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connections T H E M AGA Z I N E O F R O L A N D PA R K CO U N T RY S C H O O L

COMMUNITY

VOICES Tiana Redfern Oguaman, 1999 English Department Chair, Middle and Upper School English Teacher and RPCS Parent

ENCOURAGING CREATIVE ACTIVISM PAGE 6

GIRLS WHO CODE PAGE 8

SPOTLIGHT ON ALUMNAE AUTHORS PAGE 21


FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL

Dear Roland Park Country School Community, If there was ever a year in recent history to look back and reflect on our journey as a school, it is this one. The very nature of school life is predicated on traditions and reliable schedules, the ebb and flow of days, weeks, months and seasons marked by time with beloved teachers, familiar smiles, hugs from friends, sports schedules, arts performances and so on. However, for all of us, the 2020-21 school year began with uncertainty and the ever-present sense that the only way through this year was to recalibrate, reset and reframe our expectations — but never, ever give up. I am so very proud of our employees, students and families. We accomplished the extraordinary against great odds. We faced down our deepest fears and emerged from this year with an even deeper sense of just how strong and joyful we can be at our core. Plus, in the end, we look back now and we see that despite all of the challenges, we had plenty of smiles and time together. Especially this year, I hope you enjoy the articles and stories in this particular issue; each one offers remarkable examples of the grit, innovation and tenacity of spirit that defines RPCS!

‘‘ We faced down our deepest fears and emerged from this year with an even deeper sense of just how strong and joyful we can be at our core. ‘ ‘ In this issue of Connections, we are sharing your stories, to better understand and celebrate the strength of this incredible community. Learn about a few dynamic and inspiring learning and internship opportunities our alumnae have provided our students this past year on pages 6 and 8. On page 9, you can read about how RPCS has impacted the lives of five of our young graduates well beyond graduation. Our teachers, parents, alumnae, a student and our lead school nurse share in their own words the most valuable lessons they’ve learned this past year on page 10. And check out some of our incredible alumnae authors on page 21! These stories are a gift to read and a testament to the people who comprise our passionate, brilliant and dynamic community. As you read through this issue, I invite you to reflect on your own story as well, to help process the past and look forward to what’s possible. There is so much for us to look forward to in the future, and I can’t wait to share our continued stories together in the years to come. Warmly,

Caroline Blatti Head of School


connections 6 8 9 10

New R.E.D. Block Seminar Encourages Creative Activism Students create actionable plans for social change

Girls Who Code Alumna offers students internships in computer science Launching Leaders How RPCS prepares graduates for life after high school

Community Voices Teacher, student, alumnae and staff reflections from the past year

02 WITHIN THESE WALLS A snapshot of what’s been happening around campus 16 SENIOR PROFILES Read about four outstanding students from the Class of 2021 18 ALUMNAE STORIES Learn more about three extraordinary RPCS alums 21 ALUMNAE AUTHORS SPOTLIGHT

24 2020 AND 2021 MCCAULEY BOWL 26 12TH ANNUAL GOLF CLASSIC 27 CLASS NOTES 57 SYMPATHIES 58 CLASS OF 2021 LEGACY RELATIONS 59 ALUMNAE BABIES

22 100TH NIGHT AND SPIRIT WEEK

CONNECTIONS is published annually for the Roland Park Country School community. HEAD OF SCHOOL: Caroline Blatti EDITORS: Abbey Pulcinella, Associate Director of Communications, Senior Writer; Missie Dix Mack, Director of Alumnae Relations Melissa Tully, Communications Associate/Photographer; Tracy Bracken: Bracken, Photographer

DESIGN: Josephine Bergin

COVER PHOTO: Tracy Bracken R O L A N D PA R K CO U N T RY S C H O O L

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WITHIN THESE WALLS RE-IMAGINED ATHLETICS IN A GLOBAL PANDEMIC

New Look, Same REDS!

Last August, RPCS unveiled its new bear mascot to honor the extraordinary spirit, determination and grit of the REDS! The students, faculty, staff and families have loved celebrating our beloved new mascot and fresh look this past year!

RPCS Athletics looked a little different this year, but through reimagined strategies and the flexibility of our coaches and student-athletes, we are proud that our REDS were able to practice and compete safely throughout all three sports seasons! From an outdoor volleyball “court” on the lower turf and crew erg workouts on the tennis courts, to livestreamed games and virtual strength and conditioning sessions, the Athletics Department proved that the spirit of our REDS knows no bounds. We are so proud of our REDS who have embraced their athletic opportunities this year with tremendous resilience and spirit!

This past January, members of the Polar Bear Plunge Club Zoomed with Special Olympics athlete John Wolfe and enjoyed their own chilly plunge while on the call to raise $1,822 for the Special Olympics of Maryland! Students got creative and dumped cups of cold water on themselves, ran into a cold shower, or even jumped into an inflatable pool outside. Club president Charlotte Wright, 2022 organized the event, which was also featured on WBAL’s evening news.

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Since we couldn’t hold our traditional Valentine’s Day Legacy Luncheon this year, the Alumnae Office sent home bags of sweet treats with the RPCS legacy students before Valentine’s Day weekend. We look forward to celebrating with our Legacy families in person in 2022!

RPCS Students Recognized by the National Center for Women and Information Technology Five Upper School students were recognized by the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT) for their computing-related achievements and interests! Ellie Dassoulas, 2022 was named the Maryland Affiliate Winner of the Aspirations in Computing Award and Charlotte Corcoran, 2022, Suzannah Figler, 2023, Katherine Guerrerio, 2033, and Bella Hessler, 2021 each won a Maryland Affiliate Honorable Mention in the same category.


OUR YOUNGEST STUDENTS TAKE TO THE VOTING BOOTHS! Our kindergarten teachers educated our youngest learners on how to become global citizens during the Presidential election last fall. Both kindergarten classes learned about voting during election week and conducted their own election – choosing the best class cookie! They created their own voter registration cards, sampled the cookies to make educated decisions, voted independently in their handmade voting booths, and even received “I Voted” stickers! The winner? Chocolate chip!

Read Across America Week With the magical Lower School librarian Ms. Edwards at the helm, Lower School students participated in Read Across America Week in March. The theme this year was Diversity Matters, with each day focused on a specific theme, from women in leadership to accepting other cultures. Every day’s theme was brought to life with fun outfits and a morning reading of an accompanying story. From dressing up as their favorite book characters to wearing shirts with inspiring messages, the week was a ton of fun for our young learners!

RPCS Donates 2,100+ Books to Maryland Book Bank Lily Milstone, 2022, along with other members of the RPCS Reading Club, organized a schoolwide book drive to collect slightly used books for the Maryland Book Bank. We donated more than 2,100 books!

Gracen Drake, 2022 earned a Silver Medal in the National Scholastic Art Awards for her photo Halo. More than 80,000 students submitted nearly 230,000 pieces of art and writing. Only 2,000 pieces earned a medal, making Gracen’s work in the top 1% of all submissions! She was also awarded a Gold Key from the Regional Scholastic Arts Awards earlier in the year for the same piece.

CICADA MANIA The RPCS science department was very excited about the 17-year Brood X cicadas this year and planned several fun and informative activities for the students to celebrate this major ecological event! In addition to creating a funny and educational video for students, there was a contest to see who could guess when the first cicada would be spotted on campus, posters of cicadas made by the seventh-graders, T-shirts, games, and prizes.

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WITHIN THESE WALLS HONORING BLACK LIVES MATTER WEEK The Middle School honored Black Lives Matter (BLM) Week in February with a number of memorable activities, including learning about the 13 principles of BLM, watching the movie Selma, and creating buttons and a Black Lives Matter banner that was displayed in the Middle School. The week culminated with a Black Excellence Middle School assembly that also included our students in grades 3-5 and students from Lillie May Carroll Jackson Charter School. The assembly featured RPCS alumna and parent, Sydnee Wilson Ruff, 2004 as the keynote speaker and performances that included original poems, songs, and stories of successful Black women entrepreneurs, and guest speakers from all three divisions and LMCJS.

