pocket with Lane’s name typed on the first line and a date of “7754,” typed on the second. Matching brown pants bear a matching label with the name and date typed on the lines. Also included are a pair of Lane’s brown leather cowboy boots by Austin Boots, with Lane’s name stamped inside of each boot. Accompanied by a letter of provenance from Jamie Nudie, granddaughter of Cohn. Letter reads, in part: “This suit made for Rocky Allan Lane was designed by ‘Nudie.’ Made sometime after 1963.” In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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974. Pat Brady. One of Brady’s personally-owned Stetson cowboy hats. Beige hat has a small feather tucked into the band, and its brown leather sweatband with “XXXX Stetson,” “John B. Stetson Company 4X Beaver,” and Brady’s name printed around it, as well as a label of the world-renowned tailor to the stars, Nudie Cohn of Nudie’s Rodeo Tailors. Accompanied by a letter of provenance from Jamie Nudie, granddaughter of Cohn. Letter reads, in part: ”This XXXX Stetson belonging to Pat Brady is in fantastic shape…Pat & Nudie were great friends.” In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Dress worn by Connie Corleone in the famous Godfather baptism scene, while Michael ruthlessly seizes power 975. The Godfather: Talia Shire. Screen-worn dress,

worn by Talia Shire in the role of Connie Corleone during the important baptismal scene in The Godfather. One-piece longsleeve striped dress features a 15-button front, two pockets, and accented collar and cuffs. A Brooks-Van Horn Costumes label is sewn into the lining below the collar, with “Talia Shire,” written on the first line, and “‘8’ Connie,” written on the second line. Dress can be clearly seen as Connie and Michael exit the church after the christening. In fine condition. As Michael Corleone stands as godfather to Connie’s son, his assassins murder the other four New York dons and More Greene, as Michael assumes power as the only remaining don in New York, taking over for his father Vito. A rare offering from one of the most pivotal scenes of the classic film. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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976. Slim Pickens.

Pickens’s personally-owned Stetson cowboy hat. Beige hat has a plain matching band, with its brown leather sweatband with “XXXX Stetson,” “Made by Stetson especially for Slim Pickens,” “John B. Stetson Company 4X Beaver,” printed around it, as well as a label of the world-renowned tailor to the stars, Nudie’s Rodeo Tailors. Accompanied by a letter of provenance from Nudie Cohn’s granddaughter, Jamie Nudie, which reads, in part: “This hat is a Stetson RCA block shaped for Slim Pickens. I remember Slim coming into Nudie’s when I was growing up. He was a great friend to Nudie.” In fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Tony Soprano’s custom-made suit from Season 5

977. The Sopranos: James Gandolfini. Fabulous screen-worn suit, worn by Gandolfini in his role as Tony Soprano on the HBO series The Sopranos. Suit consists of a dark blue single-breasted jacket, with a one-button closure, with one inside pocket bearing a Camelia’s Custom Clothier label, and the other pocket with a label which reads, “Custom styled for Tony Soprano”; matching pants with a printed Camelia’s label sewn into the waistband, with Gandolfini’s name printed on the second line and dated April 9, 2003; a long-sleeve Ike Behar dress shirt; and a taupe necktie with a light blue repeating pattern. This suit was worn in Episode 13 of Season 5 of the Sopranos episode entitled ‘All Due Respect,’ in which Tony is forced to kill his cousin Tony B and settle up with Johnny Sack. In fine condition, with several production tags pinned to the articles. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from The Golden Closet, bearing a printed signature of Gandolfini. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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978. Academy Award Winners

979. Actors

980. Actors and Actresses

981. Actors and Actresses

982. Actors and Actresses

983. Actors and Actresses

984. Actresses

985. Actresses

986. Autograph Album

987. Brigitte Bardot

988. Mikhail Baryshnikov

989. Batman

990. Noah Beery

991. Art Carney

992. Classic Television

993. Joan Crawford

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994. Linda Darnell

995. Sandra Dee

996. Catherine Deneuve

997. Entertainment

998. Rainer Werner Fassbinder

999. Hoot Gibson

1000. Edmund Gwenn

1001. Henry Hathaway

1002. Grace Kelly and Prince Rainier

1003. Grace Kelly and Prince Rainier

1004. Carole Landis

1005. Lost in Space

1006. MASH

1007. Raymond Massey

1008. Marcello Mastroianni

1009. Munsters: Al Lewis

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1010. Nita Naldi

1011. Maria Ouspenskaya

1012. Satyajit Ray

1013. Rebecca Schaeffer

1014. Peter Sellers

1015. Steven Spielberg

1016. Star Trek

1017. Star Trek

1018. TV Actors and Actresses

1019. TV Actors and Actresses

1020. TV Actors and Actresses

1021. The Untouchables

1022. Johnny Weissmuller

1023. Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory

1024. Wizard of Oz: Bolger and Haley

1025. Wizard of Oz: Jerry Maren

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sports Unique jersey signed by the greatest Braves sluggers 1026. Hank Aaron and Eddie Mathews. Official

Rawlings Braves baseball uniform worn by pitcher Gene Conley in a 1972 Atlanta Braves old-timers’ game, signed on the front of the jersey in blue felt tip, “Best wishes, Hank Aaron” and “Best wishes, Eddie Mathews.” The zipper-style jersey is size 46 and bears Conley’s name and number 22 screened onto back, the Braves ‘tomahawk’ logo on the front, and ‘chief’ logo on the left sleeve. Pants are a size 40 with 27-inch inseam, and feature red and blue stripes along the sides. Stirrups are also included. Some scattered toning and soiling to the jersey, otherwise fine condition. Conley wore this uniform for an old-timers’ game held to honor the 25th anniversary of the 1957 Milwaukee Braves World Series championship. A magnificent piece tying together the two Braves 500 Home Run club members as well as their historic 1957 championship run. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

1027. Muhammad Ali. Official unused Ringside

right-foot off-white boxing shoe (size 11) signed in black ink on the heel. In fine condition. Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from James Spence. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

1028. Baseball: 1958 All-Stars. Official Reach American League baseball signed in blue ballpoint on the sweet spot and side panels by 25 members of the 1958 National League All-Star team, including: Stan Musial (ss), Warren Spahn, Eddie Mathews, Richie Ashburn, Ernie Banks, Bill Mazeroski, Johnny Antonelli, Don Blasingame, Del Crandall, George Crowe, Fred Haney (ss), Turk Farrell, Bob Friend, Larry Jackson, Johnny Logan, Don McMahon, Walt Moryn, Johnny Podres, Bob Purkey, Bill Rigney, Johnny Roseboro, Bob Schmidt, Bob Skinner, Frank Thomas, and Lee Walls. A bit of scattered soiling and brushing to signatures, and an ink identification notation to the right of the sweet spot, otherwise fine condition. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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1029. Baseball: 500 Home Run Club. Color 35.5 x 17.75 print entitled ‘500 Home Run Hitters,’ by Ron Lewis, signed in blue and black felt tip by all eleven members pictured: Mickey Mantle, Ted Williams, Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, Eddie Mathews, Willie McCovey, Reggie Jackson, Ernie Banks, Frank Robinson, Harmon Killebrew, and Mike Schmidt. Mantle, Aaron, and Killebrew also added their career home run totals, “755,” “536,” and “573,” all of which are uncommon notations for these players. Nicely matted and framed to an overall size of 40 x 22. In fine condition, with the Mathews signature a few shades light but legible. Oversized. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The elite 500 Home Run Club 1030. Baseball: 500 Home Run Club. Official Rawlings National League

baseball signed in blue ballpoint on the sweet spot and side panels by ten members of the elite 500 Home Run Club, including: Mickey Mantle (ss), Reggie Jackson, Frank Robinson, Mike Schmidt, Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, Ernie Banks, Eddie Mathews, Willie McCovey, and Harmon Killebrew. In fine condition, with subtle toning near the Banks signature. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from JSA. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Bird’s game-used 1991-92 Boston Celtics jersey 1031. Larry Bird. Bird’s game-used official Champion green Boston Celtics away jersey from

1991-92, his final NBA season, with sewn on letters and numbers, featuring “Celtics” on the chest, “Bird” across the back, and his number 33 on both, signed on the number on the back in black felt tip, “Larry Bird.” The Champion manufacturer’s tags are sewn to the front left tail, indicating a size of 48, year of 1991, and alteration of “Body Length +3.” General wear from use and light soiling, otherwise fine condition. Bird generally wore a size 46 jersey, but following a back injury suffered at the 1992 All-Star break, he needed a larger size to accommodate his back brace during the final months of his career. The consignor notes that his brother was a financial advisor to many athletes and became friends with Manute Bol, who obtained this jersey for him via his former teammate, Chris Mullin, a friend of Bird. Pre-certified Steve Grad/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Enormous collection featuring Boston’s greatest champions—Russell, Orr, Brady, and Ortiz 1032. Boston Sports. Fantastic collection of 53 items related to Boston sports, including signed baseballs and basketballs, nicely matted and framed signed photos, and four game-used pieces. The highlight of the collection is a massive 32 x 50 display honoring ‘Champions of New England,’ featuring limited edition photos of Tom Brady, David Ortiz, Bill Russell, and Bobby Orr, numbered 56/250, each signed by the player pictured. Reverse bears COAs from the companies that represent each athlete: Tri-Star for Brady, Upper Deck for Ortiz, Rich Altman for Russell, and Great North Road for Orr. The collection also contains 14 framed oversized photos, signed by Ted Williams, Clay Buchholz (2), Dave Henderson, Jim Lonborg (2), Jim Rice (2), Milan Lucic, Paul Pierce (2), and Rajon Rondo (3). Also included are 18 framed 8 x 10 photos, signed by John Lackey, John Lester, Dave Roberts, Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Milan Lucic (5), Robert Parish, and Paul Pierce (8). There are also nine baseballs, signed by Bill Buckner and Mookie Wilson (2), Bernie Carbo (2), Jim Lonborg (3), Fred Lynn, and Jim Rice; and seven basketballs, signed by Paul Pierce (5) and Rajon Rondo (2). Unsigned items include a game-used first base from a 2009 Red Sox home game against Toronto; and three game-used baseballs from a 2009 home game against Tampa Bay. In overall fine condition, with signatures on the large display a bit faded. All baseballs and baseball photos, as well as the four game-used items, bear official MLB or Steiner authentication labels. A fabulous instant collection of Boston legends from four of the oldest and most storied franchises in sports. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

The classic 1950s Dodgers heroes—Hodges and Snider 1033. Brooklyn Dodgers.

