Page 1

rchitecture

FOLIO

ARAVINDH KUMAR R P


ARAVINDH KUMAR RP Architect | Researcher | Designer

PERSONAL INFORMATION

SKILLS

Nationality

Indian

Manual :

Date of Birth

30|01|1992

Drafting, Sketching, Painitng, Physical model making

Marital status

Single

Availability

March 2018

Fabrication | prototyping : CNC Milling, Laser cutting, 3D printing, Robotic Fabrication (basics) Software : 2D & 3D Modeling :

CONTACT No.7, Ramakrishnapuram, near Ponnaiyarajapuram, Coimbatore - 641001 +91 9865212242 +44 7561091076

Autocad

Rhino

Revit

3DS Max

Sketchup

Maya

Graphics & Presentation : Adobe Photoshop

Adobe Illustrator

Adobe InDesign

Computation :

rp.aravindhkumar@gmail.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/aravindhkumar-rp-22b313123/

EDUCATION 2015

AA School of Architecture, London Master of Architecture [M.Arch] Emergent Technologies & Design

Python

Grasshopper Ladybug (Environmental Analysis), Karamba (Structural Analysis), Octopus (Multi objective optimisation) Millipede (Toplogy optimisation) Kangaroo ( Digital Simulation) Kuka PRC Space syntax ( Network optimisation)

Rendering & Animation : V-Ray

Adobe Premiere

Keyshot

Virtual reality ( kubity)

Lumion

2017 2014

SRM University, Chennai 2009 1995

Bachelor of Architecture (First class, CGPA - 8.34 )

Strand

Ansys

Flow Design ( CFD)

Microsoft :

S.B.O.A Matriculation & higher secondary school, coimbatore Maths, physics, chemistry, Biology, English, Tamil (91 % First class)

2009

Digital Analysis | Simulation :

Office Suite

Languages : English, Tamil (Native), Hindi ( basic level )


| CURRICULUM VITAE Aravindh kumar Rathinam Paneer selvam is a qualified Architect from Coimbatore, India. He had successfully completed his masters in Emergent Technologies in Architecture from Architectural Association School of Architecture, London. His path to AA Emtech program was paved by his strong understanding of a plethora of Architectural styles, his ardent interest in exploring radical design ideas and deep reverential respect for the world of science and technology around him. He had previously worked for couple years as a Junior Architect, freelancer and as an Intern over a wide range of projects. During his time at the AA, In addition to broadening his architectural knowledge, he had successfully developed technical, parametric, fabrication and digital skills to solve design problems holistically. And working in a team has helped him develop cooperation, management, leadership, critical analysis and several interpersonal skills. Currently, his design methodologies are strongly inclined towards computation and fabrication in the realm of Architectural design. His interest lies in the concept of timelessness in Architecture sculpted by new facets of design and technology.

ACTIVITIES 2011 - 2012

Association General seceratery, SRM School of Architecture & Interior Design

2013 - 2014

Association President, SRM School of Architecture & Interior Design

2011 - 2012

Core Committee Co-ordinator, FAB Symposium SRM School of Architecture & Interior Design

2015

Parametric workshop Tutor, Atelier Symposium Prahar School of Architecture, Coimbatore

COMPETITIONS & WORKSHOPS 2011 2011 & 2013 2014

Indian Green Building Council (IGBC) Competition, Campus School Design National Association of Students of Architecture (NASA) Annual Design Competition (ANDC) Hands on workshop focusing on compressed stabilised earthen blocks & Ferrocement - Auroville, India Hyper Threads Workshop - AA Visiting School, Chennai, India

2015

Filling The Void, Computational Design workshop - rat[LAB], India

2017

Bamboo U Workshop - IBUKU, Bali, Indonesia

WORK EXPERIENCE 2012 (MAY - OCT) Internship - Gowtham Architetcs, Coimbatore, India 2014 (JUNE - DEC) Freelancing 2015 (JAN - AUG) Junior Architect, Yanapada Architects, Coimbatore, India 2017 (JUNE) - 2018 Freelancing

REFERENCES Academic Michael Weinstock Director Emergent Technologies & Design, Architectural Association School of Architecture, London mweinstock@aaschool.ac.uk +44(0)2078874000

Professional Ar. Sivith Kumar Founder / Architect Yanapada Architects, Coimbatore, India yanapadaarchitecture@gmail.com +919994975922 Ar.Haneefa Partner / Architect Gowtham Architects, Coimbatore, India design@gowtham.co +918526270361


PA GE

PAG E

PAG E5

PERFOSIDENCE

FREELANCING

FREELANCING

A-1 HEAD OFFICE INTERIOR

INTERNSHIP

GREEN FIELD INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

PAG E4

11 10 1

PA GE PAG E PAG E PAG E

1

EMERGENCE REDIFINING THE URBAN BLOCK

FIBRE COMPOSITE SYSTEM

DESIGN RESEARCH THESIS

BIOMIMETICS SELF RIGHTING SYSTEM

LEGENDS’ SQUARE APARTMENT

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

63

62

1

-6

58

7 -5

4

3 -5

8

BOOTCAMP COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN & PROTOTYPING 6

09 08

27 24

3 -2

2 - 11

0 -9

04 03 02 01

( Graduate works )

ACADEMIC RESEARCH

PROFESSIONAL


PAG E

PAG E

IBUKU

BAMBOO U (2017)

6

WORKSHOP

PAG E

36 PA GE

PAG E

47

DESIGN STUDIO ( 2013 ) INDOOR SPORTS COMPLEX

ARCHITECTURAL THESIS BUILDING AS A LANDSCAPE

MEMBRANE PLUS

DESIGN & BUILD

HYPER THREADS

AA VISITING SCHOOL ( 2014 )

3 -7

68

7

-6

66

5

-6

4

14 13 12

07 06 05

( Under Graduate works )

ACADEMIC

44 3 -4 35 28

CORE 02 STUDIO CITY SYSTEMS

PAG E

| CONTENTS


01 | BOOT CAMP The purpose of the project was to create an anticlastic surface by means of a component based assembly in order to gain a better understanding of the relationship between material behavior, geometry and fabrication processes in the construction of a doubly curved surface.


ANISOTROPIC PROPERTY

B

Wood is an anisotropic, organic and elastic. The anisotropic behaviour allow wood to be loaded differently dependent on fiber- directions.

A

A

B

BENDING PROPERTY

Series of experiments examining the properties and behavior of wood was conducted to gain a better understanding of its potential to create a component based surface. The developed components were guided by our observations on the bending properties of wood.

COMPONENT ASSEMBLY

Also, the different profiles of strip on compression offer different degrees of curvature. This principle was further explored to inform the design of the component.

ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (2) | 07


COMPONENT CONNECTIONS

COMPONENT DIFFERENTIATION

1

2 1

2

2

2

1

3

3

1

1

1

3

2

2

3

2

2

3

3

3

AGGREGATION LOGIC

a

6

a

6

57

5 1

1

3

1

1

3

4

2

b

7 c

b

2

b

6

c

a

b

c

ab

a

1 c

c

b

c

6

7a c

b b 21 c

a

4 3

b

a6

a

a

a

b 3b c

b 3 c

a

a6

a

5b 5c c a

b

4

a7 b7

a 4

c

a7

J7

b7c7

J7

c

b2

b2

b6 c6

c7 b1

c2

J6

J1

c6

J5

c5

a1 c1

b1

a2 J2

J6

a3

a5

a5 b5

a1

a2 J2

b6

b4

J3 b3c2 c3

J1 a4 J4

J3

J5

c5

c1 a4

c4

b4

a3 b3

b5

c3

J4

c4


COMPONENT CONNECTIONS

CURVATURE DIFFERNTIATION

GLOBAL SURFACE

COMPONENT

PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS

SURFACE 1

SURFACE 2 Double bolted connection (a To c) double perforation

a Point of connection (b To c) 3mm single perforation *critical point for bending

c

b mean curvature range: -0.007 to 0.069

unrolled surface

unrolled surface

SURFACE 2 double bolted connection (a To c) double perforation

a

c

Point of connection (b To c) 3mm single perforation *critical point for bending

b

unrolled surface

unrolled surface

mean curvature range: -0.01 to 0.1

Based on the analysis of various possibilities of joining at regional level and performance of the system at global level, It was found that, by changing the degrees of compression of the components at a local scale would add more stiffness and in turn influence the change in the curvature at a global scale.

ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (2) | 09


02 | SELF RIGHTING SYSTEM The goal of this project was to study and analyze the Tortoise Shell, it’s function, geometry, principles and logic to design a material system. Having studied the scientific body of literature on the complex tortoise shell and it’s properties, self righting property of a tortoise shell was considered for the development into a material system. Through digital and physical exploration existing geometries were modified to mimic the stable states and fulfill the conditions of a self righting object to derive a monostatic component.


TEST FOR VARIED PROPORTIONS

TEST FOR VARIED ANGULAR ORIENTATIONS

The research and methodological study of this property lead to the derivation of a basic monostatic component. The following experiments and explorations with the component lead to this in depth investigation of component testing its limits in terms of scale, proportions, varied angular orientations which provided a better understanding about the scalability & limitations of the component and also provided a strong data base for further potential development.

ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (2) | 11


03 | FIBRE COMPOSITE SYSTEM The project aims in contributing to the wide spectrum of composite systems with an alternative low-tech construction system for the existing contemporary practices. Through exploring and understanding the relationship between the geometry and material performance, the research focuses on the development of a Natural (Bamboo) Fibre reinforced polymer composite (NFRP) material system capable of achieving a continuous porous structure at a building scale level that can provide varied spatial qualities and configurations. The system is tested in a project for a housing system in a context like Nepal to evaluate its potential for its adaptability to specific environmental conditions, spatial requirements and its capability to withstand the seismic inputs.


MATERIAL PRODUCTION

2

1

3

Strips are then alkalized or hydrated by soaking it in a solution of Sodium Hydroxide (NAOH) or steamed water for a duration of 24 to 36 hours

Bamboo strips are Extracted from Bamboo Culms

The fine fibres are then allowed to dry for 6 to 9 hours

INITIAL PROCESS

1

2

1

2

Dried Strips are then cut into smaller size

Extracted Long Fibres are then allowed to dry for 6 hours

The dried strips are then beaten up against any surface to separate the fibres

VISCOSE FIBRES

SHORT FIBRES PRODUCTION

LONG FIBRES PRODUCTION

Strips are dried and then grinded

3

Viscose Fibres doesn't require any process. They are directly used for the fabrication of composite

4

Extracted short fine fibres after blending

Fibres are made ready for the composite casting

COMPOSITE FABRICATION

1

Wooden battens are bolted together to form a framework for the plate

2

Spandex fabric is stretched and anchored at the corners to serve as as base

3

4

First layer of matrix is laid

Fibers of any form (long strands, chips , viscose) is then laid followed by the second layer of matrix

5

Fibers are then pressed against the matrix to make them aligned and to get amalgamated with the resin or matrix

6

Then composite is then allowed for drying and once its hardened, it can be removed and sanded

ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (2) | 13


MATERIAL EXPERIMENT - ELASTIC PROPERTY | SEISMIC STRATEGY 01

VISCOSE FIBRES specimen - 2

VISCOSE FIBRES

specimen - 2

Specimen

Length

Width

Fiber form

Resin

1 2

750 mm

140 mm 140 mm

20 mm 20 mm

Long Fibre Viscose Fibre

Polyester

140 mm

20 mm

140 mm 140 mm

25 mm 25 mm

Short Fibre Viscose +Short Fibre Viscose +Short Fibre

3

750 mm 750 mm

4 5

750 mm 750 mm

Thickness

SHORT FIBRES / WHISKERS specimen - 3

Polyester Polyester Polyester Bio-Epoxy

R : F ratio

SHORT FIBRES + VISCOSE specimen - 4 specimen - 5

Self Weight

Specific Weight

Drying time

60 % 60 %

24.5 N 21.5 N

11.60 KN/m3 10.23 KN/m3

12 hours 12 hours

60 %

19.0 N

12.06 KN/m3

16 hours

45 % 45 %

19.0 N 19.0 N

12.06 KN/m3 12.06 KN/m3

18 hours 18 hours

LOAD TESTS Simply supported condition

Cantilevered condition

P

a

B

A

50

650

δ

δ

50

L

L

δ

=

P L3 48 E I

b P

P : Load L : Span E : Elastic modulus

δ

I : Moment of inertia δ : Maximum deflection

=

P a2 6EI

( 3L- a )

P : Load L : Span E : Elastic modulus I : Moment of inertia δ : Maximum deflection

Simply supportecd condition

Specimen - 1

Specimen - 2

Specimen - 3

Specimen - 4

Specimen - 5

Load : 50 kg Max deflection: 24 mm

Load : 25 kg Max deflection: 35 mm

Load : 50 kg Max deflection: 28 mm

Load : 50 kg Max deflection: 50 mm

Load : 50 kg Max deflection: 48 mm

Cantilevered condition

Specimen - 1

Specimen - 2

Specimen - 3

Specimen - 4

Specimen - 5

Load : 25 kg

Load : 05 kg

Load : 25 kg

Load : 15 kg

Load : 35 kg

Max deflection: 48 mm

Max deflection: 47 mm

Max deflection: 62 mm

Max deflection: 101 mm

Max deflection: 119 mm


Deflection ( In mm )

RESPONSE SPECTRUM ANALYSIS

Deflection ( In mm )

Load ( In Kg)

specimen 1 specimen 2 specimen 3 specimen 4 specimen 5

Load ( In Kg)

From the results, we can observe that specimen 5 with the bio-epoxy resin as the matrix performed better in terms of yield strength and elasticity, proving to be a ductile material. This could potentially be an advantageous aspect for application in seismically active regions. Having obtained the properties of material through these physical tests, this can be now digitized to set up an experiment to evaluate the material for seismic inputs.