The REDS now have more dining options on campus! A brand-new café opened in January in the RPCS Athletic Complex and offers breakfast sandwiches, cold and hot coffee drinks, smoothies, tea, baked goods and more.

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The Little Mermaid Jr. Musical The Middle School put on an amazing virtual musical this spring of “The Little Mermaid JR.” The talented group of 15 cast members took the audience on an adventure through Ariel’s grotto, Ursula’s lair, Prince Eric’s castle and everywhere in between!


President & CEO of Nasdaq, Adena Testa Friedman, 1987, Inspires Leadership Among Students This past spring, alumna and president and CEO of Nasdaq, Adena Testa Friedman, 1987, spoke with Lower School and Upper School students on leadership, finance, and investment. Ms. Friedman spoke with RPCS fifth-grade students who made simulated investments in The Stock Market Game through Towson University, as well as Upper School students from the school’s newly formed Power Lunch, a networking and investing club and pilot initiative of The Gore Leadership Institute. Part of the school’s larger campaign, This Is Our Moment: The Campaign for RPCS, the Gore Leadership Institute is a K-12 leadership program that connects RPCS students to local and national communities through experiences that develop the leadership capacity of every student at the school.

LINDE HEALTH COLLOQUIUM WITH GABBY RIVERA

Food Truck Treats for Employees

Donuts and pizzas and burgers, oh my! The RPCS Parents Association and Employee Appreciation Committee collected donations and provided treats and gifts all year to thank teachers and employees for all of their hard work in keeping school open. The Board of Trustees and Alumnae Association also expressed their gratitude, and every gesture was genuinely appreciated, especially the lunches and treats from various food trucks, which were definitely a hit among all faculty and staff!

“Easy isn’t helping us. We have to dig deep.” Author, writer and activist Gabby Rivera brought light and energy (virtually) to RPCS for the annual Doug and Carol Croft Linde, 1982 Health Colloquium earlier this spring. Gabby spoke with Middle School and Upper School students, and separately with parents and guardians, about finding, maintaining and nurturing joy, how radical creativity is for all of us, and ways to make the world our own. She also answered many student questions on everything from dealing with negativity and bullying to overcoming writer’s block. Gabby lifted everyone up with her wisdom, warmth, humor and spirit!

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R.E.D. BLOCK

New R.E.D. Block Seminar Encourages Creative Activism Partnership with Jhpiego Empowers Students to Create Actionable Plans for Social Change By Sarah Morehead Pope, 2006

I teach in the Gore Leadership Institute, with the task of equipping our students with the tools to innovate and create positive change. Offerings through our Leadership Institute are designed not only to inspire students to want to make a difference, but also to consider what kind of difference they intend to make, and how they might begin to turn their ideas into realities. In the 10th and 11th grades, students work

Changemakers is the perfect fit for

“Education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world.” – Nelson Mandela

with the basic principles of leadership and

the Gore Leadership Institute. It is aligned with our vision and belief that young women who build each other up will thrive. Over the course of the fall semester, students in this seminar gained a greater sense of issues related to women and girls within health systems – especially in developing regions around the world. Through exposure to stories that highlight the

entrepreneurship through multifaceted

necessity of innovation and energy,

R.E.D. (Reflect. Explore. Do.) Block Seminars they choose to

the students became inspired to take action while learning the

take, including, for the first time this past fall, a course called

skills and tools needed to do so. Then, using Jhpiego’s efforts

Changemaking: Creative Activism + International Women’s

to make the world more equitable as a model, students took

Health.

creative action to address the issues that felt most important to

This seminar came about when RPCS was approached by

them.

Jhpiego, an international, nonprofit health organization

The 10th graders in this seminar became creative activists,

affiliated with The Johns Hopkins University dedicated to

producing projects that address existing power structures

improving the health of women and families, to see if we

and call for reform. Topics students chose to explore

would be interested in piloting their Changemakers curriculum

included maternal health, women’s empowerment, gender

in our Leadership and Entrepreneurship Institute. Jhpiego’s

discrimination in healthcare, access to education, adolescent

Changemakers’ mission is to engage students in global

health, and disease prevention.

women’s health issues and showcase proven methods for sustainability to holistically meet these challenges. Through a thoughtful, hands-on curriculum, Changemakers leverages individual interests and talents by empowering students with both the knowledge and tools to create actionable plans for social change.

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Three of the students’ projects on female empowerment culminated in a podcast called “Not All Queens Wear Crowns” (available on Spotify and Apple Podcasts), in which they interviewed five different women from all aspects of life who are inspirational. “We were able to connect with amazing women and not only have great conversations about change-


LEFT: “Not All Queens Wear Crowns” podcast logo RIGHT: Sketch note from Makenzie Pridgen and Blessing Darden’s project on adolescent health.

making, but also learn from their experiences. We learned a lot

At RPCS we believe that leadership is a process of engagement

from these conversations and hope that we have also inspired

that moves people toward awareness, compassion, and action

some of our listeners as well,” said 10th graders Ryan Greenlee,

to ultimately impact the world for the better. My students

2023, Lanie Lawrence, 2023 and Taite Shaivitz, 2023.

and I loved piloting Changemakers this fall and I am pleased

“I learned a lot from this class, and enjoyed taking a deeper look into women’s health and activism,” said sophomore Maggie Waldron, 2023, who researched issues about advocacy and women’s health and created a website detailing Serena Williams’ story of giving birth and the complications she faced

to be able to offer the seminar again in the fall of 2021. The RPCS Leadership and Entrepreneurship Institute is thrilled to be partnered with Jhpiego in this important work and to be able to give our students a global platform for their creative activism.

when delivering her daughter in 2017. Makenzie Pridgen, 2023 and Blessing Darden, 2023 created an insightful presentation titled “Factors That Influence Adolescent Health,” with a focus on teenage pregnancies. “We were able to research and explore how different teenagers around the world are impacted by possibly being uneducated about matters involving their health,” Makenzie and Blessing said. “We really enjoyed getting to learn so much about this topic and hope that our project can enlighten others about it as well.” Additional student projects included insightful presentations and creative public service announcements about gender

About Sarah Morehead Pope, 2006 Sarah Pope teaches in the Leadership and Entrepreneurship Institute at RPCS. This school year, in addition to piloting the Changemakers curriculum with 10th-grade students, Sarah is co-advising the school’s student-run Philanthropic Literacy Board, and hosting Power Lunch, a new investing and networking program for students in grades 9-12. She also serves as an 11th-grade advisor and is the faculty sponsor for RPCS’s Community Service Organization. For the past five years, Sarah has served as a mentor for the Baltimore Girls Schools Leadership Coalition.

discrimination and disease prevention, including COVID-19.

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Girls who RPCS Alumna Offers Students Internship Opportunities in Computer Science

NKENGE WHEATLAND, PH.D., 2004.

For the past two summers, Roland Park Country School students who are interested in computer science have been able to gain valuable hands-on experience through internships at a leading online textbook company called zyBooks, thanks to Nkenge Wheatland, Ph.D., 2004.

As an Upper School student at RPCS, Nkenge was the only girl in the only computer science class offered at the time, with Gilman students making up the rest of the class. After graduating from RPCS, Nkenge earned a B.S. in Computer Science at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of California, Riverside (UCR) before joining zyBooks in 2016. Nkenge is currently a Senior Manager of Content Development in Computer Science and a mentor to rising RPCS seniors who are interested in exploring possible careers in coding. In 2019, Nkenge mentored Gabi Dorsey, 2020 for a summer internship, and in the summer of 2020, she mentored three students, Charlotte Brand, 2021, Audrey Herskovits, 2021 and Bella Hessler, 2021. During their internships, which ranged from two to three weeks, Bella, Audrey and Charlotte built coding solutions for problems that readers need to solve in three online STEM textbooks, using the programming languages they learned at RPCS and teaching themselves new ones along the way. Their work will be recognized with their names published in the next release of these textbooks in August. “Bella, Audrey and Charlotte taught themselves how to write in new languages, including C, C++ and Java, in just a few weeks,” Nkenge said. “Diversifying their programming language base is an important skill to gain as they pursue careers in computer science.”