Original circa early 1950s glossy 9 x 8 Associated Press photo of Gil Hodges, Duke Snider, and Jim Hughes posing together in the Brooklyn Dodgers locker room, signed during the period in fountain pen by all three. Reverse bears an AP Wirephoto stamp. In fine condition, with light scattered surface creases and soiling, and slight crazing to finish. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from JSA. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

1034. Earl Campbell. Game-used of-

ficial white mesh Wilson Houston Oilers road jersey circa 1979, featuring “Campbell” screened in block letters across rear nameplate and his number 34 screened in royal blue and red to chest, back, and sleeves. The Wilson tag is sewn to the bottom left and indicates a size 46. Exhibits general marks and wear consistent with use. Accompanied by a letter of provenance on Grey Flannel Auctions letterhead from Joe Proski, in part: “I am writing this letter to attest to the authenticity of this Circa 1979 Earl Campbell Rookie Era Houston Oilers road jersey, which I received during my 32 years as Head Athletic Trainer for the Phoenix Suns.” RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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Remarkable manuscript by the football innovator— “The Aviator, the Quarterback of War’s Gridiron” 1035. Walter Camp. A ‘founding father’ of American football (1859–1925) who invented the sport’s line of scrimmage and the system of downs. Hand-corrected typed draft, eight pages, 8.5 x 11, no date but circa 1917–1918. Draft for an article comparing quarterbacks to military pilots, heavily corrected throughout in Camp’s own hand, and titled by Camp at the top, “The Aviator, the Quarterback of War’s Gridiron.” In part: “The aviator is for the army or navy the eyes and nerves of the team…we should look after his physical, mental and nervous condition with at least the same solicitude as that shown by coaches and trainers in the case of a star quarterback…Every man in the army and navy should be should be strong, enduring and supple…The aviator is for the most part confined, especially in handling a gun, to movements in a sitting position where suppleness of the body and ability to work in a confined and possibly awkward positions of the greatest value. This ability may be very largely increased through certain exercises which at the same time have also a very favorable effect upon the physical condition of the man.” He goes on to list eight points important for developing an efficient exercise regiment, and adds three handwritten paragraphs at the conclusion, in part: “Shall we not begin at once to take care of the quarterbacks, the eyes and nerves of that greater team of ours which is now going out upon war’s gridiron?” In fine condition, with staple holes and a paperclip impression to the upper left. At the time, Camp was a member of the Navy Department Commission on Training Camp Activities, and his article was published in the January 1918 issue of Flying. Both the Army and Navy adopted Camp’s system of physical training, which became known as the ‘Daily Dozen’—a set of twelve simple exercises which were to be done every day, and could be completed in a matter of minutes. A one-of-a-kind work from World War I combining two of America’s greatest traditions—football and the military. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Classic portrait of Cobb stealing third with spikes up 1036. Ty Cobb. Vintage 9.25 x 7.5 cardstock

photo of Cobb sliding hard into New York Highlanders’ third baseman Jimmy Austin, originally taken by Charles Conlon, signed in fountain pen, “With regards, Ty Cobb, 6/2/56.” Slightly trimmed edges, scattered light dampstaining, some over top of sentiment, and a few mild ripples, otherwise fine condition. A fantastic portrait capturing the gritty Hall of Famer’s legendary aggressive playing style. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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Scarce single-signed Cobb baseball from his .401 season 1037. Ty Cobb. Official Reach American League baseball signed in black

ink near the league stamp, “Ty Cobb,” and dated 1922 in another hand to the left of the signature. In good to very good condition, with heavy overall toning and soiling, various scuffs and surface loss, and a few scuffs and marks affecting the signature. Cobb is quite scarce in this single-signed format, which is especially desirable as it was signed during his playing days—1922 was a particularly impressive year, with Cobb batting .401, breaking the milestone .400 mark for the third and final time of his career. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

1039. Eddie Collins. DS,

1038. Ty Cobb. Personal check, 8 x 3, filled out in another hand

and signed by Cobb, “Tyrus R. Cobb,” payable to Frank Follansbee for $4.07, September 4, 1956. In fine condition, with expected bank stamps and cancellation holes (show-through from stamp slightly affecting first letter of signature). Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

signed “Edward T. Collins,” one onionskin page, 8.5 x 11, December 8, 1945. Agreement between the Boston American League Baseball Company and Portland Baseball Company for the assignment of James Bucher for the sum of $5,000.00. Nicely signed at the conclusion by Collins. In fine condition, with expected document wear. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from PSA/ DNA. Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Scarce signature of the Iron Horse 1040. Lou Gehrig. Fountain pen signature, “L. Gehrig,” on an

off-white 2.25 x 1.25 lightly-lined slip. In fine condition, with the first letter a shade light. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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The ‘Galveston Giant’ presents a copy of his autobiography

1041. Jack Johnson. Signed book:

Jack Johnson—In the Ring—and Out. First edition. Chicago: National Sports Publishing Company, 1927. Hardcover with dust jacket, 5.5 x 7.75, 259 pages. Signed and inscribed in blue ink on the third free end page, “Jack Johnson, Former Heavyweight Champion to Walter Summer Good Luck.” Autographic condition: fine. Book condition: VG+/VG. Johnson is quite scarce in any form. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

1043. Sonny Liston and Mickey Mantle. Program for the

59th annual Philadelphia Sports Writers Association Dinner, held on January 28, 1963, 15 pages, 6 x 9, signed on the back cover in blue ballpoint by Sonny Liston and inside by Mickey Mantle. Also signed by: Dave Robinson, Herb Adderley, Paul Arizin, Johnny Callison, Harold Johnson, Jack Kraft, Stanley Dancer, Jerry Pisano, Ron Ferraro, Jack Ramsay, Herman Taylor, John Wideman, John Uelses, Jack Sanford, Jim Katcavage, and Tim Brown. A mild central vertical fold and a few pieces of tape affixed to the first page, otherwise fine condition. Precertified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Desirable signed ticket stub for Larsen’s 1956 World Series perfect game 1042. Don Larsen.

Original ticket stub from Game 5 of the 1956 World Series, held at Yankee Stadium on October 8, 1956, 4.25 x 2.25, signed on the reverse in blue felt tip. Encapsulated in a plastic PSA/DNA authentication holder. Signature is bold and in fine condition, with scattered creases and a few ballpoint notations to the front of the ticket stub. Over the course of the 135-year history of Major League Baseball, only 23 perfect games have been thrown, with Larsen’s the only one coming in the postseason. The 1956 World Series was a rematch of the pre vious year’s, pitting the Yankees against their crosstown rivals, the Brooklyn Dodgers. The teams were evenly matched, but the Yankees won the championship in seven games, and Larsen was named the MVP of the series for his once-in-a-lifetime achievement. Unquestionably the most desirable format for Larsen’s autograph, as it represents one of the most memorable sporting moments of the past century. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) 290 | April 16, 2014 | SPORTS

1044. Vince Lombardi. Green Bay Packers, Inc. business check, 8.25 x 3.25, filled out in another hand and signed by Lombardi, “Vincent Lombardi,” payable to Edw. Garot & Son for $48.25, April 7, 1959. Countersigned by Dominic Olejniczak. In fine condition, with expected bank stamps and cancellation holes (none affecting the signature). Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

1045. Joe Louis. Pro-

gram for the gala premier of Harry Belafonte’s show at the Empire Room of the Waldorf Astoria on November 21, 1957, 5 x 6.5, two pages, signed across the inside in pencil by Louis. In fine condition, with hinge passing through a single letter of last name of signature and some light handling wear. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)


Extremely rare ‘M & M’ boys dual-signed ball 1046. Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris. Official Bob Feller

Youth League baseball signed in black felt tip on the sweet spot by Mickey Mantle and on a side panel by Roger Maris. Some scattered scuffs and stains (one affecting Maris’s last name), otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity and grading from PSA/DNA, evaluating the Mantle autograph at ‘9,’ Maris at ‘8,’ and the ball itself at ‘4,’ for an overall grade of ‘7.’ A rare example of this sought after combination, signed earlier than those typically seen. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Moses Malone’s “Sixers” practice jersey 1047. Moses Malone. Malone’s prac-

tice-used reversible Philadelphia 76ers practice jersey, with “Sixers” screened across the chest and his number 2 on the front and back. The reversible jersey can be either white mesh with red lettering, or red mesh with white lettering. Signed on the front of the white side in black felt tip, “Moses Malone, #2, 76ers.” Expected general wear from use, otherwise fine condition. The consignor notes that his brother was a financial advisor to many athletes and obtained this directly from Malone, one of his clients. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

1049. Roger Maris.

Ballpoint signature, “Roger Maris,” on an off-white 4 x 2.5 card. Matted and framed with a photo of Maris hitting his 61st home run and a newspaper clipping to an overall size of 13 x 16. In fine condition. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.… (MB $200)

“‘Yours in sports,’ Rabbit Maranville” 1048. Rabbit Maranville.

ALS signed “‘Yours in sports,’ Rabbit Maranville,” one page, 8.5 x 11, no date. Response to an admirer. In part: “Have no mug of my own and many thanks for your nice letter. Busy as hell with the kids so excuse so short a note.” In very good to fine condition, with uniform toning and partial edge separation to one mailing fold. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

1050. NY Yankees: 1961. Official Rawlings American League baseball signed in blue ballpoint on the sweet spot and side panels by 33 members of the 1961 team, including: Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, Whitey Ford, Bill Skowron, Hector Lopez, Bill Stafford, Jesse Gonder, Johnny Sain, Johnny Blanchard, Clete Boyer, Bobby Richardson, Jim Coates, Ralph Terry, Art Ditmar, Billy Gardner, Bob Turley, Ryne Duren, Bud Daley, Bob Hale, Joe DeMaestri, Tom Tresh, Deron Johnson, Hal Reniff, Al Downing, Jack Reed, John James, Luis Arroyo, Rollie Sheldon, Bob Cerv, Earl Torgeson, Tex Clevenger, Ralph Houk, and Danny McDevitt. In fine condition, with subtle haloing to Mantle’s signature. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

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The World Series champs, highlighted by Mantle, Berra, and Ford 1051. NY Yankees: 1961. Limited edition color 37.25 x 25 print of the 1961 Yankees team by artist Ron Lewis, numbered 849/1000, signed in blue felt tip by 33 members of the classic squad, including: Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, Whitey Ford, Ralph Houk, Bill Skowron, Hector Lopez, Bill Stafford, Jesse Gonder, John Blanchard, Johnny Sain, Clete Boyer, Bobby Richardson, Jim Coates, Billy Gardner, Bob Turley, Ryne Duren, Ralph Terry, Art Ditmar, Bud Daley, Bob Hale, Joe DeMaestri, Tom Tresh, Tex Clevenger, Deron Johnson, Hal Reniff, Al Downing, Jack Reed, John James, Luis Arroyo, Rollie Sheldon, Bob Cerv, Earl Torgeson, and Danny McDevitt. Also signed in the lower right by Ron Lewis. In fine condition. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

As peace is obtained in Europe, the inventor of basketball offers a plan to assist returning soldiers “without any idea of charity”

1052. James Naismith. Inventor and founder of basketball (1861–1939). ALS signed “Ever your loving hubby, Jim,” four pages, lightly-

lined on two sets of adjoining sheets, 5.25 x 8.25, on ‘Active Service with the U. S. Naval Forces Operating in European Waters’ letterhead, October 13, 1918. Letter to his wife. In part: “You need not think from the heading that I am on my way home, but I happen to be in a port city so I write on the naval stationery. This P.M. I return to my Hqts where I expect to get a few letters from home. This morning’s paper tells us that Gem. has accepted all terms and I know that this will bring cheer to many hearts, but this does not mean that everything is settled or that we can come home immediately for it may be months before we can return. Indeed in some ways our work is just the most needed. I hope America will prepare to take care of the boys in the right way. The trouble is that she will make a great fuss over them for a couple of weeks then forget all about them. I have a plan that I wish could be carried through to set the boys up when they return and give them a chance to make good…without any idea of charity…I am going out to see a soccer game played between our army and a French team. International athletics are in vogue now, and our work will be more important than ever now.” In very good condition, with missing lower right corner to three of the pages, affecting just a few words of text, uniform toning, and a central horizontal fold passing through signature, with a few pinhole-size areas of paper loss along fold and signature. Despite not yet being an American citizen, Naismith served as a chaplain in the first Kansas Infantry and patrolled the Mexican border for several months of 1916. He was later sent to France, where he served on the front lines and counseled soldiers on sex education and morality, using athletics as a way to maintain and protect soldiers’s morale. His plan, which he would outline in a later letter to his wife, was very similar to what became the G.I. Bill. Naismith is notoriously rare in handwritten letters. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

