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PLUS 2018 BEST OF TALLAHASSEE RESULTS ARE IN

A Taste of the Holidays What to serve and how to present it during this season of giving and sharing

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Holiday recipes cooked up by our experts

CHECKING YOUR LIST

Things to remember before hosting those dinner parties


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Elegance is an attitude Simon Baker

850-893-4171 4

November–December 2018

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THANKS A BILLION!

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1,304 scholarships and 94 professorships, ensuring that the nation’s best and brightest students and faculty don Garnet and Gold.

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See what else we’ve accomplished at raisethetorch.fsu.edu November–December 2018

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Contents

NOV/DEC 2018

104

Frank Gorski, retired U.S. Army Ranger

U.S. ARMY SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES

FEATURES

boast a remarkable group of alumni in the Capital City. by PAMELA FORRESTER

FEATURES

92

HOLIDAY PARTY 101

100

HOLIDAY MEMORIES

Plan well and create a tasty sparkle for your special dinner event.

A diverse collection of Tallahasseeans share heartfelt recollections.

by ROCHELLE KOFF

by MARINA BROWN

photography by DAVE BARFIELD

114

BEST OF TALLAHASSEE Tallahassee Magazine salutes the winners and runners-up of its annual readers’ poll.

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Contents

NOV/DEC 2018

43 34 How a nonprofit leader and a diving coach thrive together. more ways to tug at your holiday heart.

26 PERSONALITIES

A marketer and a mechanic maintain their drive as business partners.

30 EDITOR’S CHOICE

Organizations combat isolation and loneliness among young and elderly.

34 PETS

A parrot named Princess is a hit at a Tallahassee music venue.

38 CHAMPIONS

Artist Ruth Nickens uses her creations to make connections.

PANACHE

43 CITIZENS OF STYLE The colorful Chop barbershop says it values “hair for all humanity.”

8

features a mouthful of music and a taste of history.

November–December 2018

154 QUICK TRIP If you like

Think outside the box as you go looking for that special holiday gift.

dolphins, Discovery Cove offers a trip with porpoise.

52 WHAT’S IN STORE

Local artists to put potential gifts on display at LeMoyne’s holiday show.

GASTRO & GUSTO

55 DINING IN Holiday

appetizers help you spread holiday cheer.

58 74 MUSIC

As he eyes the big time, Royce Lovett keeps life in perspective.

58 DINING OUT Lucilla’s

offers a welcome neighborhood dining experience.

62 LIBATIONS Too much celebrating? Know these hangover treatments.

86 LANDMARKS

Pasaquan represents one man’s colorful, transformative vision.

ABODES

PUBLISHER’S LETTER SOCIAL STUDIES DINING GUIDE POSTSCRIPT

127 INTERIORS Maximize twinkle and fun for the rest of the year.

134 GARDENING How

to get what you want out of your fall vegetable garden.

PLUS 2018 BEST OF TALLAHASSEE RESULTS ARE IN

A Taste of the Holidays What to serve and how to present it during this season of giving and sharing

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Holiday recipes cooked up by our experts

CHECKING YOUR LIST

Things to remember before hosting those dinner parties

ON THE COVER:

showcases creations that are out of this world.

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

now for a brilliant lawn in the spring.

69 ART Linda Hall

14 171 191 194

136 EXTERIORS Prepare

EXPRESSION

80

IN EVERY ISSUE

In Erin Hoover’s Barnburner, good storytelling meets its match.

A platter from Tallahassee’s Coton Colors and a glass of wine from Farmer’s Daughter Vineyards of Thomasville, Georgia, are featured with a pork tenderloin dish that you can prepare for the holidays (recipe on page 98).

Photo by James Stefiuk

PHOTOS BY SAIGE ROBERTS (80), ALICIA OSBORNE (43), JOHN HARRINGTON (34) AND RICHARD LINCK VIA LUCILLA (58)

19 RELATIONSHIPS

24 GIVING Charities find

145 GETAWAYS Nashville

46 HIS & HERS

323

DESTINATIONS


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Contents

PROMOTION

NOV/DEC 2018

SPECIAL SECTIONS AND PROMOTIONS

50

186

HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE Get

inspiration from Apple Pie Maids, Narcissus, Southern Seafood, Tallahassee SmileLabs and others.

140

DEAL ESTATE

Find gated privacy in a Mediterraneanstyle Moore Pond estate, or own a piece of history in the remainder of the old Luna Plantation.

↑ TOP SINGLES RECAP

Singles performed unique runway routines with coordinated music, and attendees danced and toasted the night away, as the 2018 Top Singles event became Tallahassee Magazine’s most charitable event yet, raising over $123,000 for 19 charities. A crowd of 800 attended the event at the Donald L. Tucker Civic Center.

The Tallahassee Ballet glides gracefully into the holidays with “The Nutracker” at Ruby Diamond Concert Hall. And for Opening Nights in January, see the New York-based Parsons Dance Company.

165

TMH FOUNDATION NEWSLETTER The

Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare Foundation welcomes Nigel Allen as its new president and chief advancement officer, citing his “accomplished history in the nonprofit and fundraising industry.” The foundation also shares news on community events, Gifts at Work, and more.

84 OPENING NIGHTS

Traditional Scottish music forms the foundation of Skerryvore, which is made of eight men from throughout Scotland who have played in New York, Dubai and Shanghai.

90

continues its 2018-2019 season with a unique adaption of the story of George Bailey in “It’s A Wonderful Life.”

152 Next Issue 10

EMERALD COAST THEATRE COMPANY The company

← FORGOTTEN COAST MAP

Our illustrated map orients you to a historic and picturesque region of the Gulf Coast that shies from the spotlight.

180 HEALTH & FITNESS

Whether young or old, you will do yourself well to make exercise a part of your daily life, according to experts.

A RECAP ON BEST OF TALLAHASSEE — a celebration of the best of the best

November–December 2018

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PHOTOS BY LAWRENCE DAVIDSON (186), SAIGE ROBERTS (50), CORY TUCKER (90), KIKOVIC / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS (180) AND RACHEL KEENAN (SKERRYVORE)

158 CALENDAR


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November–December 2018

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TALLAHASSEE MAGAZINE VOL. 41, NO. 6

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2018

PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BRIAN E. ROWLAND

EDITORIAL MANAGING EDITOR Pete Reinwald STAFF WRITERS Hannah Burke CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lazaro Aleman, Steve Bornhoft, Marina Brown, Steve Dollar, Rosanne Dunkelberger, Lee Folmar, Pamela Forrester, Elizabeth B. Goldsmith, Erin Hoover, Rochelle Koff, Jack Macaleavy, Audrey Post, Rob Rushin

CREATIVE CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER Lawrence Davidson DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY Daniel Vitter CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jennifer Ekrut PUBLICATION DESIGNERS Sarah Mitchell, Shruti Shah GRAPHIC DESIGNER Amanda Brummet CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Dave Barfield, Sara Brockmann, Matt Burke, Phil Cicero, Lawrence Davidson, Dove Wedding Photography, Lois Greenfield, S Christine Han, John Harrington, Meagan Hellman, Chris Hollo, Scott Holstein, Donn Jones, Rochelle Koff, Richard Linck, Ryan McVay, Alicia Osborne, Kate Pierson, Johnston Roberts, Saige Roberts, Brian Rowland, James Stefiuk, Shelly Swanger, Adam VL Taylor, Corey Tucker

SALES, MARKETING AND EVENTS VICE PRESIDENT/CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT McKenzie Burleigh Lohbeck SALES MANAGER, EASTERN DIVISION Lori Magee Yeaton SALES MANAGER, WESTERN DIVISION Rhonda Lynn Murray DIRECTOR OF NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, EASTERN DIVISION Daniel Parisi DIRECTOR OF NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, WESTERN DIVISION Dan Parker ADVERTISING SERVICES COORDINATORS Tracy Mulligan, Lisa Sostre ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES MaKenna Curtis, David Doll, Julie Dorr, Margaret Farris, Darla Harrison, Linda Powell MARKETING MANAGER Kate Pierson SALES AND MARKETING WRITER Rebecca Padgett SALES AND EVENTS COORDINATOR Mackenzie Ligas SALES AND EVENTS ASSISTANT Abby Crane SALES, MARKETING AND EVENTS INTERN Tayler Ronco INTEGRATED MARKETING COORDINATOR Javis Ogden CLIENT SERVICES COORDINATOR Charles Shelton

OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATION AND HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER Melissa Spear CUSTOM PUBLISHING MANAGER Sara Goldfarb CLIENT SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE/PRODUCTION SPECIALIST Melinda Lanigan CUSTOM PUBLISHING EDITOR Jeff Price STAFF ACCOUNTANT Jackie Burns ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT Amber Dennard RECEPTIONISTS Natalie Kazmin, Kirsten Terhofter

DIGITAL SERVICES DIGITAL EDITOR Janecia Britt TALLAHASSEE MAGAZINE tallahasseemagazine.com facebook.com/tallahasseemag twitter.com/tallahasseemag instagram.com/tallahasseemag pinterest.com/tallahasseemag youtube.com/user/tallahasseemag ROWLAND PUBLISHING rowlandpublishing.com

EDITORIAL OFFICE 1932 Miccosukee Road, Tallahassee, FL 32308. (850) 878-0554 SUBSCRIPTIONS One year (6 issues) is $30. Call (850) 878-0554 or go online to tallahasseemagazine.com. Single copies are $3.95. Purchase at Barnes & Noble, Costco, Books-A-Million, Walgreens and at our Miccosukee Road office. CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUBMISSIONS Tallahassee Magazine and Rowland Publishing, Inc. are not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photography or artwork. Editorial contributions are welcomed and encouraged but will not be returned. Tallahassee Magazine reserves the right to publish any letters to the editor. Copyright November 2018 Tallahassee Magazine, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited. Partners of Visit Tallahassee and Member, Greater Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce.

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from the publisher

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November–December 2018

Even if you are not a tennis fan, you almost certainly became aware of the women’s singles final at this year’s U.S. Tennis Open Championships in New York. The tournament was remarkable not just because a Japanese player, Naomi Osaka, won her first major title, but also due to the temper tantrum and breakdown of the perennial champion, Serena Williams. Osaka was 3 years old when Williams won her first Grand Slam event. In September, Williams was seeking her 24th such title. Even so, Osaka ran Williams all over the court, handily won the first set and appeared to be on her way to a straight-sets victory. Having played competitive softball for more than 40 years, I have many times seen and experienced what happens when the “big dogs,” who expect to crush every team they meet, unexpectedly fall behind. The possibility of losing gets in their heads and they begin to fight among themselves. They will stretch the rules or outright cheat in order to win the game. And, should they lose, they will prove to be poor sports incapable of absorbing a defeat with class. This is just what Ms. Williams did. Her coach did depart from the rules by giving hand signals to her from the stands, but Williams denied that truth over and over again and confronted the chair umpire at the top of her lungs when she was given a one-point penalty for the coaching violation. Williams proved unable to regain her composure. Not long after play resumed, a frustrated Williams slammed her racquet into the court resulting in another one-point penalty. There was nothing discretionary about that; you abuse your racquet, you get penalized. Osaka continued to have her way with the legendary Williams, who could not or would not demonstrate some class and

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

civilly move on. Instead, she continued to disparage the umpire until finally she was assessed a third misconduct penalty, which resulted in the loss of a game. Even as Williams’s meltdown continued, Osaka somehow kept herself together despite a pro-Williams crowd that would have been more appropriate to a hockey game than a tennis championship. My heart went out to Osaka, whose first U.S. Open title and first Grand Slam triumph were trampled by a storyline that she had done nothing to create. Even the awards ceremony was all about Williams, and all Osaka could do was cry. Her day in the limelight had been shattered by a poor sport with a giant ego. I wonder if Williams, in the weeks since the Open was concluded, has thought about what her ugly display will have done to her legacy. Has she thought about what her infant daughter will think when she sees the match on tape 10 or 15 years from now? The 2018 U.S. Open may have been the beginning of the end for Williams; what a way to go out. In all of this, there is a lesson for parents regarding competition of all sorts. Have your children take the high road; there is far less traffic on it. Think smart and play fair. Best,

BRIAN ROWLAND browland@rowlandpublishing.com

PHOTO BY BRIAN ROWLAND

I have a few observations to share with you as someone who assesses impressions created by the media and who views the behavior of stars through glasses that may differ from yours. Consider the local billboards that read, “YOUR NEW FSU TARGET IS NOW OPEN.” Upon first seeing them, I immediately wondered who it was at some big-time advertising agency that wrote and approved the copy. The responsible parties clearly did not do their research, with the result that the Target stores brand was trashed in the Tallahassee market. And, the placement of the boards on Orange Avenue and Lake Bradford Road just added insult to injury. Should we assume that FAMU and TCC students will not be recognized or welcomed at the new Target store on Tennessee Street? Tallahassee is a three-college town, and national brands like Target certainly don’t help themselves by allowing careless mistakes to occur. They could easily have run FSU in garnet, FAMU in orange and TCC in blue, thus positioning the brand as inclusive and not naive. A quick call to the Chamber of Commerce, Visit Florida or the offices of Tallahassee Magazine would have prevented this faux pas.

SCOTT HOLSTEIN

THOUGHTS PRODUCED BY COMMON SENSE


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323

NOV/DEC 2018

PROFILING THE PURSUITS, PASSIONS AND PERSONALITIES AMONG US

THE

RELATIONSHIPS

HEAD

over heels Nonprofit leader, diving coach experienced their own twists and turns, and now they thrive together by MARINA BROWN

GIVING

The Season of Generosity

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS

|| PERSONALITY

2 Who Make C.A.R.S. Purr

|| EDITOR’S CHOICE

Combatting an Epidemic

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THE

323

A

phorisms abound on the subject of how to know if you’ve found The One For You. “Perceptions can be deceiving.” “You can’t tell a book by its cover.” But perhaps more importantly, “One sees clearly only with the heart.” In the more than 20-year relationship between Traci and John Proctor, the latter phrase has been their motto and mantra. From something akin to first-sight-love to careers that have taken right turns, soared, fluttered and now steadied into a sure and steady flight-path, the couple has settled into Tallahassee. Since 2017, Traci Proctor has been executive director of Tallahassee’s Ronald McDonald House. She exudes organizational competence and a nononsense charm. “I guess you would say that I am determined, stubborn and responsible,” she said with a smile. Yet, when in proximity to her husband, Traci Proctor’s demeanor softens to that of a teenager in the early days of love.

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During those formative high school years, it would seem that Traci and John had nothing in common. “My family, unfortunately, was falling apart,” Traci said. Her father and a step-father had left, her mother was in the hospital, the family assets were in receivership, and 16-year-old Traci had become the caretaker of her two siblings and the breadwinner of the family. “Remarkably, I got a job in the mayor’s office of our town,” she said. Town leaders in Valparaiso, Indiana, took note of the bright teenager who without complaint was taking up any slack in her disintegrating family. “The mayor’s office helped me get a scholarship to the University of Arizona,” she said. “I wanted to be the first in my family to go to college. I wanted to be an engineer.” ← Meanwhile, John had finally John and Traci Proctor, with daughter Leigh, 16, found something that piqued moved to Tallahassee his interest. And he was imabout five years ago from Midland, Texas, mediately good. “I won two where they focused state high school diving chamtogether on the City of Midland Aquatics pionships on springboard,” he Program. said. He even began to harbor thoughts of diving as a career. It wasn’t long before John too received a scholarship to Auburn University. At Arizona, Traci modulated from dreams of engineering to business, and Traci is comfortable in dark business she was thriving. By his sophomore year, suits as she guides programs at John, too, was doing well. He was diving, Ronald McDonald House, a nonprofit helping diving coach Rick Theobald at organization that provides a place to stay, Auburn and coaching an age-group team. for free or at a reduced price, for families That is, until the accident. “It was on the of children undergoing medical treatment. skate board,” he said. “I tore my ACL, John is more at home in rubber flip-flops, the surgery did not go well, and it was sports shorts and stretched Tee — the eight months before I could even walk. clothing of choice for the head coach of My diving was, just like that — over.” Florida State University’s diving program. So, he decided, was his college career. They keep their focus on each other He dropped out of school except for a and what they do, preferably without random class, cooked in a restaurant and fanfare, so they took time to ponder wondered what to do next. whether a magazine article about their Then he received an “out of the blue” relationship would be right for them. invitation to become coach of a diving team in Tucson, Arizona, and to manage Their story the University of Arizona’s diving team, a John acknowledges that as a youth in position in which he started in 1997. And Louisville, Kentucky, a heady career path the stage was set for the serendipitous didn’t seem likely. He was the kid who meeting that would change Traci and was, “a mess,” he said. “Always in trouble, John’s life forever. I sort of lived on my skateboard with no “I picked him up in an Irish pub,” she goals and little ambition.” said with a laugh. Here, Traci stretches her hand into his New in town, without a car to pickher and gazes at him. up for the next evening’s dinner, John

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photography by SAIGE ROBERTS


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TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

coaxed a car from a buddy and, though two hours late, got his date. The two somehow found their new connection irresistible. They were married a year later — just about the time John got a call to go to Midland, Texas, to run a huge not-for-profit diving program. John built the program into one that became nationally known, and over 15 years he produced dozens of Junior National individual champions. “The kids loved him,” Traci said. And very soon, they made a “kid” of their own. Daughter Leigh, now 16, was born. Traci’s career blossomed as well, first at Midland College, then later as head of the City of Midland Aquatics Program, where John coached. He said she developed programs for adults, for physical therapy — Traci Proctor and for rehabilitation and worked to raise $25 million for an 80,000-square-foot building that she helped design. At Midland, John’s diving program was producing young athletes who were beating college contenders in international competitions. He saw his divers recruited to top-flight universities, and he eventually followed their path. The call from Florida State came in 2013, and the Proctors moved to Tallahassee for the 2014–15 season. For Traci, who’d established deep roots in Texas, the move was bittersweet. She would continue making trips to Midland for several years. After a final moment of indecision about where her heart lay, the couple renewed their commitment to Tallahassee and what they do — John developing world-class competitors and Traci helping families cope through stressful and uncertain times. “As a couple, we decided that our happiness is in doing what we love together … no matter where that is,” Traci said. Meanwhile, the interview was ending. John was needed back at the pool. He was busy recruiting and setting up his roster for the coming season: “Two ACC champions, some All-Americans, and one from the Junior Pan Am Team …” he said. And what about his own diving urges? John laughed. “On our vacation in Mexico this year, I jumped off a rock.” That’s good enough, the couple said. Seeing each other clearly, John and Traci Proctor are concentrating on their own springboard — into the future and in a place they love. TM

“As a couple, we decided that our happiness is in doing what we love together … no matter where that is.”

Embrace the Rhythm of Life.

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323

GIVING

The Season of Generosity Charities find more ways to tug at your holiday heart by ROSANNE DUNKELBERGER

M

ost folks enter the year-end giving season with full hearts and a desire to be generous, and even Scrooges and Grinches can’t help but feel a tingle of charitableness in December. It’s not just a feeling. Giving USA estimates that about 30 percent of annual charitable contributions in the U.S. happen at the end of the year, which explains the avalanche of appeals you receive throughout the holiday season. “That’s one reason why charities are throwing their hat in the ring, so that if you’re one of those people that traditionally gives at that time of year, then every charity wants (to be considered) as part of your charitable giving,” said Alyce Lee Stansbury, president of Stansbury Consulting, which focuses on nonprofit fundraising and governance. In recent years, a new “must do” event has been added to the list, after Black Friday and Cyber Monday. On Giving Tuesday, celebrated this year on Nov. 27, people throughout the world are urged to go online to discover ways to share their time and treasure at the end of the year. The local affiliate of this effort, Big Bend Gives Back, boasts on BigBendGivesBack.org that the global effort last year raised more than $300,000 million online. Giving Tuesday’s website (GivingTuesday.org) provides resources to help organize your giving plans. Meanwhile, organizations including the Salvation Army seek a boost. Perhaps nothing symbolizes Christmas giving more than the organization’s bell ringers and red kettles. But modern life has put a crimp in its efforts. “We have fallen short the last two years,” said Margo Armistead, a volunteer coordinator for the Salvation Army in Leon County. Bell ringers have reported that many people indicated they didn’t carry cash. “So, this year a number of our kettles will have a way to electronically give,” Armistead said. “It will be something new for us. They can just swipe a card.” Another way to help is for local businesses, families

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November–December 2018

and individuals to volunteer their time as bell ringers. Last year, only 18 percent of the ringers were volunteers, Armistead said, and this year’s goal is to raise that to 50 percent. “That’s one of the great ways people can help and give without having to write a check,” she said. As with other organizations, the Salvation Army also sponsors giving trees for children and senior citizens. And that presents a problem. “We find people are more quick to adopt children than they are seniors, and the seniors are just as needy and, I think, sometimes more,” she said. “They all ask for the same thing so it’s easy to predict — bedroom slippers, bathrobes, tablecloths, napkins, toiletries and nightgowns almost consistently. Once in a while you’ll have someone ask for a toaster.” Stansbury, of Stansbury Consulting, said year-end giving is a good time to look at the bigger picture. “Certainly, you don’t want to take away from organizations that serve children, but it is a good reminder that there are lots of needs in the community … the working poor, older kids, families who through a gift could get something as mundane as a washing machine — which is not as fun as a new bike but actually is equally as transforming for a family,” she said. “If you support a variety of organizations, consider giving to their infrastructure or to their programs or the things that don’t fit in a box, things that maybe are not as sparkly but can have a huge impact on a family or on the organization that’s serving people.” Don’t be dismayed by the inevitable holiday stories about fraudulent charities, Stansbury said. “There are a lot of resources out there for people to validate and make sure that it really is a legitimate charitable organization that’s properly registered,” she said. “The overwhelming majority of charitable organizations … are doing good works in the community.” To learn more about a nonprofit’s finances, she suggests visiting GuideStar.org and Check-aCharity, sponsored by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. TM

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NEED INSPIRATION? The Christmas Connection, an initiative of Catholic Charities that serves families of all religious, racial and ethnic backgrounds, has been bringing holiday cheer to families in a five-county region for 39 years. Last year, it served more than 450 families. The organization invites donors to fill the specific wish lists of families and individuals in need. Meanwhile, the Christmas Connection can never get enough of some items, including: ➸G  ift cards ➸B  aby food and formula ➸B  aby items ➸D  isposable diapers (infant/adult) ➸ Heaters (electric/space) ➸ Blankets ➸N  ew coats, hats and gloves ➸N  ew clothing, including underwear and socks ➸N  ew teen clothing ➸N  ew extra-large size clothing ➸ T een gifts such as headsets, and certificates for movies, games, fast food, skating, etc. ➸ T oiletries and household items such as deodorant, shampoo, soap, cleaning supplies, paper goods, detergent, etc. ➸N  on-perishable foods, especially protein foods like canned meats, tuna and peanut butter

LEARN MORE ABOUT COMMUNITY NONPROFITS INSTITUTE FOR NONPROFIT INNOVATION AND EXCELLENCE (INIE) theinstitutefornonprofits.org BIG BEND GIVES BACK bigbendgivesback.org COUNCIL ON CULTURE & ARTS (COCA) coca.tallahasseearts.org UNITED WAY OF THE BIG BEND uwbb.org UNITED PARTNERS FOR HUMAN SERVICES uphsfl.org

ILLUSTRATION BY BADBROTHER/ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

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PRESENTING THE

2018 LEON COUNTY ANNUAL REPORT LeonCountyFL.gov/AnnualReport PEOPLE FOCUSED. PERFORMANCE DRIVEN.

Leon County Board of County Commissioners

Vincent S. Long, County Administrator

Watch the Annual Report Video: LeonCountyFL.gov/Driven

2018 was another year of great progress for Leon County Government toward realizing an ambitious vision for our community and setting the standard for performance, fiscal stewardship and best practices for local governments everywhere. Through the vision and leadership provided by the Board of County Commissioners and the hard work of our dedicated County employees, I am proud to report that in 2018, Leon County has proven to be a government that our citizens can believe in and others can benchmark against. Please learn more about all of Leon County’s efforts this year on behalf of and alongside our community in the 2018 Annual Report at LeonCountyFL.gov/AnnualReport. TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

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Rodney Funderburk Jr., front, and Josh Iman opened Complete Automotive Repair & Sales in 2015, three years after they met and decided to start a Tallahassee repair business.

PERSONALITIES

2 WHO MAKE C.A.R.S. PURR How a marketer and a mechanic became business partners and maintain their drive by ERIN HOOVER

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November–December 2018

R

odney Funderburk Jr.’s eyes lit up like a dashboard after dark. “Our origin story!” he said. A student at Florida State University’s business and marketing program, Funderburk was working an internship at a local automotive shop in 2012 when he met master mechanic, Josh Iman. The two got along well and decided to start a repair business in town. At the end of 2014, Funderburk said, they started getting their plans and ideas in order and then found a building to lease on South Adams Street. “We pretty much put everything we had into it,” he said. Funderburk did the business plan, Iman said, and Iman got a group of friends together and built the shop at their new building.