Response spectrum analysis was conducted through Finite element Analysis, where a frequency range of 1-100 Hz was applied to calculate the Total displacement and total shear stress values for the specimens. From the results we can verify that specimen 5 had minimum displacement and shear stress values than the other two accounting for a better performance which is mainly due to their high yield strength and higher elastic limits.

FABRICATION PROCESS

FLEXIBLE FORM WORK PREPARATION

FIRST PHASE OF \APPLICATION ALLOWED FOR DRYING

FABRIC FORM WORK WITH INTIAL COAT OF RESIN

T = 3 Hours

Self Weight

17.64 N

Thickness

14 mm

Spandex Fabric

0.024 m2

Drying time

12 Hours

Short Fibres

500 g

Polyester Resin

1500 g

SECOND PHASE OF APPLICATION ALLOWED FOR DRYING

PERFORMANCE UNDER LOAD (75 kg)

This process explains the fabrication method. Layering of material allowed to build on a fabric formwork mould by spreading the mixture of resin and short fibres without compromising the target shape. The thickness was achieved through layer by layer application of pure resin and the resin fibre mixture. However for large scale surface applications hand layup process would not be a significant method. Spray layup method can be assembled by simple vacuum and compressors. ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (2) | 15


GEOMETRY EXPLORATION SHWARTZ P

The exploration is particularly centered on the application of triply periodic minimal surface for geometry generation that could potentially be developed for an continuous porous Architectural system . In order to do that, a series of minimal surfaces were studies to understand their potential for architecture application. The one that holds simplicity in terms of geometric configuration, modularity and connectivity Schwartz - p was chosen the ideal choice

Elevation Perspective cos(x) + cos(z) + cos(y) Plan

FITNESS CRITERIA

Fitness Criteria 01 (F1 ) Maximum Base Area

Fitness Criteria 03 (F3 )

Fitness Criteria 02 (F2) Minimum Displacement

Fitness Criteria 03 (F3 )

Minimum Surface Area

Fitness Criteria 03 (F3 )

Maximum opening Area

Maximum Mid Level Area

OPTIMISED GEOMETRY TYPE 01

TYPE 02

G 200.4

G 200.10

Two different sequences of optimisation is done to achieve the optimised outputs catering for different requirements. The optimised individuals are again structurally analysed for different material properties by varying the fiber to resin ratio. The intent of this analysis is to prove that these geometries with different material properties, once aggregated at a cellular solid level can avoid large deformations due to its variation in density so that it can vibrate at different resonant frequencies much varied from the natural frequency of the seismic waves.

37.4 m2 0.013 m 235.7 m2 52.9 m2 73.9 m2

23.78 m2 0.02 m 172.2 m2 57.45 m2 50.2 m2

STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS Fiber to Resin volume : 15 % Tensile strength : 7.2 Mpa Flexural strength : 29.38 Mpa C1

Fiber to Resin volume : 30 % Tensile strength : 8.587 Mpa Flexural strength : 38.9 Mpa

+ 0.24 m

+ 0.19 m

- 0.24 m

- 0.19 m

C2

Fiber to Resin volume : 45 % Tensile strength : 15.601 Mpa Flexural strength : 26.2 Mpa

+ 0.21 m

+ 0.15 m

- 0.21 m

- 0.15 m

C3

+ 0.15 m

+ 0.08 m

- 0.15 m

- 0.08 m

-204.0%

-178.7%

-150.3%

-168.6%

-196.1%

-131.5%

> 199.7%

> 163.9%

> 146.7%

> 148.4%

> 195.7%

> 106.7%

TYPE 01

CELLS WITH SAME MATERIAL DENSITY

TYPE 02

CELLS WITH VARIED MATERIAL DENSITY

CELLS WITH SAME MATERIAL DENSITY

CELLS WITH VARIED MATERIAL DENSITY

From the response spectrum analysis it can be confirmed that, by varying the material density at the local cell level the fundamental frequencies of the structures can be increased and so their vibration modes will be triggered less by earthquakes.


CONTINUOUS SURFACE LOGIC

FITNESS CRITERIA

Condition 1 - cells at middle of

Fitness Criteria 01 (F1 ) Maximum habitable Area Fitness Criteria 03 (F2 ) Maximum Open space

Condition 2 - Cells at the edge

The previous experiments with minimal surface geometry provided a better insight for the development of a continuous surface structure, It was revealed that in order to be able to create a surface system that allows the flexibility both vertically and horizontally. First of all, the zone of functions needs to be laid out in a grid. We can see that the zone of functions is divided into two zones. These two are zones laid out in a grid, but in order to create a continuous surface they have to be separated into different vertical levels but they have to maintain the position in the grid.

Condition 3 - Cells at the corners Fitness Criteria 03 (F3 ) Minimum Displacement

Fitness Criteria 04 (F4 ) Maximum interior area for solar exposure

OPTIMISED SYSTEM TYPE - 01

TYPE - 03

30.09 m2 0.03 m 158.57 m2 49.2 m2

92.65 m2 0.46 m 158.57 m2 7.56 m2

TYPE - 02

Based on these inputs and various criteria above, primitives are set for each typology with differing boundary condition range

TYPE - 04

30.09 m2 0.03 m 158.57 m2 49.2 m2

The typologies for the housing system is based on the social structure ( live, live-work, livework-retail), patterns of occupancy ( Nuclear family, Extended family) and spatial requirements of the existing housing scenario in Nepal.

142.7 m2 0.0256 m 173.12 m2 26.52 m2

Thus the fittest individuals for each type can potentially be further developed by evaluating them through environmental inputs and structural inputs, which could then potentially be further better optimised to cater for better habitable conditions.

ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (2) | 17


CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUE

SEQUENCE - 01

SEQUENCE - 02

SEQUENCE - 03

The design logic developed for the spatial configurations aims to maintain a simple construction process to achieve a continuous integrated structure.

3

SUPER STRUCTURE (FABRIC FORMWORK)

2

SEQUENCE - 04

MATERIAL APPLICATION

SCRAP TYRE PAD (STP) BASE ISOLATORS

The construction process involves two major processes which include the formwork assembly and the material application. In order to break the complexity of the assembly process, it is done in a sequence from a bottom-up and then in a lateral fashion.