292 | April 16, 2014 | SPORTS


“My greatest accomplishment was my ability to accept the racial abuse I did early as it was certainly not my nature to do so” 1053. Jackie Robinson. Amazing ALS signed “Jackie,” one page on a 5.75 x 3.25 card, no date but bears a collector’s notation of November 1958 on the reverse. Response to a letter asking what he considered to be his greatest accomplishment. In full: “I believe my greatest accomplishment was my ability to accept the racial abuse I did early as it was certainly not my nature to do so.” In very fine condition. An exceptional letter in its succinct retelling of how it was Robinson that came to break Major League Baseball’s color barrier. When Brooklyn Dodgers General Manager Branch Rickey explained that he was looking for a black player who could ignore any racial antagonism that came his way, Robinson asked if he was ‘looking for a Negro who is afraid to fight back’—Rickey responded with a subtle change of phrasing, saying he needed black ballplayer ‘with guts enough not to fight back.’ As Robinson notes in this letter, meek acquiescence wasn’t something in his nature—he had even been court-martialed after refusing to move to the back of an Army bus—but he overcame this and went on to have a Hall of Fame career on the baseball diamond while historically impacting the civil rights movement. An altogether remarkable letter with ideal content. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

Fantastic collection of baseball’s home run heroes—Ruth, Maris, McGwire, and Bonds 1054. Babe Ruth and Home Run Champions. Remarkable col-

lection of four signatures of the Home Run greats: fountain pen signature, “Babe Ruth,” on an off-white card; felt tip signature, “Roger Maris,” on an off-white card; felt tip signature, “Barry Bonds,” on a San Francisco Giants ticket from 2001; and a ballpoint signature and inscription, “To Leo, Mark McGwire,” on a white card. In fine condition. The Ruth and Maris signatures are encapsulated in plastic PSA/DNA authentication holders. In overall fine condition, with bands of toned adhesive remnants to top and bottom of the Ruth card. Accompanied by unsigned photos of each slugger. An instant collection of home run champs, all with crisply penned, clean signatures. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

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Choice photo of a powerful Ruth practice swing 1055. Babe Ruth. Highly desirable vintage matte-finish 8 x 10 full-length photo of Ruth posing at the end of one of his mighty swings, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To my good friend, Mrs. J. P. Tehan, From, Babe Ruth.” Mild scattered soiling, a tack hole to the right edge, and slight rippling to top edge, otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by full letters of authenticity from PSA/ DNA and JSA. A fantastic pose of the ‘Sultan of Swat.’ Pre-certified PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

Gorgeous image of Ruth in his legendary pinstripes

1056. Babe Ruth. Exquisite matte-finish 7 x 9.5 full-length photo of Ruth in his Yankee uniform before a game at the Polo Grounds in 1921, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Joe Fareno, Harlem Golden Gloves Bantam Weight Champion 1929, From Babe Ruth.” Intricately double-matted and framed with two images of Ruth, a Yankees patch, and two plaques to an overall size of 45.5 x 27.5. Some unobtrusive scattered staining otherwise fine condition. Accompanied by a color photocopy of a full letter of authenticity from JSA. During the period this photo was taken the Yankees shared the Polo Grounds with the New York Giants, as Yankee Stadium—the ‘House the Ruth Built’—was not constructed until 1923. The signature is extremely crisp and clear on this early photo of baseball’s most fabled slugger. Oversized. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

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1057. Michael Schumacher. Leg-

endary German F1 race car driver (born 1969) who suffered a traumatic brain injury while skiing in December 2013. Official red cotton Ferrari polo shirt made by FILA, prominently signed on the large Ferrari logo patch on the back in black felt tip by Schumacher. In fine condition. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from MSM/SMP. Pre-certified Steve Grad/PSA/ DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

1059. Sam Snead. Collec-

tion of 10 personal checks, 8.25 x 3, all filled out and signed by Snead, “Samuel J. Snead,” all dated either 1984 or 1987. In fine condition, with expected bank stamps, lightly affecting a couple of signatures, and a few vertical folds. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

Limited edition solid Jim Reno bronze of Secretariat, once owned by Penny Tweedy 1058. Secretariat. Limited edition and beautifully detailed bronze of Secretariat by renowned sculptor Jim Reno, 5/100, previously owned by Secretariat’s owner Penny Tweedy. The solid bust, with hand-painted accents to the legs, hoofs, and nose, is set upon a marble stand which bears a small engraved plaque, measures 14 x 16.5 x 7 and weighs almost 44 pounds. Impressed into the bronze’s base is “Secretariat 1970–1989 © Jim Reno.” In fine condition. Accompanied by two property certificates from the 1999 sale of the statue on Sothebys.amazon. com. The original model was commissioned by the Kentucky Horse Park Foundation, and was purchased when Mrs. Tweedy was raising funds to build the Secretariat sculpture that was presented to the Horse Park. A fantastic piece of art that perfectly captures the grace and strength of one of racing’s most dominant horses. Oversized. RR Auction COA.…(MB $500)

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Diverse jersey collection highlighted by Jeter, Namath, and Armstrong

1060. Sports. Collection of 20 replica sports jerseys, most with sewn on letters and numbers, each signed in felt tip or ink by a major athletic figure. Signers are: Lance Armstrong, Ernie Banks, Jim Brown, Earl Campbell, Roger Federer, Tony Gwynn, Ryan Howard, Reggie Jackson, Derek Jeter, Dan Marino, Stan Musial, Joe Namath, Pete Rose (6), Patrick Roy, and Bill Walton. In overall fine condition. Many are accompanied by certificates of authenticity from PSA/DNA or JSA. An impressive instant collection of sports greats, nearly all of whom are current or future Hall of Famers. RR Auction COA.‌(MB $500)

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Remarkable portrait of the Native American football legend embracing his heritage 1061. Jim Thorpe. Fantastic matte-finish 8 x 10 photo of Thorpe in an elaborate Native American headdress, signed and inscribed in fountain pen, “To Norman D. Money from Jim Thorpe 1940.” Encapsulated in a removable plastic PSA/DNA authentication holder grading the autograph an “8.” In fine condition, with a few small mounting remnants to reverse, a bit of mild silvering to darker areas, and a small tear to lower right edge. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from PSA/ DNA, also grading the autograph an “8.” Autographed 8 x 10 portraits of Thorpe are extremely rare, with this exceptional example being just the third we have ever offered. RR Auction COA.…(MB $300)

Desirable Wagner induction day cover, postmarked June 12, 1939, the date of the Hall’s grand opening 1062. Honus Wagner. Commemorative

Crosby photo cover with a cachet honoring Wagner’s induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame and the 100th anniversary of ‘America’s National Game,’ postmarked June 12, 1939, in Cooperstown, New York, signed vertically in fountain pen, “J. Honus Wagner.” In fine condition, with a subtle diagonal band of toning to the right side and a chip to the upper left corner. Accompanied by an unsigned HOF plaque card. Though he was one of the first five men elected to the Hall of Fame in 1936, it was not until the Hall’s grand opening in Cooperstown on June 12, 1939, that he was officially inducted. Pre-certified Steve Grad/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

1063.

Wrestling.

Fountain pen signatures of 24 wrestlers on an off-white 7.5 x 10 lined sheet of graphlike paper, with an Ecuadorian postage stamp affixed near the center. Signers are: Angelo Savoldi, Gino Garibaldi, Ernie Dusek, Rudy Dusek, Emil Dusek, Alan Eustace, Tom Mahoney, Bob ‘Strangler’ Negrew, Bobby Managoff, Brownie La Chappelle, Mark Hosley, Hanji Singh, Abe Yourist, Abe Coleman, John Katan, Joe Dusek, Chick Garibaldi, Ralph Garibalsi, Gino ‘Red’ Vagnone, Yvon Robert, Raoul Lopez, Stanley Pinto, Bobby Managoff, Jr., and Tommy Rae. Matted and framed to an overall size of 11.75 x 14. In fine condition, with some scattered mild toning. Pre-certified Steve Grad/ PSA/DNA and RR Auction COA.…(MB $200)

1065. Wrestling. Hardcover autograph book circa 1950s, 6 x 4.75, signed inside by 53 wrestlers from the ‘golden age’ of the sport, including: Ed ‘Strangler’ Lewis, Ivan Rasputin, Wild Bill Longson, Gypsy Joe, Lord Finis Hall, Al Lovelock, Johnny Kostas, Don Curtis (signing with his given name, Don Beitelman, which he used for 1950 only), Dandy Davis, Bill Melby, Dr. Bill Miller, Lou Thesz, Verne Gagne, Little Beaver, Pat O’Connor, Freddie Blassie, Ernie Dusek, Sonny Myers, Wladek ‘Killer’ Kowalski, Karol Krauser, Tarzan White, Lucky Simunovich, Ray Villmer, Ellis Bashara, Bobby Nelson, Farmer Jones, Johnny Balbo, Bob McCune, Bud Curtis, Frankie Talaber, Hans Schmidt, and 22 others. Toned tape remnants affecting some of the signatures, otherwise fine condition. RR Auction COA.…(MB $200) www.RRAuction.com | 297