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

With a marketing background, Funderburk came up with the name, Complete Automotive Repair & Sales, or C.A.R.S. “It’s so simple — ‘Take it to C.A.R.S,’” he said. The shop’s website proclaims each repair as “an opportunity to help another person. We’re in business to help people and make their lives better.” C.A.R.S. opened in January 2015. About four years later, the business employs six people full time and is open every day except Sunday. Funderburk is more likely found in the front of the shop, Iman in the bay. Funderburk said his interest in cars “goes back to Hot Wheels, basically.” Iman credited his father, who was an engineer for Honda, with sparking his interest in working on cars. “When he was 19, he bought a 1930 Model A Ford,” he photography by JOHN HARRINGTON


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November–December 2018

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323 said. “That’s been in the family the entire time, so I helped him do a lot of work on it.” A visitor to C.A.R.S. will notice distinctive T-shirts on employees. Matt Manning, who works at Monument Tattoos, created the design, an homage to a car model that Funderburk and Iman both own: the Datsun 280Z, a classic sport coupe produced in middle to late 1970s. Even though they’re in the repair business, Funderburk said the two have done significant modifications on those two cars. Funderburk owns six cars, all modified. Iman owns two cars, a truck and 14 motorcycles, and he holds a particular appreciation for earlier models. “I’ve been working on older vehicles longer, and I prefer them for myself,” he said. “There’s an aesthetic I really like. You open up on the engine on a ’70s vehicle, and it’s a pretty, well-built engine sitting in the center of the engine bay.” About a year ago, the business began hosting monthly “car meets” for enthusiasts

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↑ Josh Iman owns two cars, a truck and 14 motorcycles, with various pet projects. A master mechanic, he says he gives advice free of charge. “I enjoy teaching,” he says.

to get together and discuss their current shop when thinking about where to bring projects. The meets take place on the third their vehicle for repair. Funderburk posts Sunday of each month, if weather allows. the photos from meets on the company’s The C.A.R.S. meets are free and lowFacebook and Instagram accounts. key. Customers often drop by “We do this as our hobby,” the shop to show Iman their Iman said. “We take pride in it.” automotive projects. He says C.A.R.S. C.A.R.S. also sees the he gives advice free of charge. 1529 S. Adams St. meetings as marketing tools: “I enjoy teaching,” he said, (850) 765-9355 Enthusiasts who have attended “so I’ll point out what to do if carstallahassee.com a meeting might remember the they hit a roadblock.” TM

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PHOTO BY JOHN HARRINGTON

THE


Setting the Standard for Beautiful Smiles W

ayne had given Melody trips to Sydney, Monaco and Paris. Then, he gave her a lifetime of happiness. You see, Melody will wake up tomorrow looking gorgeous. She’ll smile at strangers “just because.” People will tell her she looks young and vibrant. She’ll feel young and vibrant. And next year, Melody will still be gorgeous. Wayne changed Melody’s life, forever.

Melody chose Dr. Oppenheim. Why? Was it Dr. Oppenheim’s ten gold medals in international cosmetic dentistry competitions, or that he’s one of only 63 AACD Fellows in the world, or that his patients have appeared on the cover of The Journal of Cosmetic Dentistry eight times? Melody says, “Yes it was!” Love someone. Change their smile and their life.

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November–December 2018

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323 He said most people develop social skills “by hit-and-miss observation.” Technology presents its own challenges to forming deep friendships. “Social media and cell phones make it easy to have acquaintances but much harder to have friends,” Kubiak said. “While technology has allowed us to reach out, it hasn’t necessarily allowed us the depth of relationships that are the most rewarding to us.”

Making Friends ... and Living Longer?

Melanie Lachman is working at the Tallahassee Senior Center to combat the problem of isolation and loneliness. She’s program coordinator for UPSLIDE, which stands for Utilizing and Promoting Social Engagement for Loneliness, Isolation and Depression in the Elderly. She hosts group meetings at the Senior Center and various neighborhood outreach sites, or EDITOR’S CHOICE meets with people at their homes, brainstorming ideas to help them decrease any obstacles to meeting people. She also connects them to resources. “Think of a couple who’s been married for years and then one of them dies,” Lachman said. “Or by ERIN HOOVER just being out in a rural area and not having access to people or transportation — that is huge. uring the spring, Cigna looked into clinical experience, social isolation “is Caregiving can also be isolating. loneliness. The global health insurer common with people who seek help for Retirement can be isolating. If compiled survey responses from issues such as depression and anxiety.” you’re frail and you’ve ever fallen some 20,000 adult subjects from A study published in 2016 in Heart, a in public, you become fearful that across the country and found that nearly journal of the British Cardiovascular Society, will happen again. If you have half of Americans reported sometimes or cited loneliness and social isolation as risk hearing loss, that can make it hard always feeling alone (46 percent) or left out factors for coronary heart disease and stroke. to engage in a conversation.” (47 percent). Social isolation can arise over time: a She said research shows the imCigna’s study used the UCLA Loneliness relationship ends or a partner passes away, portance of close reScale, a 20-item survey developed in 1978, or family lives far away. As lationships and social in which subjects describe how often they people age, support systems integration — how agree with each statement. sometimes dwindle. FOR THOSE much a person interLoneliness can happen to someone “Many of us are uncomfortINTERESTED acts with others. easily, said Dr. Larry Kubiak, director of able going out of our way to IN UPSLIDE “You just have to be Psychological Services at the Tallahassee make friends. It’s challenging,” Call Melanie around people in some Memorial Behavioral Health Center. Kubiak said. “It’s not like you Lachman directly: way,” Lachman said. Experts say social isolation can lead to take a course in school” on how (850) 891-4066 “That means taking loneliness. And Kubiak said that in his to do it.

COMBATTING AN EPIDEMIC Organizations provide support for isolation, loneliness among the young, elderly

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THE

323 a class, finding a church.” That takes work, she said, and for some it can be especially difficult. For people who are able to get out of the house, she sometimes suggests they say hello to people they meet. She may tell them to consider pursuing activities or interests that they’ve always wanted to do or perhaps restarting hobbies they’d given up.

Widen Your Circle

Perhaps surprisingly, Cigna’s study found that social isolation was most prevalent among younger Americans, ages 18 through 22. That problem hadn’t been lost on Lu Johnson, who in 2014 founded Tallahassee Young Active Professionals, or TYAP, with the goal of meeting new people. Using the online organizing tool Meetup.com to schedule events, she began planning open-invitation Ultimate Frisbee games, restaurant dinners and other activities. “After college it was difficult for me, because a lot of my friends moved out of town,” she said. “I found myself in a routine where I’d wake up, go to work, go to the gym and go home. I was on repeat every day … I knew that I wasn’t the only person experiencing that.” Friends began sharing TYAP events on Facebook, and the group has grown to some 1,400 members. All ages are welcome at TYAP events, Johnson said. “All friendships start out with strangers meeting for the first time,” she said. “Life is more enjoyable when you have good people to spend time with.” Johnson said she has seen formerly shy members gain confidence and relationships form within the group. Dr. Kubiak, of Tallahassee Memorial Behavioral Health Center, provided tips to meeting people. “The first step is recognizing that people are meaningful to you,” he said. “Then, identify what steps that you feel comfortable with taking to meet people.” Maybe that’s asking someone to introduce you to a new friend or meeting others through volunteering or at community events. “You may not meet someone who’s going to be your lifelong friend, but (volunteering) gets you out of yourself and comfortable dealing with other people,” he said. Even a pet can help bring those used to being alone out of their shell, he said. “People can create a lot of strain in our lives,” Kubiak said. “But they can create joy if we give them the opportunity to do that.” TM

→ SHORT VERSION OF THE UCLA LONELINESS SCALE QUESTIONS: Visit psychcentral.com/quizzes/loneliness-quiz

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323

PETS

LOOK WHO’S TALKING Parrot becomes a hit at ‘Junction’ music venue by PETE REINWALD

P

rincess tilted her head and delivered a kiss, and not just any old kiss. This one featured a faint chirpy “mwah.” Russ Pangratz asked for a better kiss and puckered up again, and Princess planted a bigger chirp, this one with smack, on her owner’s lips. “There we go!” Pangratz said. “That’s better.” That’s Princess, an African grey parrot and the new mascot of Pangratz’s The Junction At Monroe music venue on South Monroe Street. Princess likes mwahs, margaritas and, yes, music. But she doesn’t like dogs, daredevils and digits. She’s happy to walk around on your hand or forearm. But get too brave and careless with your fingers, and you’ll forget the band that just played. You’ll want a Band-Aid. Princess is the first to greet customers at J@M, where she roosts in a spacious cage near the entrance of the former warehouse. A handwritten note makes no beaks about it: “I bite! Please keep hands & faces away. Thanks” Yet customers think she rocks. On a recent night, they cooed at her, talked nice to her — “Pretty girl!” — and parroted the magic question. “What does she say?” a woman asked. “She says all kinds of stuff,” said Pangratz, bird in hand. Examples from Pangratz: “Do you want a margarita?” and “Be quiet.” To dogs, she commands: “Outside, outside, c’mon — out!” “And ‘Bad boy! Bad boy!’ ” her owner added. She also meows like a cat and barks like a dog and recently started sneezing like Donald Duck, a cartoon cousin of sorts.

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TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

photography by JOHN HARRINGTON


→ ABOUT THE SPECIES

Russ Pangratz, owner of The Junction At Monroe music venue, gets a little love from Princess, whom he calls “my baby.”

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

The African grey parrot is known for its mimicking ability, high intelligence and high-maintenance personality. The species, native to equatorial western and central Africa, generally lives 60-65 years in captivity and can cost up to $2,500 unweaned, said Ray Qaiser, a Tallahassee bird breeder who said he doesn’t currently breed the species. You can find them offered for much more and much less. Qaiser said prospective owners will want to get this bird before its weaned “because you have to start hand-feeding them at two to three weeks. That’s how the baby bird bonds with the human.” He said they pick up words quickly. “Once you start handfeeding them, you have to talk to them, invest time with them,” he said. “Whatever they hear, they pick up right away.” He said he built a commode for an African grey he once owned. The bird didn’t disappoint, he said, doing its business right on target. The species was featured in a 2008 book, “Alex & Me,” about the bond that scientist Irene Pepperberg said she formed with her African grey parrot during research of the bird’s cognitive and communicative abilities. A bird “with a brain the size of a shelled walnut could do the kinds of things that young children do,” she wrote in her book. “And that changed our perception of what we mean by ‘bird brain.’ ”

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323

↑ Princess,

Pangratz said he got Princess shortly after she hatched, from the owners of a local animal DNA testing lab for which he was doing web development. “And she’s been part of the family ever since,” he said. He feeds her grain-based pellets that include vitamins and minerals. The bird also dines, Pangratz said, on grapes, cheese, spaghetti, mashed potatoes and even, in an avian act of cannibalism, chicken wings. In early 2018, Pangratz decided to make his business his home, and he brought Princess with him. He keeps her mostly in her cage but occasionally carries her around as he mingles with customers. Outside of business hours, he said, she often falls asleep on his chest. She’s now 17, a sassy teen even in parrot years. “She’s my baby,” Pangratz said. “I can flip her upsidedown, play with her, tickle her.” But others can’t. She might object and peck. “I can do anything with her that no one else can,” he said. A visitor asked to take Princess for a walk around the music venue. Pangratz, bird on his hand, instructed the visitor to hold out an arm, and Princess made the transfer without hesitation — settling calmly to the beat of a Stevie Wonder cover band. “What I’m amazed about with this bird is how adapted it is to the amount of people who come through here,” said Mike Fox, a friend who was helping out a short-handed Pangratz at the cash register. “This bird thrives on people.” Before he returned Princess to her cage, Pangratz lowered his face to hers. “Kitty cat?” he asked. “Meow,” Princess responded. “OK, do the doggie.” “Ur, rur, rur.” Two rooms over, the band was finishing up “Ma Cherie Amour,” drawing applause from the crowd. On her way into her cage, Princess joined in with a whistle. TM

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a 17-year-old African grey parrot, is the first to greet customers at The Junction At Monroe.


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323

Ruth Nickens, with her dog, Ari, feels purpose through her art, including stained glass/mixed media creations. As coordinator of the Tallahassee Senior Center’s health-and-wellness program, she works to foster connectedness and viability through creative outlets.

CHAMPION

A TOUCH OF GLASS

Artist makes connections through care, creations, music by LAZARO ALEMAN

C

onnections are vital to Ruth Nickens: health and wellness advocate, stained-glass artist and house-concert impresario. An educator and registered nurse, Nickens has coordinated the Tallahassee Senior Center’s health-and-wellness program for nearly 15 years, overseeing services that include screenings, counseling and fitness classes. “We have something for everybody,” Nickens said, noting that the center offers more than 180 programs designed to keep

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people active, creative, and socially and mentally engaged and connected. One of Nickens’ proudest professional accomplishments is the UPSLIDE program — a new three-year initiative geared to combat loneliness, isolation and depression in the elderly. “The idea is of sliding up instead of sliding down,” she says. Funded with a $221,000 Florida Blue Foundation grant that she and coworker Laurie Koburger secured, the program identifies socially isolated individuals, assists them to overcome obstacles fostering their isolation and gets them involved in social activities. “It doesn’t have to be at the center,” Nickens said. “It can be a lunch-and-learn in their rural community or going back to church. Or we connect them to other local resources. We have lots of ways to get people engaged.” Loneliness and social isolation affect 42.6 million U.S. adults 45 and older, a 2010 AARP study found. And in England, the government deemed the problem so dire that it recently created a Minister for Loneliness.

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

“The issue is definitely getting lots of attention,” Nickens said. “There have always been lonely people. But we now know that social isolation can lead to a cycle of chronic decline, the potential for falls, further isolation and a downward spiral. We’re trying to break that cycle.” A creative outlet is another way to maintain viability and connectedness, Nickens said. No matter the hobby or activity, so long as it’s fulfilling. “I know if I don’t have a project or projects going, I feel empty,” she said. “Everybody needs to feel a purpose.” For Nickens, art serves that function, evident by the many stained glass/mixedmedia creations of her own making that adorn her signature purple house opposite Lake Jackson. “My whole life, I’ve being fascinated by stained glass,” Nickens said. “I’ve always been drawn to beads, crystals, enamels and glass. Anything smooth, shiny, sparkly or glassy — there’s something magical about it for me.” Nickens has exhibited and sold her artworks for more than 20 years. Nowadays, photography by JOHNSTON ROBERTS


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323 she said, she mostly limits her creations to commissioned pieces and those “that come from within and that I just have to create.” Her inspiration can come from anywhere — books, sketches, memories or emotions. Or the artworks simply metamorphose. “I never use patterns,” she said. “I just start building and see what evolves.” She will incorporate assorted non-glass materials into her pieces, including found objects, mementos, photographs or anything that strikes her fancy. “Nothing’s sacred,” Nickens said. “Anything might end up in my art — jewelry, vintage glass or a special shell that someone brought me or I found. “I used to say my art was about being joyful and whimsical,” she said. “It’s still whimsical, but I pour more emotions into it now.” Music also keeps her connected. Her Purple House Concerts, now in their fifth year, began as fundraisers that she admits were partially self-serving, as they featured her ↑ Ruth Nickens says, “Anything favorite musicians. might end up in my art — jewelry, vintage glass or a special shell …” There followed an epiphany. “I realized I was fortunate to live in this house and enjoy its space and beauty,” she said. “I felt it incumbent on me to share it.” Now the concerts, which average about one a month, have taken on a life of their own. The shows are free, but donations to the musicians are encouraged. Typically featured are artists, such as Tallahassee’s own Grant Peeples, who play contemporary music incorporating elements of various American styles, such as country, rock and folk. For Nickens, the concerts are labors of love, whose rewards include getting to hear distinctive original music and connecting with talented individuals. Never mind having the satisfaction of knowing she is providing a venue where the genre can flourish. “It’s a listening room, not a noisy smoky bar where no one’s paying attention,” she said. The concerts also afford an opportunity for people to come together and bond. “It’s the kind of event that anyone can attend alone,” Nickens said. “A lot of people find themselves alone, and where are they going to go and meet decent people? So that’s been fun too, watching the connections.” TM

PHOTO BY JOHNSTON ROBERTS

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REGARDING MATTERS OF ALL THINGS STYLISH

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Chop barbershop seeks to expand its stylish concept beyond Tallahassee by ERIN HOOVER

HIS & HERS Gifts Worth Giving || WHAT’S IN STORE Handmade and Heartfelt Holiday Gifts photography by ALICIA OSBORNE

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ou might have missed the salon where Steve Bolinder cut hair for two decades in Tallahassee if no one pointed it out to you. With no sign or website, and a clientele that grew via word of mouth, Bolinder had an “old school” way of doing business, according to his wife, Sarah — down to his paper appointment book. Meanwhile, Katie Rainey said her husband had become a barber after a long career as an electrician. “He decided he was sick of it when our daughter was in high school,” she said. “He was tired of being hot and working in attics.” A few years ago, Danny Rainey had finished barber school and started working at a local shop when Steve Bolinder stopped in for a haircut. That afternoon, the two old Tallahassee pals, friends from high school, started talking about the kind of barbershop they’d like to own. Bolinder “pretty much invited me to help start Chop,” Danny Rainey said. “Steve and Sarah let us be part of their vision, allowed us to add to it and meld our styles with theirs.” Among its three barbershops, Chop today employs 30 or so barbers and cosmetologists who each practice their own unique and coveted look, led by a team of owners who exemplify a certain kind of bearded and tattooed cool (for the men) or artsy and colorful chic (for the women). Gents, as Chop calls them, can get a “quickie,” a “lumberjack” or various other styles. Ladies can choose among a “blowout,” an “updo,” or even a “multitonal mermaid,” among others. And beer really cuts it here. Chop offers customers over 21 a brew along ↑ Chop co-owner Katie with their haircut, or a soda for those Rainey’s appreciation for color who don’t drink. extends to her tattooed ankle area and foot and to her fun “That family feel of the pub is there unicorn shoes. from the moment you walk in,” said Sarah Bolinder, the company’s chief executive. Katie Rainey, who specializes in customer service, estimated that men make up 70 percent of Chop’s clientele. “Women get our nails done, and we get champagne or a glass of wine,” she said, her hair dyed a blue-green ombre. “We thought, ‘Why aren’t guys getting the same?’” Danny Rainey cites the barbershops of his youth and the fashion around car culture as inspirations. “I like the neat look, tapered on the sides, long on top like a pompadour,” he said. “I like some of the more extreme Mohawks.” Chop has grown faster than either the Bolinders or Raineys might have expected at that first meeting years ago over drinks. The first store, in Midtown, opened in 2015. A three-chair version opened in Railroad Square a year later. Then came a large shop in Killearn. They have since relocated the Midtown store and Railroad Square location to bigger digs in order to meet the demand. In Chop’s first year, Sarah Bolinder worked full-time as a lawyer while running the business as general manager. She calls her style a mix of “Nicole Kidman for dressing up and Joanna Gaines for

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photography by ALICIA OSBORNE


IS THERE A PERSON WHO INFLUENCED YOUR STYLE? “Probably one of my uncles as far as tattoos go. That was a different time. Not everybody was tattooed. My father was always into vintage automobiles and motorcycles. I picked that up, too.” — Danny Rainey

WHAT ARE YOUR INSPIRATIONS? “A lot of it comes from the old barbershops. I’m a huge customer service fan, and I feel like it’s gotten lost over the years in many industries. We have the ability to not only interact with our clients and to get to know them, but we have the power of touch — I think there’s something magical about that.” — Steve Bolinder

↑ Katie Rainey enjoys some colorful down time with her husband, Danny, left, and Steve Bolinder as Sarah Bolinder wears the look of chief executive. “One of our values is hair for all humanity,” she says. “Anybody from any culture, background or gender should be able to come into our shop and get a great cut for a good price.” ↙ At Chop, you never know where a tattoo of a fellow co-owner might turn up.

kicking around town.” Among other duties, she set up Chop’s online bookings and devised much of the company’s social marketing. She transitioned into the role of chief executive to help the company prepare for the next wave: Chop seeks to franchise its brand. As part of that process, the Bolinders and Raineys and their management team met over the summer to write out the core values that have formed the company’s culture. “One of our values is hair for all humanity,” Sarah said. “Anybody from any culture, background or gender should be able to come into our shop and get a great cut for a good price.” She added: “We offer things here that barbers don’t usually get, like half their health insurance

paid, a retirement savings plan starting after two years, a week’s paid vacation. Our goal is to share that love beyond Tallahassee.” Her husband noted that the company’s barbers and cosmetologists are trendsetters. “There are bartenders in this town who obviously come in here to get their hair done,” he said. “They look to see what our guys are doing with their hair.” Steve Bolinder said he has seen his own interest in style revitalized. “When I first started, I’d been (cutting hair) for years,” he said. “A lot of people were asking me if I was going to retire. Now that our crew has grown, it’s hard to get me away from the chair. There’s a whole other fire lit.” TM TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

WHAT IS DRESSING UP FOR YOU? “I really like the flowing, higher-end pantsuit with a halter. If I go out, you’ll see me in black.” — Sarah Bolinder

IS THERE A LOOK OR AN ITEM THAT PEOPLE ASSOCIATE WITH YOU? “Bright hair. I just like color.” — Katie Rainey November–December 2018

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panache THE FASHIONISTA You know who she is — the friend who always looks flawless, fabulous and full of flair. Luckily, Tallahassee boasts a variety of boutiques that can help you keep her style in check. 1

NARCISSUS predicts the ’70s will be grooving back into closets in 2019. Select from Trina Turk plaids or floral prints and rich solids from Tory Burch. And everyone knows an outfit isn’t complete without accessories. Narcissus sells a variety of modern, geometricshaped resin earrings by 8 Other Reasons and Verdier. For a more classic, elegant and timeless look, HEARTH & SOUL loves the Adina Reyter Folded Heart Necklace. Give this one to someone special. For the Southern sweetheart, REBELS BOUTIQUE has a wide selection of handmade freshwater pearl necklaces that pair perfectly with its cowhide clutches.

HIS & HERS

GIFTS WORTH GIVING Have them unwrap the best box under the tree, by thinking outside the box by REBECCA PADGETT

Your gift list may seem daunting as you ponder something meaningful for your significant other and something appropriate for cousin Jimmy in Arkansas. We’ve composed a gift list that features local stores and targets a variety of personalities. You’ve made your list, and you’ve checked it twice. Now go forth and buy. 46

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2 THE HOMEBODY There’s no place like home, which is especially true for the homebody. Whether it’s the first-time homeowner or the want-to-be interior designer, a stylish, new home furnishing piece can be exhilarating. For a friend, consider an intricate, eye-catching throw pillow, a whimsical serving platter from COTON COLORS or a Moroccan oil candle from FUEL SALON + STORE. These candles, crafted in France, provide 50 hours of soothing ambiance in any room. For a heartfelt and useful gift, buy a photo session from one of many local photographers. A new couple or a large family, among others, would consider the chance to pose for keepsake photos an irreplaceable gift. Green thumb? Enlist the help of TALLAHASSEE NURSERIES ››

PHOTO BY MARIANVEJCIK/ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

Let your holiday gift fit the personalities of the people on your list.

The dapper dude in your life likely appreciates the sleek and timeless look of high-quality leather products. HEARTH & SOUL carries FRYE, the popular American-made leather goods brand. The addition of a structured leather bag and bold, vintage cufflinks can update any outfit. NIC’S TOGGERY stocks every man’s ideal shirt; the Mizzen + Main brand features a variety of dress and casual shirts that are moisturewicking and wrinkle-resistant and stretch to your comfort.


For every kind of style a man could wish for

DOWNTOWN | (850) 222-0687

THE GALLERY | (850) 893-9599

NIC’S BIG & TALL | (850) 385-6866

MORE THAN A STORE. Simple, modern, classic women’s and men’s clothing, accessories, furniture, lighting, kitchen and bar provisions, library, coffee bar, special gatherings, wedding registry, design services Mon-Fri 9am-7pm • Sat 10am-6pm • Sun 12pm-5pm

1410 Market Street | 850.894.SOUL Follow us @hearthsoulTLH TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

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panache to pick out a plant that is unique to the gift-getter’s personality and lifestyle.

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WHERE FUN, FASHION AND LIBATIONS COLLIDE R E B E L S A B O U T I Q U E . C O M | 1 9 5 0 T H O M A S V I L L E R OA D, S U I T E 1 | 8 5 0 . 5 9 7 . 7 4 5 6

DAUGHTER VINEYARDS

can be bought locally in Thomasville and Tallahassee. SMASHING OLIVE is a delight for the senses with 38 highquality oils and vinegars. The company can help you design a gift basket to include oils, vinegars, Bradley’s sausage, local honey, jams, olives, butters, seasonings and more.

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a.m. break WITH

ANN

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Thursdays 10:30 am Fox 49 TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

THE FOODIE

This person somehow finagles a reservation at the newest restaurants in town months in advance and can tell you the tasting notes in specialty wines and beers. And she or he consumed bone broth and chia seeds before you’d even heard of either. The food and wine connoisseur deserves the best tastes of Tallahassee. Fill up a growler or two of locally brewed beers from DEEP BREWING CO. and PROOF BREWING CO. If wine is more their style, THE WINE HOUSE offers an impressive selection, and wine from FARMER’S

THE HEALTH NUT

True fitness junkies enjoy a variety of activities that get their hearts pumping. Select an activity and buy your fitness friend a class or two, be it yoga, high-intensity workouts, kickboxing, barre, cycling or rock climbing. Outfit them for success in a trendy, comfortable and breathable outfit from LULULEMON ATHLETICA. Step out in a sleek pair of sneaks from FLEET FEET SPORTS, which specializes in custom fits based on your foot and physicalactivity preference.