“I had such a great experience and was excited to teach myself a new coding language,” said Bella, who plans to major in computer science when she attends Rollins College this fall. “I also thought it was pretty neat that zyBooks had been holding office meetings on Zoom years before the pandemic started, with employees connecting from all over the country and Canada!” Audrey enjoyed the balance of working individually while also collaborating with others virtually. “I’m also now more sure about what I want to do career-wise with computer science,” she said. Charlotte also had a wonderful experience. “Through my internship with zyBooks, I was truly able to broaden the scope of my computer science knowledge and improve my programming skills,” she said. Since Nkenge’s time as a student, the STEM/STEAM programs and computer science offerings at Roland Park Country School have grown significantly. There are now two computer science classes offered in the Upper School at RPCS: AP Computer Science Principles and Introduction to Computer Programming, and some of the other classes incorporate programming as well, such as the STEM Research Seminar I: Robotics class. RPCS also offers two clubs that are computer science-adjacent: Robotics, which uses Java programming, and CyberPatriot, which focuses on forensic computer science to explore Windows and Linux operating systems and detect and protect against vulnerabilities. There is also a concentrated effort in the school’s newer K-8 STEAM program to incorporate programming and the design thinking process as students move through the two divisions. This summer, Nkenge will mentor another RPCS student, rising senior Charlotte Corcoran, 2022, who is very excited about the internship at zyBooks. For other students who are interested in pursuing computer science, Nkenge’s biggest piece of advice is to practice! “Write code as often as you can, until it’s almost second nature,” Nkenge said. “And don’t get discouraged when things get hard. Continue to work at it and things will click into place!”

To learn more about the RPCS Summer Internship Program and mentorship opportunities, visit www.rpcs.org/internships. 8

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! We were thrilled to welcome five young graduates back to RPCS this past February to meet virtually with prospective students and their families for our second annual “Launching Leaders: Life After RPCS” event. The evening featured panel presentations with young alumnae, current students, parents and the College Counseling team to share how RPCS prepares its students for happy and purposeful lives. Each graduate spoke about how their lives have unfolded since walking the halls of RPCS and how the supportive environment here helped them succeed well beyond graduation. Prabhnoor Kaur, 2018, a junior at the University of Pennsylvania who is majoring in neuroscience, spoke about the safe space RPCS created for students, which personally encouraged her to pursue her passions, dance and STEM, and explore new interests. “I never felt afraid to try something new. RPCS really teaches its students ‘Why not?’ Go for it!” Prabhnoor has carried this motto in college, which has given her a certain fearlessness and she often asks herself “Why not? What’s stopping me? RPCS has really given me this attitude in life and it’s something that sticks.” “I am the person who I am today – the advocate, the co-worker, the student, the friend I am today – because of RPCS,” Grace Laria, 2015, told the audience. A graduate of Georgetown University, Grace now works as a Bilingual Community Health Worker/Contact Tracer with the Baltimore City Health Department and a part-time Communications Assistant with an immigration legal services organization called Santa Fe Dreamers Project. Grace credits her close relationships with her teachers and advisors for inspiring her to become a strong student and active in her community, which also built her confidence. “RPCS encourages students to shine, share experiences, try really hard and take up space,” Grace said.

Ajée Robinson, 2019, discovered her passion for service as a freshman at RPCS, when she first became involved with Bridges, an after-school program and summer camp at the Gilman School that provides mentorship to students from Baltimore schools that are under-resourced. As this work became a huge part of her high school years, Ajée knew she wanted to continue her commitment to service after graduation and her college counselor, Sally Diehl, helped her find schools where she could continue to help others. In her freshman year at Villanova University, Ajée started an organization to serve Philadelphia children. Now a sophomore majoring in Sociology with a double minor in Political Science and Criminology and a Presidential Scholar, Ajée is also secretary of the Pre-Law Black Law Student Association, and is still committed to working with many organizations that give direct support and help to Philadelphia youth who are under resourced. And she continues to work as a summer camp head counselor at Bridges. “The program changed how I view activism and service. It’s something that has stuck with me throughout college,” Ajée said. “It really has changed my life … and it has definitely propelled my interest in the field of law.”

Visit our website to watch these incredible alumnae share their stories with Megan Johnston, Associate Director of College Counseling.

For Berit Ginsberg, 2017, the skills she learned at RPCS helped her feel well-prepared for college when she first started at Northwestern University, where she will graduate this spring with a degree in Communications Studies and a minor in Psychology. “I knew how to write a strong paper, how to give a persuasive speech and how to advocate for myself,” she said. Berit also credits RPCS with helping her find her passion in the fine arts and identifying her strengths and areas for growth to help her as she figured out what she wanted to pursue for a career. Berit is currently interning at Chicago Filmmakers and also worked as a producer for a College Emmy award-winning latenight variety show on campus. Margaux Miller, 2020, one of our most recent graduates and a recipient of a World Languages Certificate, spoke about how RPCS cultivated her love of languages and encouraged her to study two languages, Russian and French. Now a freshman at Wake Forest University, Margaux is a President Scholar for Distinguished Achievement in Dance and is continuing her studies in both languages. “Now that I’m in college, I am seeing how unique this is … RPCS has given me every opportunity and it’s been amazing to be part of both the French and Russian departments.” Margaux hopes to use both Russian and French when she pursues a career in government security work.

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cover story

COMMUNITY

VOICES In a year like no other, everyone’s lives have been challenged and changed. In their own words, members of the RPCS community – including teachers, parents, a student, alumnae, and our lead school nurse – reflect on the most valuable lessons they’ve learned throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the importance of resilience and finding joy in difficult times.

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Tiana Redfern Oguaman, 1999 English Department Chair K-8 Middle and Upper School English Teacher Middle School Advisor Current Upper School and Former Little Reds Parent


Last March, I could never have envisioned the pivoting that would need to be done over the course of the year. The one word that I keep coming back to this year is transformation. I had to transform my home into a school for a teenager and preschool aged children, while at the same time maintain an office space for two working adults. I have had to transform my notion of teaching and what it means to create a sense of community. Most significantly, I have had to transform myself and my own way of thinking. Positivity was something I had to fight to maintain this year, and through it all, my sense of self was stretched but never broken. I always believed that I could “do hard things,” but to do so while maintaining a sense of joy and positivity is a challenge unto itself. I’ve learned to teach from home, teach in a hybrid classroom, teach six feet apart, and teach while masked, but the most important lessons we teach are not at all related to the content covered.

I always believed that I could “do hard things,” but to do so while maintaining a sense of joy and positivity is a challenge unto itself. Collectively, and individually, the employees at RPCS have taught every young person we’ve encountered to harness resilience, compassion, creativity, and positivity in the face of struggle. Ultimately, I hope when we look back on the past year these are the lessons learned, and that my students, my children, and everyone I have had the privilege of impacting this year has come to terms with the fact that while transformation is inevitable at certain times, each individual chooses who they will become.

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C O M M U N I T Y VO I C E S

Krisha Gandhi, 2025 Rising Ninth-Grader

This year has been a total rollercoaster. Personally, I have been able to spend more time with my family and grow closer with my older sister, which has made me very happy. Academically, going to school and learning during the pandemic has taken some getting used to, but now that I know how everything works, I have so much fun being with most of my friends and teachers in person, and I am accustomed to the ways that we have adapted to learning this year.

We got some time on the swings, which seems small, but it means a lot to our grade because as Middle Schoolers, we don’t usually get recess time. During the winter, when the cases were peaking, it was hard feeling cooped up at home. I attended school virtually during December and barely got out of the house because it was also cold. It made me very grateful that I wasn’t home for the full school year. Also, socially it’s been harder this year because I try my best to follow COVID protocols when making plans with friends, so that makes hanging out with them more difficult. Because of COVID-19, we had to go outside between every class this year, but on nice days, it was really enjoyable. We also got some time on the swings, which seems small, but it means a lot to our grade because as Middle Schoolers, we don’t usually get recess time. This year has really taught us to appreciate the small things in life. This year, I have also found myself doing well especially in Spanish class, and I feel like I have improved my language skills a lot. I have also picked up knitting and crocheting, which are some of my favorite ways to occupy my free time. I have surprised myself with still staying predominantly focused during class, with so many distractions at home. It is really challenging to devote 100 percent of my attention to class, but I have still been learning a lot and thriving in my classes, which makes me feel happy and prepared to go to Upper School.