1066. Muhammad Ali

1068. Baseball

MB $200

1069. Baseball Dinners

MB $200

MB $200

1070. Baseball Hall of Famers

1071. Baseball Hall of Famers

1072. Baseball Hall of Famers

1073. Baseball Hall of Famers

1074. Baseball: 2002 All-Star Game

1075. Baseball: Famous Moments

1076. Larry Bird

1077. Boston Celtics

1078. Boston Red Sox: 1954

1079. Boxing

1080. Bryant, Lindros, Stewart, and Rodriguez

1081. Chicago Bears Hall of Famers

MB $200

MB $200

MB $200

298 | April 16, 2014 | SPORTS

MB $200

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1082. Fred Clarke

1083. DiMaggio Brothers MB $200

1084. Joe DiMaggio and Frank Crosetti

1085. Joe DiMaggio

1086. Joe DiMaggio

1087. Joe DiMaggio

1088. Joe DiMaggio

1089. Golf Greats

1090. Golf Greats

1091. Hank Greenberg

1092. Hank Greenberg MB $200

1093. Hockey Hall of Famers

1096. Mickey Mantle

1097. Mickey Mantle

MB $200

MB $200

MB $200

MB $200

1094. Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays MB $200

MB $200

1095. Mantle, Mays, and Snider MB $200

MB $200

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1098. NY Knicks

1099. NY Mets

1100. NY Yankees

1101. NY Yankees: 1961

1102. Manny Pacquiao

1103. Bill Russell and Red Auerbach

1104. St. Louis Cardinals: 1967

1105. Tennis

1107. Roderick Wallace

1108. Ed Walsh MB $200

1109. Williams, Mathews, and Killebrew

1112. Ted Williams

1113. Tiger Woods

MB $200

MB $200

1106. Tennis: Wimbledon Champions MB $200

1110. Ted Williams MB $200

300 | April 16, 2014 | SPORTS

MB $200

MB $200

MB $200

1111. Ted Williams MB $200

MB $200

MB $200

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Terms and Conditions of Sale TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE - AGREEMENT BETWEEN R&R AUCTION COMPANY, LLC AND BIDDER BY EITHER REGISTERING TO BID OR PLACING A BID, THE BIDDER ACCEPTS THESE CONDITIONS OF SALE AND ENTERS INTO A LEGALLY, BINDING, ENFORCEABLE AGREEMENT WITH RR AUCTION. The following terms and conditions constitute the sole terms and conditions under which R&R AUCTION COMPANY (“RR Auction”) will offer for sale and sell the property described in the Catalog. These Conditions of Sale constitute a binding agreement between the Bidder and RR Auction with respect to the auction. By bidding at auction, whether in person, through an agent or representative, by telephone, facsimile, on-line, absentee bid, or by any other form of bid or by any other means, the Bidder acknowledges the thorough reading and understanding of all of these Conditions of Sale, all descriptions of items in the Catalog, and all matters incorporated herein by reference, and agrees to be fully bound thereby. NO BID MAY BE PLACED IN ANY MANNER UNLESS THE BIDDER HAS FULLY REVIEWED AND AGREES TO ALL OF THE “CONDITIONS OF SALE” EITHER PRINTED IN THE CATALOG OR ONLINE, AS WELL AS THE TERMS OF THE REGISTRATION FORM. BY PLACING ANY BID, THE BIDDER REPRESENTS AND WARRANTS TO RR AUCTION THAT HE OR SHE HAS FULLY REVIEWED AND AGREES TO BE BOUND BY ALL OF THESE “CONDITIONS OF SALE” AND THE TERMS OF THE REGISTRATION FORM. WITHOUT SUCH REPRESENTATION, WARRANTY AND AGREEMENT, RR AUCTION WOULD NOT PERMIT THE BIDDER TO BID. Bidder and RR Auction agree that any agreements between the Bidder and RR Auction including but not limited to these Conditions of Sale are entered into in Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County, which is where the agreements are to be performed and the auction to take place, no matter where Bidder is situated and no matter by what means or where Bidder was informed of the auction and regardless of whether catalogs, materials, or other communications were received by Bidder in another location. Both RR Auction and the Bidder agree that any disputes under these Conditions of Sale, the subject matter hereof, the entering into, or any aspect of the auction, shall be exclusively governed by Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County law, and that any and all claims or actions shall be brought and maintained only in Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County. THE PARTIES EXPRESSLY WAIVE ANY RIGHT TO TRIAL BY JURY. The Bidder hereby consents that any dispute shall be presented in confidential binding arbitration before a single selected Arbitrator selected by the American Arbitration Association. The Bidder and RR Auction herby agree that the dispute shall go to binding arbitration in accordance with the commercial rules of the American Arbitration Association. The American Arbitration Association arbitration shall be conducted under the provisions of the Federal Arbitration Act and the Bidder consents to jurisdiction in The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Any dispute, claim, cause of action must be brought within one (1) year of the alleged breach, default or misrepresentation or the claim is waived. After one (1) year, the Bidder hereby releases and discharges RR Auction from any and all legal, equitable, administrative and/or other claims, counterclaims, demands, setoffs, defenses, accounts, suits, debts, dues, actions, causes of action, proceedings, arbitrations, damages, executions, judgments, findings, controversies and disputes, whether known or unknown or suspected or unsuspected, whether in law or equity, that the Bidder have or may have had against RR Auction arising from or relating to any claim whatsoever. Both Bidder and RR Auction agree that these provisions are intended to be binding on all parties in the event of any dispute specifically including third party claims and cross-actions brought by either RR Auction or Bidder, and that absent such agreement, RR Auction would not permit Bidder to bid hereunder. Any violation of the terms of this Paragraph shall entitle RR Auction to reasonable attorney fees and litigation costs in addition to all other available remedies, all of which remain reserved. The Bidder hereby agrees that RR Auction shall be entitled to present these Conditions of Sale to a court in any ju-

risdiction other than set forth in this paragraph as conclusive evidence of the parties’ agreement, and the parties further agree that the court shall immediately dismiss any action filed in such jurisdiction. An award granted in arbitration is enforceable in any court of competent jurisdiction. The arbitrator’s award may be enforced in any court of competent jurisdiction. This agreement and any claims shall be determined and construed under Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County law. RR Auction is in compliance, to the fullest extent possible, with Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County procedures regarding the bonding of auctioneers. Auctioneer and Auction: 1. This Auction is presented by RR Auction, a d/b/a/ of R&R Auction Company, LLC, as identified with the applicable licensing information on the title page of the catalog or on the www.RRauction.com Internet site (the “Auctioneer”). The Auction is conducted under these Terms and Conditions of Sale and applicable state and local law. Announcements and corrections from the podium at live auctions and those made through the Terms and Conditions of Sale appearing on the Internet at RRauction.com supersede those in the printed catalog. Bidder/Bidders: 2. “Bidder” or “Bidders” shall mean the original Bidder of the property from RR Auction and not any subsequent owner or other person who may acquire or have acquired an interest therein. If Bidder is an agent, the agency must be disclosed in writing to RR Auction prior to the time of sale, otherwise the benefits of the warranty shall be limited to the agent and not transferable to the undisclosed principal. 3. The rights granted to Bidders under these Terms and Conditions of Sale are personal and may not be assigned or transferred to any other person or entity, whether by operation of law or otherwise. Any attempt to assign or transfer any such rights shall be absolutely void and unenforceable. No third party may rely on any benefit or right conferred on any Bidder by these Terms and Conditions of Sale. 4. Bids will not be accepted from minor persons under eighteen (18) years of age without a parent’s written consent containing an acknowledgment that the Terms and Conditions of Sale herein and indicating their agreement to be bound thereby on behalf of the Bidder. 5. Any person participating or registering for the Auction agrees to be bound by and accepts these Terms and Conditions of Sale. 6. All Bidders must meet Auctioneer’s qualifications to bid. Any Bidder who is not a client in good standing of RR Auction may be disqualified at RR Auction’s sole option and will not be awarded lots. Such determination may be made by RR Auction in its sole and unlimited discretion, at any time prior to, during, or even after the close of the Auction. RR Auction reserves the right to exclude any person from the auction. 7. If an entity places a bid, then the person executing the bid on behalf of the entity agrees to personally guarantee payment for any successful bid. 8. By accepting the Terms and Conditions of Sale, Bidder personally and unconditionally guarantees payment. If the Bidder is a corporation, the officers, directors, and principals of the corporation hereby agree to personally and unconditionally guarantee payment as part of the corporation’s agreement to bid. The authorized representative of any corporate Bidder who is present at the sale shall provide RR Auction or its agent, prior to the commencement of the bidding (or at the time of registration), with a statement signed by each principal, director and officer that they each personally and unconditionally guarantee any payment due RR Auction Credit: 9. In order to place bids, Bidders who have not established credit with the Auctioneer must either furnish satisfactory credit information (including two collectibles-related business references) or supply valid credit card information, well in advance of the Auction. Bidders who are not members of RRAuction.com should pre-register before the close of the Auction to allow adequate time to contact references. Credit will be granted at the discretion of Auctioneer. Additionally Bidders who have not previously established credit or who wish to bid in excess of their established credit history may be required to provide their social


security number or the last four digits thereof so a credit check may be performed prior to Auctioneer’s acceptance of a bid. Check writing privileges and immediate delivery of merchandise may also be determined by pre-approval of credit based on a combination of criteria: RRAuction.com history, related industry references, bank verification, a credit bureau report and/or a personal guarantee for a corporate or partnership entity in advance of the auction venue. Buyer’s Premium: 10. The Bidder acknowledges and agrees that a 22.5% buyer’s premium will be added to the hammer price on all individual lots, with a 2.5% discount for those paying by cash, check or wire. RR Auction may accept a current and valid VISA or MasterCard, credit or debit cards and/or PayPal for payment of an invoice totaling $5,000.00 or less, under the express condition that any property purchased by credit or debit card shall not be refundable, returnable, or exchangeable, and that no credit to Buyer’s credit or debit card account will be issued under any circumstances. The last sentence constitutes RR Auction’s “official policy” regarding returns, refunds, and exchanges where credit or debit cards are used. For payment other than by cash, delivery will not be made unless and until full payment has been received by RR Auction, i.e., check has fully cleared or credit or debit card funds have been fully obtained. Unless otherwise agreed in writing, signed by RR Auction, payment in full is due within thirteen (13) calendar days of the auction or within twelve (12) calendar days of the invoice date, whichever is later. Bidding: 11. By submitting a bid, whether online, in person, by mail, by phone, by facsimile or through an employee or agent, the Bidder acknowledges (i) receipt of the catalogue, (ii) that the Bidder has read the Terms and Conditions of Sale and the descriptions for the lots on which they have bid, and (iii) that they agree to adhere to these Terms and Conditions of Sale. 12. Each Bidder’s determination of its bid should be based upon its own examination of the item(s), rather than the strict reliance as to what is represented in this Catalogue, online or elsewhere. In any purchase or sale, the value of the item(s) is determined by the price. THE BIDDER HEREBY ASSUMES ALL RISKS OF VALUATION CONCERNING ANY AND ALL PURCHASES. 13. RR AUCTION IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ERRORS IN BIDDING. A Bidder should make certain to bid on the correct lot and that the bid is the maximum (plus the 22.5% Buyer’s Premium) that the Bidder is willing and able to pay. Since other Bidders (by mail, facsimile and in person) will be present, and since a re-offering could damage the momentum of the sale, once the hammer has fallen and the Auctioneer has announced the winning Bidder, such Bidder is unconditionally bound to pay for the lot, even if the Bidder has made a mistake. 14. If the description of any lot in the catalogue is incorrect (e.g. gross cataloging error), the lot is returnable if returned within five (5) calendar days of receipt, and received by RR Auction no later than twenty-one (21) calendar days after the sale date. NO RETURN OR REFUND OF ANY AUCTION LOT WILL BE CONSIDERED EXCEPT BY REASON OF LACK OF AUTHENTICITY, UNLESS OTHERWISE PROVIDED IN THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE. 15. All prospective Bidders who examine lots in person prior to the sale shall personally assume all responsibility for any damage they cause in so doing. RR Auction shall have sole discretion in determining the value of the damage caused, which shall be promptly paid by the prospective Bidder. 16. Title to any lot remains with Consignor, any secured party of the Consignor, or assignee of Consignor, as the case may be, until the lot is paid for in full by Bidder. RR Auction reserves the right to require payment in full before delivering any lot to the successful Bidder. 17. It is the Bidder’s responsibility and obligation to have the lots fully insured while in their possession. Bidder assumes any and all RISK OF LOSS once the lot(s) is in Bidder’s possession. 18. Bidder grants to RR Auction or its assigns the right to offset any sums due, or found to be due by RR Auction, and to make such offset from any past, subsequent or future consignment, or items acquired by