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THE BOOKWORM

Curled up, nose to novel is usually where you can find this friend or family member. Sure, you could buy him or her a gift card to a bookstore, or you could make it more meaningful through a visit to MIDTOWN READER or Thomasville’s THE BOOKSHELF. Knowledgeable staff members can help you find the ideal book for any reader.

THE ADVENTURE SEEKER This is the 6

friend on your gift list who always seeks something new to do. For the outdoorsman or woman, a trove of outdoor adventure equipment awaits at TRAIL & SKI and

KEVIN’S FINE OUTDOOR GEAR & APPAREL. Or

consider gifting an annual membership to the

TALLAHASSEE MUSEUM or GOODWOOD MUSEUM AND GARDENS. That

would guarantee yearround access to activities, exhibits and events.

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THE BEAUTY MAVEN

Pamper and primp via

purchase of services or gift cards from one of the many Tallahassee salons. A new do, a fresh manicure or pedicure, shaped-up eyebrows and lashes or a massage will refresh and relax. For an at-home spa day, FUEL SALON + STORE suggest the FarmHouse Fresh Rainbow Road body scent collection featuring bath gel, shea butter lotion and a rollerball perfume in an uplifting blend of coconut and pear. Good grooming is also essential for the guys, and the Redken Brews men’s line of shampoo, conditioner, shave cream and body-cleansing bar has drawn raves.


CURRENT OBSESSIONS. (850) 553 3327

1350 MARKET STREET

S H O P E L L E M A R K E T. C O M

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PROMOTION

HOLIDAY Whether you want to deck yourself out for date night, thank a coworker or find a unique gift for someone on your nice list, our handy Holiday Gift Guide will make your shopping spree in Tallahassee a breeze. With fabulous finds ranging from upscale designer duds to treat-yourself gifts, sensational seasonal shopping is simply in the bag! Now that’s the spirit!

BUMBLEBEE WAXING & MORE Experience the positivity, collaboration and

connection from staff professionals. Products are high-performance professional-grade botanicals. Cold-pressed extracts, chemical-free, 100% vegan and organic, and no animal testing. 359 N. Monroe St., (850) 631-1868, Bumblebeewaxing.com

TALLAHASSEE SMILELABS

Please come see us at Tallahassee SmileLabs Teeth Whitening and see how much brighter your smile can be in only 20 minutes! Gift cards available. 2536 Capital Medical Blvd., (850) UR SMILE (877-6453) tallahasseesmilelabs.com

NARCISSUS

The studded leather tote is a neutral everyday piece with limitless versatility. The mixed material crossbody is great for the girl on the go. Rebecca Minkoff leather studded tote $295. Tory Burch mixed material crossbody $298. 1408 Timberlane Road, (850) 668-4807, narcissusstyle.com

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SOLEIL 7 SALON & SPA

Achieve peace of mind and body with the soothing signature scent of Aveda Shampure Hand and Body Wash, Shampure Body Lotion and Hand Relief, $45.50. (850) 727-0482, 1410 Market St., C-6; (850) 681-6681, 1435 E. Lafeyette St., soleil7.com

PHOTOS BY SAIGE ROBERTS (TALLAHASSEE SMILELABS, NARCISSUS, PINK NARCISSUS, SOLEIL 7 SALON & SPA, ELLE | MARKET AND FARMER’S DAUGHTER VINEYARDS) AND LAWRENCE DAVIDSON (MILLENNIUM AT MIDTOWN)

GIFT GUIDE


PROMOTION

PINK NARCISSUS

Give the gift of print with Lily Pulitzer this holiday season. Pink Narcissus is also Tallahassee’s exclusive home to Kendra Scott jewelry. $98 printed popover; $55 earrings. (850) 597-8201, 1350 Market St. #100, lillypinknarcissus.com

ELLE | MARKET

APPLE PIE MAIDS

Save your valuable time and hire a cleaning service. Let us help you accomplish your goals by setting up a cleaning routine. Leave the cleaning to our trustworthy cleaners. Serving tallahassee since 2011! (850) 273-9082, applepiemaids.com

Where fashion meets fragrance! Mavens in the world of candles delight as holiday scents and styles have arrived at Elle Market. Capri Blue Holiday Candle $30. 1350 Market St., Suite 104, (850) 553-3327, shopellemarket.com

MILLENNIUM AT MIDTOWN

Relax and rejuvenate with stress relieving body oil, sip on soothing herbal tea to calm the senses and breathe in the pure aromas of a plant essence candle. $30 stress fix composition oil. $30 comforting tea. $42 Shampure soy wax candle. (850) 224-2222, 1817 Thomasville Rd., Ste. 230, millenniumatmidtown.com

FARMER’S DAUGHTER VINEYARDS

Georgia wine that is locally grown and internationally recognized. Bright and refined Chardonnaystyle, fruity and dry Rosé, bold and silky Grenache-style. Bombshell Chardonnay-Style $22. Sand Angel Rosé $21. Heart Breaker Grenache-Style $26. stompedingeorgia.com

SOUTHERN SEAFOOD

Our fresh Gulf seafood makes a great gift for the holidays! Stone crabs and lobster are now in season and are always a hit at any party or at home among family and friends. Gift cards are also available. (850) 893-7301, 1415 Timberlane Road in Market Square, southernseafoodmarket.com

SOUTHEASTERN PLASTIC SURGERY, P.A. Seeking the perfect gift? No sweat, literally!

miraDry® is a treatment that permanently eliminates sweat and odor glands making you sweat and antiperspirant free forever. Contact Southeastern Plastic Surgery to learn more. 2030 Fleischmann Road, (850) 219-2000, se-plasticsurgery.com

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panache HANDMADE AND HEARTFELT

HOLIDAY GIFTS

FIREFLY POTTERY presents a treasure trove of pieces that invite you to unleash your creativity. You might have a hard time choosing from over 100 pottery items and over 50 paint options, but once you do, your mind will open to limitless creative possibilities. The artistic endeavors don’t stop with pottery; you can also create mosaics, canvas paintings, wood paintings and glass art. Pull together a group for an instructed class, paint together for a unique date night or create solo with a special gift idea in mind.

 What’s In Store?

A roundup of retail happenings throughout Tallahassee

The LeMoyne Arts 55th Annual Holiday Show features an array of art crafted by local artists. Skip the long lines on Black Friday and attend this event featuring unique gifts. The show opens to the public Nov. 23 and continues to Dec. 24. Hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Prices start at less than $30, organizers say. A children’s area allows kids to write a letter to Santa, take part in crafts and find gifts catered to tiny budgets. “The LeMoyne Holiday Show offers original, one-of-a-kind artwork for gift giving at affordable prices,” said Kelly Dozier, president of LeMoyne Arts. “The object is to get art into the hands of the people. We want to provide the opportunity for those just starting their collections of original art to do so at a comfort level that will keep them coming back.” Each purchase supports the mission of LeMoyne Arts — to promote and advance education, interest and participation in the contemporary arts through support of local artists.

Artwork Galore

AR WORKSHOP, recently opened on Thomasville Road, is a unique boutique and DIY studio offering classes that allow you to create your own home décor projects. The instructor-led workshops offer a variety of options including pillows, wood-plank signs, tote bags, centerpieces, frames and more. Visit the calendar on its website to see what home décor projects are coming up, and book a workshop. Give your creation as a gift made by your hands, straight to somebody’s heart.

Craft lovers delight, as it just so happens that Tallahassee hosts one of the Southeast’s largest and best-juried arts and crafts shows. MARKET DAYS is a cherished Tallahassee tradition, celebrating its 53rd year. On Dec. 1–2, head out to the North Florida Fairgrounds to shop over 300 vendors featuring artwork, jewelry, pottery, clothing, sculptures, glasswork, photography, ceramics, woodwork, home décor, garden décor, stained glass, furniture and more. Saving your Christmas shopping for this event will reward you with creative products that will impress anyone on your list. Through Market Days, you support local artists and contribute to a major fundraiser for the Tallahassee Museum.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF LEMOYNE ARTS AND FIREFLY POTTERY STUDIO

by REBECCA PADGETT


OLFLY

FU

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gastro&gusto NOV/DEC 2018

FROM THE SIMPLY IRRESISTIBLE TO THE PIÈCE DE RÉSISTANCE

Colorful and wellpresented munchies provide a great way to welcome guests for the holidays.

DINING IN

YULETIDE YUM-YUMS Appetizers spread holiday cheer, one bite at a time by ROSANNE DUNKELBERGER

DINING OUT No Plate Like Home || LIBATIONS Too Much Holiday Cheer photography by JAMES STEFIUK

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gastro & gusto Tuna Poke

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hether it’s at a seasonal cocktail party, a little nibble for visitors or the kickoff to a grand meal, appetizers offer a great way to welcome friends and family into your home while honing your hosting skills. First, a little Appetizer 101 from Janice Powell, event manager at John Gandy Events: “If it’s an appetizer and you’re trying to put it in your mouth, you don’t want it to be over a bite size and you don’t want it to be something you pick up and it falls apart,” she said. Because not every house is equipped to handle a crowd in just one room, Powell also suggests spending a few moments considering how a gathering will “flow,” by creating food and drink stations throughout the inside and outside of the house. Presentation is key, she said, and the more colorful, the better. “I’m all about a beautiful tablecloth and a beautiful arrangement … because to me that’s what makes that food look good,” Powell said. She and fellow Gandy event manager Troy Rentz applaud a good charcuterie board, a collection of meats, cheeses and accompaniments, so guests can build their own appetizers. But please don’t cut your cheeses into little squares, they say. Offer something that your guests can pick up with a little fork and put on a cracker. A different spread that Powell adds to her charcuterie or serves separately mixes fig preserves and goat cheese. Online recipes suggest two ounces of preserves to four ounces of goat cheese, but she goes “by taste.” Old-time appetizer favorites making a comeback include pineapple and cream cheese spread, finger sandwiches, chicken salad and petit fours, Powell said. Bruschetta is particularly seasonal, with red tomatoes atop a crunchy crostini. For a wow appetizer that shows off your culinary chops, consider tuna poke, a sushi-like mix that’s delicious — and healthful too. It looks great spooned on an oven-baked wonton chip or served in a pre-made pastry cup. TM

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INGREDIENTS ➸ 1 pound sushi-grade ahi tuna (also known as yellowfin tuna) ➸½  cup English cucumber, 1/8-inch dice ➸ 3 scallions, finely chopped ➸ 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice (about 2 medium limes) ➸ 2 tablespoons soy sauce ➸ 1 ½ teaspoons grated fresh ginger ➸ 4 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds ➸ 1 teaspoon sesame oil ➸ S alt ➸ T ogarashi or freshly ground black pepper INSTRUCTIONS Place a serving dish in the refrigerator to chill for at least 30 minutes. Trim any dark flesh and fat from the tuna and discard. Dice into 1/4-inch cubes and place in a large bowl. Add cucumber, scallions, 2 tablespoons of the lime juice, soy sauce, 3 teaspoons of the sesame seeds, ginger and sesame oil and stir gently to combine. Season with salt, togarashi or pepper, and remaining 1 tablespoon lime juice as desired. Transfer to the chilled serving dish and sprinkle with the remaining teaspoon of sesame seeds.

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


DIY Charcuterie Board ➸ The possibilities are endless when creating a charcuterie board. Often literally served on a wooden board, it’s a collection of meats, cheeses, bread and crackers, and “accents” like fruit and pickles. The trick is to curate an abundant board that invites guests to indulge in a variety of flavors and textures. The word charcuterie refers to the meats, and a good selection would include hard cuts like salami and soppressata, thinly sliced meats such as prosciutto and even spreadables such as pate and terrines. A rule of thumb is to plan on serving two ounces of meat per person if it is a pre-meal appetizer or five ounces per person when it substitutes for a meal. A mix of hard and soft cheeses should be included, with flavors ranging from mild (chevre and brie) to strong (Maytag blue and Parmigiano Reggiano). The bread selection can include fancy crackers, crostini or even plain baguette slices. As for the accompaniments, use your imagination. Recipes have included pickled vegetables, hummus, grapes, melon, jams and chutneys, olives and nuts. For condiments, consider coarse salt and pepper, grainy mustard and honey.

Five Things You Can Pour Over a Block of Cream Cheese You have days when you can wow your guests and coworkers with a cranberry chutney-topped blue cheese tart or freshfrom-the-oven gougéres. Pretty much all the other days, you’re caught up in the holidaze of shopping and celebrating — and opening a sleeve of crackers seems like a monumental task. During those hectic times, we turn to the appetizer go-to ingredient — cream cheese. Unwrap an 8-ounce block, plonk it on a pretty plate and cover it with one of these sauces. Present it with a spreader and a collection of crackers for a tasty sweet or savory nibble that comes together in a hurry. ➸ Pepper jelly ➸ Peach or apricot preserves with jalapeños ➸ Pickapeppa sauce ➸ Caramel sauce and toffee bits (works great with apple slices) ➸ Sweet chili sauce

photography by JAMES STEFIUK

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gastro & gusto

Pan Roasted Scottish Salmon

DINING OUT

No Plate Like Home

Salted Butterscotch Pots de Creme

Neighborly Lucilla beats city ‘curse’ via diet of steady customers by ROCHELLE KOFF

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Pimento Cheese Fritters

PHOTOS BY RICHARD LINCK COURTESY OF LUCILLA

hen Joe Richardson and Lara Hooper were ready to launch their new restaurant, Lucilla, they figured it would be a few years before it evolved into more than a neighborhood destination. Instead, it took about three weeks. Lucilla’s 50-seat dining room has been attracting big crowds since the restaurant opened Jan. 2 on Lafayette Street, in the former home of Sahara Greek & Lebanese Cafe. The restaurant draws regulars from Tallahassee and the surrounding area who have become hooked on dishes such as pimento cheese fritters, snapper St. Charles and salted butterscotch pots de crème. Lucilla offers a call-ahead system that puts you on a wait list for lunch or weekend brunch. You’ll want to make reservations for dinner, particularly at prime times. “We thought it would take three years to gain traction,” Richardson said. “It kind of took off from the very beginning and exceeded our expectations.” Taking a break as the last of Lucilla’s lunch crowd finished up at 2 p.m. on a Tuesday afternoon, the couple reflected on their initial plans for Lucilla. Richardson, Lucilla’s chef, said he and Hooper had set out to create “a neighborhood bistro for Myers Park and Indianhead Acres. That was always the foundation of our business. We live nearby, and we wanted the kind of place that we would want to go to.” But they were concerned about a dilemma experienced at so many new Tallahassee restaurants — fickle diners.

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Mascarpone Stuffed French Toast Nutella Stuffed Brownie

Warm Goat Cheese Salad

Fried Gulf Oysters

Green Hill Chicken

Chef Joe Richardson, who honed his skills in New Orleans, has labeled his cuisine upscale American comfort food with Creole and Southern accents.

Snapper St. Charles

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gastro & gusto

“We know about the new restaurant curse in Tallahassee,” Richardson initially learned a Hooper said. “Diners patronize a new restaurant for a few lot about cooking in his childhood months and then they stop going. They move on to the next kitchen, with the help of his new thing.” mother and both grandmothers. “Always in the back of my mind, I worried, ‘Is this business But he honed his skills in the Big going to die off after a few months?’ ” she said. “We wanted Easy. to come out of the gate ready. We wanted to impress people After his sister went to graduate right away, and maybe that has had something to do with it. school at Tulane University in New Our customers have been so supportive.” Orleans, Richardson joined her Richardson has labeled his cuisine upscale American there in 1993 and began working comfort food with Creole and Southern accents. The in local eateries. “That’s where I restaurant complements it with a small, thoughtful wine and got passionate about restaurants,” beer list. he said. “Cooking in a restaurant The brunch menu features shrimp and grits as well is entirely different from cooking as crab cake Benedict, bruléed grapefruit with ginger at home. cardamom sugar and a playful dish of Bradley’s sausage “The pace and the pressure, with figs, pecans and duck fat Coca Cola jus. During lunch, the multitasking and the scale of customers can chow down on vegetable pot pie, meatloaf everything is so much more intense or a big, juicy burger. Dinner staples include roasted duck in a restaurant,” Richardson said. breast, Scottish salmon and pepper-crusted filet mignon. “It’s easy to make something Two favorites at any meal are pimento cheese fritters and fantastic if you have three hours to fried oysters. cook for four people. It’s something Take a bite of those Southern-fried pimento puffs and else if have three hours to cook for savor the soft melty cheese inside a crisp panko 300 people. But the shell. The fun fritters are set atop a smidgeon rush was what made of bourbon-peach glaze with a side dip of kicky me enamored with the Creole black garlic aioli. The fried oysters, from business. I had never 1241 E. Lafayette St. Tallahassee’s Southern Seafood Market, are experienced anything (850) 900-5117 lightly coated and seasoned, letting you taste the like it. It was exciting.” Open for dinner faint flavor of the sea. Hooper worked in 5–9 p.m. Monday Sunday; “We don’t have a big walk-in cooler, so we restaurants as a server for brunch order a small amount of fish and produce every while attending high 11 a.m.–3 p.m. day,” Richardson said. As a Tallahassee native, he school and college. Saturday and Sunday said he appreciates products from local farms. Originally from North

LUCILLA

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PHOTOS BY RICHARD LINCK COURTESY OF LUCILLA

↗ Lucilla’s fried oysters allow you to taste the faint flavor of the sea.

Carolina, she came to Tallahassee in 2009 to do graduate work in health care administration at Florida State University. In 2011, she went to work at Andrew’s 228, where she and Richardson, Andrew’s chef, became friends. A few years later, they started dating. Hooper had decided to stick with restaurants instead of health care, and in 2016, she went to work at Sage as a server, bartender and manager. Richardson said Hooper has “set the tone and culture” at Lucilla, managing the service and handling finances. “Of all the people I have worked with, she is the most relentless advocate for the customer experience,” he said. “She’s been incredibly dedicated to service and making the place look as fantastic as possible.” The couple worked for about five months to refurbish Lucilla’s space and add spiffy decorative touches such as new art work, fresh flowers on the tables and whimsical piglet salt-and-pepper shakers. As for choosing the restaurant’s name, there’s a story. “On our first or second date, I asked Lara what her middle name was and she told me ‘Lucilla,’ ” Richardson said. “I immediately said that should be the name of our first restaurant.” TM


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gastro & gusto

TOO MUCH HOLIDAY CHEER Tallahassee bartenders offer their personal hangover cures by ERIN HOOVER

A

s a species, we’ve always gone great lengths to halt our hangovers. In ancient Assyria, hangover sufferers chewed on ground bird beaks and myrrh. A Depression-era Ritz-Carlton in New York purportedly would serve morning-after glasses of Coca-Cola and milk. Ask around, and you’ll find an interesting origin or perhaps the delightful realm of pseudoscience in the average person-on-the-street cure. But do hangover cures work? In 2015, a group of Dutch and Canadian researchers presented a study at a neuropsychopharmacology conference in Amsterdam to demonstrate the effects of consuming food or water after heavy drinking, as most cures include of one of them. “Those who took food or water showed a slight statistical improvement in how they felt over those who didn’t, but this didn’t really translate into a meaningful difference,” lead author Dr. Joris Verster of Utrecht University said in a news release from the study. He concluded: “The only practical way to avoid a hangover is to drink less alcohol.” Hangovers serve an important biological function by discouraging further heavy drinking. Remember that too much drinking can lead to alcohol poisoning, which can be deadly. In the meantime, at a miserable hour, the “hangover cure” presents an important illusion of control and the promise of relief. Perhaps if you need a good hangover cure this holiday season, you’ll think of asking a bartender, as we did.

→ WATER/COLD FOODS ERIC WEBER, Siam Sushi YEARS BARTENDING: Two

“I mix about half a teaspoon of ground Himalayan pink salt in a 16 oz. glass of water. Drinking a little salt with the water helps you to rehydrate and replenishes sodium, potassium and magnesium. Himalayan salt is higher in mineral content.” WHY IT MIGHT WORK: Electrolytes! Alcohol dehydrates the body. Keeping electrolytes such as sodium, potassium and magnesium in balance helps to regulate hydration.

→ SPICY FOODS/

EATING BEFORE OR WHILE DRINKING BECCA MOERLINS, Liberty Bar and Restaurant YEARS BARTENDING: Five

“I like spicy food, such as Indian food or tacos. A virgin bloody mary (bloody mary mix, horseradish, Tabasco) can have a psychosomatic effect, like ‘hair of the dog’ but without the alcohol. To prevent a hangover, I continually eat while I drink. But don’t drink a lot and then think Whataburger will fix it — your body has already metabolized the alcohol.” WHY IT MIGHT WORK: Moerlins

suggested that the capsaicin in spicy foods raises endorphin levels. Another theory is that the pain of spicy food distracts the body from the pain of the hangover. While it’s true that eating before drinking helps slow the absorption of alcohol, as Moerlins points out, it won’t work afterward.

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PHOTOS BY DAVE BARFIELD (MOERLINS), IQUACU/ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS AND COURTESY OF ERIC WEBER

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gastro & gusto → WATER/COLD FOODS JOHN ALAN GRANT, Liberty Bar and Restaurant (Now a Chicago resident) YEARS BARTENDING: Eight

“I try to chug a lot of water. When my brother and I were traveling from Prague to Amsterdam, we decided it would be smart to try to drink an entire bottle of Jameson. I woke up three hours later absolutely dying, unable to get food or water because they didn’t have credit card machines on the plane. My brother and I both drank out of the (non-potable water) faucet that says ‘DO NOT USE! CONTAMINATED WATER!’ It helped me, and I didn’t die. I also like to eat cold sandwiches like turkey and avocado or poke bowl with things like rice, edamame, cucumbers, salmon or tuna.” WHY IT MIGHT WORK: Alcohol dehydrates the body, and

water replaces what has been lost. And part of the pain of a hangover could be low blood sugar, so eating helps. We couldn’t find any research on food temperature, but some say that room temperature or cold foods are less likely to provoke nausea.

→ BITTERS/HAIR OF THE DOG/

FRIED POTATOES

ADAM HANLEY, The Lounge at Market Square YEARS BARTENDING: 13

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“For an upset stomach, I mix bitters and soda water: 3-5 dashes of bitters to 6 oz. soda water. For people who like hair of the dog, add 1 shot of Jameson to a cup of hot, black coffee. I also like to eat fried potatoes, like hash browns or tater tots. I learned these ‘cures’ in New Orleans at Clover Grill, a greasy spoon, the hard way from a bunch of pros.” bitters were developed and sold as patent medicines to settle the stomach. According to Oxford Dictionaries, the phrase hair of the dog, short for “a hair of the dog that bit you,” originates with “an old belief that someone bitten by a rabid dog could be cured of rabies by taking a potion containing some of the dog’s hair.” It’s true that more alcohol can delay the pain of a hangover, but you won’t escape the effects of metabolizing that alcohol. Meanwhile, we could find no scientific, chemical reason that greasy food such as the fried potatoes that Henley likes would help a hangover. On the other hand, never underestimate the psychological effect of comfort food. Will Cummings and Jeremy Norwood, bartenders at Liberty Bar and Restaurant, mentioned getting over their hangovers with miso soup and pho, respectively. TM

Lee Folmar contributed to this article.

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PHOTOS BY DAVE BARFIELD (GRANT) AND CHRIS DAY (HANLEY)

WHY IT MIGHT WORK: Before they appeared in Manhattans,


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or nearly 40 years, Chan Cox, founder of Wine World, has been impacting wine culture in Northwest Florida. In 2013, he launched the South Walton Beaches Wine & Food Festival as an event where wine lovers could gain access to a vast array of diverse wines from around the world. The festival now stands as the Southeast’s premier wine and food event. The high caliber of wine is ensured as, each February, an international wine competition takes place at the Hilton Sandestin. Wines throughout the world are juried and judged, with the winners acknowledged at the April festival. The integrity of the festival is further bolstered by access to winemakers, wine representatives and winery owners. Attendees are able to learn from and meet the people who have firsthand experience in the winemaking and spirits-making process. Two seminars are held during each day of Grand Tasting, allowing attendees to experience an in-depth tasting with industry notables. Winemakers and special guests at the festival include Erik Kramer, winemaker for WillaKenzie Estate, who holds a bachelor’s degree in geology from Florida State — a degree he draws on when considering the relationship between terroir and wine quality. Joining Kramer will be Jackson Family Wines, Rob Samuels of Maker’s Mark and Michael Landis with Institut du Fromage. Landis promises to prepare an impressive charcuterie perfectly paired with wines. “Our hope is that wine lovers will have an amazing experience tasting wines they might never have tasted otherwise and to be able to meet with industry professionals to glean information about what they are tasting,” said Stacey Brady, Executive Director of the South Walton Beaches Wine & Food Festival. The weekend kicks off with with the Friday VIP Tasting, 4–6 p.m., pouring high-end, collectible and library wines and food prepared by the variety of highly regarded restaurants in Grand Boulevard. From 6–9 p.m. on Friday, the festival presents the Craft Beer and Spirits Jam, a true block party with craft breweries, premium spirits, tasty food and a jamming band. Grand Tastings will occur from 1–4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, and guests are

encouraged to visit the over 100 wine tents and specialty areas. The Culinary Village is a true delight, caringly curated by culinary director Scott Plumely. The Nosh Stations serve up a variety of foods that pair decadently with wine, including cheese, charcuterie, sushi and substantial offerings from the best local restaurants. The Rosé All Day Garden debuted in 2018 and is back in high demand for 2019. In a whirl of Rosé adornments, sip on this crowd favorite wine from varieties around the world. Chill out by stopping for a frosé at one of the four machines on-site. “We stay on top of all the major trends happening in the wine and spirits industry, which transcends into the success of the festival,” said Brady. “The festival has won countless awards because we are always ahead of the curve. But even more so, we stay on trend because attendees appreciate the attention to detail.” Guests might come for the wine, but they leave knowing they have contributed to the Destin Charity Wine Auction Foundation through their ticket purchase. The festival is very proud of their partnership with DCWAF, which supports 16 charities throughout Northwest Florida. If the clink of glasses and pop of a cork are music to your ears, and if your taste buds tingle at the thought of swilling fabulous wines, the South Walton Beaches Wine & Food Festival is your personal weekend paradise.