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Amy L. Popp Upper School Science Department Chair Little Reds Parent As the country was shutting down last spring, my family continued to work, with my husband reporting to his job daily and school pushing on virtually. As a mom of two young children, I was tasked with simultaneously fulfilling two full-time jobs. I was torn between meeting the needs of my own children and the needs of my students, feeling unable to give my best self to either. Quickly becoming overwhelmed and mentally and physically exhausted, I was reminded of a quote by Marcus Aurelius that helped shift my mindset: “Our life is what our thoughts make it.” My thoughts had succumbed to self-pity, hindering me from embracing the hard with joy. Framing can set boundaries, establish focus, regulate perception, and influence acceptance or rejection of an idea, activity and/or situation. Reframing my “new normal” to include opportunistic language dramatically changed my outlook. I had the opportunity to see my younger son take his first steps, which occurred during a “school day.” I had the opportunity to learn new technologies that enhanced the student experience by allowing for more differentiation. I had the opportunity to try new experiments with only materials I could find in my home. Language is powerful. Altering my language positively altered my mindset. While my personal life became a little more settled this past fall with the reopening of Little Reds, professionally I felt like a brand-new teacher, though this was my 10th year at RPCS. Each lesson was recreated to pivot between in-person and virtual learning. Chemistry experiments were developed to be completed safely at home. Learning outcomes were streamlined to focus on information processing, problem solving, and inquiry-based skills. Every day felt brand new, with no past experiences to draw from, stretching me to grow as an educator in ways that would not have occurred otherwise.

Every day felt brand new, with no past experiences to draw from, stretching me to grow as an educator in ways that would not have occurred otherwise. The Race Director of the Barkley Marathon, a 100-mile trail race broken into five 20-mile loops where the first three loops are considered a “fun run,” once said, “We need challenge to be happy. We need things to be hard.” Though it has been hard to feel happy during these challenging times, my sense of accomplishment and the internal pride experienced as I come out on the other side is invaluable, translating to a resiliency that allows me to find joy in the hard.

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C O M M U N I T Y VO I C E S

Sydney Haywood, 2016 Intern in the RPCS Offices of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Communications Journalist and Graduate Student This past year has been challenging but rewarding, as I imagine it has been for many. We are in an interesting space where so many of us must make significant and uncomfortable adjustments to benefit the larger community. As a journalist in a global pandemic amidst a continued fight for racial justice and equality, I believe I have grown in my passion for telling stories that reflect the voices of disregarded communities. I’ve also realized that learning how to exercise self-care consistently is complex. It is hard to distinguish when to rest and when to work, when home is also the classroom or office. I have to be intentional about setting parameters around my time and energy so I can show up and be the best person I can be for myself, my family and my friends. Similarly, this year has forced me to be more intentional about my time with my loved ones. The pandemic is an unfortunate reminder that life is not promised. I want to make sure that I’m deliberate about being present with the people I love. At the end of the day, that is what will make the biggest difference in my life. I think thoughtfulness is a strength that’s served me well this year. We’re in a cultural moment where we’re constantly inundated with an influx of information about what we should think and how we should feel. That information can be important, but also overwhelming if we do not take inventory of what we think and feel first. Thoughtful thinking has become one of my most useful skills during this time. Most of all, this year, I’ve learned that I’m stronger than I thought I was. I can appreciate that despite the challenges of going to graduate school in a global pandemic, I’ve learned new things about myself, rested well, and discovered that I’m capable of more than I gave myself credit for.

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Despite the challenges of going to graduate school in a global pandemic, I’ve learned new things about myself, rested well, and discovered that I’m capable of more than I gave myself credit for.


Danielle Thiboutot School Nurse Little Reds Parent This year has brought a lot of change for me both professionally and personally. Not only did I begin a career in school health, but I also welcomed a new son and moved from the city to the county. Gabriel is now 1 year old, and we are very happy in our new neighborhood. The transition professionally to become the lead school nurse during a pandemic has been quite the adventure, but very rewarding professionally.

I am so grateful to have felt an overwhelming amount of support from families, students, and faculty, even when my opinion was not the most popular. Throughout this year, it has been challenging at times to make tough decisions with regard to the health of the RPCS community. However, I am so grateful to have felt an overwhelming amount of support from families, students, and faculty, even when my opinion was not the most popular. There have also been bright spots I wouldn’t have anticipated. Without a doubt, the biggest silver lining this year has been working with different members of the RPCS community, who I would not usually interact with regularly. The COVID-19 support team, which considers best practices for the school and advises on risk mitigation protocols to ensure the health and safety of everyone on campus, has allowed me to debrief on a near-daily basis with my colleagues who I now consider friends. Their support has made a huge impact on my first year on campus. One new skill I have learned this year is not pandemic-related, but still very important – tooth extraction! It has been such a delight to help our Lower School students with their wiggly teeth. The girls get very excited to lose a tooth during school. Most of all, this year I have been surprised by all the moments of normalcy and routine within the school. While there have been many changes to help mitigate the risks of COVID-19, the year has been filled with students who are so happy to be learning in person. That has been another silver lining!

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SENIOR PROFILES Lauren DeMuth Before starting Upper School at RPCS, Lauren DeMuth wouldn’t have dreamed of running for an elected position or auditioning for a dance company. Now, four years later, she is co-president of the Spirit Association and a member of the Roses Repertory Dance Company, and credits RPCS with helping her grow as a leader and build confidence in her abilities and talents. “Because I have the support of everyone around me, I am not afraid to try something new, and I know I will carry this with me to college,” Lauren said. “And with so many leadership opportunities at RPCS, I have learned how to use my voice and what it really means to be a leader.” Lauren is also involved with the Philanthropic Literacy Board at RPCS, where she works in a group with other seniors to research the critical issues facing the Baltimore community and organizations that effect positive change and ultimately selecting one to award a $5,000 grant. This year’s focus was on supporting the mental health of Black youth in Baltimore. This year, Lauren was inducted into the RPCS Chapter of the Cum Laude Society. She was also awarded a Head’s Commendation for Biology, served as a member of the National Spanish Honor Society, and has made the Honor Roll every semester. Lauren will miss the RPCS community and the bonds she has created with her classmates and teachers. “Since my first day here, everyone has been so welcoming and spirited,” Lauren said. “I know that everyone here wants me to succeed and will support me in anything I do.” Outside of RPCS, Lauren is a competitive gymnast. This fall, she will attend UCLA, where she plans to major in psychology.

Bella Hessler During her four years at RPCS, Bella Hessler has excelled in everything she pursued – academics, sports, and student life! As a coxswain for the crew team, she led two boats that won first place in the Baltimore Championship regatta during her sophomore year, and also scored a goal for her indoor soccer team during an IAAM conference championship-winning game that same school year. Bella is also a thrower on the indoor track and

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field team and a defender on the RPCS soccer team. And during the summer between her freshman and sophomore year, Bella participated in a program called Overland, where she biked 750 miles down the California Coast for three weeks. Since 10th grade, Bella has served as a peer health mentor and teacher, providing social-emotional support to the students at RPCS, Roland Park Country School and Lillie May Carroll Jackson School. She is a co-founder of the Asian Student Alliance and a member of the Student Diversity Association and the Gender Sexuality Alliance. “RPCS has shaped me to become a more resilient and independent woman,” said Bella. “I am so grateful for the connections I’ve made with my peers, teachers, coaches, and the staff at Roland Park Country School.” Bella is passionate about taking what she has learned in her Advanced Placement (AP) computer science and technology courses into helping communities of color in this country and around the world. This past spring, she was awarded a Maryland Affiliate Honorable Mention by the National Center for Women and Information Technology for her computing-related achievements and interests. And last summer, Bella completed an internship at zyBooks, a leading online textbook company, where she taught herself a new coding language, and confirmed her interest in pursuing a career in computer science. Read more about Bella’s internship on page 8. When she’s not at RPCS, Bella coaches fencing, plays sports, and spends time with her friends and family. She also loves traveling and learning about the history of the places she visits and will explore some of the national parks with her family this summer. In the fall, Bella will head to Rollins College, where she will major in computer science and be a coxswain on their rowing team.