1

MAT FOUNDATION

Scissor joint arms for lifting mechanism

Actuator joints

Lever arm for scaffolding erection Movable platform

The design of the formwork is based on a system of deployable scaffoldings with sleeves that can be used to anchor the spandex fabric. The tension in the fabric can be controlled by the movement of this scaffolding which acts like more of a hydraulic device through its scissor joints


ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

N SOLAR RADIATION ANALYSIS: Direct radiation on the exterior surface

Number of apertures: 3 Total Radiation : 253752.3 kwh/m2 Height of apertures : 1.2 m

Number of apertures: 14 Total Radiation : 243311.41 kwh/m2 Height of apertures : 1.2 m

Solar radiation Weather file Kathmandu Period: Annual

The experiment aims to understand what kind of modifications can be made to the geometries of each typology to be effective to maximize the solar radiation and thus the thermal gain of the structure. Few parameters are tested to in relation to the environmental performance in order to calibrate a more effective environmental strategy for the housing system of each typology.

SUNLIGHT HOUR ANALYSIS : Direct Solar exposure on the interior floor area

Number of apertures: 3 Sunlight hours : 1.86 hours Height of apertures : 1.2 m

Number of apertures: 14 Total Radiation : 2.29 hours Height of apertures : 2.4 m

Solar radiation Weather file Kathmandu Period: Annual

More parameters like scale of the openings, changing the angular orientation of the openings towards the south or combination of all of these also can be experimented to achieve an increased amount of solar exposure of the interior spaces.

ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (2) | 19


HOUSING SYSTEM TYPOLOGY - 01 ( NUCLEAR) LIVE - WORK

14.5 m

12.6 m

B'

HOUSING SYSTEM TYPOLOGY - 02 ( EXTENDED ) LIVE - WORK

17.01 m

10.7 m

B'


ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (2) | 21


HOUSING SYSTEM TYPOLOGY - 01 ( NUCLEAR) LIVE - WORK - RETAIL A

13.50 m

12.09 m

A'

HOUSING SYSTEM TYPOLOGY - 02 ( EXTENDED ) LIVE - WORK - RETAIL

15.85 m

19.15 m

A A'


ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (2) | 23


04 | EMERGENCE BODY PLAN | TUBE

This research takes place in light of an advance and innovative approach in Evolutionary algorithms. These methodologies are explored over a primitive object, within a digital environment, where multiple populations of the same were generated. During breeding within these populations, growth was regulated through a relevant gene pool– A collection of genes. These genes re-sequenced themselves, based upon growth strategies during every distinctive breeding procedure, resulting in a variety of individuals. This process was further evolved by incorporating more complex approaches such as mutation, body plans, kill strategies. Allowing evaluations within populations based upon a one or more fitness criterion’s.

FITNESS CRITERIA Fitness Crtiteria 1 (FC1)

Fitness Criteria 2 (FC2)

1

h

2

Sa 3

Height (mm) Surface area (mm2)

Shadow Area(mm2) FC = FC1 + FC2 Max value

GENE POOL | STRATEGY A Make copy & move in Z-direction by h/2

Y

B Scale in X direction by a factor of 3.0

C

Z

Rotate in YZ Plane by 600 & move in Y direction by 8.0(r1)

Scale in X direction by a factor of 1.5

K

1

X Scale in Z-direction by a factor of 3.0

Rotate in YZ Plane by 300 & move in Y direction by 8.0(r)

M

L

Linear array in X direction 2 times by step size of 4.0 (r1/2)

Rotate in XZ Plane by 300 & move in Z direction by 4.0(r1/2)

Linear array in Y direction 3 times by step size of 4.0 (r1/2)

K

L

M

2

3


GENE MATRIX

STRATEGY

G 3.01

X Y X Z K Y CMB C L Y Z A B XMX

Breeding

GENE FREQUENCY 14

G 3.02 G 3.03

K B CAC Z Y Z L Z C Y LMB K A K Y K X A B MM X L

12

G 3.04

10

G 3.05 G 3.06

8

G 3.07

C BA Z X B Z Y C KMY X MM K Z L L K BM Z L BMA A Z C

A X C A X

K B Y C K

Gene Pool Size: 9 Genes Genome Length: 9-11 Genes Population Size: 10 individuals

G 3.08

L L Y A L

G 3.09 G 3.10

4

A X

B

Y

C

Z

K

L M

2 0

PHENOTYPES

60%

Three point Cross-over

C BA Z X BAK L 40%

C L Y Z A B XMX PARENT

C B Y Z X BAK X C BA Z X B X K L

Mutation (Insertion)

OFFSPRING

CONDITION

G 3.01

G 3.02

G 3.03

G 3.04

G 3.05

G 3.06

G 3.07

G 3.08

G 3.09

G 3.10

L

L

Y K Y A B BMX K Y L K Y A B BMX K L

Fig 2.13

Mutation Probability: 30% Mutation Rate: 20%

Mutated phenotypes

Generation 3

Generation 2

Generation 1

ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (3) | 25


COMPARISON | FITNESS 1.4 G1 G2 G3

1.2

1

0.8

0.6

G 1.04

0.4

G 2.09

S.A. : 3140mm2 H : 33 mm SH.A. : 712 mm2

0.2

G 3.09

S.A. : 3681 mm2 H : 39 mm SH.A. : 1222 mm2

S.A. : 3068 mm2 H : 52 mm SH.A. : 1501 mm2

0 �0.5

0

0.5

1

1.5

2

VILLA CONTEMPORAIRE | PRIMITIVE BLOCK

STRATEGY | SUPERBLOCK

1

The ville Contemporaire is an unrealized Urban scale housing project by Le-Corbusier. It consists of rectangular blocks of housing units arrayed on a grid-iron pattern with a courtyard in the middle. This closed block in the Ville Contemporaire is 200 metres wide and 400 metres long and between 5 and 6 double stories high.

Primitive configuration Superblock- 16 blocks

3 Occurence of open spaces (transition) between the road and the building line

2 Dispersion of blocks from the defined road line

This project has had its criticism from the past, mainly, due to its mechanical layout and non-engagement with human scales. Effective design strategies are devised to redefine the urban block through generative experiments. High dense configurations

Low dense configurations

Defining the Block heights

Blocks with inner yardmore height Sub-Blocks with more volume has a 80 % probability of getting an inner yard

4

sub-divsion of Blocks

Possible Block configurations

�1

U-configuration Blocks


FITNESS CRITERIA

Fitness Crtiteria 1 (FC1) Minimum building exposure(kWh/m2)

Fitness Crtiteria 3 (FC3) Maximum Ground exposure (kWh/m2)

Fitness Crtiteria 2 (FC2) Maximum Volume(m2)

Fitness Crtiteria (FC) = FC1 + FC2 + FC3

MULTI OBJECTIVE OPTIMISATION | PHENOTYPES

G 40.0

G 40.01

G 40.02

G 40.03

G 40.05

G 40.06

G 40.07

G 40.08

PHENOTYPE DISTRIBUTION

Chart Title

Cross over Rate: Mutation Rate:

80 %

4.5

80 %

3.5

4

Mutation probability:

3

50 %

Building Exposure (Be) Building Volume (Vo) Ground Exposure (Ge) Dominant Phenotype Possible fittest Phenotype