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expression NOV/DEC 2018

NOV/DEC 2018

KEEPING TABS ON ALL THAT MUSES INSPIRE

KEEPING TABS ON ALL THAT MUSES INSPIRE

Linda Hall says she wants her creations “to be wild, like they come from another place.”

ART

FERAL VISION

Tallahassee artist conjures up wild, otherworldly creations by STEVE DOLLAR

BOOKS

Tallahassee Author Explores Injustice, Unfairness

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS

|| MUSIC

Family Man Royce Lovett Thoughtfully Aims for the Big Time

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expression

→ In her menagerie/studio, artist Linda Hall makes otherworldly creations out of paper mache, old quilts, clothing, beads and more.

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nly a short walk uphill from Cascades Park, nestled in the postage stamp of a historic neighborhood called Smoky Hollow, assembled within a tiny, mid-1940s bungalow, they gaze out from almost every surface. The beasts. Towering bears and conniving foxes and sharp-antlered deer, shaggy mongrels and stray cats, cagey raccoons and stalking panthers, even a random human face or two, witnesses with empty eyes, all part of a gallery of animal forms, possessed of soul yet awaiting substance. They are the residents of Goose Hall, the otherworldly menagerie/studio of artist Linda Hall. Manufactured out of battered and frayed old quilts, paper mache, scraps of clothing, beads and random organic materials — including feathers, claws and real animal teeth — the creatures aren’t meant to terrify, says Hall, but neither are they fluffy companions, like stuffed animals. “I want them to be wild, like they come from another place.” As Hall emphasizes in an artist’s statement she once wrote, “I want the sculptures that I make to function as containers for spirit. Sometimes bare, sometimes adorned, they create a space to be filled with unfamiliar and elusive intensities: an animal energy that suffuses what is human, and a humanity that resides in objects and beasts.” Although such pieces command a vivid and provocative place in Hall’s practice — offering a gateway, if you will — they are only a fraction of her artistic endeavor, a kaleidoscopic, 35-year outpouring of work in nearly every medium at hand. It includes painting and sculptural photography by SAIGE ROBERTS

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expression Artist Linda Hall’s work includes masks, drawings, street murals, postcards and Christmas tree ornaments, plus collaborations with musicians, dancers, theater troupes and filmmakers that evoke ritualistic elements, primal mysteries and a boisterous spirit. About Tallahassee, she says: “Nature is such a force here.”

pieces — tiny, doll-scaled tableaux staged inside boxes reminiscent of the American assemblage artist Joseph Cornell, surreal and haunted like a lingering dream — drawings, street murals, postcards, cheeky Christmas tree ornaments, masks (cats and bird faces for humans, human faces for cats and dogs), costumes and stage design, as well as collaborations with musicians, dancers, theater troupes and filmmakers that evoke ritualistic elements, primal mysteries and a boisterous spirit. “It feels important to me that people who approach my work be attracted to the mystery of it,” said Hall, who feels a great kinship with idiosyncratic creators far and near, from the Czech animator Jan Švankmajer to the late Tallahassee folk artist O.L. Samuels. “People are open when they’re standing there. They look at it and see the possibilities.” Tallahassee, in its overgrown natural splendor, is a wellspring for much of what the artist does. “This might sound kind of weird,” began Hall, perched at a table in her studio on a hot summer afternoon, sipping from a glass of cold, tart kombucha. The walls and shelves are full of artifacts and raw materials. Doll heads, shoes made of human hair, tiny ornaments, thrift-shop objects that might be talismans. We could be inside a 19th century cabinet of curiosities. “I don’t feel that inspired anywhere else,” she continued. “I feel like the place informs

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me. If we walked out of our house and came back six months later, it would be covered in kudzu. Nature is such a force here, and there’s places yet to be discovered.” Hall moved around a lot as she was growing up. Her father often relocated for his job with a major military contractor, taking his family all over Europe, to California and, finally, to Fort Walton Beach, where she went to high school. That rootless childhood meant that, at an age when most kids leave home for the first time, she could claim to have finally found it. When Hall arrived in Tallahassee in 1983, soon to pursue an art degree at Florida State University, she took to the city like a caterpillar to a leaf. “For the first time in my life I felt like I had a community,” Hall recalled. “I don’t know what happened, but it was a really lovely connection.” She credits teachers such as Jim Roche and Mark Messersmith — two of Tallahassee’s most potent and original visual artists — with some key life lessons. “Jimmy gave me permission to trust my intuition,” Hall said. That trust leads Hall to unexpected places. She has an ongoing relationship with Ghostbird Theatre, a theater company in Fort Myers, and she worked with singersongwriters such as Tallahassee’s Patrick McKinney and New York City’s Peg Simone, often transforming the players into incarnations of her animal forms. This openness also speaks to Hall’s rejection of

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

both high-toned galleries and academic frameworks as arbiters of artistic expression. Besides, it’s way more fun to take it to the streets. “When we’re in public spaces, unexpected things happen,” explained Hall, who early on mobilized mural-painting teams in Frenchtown, gracing the walls of a corner disco with a larger-than-life portrait of local jazz vocalist Pam Laws, for instance. “Street theater and parades excite me. It’s wonderful to have the community have a hand in it. I’m not listening to my single voice. It becomes something larger.” TM

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS


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See what else we’ve accomplished at raisethetorch.fsu.edu TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

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MUSIC

A NOTE OF FAITH, CHARISMA

Royce Lovett aims for the big time in music as he keeps life in perspective by ROB RUSHIN

T

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↗ Tallahassee

singer Royce Lovett declares that “I’m living my dream,” with music that has a deep connection to hip-hop, ’70s soul, Prince and more.

PHOTO BY ADAM VL TAYLOR

he variables involved in “making it” in the music business are vast. It takes more than talent. In so many cases, the difference between making it and falling short can come down to dumb luck. But the ones who get lucky didn’t sit on the sofa waiting for lightning to strike. Everybody who survives as a professional musician — from the wedding band cover singer all the way up to Kendrick or Beyonce — got there by dint of boatloads of hard, persistent work. Royce Lovett is still reaching for the brass ring. He has the goods: With wholesome good looks, an expressive voice, great songwriting skills and charisma to burn, he knows how to connect with his audiences. Born and raised in Tallahassee, Lovett reflects his family’s deeply entrenched religious grounding — he grew up surrounded by music in his family’s church — in his socially conscious lyrics and his conscious effort to reach a broad and diverse audience. He signed with Motown in 2014 after one of their reps heard him by chance at a showcase gig. His first year with a major label was an intense learning experience. “In my first year, I was so stressed out. It was just so unfamiliar. I had to learn so much. But I got to a place where I just decided to be very teachable.”


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Lovett is open and forthright about his faith and the role it plays in his musical expression and career goals. Maybe this is why Motown slotted him into their “Christian music” category, even though he says, “I don’t really play so-called Christian music.” It is an odd fit for Lovett, whose music has deep connection to hip-hop, ’70s soul, Prince and old-school torch-bearers such as Lenny Kravitz. Expectation for an African-American Christian musician is to deliver gospel; gospel is in his sound, but it is by no means a prominent element. And he sounds nothing like the typical white Christian rock genre. But there he is: Struggling against a pair of stereotypes. “Getting signed put me in front of a bigger audience, but it also confused things as far as the general market is concerned. College radio used to play my stuff, but then they stopped. ‘We don’t play gospel,’ they said, but I’m like, ‘It’s not gospel. It’s the same stuff.’ But it was coming from another side of the industry. I had not really thought about the divide between white and black music, between mainstream and Christian. People think like, you get signed and it’s easy. I probably work harder than ever before.” While he most frequently performs solos, a recent gig at The Wilbury found Lovett playing with his top-notch

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band in front of a full house. No of topics in music that are negative surprise there; his infrequent or aren’t conducive for growth. As hometown shows are typically a young black man in America, a packed. What stood out was lot of the music — not all of it — the demographic range of the sometimes isn’t the best image or audience, a rainbow mix of old messages of what you can strive for and young, and what you can be. So, yeah: Food.” college kids and Our time was running out: ← As he stays aware of the townies, gays Lovett’s wife of nine years, need to satisfy and straights and Hannah, was on her way to pick expectations racial diversity. him up with their two sons, Levi, regarding showmanship, Somehow, in 6, Davi, 2. Lovett is grounded by Royce Lovett this town not faith and family, which keep him stays true to his noted for its from forgetting who he is and what craft. “I want my music to permeable racial he aims for in life. be some food, divide, Lovett And that is how he defends something that has tapped a vein himself against a brutal truth about you can grow on …” he says. that makes his the music industry: It just isn’t fair. audience — at If the music biz were fair, Royce least here in his home — one of Lovett — talented, handsome, the most representative crosssmart and brimming with charisma sections of what America truly — would someday soon ride high looks like circa 2018. on the charts. Might happen. “I’m living my dream, being able Might not. Lovett would love to to connect with my community in be a chart-topping artist, but he is a way I never thought I could. I’m sharp enough to realize he cannot encouraged to tell all these stories, control blind luck. getting races together, getting He keeps his eyes on other financial statuses together. These markers of success. new ideas I have, this new music “There’s living your dream, there’s I’m about to push out, I’m just so financial freedom and there’s fame,” excited and expecting something he said. “I think you have to define really great out of this year as far those things and really pick what you as artistry goes.” want. I’m not saying they can’t mix, Lovett always looks to refine his but I have to remind myself, I feel so craft. At the Wilbury gig, he was grateful at the end of the day that I trying things out, everything from get to live my dream.” slight changes in Lovett and his team arrangements to the are working every way he gestures with angle. They analyze his hands and body. streaming stats and He is keenly aware make sure he regularly of the need to satisfy plays the towns and expectations regardcities where the ing production values numbers are strong. and showmanship, all If he does not find while staying true to fortune and fame, it LOVE & the music. won’t be from lack of “I want my music trying. But you have OTHER DREAMS to be some food, to believe it when this Listen to Tallahassee singer Royce Lovett’s something that you young man looks you album on YouTube, can grow on, meditate in the eye and says, “I Spotify and Amazon, on and find some just want to touch lives among other online nourishment,” he and make good music streaming services. said. “There are a lot doing it.” TM

PHOTO BY ADAM VL TAYLOR AND COURTESY OF ROYCE LOVETT (ALBUM COVER)

expression


André J. Thomas, Artistic Director

Concert Season 2018-2019 U N I T Y 14 :

Celebrate the A r t s in Education! January 26, 2019; 7:30 PM

Tr i b u t e !

April 13, 2019; 7:30 PM Mass, André J. Thomas With the University Symphony Orchestra and FSU Choirs Photos: Claire timm and BoB o’l ary

Song of Democracy, Howard Hanson With Special Guests

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PROMOTION

VALERIE S. GOODWIN The Arts Live Here

By Erica Thaler, Council on Culture & Arts (COCA) Valerie S. Goodwin is a wife, mother, author, artist and college professor who began designing and making art quilts in 1998. Her work as an artist uses architectural elements such as built forms, city grids, mapping and composition as a source of inspiration. Her pieces are part of a continuing investigation of ideas that focus on geometric relationships, patterns and ordering principles found in architecture.

What music is playing in your car? I am now listening to Senator Kamala Valerie S. Goodwin

Harris’ playlist on Spotify. I love her selection of R&B, hip-hop, jazz, gospel and reggae. It gives me a positive connection to both the music and a powerful political figure that I admire. What is the last book you read that had an impact on you? “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration” was absolutely masterful. It connected me to my family’s own story of migration to the North in search of better opportunities for AfricanAmericans. It’s time for dinner; what are we going to eat? Quiche, salad, a few chips and cold brewed mint iced tea.

If you were trapped in a TV show or movie for a month, which would it be? I’d love to be trapped on the Netflix show “The Get Down.” It’s a fun, heart-warming story of the waning days of disco and the early days of hip-hop. What superpower would you like to have? Invisibility. There’s a lot happening in our country these days and I’d like to get first-hand knowledge of it without being detected.

What have your learned from failure? It’s all right to make mistakes as long as you make them quickly AND learn and grow from them. What do you hope you will be remembered for? I’ve included a quote I’d read by Maya Angelou some time ago. “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” Maya says it better than I can!

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Visit TallahasseeArts.org for a complete list of arts and cultural events, public art, arts education and more on the Tallahassee Arts Guide.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF RICHARD BRUNCK

What is necessary for your creative process? Thinking, planning and sketching — searching for that “aha” moment when you know you’re onto something. This process involves hard work, bravery, serendipity and going on a journey where sometimes the exact destination is not apparent. I enjoy the process of designing, improvising and finding connections.


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BOOKS

COLLISIONS AND COHESION Erin Hoover unites disparate subjects in poems

E

rin Hoover, like her parents and grandparents before her, grew up in the tiny Pennsylvania town of Duncannon. The place had been dominated by a factory that made children’s sleds — not Radio Flyers, but the less familiar Lightning Guiders. Production ceased in the late 1980s and, as Hoover was growing up, Duncannon went downhill as drugs, increasingly, took their place as a fixture in rural Pennsylvania life. “I was never buoyed by the notion of American prosperity that others enjoyed. And I think my experience is becoming more prevalent in America,” Hoover said during a recent interview. Barnburner, a collection of 29 poems (Elixir Press, 2018), is the work of a storyteller, not a lyricist, who studies ways in which subjects and characters collide and then challenges herself to make something cohesive and meaningful of such meetings. Fundamentally and inescapably, her work is informed by a young woman’s encounters with a world that is often dysfunctional, disjointed and disrespectful. Hoover earned a doctorate in poetry at Florida State University and worked for a time as a writer at Rowland Publishing before accepting a teaching position at FSU. She is the mother of a 1-year-old daughter, Hester, to whom her book is dedicated. Her poems at times speak to her transition-in-the-making from

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by STEVE BORNHOFT

advice recipient to counselor, from protected to protector. In “Gifts,” a young woman and a senior co-worker trade stories — war stories of a sort, involving dangerous, intoxicated escapades. He recounts a “week lost to dope in Paris.” She as much as matches him in recalling “the morning I woke naked on a rooftop ringed by butts and shards.” But he has passed markers that she has not. Vincent is old and she is wide-eyed and new to the city, wowed by towering structures and removed but slightly from people who look up as they move about the streets versus those who look down and away. “Being young is living outside of time,” the old man says, and he advises, “Never get old.” But the storyline in “Gifts” advances. The young woman enters the realm of the chronological. Vincent dies. Her perspective changes, and she looks about herself seeking someone to whom she can give gifts in the same way that he had imparted wisdom to her. For now, she has no one. But there is at least a chance that someone will emerge, someone, she hopes, for whom her advice will be a good fit. If and when that friend arrives, let me slip my present easily, sans ceremony, over their bare shoulders. Alive is a desire for companionship that will offer more than the series of ephemeral encounters with

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“slim-hipped Jagger clones” that she navigated in days when she took turns on dance floors. “Gifts” shifts, by the way. There exist three different published versions of the poem. One day, there may be another. Often, Hoover “makes several attempts at what a story becomes. I may arrive at something that is not what I intended to say. It may be just part of the story.” And, so, the work continues, in pencil. Hoover wants to get the story right and “I intend that my poems be of interest to people. I write about people who are wanting something, seeking close ties with other people while moving through a chaotic, dark place that may be morally ambiguous.” In a world where even “truth” is variable, there are no absolutes. “Is it possible for a drug dealer to also be a good father?” Hoover wondered in conversation. Compartmentalization can be a coping skill — and necessary. In “PR Opportunity at the Food Bank,” an image-shaping, communications director type grows exhausted by a journalist who wears his camera as a mask and, seeking poignancy, because that is his job, asks of a woman seeking only food, “Who is responsible for your poverty?” For the PR pro, her dance with the journalist whom she strives to lead is unwelcome, dishonest and too much work, and she confesses:


Honestly, I’m tired. I’d like to go home, to my rosé, my couch, my nice neighborhood, its plentiful Thai takeout and late shows where comedians talk about something else.

In Barnburner, Florida State University Ph.D. Erin Hoover offers a collection of 29 poems formed by her encounters with an oftendysfunctional world.

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS

She wants to set aside her sales pitch, the suggestion that “this is how hunger ends, with chicken a la king bubbling in Baptist kitchens,” because a hot meal has no more staying power than a one-nighter with a Jagger clone. We are, all of us, given to hungers, some of which define humanness. These yearnings persist, even in a nation and a time, Hoover said, where “I don’t know who you could find who would say everything is going well and this is just what we envisioned. Everyone has a bone to pick.” Nonetheless, we approach others optimistically and extend them the benefit of the doubt. In “Barrier Islands,” a storm that just passed forms the backdrop to the story. On an island, but a single restaurant is open, and people are assessing damage and comparing notes, having been thrust together by a powerful, shared experience. A woman whose beach cabin has been only slightly dinged by Hurricane Sandy strikes up a conversation with a couple in the eatery. Their phone photos reveal a lost roof, a battered balcony. They are bitter and spew hatred for tourists. They are blowhards, really. The woman repairs to a restroom, leaving her purse behind. The couple seems trustworthy, or so she wants to believe. When she returns, the purse has been rifled, emptied of valuables, and the couple is gone. “But at least the woman tried to make a connection,” Hoover said. Trying matters. We are vulnerable when we reach out and we may get singed, but rarely is it possible to burn the barn to the ground and start fresh. We pick up pieces, file away

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↗ Erin Hoover’s new book of poems is the work of a storyteller

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lessons, get guarded and move on. We seek, as Hoover writes, “another route to take.” For Hoover, poetry was that other route. She thought about going to law school. Her father encouraged her to go into politics. She was accepted to an art school and to a screenwriting program at NYU. But she opted instead for a pursuit that affords her the opportunity to employ her powers of observation and her knack for identifying images and returns her, time and again, to that incredible feeling that overtook her when “I wanted to she wrote her first poem as a make a mark, 10th grader, following the death of a grandmother. to make a “I wanted to make a mark, to contribution, make a contribution, to create to create something I would be proud of, and poetry was a way for me to something do that,” Hoover said. “I have I would be never lost my passion for poetry. proud of, and I would keep writing it, even if poetry was a no one told me it was any good.” Hoover has a favorite cartoon way for me to from The New Yorker in which a do that.” “little engine that wouldn’t” says — Erin Hoover to his parents, “I don’t care about hills. I want to be a writer.” Hoover, to be sure, is a writer who is taking her place among American poets of note. And, as it happens, she is much more about climbing hills than setting fires. Like all fine poets, she helps us make sense of the world, or asks the best questions. She is a lightning guider. TM

PHOTO BY SAIGE ROBERTS

who wrote her first poem in the 10th grade, following the death of a grandmother.


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PROMOTION

Skerryvore at Opening Nights A Scottish core and much more

D

aniel Gillespie is aware that the music of the band, Skerryvore, which he founded in 2005 with his brother, Martin, isn’t easily described. To those who call it “Celtic rock” or a “fusion of traditional and contemporary sounds,” Gillespie is prepared to give only partial credit. Traditional Scottish music forms the foundation of Skerryvore’s sound — that much is for sure — but beyond that, Gillespie says, “We play music and leave it to others to determine what kind it is.” The band, based in Glasgow, comprises eight men from throughout Scotland. Together, they have furnished the foundation with influences including folk, rock and pop. Instrumentation includes bagpipes, accordions and concertinas, guitars and drums. And songs range from soft ballads to highly energetic, pulsing anthems. Moving beyond the traditional core, Gillespie said, has made Skerryvore’s music “accessible” by diverse audiences around the world. The band has played dates from New York City to Dubai and Shanghai. In the United Kingdom, it is synonymous for many with its

festival, Oban Live, conducted each June. No such success was envisioned when Skerryvore, named for a Scottish lighthouse, got started 13 years ago. “Really, we just wanted to play music and have a few beers and a good time,” Gillespie said. It may be hard to think big when you grow up on the tiny Isle of Tiree, the westernmost island in Scotland’s Inner Hebrides. The island is treeless due to relentless winds, flatter than Nevada and often cold, meaning that its white sand beaches often go unoccupied. Measuring just 12 miles in length and three miles in width, the “Sunshine Isle,” so called because it enjoys more hours of sunlight each year than any other spot in the UK,

is home to some 600 hearty souls. Gillespie, who has a sunny disposition, was part of a high school graduating class of 15. “We are excited about being in Florida, especially in January,” Gillespie enthused, noting that he has been only as far south as Louisville, Kentucky, in the United States. He learned most of what he knows about the “Sunshine State” from a friend who moved south from Wisconsin. Skerryvore is scheduled to play Jan. 9 at the Ruby Diamond Concert Hall as part of FSU’s Opening Nights performance series. The audience can expect songs about yearning, striving, love and ultimately, resolve and the notion of “home.”

To anyone who wishes to quickly get an appreciation for what Skerryvore is all about, Gillespie recommends that they listen to its song, “Take My Hand.” “It’s a good representation of what we do,” Gillespie said. The song recalls a long-ago summer, “a time when our dreams were born paving the way for all we have and all we need.” So things have come to pass for Gillespie and the boys in the band.

Want to catch Skerryvore on stage? They will perform at Ruby Diamond Concert Hall on Wednesday, January 9, 2019, at 7:30 pm. For information on other performances, visit openingnights.fsu.edu/events.

Tickets are priced at $12 and $17 for students and $25 and $35 for others. To get yours, visit openingnights.fsu.edu or call (850) 644-6500.

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PROMOTION

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LANDMARKS

A QUICK TRIP TO ANOTHER WORLD

Created from one man’s visions, Pasaquan still inspires an adventure by ROB RUSHIN

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H

ow do you get to Paradise? Just ask your favorite Google machine for directions. “Siri, take me to Pasaquan,” you say, and Siri sets the course for Buena Vista, Georgia, about three hours north of Tallahassee and a little southeast of Columbus. Pasaquan is a seven-acre art park that was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2008. After a two-year restoration project, it reopened to the public in late 2016, 30 years after the death of its creator, Eddie Owens Martin, known to a wider world as St. EOM (pronounced like the mantra “ohm”). The Pasaquan Preservation Society and Columbus State University, with a grant from the Kohler Foundation, restored

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the spectacular, cosmitechnicolor creations of a misfit, eccentric, homosexual son of sharecroppers who had said he was told in visions that he would build a religion for the future for all people, Pasaquoyan. During Pasaquan’s grand reopening festivities two years ago, a stream of shuttles ferried visitors from Buena Vista’s town square to Pasaquan, where a fleet of food trucks sat ready to serve. Col. Bruce Hampton — the late musician who was a longtime friend and champion of St. EOM — performed. Professionally chipper tour guides, twenty-something and well-scrubbed, chattered about how proud everyone was of St. EOM. He was, the script assured us, a gentle, well-loved local oddball.


“I built this place to have something to identify with. Here I can be in my own world, with my temples and designs and the spirit of God. I can have my own spirits and my own thoughts.” — St. EOM ↗ The late Eddie

But it was not always this way. Back before cell phones and internet and GPS, my new bride, Stanwyck, got the wild idea — from Col. Hampton, decades before his death in May 2017 — to track down a rumor: Somewhere near a one-light town in Southwest Georgia, there existed one man’s vision of Paradise. If you could find it.  We finally found Buena Vista — itself something of a triumph in those ancient days of primitive navigation, the mid ’80s — and stopped at a gas station and asked how to find St. EOM. We got a blank stare from the young lady at the register who turned to a woman frying chicken. “These people are looking for somebody called Saint Something.” The woman leaning over the fryer never looked up as she explained we were looking for “Crazy Eddie, that old fortune-teller man.” Mystery solved, we received directions, along with another reference to St. EOM as “crazy.” Forty-five minutes and several wrong turns, dirt roads and dead ends later, we came upon a hand-lettered sign: PHOTOS COURTESY OF CSU ARCHIVES

Owens Martin, above, who called himself St. EOM, created Pasaquan beginning in the late 1950s after he experienced visions of Pasaquoyan, a religion for the future for all people. HIs sevenacre art park in Buena Vista, Georgia, about three hours north of Tallahassee, features pagodas, temples, shrines and sculptures.

