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FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 Vol. 104 No.68 • Established 1908

Unlikely activist

14

WEEKEND EDITION

THE VOICE OF VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS

THEATRE: A is for Alice 25/ SPORTS: Teen golf siblings 28

Communitycentre associationssue Vanparkboard SIX GROUPS BLAME ONECARD AS THE LAST STRAW IN ONGOING FIGHT SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

T

photo Rebecca Blissett

CELEBRATING STANLEY: There’s a party going on to mark Stanley Park’s 125th birthday and everyone’s invited. See related story on page 4. To watch an old park board film to see what Stanley Park looked like more than 70 years ago, scan this page with your smartphone or tablet using the Layar app.

he park board is declining comment on a lawsuit filed in B.C. Supreme Court Tuesday afternoon by six of the city’s community centre associations. In the 45-page document outlining the suit, the associations accuse the park board of breaching numerous sections of the current joint operating agreement while also limiting their ability to raise money now and in the future. The six associations involved in the lawsuit are Hillcrest, Killarney, Hastings, Kerrisdale, Sunset and Kensington. Jesse Johl, president of the Hillcrest Community Centre Association, said the recent introduction of the “universal” OneCard “broke the camel’s back.” The system-wide membership card, introduced by the park board in June, was immediately accepted at seven community centres as

well as the city’s rinks, pools and gyms. The plan was that if the proposed joint-operating agreement between all of the associations and the park board was ratified by September, the OneCard would be universally accepted at 22 community centres. The six community centres are concerned that the OneCard eliminates the need for community centre association memberships. According to the provincial Society’s Act, the associations must have a membership list to qualify as a non-profit society. The associations say non-profit status is vital to their ability in obtaining government funding or grants. With that September deadline looming and no sign of ratification in sight, the six community centre associations have continued to charge membership fees over and above the cost of a OneCard, which replaces the park board’s Flexipass. See PARK on page 4

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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HOUSE OF LIFE BY CHERYL ROSSI

photo Jason Lang

Inara Jaunozola and her husband Juris Austrins renovated this West End home to give solace to a dying friend.

CLASS NOTES: CHECK MATE BY CHERYL ROSSI Seven-year-old Kevin Low, who could read at three, returned from a national competition as one of the top-ranked players in his age group.

WALKED THIS WAY BY JENNIFER THUNCHER Teacher Bart Zych finished a 1,100-kilometre solo walk from Hope to Calgary to raise money for youth and discovered serendipity.

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Living to New Heights

SPORTS PUTTING UP WITH FAMILY BY MEGAN STEWART

16

Shaughnessy Golf and Country Club teens Sumie and Alex Francois learned the game from a family dedicated to the greens.

HOME AND GARDEN

SEE MORE WITH LAYAR Additional content in this issue available through the Layar app includes: P06: PHOTO GALLERY: VANCOUVER SPECIALS A close-up look at a reborn Vancouver Special renovation near Southeast Marine Drive and Fraser Street.

P14: VIDEO: COAL MAN Activist Kevin Washbrook talks about why he and a small band of Vancouverites are putting coal exports on the public agenda.

P23: PICKS OF THE WEEK Videos of upcoming events and performers coming to town, including some vintage James Bond movie trailers.

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Download the free Layar app to your iPhone, iPad or Android smartphone or tablet. The Vancouver Courier, a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership, respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at vancourier. com. For all delivery problems, please call 604-942-3081. To contact the Courier’s main office, call 604-7381411.

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newsfront A4

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

FROM FRONT PAGE

StanleyParkgoesbigfor125thbirthdaybash SANDRA THOMAS

MEMORY LANE AT THE GARDENS

Staff writer

E

ver wonder how they get those tiny bands on hummingbirds, what the VPD’s Mounted Unit’s stables look like, or how to lawn bowl? The answers to those questions about happenings in Stanley Park and more will be answered this weekend during the biggest party ever held at the iconic green space. Celebrate! Stanley Park takes place Aug. 24 and 25 with more than 200 events happening at five main festival sites to mark the city’s 125th birthday. The weekend has something for everyone including music, children’s entertainment and activities, nature walks, sports, drinks and more. Vision Vancouver park board chair Sarah Blyth is excited about the weekend and plans on attending with her son. “I’m looking forward to watching everyone have a good time,” said Blyth. She added the 2012 Voices in the Park fundraising concert starring Sarah McLachlan acted as good practice for this weekend’s festival, expected to draw more than 40,000 visitors per day. “We’ve been planning this for more than a year,” said Blyth. “I think it’s really important that the city hold these free, family-friendly events once in a while to give people a chance to have some fun.” The following are some of the highlights of each festival site:

SECOND BEACH The Juno-award winning Arkells will headline a list of musical performances including the Born Ruffians, the Matinee, Ali Milner, and the Washboard Union. Second Beach is also where the Stanley Park Ecological Society will stage nature walks. The park’s lawn bowling and pitch

This festival zone, located near the Rose Garden, is where you can watch an expert band, a hummingbird or walk with the Indigenous Plant Diva who will lead visitors through trails, sharing stories about the use of traditional food and medicine plants by Coast Salish peoples. Memory Lane is the location of a vintage car display and is adjacent to the VPD’s stables where tours will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. A historical interpreter will explain how Vancouver’s active women found freedom in the park on Brockton Point’s grass hockey field, on the archery range, while boating in the harbour, or trotting on horseback. Theatre Under The Stars looks back at its 67-year history in Stanley Park with backstage tours of Malkin Bowl.

BROCKTON SPORTSAPALOOZA

This is the area to enjoy rugby and cricket games while enjoying a cold beverage in one of the two licensed areas of the park, with combined seating of 1,000. The Brockton Sportsapalooza festival zone is dedicated to all things sports so be prepared to work up a sweat.

LOST LAGOON’S ECOHARMONY

illustration Adrian Cunningham

With more than 200 events staged for Stanley Park’s 125th birthday celebrations Aug. 24 and 25, the iconic greenspace has been divided into five festival zones. and putt centres are nearby.

FAMILY FUN AT THE ARCH Lumberman’s Arch is where the kids will enjoy family-friendly entertainment like Bobs and Lolo, Will Stroet and the Backyard

Band, Music with Marnie and the Legion of Flying Monkeys Horn Orchestra. The Purple Pirate is a must see, as are the Vancouver Korean Dance Society, the Ta Daa Lady, the Nylon Zoo and Vancouver Pars National Ballet.

Glittering Kingdom, Late Thaw and City Opera are a few of the acts performing on the Lost Lagoon stage. Check out a vintage car display, art, Ruffle RedBird and programs at the Stanley Park Ecological Society Nature House. For a complete schedule of events and advice on how to get to Stanley Park this weekend, visit vancouver.ca. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

Park ranger called to Hillcrest to help staff deal with irate public CONTINUED from page 1 But the park board made it clear in an Aug. 20 letter to Johl that ratification or not, the OneCard will be accepted at all community centres starting in September. In the letter Thomas Soulliere, director of recreation for the park board, wrote in part that forcing people to purchase a separate membership “does not align with the principle of ‘universal access,’ which the park board has consistently affirmed as a key priority for the operation of community centres.” Soulliere continued, “It is the park board’s clear intention to remove these mandatory membership fees in order to improve access for all residents, regardless

of income, to programs offered in public recreation facilities… Those CCA’s who have not aligned with the interim agreement and continue to charge a membership fee for access to programs will be the subject of further discussion at the park board.” Ainslie Kwan, president of the Killarney Community Centre Association, said the letter is proof the park board’s intention all along was to dissolve the associations. “Basically we were told that if we don’t get on board there will be discussions about our future,” said Kwan. “We are concerned we’ll be removed. I’m deeply saddened that these volunteer groups have had to go so far as to launch a lawsuit against the park board.”

Kwan added while the OneCard was the final action from the park board that forced their hand, there are other issues at stake. “The OneCard is part of the lawsuit, but it’s just one piece of the problem,” said Kwan. On Wednesday morning, a park ranger was called to Hillcrest Community Centre to assist staff concerned about dealing with an irate public upset about being charged a membership fee on top of the cost to purchase a OneCard. “Now the park board is bringing in park rangers to protect us from ourselves,” said Johl. “It’s the park board that’s created this dangerous situation.” sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

photo Rebecca Blissett

Jesse Johl, president of the Hillcrest Community Centre Association, said the recent introduction of the OneCard “broke the camel’s back.”


news

FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Young chess champ checks out UAE CLASS NOTES

with Cheryl Rossi

K

evin Low taught himself how to play chess before he turned four. He was bored at preschool so his mother Vivien Lai introduced him to dinosaurs and board games. “He learned too quick,” she said. “I say why don’t you learn something that I do not know, which is chess.” Low could read at three so she directed him to chess websites and library books. Fast-forward four years and Low has just returned from the prestigious North American Youth Chess Championship in Toronto. Entrants included children from the United States, Mexico, Haiti and Costa Rica. Low competed in the under-8 male category, placed third and was awarded the Candidate Master title. His game improved over last year when he was the National Grade 1 Champion. Low, who’s entering Grade 3 at Dr. George M. Weir elementary in Killarney, says he plays chess a maximum of two hours a day. “It’s fun to calculate things,” he said. “It’s good to train your brain, I guess.” He began studying chess at what Maxim Doroshenko, owner and director of Vancou-

ver Chess School, says is Metro Vancouver’s only full-time chess school last September. Doroshenko, junior coordinator for the B.C. Chess Federation, says Low possesses a “brilliant” memory, a competitive spirit and learns from his mistakes. “Kevin played with five players who would be in top 10 in the world according to their rating,” Doroshenko said. “It is even more amazing because U.S. players, they have much more practice, they have more tournaments, they have more coaches and we just started here.” Low will compete at the World Youth Championships in the United Arab Emirates over Christmas. “It’s kind of scary to me. I’m not sure if he’s ready but he told me, ‘Mommy, I’d like to go,’ so I will support him,” Lai said. “It’s actually kind of a pressure to me when I watch them play. You sit outside the room for four hours waiting to know what happened.” Lai believes more B.C. children should learn chess. “It’s a time for B.C. kids or kids at this age doing something more healthier [than] playing computer games,” she said. “There’s no communication when you play in computer games, but there’s a lot to do when you play chess. At least they can travel around and meet new friends and they can talk about chess all day long.” crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

news

UpdatedVancouver Specials get heritage tour treatment CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

A

contractor and architect have transformed a gloomy stucco and brick Vancouver Special into an airy and sustainable abode. The residence near Southeast Marine Drive and Fraser Street boasts reused materials, sustainable systems and “Ikea hacks.” Shaun St. Armour, chief executive officer of Footprint Sustainable Housing, wants to build a prototype sustainable prefabricated laneway home. But the condo-dweller needed to buy a house first so St. Armour bought a once reviled design, and with the help of Erick Villagomez, the architect behind Metis Design Build, transformed it into a desirable home. St. Armour’s home is one of five on Vancouver Heritage Foundation’s Vancouver Special tour, Sept. 21. He and Villagomez will be on hand to answer questions.

Bluish-grey, long-lasting HardieBoard siding and cedar now cover its exterior. The main entry door includes glass panels to provide a sense of flow. For extra storage, they installed drawers in the stairs with Ikea products. “My wife loves shoes,” St. Armour said. Wall, doorways and window placements were moved to create a living area that capitalizes on natural light, heat and ventilation. “Anyone can do this,” Villagomez said. “If you’re replacing a window, all you have to do is [ask] OK, what way should I open it, how big should it be, where should I maximize fixed windows… and that type of mentality permeates the entire project. We wanted it to be a very popular approach to renos and construction with the price point to match.” St. Armour bought the 2,400-square-foot home for $890,000 in June 2012. Renovations cost $225,000, or $90 a square foot, which he and Villagomez say is less than half the standard cost of renovations, at $250 a square foot. St. Armour’s relatives occupy the ground floor suite. St. Armour spent much of his budget on systems, fixtures

and materials that make the home more energy efficient, including heat recovery ventilation, dual flush toilets, fibreglass-framed windows and a metal roof. They insulated the entire home with more expensive but more energy efficient spray foam. Before the reno, the house rated 47 out of 100, with 100 being the most efficient, on the federal EnerGuide Rating System. St. Armour said it now rates 74. The house is currently valued at $1.2 million, according to St. Armour. He anticipates a laneway home would boost his property value to $1.3 million. St. Armour acquired many of the appliances and fixtures for free. “You’d be surprised what you can get on Craigslist,” Villagomez said. For more information, see vancouverheritagefoundation.org. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

photo Rebecca Blissett

To see a photo gallery of the St. Armours’ renovated Vancouver Special, go to vancourier.com or scan this page using the Layar app.