As an important part of the experimentation the evolutionary solver software, with multiple conflicting objectives, plays an imperative role in creating the optimized design and drives the experiment towards the evolutionary goal. This computational environment plays a significant role in the application of an evolutionary model as a design strategy

Normal distribution

80 %

Elitism:

2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 0 deviation 0.2 Standard

0.4

0.6

LOW PERFORMANCE

0.8

MEDIUM

1

1.2

HIGH PERFORMANCE

MEAN FITNESS: 0.76 MEAN STANDARD DEVIATION: 0.101 MEAN VOLUME: 9052181.9 m 3 MEAN BUILDING EXPOSURE: 347923.5 KWh/m2 MEAN GROUND EXPOSURE: 1723.5 W KWh/m2

ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (3) | 27


05 | CITY SYSTEMS The primary objective of this research was the densification of 1.25 Sq.km of urban area with a density of 100,000 /Sq.km. In-order to conceive viable solutions, the project looks into the development of an integrated system of built and natural environment. Along with various network distribution strategies, cluster formations, program distribution and typological optimization strategies, environmental intervention are immersed into this integrated design model. Especially with the introduction of wetlands and interconnected-green spaces, as a mean of increasing interest towards a more pedestrian dominated environment.

CONTEXT | SITE


NETWORK STRATEGY

Min distance Max distance

Min distance

800m 1200 m

Max distance

600m

Shortest path between attractors 1000 m

ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (3) | 29


DEPTH 4

NETWORK DEVELOPMENT VS

SA

CI

RC

ES

N8

NH SI

DEPTH

NI

KEY Fig 16

ES- Etihad st ES

D4 D3

D2

D3

D4

D1

D2 D1

PS

PS- Piccadilly st External Nodes

STREET NOMENCLATURE

Streets

Piccadilly Station

No of pe op le

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

NWI

N1 N6 N9

N2

N5 N3

N7 PS

N10 N4

6 5 4 3 2 1 0

VS: 0.514 NWI: 0.57 PS: 0.59 NI: 0.61 CI: 0.63 SI: 0.69 SA: 0.66 ES:0.697 NH: 0.751 RC: 0.77 N7: 0.81 N3: 0.976 N5: 1.009 N4: 1.009 N1: 1.22 N2: 2.138

NH: 1.985 N2: 2.067 N5:2.105 RC: 2.258 N4:2.296 N3:2.346 N7:2.391 SA: 2.487 CI: 2.537 SI: 2.537 ES: 2.552 N6: 2.582 NWI: 2.582 PS:2.582 VS:2.699 SA: 2.834

The Syntactically driven network solution determined previously was further analyzed in-order to understand the flow of people along certain routes.. As our primary focus was to emphasize movement across our most integrated spine that connects the Piccadilly station and the Eitihiad stadium and encapsulates all major pedestrian activities. Thus all intersections lying on the routes were treated as “destination” nodes and all external nodes were treated as “starting” nodes. The external nodes were charged with weights based upon their relationship any existing transport nodes. This meant that these nodes had a probability to release higher crowds of people due to their close proximity to such high active areas.

Destination D3

Starting Nodes

Starting Nodes

Destination N3

Destination D4

Starting Nodes

Starting Nodes

Destination N2

Etihad Stadium

Starting Nodes

Starting Nodes


No of People

80 K 76 K 72 K 68 K 64 K 60 K 56 K 52 K 48 K 44 K 40 K 36 K 32 K 28 K 24 K 20 K 16 K 12 K 8K 4K

It was observed that in almost all cases (barring case 2) at least one street showed the accumulation of large amounts pedestrian crowds. This data was combined for each street and a domain for total number people was generated. It was also observed that streets 1, 2, 5, 13, 16, 23, 26 had the highest amount of pedestrian traffic and street 12 had lowest differential domain– this means that in case of least traffic their would be highest traffic on this street.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Streets

SECONDARY & TERTIARY NETWORK 3

C

1 2

2

3

3 2

5 4

4

4 - Sided Configuration

5 - Sided Configuration

5

3 - Sided Configuration 4

6

Join the midpoints of adjacent lines 4 & 5

Join the midpoints of adjacent lines 1 & 3

Join the midpoints of adjacent lines 1 & 3

6 7

A

5

B Join the midpoint of the parallel lines 5 & 2

After assigning the width to the Secondary network the super blocks were further subdivided into sub-blocks. The resultant sub-blocks were then categorized into three configurations based on their geometry, by number of sides. The sub division logic was then employed for the three different configurations to derive the tertiary network.

8 7

6

Join the midpoint of the parallel lines 6 & 4

8

9

Join the midpoint of the parallel lines 6 & 4

WETLAND STRATEGY

EXISITING CANAL

FLOOD RISK ZONE

SITE

MODIFICATION

EXISITING TOPOGRAPHY

WETLAND CATCHMENT AREA WETLANDS EXTENSION

OPTIMIZATION

GREEN INTEGRATION

Checking rules

Fig 25

SURFACE RUN OFF RISK ZONE

INTERNAL NODES

Optimization rules

Criteria- i- Flood flows Criteria- ii Surface flow volume Criteria- iii Swale volume/ fill time

ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (3) | 31


Step (ii)

3.0 m

6.0 m

1.0 m 2.0 m

Summer scenario

Step (i)

Step (iv)

3.0 m

zone 04

zone 03

zone 02

zone 01 SUBMERGENT ZONE

The primary objective was the transformation of the neglected river system, in-order to recharge the site; a system of wetlands were created that would promote water peculation and channelize surface run-off from the catchment area. Thus negating the chances of occasional flooding.

WATER CATCHMENT/ RIVER

zone 02 EMERGENT ZONE

HYDROPHILIC PLANTS

zone 03

zone 04

RIPARIAN ZONE

UPLAND ZONE

FERNS & FORBES

RIVER FLOW SIMULATION

3.0

6.0

9.0

12.0

15.0

18.0

The wetlands were grown out from the topography, using agent based approach, The domain of the wetlands was further optimized using flow dynamics, that helped in estimating various levels of wetzones within the wetlands, upon which build-able and non build-able zones were designated on site.