Grace Sarkar As an athlete, artist and student, Grace Sarkar credits Roland Park Country School for shaping her into the person she is today. In addition to being a member of the RPCS crew team for all four years of high school, she also ran track and played soccer as a RED. Additionally, Grace is a Red Key Tour Guide who serves as an ambassador of the school for prospective parents and students and is involved with the Student Government Association, where she served as Class President her junior year and Class Senator her senior year. Grace also performed in the Upper School musical this year and is a


“RPCS has shaped me to become a more resilient and independent woman.” BEL L A H ES S L ER member of the Semiquavers, the school’s auditioned junior and senior a capella group. “The RPCS community has provided me with a space to understand who I want to be and has given me the confidence to become that person.” In her junior year, Grace was inducted into the RPCS chapter of the Cum Laude Society, which recognizes scholastic achievement, moral character and integrity. She is grateful for the countless opportunities she had at RPCS to foster her passion for human biology and has a clear understanding of what she wants to study in college, with plans to work in healthcare as a doctor or nurse in the future. Outside of the classroom, Grace’s most cherished activity is singing with the Semiquavers. “I am incredibly grateful that RPCS has managed to keep music alive during the pandemic.” One of her favorite RPCS memories is singing holiday carols with the Semiquavers and visiting various nursing homes and Mount Washington’s Pediatric Hospital (pre-pandemic) to spread holiday cheer. “I will never forget how happy everyone was!” Grace will miss the close-knit and supportive community on campus and her incredible relationships with her teachers and fellow students from the Class of 2021, but she knows she will always be part of the RPCS community and is excited for what lies ahead. This fall, Grace will attend the University of Maryland, where she will major in physiology and neurobiology.

Kayla Velez Although Kayla Velez has been a student at Roland Park Country School for 14 years, her first visits to campus were as a baby, when her great grandfather Mr. George Mitchell was the director of security at RPCS for over 15 years. Growing up at Roland Park Country School, Kayla developed a deep sense of individuality, which shaped her to be the person and leader she is today. “The most important value that I have learned at RPCS was to always be myself and think for myself,” Kayla said. Kayla’s leadership roles include serving as President of the Association of School Activities (ASA), captain of the Varsity Volleyball team for the past two years, and co-captain of Hip Hop Squad. She is also in the Black Student Union, a member of both the Varsity Badminton team and the Varsity track and field team, and a participant in the Polar Bear plunge and club. Out of all of her impressive accomplishments and activities, Kayla is most proud of her work with Angels Helping Angels, a Black-owned nonprofit organization that provides food, housing, monetary support, clothing and referral assistance to thousands of Black individuals and families. Created with a “pay

Kayla Velez, pictured left, presented Mr. Curtis Black of Angels Helping Angels with the proceeds from last winter’s fundraiser.

it forward” philosophy in mind, Angels Helping Angels seeks to establish an opportunity for a new generation of missionaries and volunteers. This past winter, Kayla organized and hosted a three-day fundraiser and donation drive in cooperation with the Community Service Association. She worked tirelessly for over a month to coordinate with small and locally Black-owned (and primarily women-owned) businesses and the school to purchase their products and goods for the drive. “As one of the few Black presidents, it was very special to me to plan this event in support of the Black community, which ASA had never done before,” Kayla said. “It was also a terrific learning experience as I promoted the fundraiser by making flyers and PowerPoint presentations and connected with so many business owners to make this happen.” Kayla will miss all of her classmates and fun events like Senior Day, Town Hall and Class Day. Outside of school, she loves cooking, watching movies and spending time with her friends and family. This fall, Kayla will attend Temple University and plans to major in kinesiology on the pre-physical therapy track.

“The most important value that I have learned at RPCS was to always be myself and think for myself.” K AY L A V EL EZ

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ALUMNAE PROFILES Regina H. Boone, 1988 Growing up, Regina Boone’s home was filled with newspapers, magazines and books. Incredible visual storytelling was all around her. Her father, a journalist, instilled in her the critical thinking skills she would need for the world of journalism, and he also emphasized the importance of seeing things from all perspectives. Regina unconsciously applied this nascent photojournalism education to her time at RPCS, where she attended from grades 7-12, and documented her life and classmates in the medium of photography. “My understanding of locking in the everyday moments was totally in my DNA, even though I was not in tune as to why I actually did this.” Even at an early age, Regina’s passion for seeing the humanity embedded in the ordinary moments of life was hardwired into her. Today, Regina is an award-winning photojournalist, who has spent more than 20 years documenting human resiliency. In 2016, Time magazine chose a portrait of hers as its cover image documenting the Flint water crisis, which also made CNN’s 2020 list of “100 Photos that Defined the Decade.” She was also the keynote speaker at Roland Park Country School’s Commencement this past June. After graduating from RPCS, Regina attended Spelman College, where she earned a B.A. in Political Science in 1992. Regina taught English on the Japanese Exchange and Teaching (JET) Program, while living in Osaka for three years. After four years of living abroad, she moved to Richmond, Virginia to work for her family’s weekly newspaper, the Richmond Free Press. Four years later, she completed a two-year graduate program at Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication and was then hired to join the photojournalism staff of the Detroit Free Press, where she worked for nearly 14 years. In 2018, Regina completed the Knight-Wallace Fellowship at the University of Michigan, and three years ago she rejoined the staff at the Richmond Free Press. When Regina was a student at RPCS, the school provided a solid foundation of academics and independent thinking that prepared her for college. But RPCS is also where she learned firsthand about racism, wealth and privilege, and inequities of all kinds. She credits the school and her parents with opening her eyes from a very young age to the gross imbalance of the playing field between white people and people of color. She learned how to study, think critically and to maneuver in spaces with people who didn’t look like her and oftentimes did not respect her or her background. Teamwork as a lacrosse and field hockey player helped to build Regina’s character to be outspoken and fearless and being a teenager dealing with microaggressions and racism made her stronger, but her struggles were often lonely. “I value all that I learned, even the bad and hurtful things,” said Regina. “I

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“The school taught me to lead and not to back down, even when the majority was against me sometimes.” cherish many memories with my classmates and teachers. The good and the bad made it all a very rich experience that I actually would not change.” Regina especially values the friendships she has made at RPCS, including her best friend Nikki Parker, 1988. She is also still in touch with Mrs. Anne Heuisler, who understood her deeply and challenged her personally and academically. “I truly cherish her and I am immensely grateful to have someone like her who knew me then, knows me now and understands both versions of me.” As a student, Regina was inspired by her classmates and the other intelligent, fierce and talented young women of RPCS. “I was often in awe of the thinkers we were surrounded by at such a young age and am still inspired by creative minds and those who are fearless and those who lead the way,” Regina said. “The school taught me to lead and not to back down, even when the majority was against me sometimes.” Over the past year, Regina has felt the heavy load of the pandemic and the reckoning surrounding ongoing racism. But she has learned that giving up is not an option. “As my dad used to remind my family many mornings growing up and into adulthood, he’d say, ‘It’s opportunity time.’ Yes, it is.”


“I feel so lucky for our crew of strong, incredible women. Even though we’ve all taken different paths, we’ve always found our way back to each other.”