BEWARE OF BAD DOGS. BLOW HORN AND WAIT IN CAR UNTIL I COME OUT. Stanwyck, a woman not accustomed to waiting, got out of the car and headed for

a front door that promptly was flung open. Two enormous German shepherds flew from the doorway, followed by a howling old man with wild hair yelling, “You git back in that car ’fore them dogs eat you!” Stanwyck slammed the car door just as the dogs began leaping and scratching and snarling at her window. The Grand Pasaquoyan knocked on Stanwyck’s window. “What you want here?” We explained. “I hadn’t been feeling so good.” Stanwyck: “We brought some pot.” “Well why didn’t ya say so? Come on. Those dogs won’t bother you as long as you don’t carry any evil thoughts.” We handed over our botanical tribute and settled in for a chat. For the next 90 minutes, St. EOM told us his story, often in language that would make a sailor blush. Born into grinding poverty, Eddie realized that a gay man in the Deep South circa 1922 faced some serious challenges. He ran away from his hometown of Buena Vista to the streets of New York, making ends meet the best he could: prostitution, running gambling games, dealing marijuana, waiting tables, and notably, as a 42nd Street fortune teller. He had the knack, he said, of understanding what people needed to hear based on their “viberations.”  Then one day, he said, “A voice in my head said ‘GO HOME,’ and I said ‘What?’

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and the voice said, ‘GO HOME!’ So I came home and started building Pasaquan.” In Tom Patterson’s fine biography, St. EOM in the Land of Pasaquan, St. EOM explained that the voice told him, “You’re gonna be the start of somethin’ new, and you’re gonna be called a Pasaquoyan, and your name will be Saint EOM.” He told Patterson, “Later I found out that pasa means ‘pass’ in Spanish. And I found out that quoyan is an Oriental word that means bringin’ the past and future together, so you can derive the benefits of the past by bringin’ it into the future. And so I call myself a Pasaquoyan, and this place is Pasaquan, a place where the past and the present and the future and everything else come together.” St. EOM told us about his visions, about beings who came to him regularly, beginning in his 20s and right up to when we visited,

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told us how the voices and visions led him to build his seven-acre dreamscape of pagodas, temples, shrines and dance floors. Handmade of cement and sand, layered with bright colors and bas-relief sculptures and decorated with vividly painted mandalas and representations of his spirit guides, Pasaquan is a fever-dream of influences ranging from pre-Columbian and African art blended with Native American symbolism and a polyglot of Eastern religions. From his return to Buena Vista in 1957, St. EOM embellished and embroidered his vision for almost 30 years. He sent us to stroll the grounds alone. He was not feeling well, wanted to lie down. We wandered in a place that was out of time, gorgeous, hallucinogenic, heartfelt and obsessive. St. EOM walked out and thanked us for visiting and cautioned Stanwyck that the spirits did not like her short hair, which he grabbed roughly.

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Brilliance in Bloom

850-385-7363 blossomsflowers.com 541 N. Monroe St., Tallahassee (Walker Building) Pasaquan, which reopened to the public in late 2016, includes pre-Columbian and African art blended with Native American symbolism and Eastern religions. It was added in 2008 to the National Register of Historic Places.

“Hair is power, and they want you to have lots of it!” A gentle old oddball? Not so gentle, at least not with Stanwyck’s locks. But essentially kind and generous to a couple of kids out on an adventure? Darn right. We drove off. I looked in my rearview and saw St. EOM waving goodbye, dogs scampering around his feet. Less than six months later, sick and tired, St. EOM took himself off the earthly plane with, according to one account, a gunshot to the head. For years, the property languished, but thanks to the diligence of writer Tom Patterson, the Pasaquan Preservation Society, the Kohler Foundation and Columbus State University, Pasaquan is open  this little slice of Paradise has Friday through  Sunday, except for been restored to vivid glory. “federal and bank You can find it much easier holidays and the than we did. Now, no wildmonths of December haired man yells at you, no and July,” Columbus dogs snarl and jump on your State says on its Pasaquan site. car. But you will still find For more a Paradise that dazzles and information, takes you clean out of daily visit pasaquan. expectation — a place that will columbusstate.edu. blow your daggum mind. TM

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CSU ARCHIVES

VISIT

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PROMOTION

Emerald Coast Theatre Company Offers an Enriching Escape “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE,” BRUCE COLLIER AS FREDDIE FILMORE & CAITLIN ARTRIP AS MARY HATCH BAILEY. PHOTO BY CORY TUCKER.

T

o many, theatre represents a pause in reality. Talented actors, stunning sets, ornate costumes and an entertaining plot allow you to delve into another world for an hour or two. Emerald Coast Theatre Company encourages you to enjoy their performances while providing you with welcome doses of connection through humorous and heartfelt moments. In 2012, Nathanael and Anna Fisher opened the Emerald Coast Theatre Company in Miramar Beach as a venue to produce highquality theatre productions and to provide performing arts education. The company provides community outreach through professional theatre performances, theatre for young audiences and theatre education programs. “Our goal is to get kids to experience theatre,” said Nathanael Fisher, producing artistic director of ECTC. “The education

programs let children experience being on stage, help them to develop confidence and work together in groups. It also lends to their understanding of characters, conflicts and empathy when navigating the world.” From family-friendly plays to edgier comedies, ECTC selects a lineup of performances that you can appreciate and applaud no matter your age. Being a professional theatre with high-caliber actors, ECTC strives to provide exceptional theatre in all aspects of the craft. With many visitors and residents that originated from larger cities, ECTC matches the expectations of their guests. The 2018/2019 season continues with a unique adaptation of the Christmas classic, “It’s A Wonderful Life.” The story of George Bailey will unfold as a live 1940s radio broadcast complete with on-stage sound effects. January will usher in the hilarious and heartwarming

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|

“Dancing Lessons,” following a young man with Asperger’s syndrome who seeks lessons from an injured Broadway dancer. In March, the laughter continues with a female centric comedy, “Bad Dates,” about a newly single woman who goes on a series of laughable dates. The end of March will take viewers on an adventure of triumphs and tribulations in “Around the World in 80 Days.” “The performances aren’t solely for entertainment,” said Fisher. “We want people to have an unforgettable experience, but we seek stories that have a sense of community or personal value so, when you leave the theatre, you’re not just entertained, you’re enriched.”

For more information on ECTC and to view the performance schedule, visit EmeraldCoastTheatre.org.

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SERVING UP THE

HOLIDAYS How to make your dinner party succeed and even sparkle BY ROCHELLE KOFF

Planning a party involves your own style and philosophy, plus understanding how much time you have and what fits your entertaining skills. PHOTO BY JAMES STEFIUK

This is the year you’ve decided to throw a holiday party, but you’re filled with angst and questions: What to serve? Who to invite? How to set the table? Where to begin? Take a deep breath. We’ve got you, and your table, covered. We’ve asked the experts — seasoned entertainers, caterers and designers — for ideas about how to throw a fun holiday party. In these days of Pinterest and online potluck signups, you can certainly get lots of ideas for every step of the party process, from planning the menu to learning the lingo. For instance, what’s a charger? A clue: It’s not for your cell phone. Still, planning a party is also about deciding your own style, your philosophy and personal reality, as in what kind of party fits your time-management and entertaining skills. More questions: Do you want to have a casual gathering of a dozen besties or a formal affair for 200. Do you want a DIY-party or one with caterers, bartenders and bands? Do you want to carry on family traditions or try something different? WHERE TO START? LOOK IN THE MIRROR.

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For artist and cookbook author Laura Johnson, CEO of Coton Colors, parties — whether big or small — are “about spending time with friends, family and even new acquaintances.”

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PHOTOS BY SARA BROCKMANN AND COURTESY OF COTON COLORS AND TALLAHASSEE TABLE

“Hosts and hostesses come in a variety of styles,” said chef and caterer Jessica Bright McMullen, owner of KitchenAble, a cooking school located in a Lake Ella cottage. “We all have our strengths and our weaknesses.” Bright McMullen urges hosts and hostesses to consider what they do best, whether it’s cook a great meal, create beautiful flower arrangements, decorate like a pro or “really know how to pick out a bottle of wine.” Even if you can’t do any of those things, she said, “maybe you’re just a delight to be around and your friends love you anyway. So, take a moment to soul search about what you, pun intended, bring to the table.” For starters, you don’t have to bring perfection. “Don’t overcomplicate it,” said Laura Johnson, founding artist and CEO of Tallahassee-based Coton Colors. “To me, it doesn’t matter if it’s a large or small party. All the elements are the same, and ultimately it’s about spending time with friends, family and even new acquaintances.” Jewelry artist Quincie Hamby has embraced this philosophy to create warm gatherings without the hassle. “I work full time and I like to entertain, but I don’t worry about my house being completely decorated,” said Hamby, whose jewelry creations are featured at Wish Boutique in the Glenview Plaza. She’s a hostess who loves to cook, but she may supplement her menu with dishes made by friends. She has a pantry stocked with wine and champagne glasses, but she’s not about formalities. “If I have the table set for 12 people, and a 13th drops by, I’m not going to say they can’t drop in,” Hamby said. “The more the merrier. I’m kind of relaxed that way.” Experienced entertainers agree that your attitude is more important than the fanciest decorations or ingredients. “If the host and hostess are comfortable and having fun, the guests will have fun,” said Stephanie Jansen, co-owner of FIT Weight Loss & Medical Spa. “If you look stressed, your guests are going to feel awkward.” Jansen said she started out having “very small gatherings on Christmas Eve Eve. That was 23 years ago.” Since then, her guest list has expanded to about 300 attendees for a Dec. 23 party “that takes a lot of coordination.” Jansen plans months in advance to pick a theme, decorate and work with a caterer and friends to create a festive occasion.

“It’s been wonderful,” said Jansen. “Over the years our children have grown up and we’ve seen their friends grow up, and they still come back to the party.” Business-management consultant Lisa Miller has been hosting holiday parties for a dozen years, but five years ago, she began dedicating her celebrations to Last Hope Rescue, a volunteer group that finds homes for pets, particularly those in danger of being euthanized. “It’s truly a labor of love,” said Miller, owner of Lisa Miller & Associates. “It’s the greatest reward, after weeks of work, to stand back and see 200 people who care about animals together at a very joyful time.” About 20 friends and her husband, Jerry, help her decorate 12 trees and the house, prepare all the food and find items for a silent auction to benefit the petrescue group. Last year, the party raised $5,000 and collected 75 bags of dog food. The “ticket” to the party is a bag of dog food of at least 50 pounds or other pet items. To pull it off, Miller and friends start planning in early November and hold the party in midDecember. Even if you’re hosting a more casual wingding, don’t wing it, entertainers advise. To help you throw a holiday party that you’ll enjoy as much as your guests, here are tips gleaned from the experts.

GETTING STARTED Pick the date. Are you celebrating a specific holiday or the season? Keep in mind that in 2018, Hanukkah starts at sundown Dec. 2 and Kwanzaa on Dec. 26. Fridays and Saturdays book up quickly

ADVICE FROM THE EXPERTS

Jessica Bright McMullen, owner of KitchenAble urges hosts and hostesses to consider what they do best, whether it’s cook a great meal, create beautiful flower arrangements, decorate like a pro or “really know how to pick out a bottle of wine.”

ADVICE FROM THE EXPERTS

Laura Johnson, co-author of Coton Colors’ The Happy Everything Cookbook, suggests hosts “start with a theme and work your way from there. If it’s a large party, let your theme inspire your choice in food, music or entertainment and decor.”

Business consultant Lisa Miller and friends collect items for a silent auction to benefit the group Last Hope Rescue, which aims to save homeless pets.

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Volunteers make dozens of dishes for Lisa Miller's holiday party, which benefits Last Hope Rescue to help save homeless pets.

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from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Eve, so if you’re not planning a family-focused event, you’ll want to reserve your date early. Consider the option of a Sunday afternoon fete. It’s easy to sweat over the guest list. You may want to reciprocate for every invitation you’ve ever received in your life, but don’t be overambitious. Keep in mind that a great group of guests can overcome calamities like a fallen soufflé or a rainsoaked patio. “Instead of inviting every human you know, invite the ones you truly want to spend time with,” said Bright McMullen of KitchenAble. In her list of do’s and don’ts in “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Etiquette,” author and etiquette columnist Mary Mitchell suggests inviting guests

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who will “make an effort to contribute to the success of the party.” But she also recommends not inviting known adversaries who “may make the party livelier than you had hoped.” For a large gathering, the size of your soiree is likely dictated by how many people can fit comfortably in your home and usable outdoor space. For a cozier dinner party, you can limit your guest list to the number of people you can accommodate at the table, or make it a buffet. Adding a nicely decorated small table can help expand your list. Do you need to send out invitations? Options include email invites, personalized if possible, or snail mail. Calls work for a small, informal party. Jansen, co-owner of FIT, still prefers to use regular mail to get the word out.


PHOTO BY SARA BROCKMANN

“For years, we drove around town and handdelivered the invitations,” she said. “Now we have too many people, so we mail them out. We end up emailing some invitations, but it kills my soul to do it.” Your invitation can reflect the mood or theme of your party, if you want a theme, that is.

ABOUT THAT THEME This can be another one of those party conundrums. You want to do something creative but not too weird or overdone. A piece of advice: Let someone else have the ugly sweater party this year. For some entertainers, the theme is simply the joy of the holiday, with festive decorations that set the tone. If you want to build on that, you can certainly tap Pinterest or the internet. You’ll find ideas such as the “Nightmare Before Christmas” party, the holiday movie marathon, the spiked hot chocolate-sipping event and Christmas tree-trimming get-together. As for our experts, Bright McMullen said she likes to start planning her parties “with a source of inspiration.” The inspiration or theme can be seasonal or an ingredient — flowers blooming in your garden, for example. Or it can be as simple as a beautiful piece of china from your grandmother that you like to pull out during the holiday season, she said. “The whole party doesn’t have to be focused on that theme, but it’s a launching pad,” said Bright McMullen, who recommends clipping magazine recipes and decorating tips for future ideas. Jansen starts planning themes months in advance for her popular holiday parties. Last year, the theme was “Christmas in New York.” “Our menu had tiny pastrami sandwiches and chicken lo mein noodles served in miniature takeout boxes. How easy is that?” she said. “People don’t relax when it’s too fancy.” Johnson, co-author of Coton Colors’ “The Happy Everything Cookbook,” suggests hosts “start with a theme and work your way from there. If it’s a large party, let your theme inspire your choice in food, music or entertainment and decor.” “If it’s a small dinner party, decide what you want the feeling of the party to be — casual and cozy or maybe small and festive — and then pick recipes, flowers, table settings and a playlist that sparks that feeling,” she said. WHAT TO SERVE Remember that when you’re planning a party, checklists rule. Make shopping lists for food and beverages, decorations and supplies. Make lists for

what you need to do in the weeks and days before the party and your day-of schedule. And then remember to look at the lists. If you’re getting a caterer, word-of-mouth recommendations are best, but also look at the firms’ websites to peruse their recipe repertoire. You’ll want to book a caterer as soon as possible, and be realistic about the cost. Consider whether you’ll want a caterer to bring plates, flatware and serving platters. Some home cooks expand their menu by ordering premade plates. “If you order from stores, you have to order at least a week or more in advance,” said Hamby, the jewelry artist. “It’s OK to supplement what you cook yourself.” Hamby’s holiday party menus typically feature seafood dishes, including bouillabaisse, shrimp and grits, paella, salads with anchovy dressing, and oysters (grown in Apalachee Bay by OysterMom’s Deborah Keller). Mark Suber, chef/owner of the Black Fig catering company, suggests offering some room-temperature dishes that can be prepared ahead of time, such as sliced beef tenderloin and smoked salmon. Other top make-ahead choices are charcuterie and cheese boards and antipasto platters or even a big, festive salad. Tradition dictates some holiday fare. Hanukkah dinners will typically include fried foods “because the oil symbolizes the oil that lit the menorah,” said Stefanie Posner, education and music director at Temple Israel. “My family ate fried chicken” for Hanukkah, said Posner, who teaches cooking classes at the temple. Potato latkes or pancakes and jelly doughnuts are popular Hanukkah dishes. Posner noted there are myriad latkes recipes, including international choices, and even a Paleo-friendly version. She’s a fan of chicken levivot, “a Sephardic spin on the Ashkenazi traditional Chanukah food,” she wrote in an email. “Levivot = latke.” If you’re looking for unconventional additions to your holiday party menu, consider “featuring a little bit of culinary diversity,” said Beverly Rich, chef and co-owner of Klassic Katering with her husband, Lincoln Rich. “It adds a wow factor and broadens your guests’ palates. Food and culture bring us together. “During November and December, we eat so much turkey and ham and casseroles,” she said. “It’s good to have something light and bright when it (continued on page 184) comes to the holidays.”

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WHAT HAVE YOU MISSED Do you have enough dishes, flatware and glasses? If not, you can rent them, though that can be expensive. Shop around for the best deals. Consider traffic flow. Provide drinks in one area and the food in another, with plenty of space around. Stephanie Jansen, co-owner of FIT, suggests placing plates of finger food, napkins and decorative trash cans around the house. If you expect lots of guests piling jackets on your bed, think about buying or renting an inexpensive coat rack you can put in the bedroom or near the entryway. One of the most common mistakes “is to underestimate how long it takes to do something, like set the table,” said Jessica Bright McMullen, owner of KitchenAble. “Be sure to allocate yourself enough time for what you have to do.” “Think of every detail from your guests’ perspective,” said Laura Johnson of Coton Colors. “What details will make them feel at home and ready to unwind? Have a signature cocktail or a nonalcoholic beverage waiting for them when they walk in. Pre-plan so that you can be present with your guests.”

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HERE ARE A FEW HOLIDAY RECIPES SHARED BY OUR EXPERTS

Pecan Crusted Pork Tenderloin with Peach-Apricot Horseradish Compote INGREDIENTS ➸ 3 pounds boneless pork tenderloin ➸ 2 tablespoons soy sauce ➸ 1 shallot chopped ➸ ½ teaspoon kosher salt ➸ ¼ teaspoon ground cayenne ➸ 1 cup soft bread crumbs

➸ ¾ cup chopped pecans ➸ ½ cup apricot preserves ➸ 4 tablespoons butter, softened ➸ 2 teaspoons smoked paprika ➸ 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley

COMPOTE ➸ ½ cup apricot preserves ➸ 1 teaspoon prepared horseradish ➸ 1 teaspoon Sriracha ➸ ½ cup chopped fresh or frozen peaches

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INSTRUCTIONS Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray a baking pan with nonstick baking spray. Remove the tenderloin from packaging, pat dry with paper towels, and season with soy, shallot, salt and cayenne. Let marinade 20 minutes. In the work bowl of your food processor (or mix by hand), combine bread crumbs, pecans, ½ cup preserves, butter, paprika and parsley. Pulse to mix well and form a thick paste. Pat the paste on the outside of the pork to form crust. Place on baking pan and cook for about 45 minutes. Check temperature of pork for doneness. It should reach 145°F internally. Let rest for 10 minutes before carving. Stir together remaining apricot preserves, horseradish, Sriracha and peaches. Serve with pork. Yields 8 servings. The compote can be made up to a week in advance. You can assemble the pork tenderloin before baking and store in the refrigerator after assembly, up to eight hours in advance. — Submitted by Jessica Bright McMullen


Bouillabaisse

PHOTOS BY JAMES STEFIUK (PORK TENDERLOIN ), SCHRISTINE HAN FOR NEW YORK SHUK (CHICKEN LEVIVOT) AND JOHNDOLE / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS (BOUILLABAISSE) AND COURTESY OF COTON COLORS (YBOR CHICKEN)

Chicken Levivot INGREDIENTS ➸ 1 whole chicken (4½ pounds) ➸ 2 cinnamon sticks ➸ 1 tablespoon fennel seeds ➸ 1 tablespoon dry sage ➸ 3 bay leaves ➸ 1 tablespoon allspice ➸ salt ➸ 2 big bunches parsley, finely chopped ➸ 1 big bunch cilantro, finely chopped ➸ 1 cup mashed potatoes ➸ 5 eggs ➸ oil, for frying HARISSA SAUCE ➸ ¼ cup harissa ➸ 3 tablespoons canola oil ➸ 2 small garlic cloves, peeled and finely grated or put through a press ➸ 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice ➸ finely grated zest of 1 lemon ➸ ½ teaspoon salt

INGREDIENTS ➸ 6 garlic cloves ➸ 1 large onion ➸ 4 tomatoes ➸ 1 fennel chopped ➸ stock (about two quarts) ➸ Yukon gold potatoes cut in large cubes ➸ 1 lb shrimp with head on ➸ 4 lbs white fish like snapper or grouper ➸ 1 lb scallops ➸ 1 lb mussels ➸ 1 lb clams ➸ bay leaf ➸ saffron INSTRUCTIONS Mince garlic. Chop onion and tomatoes and cook in a stock pot until the onion is translucent. Add stock, potatoes, fennel and bay leaf and simmer until potatoes are almost cooked, about 10 minutes. Add shrimp, fish and scallops, and cook for two minutes, then place the mussels and clams in and put the lid on for a couple of minutes. Check to make sure everything is cooked. Add a dash of saffron and salt to taste. Serve with a crusty baguette and butter. Quincie Hamby pairs with a chardonnay or a pinot noir. About the stock, Hamby said: “Get to know your fishmonger. I know mine and he’s Mike (Wynn) at Capital Seafood Market. Ask for shells of shrimp, crabs, fish heads, etc. I roast the shells and then boil them in water for about a hour. After that, I add some onion, celery, carrots, tomato paste and bay leaf and let that simmer for 30 minutes. Strain with cheesecloth. Place in glass jars, leaving room for expansion, and place in freezer. Bouillabaisse isn’t difficult, but the broth is time-consuming, so I always make the broth weeks before and freeze it. Once the stock is made, the rest is easy. You can buy fish stock at the grocery store, but it’s not as good as homemade.” — Submitted by Quincie Hamby

Ybor Chicken INGREDIENTS ➸ ½ cup flour ➸ 1 whole chicken, cut ➸ salt and pepper to taste ➸ 2 tablespoons olive oil ➸ 1 green pepper, cut ➸ 1 large onion, cut ➸ 1 large garlic clove, minced ➸ 1 large tomato, chopped ➸ 1 bay leaf ➸ 1 cup raisins ➸ 1 cup green olives with pimento, sliced ➸ 1 cup dry red wine ➸ 1 chorizo sausage, chopped

INSTRUCTIONS Combine the chicken, cinnamon sticks, fennel seeds, sage, bay leaves and allspice in a big pot. Add cold water to cover and season with salt. Bring to a boil and simmer for 45 minutes or until the chicken is fully cooked. Let the chicken cool completely in the broth. Remove the chicken and strain the broth. Finely shred the chicken into a large bowl. Discard the skin and bones. Reserve the broth for later use. Add the parsley, cilantro and mashed potatoes to the chicken. Season generously to taste with salt and mix well. Stir in the eggs. Form the mixture into patties about 2 inches round and ½-inch thick; the thinner the patties, the crisper they will be. Heat oil in a large skillet. Fry the patties in batches until browned. Makes 25 to 30 patties. Serve warm, with the harissa sauce on the side. You can buy harissa sauce or make your own: Combine ingredients in a small bowl and whisk. — Submitted by Stefanie Posner, recipe from the food company New York Shuk

INSTRUCTIONS Mix flour, salt and pepper, and coat the chicken. Heat olive oil in a large skillet on medium heat. Brown the chicken slowly. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Place chicken in a casserole dish. Sauté green pepper, onion, garlic, tomato, bay leaf, raisins and olives in the skillet with the remaining oil. Add wine and simmer for five minutes. Pour over the chicken and add chorizo. Cover and bake until chicken is tender, 1¼ to 1½ hours. Serve with white rice. Adapted by Laura Johnson from the Tampa Treasures Cookbook

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Holiday Rem “I remember the old man Pop brought home on Christmas Eve. No home, no family. I don’t think we ever learned his name … but I think we made him happy that night … I remember that. “How about when Betty’s greasy holiday meatballs slipped down the drain … and how she hauled them out, splashed on the red sauce and served them anyway?! “I’ll never forget the cabin on Christmas Eve when the electricity went and we just sat by candlelight singing carols and telling stories. That was my favorite.” — MARINA BROWN, AUGUST 2018

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A Walk Down The details may have faded, but there is something about memories made over the holidays. They tend to stick. Emotions seem closer to the surface, expectations a little more gilded, potential for disappointment or delight greater. Tallahassee Magazine asked a diverse collection of people to share some of their holiday memories with you. Prominent or ordinary, younger or older, each holds dear a moving moment from long ago and places far and near. Maybe they will inspire you to jot down reminiscences you cherish. Share them with friends. Remind family of the good, the dreadful or the hilarious moments that bind us all in one way or another during these final days of the year. Eluster Richardson, artist and teacher:

“I grew up on a plantation in Tallahassee. My father was a tenant farmer, a farm hand, and later the plantation’s foreman. There were eight of us children, and we’d all be excited at the holidays to go to the woods to cut us a pine tree for Christmas. We’d also be keeping a close eye on Daddy, checking for the day that he was going shopping. We’d especially want to know where he was going to hide the toys. There weren’t ever many, but what was coming, we wanted to know about! “This one Christmas, I remember us waiting for him to come back, when all of a sudden, the car passed by and out of the trunk were hanging a couple of bicycles! Oh, that was special! He passed us on by, taking the bikes to a neighbors’ for hiding. But on Christmas Eve, my brother and I only played asleep, peeking out our door just to make sure those bikes were brought in for us.”