Bidder in possession or control of RR Auction or from any sums due to Bidder by RR Auction. Bidder further grants RR Auction a purchase money security interest in such sums or items to the extent applicable, and agrees to execute such documents as may be reasonably necessary to grant RR Auction such security interest. Bidder agrees that RR Auction and its assigns shall be a secured party with respect to items bought by Bidder and in the possession of RR Auction, to the extent of the maximum indebtedness, plus all accrued expenses, until the indebtedness is paid. 19. By bidding in this sale, Bidder personally and unconditionally guarantees payment. If the Bidder is a corporation, the officers, directors, and principals of the corporation hereby agree to personally and unconditionally guarantee payment as part of the corporation’s agreement to bid. The authorized representative of any corporate Bidder who is present at the sale shall provide RR Auction or its agent, prior to the commencement of the bidding (or at the time of registration), with a statement signed by each principal, director and officer that they each personally and unconditionally guarantee any payment due RR Auction. 20. RR Auction may at its sole and absolute discretion, make loans or advances to Consignors and/or prospective Bidders. 21. If a dispute arises concerning ownership of a lot that has been bid upon during the course of the sale, RR Auction reserves the right to commence a statutory interpleader proceeding at the expense of the Consignor and successful Bidder and any other applicable party, and in such event shall be entitled to its reasonable attorney’s fees and costs. 22. In the event of a successful challenge to the title to any goods purchased, RR Auction agrees to reimburse any Bidder in an amount equal to the successful bid price actually paid by Bidder at auction plus any Buyer’s Commission actually paid, in full and complete satisfaction of all claims, which once tendered by RR Auction, relieves and releases RR Auction from any responsibility whatsoever to the Bidder, even if the instrument is not cashed or is returned. Bidding Options: 23. Non-Internet bids (including but not limited to podium, fax, phone and mail bids) are treated similar to floor bids in that they must be onincrement. Any podium, fax, phone, or mail bids that do not conform to a full increment will be rounded up or down to the nearest full increment and this revised amount will be considered your high bid. 24. When identical mail or FAX bids are submitted, preference is given to the first received. To ensure the greatest accuracy, written bids should be entered on the standard printed bid sheet and be received at RR Auction’s place of business at least twenty-four (24) hours before the Auction start. Auctioneer is not responsible for executing mail bids or FAX bids received on or after the day the first lot is sold, nor Internet bids submitted after the published closing time; nor is Auctioneer responsible for proper execution of bids submitted by telephone, mail, FAX, e-mail, Internet, or in person once the Auction begins. 25. In internet only Auctions, bids on an item must raise the current high bid by at least 10%. Bids will be accepted in whole dollar amounts only. No “buy” or “unlimited” bids will be accepted. In a live sale, bids on an item can change at the discretion of the auctioneer. 26. RR Auction reserves the right to accept or decline any bid. Bids must be for an entire lot and each lot constitutes a separate sale. All bids are per lot unless otherwise announced. Live auction lots will be sold in their numbered sequence unless the Auctioneer directs otherwise. It is unlawful and illegal for Bidders to collude, pool, or agree with another Bidder to pay less than the fair value for lot(s). Bidders participating in both live and online auctions acknowledge that the law provides for substantial penalties in the form of treble damages and attorneys’ fees and costs for those who violate these provisions. For live auctions the auctioneer will have final discretion in the event that any dispute should arise between bidders. The auctioneer will determine the successful bidder, cancel the sale, or re-offer and resell the lot or lots in dispute. RR Auction will have final discretion to resolve any disputes arising after the sale and in online auctions. If any dispute arises our sale record is conclusive.


Payment: 27a. Subject to fulfillment of all of the Terms and Conditions of Sale set forth herein, at the close of the Auction, title to the offered lot will pass to the highest bidder acknowledged by RR Auction, and such bidder thereupon (a) assumes full risk and responsibility (including without limitation, liability for or damage to frames or glass covering prints, paintings, photos, or other works), and (b) will immediately pay the full purchase price or such part as we may require. In addition to other remedies available to RR Auction by law, RR Auction reserves the right to impose from the date of sale a late charge of 1.5% per month of the total purchase price if payment is not made in accordance with the conditions set forth herein. All property must be removed from RR Auction’s premises by the Bidder at his/her expense not later than thirteen (13) business days following its sale and if it is not so removed, (i) a handling charge of 1% of the total purchase price per month from the 13th day after the sale until its removal will be payable to RR Auction by the Bidder, with a minimum of 5% of the total purchase price for any property not so removed within 60 days after the sale, and (ii) RR Auction may send the purchased property to a public warehouse for the account, at the risk and expense of the Bidder. 27b. All purchases are subject to the Massachusetts 6.25% sales tax unless the purchaser possesses a Massachusetts sales tax exemption number. Exemption numbers from other states are accepted in Massachusetts if presented with a business card or letterhead. Dealers, museums, and other qualifying parties can apply for a Massachusetts exemption number prior to the auction by contacting the Massachusetts Department of Corporations and Taxation at 100 Cambridge Street in Boston. 28. Payment is due upon closing of the Auction session, or upon presentment of an invoice. Auctioneer reserves the right to void an invoice if payment in full is not received within thirteen (13) calendar days of the auction or within twelve (12) calendar days of the invoice date. In cases of nonpayment, Auctioneer’s election to void a sale does not relieve the Bidder from their obligation to pay Auctioneer its fees (seller’s and buyer’s premium) on the lot and any other damages pertaining to the lot. 29. All sales are strictly for cash in United States dollars (including U.S. currency, bank wire, cashier checks, eChecks, and bank money orders, and are subject to all reporting requirements). All deliveries are subject to good funds; funds being received in RR Auction’s account before delivery of the Purchases; and all payments are subject to a clearing period. RR Auction reserves the right to determine if a check constitutes “good funds”: checks drawn on a U.S. bank are subject to a ten (10) business day hold, and ten (10) days when drawn on an international bank. Clients with pre-arranged credit status may receive immediate credit for payments via Check, personal or corporate checks. All others will be subject to a hold of five (5) days, or more, for the funds to clear prior to releasing merchandise. 30. In the event that a Bidder’s payment is dishonored upon presentment(s), Bidder shall pay the maximum statutory processing fee set by applicable state law. If Bidder attempts to pay via Check and the financial institution denies the transfer from Bidder’s bank account, or the payment cannot be completed using the selected funding source, Bidder agrees to complete payment. 31. If any Auction invoice submitted by Auctioneer is not paid in full when due, the unpaid balance will bear interest at the highest rate permitted by law from the date of invoice until paid. Any invoice not paid when due will bear a one and one-half per cent (1.5%) late fee on the invoice amount. If the Auctioneer refers any invoice to an attorney for collection, the buyer agrees to pay attorney’s fees, court costs, and other collection costs incurred by Auctioneer. If Auctioneer assigns collection to its house counsel, such attorney’s time expended on the matter shall be compensated at a rate comparable to the hourly rate of independent attorneys. 32. If any applicable conditions herein are not complied with the Bidder will be in default and in addition to any and all other remedies available to RR Auction and the Consignor by law, including, without limitation, the right to hold the Bidder liable for the total purchase price, including all fees, charges and expenses more fully set forth herein, RR Auction, may (a) cancel the sale of that, or any other lots sold to the defaulting Bidder at the same or any other auction, retaining as

liquidated damages all payments made by the Bidder, or (b) resell the purchased property, whether at public auction or by private sale, or (c) effect any combination thereof. In any case, the Bidder will be liable for any deficiency, any and all costs, handling charges, late charges, expenses of both sales, RR Auction’s commissions on both sales at our regular rates, legal fees and expenses, collection fees and incidental damages. RR Auction may apply any proceeds of sale then due or thereafter becoming due to the Bidder from RR Auction or any affiliated company, or any payment made by the Bidder to RR Auction or any affiliated company, where or not intended to reduce the Bidder’s obligations with respect to the unpaid lot or lots, to the deficiency and any other amounts due to RR Auction or any affiliated companies. In addition, a defaulting Bidder will be deemed to have granted and assigned to RR Auction a continuing security interest of first priority in any property or money of RR Auction’s owing to such Bidder in RR Auction’s possession, and RR Auction may retain and apply such property or money as collateral security for the obligations due to RR Auction. Payment will not be deemed to have been made in full until RR Auction has collected good funds. In the event the Bidder fails to pay any or all of the total purchase price for any lot and RR Auction elects to pay the Consignor any portion of the sale proceeds, the Bidder acknowledges that RR Auction shall have all of the rights of the Consignor to pursue the Bidder for any amounts paid to the Consignor, whether at law, in equity, or under these Terms and Conditions of Sale. 33. Auctioneer shall have a lien against the merchandise purchased by the buyer to secure payment of the Auction invoice. Auctioneer is further granted a lien and the right to retain possession of any other property of the buyer then held by the Auctioneer or its affiliates to secure payment of any Auction invoice or any other amounts due the Auctioneer or affiliates from the buyer. With respect to these lien rights, Auctioneer shall have all the rights of a secured creditor, including but not limited to the right of sale. In addition, with respect to payment of the Auction invoice(s), the buyer waives any and all rights of offset he might otherwise have against the Auctioneer and the consignor of the merchandise included on the invoice. If a Bidder owes Auctioneer or its affiliates on any account, Auctioneer and its affiliates shall have the right to offset such unpaid account by any credit balance due Bidder, and it may secure by possessory lien any unpaid amount by any of the Bidder’s property in their possession. 34. Title shall not pass to the successful Bidder until all invoices are paid in full. It is the responsibility of the buyer to provide adequate insurance coverage for the items once they have been delivered to a common carrier or third-party shipper. 35. Please send PayPal payments to FinanceDepartment@rrauction. com. All checks, cashiers checks or money orders are payable to R&R Auction Company, LLC. Orders paid by cashier check, money order, wire, Pay Pal or credit card are shipped upon receipt. Delivery; Shipping; and Handling Charges: 36. Bidder is liable for shipping and handling. Auctioneer is unable to combine purchases from other auctions or affiliates into one package for shipping purposes. Lots won will be shipped in a commercially reasonable time after payment in good funds for the merchandise and the shipping fees is received or credit extended, except when third-party shipment occurs. Bidder agrees that Service and Handling charges related to shipping items which are not pre-paid may be charged to the credit card on file with Auctioneer. Unless otherwise specifically indicated, all merchandise is stored at Auctioneer’s facilities in Amherst, New Hampshire. The purchases shall be shipped from that facility unless bidder makes arrangements to take possession at the facility. 37. Successful international Bidders shall provide written shipping instructions, including specified Customs declarations, to the Auctioneer for any lots to be delivered outside of the United States. NOTE: Declaration value shall be the item’(s) hammer price together with its buyer’s premium and Auctioneer shall use the correct harmonized code for the lot. Domestic Buyers on lots designated for third-party shipment must designate the common carrier, accept risk of loss, and prepay shipping costs. Title: 38. On the fall of the auctioneer’s hammer, title to the offered lot will pass to the highest bidder acknowledged by RR Auction but fully sub-