Morgan Katz, M.D., MHS, 2002 As an Assistant Professor of Infectious Disease at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Director of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, this past year has been busier than ever for Morgan Katz, M.D., MHS, 2002. In addition to serving as the long-term care incident commander for the Johns Hopkins Health System COVID-19 response, assisting with the stabilization and infection prevention guidance for nursing homes across Maryland, she was also a developing member of the Maryland state strike teams and served on the White House nursing home commission to guide the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services in protecting residents and staff in nursing homes during COVID-19. Morgan acknowledges it has been a challenging year, juggling an increasingly demanding career and two young children, ages 2 and 4, during a pandemic. “This year, we have all learned that we can do really hard things and survive,” Morgan said. “We are resilient.” Morgan’s interest in medicine began when she was an Upper School student of Mr. Brock’s, learning about biology and the human body. After graduating from RPCS in 2002, Morgan attended Tulane University in New Orleans, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in Neuroscience. She went on to earn her Doctor of Medicine from the University of Maryland School of Medicine, before completing a residency in Internal Medicine at Tulane University Hospital and a fellowship in Infectious Diseases from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She also earned a Master of Health Science (MHS) degree from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Morgan is board certified in Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease. Growing up in a supportive environment at RPCS surrounded by strong women gave Morgan confidence to speak up and voice her opinions throughout her career. She also credits her close group of friends from the Class of 2002 for inspiring and encouraging her dreams. “I feel so lucky for our crew of strong, incredible women. Even though we’ve all taken different paths, we’ve always found our way back to each other.” Some of Morgan’s favorite memories of RPCS include the Halloween parades and singing “Hodge Podge Halloween” with Mr. Forbes, spirit days, and her early morning crew practices (at 5:30 a.m.!), followed by bagels before school started. She also recalls how her class would all sit on top of each other in the student lounges, even though there were plenty of couches to sit on, prompting her parents to refer to the Class of 2002 as “Roland Park Sitting!”

Distinguished Rising REDS Award Earlier this year during Alumnae Weekend, Morgan was selected as the inaugural recipient of the Distinguished Rising REDS Award! This award celebrates an alumna under the age of 40 who has enhanced the reputation of Roland Park Country School through outstanding professional achievements, personal accomplishments, significant contributions to their community and/or engagement with RPCS. Morgan shows distinction as a leader in her field and actively embodies the spirit, leadership, and integrity of our REDS community!

“I owe a lot to RPCS,” Morgan said. “I always felt like I had a safe space, an outlet and supportive friends, which has had a significant and positive impact on my life.”

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ALUMNAE PROFILES Adrienne Rich, 1947 In The Power of Adrienne Rich, the first comprehensive biography published last year about the internationally acclaimed poet, essayist and RPCS alumna, author Hilary Holladay provides a detailed account into her complicated and extraordinary life. Described as “one of the most prominent and influential intellectuals of the latter half of the twentieth century,” Adrienne’s personal life was one of transformations, from a gifted student to a dutiful wife and mother of three, to a feminist, activist and queer icon, and always an artist. Adrienne grew up in Roland Park and after being tutored at home as a young child, enrolled at RPCS with her sister Cynthia Rich, 1951. According to Holladay, her teachers quickly realized that she was a gifted student and encouraged her academic pursuits. Adrienne loved learning and spent her free time playing the piano and writing. In fact, she produced her first book of poetry at age 6 and then wrote a 50-page play about the Trojan War when she was 7. “Adrienne Rich was on a lifelong quest to know herself and the world,” Holladay wrote. “The process of discovery always motivated and energized her.” While at RPCS, Adrienne admired her French teacher Miss Emerson Lamb and developed a close relationship with Miss Margareta Faissler, who taught European History at the school for more than 30 years. According to the biography, Miss Faissler taught Adrienne the principles of social justice and inspired her “to read widely and think deeply about the human dimensions of history.” Adrienne also credited Miss Faissler for helping her see herself as someone who should help those less privileged than she was, which she was grateful for. They kept in touch throughout the rest of Miss Faissler’s life. Adrienne sang in the glee club, starred as Juliet in “Romeo and Juliet”, wrote for the Quid Nunc yearbook and was the literary editor of the school’s newspaper, The Red and White. She was also voted most intelligent and wittiest in her senior class (tied with another classmate in both categories), but she never considered herself popular. Adrienne graduated high school on June 3, 1947, and the next evening, June 4, Roland Park Country School caught on fire and most of the school burned down. In 1950, Adrienne was awarded the Yale Younger Poets Prize for her first book of poetry, A Change of World and graduated from Radcliffe College the following year. Two years later, she married and had three sons. Throughout the 1960s, Adrienne’s poetry evolved to focus more on racism and civil rights, sexism and the

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Vietnam War. She left her husband and “successfully embraced feminism, lesbianism, and her ancestral Judaism,” according to the biography. Throughout her life, Adrienne published more than 12 volumes of poetry and several collections of nonfiction. Her work received global recognition, including the National Book Award, Book Critics Circle Award, the Bollingen Prize, the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, a MacArthur Fellowship, two Guggenheim Fellowships, and the Academy of American Poet’s Wallace Stevens Award for outstanding and proven mastery in the art of poetry. Adrienne passed away on March 27, 2012 at the age of 82 from complications of rheumatoid arthritis. Her work lives on and according to Holladay, this is the power of Adrienne Rich – her art. “Poetry has the capacity – in its own ways and by its own means – to remind us of something we are forbidden to see,” Adrienne said in a speech she gave when she was 77. “A forgotten future…this ongoing future, written off over and over, is still within view.”


Alumnae Authors Spotlight Congratulations to our many Roland Park Country School graduates who are also published authors! See below for a few examples of books recently published by RPCS alumnae and be sure to check out some (or all) of these impressive works!

Julia Bainbridge, 2001 Good Drinks: Alcohol-Free Recipes for When You’re Not Drinking for Whatever Reason

Natalka Burian, 1999 A Woman’s Drink: Bold Recipes for Bold Women

Mirande Bissell, 1990 Stalin at the Opera (poetry)

Elisabeth Fassas, 2013 Making Pre-Med Count: Everything I Wish I’d Known Before Applying (Successfully!) to Med School

Jennifer Beatty Bodine, 1966 Trains, Photography of A Aubrey Bodine and Annapolis, The photography of A Aubrey Bodine

Heidi Klotzman, 1999 Reflections of a Decade: My Facebook Wisdom and Humor and Circadian Rhythm: A Book of Poetry

Danielle Casson Breese, 1996 Black Gold: 19th Century Ladybosses Show Us How to Live Abundantly and Build Wealth

Alexandra Alevizatos Kirtley, 1989 American Furniture, 1650-1840: Highlights from the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Sondra Kornblatt, 1971 Everyday Energy Boosters: 365 Tips and Tricks to Help You Feel Like a Million Bucks

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A Lab of One’s Own

“Inspiring.” —LIBRARY JOURNAL (starred review) “An unforgettable tell-all.” —KIRKUS REVIEWS (starred review) IF YOU THINK SEXISM THRIVES ONLY ON WALL STREET OR IN HOLLYWOOD, YOU HAVEN’T VISITED A LAB, A SCIENCE DEPARTMENT, A RESEARCH FOUNDATION, OR A BIOTECH FIRM.

Rita Colwell is one of the top scientists in America: the groundbreaking microbiologist who discovered how cholera survives between epidemics and the former head of the National Science Foundation. But when she first applied for a graduate fellowship in bacteriology, she was told, “We don’t waste fellowships on women.” A Lab of One’s Own is a riveting memoir-manifesto, documenting all Colwell has seen and heard over her six decades in science. It shares the sheer joy a scientist feels when moving toward a breakthrough and the thrill of uncovering a whole new generation of female pioneers. But it is also the science book for the #MeToo era, offering an astute diagnosis of how to fix the problem of sexism in science—and a celebration of the women pushing back. “A great read and a profound commentary.” —DR. JENNIFER DOUDNA, Nobel Prize winner and professor of molecular and cell biology and of chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley

S I M O N & SCHUSTER PAPERBACKS

BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY

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Lydia Kang, M.D., 1989 Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything and Patient Zero: A Curious History of the World’s Worst Diseases.

COVER DESIGN BY ALISON FORNER COVER ART BY DUNCAN1890/GETTY IMAGES AUTHOR PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI/UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

Jeanne Martinet, 1976 Mingling With the Enemy: A Social Survival Guide for Our Divided Era

PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.