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

news

The Friendliest Dealers and Best Deals in Town

Long, winding road to restoration CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

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promise made to a dying friend saw a house at the corner of Thurlow and Pacific revived. Dark red and trimmed with petunias, the 102-year-old house has seen its once dilapidated exterior restored and its interior transformed from six small housekeeping suites with shared bathrooms to a strata-titled duplex. Inara Jaunozola was a Martha Stewart-like TV show host in Latvia while her husband Juris Austrins worked as a computer engineer when Jaunozola’s aunt, who’d fled Soviet rule decades earlier, begged her in 1990 to come to Vancouver so she wouldn’t die alone. Jaunozola’s bosses agreed to hold her job for a year. The couple bought return tickets. But Jaunozola’s aunt adored their young son andrallied.Insteadoflivingmeremonths,shelived four years. “My aunt, she said, ‘I will never forgive you if you leave me here alone, dying. I have family now for the first time in my life,’” Jaunozola said. So they stayed. Her aunt left her decaying home at West Sixth Avenue and Larch Street to the family and they turned it into a bed and breakfast. “Because we are old, our English is not good, all we can do, just work for ourselves,” Jaunozola said. Austrins renovated the home and won a heritage award for the restoration. TheirLatvianfriendBrunoOzolins,who’dfled Soviet rule in the 1960s and bought the home at

Thurlow and Pacific, was unwell. He asked Austrins to buy and bring life to his home in 2006. The couple bought the home in a private sale. The houses on either side were on the market and the corner was ripe for development, but they turned down offers. Austrins couldn’t betray his friend who died three months later. They initially planned to renovate so each suite would have its own bathroom, but with more than four suites, the city treated the house like an apartment building and the requirements overwhelmed them. Austrins was diagnosed with cancer in 2009, so the couple sold their bed and breakfast and moved to an apartment around the corner from Thurlow on Beach Avenue. Austrins acted as contractor and they did much of the work themselves. “On top of the weight of the project, my husband was battling a terminal diagnosis of cancer and I am convinced that keeping his promise to Bruno has kept him going to finish this renovation,” Jaunozola told the Courier. They completed renovations and moved in last month. They hope to rent out the other half. Austrins is bedridden now with terminal cancer. So was the renovation worth the time and effort? “You know, when we were doing this, it felt no,” Jaunozola said. “There were months and months when I thought oh my God, what have we gotten ourselves into. But now, when it’s done, it gives us, especially for my husband, because he knows if something happens to him, that there is security.”

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

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n audit of Metro Vancouver’s privacy practices has found 13 areas of non-compliance that need to be fixed. Metro says no privacy breaches were found so far, but the report says the potentials for these exist. “These are the most basic privacy requirements,” said Vincent Gogolek, executive-director of the B.C. Freedom of Information and Privacy Association. “They are in violation of the B.C. privacy law.” Metro says it is working to resolve all the problems. Metro Vancouver Housing Corporation (MVHC) stores personal information on 10,000 tenants in the 50 affordable rental housing sites that it owns and operates across the Lower Mainland. A dozen sites are located in Vancouver, such as Heather Place, Habitat Villa, the Regal Place Hotel, Hemlock Court and Kelly Court. Metro’s information and privacy director Chris Plagnol told the Courier that each tenant has a tenant file which can include a tenancy agreement, data on income verification, repairs, and complaints on behaviour. He believes no medical data is kept. Metro also stores personal data on its 1,400 employees, such as their social insurance numbers for payroll, resumes, reports on discipline and promotion, and sometimes medical records for those with injuries and disabilities. The April 2013 report from Metro’s internal audit branch — marked confidential and for internal use only — was obtained by the Courier under the freedom of information law. Some problems, which were noted in the “high priority” red category, include: • The audit noted a risk of “the potential for personal identifiable information to be stored outside of Canada given the use of “cloud computing” services.” Plagnol said that Metro now stores only one personal database in a cloud — about worker recruitment — in Montreal. It won’t store any such data outside the country, for that would be a violation of the B.C. privacy law. (An RCMP report in 2011 noted that any cloud storage system, which many governments now use to save money, can pose higher risks of privacy violations and hacking.) • Metro needs an up-to-date directory of “personal information banks,” to conform to the B.C. Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Plagnol said Metro had a directory of records once but did not update it because it lacked resources for this task. • Metro needs a formal privacy impact assessment process, as per the privacy law. Plagnol said this rule was passed for ministries in 2002, but to other public bodies only in 2011, and Metro is now working to create such a process. • “Examples of personal information not restricted on a need to know employee basis were noted.” Plagnol said he believed that some documents were moved to another department and should have been locked down more securely, but it was no serious breach. “The fact there haven’t been major breaches according to Metro is more attributable to good luck than good information practices, judging by the results of this audit,” said Gogolek. “It makes you wonder how many other public bodies are similarly delinquent in what is a legal duty, not just good practice.” stanleytromp@gmail.com

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

THE VANCOUVER COURIER

1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2 604-738-1411 Twitter: @vancouriernews vancourier.com

Powerex pay out doesn’t add up

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overnments like to try to bury bad news announcements, and using a Friday in the dog days of summer is usually a good time to try it. And that’s what the B.C. Liberal government did last week with a bolt from the blue announcement that it was ending its decade-long fight with the state of California and electrical utilities there over whether B.C. Hydro acted legally when it sold power to the state in 2000 and 2001. It’s been a fascinating story since it first unfolded and the sudden end to it leaves a lot of questions unanswered. The way it has ended has also cost British Columbia a lot of money. The out-of-court settlement cost B.C. Hydro $750 million (about $477 million in unpaid bills and $273 million as an actual payment). Considering the government’s fierce insistence for years that it would never back down because nothing illegal occurred, it’s extraordinary it is actually writing a cheque to the Americans (rather than walking away from unpaid debts). The saga began in the winter of 2000-01, as California experienced an energy crisis brought on by a number of factors: a poorly-conceived deregulation plan, aging energy generation and distribution facilities used by utility companies in the state, and an explosion in energy demands (it was an unusually cold winter). Quite simply, California couldn’t generate enough electricity on its own to keep up with demand and so was forced to look outside the state for help. Rolling electrical blackouts were literally keeping the lights off, as well as the heat, in California homes. One of the energy companies California officials called was B.C. Hydro, which sells surplus electricity it generates through its export subsidiary, Powerex. At the time, I interviewed the energy traders responsible for selling the power to California. They use a complex system that requires them to ensure that B.C. energy demands are met before they start moving power outside the province. They also are acutely aware of the price of electricity at any given moment. It is traded on an open “spot” market and the price can vary at different times of day. In this situation, because California was in such a desperate and precarious situation, the price on that open market had skyrocketed and that meant B.C. Hydro, through Powerex, made a lot of money selling its power to the state (roughly about $1 billion). At the time, B.C. Hydro was viewed as a saviour by California for literally keeping the lights on in the state. In fact, the energy traders I talked to over the phone recalled how thankful their counterparts in the state had been. However, within months, the Americans’ view had dimmed considerably, as they began to suspect they had been “played” by an energy market that had been manipulated by outside interests, including Powerex. The company was accused, in a lawsuit, of engaging in a lot of “Enronlike games” that effectively and illegally fixed energy prices through manipulation and deceitfulness. Enron, the notorious phony energy company, used schemes colourfully called Fat Boy, Death Star and Ricochet. Enron would mislead California’s power grid operators on how much power was needed, in order to increase scarcity and boost prices, and then sell at the artificially high rate. It also created false “congestion” on the grid, and then charged huge prices to relieve it. Powerex was accused of being part of these schemes, although the company has strongly denied the allegations. It argued it was playing by all the rules and had simply taken advantage of the looseness of those rules. Energy Minister Bill Bennett has argued that throwing in the towel in this fight fends off what could have been an even more expensive outcome (more than $3 billion) if U.S. courts had ultimately ruled against Powerex. He may be right, but his predecessors in that portfolio (most recently Rich Coleman) had adamantly maintained there was not a shred of evidence to implicate Powerex in any wrongdoing. So what’s changed? No real explanation has been provided, other than the claim that Powerex wants to “move forward and enhance (its) relationship with California” for future energy sales. But it is a bitter and expensive pill to swallow, particularly since B.C.’s energy helped the state at such a critical time. If California ever goes through another such energy crisis, perhaps Powerex may think twice before picking up the phone when the Americans come calling. Keith Baldrey is chief political reporter for Global BC Keith.Baldrey@globalnews.ca

KEITH BALDREY

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

WE WANT YOUR OPINION Hate it or love it? We want to know... really, we do! Reach us by email: editor@vancourier.com

A ruse by any other name is still a ruse

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mong some tribal societies, a person’s True Name must not be altered or profaned. And in many of the world’s mythologies, to name is to create (“In the beginning was the Word”). So by inference, to rename is to damage or destroy. Consider the fate of Chinese Communist Party secretary Li Hsueh-feng. When he fell out of favour during China’s Cultural Revolution, his superiors punished him with a new name. “The slight modification of a character, while preserving its sound, has long been a medium of official language insults. This is especially true of a language where a single syllable can have more than 40 different meanings, depending on how it is written,” observed language guru Charles Berlitz. Poor Li woke up one morning to discover his name had been changed from “Snowy Mountaintop” to the equivalent of “Bloody Weirdo.” Another target was Fu Chu’ung Pi, a former commander in the Peking garrison. He found his name altered from “Magnificent Precious Stone” to “Corpse of Miserable Worm.” A voluntary name change is a different story. It can represent an opportunity to cast off the past and start anew (Paul Hewson became Bono; Stefani Germanotta morphed into Lady Gaga; Jonathan Stuart Leibowitz shed his skin for Jon Stewart). For a large corporations — they’re people too! — the gambit can be a way to ditch a problematic brand identity. For example, Philip Morris Companies Inc. became Altria Group in 2003, to introduce “clarity” into a company with a history of PR problems involving its flagship product, cancer sticks. Although the company still owns Philip Morris U.S., the term “Altria Group” it’s more likely to conjure a question mark in consumers’ minds than a curlicue of smoke. Yet for letterhead gymnastics, you can’t beat the security services Academi, formerly known as Xe Services, formerly known as Blackwater. The latter was co-founded in 1997 by former Navy Seal and Christian fundamentalist Erik Prince. In short order Blackwater began behaving like a crusading paramilitary outfit answerable only to Prince’s putative boss — God — and was banned from Iraq after a shootout in the streets of Baghdad in 2007 that resulted in the deaths of 17 Iraqi civilians. The company responded decisively with a remake as Xe Services. In December 2011, Xe was reinvented as “Academi.” The name, a riff on Plato’s Academy, was meant convey a more “boring” image, according to CEO Ted Wright. (A spot of trouble in Iraq? That was SO two names ago!) Academi is now the largest of the U.S. State Department’s three private security contractors, which suggests there’s no corporate injury so serious that a Band-Aid of a noun can’t mask it. The Madonna-like reinvention routines extend to a military base in Georgia. “The School of The Americas” at Fort Benning has been slammed by activists as a north-south conduit of human rights abuses, through its training of Latin American security forces. In 2004 its name was changed to the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation. WHINSEC? Sounds like a software patch to me. Not all big name changes in business and government are as dubious as those above. The 2013 decision by CEO Thorsten Heins to rename his lesserrecognized Research in Motion (RIM) with the handle of its iconic smartphone, Blackberry, made sense on paper — even though some tech commentators interpreted the move as a staggering company’s last shot at self-inflation. Some name change proposals beg the question, why? In spite of four consecutive majority Liberal governments, Premier Christy Clark recently floated the idea of renaming the B.C. Liberal Party with a new, more “inclusive” moniker that won’t be confused with the federal Liberal party. Not that fiddling with terminology is likely to help or hinder the Libs’ performance. Every provincial election since 2001, this scandal-hardened crew sails into a majority by default, courtesy apathetic British Columbians with the attention spans of gerbils on Benzedrine. If the party’s current name is barely sensible, it’s perfectly consistent with politics in B.C., where 41 per cent of eligible voters went AWOL in 2013. I’m tempted to tag you democratic abstainers as “bloody weirdos” or “miserable worms.” www.geoffolson.com

