Page 1

ACADEMIC PORTFOLIO ROY CLOUTIER


ROY CLOUTIER // ACADEMIC PORTFOLIO

2012

IRON RANGE MAUSOLEUM

2

THE CONCISE HOUSE

4

LOWERTOWN LIVE/WORK

6

H E N N E P I N B LU F F S R E V I TA L I Z AT I O N

10

ST R U C T U R E S , M AT E R I A L S , & METHODS

12

M AT E R I A L S & M E T H O D S PAV I L I O N

14

NICOSIA BUFFER ZONE MUSEUM

18


2

IRON RANGE MAUSOLEUM

SPRING 2012 | WHITEFACE RESERVOIR, MN | INDEPENDENT STUDY

The Iron Range Mausoleum seeks to use architectural atmospheres to heighten the experience of the cremation ritual. Situated on a small island near a declining former mining town in Northern Minnesota, the project seeks to capture the somber beauty of its landscape, framing it and complementing it with minimal, restrained architectural interventions. The architecture focuses on the poetics of light, material, and form, seeking to merge with the landscape to create a cohesive, contemplative environment for the grieving ritual and the beginnings of the healing process.


3

COLUMBARIUM WALL: GROWTH OVER TIME


4

THE CONCISE HOUSE

SUMMER 2011 | PROCTOR, MN | COMPETITION | ADVISOR: SARAH NETTLETON B E S T U N D E R G R A D U A T E P R O J E C T, U S G B C N AT U R A L TA L E N T D E S I G N C O M P E T I T I O N 2 0 1 1

In this competition, we were asked to design a three-bedroom house to LEED Platinum standards, while maintaining a budget of under $150,000. The design that emerged out of these rigorous constraints placed priority on simplicity, efficiency, and finding elegant solutions to complex problems.

NW WINTER WIND N

SERVICE SPACES DINING/ ENTERTAINING

SLEEPING LIVING

The design of the house seeks to harness the bioclimatic patterns of the site. The living spaces face south, capturing the most warm, winter sunlight, while the service spaces form a buffer from the cold northwest wind, sheltering the living spaces.

SUNLIGHT

PLAN LEGEND: SERV

1. Porch/Pergola 2. Entry & Mud Room 3. Living Room 4. Dining Room 5. Kitchen 6. Pantry 7. Master Bedroom 8. Bathroom 9. Laundry/Utility Room 10. Mechanical Core 11. Storage 12. Garage

ICE LIVIN

12

G

1 6

2

11

10

9 8

5 4 FORM PROCESS

PLAN

3

7


5 The construction of the house relies on digital prefabrication and easily-constructed rectilinear forms to reduce costs; its structure is comprised of energy-efficient, super-insulated SIP panels, which are milled at a factory and tipped into place on site. The form of the house emerged from seeking a clear tectonic expression of SIPs as a structural system, leading to the shell approach. These shells were then optimized for passive solar gain in the winter and shading in the summer. R E N D E R I N G : S TA I R S T O L O W E R F L O O R

PROJECT COMPLETED IN COLLABORATION WITH THERESA MOZINSKI DESIGN / CONCEPT: R.C. AND T.M. GRAPHICS AND TEXT: R.C.

RENDERING: APPROACH FROM SIDEWALK


6

LOWERTOWN LIVE/WORK

S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 | S T. P A U L , M N | S T U D I O I V | P R O F. C Y N T H I A J A R A

Lowertown Live/Work seeks to use architectural form to facilitate social activity and interaction in the context of high-density, live-work housing. The focus of this studio was on creating spatial complexity on three scales—site, building, and dwelling unit—and on using the tectonic elements at play on each scale to emphasize and complement said spatial complexity. My design focuses on an interplay of angles and shifting axes, drawing the geometry of the site through all three scales to create spatially complex intersecting, interpenetrating, and interlocking conditions. These conditions are used to shape a nuanced approach to social space in high-density housing, using shifts between the grids to articulate thresholds between nine different tiers of social space.