ISBN 978-1-5011-8129-0 $17.00 U.S. /$23.00 Can.

SimonandSchuster.com @simonbooks S I M O N & SCHUSTER PAPERBACKS

and S H ARON BE RTS C H Mc G RAYN E

SHA RON BERTSCH Mc M c GR AYNE is the author of six books on the history of science, including Nobel Prize Women in Science and The Theory That Would Not Die.

RITA COLWELL, PhD

RITA COLWELL is a pioneering microbiologist and the first woman to lead the National Science Foundation. She is a Distinguished University Professor at both the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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A Lab of One’s Own One Woman’s Personal Journey Through Sexism in Science

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U S E D P R I N T E R F I L E S from PREVIOUS PRINTING; Used files from the DAM A R C ; Used files from the DAM PROOF FOR COLOR

Former Director of the National Science Foundation

RITA COLWELL, PhD and

SHARON BERTS CH Mc GRAYNE “You will be riveted by the true story of how [Colwell ] . . . methodically undertook to challenge biases and dismantle barriers, using the classic tools of [her] discipline: facts, data, measurement, and the persistence to try and try and try yet again.” —LIZA MUNDY, New York Times bestselling author of Code Girls: The Untold Story of the American Women Code Breakers of World War II

PRODUCTION SPINE PRINTER:

9781501181290 / 9781501181290cvr.indd / Lab of One's Own / Rita Colwell, PhD, and Sharon Bertsch McGrayne / Simon & Schuster / U.S. $17.00 / Can. $23.00 / Pub Date: 08/17/2021 / 288 pages / Mech Out: 05/18/2021

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Sharon Bertsch McGrayne, 1960 A Lab of One’s Own: One Woman’s Personal Journey Through Sexism in Science

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Tyson Greer, 1961 Writing While Masked (essays)

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100th Night Dinner for the Class of 2021 March 11, 2021

The 100th Night Celebration was held in the Sinex Theater, allowing members of the Class of 2021 and the Alumnae Board to socially distance. Hosted by the Alumnae Board, the annual tradition included special gifts, symbolic to the seniors. Unfortunately, we were unable to host a dinner this year.

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Spirit Week! March 8 - 12, 2021

This past spring, a full week was dedicated to celebrating the Class of 2021 with special events each day, including a 100 days countdown until Commencement!

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McCauley Bowl Judy Mitchell Wright, 1964 Awarded the McCauley Bowl 2020 Excerpted from Alumnae Board President Sydnee Wilson Ruff’s, 2004 presentation of the Alumnae McCauley Bowl Award, shared during Virtual Alumnae Weekend on Friday, April 16, 2021. Today I am here to present the McCauley Bowl Award to

The first recipient is our 2020 winner, Judy Mitchell

two outstanding alumnae. The McCauley Bowl is awarded

Wright, 1964. Nominated by her husband, Dr. Russell Wright,

periodically to an alumna or another member of the school

Judy has worn a number of different hats as an alumnae

community who has distinguished herself or himself through

and parent volunteer. She has been a class reunion chair, a

long service to the school and its graduates. This award is

member of the auction committee, and spent many years on

presented in memory of and in gratitude for the life of Bell

the Alumnae Board, at one point, serving as the vice president

Lazenby McCauley, 1931. Mrs. McCauley’s life and service

and secretary. While Judy’s daughter, Morgan, Class of 2003,

defines the standards and values which are used by the board

was at RPCS, Judy served as a Lower School Class Rep for five

of the Alumnae Association in selecting recipients of this

years, was a member of the Parents’ Association Board, and

honor. The Class of 1970 acknowledged their appreciation

chaired the Holiday Fair. Judy even served as a Centennial

for two employees in their 1970 Quid Nunc. “To Bell Lazenby

Parent Rep for the primary division during the School’s

McCauley—for your selfless concern, patient enthusiasm,

Centennial Celebration. Judy’s classmates recall her work and

and untiring efforts to resolve our trifling catastrophes. Bye,

enthusiasm in all things. Her quote in the 1964 Quid Nunc

darlin’.”

was: “Nothing ever succeeds which exuberant spirits have not helped to produce.” We are grateful for all Judy and her exuberant spirit have brought, and continue to bring, to RPCS. LEFT: Judy Mitchell Wright, 1964 and her husband Russ Wright BELOW: Alumnae Board President, Sydnee Wilson Ruff, 2004 presents the 2020 McCauley Bowl to Judy Mitchell Wright, 1964

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Carol Witz Hunt, 1976 Awarded the McCauley Bowl 2021 Our 2021 recipient is Carol Witz Hunt, 1976. Carol was nominated by fellow McCauley Bowl recipient Ingrid Boynton Polk, 1982. Carol has served RPCS in countless ways as both an alumna and a parent. As an alumna, Carol has twice served as a reunion planning and giving chair for her class’ milestone reunions. She was a member of the Parents’ Association Board from 2006-2011 while her daughter, Glynis, Class of 2012, was a student; she eventually served as a president. Carol chaired the Holiday Fair, served also as a Centennial Parent Rep, and ran Peppers Concession Stand for three years. Carol is most well known for her dedication as Living Reproduction Artistic Designer and Director for the Upper School Traditional Christmas Program. She has spent hours painting backdrops, creating sculptures, making props, and sewing costumes over the years. Carol has shared so much of her time and talent with the School and I am thrilled to present her with this award.

LEFT: Caroline Blatti, Head of School, joins Alumnae Board President Sydnee Wilson Ruff, 2004, to present the 2021 McCauley Bowl to Carol Witz Hunt, 1976 RIGHT: Carol Witz Hunt, 1976, with her McCauley Bowl

PAST RECIPIENTS 1990: Eleanor Graham, 1916

2003: Celeste Woodward Applefeld, 1964

2013: Laurie McCulloch Fisher, 1963

1991: Helen Metcalfe Duncan, 1921

2006: Ginny Wood Delauney, 1964 and

2014: Mary Ellen Thomsen, Honorary

and Elizabeth Protzman Webb, 1921

Janie Susemihl Vaughn, 1974

Alumna

1992: Judy Waters, 1950

2007: Jane Desvarreux January Daniels,

2015: Jean Waller Brune, 1960, former Head

1993: Marguerite Kelley, Honorary Alumna

1982

of School (1992-2016)

1994: Kay Hamilton Cavanaugh, 1937

2008: Courtney Jones McKeldin, 1958 and

2016: Libby Rutledge Murphy, Honorary

Pam Miller Loya, 1969

Alumna

former Headmistress (1950 - 1975)

2009: Lil Wise, 1950, posthumously

2017: Katharine Hudson, 1967

1997: Peggy Webb Patterson, 1947

2010: Ann Wittich Warfield, 1948

2018: Janet Bauer Hartman, 1968

2000: Agness Fulton Bond, 1941

2011: Jane Wilhelm Daniels, 1946

2019: Diane Hutchins, 1972

2002: Betty Ann Schmick Howard, 1957

2012: Ingrid Boynton Polk, 1982

1995: Anne Healy, Honorary Alumna and

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Golf Classic May 17, 2021

The 12th Annual Golf Classic was held at The Elkridge Club. Thank you to everyone who joined us on the greens for a fun and successful event. We are also grateful for the support of our title sponsor, the Charles T. Bauer Charitable Foundation and all of our sponsors. Save the date for Monday, April 25, 2022 for the next Golf Classic!

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Class Notes are included in the hard copy of this publication. Contact communications@rpcs.org if you want a copy!