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Eluster Richardson celebrating with Family


iniscences

Nostalgia’s Lane

BY MARINA BROWN

PHOTOS BY MATT BURKE (GILLUM) AND COURTESY OF LEE‘S PLACE (RABALAIS) AND INDIVIDUALS

Brenda Rabalais, Ph.D, founder and therapist at Lee’s Place:

“Holidays are often difficult for people dealing with grief, but two women, whom I’ll call, ‘Sally’ and ‘Betty,’ have found a way to turn their sadness into something beautiful. “At Lee’s Place, there is a garden with paving bricks engraved with the names of people who have passed. Sally and Betty lost a beloved nephew in his 20s, and they would come there to remember him. And then we would notice that on holidays … things would begin to appear: in the summer, paper butterflies hanging in the trees; bunnies at Easter; and lovely ornaments at Christmastime. We never know when Sally and Betty will come, we rarely see them, only the evidence — an angel statue, a thinking-bench. They are like fairies at night, and at Christmas, it’s something everyone loves and looks forward to.”

Mayor and gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum: (who emailed his comments) “My favorite memory is of our 2-year-old twins, Jackson and Caroline, ‘eating through’ their Christmas gifts, pulling at the wrapping with their tiny teeth, chewing on the ribbons! Last year, their little brother, Davis, gave a repeat performance, gnawing away on the wrappings. (Maybe it runs in the family!)”

Lisa Blackwell with her father and a look at her “miracle”

Lisa Blackwell, bookseller: “After my first time seeing snow on a vacation trip to Colorado, I prayed every winter that that beautiful ‘confectioner’s sugar’ would one day glitter in my own yard in Florida. Each year, I was denied. Even some rare Tallahassee snow saved by a friend had melted by the time I returned from a weekend away. I was cursed. “One Christmas, my parents overheard me praying again for snow. I dropped all my allowance money in the offering plate to ensure that some would arrive. Now it was up to God. I woke up the next morning to see a frosty wonderland outside my window. Icicles hung from the eaves, and the gardenia bush was dripping with droplets of ice.” “It seems my father had made my prayers a reality — rather than risk damaging my faith forever. Climbing onto the roof in the freezing night he’d set up the garden sprinkler to rain down outside my window. He explained that humans too could be agents of good will — though I wasn’t sure it counted as a real miracle. “That gardenia bush later bent and broke under the weight of the ice. And my mother’s eyes always narrowed slightly whenever the story came up. Still, both of them would have done anything to make my Christmas dreams come true.”

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Maureen Haberfeld with her younger siblings

Maureen Haberfeld, lifelong learning coordinator at the Tallahassee Senior Center: “My family lived outside of Philadelphia. My mother didn’t drive. We didn’t

have a lot of money. But on one remarkable day every Christmas season, my mother would keep my brother and sister and me out of school, and all together, we would take the train into Philadelphia and to the magical Wanamaker’s Department Store. There, there was a Christmas Village … a bit like a Dickens English fantasy place … a wonderland for us. And then, after no school, the train and the Christmas village, we would go to the Horn and Hardart’s cafeteria. The additional miracle of seeing your food through a tiny glass window, putting money into a slot, then opening the little door and extracting your sandwich or pie, was the highlight of our whole Christmas season. What a day!”

Nhan Nguyen, Ph.D, entrepreneur: Many of Nguyen’s

holiday memories revolve around food and its abundance when he arrived in the United States at age 12. In his home country, he sometimes had gone without eating. “During the final days of communist Vietnam, the Tet Offensive had forced my family to flee to Saigon. War had driven us away from our house and my father’s business, and there seemed no way to escape the bombardments. Miraculously, a Chinese family took me — pretending to be their son — aboard a boat they were escaping in.” Nguyen said he endured 15 days on a stormy sea, extorsion by pirates, grounding on an uninhabited island and months in a squalid refugee camp before his church-arranged immigration to the United States. “I didn’t know my birthday … I had never eaten chocolate. And suddenly it was Christmas and there was more food than I had ever seen! At Thanksgiving and at Christmas … so much, so wonderful … all different kinds … all different tastes! I also had never received presents before and now there were gifts, too. Wonderful! Wonderful!”

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Daughter Kathleen Nguyen, age 10: “My cousin from Vietnam is

here now, too. He’s 10, like me. I gave him a Christmas memory, I think. I saw that he likes to draw, so I surprised him with a ‘Superman Canvas’ to paint on. It made him overwhelmed. It made me happy inside, too. I think this might be how my father felt when he first came here.”

Gary Thomas, former foreign correspondent and musician:

“When I worked for the Voice of America in Thailand, India, Afghanistan and Pakistan, Christmas celebrations were all about scrounging — for a tree (which seemed odd to Indians, to want a dead tree in the house), or for pork (which you could get in shady deals in Kabul’s backstreets). Yet enhanced with some Embassy alcohol, musical instruments from all over the world, and a certain nostalgia for home, those five years away were some of my sweetest Christmases.”


Liz Jameson, editor at Florida Department of Elder Affairs: “Papa started buying matching

Christmas pajamas for the family when I was about 3 — there were five of us then, which is a reasonable number. Little did he know the monster he’d created! For the next 25 years, he had to buy more and more jammies, as the three of us married and had kids. One year there were 14 of us — with jammies sized infant to XXL adult! My mother posted all the annual group pictures on the fridge until the entire freezer area was covered. What fun it was in the middle of July, as we visited with loved ones from Wyoming, Washington, Minnesota, Georgia and Florida to peruse the Christmas jammies and show the kids all the former husbands — several came and went! — and how everyone had grown over the years. It’s a great tradition, but beware: It can get pricey!”

PHOTOS BY SCOTT HOLSTEIN (ASHENAFI RICHARDSON AND RICCI) AND LAWRENCE DAVIDSON (THRASHER AND JAMESON) AND COURTESY OF INDIVIDUALS

Judge Nina Ashenafi Richardson, 2nd Judicial Circuit: “Though I was raised in

Ethiopia, one of my sweetest memories occurred every Christmastime at home when my father was at Brandeis University. He was a professor of Ethnomusicology, studying the music of different cultures with students from many different countries. Often, during the holidays here, it wasn’t possible for his graduate students to go home, so he would invite them to our house. We would eat the foods of their countries, and they would play the instruments and sing the songs of places far away. “For a child of 10,11,12, as I was, it made a great impression — the beauty in our differences, how music can bring us all together, how food can unite us — how celebrating ours and others’ ceremonies is a bridge and something that can make us less judgmental.”

Elizabeth Ricci, partner at Rambana & Ricci, immigration attorneys:

“Food is my favorite part of the holidays! I especially relish Christmas Eve dinner when my family gets together and we lay out the Feast of the Seven Fishes — a tradition my great grandmothers brought with them from Italy. A typical Christmas Eve dinner usually includes seafood spread, escaviche on toast, calamari in ink, raw oysters, chilled lobster and crab … and my favorite, angel hair pasta in white clam sauce. “Since my husband, Neil Rambana, is from Jamaica, we also include some Caribbean flavors. Our daughters, Paloma and Belen, whom we call the Rasta Pastas, make ‘penguin’ appetizers — black olives stuffed with a mozzarella pearl and we eat my mother-inlaw’s rum-soaked fruit cake and drink sorrel, a tangy, Caribbean holiday drink. When we return from Mass, the house smells of fish, spices and joy!”

Liz Jameson appears next to her father in this 1973 photo, in which family members don her dad’s traditional Christmas gift of matching pajamas.

Rabbi Jack Romberg, Temple Israel: “Though Yom Kippur

doesn’t fall in December, I remember the holy day in 1973 well. I was attending High Holy Days services at a very orthodox synagogue out of state. But that year, Yom Kippur also happened to coincide with the World Series between the Mets and the Oakland A’s. Somehow, between prayers, word would be passed around of who was batting and what the score was. On the second day of Yom Kippur, I noticed one man with earbuds in as he prayed. I guessed he was a real fan. But shortly, the rabbi stood up and brought the service to a halt. ‘I have terrible news,’ he said. ‘War has broken out and the Egyptians and Syrians have crossed the Suez Canal and invaded Israel.’ “I will never forget the shock of hearing the word, ‘war’ and not a hoped-for World Series score from the lips of the rabbi.” Young Jack Romberg went on to fundraise for the Red Star of David (like the American Red Cross) during the war.

John Thrasher, president, Florida State University:

“Our kids were young, 16, 12 and 8, and we decided to go skiing over the Christmas holidays. We couldn’t afford going out West, but Snowshoe, West Virginia, was just right. Well, the first day was beautiful — some manmade snow, but fine for skiing. The second day was Christmas Eve and instead of a white Christmas, it was rain — lots of it. My wife said we should make the best of it, and just try someplace else. So, with a lot of luck we got a room in Williamsburg, a place she’d always wanted to go. The next morning, we went to Christmas services at the famous Bruton Parish Church, a place attended by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Patrick Henry. We got to see the very pews where they sat, and for me, in government at the time, it was very special. For all of us, turning what might have been a miserable vacation into an adventure with meaningful surprises was one of the very best holidays we’ve ever had.”

Nostalgia and memories can be rare gifts during the holidays. Enjoy each of them and share them with others. And be sure to make new ones. — HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM TALLAHASSEE MAGAZINE TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

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QUIET


WARRIORS story by PAMELA FORRESTER // photography by DAVE BARFIELD

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They don’t focus on rank, missions or operational theaters. This group is about people, and they talk like brothers.

T

They say things such as, “Let’s pop smoke” and, “Let’s pull pitch.” It’s a language understood only by those who speak it. They parachute into enemy territory, and they might find themselves desperately trying, to no avail, to save the life of a soldier shot right next to them. It’s a tragedy understood only by those who experience it. They’re U.S. Army Special Operations Forces, and Tallahassee resident and retired Army Ranger Frank Gorski understands. “Ranger James Markwell was my platoon medic during action in Panama,” said Gorski, sergeant first class, referring to the U.S. invasion of Panama in 1989. “He was right next to me when he was hit. I tried to keep him alive by stuffing his wounds with first aid field dressings and then by doing CPR when he went into cardiac arrest before he died.” Special Operations forces throughout the U.S. military are known as “the Quiet Professionals” because they’re stealth fighters who operate in the shadows. In the Army’s special operations, they’re the Delta Force, Green Berets and Rangers, among others. They also tend to keep their military experiences to themselves. To civilians, what they endure is unfathomable, from their highly specialized training to their grueling missions and trauma. Only a member of their brotherhood can relate. Groups have formed around the country, including in Tallahassee, so that these likeminded veterans can come together and talk. Tallahassee’s group, under the leadership of First Sgt. Roger Beck, a 59-year-old retired Ranger, and Captain and former Dive Detachment Commander Alan Willett,

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began in 2014 as a way to get retired Army Special Ops members and their wives together in a relaxed, informal setting. “In many ways, I spent over 30 years trying to forget some things,” specialist Hank Trull, 52, who has been coming to the breakfasts for more than a year, wrote in an email to Tallahassee Magazine. “Being a part of this group has allowed me to spend time with those that have had the same training, much of the same point of view, and I am not judged by my (unusual) sense of humor, or my unique view on many things. We are thick-skinned old vets and enjoy each other’s company.” Army Special Operations Forces haven’t received the recent publicity of Navy SEALs, who carried out the 2011 special mission that killed Osama bin Laden in Pakistan. But as this group will tell you, they have also been in a lot of especially dangerous situations, and they maintain a good-natured rivalry with their Navy brothers. Tallahassee’s Ranger/Special Forces Breakfast takes place once a month at Golden Corral, which says it plans to reopen in December after renovations. The group includes former enlisted men and officers. It includes veterans who served at entirely different times and places, from Vietnam in the 1960s to Iraq and Afghanistan in recent years. Yet when they get together, they don’t focus on rank, missions or operational theaters. This group is about people, and they talk like brothers. A recent Saturday breakfast included about 20 veterans and their spouses. They shared not war stories but fish stories. They discussed

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fishing trips and, yes, the one that got away. They also discussed motorcycles and winter ski trips, among other things. “I attend because I love associating with men that have done important things for our country and with whom I share a love for the Army,” said Jim Croushorn, 79, a former Army captain. To understand how these veterans got here, it is important to understand their specialized military journeys. The motto of the U.S. Army Rangers is “Rangers lead the way,” and that is what specialist Trull said he and fellow Rangers did at 0530 hours on Oct. 25, 1983, during Operation Urgent Fury in unstable Grenada, where a pro-Marxist military government had taken charge. U.S. forces invaded and quickly ousted the regime. “Rangers are expected to travel farther, move faster, and fight harder than their counterparts,” Trull said. “I still have the motto on my wall. It has always served as a reminder that I can do what most cannot. Through fortitude, anything is possible.” Their mission is to protect Americans and U.S. interests around the globe. Their names rarely make the news, but news reports herald their missions. They include Operation Just Cause in Panama, Operation Urgent Fury in Grenada and Operation Eagle Claw in Iran — the ill-fated attempt in 1980 to rescue the American hostages held in the Iranian Embassy.


BEING A PART OF THIS GROUP HAS ALLOWED ME TO SPEND TIME WITH THOSE THAT HAVE HAD THE SAME TRAINING, MUCH OF THE SAME POINT OF VIEW, AND I AM NOT JUDGED BY MY (UNUSUAL) SENSE OF HUMOR, OR MY UNIQUE VIEW ON MANY THINGS.” —Specialist Hank Trull, U.S. Army Ranger

↖ A recent Ranger/Special Forces Breakfast in Tallahassee included, among

others, clockwise: Alan Willett and Michael Enos; Roger Beck; Allen DeGraw; Charles Carter (in light-colored hat); Allen Beard; and Bruce Grant. The breakfast takes place once a month at Golden Corral on North Monroe Street. TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

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Some operations never make the news; they’re top secret. Of course, they’re always dangerous. Capt. Croushorn told of waiting all night in ambush in the Korean Demilitarized Zone. Col. Luther Vaughn, 87, said he was part of a clandestine group of Army Special Operations soldiers serving in Vietnam in 1964. As a platoon leader in Laos, he said, he decided that his 12 men team pinned down in an open rice field was going to overrun the enemy before nightfall. The strategy won him the prestigious military Silver Star medal. About 20 years later, Trull was in Grenada, jumping into a combat zone at 500 feet, he said. That’s a daring and skillful maneuver that leaves no room for error. “I have never been as scared as I was that day,” Trull said. Special operations forces must be ready to face extreme danger in sensitive and complex situations anywhere at any time. Take the 75th Ranger Regiment. The Army’s Special Operations Command webpage calls the regiment “the Army’s premier raid force.” It says Rangers are “always combat ready, mentally and physically tough and prepared to fight the War on Terrorism.” That means preparation that most people could never endure. “The physical and mental demands of Ranger School exceed those commonly observed among humans; it leaves an indelible mark,” said Lt. Col. Allen DeGraw, 84. “You learn that your body

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→ Retired Army Ranger Frank Gorski recalled a harrowing day in 1989 when platoon medic James Markwell got shot and died during the U.S. invasion of Panama. “He was right next to me when he was hit,” Gorski said. “I tried to keep him alive by stuffing his wounds with first aid field dressings and then by doing CPR.” Above-left, in a photo taken around 1990, Gorski participates in infiltration training in Puerto Rico. At right: Gorski prepares a jump over Fort Benning, Georgia, in 1995. He says he’s shown doing a “door check,” in which he needed to hang out the jump door and make sure the aircraft was lined up with the drop zone and that no other aircraft were too close.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF INDIVIDUALS (CGORSKI AND VAUGHN)

← Col. Luther Vaughn says he was part of a clandestine group of Army Special Operations soldiers in Vietnam. He earned a Silver Star for deciding that his 12 men pinned down in an open rice field in Laos would overrun the enemy before nightfall. At left, his son pins on his Silver Star.


“IT WAS SO DARK ON THAT RUNWAY, I COULDN’T EVEN TELL WHO HE WAS; I REMEMBER YELLING ‘MEDIC!!!’ … ALL I KNEW IS THAT HE WAS A RANGER. I HAD NO IDEA THAT HE WAS RIGHT THERE IN FRONT OF ME DYING FOR HIS COUNTRY AND HIS BROTHERS.” — Sergeant First Class, Frank Gorski, U.S. Army Rangers

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“THOSE OF US WHO MADE IT ARE BOTH PROUD AND HUMBLED HAVING ENDURED AND SUCCEEDED AND ARE UNABASHEDLY THE BEST WE CAN BE.”

— Lt. Col. Allen DeGraw, U.S. Army Rangers

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can take one more step and that your mind can still function after days without sleep or food.” Rangers must pass a grueling physical assessment test that features a series of running, climbing, dragging and sprinting drills. In fiscal year 2016, Ranger School saw a failure rate of 63 percent, largely because of the physical assessment test, the Army said in an April 2017 memorandum. Master Sgt. Roy Prine, 68, said testing includes a 12-mile “ruck march” that candidates must complete within three hours while loaded down with gear. “I have found that you can prepare yourself for the physical hardships,” Prine said, “but if you aren’t mentally prepared to face the mental and stress issues, your chances of making the cut are very slim.” In 22 years of military service, which ended with his 1990 retirement, Prine said he repeatedly performed so-called HALO jumps, free-falling from planes at 20,000 feet. “It is just not natural to jump out of a perfectly good plane,” he said. His underwater training enabled him to exit submarines or leap off duck boats for clandestine arrivals, he said. These are examples of what makes Army Rangers exceptional. “Ranger is the equivalent of major leagues,” Lt. Col. DeGraw said. “Those of us who made it are both proud and

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humbled having endured and succeeded and are unabashedly the best we can be.” For many, the pain of service lingers. Some in the Tallahassee group shared with Tallahassee Magazine anecdotes of fallen brothers in arms. “I have been on numerous burial details which were tough,” said Col. Jim Davis, who retired in 1996, “but ‘notification of next of kin’ is especially rough.” Lt. Col. Rodney Sanchez, 53, said he remembers having to write a letter to the mother of SPC Robert Allen Wise, of Tallahassee, who was killed at age 21 when a bomb exploded while he was on patrol in Baghdad in 2003. Sanchez called it “the hardest thing I ever did.” News reports noted that Wise needed the signature of his reluctant mother, Tammy, to join the Florida National Guard at age 17. “We lost him on Nov 12, 2003,” Sanchez said. “It took me several days to write the letter. It was the worst time ever.” Gorski, meanwhile, said he can’t shake the memory of that day decades ago in Panama when Markwell, the Ranger medic, lay dying next to him. “It was so dark on that runway, I couldn’t even tell who he was; all I knew is that he was a Ranger,” Gorski wrote in an email. “I remember yelling ‘MEDIC!!!!’ … I had no idea that he was right there in front of me dying for his country and his Brothers.”

PHOTOS COURTESY OF INDIVIDUALS (RATTERREE AND PRINE)

→ Leamon L. Ratterree is seen in Honduras, in Peru and at the monthly breakfast in Tallahassee. At left, he prepares to go into the mountains with Honduran soldiers on a mission to stop weapons, supplies and insurgents moving to Salvadoran guerillas. At right, Ratterree directs an Air Force helicopter during training of Peruvian commandos in counter-guerilla operations.


← Gold Star mom Alberta Simmons, the mother of Master Sgt. Shawn Elliot Simmons, who was killed in the line of duty in 2008 on a recovery mission in Afghanistan.

Members provide support to those who need it ↓ Master Sgt. Roy Prine serves as cast master during cast-andrecover operations in the Panama Canal Zone around 1979. In 22 years of military service, Prine said he repeatedly performed so-called HALO jumps, free-falling from 20,000 feet.

President George H.W. Bush mentioned Markwell in his 1990 State of the Union address. “Private Markwell was among the first to see battle in Panama, and one of the first to fall,” Bush said, according to the University of California at Santa Barbara’s American Presidency Project. “But he knew what he believed in. He carried the idea we call America in his heart.” Gorski said he met Markwell’s mother, Sandee Rouse, and that he and his wife write her every Christmas and still visit her. “To this day, I am haunted with the thought that maybe I could have done more or something different,” Gorski said about that day in Panama. Tallahassee group members continue to support their own. The group’s email list of about 25 people includes a Gold Star mother and the widow of a Special Forces officer who served in Vietnam. Members

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→ Group members who met in August offered diverse ranks, service and experiences. From left to right: Roger Beck, Alberta Simmons, Jim Croushorn, Luther Vaughn, Leamon Ratterree, Charles Carter, Allen Willett, Allen Beard, Frank Gorski, Roy Prine, Tom Burns (sixth from right), David Allen, Hank Trull, Rodney Sanchez, Bruce Grant and Allen DeGraw.

STREAMS OF GIFTS

Video of veteran and his dog spreads warmth, inspires children’s book by PETE REINWALD

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T

he Tallahassee video that moved the internet to tears turns 2 years old in December, yet it continues to make the rounds. For service members, dog lovers and anybody else who appreciates a rush of feel-good warmth when the weather turns cooler, it’s the holiday gift that keeps on giving. It even has inspired a new children’s book, but more on that shortly. The viral video features Peter Coukoulis, then 26, a veteran who his mother says made the decision on Sept. 11, 2001, when he was a boy, that he one day would join the Marines. He indeed became a Marine and served four years, including seven months in Afghanistan. He returned home in 2011 to learn that his dog, a beagle, had died. He later was diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Two years ago, his condition improved, but he continued to struggle. Just before Christmas of 2016, his mother, Dena Coukoulis, came up with

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an idea to make him feel better. The video tells the story: Peter is sitting at a table as he’s handed a partially opened gift-wrapped box. He opens the box, and out pops a beagle puppy, a pink bow around her neck. Peter cradles the pup and uses an arm to wipe away tears. A loved one pats him on the shoulder, and his new dog licks him on the face. Peter kisses her on the mouth, smiles broadly and wipes his eyes again. Dena Coukoulis posted the video of YouTube and Facebook. It became an instant hit, and as of mid-October, it approached 1.2 million views. Coukoulis said the response from the video inspired her to do more to call attention to mental illnesses, including PTSD. “His life has improved tremendously, and I think that gave him will to live,” Coukoulis said of Peter and his gift. “It gave him a sense of purpose.” Her, too: She would write a book. “It’s a Willa World” stars that gift-

wrapped dog, Willa, who carries the message of Coukoulis in a heart-warming, inspirational and patriotic story about mental illness. The book also illustrates how connections and love — and most definitely licks — can lead to happiness. She aims to use the book to trumpet “the healing power of animals” and to “start the conversation” with children about mental health, she says. In a nod to the era of technology and especially Facebook and YouTube, the book carries the official title of “#itsawillaworld.” Coukoulis planned in October to use her own money to print the first 1,000 copies, and she planned a Nov. 12 Veterans Day launch. She said she hoped her book would attract a publisher to mass-produce it. Regardless, she now can call herself a wife, mother, hairstylist, advocate and author. “I can’t even believe I did it, to be honest with you,” Coukoulis said. “I’ve


“These men don’t sit on the sidelines. They always have each other’s back.” — Alan Willett provide support to those who need it, including Capt. Walt Yost, a Purple Heart recipient who passed away last year. Special operations forces members often refer to bonds that they say will never be broken. “It’s a brotherhood,” Willett said. “These men don’t sit on the sidelines. They always have each other’s back.” If you haven’t been pinned down or haven’t overrun a hill or lay in ambush or been dropped into a pitch-black sky while being shot at, you don’t know the terror and the camaraderie that these veterans know, and you don’t understand the dependence on the guy next to you. These soldiers understand. They prefer to remember … and sometimes to forget … quietly. TM

had a lot of great people help me.” Among them: Donna Smith Randolph, a fellow 1983 Leon High graduate whom Coukoulis said volunteered to illustrate the book. Her 32-page book features Willa telling the story about her adoption and the moment she surprises and nearly overwhelms Peter, who’s “Steve” in the book. “I decided to lick him just like my furry Mom licked me!” Willa says. The story continues with their relationship and a key message:

Pam Forrester is founder of a media company, Three Star Productions, whose name recalls her late father, Lt. Gen. Eugene Forrester. She proudly refers to herself as an “Army brat born at West Point.”

“If you are feeling sad about something, “If you are feeling sad about nothing, “It is okay to tell someone.” The illustrated Willa sports appropriately cartoonish eyes, feet and tongue and, yes, a pink bow. The book includes a glossary to explain words such as “Afghanistan,” “deployed” and “viral,” plus terms such as “yiayia” and “papou” — grandmother and grandfather — a salute to the author’s Greek heritage.

Willa, by the way, stands for “the will to live.” “Mental health has got to be addressed,” Coukoulis said. “You feel better after you talk about it. Even after you cry, you feel better.”

TALLAHASSEE’S RANGER/SPECIAL FORCES BREAKFAST TAKES PLACE AT 8:30 A.M. ON THE SECOND SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH AT GOLDEN CORRAL, 1630 N. MONROE ST.

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2018

BEST OF TALLA Support for the “Best of Tallahassee” program is provided by presenting sponsor Capital City Bank and by these additional sponsors: Thomas Howell Ferguson P.A. CPAs, Comcast Business, John Gandy Events, AM Break with Ann & Audra and Live In Tallahassee

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We salute the winners and runners-up of our annual readers’ poll — businesses that have earned the respect and support of their customers

HASSEE

For 20 years, the annual Best of Tallahassee event has celebrated the best of the best as voted on by Tallahassee Magazine’s readers. The 2018 winners and runners-up reflect the business establishments that serve our favorite meals, provide the highest quality of health care, dress us in the latest fashions, manage our finances and every service that makes life in the Capital City the best. In the pages that follow, see which businesses were awarded “Best of Tallahassee.” The winners will be celebrated and honored on Nov. 1 at The Moon. We thank you, readers, for participating in the “Best of Tallahassee” poll and giving top businesses the recognition they deserve. Results tabulated by the accounting firm

THOMAS HOWELL FERGUSON P.A. CPAs

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BEST OF TALLAHASSEE

Food & Beverage APPETIZER

BAR

BONEFISH GRILL

MADISON SOCIAL

Bonefishgrill.com (850) 297-0460 3491 Thomasville Road

HONORABLE MENTION

MADISON SOCIAL

madisonsocial.com (850) 894-6276 705 S. Woodward Ave.