GEOFF OLSEN

MALCONTENTMENT IN MARPOLE

To the editor: Re: “Rebel hoods meet to fight city hall,” Aug. 14. Marpole’s opposition to the city plan is just as strong if not stronger than that in the Grandview-Woodland community. In a recent poll an overwhelming 93.5 per cent of families in Marpole said NO to the City’s Draft Marpole Community Plan! Only 2.25 per cent said yes. NO REZONING signs have been popping up all over the neighbourhood in the last couple of weeks. Included in the original City Draft Plan was a proposal for “thin streets.” Apparently that almost caused a riot at the first Community Open House where the plan was revealed. People were really upset fearing it would badly affect their property values. The city quickly withdrew the proposal. Most people are particularly opposed to plans to allow an increase in height restrictions on rental units from four to six stories along Granville Street, West 70th Avenue and Oak Street and also to a plans for small infill and row houses. Over the last year I have attended several workshops where Marpole residents had an opportunity to submit proposals to the City for a Community Plan. Those workshops seem to have been a compete waste of time because the City has completely ignored our wishes and came up with a plan that the majority are totally against. Where is the democracy in that?” If the plans are approved it will destroy this quiet family

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. To be considered for publication, they must be typed, signed and include the writer’s full name (no initials), home address, and telephone number (neither of which will be published), so authorship may be verified. Send to: 1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver V6J 1R2 or email editor@vancourier.com

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oriented community. The city must withdraw the current plan and come up with something that reflects the wishes of the community. Marpole residents are mad as hell and are going to fight hard to save their neighborhood!

flawed and biased. No amount of common sense and passionate entreaties from adjacent neighbours could deter them. How do you build a friendly, caring and tolerant neighbourhood? Not by destroying an existing one.

COHOUSING COMPLEX CAUSES CONCERNS

KCC FEATURE MISSED REZONING AFTERMATH

To the editor: Re: “Kensington area cohousing complex attracts attention,” Aug. 16 It’s ironic that in an effort to create an artificial, mandated neighbourhood the proposed cohousing complex in Kensington and its supporters, are damaging and alienating a traditional functioning one. The rezoning of three singlefamily residential lots to accommodate this 31-unit condominium, is opposed by just about everyone in the area it will impact. Not because of the lifestyle the cohousing people want to embrace but because the development is inappropriate for the neighbourhood. The massive structure will block views, cast shadows on yards and gardens, invade privacy, and the addition of 31 families will add stress to an infrastructure and community amenities that are already overburdened. Mayor Gregor Robinson and his Vision cohorts first touted this project as affordable housing. When the neighbours shot this fallacy down they continued to proceed with their misguided political agenda and a community consultation process that was

To the editor: Re: “Vancouver Special: Kensington-Cedar Cottage,” Aug. 16. This KCC resident of over three decades has been looking forward to your neighborhood series coverage of his own local community. What a surprise to find no mention of the after effects of city council’s 2004 mass rezoning of 1,577 properties. Especially since Kingsway and Knight (K&K) was the precursor of Norquay (partly in KCC) – and of four other local area plans now in severe turmoil. What is the lost anticlimax to the story of the K&K “neighbourhood centre?” The planning was never completed.Told to move on to new territories of rezoning conquest, pressured planners never managed to get around to specifications for the KCC shopping area. Even though the 2002 terms of reference said “Shopping Areas and New Housing Types at the same time.” According to the remade City of Vancouver website, planning for K&K is no longer active. KCC feels like roadkill.

Bob Loveless, Vancouver

Rod Raglin, Vancouver

Joseph Jones, Vancouver

SOCIAL MEDIA COURIER STORY: “Kensington-Cedar Cottage: Animal sculptures polarize tastes,” Aug. 16. Jen Jones @dipperdoodle: I think they are pretty creepy. Still like them though. COURIER STORY: “Marpole residents protest plan,” Aug. 21. Wayne Fougere @WayneFougere: So signs were picked up. Which lawns are they showing up on? I haven’t seen any yet. COURIER STORY: “Hastings-Sunrise: Mental health centre blending into area,” Aug. 2. East Village Van @eastvillagevan: Proud to have supported this community service provider. KUDOS & KVETCHES: “Winter Games of our discontent,” Aug. 9. Shannon Rupp @ShannonRupp: I love kudos and kvetches.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

EVENT OR COMMUNITY NEWS WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT? 604-738-1411 | sthomas@vancourier.com

Star-crossedloversonSunsetBeach COMMUNITY CALENDAR with Sandra Thomas

SUNSET BEACH Mnemonic Theatre Company is offering free Shakespearean performances — with a twist. Besides the fact these performances take place on Sunset Beach, the actors wear street clothes while telling a modern-day version of Romeo and Juliet. The company believes theatre should be accessible to all Vancouverites and hope free performances will encourage interest and the growth of new audiences. Mnemonic Theatre Productions co-founder and director Jordan Dibe says both Toronto and New York offer free summer Shakespeare, so it was time for Vancouver to join the fray. Dibe, a diehard Shakespeare enthusiast, contracted the performing talents of eight emerging artists fresh from the University of B.C. and Langara’s Studio 58. This is Mnemonic Theatre’s first free Shakespearian performance and the troupe hopes it will become an annual event. While the event is free at Sunset Beach (look for the flags), donations are greatly appreciated. Romeo and Juliet runs Aug. 25 at 2 p.m., Aug. 27, 28 and 29 at 7 p.m., and Aug. 31 at 2 p.m.

GASTOWN The Second Annual Gastown BBQ & Chili Festival takes place Aug. 31 and Sept 1 along the cobblestoned street that runs through

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the heart of the neighbourhood (recently celebrated in the winning entry for our Vancouver Minute video contest). This two-day festival is dedicated to raising funds for Athletics 4 Kids, a non-profit group that works to ensure every child can participate in sports no matter their socioeconomic background. The highlight of the festival is the barbecue competition with judges Chef David Hawksworth, Jason Garrison from the Vancouver Canucks, Angus Reid of the B.C. Lions, radio DJ and foodie Joe Leary, and finally, a TV personality who never seems to sleep, Dawn Chubai. Prizes will be awarded for best ribs, wings, brisket and chili during the Blarney Stone’s Fourth Annual Labour Day Luau. Carrall street will be closed between Cordova and Water to make room for picnic tables, a live music stage, patios, balloons and face painting. For more information, visit blarneystone.ca.

STANLEY PARK Despite the fact we dedicated much of our front news pages to the Celebrate! Stanley Park festival taking place this weekend, I could only include a fraction of the 200plus events taking place, so here’s a few more. Guided tours of HMCS Discovery and Deadman’s Island will be available Sunday, Aug. 25 from noon to 7 p.m., while the Vancouver Rowers rugby club will demonstrate the game at the Brockton Point festival site Sportsapalooza. The Greater Vancouver Orienteering Club will also be on hand in this area to allow newcomers a try at the sport. Meanwhile over at the Fun at the Arch

Mnemonic Theatre Company is offering free performances at Sunset Beach Aug. 25, 28, 29 and 31. Actors will wear street clothes with a modern-day version of Romeo and Juliet. festival site at Lumberman’s Arch, meet Lori Weidenhammer a.k.a. Madame Beespeaker a.k.a. the Queen Bee, the artist in residence at the Moberly Cultural Herb Garden. This festival site is also where you’ll find multimedia performance artist Yuki Ueda, cofounder of the annual juggling festival MadSkillz Vancouver, and the face-painting team of the Doodie Girls. Also taking place at Lumberman’s Arch

Recycling Pays!

over the weekend will be Coast Salish per formances by Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh dancers, drummers and singers, while the Coast Salish Cultura Tent will be the place to learn history, facts and stories from representatives of those three First Nations. For more information visit Vancouver.ca. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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May 1-Sept 2, 2013


FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

news

Teacher walks to Calgary to raise money for kids JENNIFER THUNCHER Contributing writer

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art Zych looks well-rested for a man who just walked from Hope to Calgary — that’s more than 1,100 kilometres — in 42 days to raise money for a charity that supports vulnerable youth. When Zych first told his friends about his plans to take two months off to walk alone across two provinces, “They all said ‘Are you crazy?’” recalled Zych. Zych’s walk idea, which quickly turned to an obsession, began in December 2012. He had just turned 40 and was feeling overwhelmed by recent tragedies involving youth. Amanda Todd’s suicide after alleged bullying in October and the fatal shooting by a teenager of 20 children and six adults in December in Newtown, Conn. made Zych ask himself why children were hurting themselves or others. “These are symptoms. A lack of confidence, self-esteem… [youth] don’t have the choices my parents introduced me to… I had parents to talk to and I had behavior options,” said Zych who teaches business courses at Vancouver’s Ashton College. He decided to do something personally challenging to raise money for the Children’s Aid Foundation, which helps underprivileged and neglected Canadian kids. Having an idea is one thing, living out the reality of walking and camping along the sides of roads for weeks on end was quite another. Along the way he encountered more than a few wildlife “that might bite or kick.” And weather was a constant challenge, from torrential rains to suffocating heat to blistering winds, and he had to always be thinking of how he could beat the elements. There were also unexpected privacy problems. “There are no restrooms when you get into Alberta, and it is all flat so there is no privacy,” said Zych laughing now at a scenario that was not so funny at the time. His lowest moments were mental, not physical. The worst happened in Keremeos, in the southern Interior. He was sore and soaking wet, sitting in his tent watching cars on the road

below whiz by, with most of the tripstilltogo.Hesaidhethought about how easy it would be to give up and go home. “But then I thought about the kids I was doing this for and they don’t have an option of taking a break from their lives.” Zych said from that moment on he adopted the motto “this too will pass.” The best moment was when he discovered “serendipity.” Camping in Moyie, a small town in the east Kootenay region, he met a woman walking her dog and they started chatting about his trip. It turned out she had been helped in her youth by the very charity

he was raising money for. She ended up being one of his biggest donors to date. So far, donations haven’t been what he was hoping. He has raised $5,000, only 10 per cent of his original goal. Zych said it is just the beginning of a bigger plan to help youth. He calls his project “I for Community” and wants to speak in high schools, make a documentary out of video he shot along the way and write a book about his experiences. For more information, see Zych’s blog at iforcommunity. org. thuncher@shaw.ca Twitter.com/Thuncher

Sunday September 8 at Krause Berry Farms & Estate Winery, Langley FarmFolk CityFolk’s annual fundraiser. Proceeds help fund our food security work in your region and throughout our province. This year, we’re celebrating our 20th Anniversary. Come celebrate with us. Tickets & info: www.farmfolkcityfolk.ca

Improving Vancouver’s Infrastructure: Construction at the South End of the Burrard Bridge – Expect Delays baabiy^vb kw`wzy NM

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Before

The Burrard and Cornwall intersection at the south end of the Burrard Bridge will be under construction beginning August 26. This project will improve traffic safety and accessibility around the Burrard Bridge. The improvements to the intersection will: l zRtquRUY nSV RsnVpoVXnRrs ZY thPRsT Rn easier to navigate and safer for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians to use.

l ^tqpr]V ohUVnY hsW WVXpVhoV nph]Vu time for pedestrians at the intersection by reducing the maximum number of pedestrian crossings from five down to two. l cVXpVhoV nSV ]rumtV hsW oqVVW rU vehicle traffic coming off the Burrard Bridge onto Cornwall Avenue. The replacement of expansion joints on the Burrard Bridge will also be XrrpWRshnVW \RnS nSRo \rpPd

During construction, motorists can expect traffic changes, lane restrictions and delays and are encouraged to use nSV `phs]RuuV znpVVn jpRWTVd The intersection will remain open and be accessible to motorists, cyclists and pedestrians, and there will be full access to businesses along Cornwall Avenue. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Phone 3-1-1 TTY 7-1-1 Outside of Vancouver: 604-873-7000 Visit: vancouver.ca/roadwork