SITE MODEL & STUDIES

RESEARCH: LIVE / WORK ARCHETYPES

LIVE NEAR WORK: W O R K O C C U R S I N A D I F F E R E N T PA R T OF THE OVERALL COMPLEX

LIVE ABOVE WORK: L I V I N G S PA C E S S E PA R AT E F R O M B U T C O N N E CT E D TO W O R K I N G S PAC E S

LIVE WITH WORK: W O R K O C C U R S I N T H E U N I T, A S I N ARTISTS’ STUDIOS OR HOME OFFICES


7

URBAN SCALE PUBLIC STREETSCAPE & SQUARE

P U B L I C C O U R T YA R D

SHOPS AND GALLERY

P R O C E S S : S I T E I N V E S T I G AT I O N S K E T C H E S

PROCESS: SITE FORCES

P R O C E S S : D E V E L O P M E N T O F T H E PA R T I / C O N C E P T

P U B L I C S PA C E , P U B L I C C O U R T YA R D, P R I VAT E C O U R T YA R D

OPENED / EXTROVERTED C O U R T YA R D S

ENGAGE BUILDING’S FORM WITH TRAIN DECK

FORM RESPONDS TO S I T E F O R C E S


8

BUILDING SCALE

R E S I D E N T S ’ C O U R T YA R D

SHARED AMENITIES

N E I G H B O R S PAC E S

P R O C E S S : U N I T T E S S E L L AT I O N S T U D Y

P R O C E S S M O D E L : U N I T T E S S E L L AT I O N C O N C E P T

MODEL: MAIN BUILDING STRUCTURE


9

DWELLING SCALE PRIVATE PORCHES

H O M E O F F I C E S / G U E ST S PAC E S

P R I V AT E S P A C E S

U N I T P R O C E S S : M A N I P U L AT I N G G R I D S ; S H A P I N G S P A C E

UNIT A

UNITS A+B

UNIT B

N

MODEL: UNIT A


10

U R B A N WA L D O R F S C H O O L

S P R I N G 2 0 1 1 | M I N N E A P O L I S , M N | S T U D I O I I : P R O G R A M | P R O F. J U L I A R O B I N S O N , P H D

In my second studio, I was able to explore one of the issues that most interests me: the integration of research with design. The project focused on designing a Waldorf school on an urban site, based on a combination of direct observation study, academic research, and site analysis. The project sought to use architectural form to reconcile the seeming contradiction of creating a Waldorf school in an urban area. My design uses the layout of the building to mediate this conflict, allowing the design to achieve multiple goals. The learning spaces were designed based on observation studies conducted in local Waldorf schools. As well, the facade of the learning spaces employs a brisesoleil to shape changes in daylighting throughout the day, in order to match the learning activities occuring at those times. WALDORF PEDAGOGY DIRECT CONNECTION T O N AT U R E

WAREHOUSE DISTRIC T SITE “ S H E L L” A P P R O A C H

DENSE, HARDSCAPED URBAN ENVIRONMENT

E X P L O R AT I O N A N D I M A G I N AT I O N A S K E Y TO LEARNING

PROTECT STUDENTS FROM SAFETY CONCERNS

ORGANIC FORMS

HISTORIC CODE: RECTILINEAR FORMS

N AT U R A L M AT E R I A L S

I N D U S T R I A L M AT E R I A L S


11 CLASSROOM DESIGN: RESPONDING TO ACTIVITY AND RITUAL

O B S E R V AT I O N S T U D Y : TE AC H E R’ S I N F LUE N C E & C LA SSROOM F OR M

CLASSROOM INTERIOR

R A D I A L L AY O U T

C O U R T YA R D / C L A S S R O O M I N T E G R AT I O N

S I T E S E C T I O N : S T R E E T S C A P E / / B U I L D I N G / / P L AY YA R D / / N AT U R A L I Z E D E X P L O R AT I O N A R E A


12

H E N N E P I N B LU F F S R E V I TA L I Z AT I O N S P R I N G 2 0 1 0 | M I N N E A P O L I S , M N | U R B A N D E S I G N S T U D I O | P R O F. P A T R I C K N U N N A L LY A’

This project explores the idea that, if stewarded well, it is possible for society and nature to enter into a mutually beneficial relationship. The project takes a systems-based approach to reconciling ecology and the city, focusing on the interaction of habitat, hydrology, and human habitation in this post-industrial waterfront site.