HONORABLE MENTION

LIBERTY BAR & RESTAURANT

BRUNCH

THE EGG CAFE & EATERY (850) 907-EGGS (3447) *Kleman Plaza 300 S. Duval St., Ste. 11 *Various locations

CATERING

ETHNIC RESTAURANT

TASTE BUDZ

SAHARA CAFE

HONORABLE MENTION

HONORABLE MENTION

CELEBRATION/SPECIAL OCCASION RESTAURANT

FINE DINING RESTAURANT

CYPRESS RESTAURANT

(850) 270-9396 3534 Maclay Blvd. S.

tastebudz.net (850) 309-7348 2655-12 Captial Circle NE

BLACK FIG

HONORABLE MENTION

saharacafeone.com (850) 656-1800 1135 Apalachee Parkway

GORDOS CUBAN RESTAURANT

TABLE 23

ASIAN

MASA RESTAURANT masatallahassee.com (850) 727-4183 1650 N. Monroe St.

HONORABLE MENTION

AZU LUCY HO’S

BAKERY

TASTY PASTRY BAKERY tastypastrybakery.com (850) 893-3752 1355 Market St., #A5

HONORABLE MENTION

THE CAKE SHOP

BARBECUE

MISSION BBQ Mission-bbq.com (850) 702-3513 216 S. Magnolia Drive

HONORABLE MENTION

JIM & MILT’S BAR-B-Q

BREAKFAST

CANOPY ROAD CAFE canopyroadcafe.com (850) 727-0263 1779 Apalachee Parkway *Various locations HONORABLE MENTION

THE EGG CAFE & EATERY

CAJUN RESTAURANT

COOSH’S BAYOU ROUGE

cooshs.com (850) 894-4110 6267 Old Water Oak Road, #101 *Various locations HONORABLE MENTION

HARRY’S SEAFOOD BAR AND GRILLE

CASUAL DINING

KOOL BEANZ CAFE

cypressrestaurant.com (850) 513-1100 320 E. Tennessee St.

HONORABLE MENTION

CYPRESS RESTAURANT

HONORABLE MENTION

SAGE RESTAURANT

HAPPY HOUR

MADISON SOCIAL DESSERT

FOOD GLORIOUS FOOD

koolbeanz-cafe.com (850) 224-2466 921 Thomasville Road

foodgloriousfood.com (850) 224-9974 1950 Thomasville Road

HONORABLE MENTION

HONORABLE MENTION

BACKWOODS BISTRO

SAGE RESTAURANT

AU PÉCHÉ MIGNON FRENCH PASTRY SHOP

COFFEE SHOP

LUCKY GOAT COFFEE

luckygoatcoffee.com (850) 422-0300 668 Capital Circle NE *Various locations HONORABLE MENTION

REDEYE COFFEE and BLACK DOG CAFE

madisonsocial.com (850) 894-6276 705 S. Woodward Ave.

HONORABLE MENTION

TABLE 23

HIBACHI

OSAKA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE theosakasteakhouse.com (850) 531-0222 1690 Raymond Diehl Road HONORABLE MENTION

NAGOYA STEAKHOUSE AND SUSHI

HOTDOG

DOG ET AL

dogetal.com (850) 222-4099 1456 S. Monroe St. HONORABLE MENTION

VOODOO DOG RESTAURANT

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HAMBURGER

VERTIGO BURGERS AND FRIES

vertigoburgersandfries.com (850) 878-2020 1395 E. Lafayette St. HONORABLE MENTION

MIDTOWN CABOOSE

SEAFOOD MARKET

SOUTHERN SEAFOOD MARKET

southernseafoodmarket.com (850) 893-7301 1415 Timberlane Road, Ste. 113 HONORABLE MENTION

ITALIAN RESTAURANT

BELLA BELLA ITALIAN RESTAURANT thebellabella.com (850) 412-1114 123 E. 5th Ave.

HONORABLE MENTION

MOM & DAD’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT

PHOTOS BY SCOTT HOLSTEIN (VERTIGO BURGER) AND COURTESY OF LUCKY GOAT COFFEE

COLD PRESSED JUICE/ SMOOTHIE

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE CAFE tropicalsmoothiecafe.com (850) 894-4980 1415 Timberlane Road *Various locations

MARTINI/COCKTAIL

PIZZA

THE BLU HALO

MOMO’S PIZZA

thebluhalo.com (850) 792-7884 3431 Bannerman Road, #2 HONORABLE MENTION

BONEFISH GRILL

MEXICAN/LATIN AMERICAN RESTAURANT

EL JALISCO MEXICAN RESTAURANT (850) 878-0800 2022 N. Monroe St. *Various locations

HONORABLE MENTION

AXIOS LIFESTYLE SPA

LUNCH

OUTDOOR DINING RESTAURANT

hopkinseatery.com (850) 386-4258 1660 N. Monroe St. *Various locations

table23tally.com (850) 329-2261 1215 Thomasville Road

HONORABLE MENTION

THE CRUM BOX GASTGARDEN

HOPKINS’ EATERY

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK

HONORABLE MENTION

MIDTOWN PIES

LA FIESTA MEXICAN RESTAURANT

HONORABLE MENTION

momospizza.com (850) 224-9808 1416 W. Tennessee St. *Various locations

HONORABLE MENTION

SEAFOOD RESTAURANT

WAHOO SEAFOOD GRILL wahooseafoodgrill.com (850) 629-4059 2714 Graves Road

HONORABLE MENTION

RESTAURANT

KOOL BEANZ CAFE

koolbeanz-cafe.com (850) 224-2466 921 Thomasville Road HONORABLE MENTION

TABLE 23

WHARF CASUAL SEAFOOD

SOUTHERN CUISINE/FOOD

TABLE 23

table23tally.com (850) 329-2261 1215 Thomasville Road HONORABLE MENTION

MARIE LIVINGSTON’S STEAKHOUSE

marielivingstonsteakhouse.com (850) 562-2525 2705 Apalachee Parkway HONORABLE MENTION

TED’S MONTANA GRILL

SUSHI

KIKU JAPANESE FUSION

kikufusion.com (850) 222-5458 3491 Thomasville Road, Ste. 12 *Various locations HONORABLE MENTION

MASA RESTAURANT

WINE LIST/WINE BAR

THE WINE LOFT WINE BAR facebook.com/ thewineloftwinebar (850) 222-9914 1240 Thomasville Road

HONORABLE MENTION

319 WINE AND CHEESE SHOPPE/ BISTRO and CLUSTERS & HOPS RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR

LUCILLA SANDWICH

TABLE 23

CAPITAL SEAFOOD MARKET

STEAKHOUSE

HOPKINS’ EATERY

hopkinseatery.com (850) 386-4258 1660 N. Monroe St. *Various locations HONORABLE MENTION

MERV’S MELT SHOP

WINGS SPORTS BAR

SALTY DAWG PUB AND DELI

(850) 562-6500 3813 N. Monroe St., Ste. 15 HONORABLE MENTION

ISLAND WING COMPANY GRILL & BAR

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ISLAND WING COMPANY GRILL & BAR islandwing.com (850) 692-3116 1370 Market St.

HONORABLE MENTION

SALTY DAWG PUB AND DELI

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BEST OF TALLAHASSEE

Service Providers CHILD CARE PROVIDER

GROWING ROOM TALLAHASSEE CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS BANQUET FACILITY

GOODWOOD MUSEUM & GARDENS

goodwoodmuseum.org (850) 877-4202 1600 Miccosukee Road HONORABLE MENTION

GOVERNORS CLUB

growingroomchildcare.com (850) 386-4769 1271 Metropolitan Blvd. *Various locations HONORABLE MENTION

LITTLE LAMBS PRESCHOOL

CHILDREN’S AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM

WEE CARE CHILD CARE CENTER Fellowshipbaptist.org (850) 562-0047 3705 N. Monroe St.

HONORABLE MENTION

CARPET CLEANER

AIR CONDITIONING/HEATING

KEITH LAWSON SERVICES, LLC Keithlawson.com (850) 562-2600 P.O. Box 37309

HONORABLE MENTION

BENSON’S HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING

ALTERATIONS

HELGA’S TAILORING AND ALTERATIONS tailoringtallahassee.com (850) 877-1266 2901 E. Park Ave., #2500 *Various locations HONORABLE MENTION

DESIGN ALTERATIONS

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ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY

ALLEGRO

allegroliving.com (850) 668-4004 HONORABLE MENTION

WESTMINSTER OAKS ACTIVE LIVING COMMUNITY

AUTO/BODY SHOP

TALLAHASSEE AUTO REPAIR (850) 574-6001 3690 Peddie Drive

HONORABLE MENTION

UNIVERSAL COLLISION CENTER

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

AUTOMOBILE DEALER

THE PROCTOR DEALERSHIPS ProctorHonda.com ProctorAcura.com ProctorSubaru.com (850) 576-5165 P.O.Box 230

HONORABLE MENTION

BOWDEN’S CARPET CLEANING & RESTORATION INC.

PRIME MERIDIAN BANK PrimeMeridianBank.com (850) 907-2372 1897 Capital Circle NE

HONORABLE MENTION

CAPITAL CITY BANK

CHIROPRACTOR

GENE E. JENKINS, JR., DC, PA

(850) 656-8224 2901 E. Park Ave., #1300

genejenkinschiro.com (850) 668-4057 1298 Timberlane Road

HONORABLE MENTION

HONORABLE MENTION

PRESTIGE CARPET CARE, LLC

LEGACY TOYOTA

BANK

GALLOP’S FAMILY CENTER, INC.

CELL PHONE AND COMPUTER REPAIR

IT NET GROUP, LLC itnetgroup.com (850) 893-5811 1815 Miccosukee Commons Drive, Ste. 106 HONORABLE MENTION

COMPUTER REPAIR DOCTOR

100% CHIROPRACTIC

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE AGENCY

COLDWELL BANKER HARTUNG AND NOBLIN, INC.

coldwellbankertallahassee.com (850) 386-6160 3303 Thomasville Road HONORABLE MENTION

NAI TALCOR


COUNSELING/THERAPIST

TALLAHASSEE PRIMARY CARE ASSOCIATES (TPCA) tallahasseeprimarycare.com (850) 297-0114 1803 Miccosukee Commons Drive HONORABLE MENTION

CAYER BEHAVIORAL GROUP

CREDIT UNION

FIRST COMMERCE CREDIT UNION FirstCommerceCU.org (850) 488-0035 *Various locations

HONORABLE MENTION

ENVISION CREDIT UNION and FSU CREDIT UNION

CUSTOMER SERVICE

ROWE ROOFING, INC. roweroofing.com (850) 386-7663 1843 Commerce Blvd.

HONORABLE MENTION

BENSON’S HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING

DANCE STUDIO

PHOTOS BY SAIGE ROBERTS (GOODWOOD MUSEUM) AND COURTESY OF OPTIONS BY E.T. INC.

TALLAHASSEE DANCE ACADEMY

tdadance.com (850) 893-3422 1409 Maclay Commerce Drive, #D HONORABLE MENTION

SHARON DAVIS SCHOOL OF DANCE

DAY SPA

BUMBLEBEE WAXING & MORE

bumblebeewaxing.com (850) 631-1868 359 N. Monroe St. HONORABLE MENTION

KANVAS

DENTAL PRACTICE

FAMILY PHYSICIAN PRACTICE

RUSSELL B. RAINEY, DMD

GYM/HEALTH CENTER

TALLAHASSEE PRIMARY CARE ASSOCIATES (TPCA)

drrainey.com (850) 385-3700 221 E. 7th Ave.

HONORABLE MENTION

CHANEY, COUCH AND ASSOCIATES

tallahasseeprimarycare.com (850) 297-0114 1803 Miccosukee Commons Drive HONORABLE MENTION

FINANCIAL ADVISOR

SIX PILLARS FINANCIAL ADVISORS

datfl.com (850) 877-4134 1714 Mahan Center Blvd HONORABLE MENTION

PAMELA S. KENNEDY, MD, PA

sixpillarsfa.com (850) 410-3568 3343 Thomasville Road *Various locations

HONORABLE MENTION

HAUTE HEADZ SALON

↑ INTERIOR DESIGN FIRM

OPTIONS BY E.T. INC.

hauteheadzsalon.com (850) 224-0414 1950 Thomasville Road

FITNESS STUDIO

THE REFINERY BARRE FITNESS STUDIOS

(850) 942-5919 1102 E. Lafayette St.

HONORABLE MENTION

O’BRIEN’S SHAMROCK CLEANERS

therefineryfitness.com (850) 999-8182 1817 Thomasville Road, Ste. 620

LAURA BRYANT DESIGN

CHELSEA SALON & SPA

LANDSCAPING/LAWN SERVICES

LAWSON & LAWSON ELECTRICAL SERVICES HONORABLE MENTION

WALSH CONSULTING & ELECTRIC SERVICES LLC

EVENT/WEDDING PLANNER

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THE NAUMANN GROUP REAL ESTATE, INC.

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BEST OF TALLAHASSEE

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Shopping

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GOODWOOD MUSEUM & GARDENS

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TALLAHASSEE NURSERIES

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nicstoggery.com (850) 222-0687 212 S. Monroe St.

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ESPOSITO GARDEN CENTER

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FURNITURE STORE

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PINK NARCISSUS lillynarcissus.com (850) 597-8201 1350 Market St., #100

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narcissusstyle.com (850) 668-4807 1408 Timberlane Road HONORABLE MENTION

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narcissusstyle.com (850) 668-4807 1408 Timberlane Road HONORABLE MENTION

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WalterGreenBoutique.com (850) 999-6105 1817 Thomasville Road HONORABLE MENTION

ELLE MARKET

MEN’S CLOTHING

NIC’S TOGGERY

nicstoggery.com (850) 222-0687 212 S. Monroe St.

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Entertainment CITY OF TALLAHASSEE PARKS, RECREATION & NEIGHBORHOOD AFFAIRS CASCADES PARK talgov.com (850) 891-3866 912 Myers Park Drive

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MICKEE FAUST CLUB

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SOUTHWOOD GOLF CLUB

southwoodgolf.com (850) 942-4653 3750 Grove Park Drive HONORABLE MENTION

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officialbrightside.com (850) 570-4156 HONORABLE MENTION

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TALLAHASSEE MUSEUM

tallahasseemuseum.org (850) 575-8684 3945 Museum Drive HONORABLE MENTION

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fifthandthomas.com (850) 391-9553 1122-1 Thomasville Road HONORABLE MENTION

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ENTERTAINMENT VENUE


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Abodes

NOV/DEC 2018

TRENDS FROM FLOOR TO CEILING, FRONT TO BACK

INTERIORS

HOLIDAY DÉCOR: MERRY & BRIGHT

How to maximize twinkle and fun through the New Year PHOTO BY TOM MERTON / OJO IMAGES

by ELIZABETH GOLDSMITH

GARDENING

Grow Vegetables and Herbs in Cool Comfort

|| EXTERIORS

A Cut Above

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abodes

Artificial greenery can give your bannister a spirited holiday boost.

H

omeowners who can’t decide whether to do nothing to their house or to go full out for the holidays can compromise through holiday décor that defines interior spaces while maximizing twinkle and fun. Decorations can add a sense of tradition and family — and a color punch — to your house or apartment. 128

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Look at the interior of your home and determine what is crying out for decoration. Maybe it is that plain oak staircase or fireplace mantle. For the mantle, remove those baseball trophies for a month and replace them with leaves, pinecones or brass. Use pumpkins for Thanksgiving. After that, go with candles, a Menorah and silver for Hanukkah, or the usual red and green for Christmas, followed by silver and gold for New Year’s Eve. For the staircase, use artificial greenery to wrap around the banister. For a party, consider having florists come in and work their magic. Put giant poinsettias at the base of the staircase or on the middle of a large coffee table. Don’t overlook the color of the plants and wrapping paper. If you have a turquoise, charcoal gray or lavender room, then white and silver work best. For most other color schemes, the traditional shiny gold, evergreen or red wrapping paper stands out. “Poinsettias come in all colors now, including purple and with blooms that look like roses,” said Jessica Martinez of Blossoms, a Tallahassee florist. “I still like greens and reds with white berries, but Christmas is wide open to do what you like — add some feathers. Boxwoods provide perfect fresh greenery that holds up well.”

PHOTOS BY TOM MERTON / OJO IMAGES (STAIRCASE) AND GOODMOMENTS / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS (PINE CONES)

Dressed for the Holidays


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abodes

polished wood floors make tree lights dazzle. And (below-right) if you use holiday scents in your home, coordinate them with tabletop options and decorative napkins. In items from land and sea, you’ll find endless possibilities for holiday decorating.

Check Shelves and Cupboards Experiment. Too often we leave decorative platters, silk flower arrangements and collectibles in the same places throughout the house. Bring out the Vietri from My Favorite Things or the Lenox china tucked high in a cupboard. Dust them off and group them in a new way. Holidays are all about sparkle and magical makeovers.

Get Inspiration from Sites, Scents Displays at gift stores, florist shops and nurseries can inspire. Walk through. See it, smell it and feel it. Visit historic Goodwood and the Knott House and notice their polished wood floors that let the tree lights dance and dazzle, setting the stage for large foilwrapped gifts. Also check out the Florida Historic Capitol Museum, which starts decorating for the holidays two days after Thanksgiving, said director Tiffany Baker. The museum aims to put visitors in the holiday spirit this year with a music series that for two weeks will feature school choirs on the steps of the museum at lunchtime, she said. The Historic Capitol decorations each year include some fake and lighted pieces. Trees on the front and back porches “provide the feeling of winter greenery with giant live poinsettias at the bottom of the stairs,” Baker said.

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For holiday scents, consider diffusers, said Gina Proctor, owner of Bedfellows. “You don’t light them, they last for six months or more, and the only thing you have to do is turn the wooden reeds around now and then,” Proctor said. “So, you can come home from a long day at work or after a weekend away and the bathroom smells wonderful.” The popular Fraser fir scent comes in diffusers, candles, room spray, dishwashing soap, all-purpose cleaner and hand wash. Bedfellows also has Nest Fragrances in three holiday scents available in a variety of candles and other products.    The gingerbread scent from Thymes is popular earlier in the winter, Proctor said, because people associate it with Thanksgiving, when they also go for Nest Fragrance Pumpkin Chai candles. Coordinate the scents with holiday table linens, tabletop options and decorative napkins. Don’t forget to dig into your linen closet for those festive Santa towels and boxes of guest soaps. 

The Lowly Foyer Becomes Luxurious Just like the tradition at the Historic Capitol, home decorations can be pulled in and out of boxes and stored each year. If neutral enough, keep them up for permanent display. Consider a large

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Celebrating a New Home, Family, Addition Maybe you have a new home and your household has gained new members, perhaps a puppy. Traditional touches lend a sense of permanence. Shoot for a delightful mix between old and new, his and hers, deep hues or light touches, classicist and modernist — and maybe a stocking for Fido. Emphasize twinkle and fun, and make it yours. Don’t ignore the holidays — do something. It will lift your spirits. TM

PHOTOS BY RYAN MCVAY / PHOTODISC (CHRISTMAS LIGHTS) AND OKSANA BONDAR / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS (TABLE)

↗ Get inspiration from how retailers and organizations do their holiday decorations and see how

crystal bowl or vase or a piece of milky quartz, perfect as a statement piece for the foyer or a formal dining room table. Quartz often serves as a base material to build countertops or other solid surfaces, but interior designers know how to include large chunks of it in design projects.  A display of high-quality crystal or milky quartz in a foyer or entrance will provide an unexpected but alluring presence. It can sit year-round unembellished on a tabletop or, for the holidays, on a mirrored finish or cloth base of red, green, bright blue, silver or gold. Milky quartz’s intrinsic sculptural and natural qualities add a touch of glamour to every space it occupies. The budding geologist in your family will appreciate it. For a do-it-yourself foyer, scavenge a branch from your backyard or make a simple arrangement from Christmas tree trimmings, real or artificial. For decorating, the possibilities are endless. Fill a large clamshell with shiny glass or silk-covered ornaments, or dress up a piece of driftwood with lights or ribbons. Another trick is to use houseplants and potted trees. Polish the leaves and move them around. There’s plenty for the innovative gardener to do during this happy time of year.


Warm wishes

for a joyous holiday season

Brian Barnard’s

Chris, Brian and JR Barnard

barnardsflooring-america.com 2731 Capital Circle NE Tallahassee, FL 850.386.8689

1501 E. Jackson St. Thomasville, GA 229.226.7438

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abodes Your Monthly Garden Chores

GARDENING

GROW VEGETABLES AND HERBS IN COOL COMFORT

NOVEMBER

COOL-WEATHER VEGETABLE GARDENING IS, in many ways, much more pleasant than toiling in the soil in high summer. The temperatures are more moderate, the bugs less abundant and the diseases less likely. Realize your cool-weather garden through these steps and guidelines: 1 SELECT A LOCATION. While you like a bit of afternoon shade for your summer garden, you’ll want full sun now. If you’re using raised beds or large pots, clean out debris from previous gardens and add new garden soil. If you’re gardening in the ground, get your soil tested (see Garden Chores).

2 PICK THE VEGETABLES AND HERBS that you and your family like to eat. Some popular coolseason vegetables are broccoli; cauliflower; Brussels sprouts; and garden peas, also called English peas; kohlrabi; and snow peas or other ediblepod peas. Transplants are available in most garden centers.

3 LETTUCES AND

OTHER SALAD GREENS can also be purchased at nurseries, but they’re grown easily from seed. If you choose to sow seeds, sow a row or section every week to ensure a continuous crop. The same is true for heartier greens, such as collards, mustard, turnip and kale.

4 IF YOU’RE NEW

5 BE PREPARED to cover your crop if a hard freeze is forecast. Most cool-season vegetables can take temperatures into the low 30s for an hour or two. In fact, collards taste better after they’ve been kissed by frost.

TO GARDENING FROM SEED, start with radishes, carrots and cool-season herbs such as parsley, sage, cilantro and dill. Follow the instructions on the seed packet. For radishes and carrots, make sure your soil is fine and loose so those edible roots can easily grow.

➸ Plant cool-season annuals for fall and winter color in the flowerbed: petunias, pansies, snapdragons, dianthus, violas and ornamental kales and cabbages. ➸ Sow seeds of springflowering annuals such as poppies, larkspur and bachelor’s buttons. Sow them across the soil, then rake them in. Keep moist until the seeds sprout and the plants are established. DECEMBER

➸ Plant pre-chilled tulips and hyacinths early in the month. ➸ Remember to bring frost-tender potted plants indoors if frost or a freeze is forecast and to protect tender plants in the ground.

PESKY PESTS

How can something so cute be so darned destructive?

Sciurus carolinensis, better known as the gray squirrel, will tear up your plantings to find food, to make holes to bury their purloined provisions and for fun. As humans continue to encroach on their wooded habitat, they remain savvy suburbanites. If you’re not going to eat them, don’t kill them. Simply outwit them: Wrap your flowering bulbs in a loose bundle made from chicken wire, which will protect them and give them room to multiply. Or plant your bulbs mixed with crushed gravel (bonus: improved drainage). Either way, don’t lay the bulbs on the ground as you prepare to plant; squirrels have a keen sense of smell, and you’re advertising the bulbs’ location. Sprinkle cayenne pepper on and around your plants; buy it in bulk in the Hispanic section of the grocery store. Put bird netting on your vegetable garden, berry plants and small fruit trees. Lay aluminum foil over the soil in your pots, poking holes for water to get through. Place birdfeeders at least 5 feet off the ground and 10 feet away from trees or other structures that squirrels can use as a launching pad. Grease your birdfeeder pole with oil or shortening. Or try feeding the squirrels on the other side of the yard. A well-fed squirrel GRAY SQUIRREL just might be too fat and happy to get into mischief. Well, we hope so.

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➸ If you buy or are gifted with a holiday potted plant, remember to take off the foil wrap around the plastic pot; it traps humidity and limits air flow around the soil line, encouraging mold and fungus. ©2015-2019 Postscript Publishing, all rights reserved. Audrey Post is a certified Advanced Master Gardener volunteer with the University of Florida IFAS Extension in Leon County. Email her at Questions@MsGrowItAll. com or visit her website at msgrowitall.com. Ms. Grow-It-All® is a registered trademark of PostScript Publishing Inc.

ILLUSTRATION BY BLUERINGMEDIA AND PHOTOS BY THE SILENT OBSERVER (GRAY SQUIRREL), KSENA32 (SNAPDRAGONS) AND LENA ZAJCHIKOVA (TULIP BULBS)/GETTYIMAGES PLUS

BY AUDREY POST, MS. GROW-IT-ALL®

➸ Get your soil tested. As you transition from warm-weather gardening to cool-weather gardening, your soil may have been depleted of certain nutrients and have excesses of others. Kits are available at your county extension office.


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abodes ↙

As you get your lawn ready for spring, consider what you want out of it. Maybe you want it to stay the same, or maybe you want to designate a spot for activities, such as badminton.