Development Permit Board Meeting: August 26 The Development Permit Board and Advisory Panel will meet Monday, August 26 at 3 pm at City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue, Ground Floor, Town Hall Meeting Room to consider this development permit application: 7298 Adera Street: This application is for phase two of the r]Vphuu qprQVXn hn zShssrs [V\oe \SRXS RsXumWVo WVtruRnRrs of four existing buildings, development of four residential buildings ranging from seven to nine storeys, restoration

of the perimeter wall development of new landscape VuVtVsno RsXumWRsT h qrpnRrs rU h qmZuRX qhpP hsW development of a district energy system. {uVhoV XrsnhXn iRnY _huu zVXmpRnY gOon xrrpf RU Yrmp ]VSRXuV thY ZV qhpPVW hn iRnY _huu Urp trpV nShs n\r Srmpod TO SPEAK ON AN ITEM: 604-873-7469 or lorna.harvey@vancouver.ca

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

feature story

Pragmatic activist

KITSILANO’S KEVIN WASHBROOK HAS PLAYED KEY ROLE PUTTING

file photo Jason Lang

Unassuming Kitsilano resident Kevin Washbrook has emerged over the past few years as one of B.C.’s least known and arguably most influential activists. To watch a video on Washbrook, go to vancourier.com or scan this page using the Layar app. TOM SANDBORN

T

Contributing writer

he first of the unlikely protesters arrived in White Rock at midnight. Casually but neatly dressed, the disparate group, made up of academics, professionals, workers, a retired union official and a local physician, all united by their concern about B.C.’s contribution to climate change and local health impacts of coal export activities walked through the spring chill and darkness of a May 2012 night. They and their supporters gathered over the next 18 hours where the tracks of the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe run beside the water, tracks that often convey loads of coal to Jim Pattison’s Westshore Terminals, filling the freighters that annually carry 27 million tonnes of Canadian and U.S. coal to off shore buyers. (The BN&SF line hauls all the U.S. coal that arrives at Westshore.) Although they arrived under the cover of darkness, they were not at all secretive about their plans. They had recently sent a letter to the railroad’s principal owner, Warren Buffett, announcing that they meant to block the tracks and prevent another coal delivery if they could. Many of them arrived in the May 5 chill prepared to risk arrest. Once the sun rose, they waited through a long and sunny spring day, as the BNSF held its trains immo-

bile on the tracks south of the border, perhaps hoping the crew of first-time activists would leave. But the protesters met amicably with RCMP officers and received regular reports from protest colleagues who were staked out beside the stalled train all day.

We really face a “ situation around

climate change like FDR’s in the face of the Depression. That president told activists that they had to push him to make the necessary reforms.

—KevinWashbrook

After 5 p.m., a call informed the activists the train was coming. Thirteen members from the crowd of over 60 moved onto the tracks when the train arrived, and refused to budge, despite the court order the railroad had obtained. They were peacefully arrested under the Railway Act and

eventually fined $115 each. Wearing a pristine white T-shirt, a hoody and a leather jacket and moving quietly among the other protesters, often on a cellphone with lookouts down the track or meeting with the RCMP and media, was Vancouverite Kevin Washbrook, a lean, graceful middle-aged father of two who has emerged over the past few years as one of B.C.’s least known and arguably most influential activists. If you have attended any of the public events held over the past few years about the plans to increase coal exports from Lower Mainland ports (plans that would see already existing exports from North Vancouver’s Neptune Terminals upped nearly 50 per cent to 18.5 million tonnes and proposed new facilities at the Fraser Surrey docks and on Texada Island that would ship an additional eight million tonnes within five years), you may have noticed a quiet man, usually in a rumpled black suit, who seems to be present at them all. This modest figure, who looks a lot more like a slightly distracted high school algebra teacher than a public policy firebrand, is Washbrook, one of the founding members in 2006 of VTACC, Voters Taking Action on Climate Change and according to both his opponents and his allies, a remarkably effective environmental organizer. Sitting on the sunny front porch of a comfortably cluttered wooden house in Kits this summer, fondly surveying the lush garden that fills his front yard or puttering around his kitchen brewing lethally strong coffee and exchanging good humored barbs with his teenaged children, or patiently addressing the questions of an inquisitive reporter, Washbrook seems like an unlikely person to have put the coal issue on B.C.’s political agenda, as claimed by a recent Globe and Mail profile. Although Washbrook would be the first to emphasize that the groups he works with, like VTAAC, are collective efforts, and to credit his colleagues with major contributions, some observers believe that he has played a key role in building the campaigns. Even Alan Fryer, the former journalist who now heads up the B.C. Coal Alliance, a pro-industry lobby group, speaks of Washbrook in terms of grudging respect. Although Fryer said his group was founded because of a feeling that the pro-coal position was missing from the public conversation, and accuses Washbrook and other activists of not answering key questions, such as what the alternative to coal export is and how to deal with job losses associated with a change in coal policy, he does say that “from a public relations point of view, Washbrook is an effective campaigner.”

VTACC’S RECORD In VTACC’s inaugural event in December 2006, Washbrook organized together with some of his neighbors a “No Coal for Christmas” rally on Kits Beach to highlight the dangers inherent in proposed new coal fired power plants in the province. They followed up the next February with a Valentine’s Day card project urging citizens to flood the mailboxes of MPs and other political leaders with cards asking them to love the planet. More than 4,000 cards were sent. Another postcard campaign targeted MPs with a challenge: in the war against climate change: were they appeasers or warriors? VTACC spoke out in favour of carbon tax initiatives, including former premier Gordon Campbell’s provincial version, a stance that drew angry criticism from non-Liberals, especially some NDP members who resented any support for the governing party.


FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A15

tells the coal story ISSUE OF COAL AND CLIMATE CHANGE ON B.C.’S POLITICAL AGENDA

photo Jason Lang

Washbrook has become a prominent opponent of proposed plans that would see already existing coal exports from North Vancouver’s Neptune Terminals upped nearly 50 per cent to 18.5 million tonnes and proposed new facilities at the Fraser Surrey docks and on Texada Island that would ship and additional eight million tonnes within five years. Washbrook remains unrepentant about his organization’s relationship to the Campbell Liberals, which included both pressure and support, he says. He sees VTACC’s work as one of the many elements in winning a government decision to shelve the plans for two new coal-fired power plants. “We really face a situation around climate change like FDR’s in the face of the Depression,” he said, referring to former American president Franklin Delano Roosevelt. “That president told activists that they had to push him to make the necessary reforms. VTACC helped give Premier Campbell the cover of public pressure for change when he became willing to cancel the power plants.” Other VTACC projects include an anticoal export billboard near Roberts Bank and a campaign to place lawn signs reading, “I am voting for real action on climate change” around the province. Since last fall, when news about the proposed expansion of coal exports broke, Washbrook and VTACC have attended public meetings and mounted a number of demonstrations on the Vancouver docks calling for more thorough public hearings into possible public health and climate change downsides to coal exports. VTACC lobbying clearly played a role this summer as both the City of Vancouver and the board of Metro Vancouver passed resolutions opposing expansion of the port’s coal export volumes. Other voices also weighed in. Dr. Paul Van Buynder, chief medical officer for the Fraser Health Authority told me this week that he had corresponded with the Board of Metro Vancouver in June on this question, advising them that to date he had not seen enough data to determine whether coal dust at the proposed Fraser Surrey Docks coal port would represent a public health issue. He called for more extensive health impact studies before any decision was made. In addition, Washbrook and VTACC or-

ganized a series of actions at the downtown Vancouver docks when cruise ships were loading, in an attempt to get cruise passengers concerned about coal exports. I contacted Port Metro Vancouver for comment on Washbrook and the coal export issue and was told the Port would not comment. Neptune Terminals and the Surrey-Fraser docks also declined to comment. Dennis Horgan, who runs the Westshore facility, the coal port targeted by Washbrook and his colleagues in the 2012 civil disobedience, also declined to comment on Washbrook. He did say that he thought public health concerns about coal dust were “overblown and hyperbolic,” saying that there had been “a lot of fuss” about coal exports from Vancouver recently, and adding that he was confident any coal dust exposure related to exporting the material through the port of Vancouver would have negligible impact. Although the civil disobedience on the tracks leading to Horgan’s Westshore facility in 2012 was not a VTACC event, it did embody many of the signature approaches to organizing that Washbrook has honed in his VTACC efforts: the focus on small group activism, the programmatically moderate language and presentation of self by the demonstrators and the call for other small neighbourhood-based groups to respond not by joining an umbrella group or sending a donation, but rather by inventing and elaborating new and thought provoking tactics. Renee Rodin, a Vancouver writer who is one of Washbrook’s neighbours and has been active in VTACC told me, “Kevin (along with Donald and other VTAAC members) has become a model of political prowess and patience in confronting the Port Authority over this issue.” The “Donald” Rodin mentions is Donald Gordon, another neighbour of Washbrook’s

and with him one of the founders of VTACC. He told me that his neighbor’s greatest strengths were his “iconoclastic sense of humour,” and his willingness to work “tirelessly.” Gordon sounds both impressed and rueful as he tells about often getting emails from Washbrook date stamped at 1 and 5 a.m.

THE MAKING OF AN ACTIVIST Washbrook’s activism got its start in one of Canada’s industrial wastelands that still, paradoxically, held some small pockets of unspoiled nature. Washbrook was born in 1963 in Windsor, Ont., then a booming automobile industry town. He remembers being a loner, a “dreamy, in my head kind of a kid,” who would sometimes wander around in big fields or woodlots near the edge of town or ride his ten-speed bike through the surviving remnants of pin oak forest and tall grass prairie to the river bank and look across the water at the hellish visual of the Ford River Rouge factory complex, dark and lit by chimney flames. His father was a local homicide detective “who never talked about his work at home,” and he had two brothers and a sister. One brother went into the military, and the other into the auto plants, while his sister is retired after a career as an admitting nurse. Washbrook says he first developed his love of nature on those lonely childhood walks and rides, and on visits to relatives who lived in a lush river valley near Mississauga. Later a volunteer stint with the Katimavik program took him to B.C. After Katimavik, Washbrook decided to stay and while he studied, first for a credential in outdoor recreational leadership at Capilano College and then on a BA and a masters in anthropology from UBC, he became increasingly involved in volunteer work like trail building for the Western Canada Wilderness Committee and attending events like the Stein Valley gatherings.

“The fight to protect the Stein really resonated with me,” Washbrook said. “Why do we have to destroy everything?” After completing his degrees, Washbrook worked for a year for the Stó:lo nation around Chilliwack doing a study of traditional resource use practices. It was during that period that he met and married his wife, a physician here in B.C. who is very supportive of Washbrook’s activism but keeps a lower public profile. After his year of work with Stó:lo, Washbrook returned to SFU to study resource environmental management with Mark Jaccard. Jaccard, who joined Washbrook in the May 2012 civil disobedience, is a worldrenowned expert on climate change. He remembers the young Washbrook with obvious affection. “He was an amazing student,” he told the Courier. “His thesis as a master could easily have been a PhD — theoretical basis, survey design, statistical analysis, etc. An incredibly rigorous and careful analysis. Kevin never ceases to amaze me. I find him truly inspirational. In part because he is very smart and very strategic, but also because he is humble and has a great sense of humour. He is striving for the right thing, and yet he knows how to laugh — often at his own expense.” Others who know Washbrook, including VTAAC members Kathy Harrison, who teaches political science at UBC and Dr. Quincy Young, a psychologist with the heart transplant program at St. Paul’s Hospital, agree with Jaccard, praising Washbrook’s humour and willingness to work hard as important elements in the successes that their group has accomplished. They also joined Jaccard in praising Washbrook’s intellectual rigour, inventiveness and willingness to deeply research new issues. Harrison called her colleague an “unsung hero” and Young said she credited Washbrook for the continued existence of VTAAC. Young highlighted Washbrook’s creativity, a quality she sees not only in his political inventiveness but also in the playful good humour he brings to the neighbourhood parties they organize together. “I have a clear memory of working with Kevin to launch a lighter than air inflated pig to mark the site of one of the parties, and of all the laughter that involved,” she said. Washbrook hopes that VTAAC and other small groups will advance the public conversation about fossil fuels and climate change, not only on coal but also on B.C.’s liquid natural gas export plans, on which he feels there has been “no real debate yet,” calling the NDP “as bad as the Liberals” on LNG policy. “I wouldn’t keep doing this work if I didn’t think we could make a change,” he said sitting on his front porch one sunny summer Kitsilano afternoon. Invoking his children and a need to protect their future, Washbrook calls the current status quo “madness, getting closer all the time to a collapse of civilization.” “All I know for sure,” he said, “is that we need to fundamentally change how we live.” ••• Tom Sandborn welcomes feedback and story tips at tos65@telus.net


A16

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

home garden

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very September I hum and haw about planting tulips, daffodils, crocus and the rest of the spring flowering bulbs. Eventually I succumb to their tantalizing potential, plant several containers worth and am so happy in the spring when they magically appear.