DEV E LO HEN P A R C E P M E N NEP L T IN B S LUF FS

The local area plan uses a combination of traditional and natural infrastructure to guide future development, creating a sustainable network for the area into which future buildings are integrated.

A

MISSISSIPPI RIVER

PHASE 1: + + +

REMOVE INVASIVE PLANT SPECIES RESTORE AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL HABITAT ADD PHYTOREMEDIATION PLANTINGS ADD SLOPE STABILIZATION PLANTINGS

+ + + +

REMOVE TOXIC SOIL ON DEVELOPMENT SITES REGRADE SITES TO GUIDE WATER FLOW ADD BIORETENTION/INFILTRATION FEATURES ADD BIOFILTRATION SLOPE PLANTINGS ADD TRAILS, BIKE PATHS, AND STREETSCAPES

PHASE 2:

A’ INFI

F I LT

PHASE 3: + + + +

DEVELOP BUILDING PARCELS INTEGRATE W/ WATER INFRASTRUCTURE CREATE COMMUNAL GARDEN AND AMENITIES EXTEND HABITAT TO BUILDINGS W/ LIVING ROOFS

ISS MISS

IPPI

RIVE

R AT I

LT

ON R AT I

ON

R

A S I T E H Y D R O L O G Y : E C O L O G I C A L S T O R M W AT E R I N F R A S T R U C T U R E


13

R E N D E R I N G : P A R K + PAT H W AY S , C O M M U N A L G A R D E N , D E V E L O P M E N T A R E A

LIVING ROOF / R A I N W AT E R C A P T U R E P O TA B L E W AT E R G R E Y W AT E R RAIN GARDENS / F L O W -T H R O U G H PLANTERS

B L A C K W AT E R

LIVING MACHINE

ANAEROBIC DIGESTER

G R E Y WAT E R CISTERN

F I LT E R

P OTA B L E WAT E R

GROUND W AT E R FLOW

D I A G R A M : I N T E G R AT I O N O F F U T U R E B U I L D I N G S ’ W AT E R & W A S T E I N P U T S W I T H H Y D R O L O G I C I N F R A S T R U C T U R E


14

S T R U C T U R E S , M AT E R I A L S , & M E T H O D S FA L L 2 0 1 1 | M I N N E A P O L I S , M N | B U I L D I N G S C I E N C E | P R O F S . J I M LU T Z & S U S A N ST R OT H M A N

For a construction materials and methods class, my team and I built a 1” = 1’ model of a portion of Greene and Greene’s Gamble House, specifically examining how its structure is articulated. The Greene brothers used many different types of wood in interesting ways, combining heavy timber as the main structural frame with standard stud wall framing as infill to support the cladding. As well, each large structural member is exquisitely crafted, featuring rounded edges and Japanese “cloud lift” motifs on the

D E TA I L : H E A V Y T I M B E R J O I N E R Y ; A R T I C U L AT E D B E A M E N D S

MODEL: GAMBLE HOUSE, N.E. CORNER

D E TA I L : W A L L S E C T I O N A N D S T R U C T U R E


15 STRUCTURES: In this class, our challenge was to design and build two structures—a bridge and a tower—to have the greatest possible ratio of weight supported to weight of structure (using only balsa and glue). Our design for the tower uses hyperbolic paraboloids to counter the inherent compressive weakness of balsa; all supporting members brace one other at their weakest points. The bridge design uses a similar strategy, seeking to minimize the length of compressive members.

D E TA I L : C O L U M N

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF EACH PROJECT COMPLETED IN C O L L A B O R AT I O N W I T H T H E R E S A M O Z I N S K I A N D T I M S C H N E I D E R

D E TA I L : B U T T E R F LY T R U S S , B R I D G E


16

M AT E R I A L S & M E T H O D S PAV I L I O N

FA L L 2 0 1 1 | M I N N E A P O L I S , M N | ST U D I O I | P R O F S . DA N C L A R K , M A R T H A M C Q U A D E , & C R A I G R O B E R T S

The project for my first studio was both an investigation of the interrelation between materials, construction methods, and form, and an exploration of an iterative approach to the design process.