1941

1953

1965

Caroline Johnston Gardiner 11/24/2020

Lucy Fallon Otto Mother of Helen Otto Tuten, 1980 1/31/2021

Mutzie Marek Jones 7/11/2020

1945 Agnes (Sunny) Klein Lee 12/23/2020

1947 Peggy Webb Patterson Mother of Margaret Patterson LeDonne, 1983 and former employee (Director of the Evening School and Director of Alumnae Relations) 9/25/2020

1948 Carolyn Demarest Wells Aunt of Anne Nelson Apgar, 1966 and Great Aunt of Rebecca Demarest Nelson Shepard, 2004 1/9/2021

1950 Helen Powell Gregory 9/14/2019 Judith Brigstocke Hundertmark Cousin of Joan Brigstocke Lyons, 1949 1/3/2021

1951 Marguerite Morgan Lambert Grandmother of Morgan Lambert, 2010 and Kendall Lambert, 2018 12/23/2020 Harriet Shriver FauntLeRoy Sister of E. Jane Shriver Sewell, 1958 2/18/2021

1956 Linda Lucas Thomas 3/27/2020

1957 Susan Wills Hunter 9/21/2020 Ellie Mills Weinstein Daughter of Betsy Smith Mills, 1933*, Sister of Betsy Mills Hughes, 1958 10/22/2020

1960 Louise Farley Reilly 12/1/2020 Ann Streett Benya Sister of Livvie Streett Rasmussen, 1964 and Aunt of Betsy Rasmussen, 2000

5/17/2021 Francie Warfield Parrack Sister of Mary Warfield, 1966*

5/10/2021

1962 Holliday Cross Heine Sister of Kathy Cross, 1966 and Niece of Emily Cross Grant, 1936

2000s

Sympathies Mimi Hayward Mother of Milly Brugger, 2007

7/25/20

1973 Dimitra Tangires Sister of Helen Tangires, 1974 and Mary Tangires Wojnowski, 1976 5/12/21

RPCS Employees Judy Comotto Former RPCS employee - Director of Kaleidoscope 9/17/2020 Louise Farley Reilly Lower School and Middle School Teacher 12/1/2020 Tishea Taylor RPCS Littlest Reds Employee 4/10/21 Ann W. Gray Former RPCS Employee 5/2/21

2/4/21 * deceased

Our sympathy to the family of Holly Cross Heine, 1962,who passed away in February. Throughout her life, Holly generously supported science-focused initiatives at RPCS to nurture young women’s interests in STEM fields. In January 2020, Holly and her husband Jack, pledged $1,750,000 to RPCS, which was split to create three separate endowments to fund in perpetuity the K-8 STEAM Director role, the STEM Director role and the School’s signature STEM Institute. A graduate of The Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a Ph.D. and from Suffolk University with a J.D., Holly turned a passion for the sciences into a thriving career as a patent attorney. RPCS is deeply grateful for Holly’s generous contributions, which will positively impact our students’ lives for years to come.

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Alumnae Legacy Relations for the Class of 2021 FRONT ROW, (LEFT TO RIGHT): Maddie Cochran Laura George Cochran, 1990, Mother Julie George Evans, 1981, Aunt Claire Evans DeSmit, 2016, Cousin Solai Cockrell Shannell Richardson Cockrell, 1997, Mother Lily Cohen Haley Hauser, 2013, Cousin Anna Hauser, 2016, Cousin Lauren DeMuth Susan Taseff deMuth, 1978, Aunt Ellie deMuth, 2010, Cousin Katie deMuth, 2014, Cousin Ammara Elsevier Asmat Khan, 1982, Mother Annie Fairall Kathryn Miller Goldman, 1978, Aunt

ABSENT: Skylar Harris Mollie Keyser, 2016, Cousin Ryienne Peterson Lexie Peterson, 2015, Sister

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MIDDLE ROW, (LEFT TO RIGHT): Anabel Saba Hadley Saba, 2019, Sister

BACK ROW, (LEFT TO RIGHT): Abby Minkin Buffy Rubenstein Minkin, 1991, Mother

McKenzie Song Emily Song, 2015, Sister Hannah Song, 2017, Sister

Mary Poggi Mellie Poggi, 2015, Sister Bethany McEvoy Boyd, 2002, Cousin

Addy Branson Mallory Schofield Branson, 1994, Mother

Emily Briggs Casey Lord Briggs, 1991, Mother Nancy Lord Lewin, 1989, Aunt

Carter Rice Jorie Rice Cogguillo, 1981, Aunt Sally Rice Hennessy, 1983, Aunt Leslie Rice Masterman, 1984, Aunt Molly Rice Goetz, 1991, Aunt Maggie Kelly Tori Fingles, 1995, Aunt Daphne Sugiuchi Quincy Sugiuchi, 2018, Sister Sarah Wolffe Suzy Witmer Wolffe, 1984, Mother Sarah Witmer Gill, 1988, Aunt

Wynne Moffet Ilana Moffet, 2018, Sister Ellie Rhea Sarah Foster Rhea, 1989, Mother Barbara Hull Francis, 1960, Grandmother Heath Foster, 1983, Aunt Hannah Rhea, 2019, Sister Annie Ho Winnie Ho, 2018, Sister Seva Nistazos Maria Orfanos, 2008, Cousin Lily Rapuano Abby Rapuano, 2017, Sister


ALUMNAE BABIES!

Sabrina Johnson Turner, 1998 Atlas Jerome Schechter

Kate Jordan, 1998 Maisy Elizabeth Parker

Katelin Crook Etoh, 2001 Emery Blake Etoh

Sheena Cline Moore, 2001 Taylor Michele Moore and Peyton Janelle Moore

Lindsay Higgins Vane, 2003 Everett Brinsfield Vane

Nkenge Wheatland, 2004 Luca Roxanna Wheatland Brown

Sydnee Wilson Ruff, 2004 Malcolm Peter Ruff, II

Dani Kell Steinbach, 2004 Cooper Kevin Kell Steinbach

Shannon Burke Vail, 2005 Emery Catherine Vail

Elizabeth Paal Goss, 2005 Madeline Bays Goss

Cara Hitchner Fuchs, 2005 Ann Reeves Fuchs

Joanna Taylor Iacobucci, 2006 Silke Annette Iacobucci

Barb Seaman, 2006 Paige Emily Edwards

Ellen Franz Greco, 2008 Kennedy Marie Greco

Posie Harwood Brien, 2005 William Fitzgerald Brien

Ateret Reisner Cope, 2006 Zygmunt Avett-Grey Reisner Cope

Niki Steel Phillips, 2011 Charli Ann Phillips

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IT’S BACK!

NOV. 7, 2021 T O H D E R OOL H C S

N U R

K L RY T A N NW COU

U F RK A Y P L I AND FAM L O R ND A K 5

Save the Date! April 25, 2022 (the Monday following Alumnae Weekend)

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2022


Save the Date! Alumnae Weekend 2022 Celebrating classes ending in 2’s and 7’s

Friday April 22Sunday, April 24

Save the Date

The Fund for Roland Park Country School To give online, visit rpcs.org/support/givenow For more information, contact the development office at 410-323-5500, ext. 2104

02.26.22 R O L A N D PA R K CO U N T RY S C H O O L

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connections

NON PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE

ROLAND PARK COUNTRY SCHOOL 5204 Roland Avenue Baltimore, MD 21210

PAID BALTIMORE, MD PERMIT NO. 3621

Alumnae Board Members 2020-2021 Sydney Armiger, 1970

Kelly Donovan-Mazzulli, 1994

Courtney Pippen, 1992

Lauren Dodrill Benjamin, 2001

Jen Banister Figler, 1988

Emily de la Reguera, 2007

Sharon Bowie, 1976

Raquel Whiting Gilmer, 1989

Sydnee Wilson Ruff, 2004, President

Alison Kenny Brennan, 1982

Corrin McBride Hunt, 1999

Annie Ferebee Short, 2001

Casey Lord Briggs, 1991

Caroline Noah Johnson, 1988

Jamye Siegel Stern, 1985

Kate Tubman Cameron, 1984

Cary Zink Kassouf, 1995

Emily Turner, 2009

Shannell Richardson Cockrell, 1997

Sarah Harrison Lenahan, 2001

Rosanna Best Corbin, 1994

Lily MacKenty, 2009

Carol Dixon Croxton, 1998

Rianna Matthews-Brown, 1997

Sally Foley, 1956 Emerita*

Neetu Dhawan-Gray, 1972

Deeley Close Middleton, 1979

Ann Wittich Warfield, 1948 *Emerita

Haley Venick Paglia, 2011

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Profile for rpcs8

Connections - Summer 2021  

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