• Choose an appropriate location. Most flowering bulbs prefer full sun, but that can be almost anywhere in the spring, before the trees leaf out. So don’t overlook a spot that seems perfect, just because it’s a bit shady in the fall.

That’s the thing about bulbs; they are so unattractive as bulbs, it’s hard to get excited about them. But then I remember how great they looked last spring when I was craving some colour in the garden and I know I have to plant more of them. And the great thing about bulbs is that they are so easy to plant.

• You can start planting your bulbs about midSeptember although a few, like Colchicums and Fritillarias, need to be planted as soon as possible.

Here are a few pointers on planting your spring bulbs:

• In general, plant the bulb with the pointy side up. The exceptions are Fritillaria, which need to be planted on their sides so they won’t rot in our rainy winters, and anemones.

• Choose healthy bulbs. Avoid bulbs that are dry and withered, spongy or mouldy. In general, the larger the bulb for its type, the more flowers you get.

• Plant bulbs to a depth of about 3 times their diameter. For Daffodils, that’s about 6 - 8 inches. Smaller bulbs can be planted to a depth of 3-4 inches and so on. • Mix some organic bone meal into the soil at the bottom of the hole at planting time, to encourage strong root growth. You could mix in some water soluble fertilizer as well, but it’s not necessary if you’ve already amended your soil. • If rodents tend to eat your bulbs try planting your bulbs in a cage made of hardware cloth or chicken wire. The roots and stems grow through, but the rodents can’t get to the bulbs. • Replace the soil on top of the bulbs. Water the bulbs after planting, to help them settle in and close any air pockets. Through the fall and winter, you only need to worry about watering your bulbs if you’re having a particularly dry season. Come spring, you should be well rewarded for all your efforts. Here are few more yummy spring flowering bulbs we are now featuring at The Natural Gardener: Narcissus Poeticus, Tulip Icecream, Tulip Havran.

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Taste of South Asia

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A18

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

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• SPORTS – Sports enthusiasts of both sexes will enjoy having mementoes of their favourite sports, whether in the form of trophies, room accessories or team pennants. Skates that have been outgrown can become decorative elements on shelves. • STARS AND MOONLIGHT – A little night owl will enjoy seeing the planets on the ceiling and perhaps a few shooting stars that decoratively land on walls and furniture. Natural light can be transformed with the right window treatment to help create an ethereal mood across the room. Article courtesy newscanada.com.

Create an appealing atmosphere. Take a cue from your child’s special interests to select a theme for decorating their room and creating an inviting setting they’ll look forward to spending time in. Some examples: • OCEAN – If your child thought their vacation at the beach was pure heaven, they can return there in memory with a beachthemed-bedroom. Use watery PICTURED: BEDCETERA blues on the walls and sandBUNK BED: GINGER – SINGLE/DOUBLE, IN DARK coloured floors. Wallpapers, CHOCOLATE. CHECK WEBSITE FOR PRICING.

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A19

garden

THE GOODS ON GARLIC Q. Where can I buy organic Russian and Yugoslavian garlic? We love garlic and would love to encourage locally grown garlic businesses. Unfortunately my garlic did not make it this year. Why? Gloria Hall-Proehl, email

A. For local garlic, farmers markets are the place to look between now and October. Farmers markets happen all over Vancouver and the Lower Mainland usually on weekends. Obtaining clusters of edible garlic/seed garlic in fall is easy. The hard part is matching

the varieties you want with the right farmer at the right time in a place reachable by you. The Russian garlic you’re looking for is probably Red Russian — a hard-neck with very large cloves. But there is also White Russian garlic. This has very small cloves that are exceptionally long-keeping (well over a year) but so fiddly to prepare for cooking. There are a huge number of different garlic varieties. Yugoslavian is excellent. But so are Persian Star, Saltspring, Fish Lake #3, Mountain Top and Red German. All these are hard-neck with large cloves. All the hard-neck garlics are resistant to braiding. Chinese garlic can be braided. It’s a soft-neck

which produces large clusters of small rounded cloves. Greek White is another soft-neck which keeps longer than most hard-neck garlic (but not as long as White Russian). Virtually all soft-neck garlics produce smaller cloves but more per cluster. Hardneck garlic plants produce larger cloves but fewer of them. You’ll be sure to find some good garlic in farmers markets this fall. It may not be the exact variety you’re looking for, but you’ll be able to see it before buying and know it did well in local conditions. About your garlic failing: rich, moist soil in a sunny place is the nutrition it needs in the

growing season. But planting in September or October is very important because it enables the roots to get a good start before winter. I wonder if you kept your garlic watered through the unusual hot spell we had in May? It likes evenly moist soil until about mid-July when it begins to die back and can be encouraged to dry out ready for harvesting. Also important is taking off the garlic scapes immediately they develop. The very young scapes can be eaten. —Anne Marrison Anne Marrison is happy to answer your garden questions. Send them to her at amarrison@ shaw.ca.

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A20

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013


today’shomes

FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A21

INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING IN TODAY’S HOMES? Contact Linda Garner:

604-738-1411 | lgarner@vancourier.com

Bowen Island catching on with high-end investors WESTERN INVESTOR STAFF westerninvestor.com

T

he startling sales success — and price increases — at one of the most expensive oceanfront projects in B.C. suggests that reports on the death of the high-end west coast recreational market may be exaggerated. In the last three years, more than $20 million worth of lots have been purchased at the Cape on Bowen Island. The Cape covers 618 acres and more than two miles of oceanfront on the southwestern tip of Bowen, a bucolic island community just off the coast of West Vancouver in Howe Sound.

The land was purchased from an extended Bowen Island family in 2004 for $16 million by Vancouver developers Don Ho and Edwin Lee. Ho, president of Trans City Group of Companies and Lee, who heads the Leeda Development Group, are developing 59 10-acre waterfront and oceanview estate lots. The oceanfront lots, with a minimum of 190 feet of waterfrontage, sell for from $1.7 million to $3.68 million, with one recent sale at $4.38 million. Inland lots start at $685,000. The first 14-lot phase of the development has nearly sold out, with 10 waterfront lots and one inland lot purchased, said Ho, who

B.C. POISED FOR MORE HOUSING STARTS, PRICE RISES B.C. is poised for an increase in housing starts between 2013 and 2014, according to a Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. (CMHC) forecast released earlier this month. In 2013, the CMHC forecasts 27,100 housing starts. In 2014, the forecast jumps to 28,600 homes. Existing home

sales will also increase, said the CMHC. In 2013, home sales are expected to reach 70,100 units. In 2014, sales are expected to hit 77,000 units. Prices of existing homes in 2013 will average $518,300 before rising to $523,200 in 2014. — Sean Kolenko

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A forest home site assessed at $470,000 in 2011 is now valued at $919,000, representing an increase in value of 196 per cent. An oceanfront home site assessed at $1,083,000 is now assessed at $2,010,000, an increase in value of 186 per cent.

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EW22

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

news

COMMUNITY BRIEFS LIVE TRAFFIC MAP USES CELLPHONE DATA Motorists looking to avoid getting stuck in a traffic jam got some help online when the transit authority revealed a new online map that tracks traffic levels in real time across Metro Vancouver. The free map, available at translink.ca, uses a colour-coding system on major high-

ways and roads to indicate real-time traffic conditions. Green means traffic is moving well, orange means traffic is slow and red means traffic is very slow. Data for the map is gleaned from anonymous tracking of cellphone signals using GPS technology. All personal information is removed before locations are uploaded into the system, according to a government press release announcing the service. The project, which cost $1.2 million, was paid for by Transport Canada ($490,000), the B.C. government ($335,000) and TransLink ($375,000).

DENTURES

COPS LAUNCH ROOFTOP GARDEN FOR NON-PROFIT Some sworn and civilian members of the Vancouver Police Department recently traded in their traditional policing gear for rakes and shovels to tend a community garden located on the rooftop of the police station at 2120 Cambie St. Some of the fruits

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of that labour are now being harvested with some produce dedicated to the Urban Native Youth Association and the rest sold to help fund the project. The volunteers began donating their time, seeds and tools this past spring to grow vegetables in the community garden with dirt provided by the City of Vancouver. The garden has been dubbed the “POPATCH,” a play on the Police Officer Physical Abilities Test (POPAT), which all sworn members are required to pass to be part of the force. The Urban Native Youth Association was formed in 1988 to address aboriginal youth concerns.

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A23

GOT ARTS? 604-738-1411 | arts@vancourier.com

1 2

3 4

1

Vancity Theatre goes Bond, James Bond with a 20-FILM RETROSPECTIVE “designed to showcase not only the changing face of Britain’s most famous secret agent, in all six of his incarnations from Sean Connery through to Daniel Craig, but also to suggest how Bond movies have changed and stayed the same as they mirror sometimes subtle shifts in attitudes towards sex, violence, nuclear weapons, terrorism, Communism, Capitalism, and, yes, good old/bad old hedonism.” 007 RELOADED: BOND VS BOND kicks off Aug. 23 with an opening gala and fundraiser, and includes quiz nights, lectures, cocktails and an exhibition of vintage posters and Bond memorabilia courtesy of collector and 007 expert Murray Gillespie, who will be on hand to introduce many of the screenings. For more details, go to viff.org or call 604-683-FILM (3456).

OUR 2

Portland-by-way-of-the U.K. singer-songwriter SCOUT NIBLETT not only has a delicioussounding name but a haunting voice to go with her stark, stripped down songs that often get compared to Cat Power and PJ Harvey. She’ll be at the Cobalt, Aug. 23, in support of her latest album It’s Up to Emma, which includes an unlikely cover of TLC’s “No Scrubs.” PG Six and Jody Glenham open. Tickets at Red Cat, Neptoon and Zulu Records or online at northerntickets.com.

PICKS 3 AUG. 23-27 For video and web content, scan page with

4

Crime, corruption, palookas and double-crossing dames. It’s all there in Howard Hawks’ 1946 classic THE BIG SLEEP starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. It screens Aug. 23, 25 and 27 as part of the Cinematheque’s annual summertime FILM NOIR series. For show times and more details, go to thecinematheque.ca or call 604-688-FILM.

Sure, GLENN DANZIG takes himself a little too seriously at times. And his politics can be a bit wacky. And he likes to wear mesh shirts that show off all the weightlifting he’s done. And he probably dies his hair black. And there’s a YouTube video of him getting one-punched backstage by the singer of his opening band. But we can forgive all that because of all the great, dark, brooding, horror-strewn rock and roll he’s produced over the years as the leader of the Misfits, Samhain and DANZIG, which marks its 25TH ANNIVERSARY with a tour that brings its fearless leader, along with Misfits’ guitarist Doyle, to the Commodore for a sold-out show Aug. 27.