CONTEXT PHOTOS

The project was to design a pavilion on an infill site. The spatial qualities of the design were explored through iteration and abstraction, via models in a variety of me-

SOLID/VOID WOOD MODELS

PAT H O F WOOD MODELS

P L A S T E R PAT H

P L A S T E R PAT H I T E R AT I O N S


17 P L A S T E R PA V I L I O N : CARVING SOLID / VOID

PA P E R PA V I L I O N : F O L D E D P L AT E STRUCTURE

H Y B R I D PA V I L I O N : BLENDING THE TWO LANGUAGES

M O D E L P H O T O : I N T E R I O R A N D E X T E R I O R G AT H E R I N G S PA C E S

MODEL PHOTO: ENTRY


18

NICOSIA BUFFER ZONE MUSEUM S U M M E R 2 0 1 0 | N I C O S I A , C Y P R U S | S T U D Y A B R O A D | P R O F. R A C H E L I A N N A C O N E

During a May Term study abroad trip that culminated in a stay in Cyprus’s divided capital city, Nicosia, I was tasked with creating a physical, social, and architectural vision for what might become of a parcel of land in the United Nations Buffer Zone in a reunified Cyprus. Building on initial background research and interviews with Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot students, my final project proposes to create a bi-communal museum in the former buffer zone, preserving the stories of both groups of Cypriots through the course of ethnic struggle, war, partition, and reconciliation. BUFFER ZONE: CURRENT CONDITIONS U.N. BUFFER ZONE - THE “GREEN LINE”

16TH CENTURY VENETIAN WALLS

TURKISH REPUBLIC OF NORTHERN CYPRUS

PLAN IN SITE BUFFER ZONE FIGURE GROUND

REPUBLIC OF CYPRUS

NICOSIA , CYPRUS: HISTORIC CORE

SITE PLAN


19 HISTORY + CONTEXT Nicosia, Cyprus—the last divided capital city in Europe—is a truly unique urban experiment. Partitioned into two halves by a United Nations buffer zone since the war of 1974, the city and country have only recently begun to take the first tentative steps toward reunification. Dividing the two is the U.N. Buffer Zone, colloquially known as the Green Line, left untouched since the war except by nature and time.

U. N . B U F F E R Z O N E : “THE GREEN LINE”

TURKISH REPUBLIC OF NORTHERN CYPRUS NICOSIA

REPUBLIC OF CYPRUS

GREEK CYPRIOT

TURKISH CYPRIOT

E T H N I C E N C L AV E S (MID-20TH CENTURY)

WA R ( 1 9 7 4 ) A N D U. N . PA R T I T I O N ( 1 9 7 4 - P R E S E N T )

SELECTIVE OPENING OF THE PA R T I T I O N ( 2 0 0 8 - P R E S E N T ) BUFFER ZONE: CURRENT CONDITIONS


20

BUFFER ZONE INTERVENTION: NICOSIA GREEN LINE MUSEUM The design of the museum seeks to subvert the singular narrative structure of traditional museums. Rather than one story or narrative, the individual stories of the Greek and Turkish communities are told in parallel, overlapped, and juxtaposed, allowing for multiple readings and new interpretations of the two histories. The museum’s layout itself fosters this condition, through use of radial symmetry, intertwined gallery routes, and overlapping spatial conditions.

G A L L E R Y C I R C U L AT I O N : F LO W T H R O U G H T H E B U I L D I N G ; INTERTWINING THE G R E E K C Y P R I OT A N D T U R K I S H C Y P R I OT G A L L E R I E S PAT H + C O U R T YA R D S

PA R A L L E L G A L L E R I E S

G A L L E R I E S : S P AT I A L A R R A N G E M E N T

PLAN: MAIN GALLERIES

RAUMPLAN


21 S PAT I A L C O N D I T I O N S : INTERREL ATION S A ND INTERACTIONS B E T W E E N THE PARALLEL GALLERIES

R E N D E R I N G : P U B L I C S PAC E / E N T RY

RENDERING: GALLERY


Undergraduate Architecture Portfolio  

This document is a compilation of works from my undergraduate architectural studies at the University of Minnesota and the University of Cal...