21.0

Time: 8hrs Flow rate: 6 m3/s % Fill: 23% of vol

Time: 2hrs Outflow Rate: 4 m3/s % Fill: 10% of vol

Time: 8hrs Outflow Rate: 5 m3/s % Fill: 50% of vol

Time: 2hrs Flow rate: 2 m3/s % Fill: 10% of vol

Time: 16hrs Outflow Rate: 12 m3/s % Fill: 90% of vol

Time:12hrs Outflow Rate: 7 m3/s % Fill: 70% of vol

24.0

TREES / SHRUBS

6.0 m

1.0 m 2.0 m

Monsoon scenario

Step (iii)


SUPER BLOCKS 01

Area of Super Block : 66894 m2 sub-blocks : 8 Cells: 27

07

Area of Super Block : 88869 m2 No. of subblocks : 5 No. of plots: 66

13

Area of Super Block : 61316m2 sub-blocks : 5 Cells : 16

02

Area of Super Block : 100606 m2 sub-blocks : 6 Cells : 40

08

Area of Super Block : 100191 m2 sub-blocks : 12 Cells: 66

14

Area of Super Block : 40442m2 No. of subblocks : 5 Cells : 19

03

Area of Super Block : 135171 m2 sub-blocks : 9 Cells : 37

09

Area of Super Block : 23644 m2 sub-blocks : 3 Cells : 66

15

Area of Super Block : 55404 m2 sub-blocks : 5 Cells: 22

04

Area of Super Block : 36606m2 sub-blocks : 3 Cells: 14

10

Area of Super Block : 106491m2 sub-blocks : 7 Cells : 66

16

Area of Super Block : 51793 m2 sub-blocks : 11 Cells : 23

05

Area of Super Block : 166634 m2 sub-blocks : 12 Cells: 52

11

Area of Super Block : 119263 m2 sub-blocks : 11 Cells : 66

17

Area of Super Block : 24421 m2 sub-blocks : 7 Cells : 18

06

Area of Super Block : 153288 m2 sub-blocks : 13 Cells: 58

12

Area of Super Block : 42768 m2 sub-blocks : 5 Cells : 66

18

Area of Super Block : 44375 m2 sub-blocks : 16 cells : 66

NETWORK \ STREET HIERARCHY

3.5 m

3.0 m

R

P1

P4

P2

P3

S

3.0 m

4.0 m

2.5 m 0.5 m

3.0 m

3.0 m

2.5 m

2.5 m

3.5 m

2.5 m

5.0 m

T

R - OUTER RING ROAD (23m Wide)

P1 - MAJOR PEDESTRIAN ROUTE (18.5 m wide)

P2 - MINOR PEDESTRIAN ROUTE (10 m wide)

P3 - PUBLIC VEHICLE /PEDESTRIAN ROUTE (22 m wide)

S - SECONDARY NETWORK (10 m Wide)

P4 - PRIVATE VEHICLE /PEDESTRIAN ROUTE (18 m wide)

3.5 m

7.0 m

2.5 m

6.0 m

1.0 m

1.0 m

7.0 m

3.5 m

6.0 m

2.5 m

T - TERTIARY NETWORK (6 m Wide)

3.5 m

7.5 m

1.0 m

7.5 m

3.5 m

ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (3) | 33


SITE

BUILDING MORPHOLOGY Criteria: maximize sky view factor

NODES

Criteria: maximize Roof exposure Criteria: maximize Ground Exposure

NETWORK HIERARCHY

WETLANDS INTEGRATION

SUB-DIVISION

PLOTS

DENSITY / HEIGHT GRADIENT

Generative rules

FITNESS CRITERIA

PROGRAM DISTRIBUTION

NETWORK ROUTE TYPOLOGY

OPTIMIZATION

PROXIMITY

BLOCK TYPOLOGY

DENSITY DISTRIBUTION

WETLANDS

Cell Structure

0 - 2600 sq.m

PROGRAM DISTRIBUTION R

5301 - 7200 sq.m

2600 -5300 sq.m

C

7201 - 10000 sq.m

R1

R2

Height Domains

Total Area

Ground Coverage

152200 sq.m

35-50%

4-6 floors

522450 sq.m

40-80%

8- 30 floors

283567 sq.m

50-90%

15-55 floors

122277 sq.m

25-60%

5-10 floors

65-80%

30-60 floors

20-75%

0- 10 floors

C1

C2

O 116299 sq.m

S 18994 sq.m

BUILDING MORPHOLOGY

GENE ACTION

BODY PLAN

PROGRAM TYPOLOGY GSI FLOORS

HEIGHT

S.C

S.O

S.O.C

R.S.

R.S

STEPPED

L - SHAPED

U- SHAPED

COURTYARD

TOWER

SLAB

PODIUM

PRIMITIVE

R

R

.86 (max)

.32 (max)

.44(max)

.8 (max)

.5 (max)

.25 (max)

0.3 (min)

.16 (min)

.23 (min)

.5 (min)

.2 (min)

.1 (min)

.5(max) 0 (min)

60 (max)

15 (max)

55 (max)

25 (max)

20 (max)

6(max)

6 (max)

15 (min)

10 (min)

15 (min)

20 (min)

5 (min)

2(min)

1 (min)

6.0 (max)

6.0 (max)

6.0 (max)

6.0 (max)

6.0 (max)

6.0 (max)

6.0 (max)

3.30 (min)

3.30 (min)

3.30 (min)

3.30 (min)

3.30 (min)

3.30 (min)

3.30 (min)


CRITERIA 1: Maximize roof exposure CRITERIA 2: Maximize ground exposure CRITERIA 3: Maximize building exposure Using evolutionary solver, the formulated genetic algorithm was processed on a single super-block. The pie charts below, depicts the optimization of between three criterion’s, which in-turn suggests a successful strategy in terms of morphology modulation. Future tests needs to be conducted to test the same for higher density scenarios. Gen 10

Gen 30

Gen 50

ACADEMIC RESEARCH | GROUP PROJECT (3) | 35


06 | BUILDING AS A LANDSCAPE (2014) Intervention of technology, changing socio-economic, cultural and spiritual ideals have induced the need of an ‘URBAN SPACE’ which will be the identifying landmark of its surroundings. “Building as a Landscape” is the Undergraduate thesis project which looks into the development of an ecological public space encompassing recreation, leisure at city center by taking the urban issues under consideration. The project also looks into making an attempt in bridging the gap between built forms and landscape by creating a close association between these two entities to achieve an integrated system of forms.


Whole site was divided into zones based on the activities.

Due to the vast area of the site, a transit network (green car track) was established with terminals at each zone.

Final SIte with complete zoning and all the spaces.

ACADEMIC | INDIVIDUAL PROJECT

| 37


ADMINISTRATION OFFICE 1450 m2 AUDITORIUM 2180 m2

CENTRAL WATCH TOWER 1290 m2

OPEN PERFORMANCE PLATFORM 1670 m2 EXHIBITION HALLS 1970 m2

HAAT / ARTS & CRAFTS CENTER

ECOLOGICAL CENTER 5000 m2

6528 m2 FOOD COURT COMPLEX 5217 m2

SITE PLAN

POETIC ORCHARD GARDEN 4660 m2

TOTAL AREA : 49 ACRES


GROUND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

MEMBRANE - CLADDING WITH TITANIUM PANELS

ELEVATION

SECTION A-A’ INNER & OUTER MASS STRUCTURAL STEEL FRAMEWORK

ACADEMIC | INDIVIDUAL PROJECT

| 39


GROUND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SECTION A-A’

ELEVATION

SPLIT - ISO VIEW

OUTER MASS- RESPONSIVE MEMBRANE CLADDING WITH ZINC PANELS

OUTER MASS STRUCTURAL STEEL FRAME WORK

INNER MASS CALDDING WITH DOUBLE GLAZING INNNER MASS STRUCTURAL STEEL FRAME WORK

Malus domestica

POETIC ORCHARD GARDEN | DETAILS

This space is created with the cultural consideration such that the literary works of few famous poets of the region are inscribed in the fabricated metallic balls (poetic fruits) which is related with the surrounding orchard trees, hence the name poetic orchard garden.