ject to Buyer’s compliance with all of the terms of the Conditions of Sale and the Registration Form. Rights Reserved: 39. RR Auction reserves the right to withdraw any lot before or at the time of the auction, and/or to postpone the auction of all or any lots or parts thereof, for any reason. RR Auction shall not be liable to any Bidder in the event of such withdrawal or postponement under any circumstances. RR Auction reserves the right to refuse to accept bids from anyone. Conducting the Auction: 40. RR Auction reserves the right to postpone the auction sale or any session thereof for a reasonable period of time for any reason whatsoever, and no Bidder or prospective Bidder shall have any claim as a result thereof, including consequential damages. 41. RR Auction reserves the right to withdraw any lot at any time, even after the hammer has fallen, until the Bidder has taken physical possession of the lot. No Consignor who has registered to bid at the sale (or at any other time unless otherwise provided in the consignment agreement), or any Bidder or prospective Bidder shall have a right to claim any consequential damages if a lot is withdrawn, even after the sale. 42. The highest qualified Bidder recognized by the Auctioneer shall be the Buyer. In the event of a tie bid, the earliest bid received or recognized wins. In the event of any dispute between any Bidders at an Auction, Auctioneer may at his sole discretion reoffer the lot. Auctioneer’s decision and declaration of the winning Bidder shall be final and binding upon all Bidders. Bids properly offered, whether by floor Bidder or other means of bidding, may on occasion be missed or go unrecognized; in such cases, the Auctioneer may declare the recognized bid accepted as the winning bid, regardless of whether a competing bid may have been higher. Auctioneer reserves the right after the hammer falls to accept bids and reopen bidding for bids placed through the Internet or otherwise. 43. Lots bearing bidding estimates shall open at Auctioneer’s discretion. In the event that no bid meets or exceeds that opening amount, the lot shall pass as unsold. 44. All items are to be purchased per lot as numerically indicated and no lots will be broken unless decided by RR Auction. Auctioneer reserves the right to withdraw, prior to the close, any lots from the Auction. 45. Auctioneer reserves the right to rescind the sale in the event of nonpayment, breach of a warranty, disputed ownership, failure to execute the reserve, auctioneer’s clerical error or omission in exercising bids and reserves, or for any other reason and in Auctioneer’s sole discretion. 46. Auctioneer occasionally experiences Internet and/or Server service outages, and Auctioneer periodically schedules system downtime for maintenance and other purposes, during which Bidders cannot participate or place bids. If such outages occur, RR Auction may at our discretion extend bidding for the Auction. Bidders unable to place their Bids through the Internet are directed to contact Client Services at 1-603-732-4280. 47. The Auctioneer has the right to sell certain unsold items after the close of the Auction. Such lots shall be considered sold during the Auction and all these Terms and Conditions shall apply to such sales including but not limited to the Buyer’s Premium, return rights, and disclaimers. Internet Auction – Extended bidding & the 30 Minute Rule: 48. Any bidder may bid on any lot prior to 6 pm. At that time, the Extended Bidding goes into effect. If you have not bid on a lot before 6 pm, you may not bid on that lot after 6 pm. Only those bidders who have placed bids on a lot before 6 pm will be allowed to bid on that lot after 6 pm. If you are the only bidder on a lot at 6 pm, that lot is awarded to you. During the extended bidding period, a lot will remain open only to those who bid on that lot prior to 6 pm. All lots WITHOUT an opening bid at 6 pm will remain OPEN to ALL bidders until 7 pm or until they receive their first bid. These lots will close immediately upon receipt of

a bid or at 7 pm, whichever comes first. For all lots that are active after 7 pm, bidding will remain open until 30 minutes pass without a bid being placed on THAT lot. The 30 Minute Rule is applied on a PER LOT BASIS; each lot in the auction closes individually based on bidding activity after 7 pm. On a PER LOT BASIS, the 30 minute timer will reset each time a bid is placed after 7 pm. If you are the high bidder, raising your maximum bid will NOT reset the timer. RR Auction reserves the right to close the auction at any time at its sole discretion. Auctioneer’s Discretion: 49. RR Auction shall determine opening bids and bidding increments. The auctioneer has the right in its absolute discretion to reject any bid in the event of dispute between bidders or if the auctioneer has doubt as to the validity of any bid, to advance the bidding at its absolute discretion and to determine the successful bidder in the event of a dispute between bidders, to continue the bidding or to reoffer and resell the lot in question. In the event of a dispute after the sale, RR Auction’s record of final sale shall be conclusive. The auctioneer also may reject any bid and withdraw the lot from sale if the auctioneer decides either that any opening bid is below the reserve of the lot or article or that an advance is insufficient. Unless otherwise announced by the auctioneer at the time of sale, no lots may be divided for the purpose of sale. Reserves: 50. Lots may be subject to a reserve which is the confidential minimum price below which the lot will not be sold. Consignors may not bid on their own lots or property. Off-Site Bidding: 51. Bidding by telephone, facsimile-transmission (fax-in), on-line, or absentee bidding (advance written bids submitted by mail) are offered solely as a convenience and permitted subject to advance arrangements, availability, and RR Auction’s approval which shall be exercised at RR Auction’s sole discretion. Neither RR Auction nor its agents or employees shall be held liable for the failure to execute bids or for errors relating to any transmission or execution thereof. In order to be considered for off-site bidding in any manner, Bidders must comply with all of these Conditions of Sale and the terms contained on the Registration Form. RR Auction’ Remedies: 52. Failure of the Bidder/Buyer to comply with any of these Conditions of Sale or the terms of the Registration Form is an event of default. In such event, RR Auction may, in addition to any other available remedies specifically including the right to hold the defaulting Bidder/Buyer liable for the Purchase Price or to charge and collect from the defaulting Bidder/Buyer’s credit or debit accounts as provided for elsewhere herein: (a) cancel the sale, retaining any payment made by the Buyer as damages (the Bidder/Buyer understands and acknowledges that RR Auction will be substantially damaged should such default occur, and that damages under sub-part (a) are necessary to compensate RR Auction for such damages; (b) resell the property without reserve at public auction or privately; (c) charge the Bidder/Buyer interest on the Purchase Price at the rate of one and one-half per cent (1.5%) per month or the highest allowable interest rate; (d) take any other action that RR Auction, in its sole discretion, deems necessary or appropriate to preserve and protect RR Auction’ rights and remedies. Should RR Auction resell the property, the original defaulting buyer shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs and expenses associated there with, including but not limited to warehousing, sales-related expenses, reasonable attorney fees and court costs, commissions, incidental damages and any other charges due hereunder which were not collected or collectable. In the event that such buyer is the successful bidder on more than one lot and pays less than the purchase price for the total lots purchased, RR Auction shall apply the payment received to such lot or lots that RR Auction, in its sole discretion, deems appropriate. If RR Auction does not exercise such discretion, the lots to which the payment shall be applied will be in descending order from the highest purchase price to the lowest. Any buyer failing to comply with these Conditions of Sale shall be deemed to have granted RR Auction a security interest in, and RR Auction may retain as collateral such security for such buyer’s obligations to RR Auction, any property in RR Auction’ possession owned by such buyer. RR Auction shall have the benefit of all rights of a secured party under


the Uniform Commercial Code (U.C.C.) as adopted by The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Warranties: 53. RR Auction does not provide any warranties to Bidders or Buyers, whether expressed or implied, beyond those expressly provided for in these Conditions of Sale. All property and lots are sold “as is” and “where is”. By way of illustration rather than limitation, neither RR Auction nor the consignor makes any representation or warranty, expressed or implied, as to merchant ability or fitness for intended use, condition of the property (including any condition report), correctness of description, origin, measurement, quality, rarity, importance, exhibition, relevance, attribution, source, provenance, date, authorship, condition, culture, genuineness, value, or period of the property. Additionally, neither RR Auction nor the consignor makes any representation or warranty, expressed or implied, as to whether the Buyer acquires rights in copyright or other intellectual property (including exhibition or reproduction rights) or whether the property is subject to any limitations or other rights. RR Auction does not make any representation or warranty as to title. 54. All descriptions, photographs, illustrations, and terminology including but not limited to words describing condition (including any condition reports requested by Bidder, see also Generally Terminology), authorship, period, culture, source, origin, measurement, quality, rarity, provenance, importance, exhibition, and relevance, used in the catalog, bill of sale, invoice, or anywhere else, represent a good faith effort made by RR Auction to fairly represent the lots and property offered for sale as to origin, date, condition, and other information contained therein; they are statements of opinion only. They are not representations or warranties and Bidder agrees and acknowledges that he or she shall not rely on them in determining whether or not to bid or for what price. Price estimates (which are determined well in advance of the auction and are therefore subject to revision) and condition reports are provided solely as a convenience to Bidders and are not intended nor shall they be relied on by Bidders as statements, representations or warranties of actual value or predictions of final bid prices. 55. Bidders are accorded the opportunity to inspect the lots and to otherwise satisfy themselves as to the nature and sufficiency of each lot prior to bidding, and RR Auction urges Bidders to avail themselves accordingly. 56. FIREARMS. Auctioneer complies with all Federal and State rules and regulations relating to the purchasing, registration and shipping of firearms. A Bidder is required to provide appropriate documents and the payment of associated fees, if any. Bidder is responsible for providing a shipping address that is suitable for the receipt of a firearm. Important Notice: Many identical versions of props and costumes are created for film and television productions in the normal course of a production. RR Auction does not warrant or represent that the screen shots referenced are exact images of the offered item (unless specifically noted in the written description). Use of a screen shot does not constitute a warranty or representation of authenticity or provenance. There is not a right of return or refund based upon a claim arising out of or pertaining to any reference to a screen shot. 57. Lots and property are not returnable to RR Auction for any reason except under Buyer’s limited Remedies set forth in Sections 58 and 59 below and under the express terms and conditions of Section 58. Limitation of Damages: 58. In the event that RR Auction is prevented for any reason from delivering any property to Buyer or Buyer is otherwise dissatisfied with the performance of RR Auction, the liability, if any, of RR Auction, shall be limited to, and shall not exceed, the amount actually paid for the property by Buyer. In no event shall RR Auction be liable for incidental, special, indirect, exemplary or consequential damages of any kind, including but not limited to loss of profits, value of investment or opportunity cost. Unauthorized Statements: 59. Under no circumstances is any employee, agent or representative of RR Auction authorized by RR Auction to modify, amend, waive or contradict any of these Terms and Conditions of Sale, any term or condition set forth on the Registration Form, any warranty or limitation