A24

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

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So Stanley Park turns 125 years old this year. Big whoop. If there’s one park that’s been coasting on its reputation since day one, it’s Stanley. Sure it’s got history, skunks that get their cute little heads stuck in jars, an overcrowded seawall for tourists and unimaginative locals to frolic along and some impressive trees, a few of which can even withstand a windstorm. But it’s all a little overrated, if you ask us. Stanley Park is like the Beatles of the Vancouver park system — everyone is supposed to love it, but they don’t really know why, except that it’s mandated by law. And don’t get us started on how tired we’ve grown of hearing Stanley Park called “the jewel of Vancouver” and seeing its smug, leafy face plastered across the cover of every damn print publication in this city (including this one) while it lazily sits atop everyone’s list of must-visit Vancouver attractions alongside its overrated brethren Granville Island, English Bay, pods of orca whales and majestic snowcapped mountains. Get over it, people. And do we even have to mention that sad bit of bark that has become the Hollow Tree? This once sturdy woodscraper used to lure visitors and photographers alike with its cavernous trunk, which could accommodate families,

Kudos and Kvetches will not be buying Stanley Park a birthday present this year. vehicles, even the occasional circus elephant. Now, ravaged by weather, age and its own mortality, the 1,000-year-old dead stump has become a shell of its former self — literally — propped up by $100,000 worth of concrete and steel reinforcements and people’s inability to accept the passage of time. So celebrate Stanley Park’s birthday all you like — we’re having none of it. While you’re busy cruising through Stanley Park’s maze of manly trails, reminiscing about that enchanting Sarah MacLachlan concert you and your lover took in while lounging on a blanket sipping some oaky chardonnay, or traveling the park’s concrete circumference with your latte, fleece outerwear, walking sandals and misguided sense of purpose, we’ll be hanging out with all the discerning peeps at Killarney’s Captain Cook Park, or Marpole’s rockin’ Ebisu Park or Mount Pleasant’s wicked-ass Tea Swamp Park, which doesn’t even have a swamp or serve tea. You know, keepin’ it real. twitter.com/KudosKvetches

Friday, September 6th, 2013 Fairmont Pacific Rim 1038 Canada Place, Vancouver 6:30 pm to 1:00 am Runway Show by

www.mexicofest.ca


arts&entertainment

Musical revue gets mostly A’s At Studio 1398 until Aug. 25 Tickets: brownpapertickets.com

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MORE SHOWS ADDED! NOW PLAYING UNTIL AUG 31 MUSIC AND LYRICS BY ROBERT LOPEZ AND JEFF MARX. BOOK BY JEFF WHITTY

A...MY NAME IS ALICE

photos by emily cooper PLAYING AT

I

Metro Theatre Presents 1370 S.W. Marine Drive, Vancouver

Bell, Book and Candle Reviewer Jo Ledingham gives A…My Name is Alice is “A” for “Admirable” in bringing some new or infrequently seen performers to the stage. To see a behind the scenes video, scan this page using the Layar app. my husband’s name is Adam, And his girlfriend’s name is Amy, And my lover’s name is Abby, And her husband’s name is Arnie, And his boyfriend’s name is Allan, And my analyst’s name is Arthur, And we’re working on my anger.” We’re no longer playing a children’s game and the “A’s” run the gamut from anxiety to alimony. Director Rick Tae brings together five talented performers whose skills range from the operatic (Michelle T. Baynton) andballetic(RebeccaFriesen)tothecomedic/dramatic (Rosie Simon, Danielle Lemon and Hannah Unterschultz). The show kicks off with a rousing “All Girl Band” and moves into a poignant “At My Age,” a duet sung by Lemon and Simon about an older woman and a younger woman nervously getting ready for their dates. Not all of the material is sung. Lemon is the kindergarten teacher intimidating socalled “bad mother” (Unterschultz), and Baynton does several turns as an angstridden poet whose poems begin with “I Am Woman” but include a shrieking, accusatory “He did it!” in each one. A…My Name is Alice does a good job of

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covering some of the stages of women’s lives, but truly disappointing — in spite of Lemon’s good performance — is the long monologue, “Ms. Mae,” a 72-year-old woman in the hair salon. She blithers on and on while the indulgent staff carries on its work. There is so much rich material that could have been used here that it’s downright painful. Gloria Steinem, Sophia Loren and Judi Dench will be 80 next year and I doubt you’d find them dithering about their hair being their “crowning glory.” Silver and Boyd squandered a golden opportunity here. Produced by Skycorner Productions in association with Vancouver Asian Canadian Theatre, A…My Name is Alice is “A” for “Admirable” in bringing some new or infrequently seen performers to the stage. Note to director Tae: I have a book club full of smart, articulate and funny women “of a certain age” who could write you a terrific replacement for “Ms. Mae” if we weren’t so busy writing, consulting, counselling, cataloguing or making art. —reviewed by Jo Ledingham For more reviews go to joledingham.ca.

THE “BEWITCHED” COMEDY BY JOHN VAN DRUTEN

August 24th to September 21st

(Thur to Sat only) Curtain at 8:00 pm Sunday Matinees on Sept 8th and 15th at 2:30pm

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Opera & Arias, 2012. Photo: David Blue

don’t usually review musical revues, but how could I resist a show with five young women under the direction of one young-ish guy? All the songs are about women in various stages of life and I do have experience: daughter, sister, aunt, wife, mother, mother-in-law, ex-wife, ex-mother-inlaw, friend and grandmother. Revues are collections of songs sometimes grouped along a theme, sometimes not. Some of the material is more interesting than the rest, and usually there’s a mix of silly and sincere, upbeat and melancholy. Revues are always a bit of a grab bag. A…My Name is Alice is all of this, but the enthusiasm and raw talent on the Studio 1398 stage make it worthwhile. And Yawen Wang — the sixth woman on stage — is simply fantastic on the keyboard. Conceived by Joan Micklin Silver and Julianne Boyd, A…My Name is Alice won the Outer Critics Circle Award in 1983 and has spawned two sequels.The songs — 21 in all — are written by various songwriters and pulled together by Silver and Boyd. The show takes it title from the children’s word game that works its way through the alphabet something like this: A…my name is Alma/My husband’s name is Al/We live in Alberta and we like apples. It’s a great road trip game for kids and by the time you’ve driven all the way to Disneyland you’ve worked through the alphabet many, many times. Boyd and Silver’s show begins with each of the five performers stepping forth and introducing themselves with “A…my name is Alice” but then things go sideways: “A ... my name is Alice, And

FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

OPERA &ARIAS

Viva Verdi!

Favourite scenes from La Traviata, Rigoletto, Falstaff and more!

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A26

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

FRED

EMAIL: yvrflee@hotmail.com TWITTER: @FredAboutTown

UNLEESHED

HOT AND BUTTERED: The Vancouver Queer Film Festival marked 25 years of celebrating queer lives. Vanhattan’s second largest movie festival, the little queer-festival-that-could features more than 70 films from 20 countries. Prior to the screening of Italian film Magnificence Presence, more than 700 movie goers participated in a spontaneous “kiss-in” to protest anti-gay laws in Russia instituted just months ahead of the Sochi Olympic Games.

WHISTLER FILM FETE: The countdown has begun for Whistler Film Festival’s 13th annual cinematic celebration. Yours truly emceed the festival’s annual benefit gala at Jack Evrensel’s Blue Water Restaurant. Festival founder Shauna Hardy Mishaw welcomed industry insiders to the stand-up soiree celebrating creative independence. Filmmaker Carl Bessai (Mothers & Daughters, Emile) was honoured with the festival’s inaugural Maverick Award. Jason Priestley’s road movie Cas & Dylan will open the five-day, 90-film celluloid celebration beginning Dec. 4. FAIR PLAY: The rain stayed away for the 103rd opener of the PNE. CEO Michael McDaniel welcomed fairgoers to the less expensive and shortened summertime event. With declining attendance for the past two years, McDaniel hopes cutting admission prices and parking fees will win fairgoers back. To save money, the fair will close the first two Mondays of its 17-day run.

Indigo’s Janet Eger and Alex Thomson decked the halls of Fairmont Pacific Rim’s $10,000-a-night suite for a preview of this year’s must-haves under the tree.

PNE CEO Michael McDaniels hopes reduced admission and parking prices will win fairgoers back to the annual summertime event.

B.C. Les Clefs d’Or’s Becky Paris and Pam Williams hosted a dine-around fundraiser at multi venues including Neil Wyles Hamilton Street Grill.

MP Hedy Fry and West End Slo-Pitch Association’s Justin Mui got hot and buttered at the 25th annual Queer Film Festival opener.

Longtime supporter and board member, filmmaker Carl Bessai accepted the first Maverick Award from Whistler film festival founder Shauna Hardy Mishaw.

At the Queer Film Fest opening gala, Everett Blackwell and Yogi Omar and others puckered up to protest anti-gay laws in Russia.

Project Limelight Society’s Maureen Webb photo bombed actors Paul Duchart and Eric McCormack’s close up benefitting inner city kids arts programs.

Better Living! Editors Anicka Quin, left, and Jen Reynolds of Western Living and Canadian Living unveiled a brand refresh of their iconic publications.


arts&entertainment

A mushroom of one’s own FOOD CRAWL

with Willow Yamauchi

D

uring a visit to Portland, I was struck by the conspicuousness of mushrooms. The people of Portland adore the ‘shroom, both for its taste and its visual properties. The visitor’s eye falls everywhere on felted mushrooms, toy mushrooms, mushroom paintings and photographs of the noble fungus. Surrounded by such wonders, I started to long for my own source of mushrooms — but how? Luckily, a Vancouver company has developed product that produces them in your own kitchen. Mushboo is the brainchild of mycology lover Matthew Unger. Simply put, Mushboo is a mushroom growing kit inside of a bamboo log — mush “room” plus bam “boo”... get it? Unger, now 30, grew up on a farm in the prairie and knows how challenging it is to make a living as a farmer. So he worked in finance, long enough to realize he didn’t like it. After a period of time trying to determine his true passion, Unger realized that he was a farm boy after all. The key to a good farm is sound, productive earth. Unger became interested in the notion of bioremediation: restoring soil by removing toxins. Bioremediation can be done in different

vancourier.com

MOVIE MOVIE LISTINGS

ways, with mushrooms and other fungi being particularly useful. As they grow, these plants naturally break down their growing medium. After much experimentation with various media and species, he created Mushboo. The mushrooms are grown on coffee grounds sourced from 11 local Vancouver coffee shops. As the mushroom grows, it breaks down the coffee waste, allowing it to be recycled quickly. Initially Unger intended to sell the complete mushroom kit to customers. However, after some soul searching his focus has shifted to being an “open source” company. This means he has opened up his inventory to the public, so people can buy individual pieces and experiment with growing mushrooms in different mediums and containers. Mushboo looks like an Easter Island statue made of bamboo. Unger tells me that people can get two or three harvests out of one refill, but he’s gotten as many as seven. Unger chose oyster mushrooms, being “easy to grow and hearty.” My sample Mushboo took about two weeks to grow. I found the entire growing process fascinating. My Mushboo lived on my kitchen counter by the sink. Every morning, I monitored the new growth; slow and tentative at first, then erupting into a mass of beautiful white mushrooms. These were fried up with garlic and butter, and, I’m happy to report, tasted fantastic. Caring for the mushrooms and having them live in my kitchen was a strangely intimate experience. It’s not just food, it’s a design feature, and a sort of family pet. That you eat. More info at mushboo.com.

CHOICES MARKETS

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Are you looking for healthy variety in your diet? Let the Choices Nutrition Team help. Each month in our stores you will find a green label on certain products, indicating our Dietitians’ Top Choices. There will be a number of items featured in every department. These Top Choices are selected by our Dietitians in hopes of helping customers navigate their way to healthier food choices. Find us on

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facebook.com/ChoicesMarkets •

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A27

COOK TO BUTLER Next Friday the Vancouver Courier continues our series Vancouver Special an ambitious year-long journey through twenty-seven neighbourhoods that make up the city of Vancouver. We will report on the character and the changing face of each neighbourhood, what makes it unique and how it is responding to the challenges of being part of our rapidly changing city. Next Friday we visit Dunbar Southlands, to advertise in this special section call 604-738-1411.


A28

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

GOT SPORTS? 604-738-1411 | sportsandrec@vancourier.com

photos Chris McGrath for the Courier

Above left: Sumie Francois, 13, was one shot behind the leader at the start the third and final round of the B.C. Girls Juvenile Golf Championship Aug. 22 at Crown Isle Resort near Courtenay. Alex Francois, 15, led the boys field by one stroke before teeing off in the final round.