Metallic balls held in the circular frame in tension with SS cables it tends to be elastic hence viewers can pull and gaze through it. P

Zizyphus mauritiana


SECTION A-A’

ELEVATION

BIOME PLAN | DETAILS

AGR IC

UL CEN TURAL TER

Cotton grass

POLAR BIOME Monkey puzzle tree

0 - 100 C TEMPERATE BIOME

Pasque flower

5 -250 C

Cherry wild MEDITERRANEAN BIOME 0 - 200 C

Arctic poppy

Alder

Clematis Gooseberry

Acacia

Blue algave

Bougenvillae

The ecological center is derived from the concept of a fragmented landform which provides an opportunity for clear storey lighting at varying levels. The building holds biome and agricultural store and center with administration and service zones.

ACADEMIC | INDIVIDUAL PROJECT

| 41


SECTION A-A’

ELEVATION

FLOOR PLANS

UNIT FLOOR PLANS

UNIT SECTION

TYPICAL STREET SECTION

Haat zone- (foodcourt, serpentine tunnel, arts & crafts street)Concept- Building as landform, serpentine landform and sinusoidal landforms,inspired from sinusoidal waves with crest & trough offering spaces for retail, working and living.

To add a differentiation and uniqueness to each street ,based on the function, different tree profiles are assigned. ( Refer diagrams on the right )


SECTIONAL ELEVATION

SECTION A-A’

FLOOR PLAN

POTTERY STREET - ROUND

STONE CARVING STREET - FASTIGATE

POTTERY STREET - ROUND

METAL CRAFT STREET - SPREADING

POTTERY STREET - ROUND

MUSICAL STREET - WEEPING

POTTERY STREET - ROUND

MUSICAL STREET - WEEPING

ACADEMIC | INDIVIDUAL PROJECT

| 43


07 | INDOOR SPORTS COMPLEX (2013) “To create an integrated facility for indoor sports & recreation for the students within the campus encompassing technology in built form.� The project looks into the possibility of depicting movement and energy through a facade system as an integrated digital interface which can display various patterns in a dynamic fashion enclosed within the hexagonal framework, alternate transition around the facade with plain and mixed with square geometry. Surrounding the facade the stairwells are made as an interesting form like a tower with the flow of the facade mass which also holds geometric slit openings with alternate pixels and streaks pattern depicting the movement.

First step involves the zoning & orientation of built forms and fixing the entry points.


Second step involves the fixing of entry points at the building level based on the user types.

Third step involves the zoning of parking, services and pathways through landscape

Final site

ACADEMIC | INDIVIDUAL PROJECT

| 45


N

SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT

SPECTATORS PARKING - 1 VIP PARKING MEDIA PARKING VIP ENTRY SPECTATORS / ADMIN ENTRY SITE ENTRY - 1

INDOOR STADIUM

MEDIA ENTRY PLAYERS ENTRY - 1

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

SPECTATORS ENTRY -2

SPECTATORS PARKING - 2

PLAYERS ENTRY -2

PLAYERS / STUDENTS PARKING STUDENT CONVENTION CENTER SITE ENTRY - 2

SITE PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

VIEW ANGLE & GUIDELINE DETAILS

GALLERY FLOOR PLAN


ELEVATION

SECTION A-A’

ROOF - CLADDING WITH FRP PANELS

ROOF - STEEL RING BEAM

ROOF - STEEL GIRDER FRAMEWORK ASSEMBLY

FACADE - STRUCTURAL STEEL FRAME WORK PRECAST

PART SECTION DETAIL FACADE - CLADDING WITH BIPV & TITANIUM PANELS

STAIR WELLS - RCC PRECAST PANELS

WALL ASSEMBLY - RCC

SPLIT - ISO VIEW

The movement is not only emphasized in the exterior, it also carries into the interior, where the vertical movement happens (stairwell). Kinetic sculptures are introduced which creates an interesting pattern due to its dynamic actuations ACADEMIC | INDIVIDUAL PROJECT

| 47


08 | LEGENDS’ SQUARE APARTMENTS LOCATION : COIMBATORE, INDIA CLIENT : http://www.somusproperties.com/ SITE AREA : 7333.5 SQ.FT BUILT UP AREA : 4354.6 SQ.FT The Legends’ square apartment was designed with an intent to create a small diverse community within the building. The building’s 17,000 square feet floor area facilitates 12 exclusive apartments, six of which are spacious 3-Bedroom flats ; other six are compact 2-Bedroom units, with the density limitations determined by the lot’s size and location. The main feature of the building was the projecting balcony spaces. To enhance the sense of identity, a combination of traditional and contemporary materials are used for louvered and mesh mass plugged into the volume along the projected balconies creating a dramatic spatial demarcation along the exterior, where the light and shade creating dynamic special experience internally, varying in every unit. ROLE: Project Lead - Elevation design, Renderig, Visual graphics, Working drawings.


PROFESSIONAL | TEAM PROJECT (2)

| 49


STILT FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

UNIT C ( 3 BHK) 1980 SQ.FT

UNIT C ( 3 BHK) 1396 SQ.FT

UNIT B ( 2 BHK) 1255 SQ.FT

ISOMETRIC PLAN


SECOND FLOOR PLAN

ELECTRICAL LAYOUT

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

NOTES: LEGEND AND ABBREVIATIONS:

NOTES: LEGEND AND ABBREVIATIONS:

PROFESSIONAL | TEAM PROJECT (2)

| 51


PROFESSIONAL | TEAM PROJECT (2)

| 53


09 | GREEN FIELD INTERNATONAL SCHOOL LOCATION : DHARAPURAM, INDIA SITE AREA : 10 ACRES CLIENT : http://greenfieldinternationalschool.net/ BUILDUP AREA : 160000 SQ.FT Aiming to bridge the educational gap between inner city and suburban area, the school is considered to provide high quality education to the residents. Therefore, the design concept should fit with current educational trend, that is , be more open and self-sustainable. The school campus is conceived as low-rise network of buildings and landscape spaces that encourage encounter & communication. The site had an added advantage of vast space thus accommodating all needs in a more precise manner thus the unbuilt spaces were well utilized for wide range of activities for the students. The major requirement was the task to bring out an emphasizing and welcoming visual outlook for the built masses which was achieved through the usage of wide range of materials and design of elements within the built mass in such a way to promote the intervention of light and shadows to enhance the spatial quality. ROLE : Design details, Working drawings, Site supervision