or exclusion of warranty, any term or condition in either the Registration Form or these Terms and Conditions regarding payment requirements, including but not limited to due date, manner of payment, and what constitutes payment in full, or any other term or condition contained in any documents issued by RR Auction unless such modification, amendment, waiver or contradiction is contained in a writing signed by all parties. Any statements, oral or written, made by employees, agents or representatives of RR Auction to Bidder, including statements regarding specific lots, even if such employee, agent or representative represents that such statement is authorized, unless reduced to a writing signed by all parties, are statements of personal opinion only and are not binding on RR Auction, and under no circumstances shall be relied on by Bidder as a statement, representation or warranty of RR Auction. Buyer’s Remedies: 60. Under no circumstance will RR Auction incur liability to a Bidder in excess of the purchase price actually paid. The terms and conditions of sale herein described shall be enforced in accordance with, and governed by the laws of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 61. This section sets forth the sole and exclusive remedies of Buyer in conformity with Sections 51-55 (“Warranties”) and 56 (“Limitation of Damages”) herein, and is expressly in lieu of any other rights or remedies which might be available to Buyer by law. The Buyer hereby accepts the benefit of the consignor’s warranty of title and any other representations and warranties made by the consignor for the Buyer’s benefit. In the event that Buyer proves in writing to RR Auction satisfaction that there was a breach of the consignor’s warranty of title concerning a lot purchased by Buyer, RR Auction shall make demand upon the consignor to pay to Buyer the Purchase Price (including any premiums, taxes, or other amounts paid or due to RR Auction). Should the consignor not pay the Purchase Price to Buyer within thirty days after such demand, RR Auction shall disclose the identity of the consignor to Buyer and assign to Buyer all of RR Auction’ rights against the consignor with respect to such lot or property. Upon such disclosure and assignment, all responsibility and liability, if any, of RR Auction with respect to said lot or property shall automatically terminate. RR Auction shall be entitled to retain the premiums and other amounts paid to RR Auction - this remedy is as to the consignor only. The rights and remedies provided herein are for the original Buyer only and they may not be assigned or relied upon by any transferee or assignee under any circumstances. 62. All Lots sold by RR Auction are accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity. On any lot presented with a Certificate of Authenticity (“COA”) issued by RR Auction, that warranty insures only to the original Bidder (as shown in Auctioneer’s records) “Bidder”. Bidder may not transfer the rights afforded under the COA and it is null and void when Bidder transfers or attempts to transfer the lot. The COA warranty is valid from date of the auction in which Bidder was awarded the lot to five (5) years after its purchase. The COA warranty is valid as to its attribution to the person or entity described or to the lot’s usage. The Bidder as well as their heirs, successors and assigns is also given an unconditional lifetime guaranteed that allows the present owner of any lot purchased through RR Auction the right to consign with RR Auction. When the lot is accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity (or its equivalent) from a third-party authentication provider, buyer has no right of return. On lots not accompanied by third-party authentication or under extremely limited circumstances not including authenticity (e.g. gross cataloging error), a Bidder who did not bid from the floor may request Auctioneer to evaluate voiding a sale; such request must be made in writing detailing the alleged gross error, and submission of the lot to Auctioneer must be pre-approved by Auctioneer. A Bidder must notify the appropriate department head in writing of the Bidder’s request within three (3) days of the non-floor bidder’s receipt of the lot. Any lot that is to be evaluated for return must be received at the office of RR Auction within 35 days after Auction. AFTER THAT 35 DAY PERIOD, NO LOT MAY BE RETURNED FOR ANY REASONS. Lots returned must be in the same condition as when sold and must include any Certificate of Authenticity. If a bidder wishes to challenge the Letter of Authenticity within the five (5) year warranty period, Bidder must present with the claim, authoritative written evidence that the lot is not authentic as determined by a known expert in the field. If Auctioneer concurs that the lot is not as represented, Bidder shall be refunded


their purchase price. If the Auctioneer denies the claim, the Bidder may file the dispute with the American Arbitration Association with locale in Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County, before a single selected Arbitrator selected by the American Arbitration Association. The American Arbitration Association arbitration shall be conducted under the provisions of the Federal Arbitration Act and the Bidder consents to jurisdiction in The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The challenge to Authenticity must be brought within one (1) year if the Auctioneer denies the claim. After one (1) year, the Bidder hereby releases and discharges RR Auction from any and all legal, equitable, administrative and/or other claims, counterclaims, demands, setoffs, defenses, accounts, suits, debts, dues, actions, causes of action, proceedings, arbitrations, damages, executions, judgments, findings, controversies and disputes, whether known or unknown or suspected or unsuspected, whether in law or equity, that the Bidder have or may have had against RR Auction arising from or relating to any claim whatsoever. Specifically, the COA provided by RR Auction, does not provide for incidental or consequential damages or other indirect damages. Any lot sold with a certificate of authenticity or other warranty from an entity other than Auctioneer is subject to such issuing entity’s rules and such conditions are the sole remedy afforded to Bidder. For information as to third party authentication warranties the bidder is directed to contact RR Auction. RR Auction’ Additional Services: 63. For Buyers who do not remove purchased property from RR Auction’ premises, RR Auction, in its sole discretion and solely as a service and accommodation to Buyers, may arrange to have purchased lots packed, insured and forwarded at the sole request, expense, and risk of Buyer. RR Auction assumes no and disclaims all responsibility and liability for acts or omissions in such packing or shipping by RR Auction or other packers and carriers, whether or not recommended by RR Auction. RR Auction assumes no and disclaims all responsibility and liability for damage to frames, glass or other breakable items. Where RR Auction arranges and bills for such services via invoice or credit card, RR Auction will include an administration charge. Headings: 64. Headings are for convenience only and shall not be used to interpret the substantive sections to which they refer. Entire Agreement: 65. These Conditions of Sale constitute the entire agreement between the parties together with the terms and conditions contained in the Registration Form. They may not be amended, modified or superseded except in a signed writing executed by all parties. No oral or written statement by anyone employed by RR Auction or acting as agent or representative of RR Auction may amend, modify, waive or supersede the terms herein unless such amendment, waiver or modification is contained in a writing signed by all parties. 66. If any section of these Terms and Conditions of Sale or any term or provision of any section is held to be invalid, void, or unenforceable by any court of competent jurisdiction, the remaining sections or terms and provisions of a section shall continue in full force and effect without being impaired or invalidated in any way. 67. These Terms and Conditions of Sale and the auction shall be construed and enforced in accordance with, and governed by, the laws of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, whether or not the auction is and these Terms and Conditions of Sale are fully performed in Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County.

AUCTION GENERAL GUIDELINES Conditions of Sale: Before you bid, you must read the Terms and Conditions of Sale, immediately preceding these pages. They represent a contract between RR Auction and you, and they contain important terms and conditions such as jurisdiction, payment terms, warranties and remedies. The Conditions of Sale are controlling over these general guidelines in the event of any conflicts between their respective terms. Estimate Prices: In addition to descriptive information, each item in the catalog some-

times includes a price range which reflects opinion as to the price expected at auction. In other instances, estimate prices can be obtained by calling RR Auction at (603) 732-4280. The Estimate Prices are based upon various factors including prices recently paid at auction for comparable property, condition, rarity, quality, history and provenance. Estimates are prepared well in advance of the sale and subject to revision. Estimates do not include the buyer’s premium or sales tax (see under separate heading). Reserves: The reserve is the minimum price the seller is willing to accept and below which a lot will not be sold. Owned or Guaranteed Property: RR Auction generally offers property consigned by others for sale at public auction; in very limited occasion, lots are offered that are the property of RR Auction. Buyer’s Premium and Sales Tax: The Bidder acknowledges and agrees that a 22.5% buyer’s premium will be added to the hammer price on all individual lots, with a 2.5% discount for those paying by cash, check or wire. RR Auction may accept a current and valid VISA or MasterCard, credit or debit cards and/ or PayPal for payment of an invoice totaling $5,000.00 or less, under the express condition that any property purchased by credit or debit card shall not be refundable, returnable, or exchangeable, and that no credit to Buyer’s credit or debit card account will be issued under any circumstances. All purchases are subject to the Massachusetts 6.25% sales tax unless the purchaser possesses a Massachusetts sales tax exemption number. Before the Auction: You may attend pre-sale viewing for all of our auctions at no charge. All property to be auctioned is usually on view for several days prior to the sale. You are encouraged to examine lots thoroughly. You may also request condition reports (see below). RR Auction’s staff are available at viewings and by appointment. Contact Information: 5 Rt 101A, Suite 5 • Amherst, NH 03031 Local/International: 1-603-732-4280 Local/Int’l fax: 1-603-732-4288 Website: www.RRAuction.com Email bidding: Bid@RRAuction.com Hours of Operation: Office hours are Mon-Fri, 9 a.m. -5 p.m. eastern standard time; hours on the last night of the auction are dictated by the 30 Minute Rule (see below). Any item in the auction can be viewed in our offices during normal business hours. Please call to set up an appointment. You must acknowledge having read your agreement with all of the Terms and Conditions of Sale prior to your registration and prior to your bidding on any lot. Bidding Live Auction: Property is auctioned in consecutive numerical order, as it appears in the catalog. The auctioneer will accept bids from those present in the salesroom or absentee bidders participating by telephone, internet or by written bid left with RR Auction in advance of the auction. The auctioneer may also execute a bid on behalf of the consignor to protect the reserve, either by entering a bid in response to salesroom, telephone or absentee bids. Under no circumstances will the auctioneer place any bid on behalf of the consignor at or above the reserve. The auctioneer will not specifically identify bids placed on behalf of the consignor to protect the reserve. Maximum Bids – Internet Auction Only: To maximize your chance of winning, we strongly encourage the use of maximum bids. For example, assume an item you want currently has a high bid of $100. Your bid would then be $110 (10% over $100), and you could tell us, “I’d like a maximum bid of $242 for that item.” We will enter your bid at $110, and we will then bid for you until the lot reaches your maximum of $242. If competitive bids only reach $148, you would win the item at $163—10% over the highest previous bid. To prevent


tie bids, all maximum bids should be made in proper increments. Maximum bids are strictly confidential. Placing arbitrary, non-incremental bids on lots with prior maximum bids may result in these lots being sold for less than 10% above the under bidder’s bid. Bid Increments: Bids on an item must raise the current high bid by at least 10% or at the discretion of the auctioneer. Checking Bids – Internet Auction Only: You can open, monitor, and/or raise bids as often as you wish. However, all bidding is governed by the 30 Minute Rule and extended bidding. Extended bidding always goes into effect at 6 pm on the last day of the auction. At 7 pm, the extended bidding ends and the 30 Minute Rule goes into effect. Callbacks – Internet Auction Only: RRAuction offers a callback service on auction night for any bidder who has the high bid on an item whose current bid is over $1,000 and who has placed a maximum bid. At your request, we will call you if your maximum bid is topped. We will need your correct telephone number(s) where you can be reached until the auction closes. Callbacks begin after 6 pm on auction night. You must request this service; it is not automatic. We make every effort to ensure that bidders who request a callback are contacted if outbid; however, we do not guarantee this service. Bidding - Internet Auction: To ensure proper registration, those Bidders intending to bid via the Internet must visit www.RRauction.com and register accordingly at least one full day prior to the actual auction. If you have questions about this feature, please call RR Auction well in advance of the auction. Winning bidders will be notified by RR Auction. RR Auction is not and cannot be responsible or liable for any problems, delays, or any other issues or problems resulting out of use of the Internet generally or specifically, including but not limited to transmission, execution or processing of bids. Bidding - Internet – Live Auction: During live Auctions, internet bids can be placed in real time through the following services: www.RRAuction.com, www.liveauctioneers. com, www.artfact.com and www.icollector.com. On some occasions beyond the control of RR Auction, the bid software or the Internet itself may not physically keep up with the pace of the auction. In order to help avoid disappointment, RR Auction recommends placing a realistic absentee bid now. Since Artfact and iCollector (hereinfafter referred to as “Third Party sites”) bids are not shown to RR Auction until RR Auction opens the lot on the floor, RR Auction treats those bids the same as floor or telephone bids. In most cases, however, the floor and/or telephone responds before the Third Party sites bid is presented, due to Live Internet bid software or Internet lag time, so for consistency it is RR Auction’ policy that floor bids and telephone bids are always considered first over Third Party sites bids with floor bids being considered before telephone bids. Also please note that all RR Auction lots purchased through the Third Party sites carry an additional Buyer’s Premium. RR Auction strongly urges the bidder to resolve any questions about these policies or their implementation PRIOR TO BIDDING. Successful Bids: The fall of the auctioneer’s hammer indicates the final bid. RR Auction will record the paddle number of the buyer. If your salesroom or absentee bid is successful, you will be notified after the sale by mailed or emailed invoice. Unsold Lots: If a lot does not reach the reserve, it is bought-in. In other words, it remains unsold and is returned to the consignor. The Auctioneer has the right to sell certain unsold items after the close of the Auction. Such lots shall be considered sold during the Auction and all these Terms and Conditions shall apply to such sales including but not limited to the Buyer’s Premium, return rights, and disclaimers. After the Auction - Payment: You are expected to pay for your purchases in full within thirteen (13) calendar days of the auction or within twelve (12) calendar days of the invoice date. (See Generally “Payment” §27 through 35 of the Term