Shaughnessysiblingsinthehunt

MEGAN STEWART Staff writer

S

umie Francois carded 69 in the opening round of the juvenile girls B.C. championship on Tuesday at the 72-par Crown Isle Resort near Courtenay. The 13-year-old shot three-under par and was the only male or female golfer to break 70 that day, giving her a six-stroke lead over the girls’ field. It also put her one shot up on her brother, Alex Francois, 15, who finished two-under par and tied Vancouver’s Trevor Yu for first among the boys. “I felt very happy about it,” said Sumie on Thursday before her 9:09 a.m. tee time on the final day of play. “I was proud of myself and also happy how I beat my brother.” She sunk four birdies and conceded only one bogey on her way to the top of the leaderboard. Both are members of Shaughnessy Golf and Country Club and say the sibling rivalry isn’t heated. On Wednesday’s second round, Sumie was less efficient and shot 79 to drop to four over par and one stroke behind the leader, Shirin Anjarwalla of Nanaimo. “Yesterday [Wednesday] I struggled a lot. I was hitting the ball all over the place. I wasn’t able to do what I wanted to do,” she said. “Today I’m just going to calm myself down, focus on every shot and do the best I can do.” Sumie, who enters Grade 9 at Burnaby’s Moscrop secondary in September, maintains a sharp mental strength and uses a lot

of self-talk to sustain her concentration. “I always talk to myself: It’s OK, there’s still another hole, I can fix the problem. I also drink a lot of water to calm myself, too.” On the boys side, Alex, held a one-stroke lead heading into the third and final round Thursday. He shot two-under-par 70 on Tuesday and followed that up with 69 on Wednesday to go five under par in the tournament and break the round one tie for first place. “I took everything one shot at a time and try not to make any dumb mistakes,” he said before teeing of Thursday morning. “I made a couple bad ones on the first day, I got a three put and I also hit my chip shot short.” In round one, Alex three-putt the parthree 12th hole for a bogey. On the same hole the next round, he gained two strokes. “I birdied it,” he said. “I tried to make sure I placed the ball on the right sport on the green to give myself a better shot.” Also on Wednesday, he shot two bogeys by the fourth hole, but answered each time with a birdie to keep his score at even par on the day. He then scored an eagle and two more birdies (plus one bogey) to shoot 36 on the front nine and 33 on the back. Before teeing off for the final round, he said he could win if he took advantage of the four par-five holes at Crown Isle. “I’m expecting to birdie today.” Alex was paired with Yu, who was just one shot behind at four under par and who returns to the Pacific Coast after winning at gold medal with Team B.C. at the Canada Summer Games in Sherbrooke. Yu, a member of Marine Drive

Golf Club, attends St. John’s School in Vancouver and is the defending Canadian juvenile champion. He won the B.C. title in 2011 and tied for second last year. With the Shaughnessy junior team, Alex won the PGA of B.C. pro-junior title at Summerland Golf and Country Club in July. Sumie and Alex may be members at Shaughnessy but are coached by their father, Joseph Francois, a devoted parent who’d never played a round of golf until his young son picked up a plastic toy putter. The Francois family famously converted the master bedroom of their two-bedroom Burnaby apartment into a training centre dedicated to tee shots, putting and golf skills training. He studied golf at public libraries and watched hundreds of hours of video, becoming a self-taught expert on mechanics, strategy and technique. In a 2009 Golf Channel interview with the family, Alex and Sumie are introduced as extremely talented pre-teens “poised to head south to take over America.” The host says, “We can safely call them child prodigies.” The children are shown on the course, both polite, skilled and smiling. “I want to be the best golfer in the world,” says Sumie. Alex says, “I might quit — when I die, when my body is all worn out.” Most remarkable about the interview, however, is the father’s dedication and professed selflessness, an attitude he expressed then and affirmed today. “I use golf to teach my children about life. I don’t teach them golf to become a pro — if they want to become a pro, it’s not my business… it’s up to them.”

Before his son and daughter teed off in hunt of a B.C. juvenile title Thursday at Crown Isle, Francois said, “To be honest with you, all I want for my children, deep from my heart, is to get an education. After that I have nothing, nothing, nothing in my mind. I am from Haiti, for a Haitian form Haiti, I am very lucky and fortunate to be here. There is a huge opportunity here, they need me to help them take advantage of that opportunity. But it is up to them.” In 1994 Francois moved to Vancouver from Montreal where his family had first arrived in Canada. He credits his wife, a Japanese woman also named Sumie, for giving up their bedroom and countless hours to golf practice. The sacrifice is a message to other families and for children and teens to appreciate the sacrifices of their parents, said Francois. “I want every parent, every kid to see that [video]. When the mom and dad say something to them, they will appreciate it. Sometimes kids take things for granted.” Francois said his children’s different personalities are evident on the links. Sumie, he said, puts pressure on herself but is very mentally tough and passionate. Alex has confidence to spare and plays a more social game. They both recognize how their father has contributed to their success. “My dad is definitely the smartest person on Earth,” said Sumie. “He is. He knows everything in life. I trust him a lot.” Final tournament standings weren’t known before the Courier’s press deadline. Visit vancourier.com/sports for results. mstewart@vancourier.com twitter.com/MHStewart

VANCOUVER CANADIANS

TOMORROW Fireworks Extravaganza Gates at 6pm First Pitch 7:05

SUNDAY A&W Family Fun Sunday & Umbrella Giveaway First 500 Fans Gates at Noon. First Pitch 1:05

MONDAY Presented by Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation First 1,000 Fans Receive a pair of VPD Sunglasses Gates at 6pm. First Pitch 7:05

VS. TEXAS RANGERS AFFILIATE SPOKANE INDIANS

FINAL 3 GAMES OF THE 2013 REGULAR SEASON

WEDNESDAY Team Photo Giveaway

First 2,500 Fans Gates at 6pm. First Pitch 7:05

THURSDAY Fireworks Extravaganza Gates at 6pm First Pitch 7:05

FRIDAY Power Smart ’Nooner at the Nat Gates at Noon First Pitch 1:05


How much is too much for gear? WHEEL WORLD with Kay Cahill

O

utside Magazine recently published an article asking, “Is $327 too much to pay for a MTB Jersey?” The article reviews Kitsbow cycle wear, a California manufacturer whose basic combo of shorts, a jersey and a soft shell jacket will set you back just a touch shy of a thousand dollars. The author of the article notes that this rather “eye-watering” price does buy you unparalleled quality, comfort and durability for clothing made in North America. My immediate reaction: it’s still far too much. Perhaps not if you’re the kind of cyclist who can afford to drop a four- or five-digit sum on a state-of-theart dual suspension mountain bike or featherweight carbon frame road bike, but for most of us who tool around on more casual rides, it’s a shockingly large amount. Personally, I’d far rather take the bike I could buy for that money rather than a brand-new outfit to wear while I ride it.

That said, good gear is definitely important and gets more so as you spend additional time in the saddle. I’m a bit of a convert to this opinion. Having always sworn I’d never be a lycra-clad cyclist, I was won over when I started trying bike clothing and realised just how much more comfortable I was on the bike when I wore clothes that were made with cycling in mind. Technical jerseys wick away sweat on the hottest of days, and once you’ve ridden in shorts with a chamois, it’s very hard (quite literally) to go back to anything made with less. Cycle chic I most definitely am not, but I’m always comfortable on my bike. For cyclists who don’t want to sport the lycra look, many brands of cycle clothing are now producing technical clothing with a more casual look and feel. These have the benefit of providing cycling-specific comforts like wicking fabric and back jersey pockets in a wide range of styles. Whatever your style preference, good cycle clothing doesn’t have to break the bank. For a rider looking for decent, basic gear that doesn’t cost a fortune, MEC-brand clothing is comfortable and dependable.

On the down side, it does lack some of the quality touches of more expensive gear and it definitely doesn’t last forever. I’m personally a big fan of Gore bike wear, which seems to hit a sweet spot: it’s high-end enough to be ultra comfortable and durable without pushing the price to the point of total sticker shock. It’s more costly than MEC gear, but at a point where you gain a lot of benefit from the extra expense. I have yet to wear out a piece of Gore clothing, whereas my MEC gear typically lasted only a couple seasons of hard riding. As you gradually progress through the price spectrum, Sugoi, Castelli and Descente are three other brands that make excellent, hard-wearing, high-quality gear. Nallini gear is even nicer but by this point, the price is almost as painful as Kitsbow. What do you think? Do you buy into the theory that it’s worth paying once for the best quality clothing, or would you rather have cheaper gear and deal with replacing it as needed? Kay Cahill is a cyclist, librarian and outdoor enthusiast who believes that bikes are for life, not just for commuting. Read more at sidecut.ca, or contact Kay at kay@sidecut.ca.

A29

Watch for the math4me flyer in today’s paper in selected locations

www.math4me.ca 071613

sports&recreation

FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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There are many reasons to forgive, and these are well expressed by many leaders. One of the greatest is that when we do not forgive, we curtail our own selves, and make our lives small. But the chief reason to forgive is that if everyone forgave, there would be nothing to forgive – no sin, no crime and no hurt. This is because almost all sin on earth, and the justification for the sin, arises from an original injury or abuse to the sinner. Those who batter, murder, rape or assault have experienced this in their youth or have observed it being done to a family member. Every pedophile, rapist, robber, murderer, bully or any other criminal will almost always feel that they are justified in their action because at some point in their lives they have been grievously wronged. (Some might doubt whether this is true or not – but I believe it is almost always true .) Had these people truly forgiven their abusers they would have felt no compunction to commit their own sin, because by forgiving they would have dissolved their own feelings of hurt, anger and vengeance. (And thus would have no motive to sin.) If they still feel the desire to abuse, then they have not forgiven. There is only one cure which can eradicate this constant thorn in the side of humanity’s progress. That cure is forgiveness. Plunge into a stack of chores, Aries. The weeks ahead feature employment, health, repairs, machinery, service personnel, and your dependents. You’ll hear lots of “chatter” about these things soon, as your workplace communications grow. Despite all the work, a definite romantic (or creative, speculative, pleasure) streak starts Tuesday, lasting to mid-October.

Take it easy over the weeks ahead. Catch your second breath, rest, lie low, avoid competitive situations. Be charitable, fulfill old obligations. Meditate, connect with the spiritual. Solitude, weariness, and quietude actually aid you now, as they give you the peace and insight to form good plans. (Your best plans will focus on late September-October, and how to achieve your ambitions, career or other.)

Sweet romance, pleasure, beauty, sports, speculation, charming kids – these fill the weeks ahead. You can speak, write – to persuade in love, or simply to express yourself. Take care that your “good times” don’t negatively impact your home, or get your family’s back up. If married, be faithful. Your energy, charisma and effectiveness soar Sunday dawn to Tuesday afternoon.

The month ahead features wish fulfilment, happiness, optimism, social delights, flirtation, popularity, entertainment and group activities. As this is a lucky love/wedding year for you, September could bring a possible partner, via a group (more likely after Sept. 10). Groups might also be involved in a potential pay raise or other money luck. Your view of the future, though optimistic, will be correct.

The weeks ahead focus on domesticity, family, home, garden, soul, sleep, nutrition (and nurturing generally) – on security, foundations and retirement. Yield to a sluggish feeling – take “power naps.” A recent spending spree (thankfully!) comes to an end. Now you can start whittling down any debt. Eat at home. Attend to your kids’ future. If single, you feel sweet about someone, but is it sweet enough?

Be ambitious (not ambiguous!) and hard-working during the month ahead, Sage. VIPs, parents and bosses are watching, measuring your performance. You might talk to a potential business partner. Your social life remains affectionate. Your sexual drive, strong lately, cools off Tuesday onward, when six weeks of intellectual discovery, creative expression, and perhaps of far travel, begin.

The month ahead isn’t an important one. You’ll be busy, but the stakes aren’t high. This is a great time to learn about things, but not to take major action, nor to commit to a big investment, etc. The weeks ahead do bring many communications, emails, calls, errands, short trips, casual acquaintances/siblings, visits, and much paperwork.

The weeks ahead emphasize intellectual growth, far travel, legal affairs, publishing (of any kind) cultural rites (e.g., weddings) and venues (e.g., a foreign film fest) and compassion, wisdom and gentle love. You understand how to climb in society; now you’ll understand why you want to. Sunday morn to Tuesday afternoon bring beauty, pleasure, winning gambles, charming kids, sports and romance.

The weeks ahead emphasize money, possessions, buying and selling. Pursue new clients, ask for a pay raise, seek work, etc. The month ahead will also promote sensual attractions – and your sexual magnetism will soar, this Tuesday to mid-October. I wouldn’t bet against a love affair, if you’re single! (Though this will probably not be marriage material.) If you’re married, be loyal.