PROFESSIONAL | TEAM PROJECT (2)

| 55


SECTION A-A’

ROAD NETWORK DRAWING


ELECTRICAL LAYOUT

SHADING LOUVER DETAIL

CLASS ROOM DETAILS PROFESSIONAL | TEAM PROJECT (2)

| 57


10 | A-1 HEAD OFFICE INTERIOR LOCATION : COIMBATORE, INDIA CLIENT : http://a1chips.in/ TOTAL AREA : 810 SQ.FT A-1 ( Chips) food production company wanted their head office to be located within their factory premises in order to have a constant supervision. The site chosen was a cantilevered balcony space within the production house of their factory. The enclosure for the space was completely made transparent one way to have a clear views over the production unit. The main aim was to Create an image of a fresh space that will play a key role in the company’s future development, encouraging a rich communication between the main staffs and CEOs of the company. The spaces needed were reception Lobby, workstation zone, storage spaces, discussion space and cabin for the CEOs. As per the clients’ request each space were made separable and carefully designed in a distinct fashion to project an unique style and to create a fresh experience for the users.


DISCUSSION LOUNGE 142 SQ.FT

CEO ROOM 170 SQ.FT

RECEPTION / WAITING LOBBY 189 SQ.FT

STORAGE SPACE 26 SQ.FT SERVER ROOM 24 SQ.FT

WORKSTATION ZONE 236 SQ.FT

TOTAL CARPET AREA : 810 SQ.FT

RECEPTION WALL PANEL DETAILS

FLOOR PLAN

DISCUSSION LOUNGE DETAILS

PROFESSIONAL | TEAM PROJECT (3)

| 59


RECEPTION LOBBY DETAILS

WORK STATION DETAILS


RENDERS | VISUALISATIONS

CONSTRUCTION | EXECUTION

PROFESSIONAL | INDIVIDUAL PROJECT | 61


12 | AA VISITING SCHOOL 2014 | HYPER THREADS A workshop focused on the exploration of the synergy between the methods of form-finding with curved-crease folding through various analog , digital models and computational tools in order to fabricate a concrete cast compressive skeletal shell structure out of a sheet material.

CURVE FOLDING EXPERIMENTS


FORM FINDING EXPERIMENTS

SHELL | PANEL CONFIGURATION

2

1

3

19

21 18 12

20

22

7

16 11

9

15

10 8

14

17 25

13

23 24

27 28 26

6

5

4

PANEL - JOINERY DETAIL 1 - Welded Wire Mesh Reinforcing Mat 2 - 3/8” Rebars with 10” over Extension 3 - Stainless C-Hanger conduit Bracket 4 - 16 mm Threaded Anchorage Bolt 5 - 8 mm Threaded Bolt 6 - Stacked 3 mm Wood Spacer Blocks 7 - Security Nut & Washer 8 - Anchorage Nut & Washer 9 - 2 mm Aluminium Folded Pan 10 - Concrete Anchor Stud on Polygon Face Centers

1 2

10

3

4

7

5

8

6

9

WORKSHOP | GROUP PROJECT | 65


13 | DESIGN & BUILD | MEMBRANE PLUS Workshop focused on the development of a material system and fabrication method exploring active fabrication in which latex and plywood composite material systems’ performance arises during the process of fabrication Material, Structure and form are thought of in parallel and the resulting geometries follow the behavioural logics of the material. These steps guides the development of a system that combines stretchable latex membranes with patterned plywood (patterns informed by digital analysis) which results in the development of complex 3D geometries. ROLE : Digital analysis, Design, Fabrication

BIRCH PLYWOOD 4 mm

STRETCHED LATEX

PLY MILLED WITH CNC FOR SPECIFIC DESIGN PATTERN

LATEX TENSIONED AND RELEASED AFTER THE ADHESIVE APPLICATION

DEFORMED PLYWOOD FORM


FEA Analysis 01

02

03

04 The FEA analysis helped us in understanding the amount of stress concentration on the panels and predicting the type of curvature that can be achieved for different types of pattern on deformation with differing amounts of stretching and loading conditions.

Fabrication

WORKSHOP | GROUP PROJECT | 67


14 | BAMBOO U |

IBUKU, Bali, Indonesia

Bamboo U, comprised of series of on-site

workshops, aided in experiencing the potential of bamboo at first hand. Majorly focusing on the life cycle of bamboo, it helped in providing the key insights into the gifts and challenges of what it takes to build in bamboo. Initial days of the workshop was dedicated to modeling, joinery making, harvesting and curing techiques, followed by a compendium of design challenges and the bulk remainder of the time was spent in building the office for Ibuku (1:1 structure) with guidance from skilled local craftsman. Interspersed was talks/discussions about the approach to sustainability by the Bamboo U team and guest bamboo experts from different parts of the world. The workshop as a whole provided an expanded, cutting edge view of bamboo architecture. ROLE : Design & Fabrication


STRUCTURAL FRAME DETAILS

FRAME A

FRAME A FRAME B

FRAME B

FRAME C

WORKSHOP | GROUP PROJECT | 69


PIN / DOWEL MAKING PROCESS & FISH MOUTH JOINT

JOINERY TECHNIQUE - 1

JOINERY TECHNIQUE - 2

WORKSHOP | GROUP PROJECT | 71


BAMBOO POLES SELECTION FOR THE CONSTRUCTION FOLLOWING THE HARVEST & CURING Dendrocalamus asper & Gigantochloa apus

FOUNDATION AFTER SETTING

STRUCTURAL FRAME ASSEMBLY ON THE TEMPLATE

ERECTION OF STRUCTURAL FRAME ASSEMBLY - B

ERECTION OF THE FRAME USING PULLEY LEVER MECHANISM THEREBY SETTING THEM ON THE FOUNDATION

STRUCTURAL FRAME ‘A’ SET IN POSITION


FISH MOUTH JOINT

ALL THE FRAMES SET IN POSITION

MEMEBER CONNECTIONS

DESIGN CHALLENGE :HONOURED PRESENTATION ( How can we Optimise the overall form / geometry of the building for an efficient rain water collection and storage in Wet tropical regions with bamboo as a material ? )

SIDE VIEW OF THE FRAMED STRUCTURE

CLADDING THE STRUCTURE WITH BAMBOO SHINGLES

WORKSHOP | GROUP PROJECT | 73


ARAVINDH KUMAR R P rp.aravindhkumar@gmail.com +919865212242 I +447561091076 No.7, Ramakrishnapuram, near Ponnaiyarajapuram, Coimbatore - 641001

Profile for Rp Aravindh

Aravindh kumar R P - Graduate & Professional Architecture portfolio  

Aravindh kumar R P - Graduate & Professional Architecture portfolio  

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