and Conditions of Sale). Shipping: After payment has been made in full, RR Auction may, as a service to buyers, arrange to have property packed, insured and shipped at your request and expense. For shipping information, please contact RR Auction at (603) 732-4280. In circumstances in which RR Auction arranges and bills for such services via invoice or credit card, we will also include an administration charge. Packages shipped internationally will have full value declared on shipping form. (See Generally “Delivery; Shipping; and Handling Charges” §36 and 37 of the Term and Conditions of Sale). At our discretion, some orders of high value may be sent via overnight or two-day service. Insurance is added to each invoice, with a minimum of $2 for the first $200 of value and 55¢ per $100 of value over $200. Oversized orders will have additional postage added to their invoices. Within the United States, rates for shipping and handling only are: $0–$100..........................................$10 $101–$500.......................................$15 $501–$1,000....................................$20 $1,001–$3,000.................................$35 $3,001–$10,000...............................$45 Over $10,000.................................$100 Additional Cataloging, Warranties and Disclaimers: NO WARRANTY, WHETHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, IS MADE WITH RESPECT TO ANY DESCRIPTION CONTAINED IN THIS AUCTION OR ANY SECOND OPINE. Any description of the items or second opinion contained in this Auction is for the sole purpose of identifying the items for those Bidders who do not have the opportunity to view the lots prior to bidding, and no description of items has been made part of the basis of the bargain or has created any express warranty that the goods would conform to any description made by Auctioneer. Color variations can be expected in any electronic or printed imaging, and are not grounds for the return of any lot. Auctioneer is selling only such right or title to the items being sold as Auctioneer may have by virtue of consignment agreements on the date of auction and disclaims any warranty of title to the Property. Auctioneer disclaims any warranty of merchantability or fitness for any particular purposes. All images, descriptions, sales data, and archival records are the exclusive property of Auctioneer, and may be used by Auctioneer for advertising, promotion, archival records, and any other uses deemed appropriate. Release: In consideration of participation in the Auction and the placing of a bid, Bidder expressly releases Auctioneer, its officers, directors and employees, its affiliates, and its outside experts that provide second opinion, from any and all claims, cause of action, chose of action, whether at law or equity or any arbitration or mediation rights existing under the rules of any professional society or affiliation based upon the assigned description, or a derivative theory, breach of warranty express or implied, representation or other matter set forth within these Terms and Conditions of Auction or otherwise. In the event of a claim, Bidder agrees that such rights and privileges conferred therein are strictly construed as specifically declared herein; e.g., authenticity, gross cataloging error, etc. and is the exclusive remedy. Bidder, by non-compliance to these express terms of a granted remedy, shall waive any claim against Auctioneer. Some Property sold by Auctioneer are inherently dangerous e.g. firearms, and items that may be swallowed or ingested or may have latent defects all of which may cause harm to a person. Bidder accepts all risk of loss or damage from its purchase of these items and Auctioneer disclaims any liability whether under contract or tort for damages and losses, direct or inconsequential, and expressly disclaims any warranty as to safety or usage of any lot sold. Dispute Resolution and Arbitration Provision: Bidder and RR Auction agree that any agreements between the Bidder and RR Auction including but not limited to these Conditions of Sale are entered into in Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County, which is where the agreements are to be performed and the auction to take


place, no matter where Bidder is situated and no matter by what means or where Bidder was informed of the auction and regardless of whether catalogs, materials, or other communications were received by Bidder in another location. Both RR Auction and the Bidder agree that any disputes under these Conditions of Sale, the subject matter hereof, the entering into, or any aspect of the auction, shall be exclusively governed by Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County law, and that any and all claims or actions shall be brought and maintained only in Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County. THE PARTIES EXPRESSLY WAIVE ANY RIGHT TO TRIAL BY JURY. The Bidder hereby consents that any dispute shall be presented in confidential binding arbitration before a single selected Arbitrator selected by the American Arbitration Association. The Bidder and RR Auction herby agree that the dispute shall go to binding arbitration in accordance with the commercial rules of the American Arbitration Association. The American Arbitration Association arbitration shall be conducted under the provisions of the Federal Arbitration Act and the Bidder consents to jurisdiction in The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Any dispute, claim, cause of action must be brought within one (1) year of the alleged breach, default or misrepresentation or the claim is waived. After one (1) year, the Bidder hereby releases and discharges RR Auction from any and all legal, equitable, administrative and/or other claims, counterclaims, demands, setoffs, defenses, accounts, suits, debts, dues, actions, causes of action, proceedings, arbitrations, damages, executions, judgments, findings, controversies and disputes, whether known or unknown or suspected or unsuspected, whether in law or equity, that the Bidder have or may have had against RR Auction arising from or relating to any claim whatsoever. Both Bidder and RR Auction agree that these provisions are intended to be binding on all parties in the event of any dispute specifically including third party claims and cross-actions brought by either RR Auction or Bidder, and that absent such agreement, RR Auction would not permit Bidder to bid hereunder. Any violation of the terms of this Paragraph shall entitle RR Auction to reasonable attorney fees and litigation costs in addition to all other available remedies, all of which remain reserved. The Bidder hereby agrees that RR Auction shall be entitled to present these Conditions of Sale to a court in any jurisdiction other than set forth in this paragraph as conclusive evidence of the parties’ agreement, and the parties further agree that the court shall immediately dismiss any action filed in such jurisdiction. An award granted in arbitration is enforceable in any court of competent jurisdiction. The arbitrator’s award may be enforced in any court of competent jurisdiction. This agreement and any claims shall be determined and construed under Boston Massachusetts, Suffolk County law. Miscellaneous: Agreements between Bidders and consignors to effectuate a non-sale of an item at Auction, inhibit bidding on a consigned item to enter into a private sale agreement for said item, or to utilize the Auctioneer’s Auction to obtain sales for non-selling consigned items subsequent to the Auction, are strictly prohibited. If a subsequent sale of a previously consigned item occurs in violation of this provision, Auctioneer reserves the right to charge Bidder the applicable Buyer’s Premium and consignor a Seller’s Commission as determined for each auction venue and by the terms of the seller’s agreement. Acceptance of these Terms and Conditions qualifies Bidder as a client who has consented to be contacted by RR Auction in the future. In conformity with “do-not-call” regulations promulgated by the Federal or State regulatory agencies, participation by the Bidder is affirmative consent to being contacted at the phone number shown in his application and this consent shall remain in effect until it is revoked in writing. RR Auction may from time to time contact Bidder concerning sale, purchase, and auction opportunities available. Rules of Construction: Auctioneer presents properties in a number of collectible fields, and as such, specific venues have promulgated supplemental Terms and Conditions. Nothing herein shall be construed to waive the general Terms and Conditions of Auction by these additional rules and shall be construed to give force and effect to the rules in their entirety.

TERMINOLOGY

Condition: Each item in the catalog is described with a statement of opinion indicating its overall condition. The condition of the items we offer generally falls into the following range: good—very good—fine—very fine. Treated as a scale of 1 to 4, good describes an item that has as many as several flaws, which are described in detail; very fine describes an item whose condition and appearance may be regarded as flawless and superior in every respect. Most of the items we offer are in fine condition, meaning that there are no serious flaws. While we make every effort to describe flaws that materially affect appearance and value, we generally do not specify minor or routine flaws, such as (but not limited to) pencil or secretarial notations, mailing folds to letters, normal aging to paper, or tiny bends or creases from normal handling. We encourage prospective bidders to examine the image(s) of each item closely and to contact us with specific inquiries regarding condition. Group Lots: In descriptions of group lots of two or more items, every effort is made to mention any obvious flaws. Bidders should note that condition for group lots is given as a general statement or range, and that specific flaws to single items within the group may be omitted in the interest of catalog space. Questions about group lots, or specific items within a group lot, should be addressed before the close of the auction to Stacey Jordan (Stacey.Jordan@RRAuction.com). Matted and Framed: Many of the items offered for sale in our monthly auctions are described as matted and/or framed. We do not remove items from frames; the given dimensions of items housed in a frame and/or mat indicate sight size only. Photographs and other ephemera used with matted and framed items are not subject to description and condition statements, nor are they considered a reason for return. Condition refers only to the item and not the mat or frame. Our terms of return apply only to the item and not the matting and framing. Any item that is removed from the frame cannot be returned. Returns are only accepted when there is an authenticity question or the description of the item is incorrect. Abbreviations and Terms: ALS - Autograph Letter Signed (a letter entirely handwritten and signed by the given personality) ANS - Autograph Note Signed (a shorter ALS) AQS - Autograph Quotation Signed AMQS - Autograph Musical Quotation Signed DS - Document Signed Endorsement - A signature on the reverse of a check, or a signature on a document indicationg approval or further instructions Ephemera - An unsigned item FDC - First Day Cover Inscribed - “Personalized” ISP - Inscribed Signed Photograph LS - Letter Signed (a letter in a secretary’s hand, but signed by the given personality) Souvenir Typescript - An excerpt from a speech, book, film, etc. or an account of an incident, typed by a collector and signed by the individual noted SP - Signed Photograph Sweet spot - The area on the baseball where the stitched lines are closest together. TLS - Typed Letter Signed Book Grading: Fine (F) - unused, no damage Near Fine (NF) - one or two very minor flaws Very Good (VG) - some signs of wear, but overall sound Good (G) - well-worn but complete Poor (P) - heavily worn, sufficient as a “Reading Copy” All defects will be noted. For complete book grading guide, please check online.


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Our auctions continually command the attention of serious collectors and consignors around the world. Last year alone we exceeded $13,000,000 in sales. Each month, our color catalog showcases the rare and remarkable from fields including space and aviation, military, presidents, art and literature, classic and modern music, entertainment, and sports—all fully-authenticated and backed by our 100% guarantee. We have a 30-year history of record-breaking results, with more records still to be broken.

www.RRAuction.com | (800) 937-3880


April 16, 2014 (800) 937-3880 | www.RRAuction.com

THE REMARKABLE CONFEDERATE COLLECTION OF JAMES W. SUGGS

RR Auction: April 2014 Rare Manuscript, Document, and Autograph Auction  

Headquartered in Boston’s North End, RR Auction is a globally recognized and trusted source for rare documents, manuscripts, autographs, and...