The weeks ahead brings secret, mysteries, and the need for research or detective work. Look beneath the surface: be polite, but don’t accept someone else’s assessment of a situation. Your subconscious bursts to the surface, so your intuition, sexual urges, and financial assertiveness are high. This is a great month ahead to invest, change your lifestyle, get a health diagnosis, or begin an intimate affair.

Your energy, charisma, clout and effectiveness hit a peak over the weeks ahead. Start important projects, tackle tasks that previously intimidated you, ask favors, seek interviews. You’re on a success path. You’ll be better than usual at communicating your position for the next two weeks. Your money picture looks good, at least until September 10. You’re had high hopes about a sexual relationship. Starting Tuesday (to mid-October) it could actually become a burden.

Relationships, good and bad, fill the weeks ahead. Good = opportunities, partnerships, love/marriage, friends, mutual projects, negotiations, dealings with the public. Bad = opposition, challenge, competition, enmity, break-ups of partnerships, of love/marriage, litigation, strained links. Which it is, will be determined by your own attitude, and by your past actions. Generally, the bad will get rid of the bad, and the good will grow from praise, attention and support.

Monday: Macaulay Culkin (33). Tuesday: Aaron Paul(34). Wednesday: Jack Black(44). Thursday: Rebecca De Mornay (54). Friday: Andy Roddick (31). Saturday: Van Morrison (68). Sunday: Mitsou (43), Dr. Phil McGraw (63).

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

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A37

dashboard Muscle car movie stands the test of time BRENDAN MCALEER Contributing writer

F

orty years ago this month, the movie posters asked audiences: “Where were you in ‘62?” For most people, the answer was: “in a better place.” The world in 1973 was not in great shape and, as far as cars go, was about to get a whole lot worse. The start of the gas crisis was not far away, and the motoring world would be plunged into a frenzy of fuel-saving measures that would result in the death of the muscle car and the production of some of the worst-performing machinery ever built. Many baby boomers were wondering just what had happened to all the youthful hope and innocence of the 1950s and 1960s. They bought their movie tickets and, as they sat quietly munching popcorn in the darkness, tried to remember exactly what those days gone by were like. Where were they in ‘62? They thought back. American Graffiti would be called, by Roger Ebert, one of the greatest pieces of historical fiction ever filmed. It was a slice of Americana, cruising around in hot rods, disc jockeys spinning early rock ’n’ roll and crooners on the late-night AM radio. Burnouts and drag races, of chrome and drive-in diners, cheap gas and four wheels to freedom. Some of the mostly unknown actors — Richard Dreyfuss, Harrison Ford, Ron Howard — would go on to become household names. Others would remain supporting cast throughout their careers. The real stars, though, were the cars. The hero of the piece is one of the most famous machines ever to grace the silver screen, the bright-yellow ‘32 Ford fivewindow coupe driven by fictional street racing champion John Milner. Picked up in LA for $1,300 by one of the producers, the little deuce coupe was already chopped down and mildly souped up. Unfortunately, it wasn’t anywhere near ready for primetime and needed considerable work to get it from its primered, redand-grey current state to the shiny yellow rocket that would be the “fastest in the valley.” Besides the paintwork, the car needed a complete mechanical overhaul from manifolds to headers, as well as further cosmetics like a sectioned-down radiator grille and period-correct fenders. Soon, it stood ready to do battle. The main rival for the ‘32 was a ‘55 Chevy, driven by Ford’s cowboy hat-wearing Bob Falfa. This all-black machine had a more-storied history than the Deuce, having been one of three similar cars used in filming an earlier road trip movie called Two-Lane Blacktop.

One of the three had already been claimed by the crusher, but both the 454-powered stunt car and the 427-engined star-car had both survived. Both these would be painted black and were then joined by a third machine rescued from a junk yard for the sole purpose of being blown up at the end of the movie. The car with the 427 was the one driven by Ford and it’s something fairly special. Besides the monstrous engine, the black Chevy had flared-out wheel wells to fit the massive tires, a roll-cage (which would later come in handy) and a hoodscoop set to clear the intake. While the two combatants circle each other throughout the movie, we’re shown vignettes of the other players. Dreyfuss’ character, Curt Henderson, spends the film trying to track down an elusive blonde in a white 1955 Ford Thunderbird. This car is still in the hands of its original owners,

and was only lent briefly to the film crew — it wasn’t involved in any high-speed hijinks. Audiences lulled into happy nostalgia were perhaps shocked by the end credits. A title card showed that none of the male characters had what could traditionally be called a happy ending: one killed by a drunk driver, one MIA in Vietnam, one stuck in an implied dead-end job, and Henderson a writer in Canada, perhaps a draft dodger. Critics at the time liked the movie, but thought its scenes of youthful simplicity and the undercurrent of coming change might not make sense to those who hadn’t lived through it. But whether you see American Graffiti as a snapshot of SoCal hot rod history or just a really good car flick, four decades later, it still stands the test of time. mcaleeronwheels@gmail.com twitter.com/brendan_mcaleer

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

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MODEL SHOWN: FB2E2DEX

% ON SELECT 2013 HONDA VEHICLES. LEASE OR FINANCE.

The ongoing benefits of owning a Honda. High resale value. Low cost of ownership. Affordable. Reliable. Fuel Efficient. Advanced safety. Fun to drive. *$5,000 Honda cash purchase incentive is available on select Honda vehicles. Honda cash purchase incentive will be deducted from the negotiated price before taxes and cannot be combined with special lease or finance offers. #Limited time 0.99% finance offer based on new 2013 Honda models and a 24 month finance term available only through Honda Canada Finance Inc. O.A.C. Finance example based on a new 2013 Civic DX model FB2E2DEX and a 48 month finance term available only through Honda Canada Finance Inc. O.A.C.: $16,935 at 0.99% per annum equals $189.19 bi-weekly for 48 months. Freight and PDI of $1,495 included. Cost of borrowing is $387.72, for a total obligation of $19,674.72. Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment, environmental fees and $0 security deposit due at finance inception. Taxes are extra. Finance on approved credit for qualified customers only. ¥Limited time lease offer based on select new 2013 Honda models and a 24 month lease term available only through Honda Canada Finance Inc. O.A.C. 72,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometres. **MSRP is $16,075 based on a new 2013 Civic DX FB2E2DEX including $1,495 freight and PDI. # Dealer may sell for less. Dealer trade may be required. For all offers license, insurance, applicable taxes and registration are extra. Offers valid from August 1st through September 3rd, 2013 at participating Honda retailers. Offers valid only for British Columbia residents at BC Honda Dealers locations. Offers subject to change or cancellation without notice. Terms and conditions apply. Visit www.bchonda.com or see your Honda retailer for full details.

SUMMER 2013 AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE SPECIAL:

Save $30 OFF a Honda Air Conditioning

Refrigerant Recharge, $ 95 Leak Test and Deodorizing FREE SERVICE SHUTTLE (DOWNTOWN CORE) COURTESY CAR WASH FOR ALL SERVICE CUSTOMERS

Reg 169.

* All offers are effective until September 15, 2013. Taxes not included. Environmental levies extra. ˚Not to be combined with other offers. Please consult Kingsway Honda for more details. Please present coupon during write-up. Valid at Kingsway Honda only. Limit one per person. Coupon does not apply to prior purchases.

12th and Kingsway, Vancouver, BC

Member of Dealer the # D8508

CALL 604-873-3676

www.kingswayhonda.ca


FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A39

only at Kia Vancouver

your car your car All new vehicles ďŹ nanced, leased or purchased from today through to Nov. 30, 2013, will be entered into a draw to win your purchase. See dealer for details.

KIAVANCOUVER 48353>0<75:9/0<2

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THANKS MAKINGFOR US

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A40

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

WEEKLY SPECIALS 100% BC Owned and Operated Prices Effective August 22 to August 28, 2013.

We reserve the right to limit quantities. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.

Grocery Department Liberté Mediterranée Yogurt

42%

29%

25%

27%

5.99

2/5.00

Bakery Department

3.99

400g product of Canada

SAVE

19%

1.75kg product of Canada

assorted varieties

assorted varieties

2.69

2/4.00

assorted varieties 1.65L product of Canada

Yves Veggie Cuisine Burgers or Wieners

from 2.79

Organika Organic Spirulina Powder

20.99

PRICING

product of Canada

Ethnoscience™ Premium Line Of Maca Powder

from 9.99

regular retail price New Roots Candida Stop

33.49

1.50 off

90cap

Candida overgrowth can cause many symptoms including sugar cravings, bleeding gums, frequent stomach pains, digestion problems, and skin problems.

regular retail price 525g

WOW!

PRICING

Choices Markets’ Wellness Library

Let Choices be your partner in wellness with our series of healthy living guides. Available at any Choices location for $11.95 plus applicable taxes. 2010 - 2013 Awards. Your loyalty has helped Choices achieve these awards. Thank you!

300g

This whole food is a complete protein with a full amino acid profile, and loaded with trace minerals and vitamins like vitamin K + E.

1.00 off

Seedsational Brown Rice Bread

WOW!

275 - 450g

Health Care Department

Rice Bakery

325ml • +deposit +eco fee

assorted varieties

20% off regular retail price

whole or half loaf

PRICING

product of Canada

Island Farms Vanilla Plus Ice Cream or Frozen Yogurt

bags or bins

Organic Multigrain Bread

WOW!

Happy Planet Fresh Fruit Smoothies

Organic Walnut Halves

regular retail price package of 12

7.99

Dairyland Cottage Cheese 500g • product of Canada

1.48lb/ 3.26kg

Bulk Department

1.00 off

assorted varieties

2.95L product of Canada

PRICING

Oatmeal Cranberry or All Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies

Olympic Organic Yogurt

10.99

WOW!

product of Canada

regular retail price

product of Canada

33%

product of Canada

.99/100g

1.00 off

185g

SAVE

500g

Organic Sunrise Apples from Rothe Organic Orchard in Oliver, BC

reg 1.99

Oka, Oka Light, Oka with Mushrooms or Oka L’Artisan Cheese

assorted varieties

8.99

.98lb/ 2.16kg

product of Canada

37%

assorted varieties

4.49

PRICING

Indianlife Frozen Vegetarian Meals

EchoClean 2X HE Laundry Detergent

35%

2/7.00

140-270g

SAVE

assorted varieties

SAVE

WOW!

assorted varieties

1dozen product of Canada

Nuts to You Almond Butter

33%

assorted varieties

Plum-M-Good Organic Rice Cakes

4.49

Organic Cantaloupe and Honeydew Melons from Porterfield Organic Farms, BC

product of Canada

Choices’ Own Hummus

assorted varieties

2.48lb/ 5.47kg

product of Canada

PRICING

Deli Department

product of Canada

28%

WOW!

PRICING

WOW!

500ml

SAVE

product of Canada

Maple Hill Farms Free Range Extra Large Eggs

SAVE

7.99lb/ 17.61kg

Leclerc Brand Cookies and Bars (Praeventia, Celebration or Go Pure)

454g

22%

Paradise Valley Pork Back Ribs

2/7.00

SAVE

1L

product of Canada

SAVE

product of Canada

assorted varieties

Terra Breads Granola

SAVE

150g

Earth's Choice Organic Salsa

Uncle Luke's Medium Maple Syrup Jug

16.99

33%

Organic Peaches from Cawston, BC

5.99lb/ 13.21kg

2/4.00

SAVE

500g product of Canada

Produce Department

value pack

assorted varieties

2.79

SAVE

Organic Lean Ground Beef

Hardbite Gluten-Free Potato Chips

assorted varieties

SAVE

Meat Department

Look for our

WOW! PRICING

Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/ChoicesMarkets Best Organic Produce

Best Grocery Store

Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/ChoicesMarkets

2010-2012

www.choicesmarkets.com Kitsilano

Cambie

Kerrisdale

Yaletown

Rice Bakery

South Surrey

2627 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0009

3493 Cambie St. Vancouver 604.875.0099

1888 W. 57th Ave. Vancouver 604.263.4600

1202 Richards St. Vancouver 604.633.2392

2595 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0301

3248 King George Blvd. South Surrey 604.541.3902

Burnaby Crest

8683 10th Ave. Burnaby 604.522.0936

Kelowna

Floral Shop

1937 Harvey Ave. Kelowna 250.862.4864

2615 W. 16th Vancouver 603-736-7522


Vancouver Courier August 23 2013