EXTERIORS

A CUT ABOVE

Things that you can do to get your yard ready for spring by ELIZABETH GOLDSMITH

A

t the heart of every yard is a beautiful, healthy lawn with green grass — cooling to the eyes, comfy for the feet — but then in winter, we watch it turn brown. We all enjoy a break from mowing, but we don’t want to neglect. Should we be watering or spreading fertilizer, and if so, how often? Should we use the time to fill in holes, re-sod or re-seed? It might be time to rethink what is the best grass for a sunny or shady yard.   What do the experts say?

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insects including those that are good for your yard, such as digger bees who are a sign of early spring. They are pollinators, living in little dirt piles that resemble mini mounds. The handbook also discusses maintenance for each type of lawn, plus pests including nematodes. “Winter is a great time to install a new lawn and a wonderful time to fix problems,” said Cathy Peters, longtime employee of Tallahassee Nurseries. She discussed the main types of grass for Tallahassee:

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Zoysiagrass, known for good weed

resistance because of thick, dense growth; 

Centipedegrass, which persists on less

St. Augustine grass, which undergoes

water but will wilt; moderate wilting. It likes water every one to two weeks. What problems might you encounter? Besides those already mentioned, watch for fungus, brown patches, turfgrass stress, tree roots, and damage from critters (armadillos, moles) and dogs.

PHOTO BY VIKTORCAP/ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

The bigger picture When getting your lawn ready for spring, consider what you want out of it. Do you want it to stay the same, or do you want a new spot for cornholing, horseshoes or badminton or maybe even adding a pool or a putting green? Maybe you like your front yard the way it is, but you want to revamp the back. Or, if the neighbors put in a tall fence on the side yard and your grass is dying, maybe it is time for a change there. For a dependable overview on lawns and grasses, get the Florida Lawn Handbook from the University of Florida IFAS Extension (tinyurl.com/yd7pdyrt). The handbook identifies grass types, weeds, diseases and


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AIR CONTROL HEATING AND COOLING

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abodes

Tiffany Hamilton, Owner/Broker PHONE 850.727.4743

PROTECTING PETS FOR 315 DOG YEARS. (850) 656-2856 | NORTHFLORIDA.INVISIBLEFENCE.COM

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Brown is the new black Our lawns are adapted to go dormant during cooler weather, so short-term wilted or brownish grass is normal. Zoysiagrass used to be considered kind of exotic and difficult to maintain, but the new varieties are quite hardy and insect resistant. It can be planted by seed, sod, plugs or sprigs. Forget the rules and guidelines of 20 years ago; the new varieties and mowers have shaken up firmly held beliefs about lawn care in our area. According to the Florida Lawn Handbook, the first fertilizer application for our area should come in mid-April and the last in September. Avoid too high of a nitrogen count (over 5 on the NPK on the package) in winter, as it will stress the grass. Nitrogen promotes fresh, new growth, which sounds good until a cold snap. Too much nitrogen sets the stage for poorer growth in the spring and greater problems with pests. “We are so lucky in North Florida because we can garden year-round, and in the winter it is cooler with fewer bugs, making it nicer to be outside,” Peters said. If the brown lawn gets you down, she suggests adding pops of color to the landscape with geraniums, petunias and violas. If you are having a lawn issue, call the Leon County Extension Office, check out the UF/IFAS online resources at ifas.ufl.edu/ or call established lawn services. Bottom line: If your lawn is properly maintained throughout the year (meaning irrigation, fertilization and mowing height), then its root system should get through winter. TM

PHOTO BY OATAWA/ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS AND COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY PRESS OF FLORIDA (BOOK)

Residential | Commercial | Investment Properties


Enjoy the beauty of healthy trees. Call AAA Tree Experts, Inc.

Firewood and Cooking Wood Available

SERVING TALLAHASSEE FOR 35 YEARS

Our Mission Our pledge to you, from AAA Tree Experts, Inc., is to offer the highest level of professionalism in all aspects of our tree service operations. From your initial phone contact, to your personal visit and consultation from one of our highly trained arborists all the way to the actual work being conducted by our highly trained crews, we want your experience to be positive and satisfying. Honesty and professionalism are extremely important to us. We will try our best to offer sound advice and never suggest services that are not necessary or beneficial.

FREE ESTIMATES CERTIFIED ARBORISTS

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HEATHER RYBAK “Be it ever so humble, there’s no place like home.” - John Howard Payne 850-692-3872

HRybak@RybakRealty.US

RybakRealty.US TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

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PROMOTION

DEAL ESTATE

JUST LISTED

Find Gated Privacy at Magnificent Moore Pond Estate Live life in grand Mediterranean-style in this custom-built, 7,000-square-foot palatial home. An award-winning Sater Design, it has been featured in numerous magazines and publications. Nestled in the exclusive Moore Pond subdivision and situated on the largest lot in the neighborhood, you’ll know you’ve arrived as you approach this stunning property. Generously proportioned rooms include a sizable master suite downstairs and full in-law/guest suite with kitchen upstairs. Also included are two family rooms on the main level and second story, which features a private custom theater room and sports room. A massive screen-enclosed outdoor entertainment area include lagoon pool and outdoor kitchen. Also notable is the abundant amount of storage, custom dog motel with fenced area and tennis court.

LIST PRICE: $1,875,000 ADDRESS: 6986 Heartland Circle SQUARE FOOTAGE: 7,059 BEDROOMS: 5 BATHROOMS: 5.5 YEAR BUILT: 2004

APPEAL: This is a great home for families that desire plenty of space to live and play. Spacious living and entertaining areas include recreational and theater room indoors. Outdoors, there is an awesome pool lanai area, tennis courts and ample space for pets, including a custom dog motel. Three-car garage with additional storage space. CONTACT INFORMATION: Kevin Davis, (850) 545-7244 KevinRealtor1@gmail.com

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE NAUMANN GROUP REAL ESTATE, INC.

FEATURES: Private 7-acre gated property within a gated subdivision; upgraded gourmet kitchen appliances, dramatic ceiling heights, millwork and lighting; lagoon pool and outdoor kitchen; tennis court


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PROMOTION

DEAL ESTATE

JUST SOLD

Own a piece of history at Luna Plantation This 14.7-acre property is the remainder of the old Luna Plantation, which was a quail hunting plantation. There is a main house, two guest houses and an outbuilding. The 14.7 acres have been subdivided into five lots (four vacant lots). Lots are ideal for building homes for extended family (for a family compound). Lots not being sold separately but will be an asset for new buyer.

SOLD PRICE: $825,000 ADDRESS: 1428 Manor House Drive SQUARE FOOTAGE: 3,574 BEDROOMS: 3 BATHROOMS: 3.5 YEAR BUILT: 1962

APPEAL: This property received multiple offers while listed. Additionally, there was a finalized backup offer in the event that the initial cash offer did not close. The kitchen was recently remodeled, marking a notable highlight for the property. It was initially sold to the current owners 33 years ago, before the presence of nearby shopping destinations. CONTACT INFORMATION: Cassandra Harbin, (850) 545-6661, CGHarbin1@aol.com

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PHOTOS BY 323 MEDIA

FEATURES: The two-story main house is 3,574 square feet and features original oak hardwood floors, beautiful fireplaces, large living room, oversized recently renovated kitchen, three bedrooms, 3.5 baths and nursery or sitting room next to upstairs master bedroom (also a downstairs master) and gorgeously paneled den/family room with built-in bookshelves. The larger guest house is 1,592 square feet, and the second guest house is 984 square feet (for an overall of 6,150 square feet). Features heritage live oaks, azaleas, camellias and spirea.


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REALTOR (850) 339-9830

A FULL-SERVICE REAL ESTATE GROUP

BUY, SELL, SEARCH WITH US | SERVING LEON COUNTY AND SURROUNDING AREAS 3520 Thomasville Road — Fifth floor | Tallahassee, FL 32309 | (850) 222-3075 |

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LAWSON & LAWSON Electrical Services, Inc.

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#1 in Tallahassee since 1979

CRS, CDPE, SFR, e-PRO, GRI, ABR, CHMS, WCR | Home Economist, Broker/Owner

Mobile & Text: 850.545.9390 | JOAN@JOANRALEY.COM | JoanRaley.com Canopy

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Call “The Good Guys” Today!

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850-562-4111 www.LLElectrical.com * All information provided is deemed reliable but not guaranteed

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ONLY 22 PRE SALE AND 8 SPEC HOMES REMAINING OF 110 AVAILABLE IN THE 1ST PHASE

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Your Home away from Home...

Only Better With low weekly rates starting at $900, there’s no question that Northwest Florida is where you should spend your winter. ResortQuest by Wyndham Vacation Rentals offers everything from one-bedroom condos to large homes for the whole family from Perdido Key to Panama City Beach. Don’t wait to get back to the emerald waters and white sand. RQWinterGuests.com | 888-974-0539

Low monthly rate mentioned based upon travel dates of October 15, 2016 through March 15, 2017 when you stay 45 consecutive nights or more. Rates from $900USD for a 1-bedroom condo at Gulfview and Nantucket. Prices vary by destination and accommodation type. Additional restrictions apply. Offer is based on availability. Deposit Required. Fla. Seller of Travel Reg. No. ST-38182. Washington Seller of Travel Reg. No. 603118961. Wyndham Vacation Rentals and related marks are registered trademarks and/or service marks in the United States and internationally. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. 14 Sylvan Way, Parsippany, NJ 07054 / ©2017 Wyndham Vacation Rentals North America, LLC.

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GETAWAY

City and Country

|| QUICK TRIP

Discovering Dolphins

destinations

NOC/DEC 2018

VISITING NOTEWORTHY PLACES NEAR AND FAR

↘ Train station on Broad Street in Nashville, Tennessee

PHOTO BY JODIJACOBSON / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

GETAWAY

CITY AND COUNTRY

Nashville and environs celebrate the past by JACK MACALEAVY

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destinations

I

f you have not been to Nashville on a pleasure trip in the past five years, then finish reading this magazine, jump on the internet and schedule a long weekend as soon as you can get away. The Music City has kicked up its appeal a few notches. And Middle Tennessee, the one-hour drive market surrounding Nashville, provides a wonderful divergence from city life with historical sites, a laid-back pace and its rolling hills. Nashville, long an iconic tourist destination, now provides for a more in-depth and interactive experience. Make the Country Music Hall of Fame your first stop. In a half day, it will familiarize you with the history of country music from its beginnings 100-plus years ago to the hot stars of today. A 20-minute film supplies images and sounds that will send you down memory lane. My visit to

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↑ The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, seen here from the outside and from the catwalk inside, takes you from the origins of country music to the stars of today. A visitor easily could spend a few hours here. The exhibit includes a 20-minute film that captures the history of the genre.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM (LEFT AND BOTTOM RIGHT) / DOVE-WEDDING-PHOTOGRAPHY (LEFT TOP) AND DONN JONES (LEFT BOTTOM) AND TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF TOURIST DEVELOPMENT (TOP AND MIDDLE RIGHT) / CHRIS HOLLO (TOP RIGHT)

the Hall of Fame coincided with a Shania Twain special exhibit. A short bus ride carries you from the Hall of Fame to Studio B, where thousands of recording sessions have taken place among artists, including Elvis Presley, Santana, Jerry Lee Lewis, Dolly Parton and Roy Orbison. Two new museums have opened downtown. They showcase in detail the personal histories of country legends Johnny Cash and Patsy Cline. See their personal letters and possessions while listening to the throaty ballads of Cash and the sweet personal stories of Patsy. Her story and climb to fame drive home the message that country music is the stories of peoples’ lives — the joys, loves and sorrows. You must drop by the Mother Church of country music and home to the Grand Ole Opry for several decades, the Ryman Auditorium. Definitely take the time to watch the video that summarizes the

NASHVILLE

↑ The Ryman Auditorium, designed more than a century ago as a house of worship, served for several decades as the home to the Grand Ole Opry, whose stage has hosted megastars including Bruce Springsteen and Taylor Swift. ← Elvis Presley records on his first day in historic RCA Studio B, a key stop on a trip to Nashville.

history of the 125-year-old church that evolved into a national landmark whose stage has hosted legends of the past and the mega-stars of today — names like Bruce Springsteen and Taylor Swift. It is said that if one gets to play music at Ryman, TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

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destinations

↑ The Music City Center is a centerpiece of downtown Nashville. The city hails the 2.1-millionsquare-foot facility as an economic driver in its role as a convention center. ↓ The historic home of Sam Davis, who was hanged and hailed as a hero for his refusal to provide a source of information to Union soldiers.

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he or she has “arrived” and has become a member of a very exclusive club. Nashville is also home to the Musicians Hall of Fame that showcases many not-so-well-known musicians who have played behind the stars and are the backbone of many of the greatest recordings of all time. The museum is still expanding. Rent a car for a couple days and depart the city. Forty-five minutes away, you can experience the history that is tucked away in the hills of Middle Tennessee. One of the the bloodiest battles of the Civil War, the Battle of Stones River began on New Year’s Eve 1862. In three days, 81,000 soldiers engaged in hand-to-hand combat that left 23,000 dead. At a 650acre park, visitors walk the same tree lines that the combatants traveled. Take the guided tour and a park ranger will make you feel like an observer of history. This was, for me, the most significant experience of the trip. Down the road, drop by Oakland Mansion, the plantation home of

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

the Manley family who somehow survived even though their home and property were occupied by both Union and Confederate soldiers at different times during the war. Continue on a rolling two-lane highway to the historic home of Sam Davis who, at the age of 21, was taken by Union soldiers and subsequently hanged because he would not give up the source of information that was found on his person at capture. He was considered a hero by both sides for his courage and integrity. Arrive in Lynnville at the home of Colonel Littleton and see his classic retail store and stock of handmade leather goods known throughout the world. His creations often become family heirlooms. If you are lucky enough to meet him, engage him in some conversation and get to know the face of a company.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF NASHVILLE CONVENTION & VISITORS CORPORATION (MUSIC HALL OF FAME), TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF TOURIST DEVELOPMENT / PHIL CICERO (SAM DAVIS HOME) AND VISIT FRANKLIN (PUCKETT’S, SHOPPING, AND DOWNTOWN)

← At Puckett’s Grocery and Restaurant in Leiper’s Fork, Tennessee, you never know who might show up to do a performance. It’s among just four or five storefronts in the town, which is a short drive from Nashville. ↓ About 15 minutes from Leiper’s Fork, great shopping and dining await on the nationally recognized Main Street of Franklin, Tennessee.

Close out your visit with a couple hours shopping in downtown Franklin on the nationally recognized Main Street. Great shopping, dining and artisanal goods line this classic Americana experience. Just about 15 minutes outside Franklin, the tiny town of Leiper’s Fork is home to just four or five storefronts, one of which is 1892 Restaurant with its lawn chair theater. Chef Dylan Morrison provides a memorable culinary experience with food from local farmers. You can have a real down-to-earth experience with the local farm owners who surround this small village. Next door is Puckett’s Grocery, a food and music venue where you never know who might step up to do a short performance. The likes of Justin Timberlake and Sheryl Crow blend in, leaving their celebrity back in Nashville. TM TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

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A DIFFERENT KIND OF LAW FIRM

850.222.3232 150

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PLAY • SHOP • DINE • STAY

at the Forgotten

Coast

BETSY’S SUNFLOWER

Events Calendar

“FUNCTIONAL, AFFORDABLE AND FUN” … BEST DESCRIBES BETSY’S SUNFLOWER KITCHEN STORE & MORE, located at 268 Water Street in the heart of Apalachicola’s Historic Bowery District. Originally opened by Betsy Doherty in 1994 (YES, there really is a Betsy), Betsy’s Sunflower is where you’ll find the widest selection of unique gifts and necessities for the kitchen, garden, gourmet and home in Apalachicola. This colorful shop is overflowing with unique items for everyone on your holiday gift list: kitchenware, barware, barbecue accessories, table linens, gourmet goodies, gardener’s gifts and so much more. You’ll find well-known lines like Vietri, Nora Fleming Ceramics and brightly colored SCOUT bags, alongside one-of-a-kind treasures from small producers and artisans around the globe. Delectable gourmet products are sampled daily at Betsy’s, and an irresistible selection of holiday sweets, scrumptious chocolates and unique stocking stuffers have been carefully chosen to tempt you! Betsy and the rest of her friendly staff are always happy to assist you in finding that perfect gift, and their beautiful holiday gift wrapping is always free. Look for their signature bright yellow bags all over town and follow them along the waterfront to 268 Water Street. Betsy’s Sunflower is the fun place to shop this holiday season in Apalachicola!

FRANKLIN COUNTY Apalachicola Downtown Christmas Celebration Nov. 23 Apalachicola Riverfront Park, Water Street Panhandle Players presents ‘Secrets & Sweet Tea’ Nov. 30, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 2, 3–5 p.m. Chapman Auditorium, 155 Ave. E, Apalachicola Jingle Jog Carrabelle 5k Run/Walk Dec. 1, 8:30–10 a.m. Franklin County Senior Center, 201 NW Ave. F, Carrabelle Panhandle Players presents ‘A Nice Family Christmas’ Dec. 7–9 Chapman Auditorium, 155 Ave. E, Apalachicola Holiday on the Harbor & Boat Parade of Lights Dec. 8, 6–8 p.m. Carrabelle Visitor Center, 105 St. James Ave., Carrabelle Living Shorelines Dec. 12, 2–4 p.m. Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve Nature Center, Eastpoint All Brass Christmas Concert Dec. 16, 4–5 p.m. Apalachicola Trinity Episcopal Church, Apalachicola

APALACHICOLA DOWNTOWN CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION NOV. 23 The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce presents the APALACHICOLA CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION. The historic town of Apalachicola lights up the day after Thanksgiving from 4–8 p.m. The streets will be lined with luminaries and filled with holiday spirit. Merchants will be open late and the sounds of carolers will echo through the streets filling the evening with the holiday spirit. Santa will arrive via shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at Riverfront Park on Water Street. He will be at the park to hear all the children’s Christmas wishes. The Orman and Raney houses will be decorated and open for tours. The staff of the Apalachicola Chamber of Commerce will be giving out hotdogs for all the children who come to visit Santa. Join us for an old-fashioned Christmas celebration!

GULF COUNTY Christmas Parade - Port St. Joe Dec. 8 Williams Ave., Port St. Joe WAKULLA COUNTY Coastal Optimist Club of Wakulla Fashion Show Nov. 15 Wakulla Community Center, Crawfordville Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla’s Annual Chili Cook-off Nov. 16 Wakulla County Community Center, Crawfordville NOTE: Because of the effects of Hurricane Michael along the Florida coast, some events are subject to change.

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TALLAHASSEE’S COASTAL REAL ESTATE CONNECTION

VISIT THE

1

Melissa Spear REALTOR® (850) 879-0687 Weichert Realtors, The H2 Group

BETSY’S SUNFLOWER

Betsy Doherty

The kitchen store and more since 1994! Gifts and necessities for the kitchen, garden, home and gourmet. We offer free gift wrap.

L

ives and businesses are being rebuilt along the Forgotten Coast after the devastating effects of Hurricane Michael in early October. As the healing process continues, please lend your support to this region and remind them that they are never forgotten by their friends and neighbors.

(850) 653-1023 268 Water St., Apalachicola 2

8

DOC MYERS’ PUB & SPORTS BAR

Come out to Doc Myers’ tiki bar in paradise! Hang out with people of all ages to watch your favorite sports team, play trivia or try your hand at cornhole in the yard. Nightly music, happy hours and a wide range of food and beverages in beautiful beach surroundings. Open seven days a week. Oyster happy hour Mon.–Fri. from 3–4 p.m. (850) 799-1930, docmyersislandpub.com 36 W. Pine Ave., St. George Island 3

A distinctive upscale atmosphere for the 21+ crowd with quiet dining. Offering extensive martini and wine lists, signature cocktails and expanded menu of lunch and dinner plates. Come in to experience Chef Richard’s creative combinations of ingredients and excellent tableside service. Open Tuesday–Saturday. (850) 653-4888, upthestairs.me 76 Market St., Suite F, Apalachicola

Serving Tallahassee residents who are buying or selling a second home or investment property on the Forgotten Coast.

Forgotten Coast

UP THE STAIRS

15

9

MEXICO BEACH

4 15

St. Joseph Peninsula State Park

1

PORT ST. JOE

St. Joseph Bay

11 APALACHICOLA

GULF SPECIMEN AQUARIUM

A unique experience to get up close with sharks, sea turtles, starfish, octopus and other sea life from the Gulf of Mexico. One of the largest touch tanks exhibits in the U.S. Open Mon.–Fri. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. and Sat.–Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

Cape San Blas

5 St. Vincent Island

Apalachicola Bay

(850) 984-5297 gulfspecimen.org 222 Clark Drive, Panacea 4

HOLE IN THE WALL

5

Family-owned and operated raw bar serving the world’s best oysters with a full menu of Gulf of Mexico seafood, including fried shrimp, grouper and crab. Also serving kids items and daily specials. Open Tuesday through Saturday in downtown Apalachicola. (850) 653-3222 23 Ave. D, Apalachicola

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INDIAN PASS GENERAL STORE

There’s a pristine spot reserved for your next RV adventure at the edges of Indian Lagoon! An old-timey general store on-site sells local merchandise and stocks a supply of grocery items and spirits. Visit us online to reserve. Located across from worldfamous Indian Pass Raw Bar! (850) 229-8600, watersedgervpark.net 8300 County Road 30A, Port St. Joe

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6

LYNN’S QUALITY OYSTERS

Enter as strangers, leave as friends at this familyowned and operated raw bar and local seafood market. Dine in or on the back deck. Open seven days. Bar is closed Sunday, but you can still buy fresh catch! (850) 670-8796, lynnsqualityoysters.com 402 Highway 98, Eastpoint


14 ST. GEORGE ISLAND TRADING COMPANY

13

SGI Trading Company has everything you need to go to the beach. Buy a new bathing suit, T-shlrts by Simply Southern and Salt Life and beach toys for the kids at this one-stop shop. (850) 927-2252 101 Franklin Blvd., St. George Island

ST. GEORGE ISLAND REALTY

12

St. George Island Realty was established in 2002 and is locally owned. Contact our educated and seasoned professionals to help you find your next investment property, building site or beautiful island home. (800) 344-7570, sgirealty.com 139 E. Gulf Beach Drive, St. George Island

CRAWFORDVILLE

LIVE OAK POINT PANACEA

Apalachee Bay

3 Ochlockonee Bay

LANARK VILLAGE

6

ALLIGATOR POINT

10

12

13 7

7

14

St. George Island

2

TALLAHASSEE

12

THE NAUMANN GROUP

Your local real estate experts with decades of experience — ready to help you find your perfect beach getaway. Look for the company Tallahassee knows and trusts! (850) 799-1230, 139 W. Gulf Beach Drive, St. George Island

11 ROBINSON REAL ESTATE COMPANY

The company that introduced you to the thrill of Florida fishing can help make Florida’s Forgotten Coast your next vacation spot or permanent home. Offering fully furnished vacation rentals and residential or commercial properties. Let us show you why it’s a great place to visit, and an even better place to live! (850) 653-1653 44 Ave. E, Apalachicola

9

8

RED PIRATE GRILL

Make this family-owned sports bar featuring mini golf your first stop for fun! With good food, grog, plus a game room, there’s something for everyone! Crab legs and oysters on the half shell served nightly and live entertainment by its house band on Fridays. Open seven days. Mini golf discount with any meal. (850) 670-1090, redpirategrill.com 236 Highway 98, Eastpoint

Dog Island

EASTPOINT

This new, lively beach lounge features a menu inspired by the flavors of Mexico and Latin America. Its house-made infusions using fruit are showcased in its signature cocktails and seasonal sauces. Every day is Taco Tuesday, and desserts change daily! Open Tuesday–Saturday 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Sunday 12–8 p.m. (850) 927-2222, stgeorgecantina.com 37 E. Pine Ave., St. George Island

10

CARRABELLE

ST. GEORGE CANTINA

THE NAUMANN GROUP

Your local real estate experts from Tallahassee thru to the Emerald Coast. Located next to Shades Restaurant at 30A. (850) 933-0328 10952 E. County Hwy 30A, Inlet Beach

OYSTER CITY BREWING CO.

Sample award-winning local beers on the most social street corner in town! Enjoy handcrafted beers from 12 taps of brewery staples and rotating seasonals. Sit in the open air and enjoy the sights and sounds of lovely Apalachicola, or sip your beers on the brewery floor and watch our fine folks create the only local beer on the Forgotten Coast. Growlers and crowlers available to go. Open seven days, starting at noon. (850) 653-2739, oystercitybrewingco.com 17 Ave. D, Apalachicola

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QUICK TRIP

Discovering Dolphins

SeaWorld visitors swim with the fishes — and marine mammals by JACK MACALEAVY

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SEAWORLD PARKS & ENTERTAINMENT™

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spent 30 memorable minutes in close proximity to one of the natural world’s sweetest, smartest and most beautiful creatures. The federal Marine Mammal Protection Act prohibits touching or feeding dolphins in the wild, but at SeaWorld’s Discovery Cove, visitors slip hands over dolphins’ smooth skin, flip fish into their mouths full of oddly conical teeth and may even grab a dorsal fin and enjoy something of a Nantucket sleigh ride. Two handlers are close by and prepared to answer any and all questions about the care, feeding and biology of the bottlenose dolphin, whose eyes were enough to melt my heart. Discovery Cove accommodates up to 1,200 people a day, no more. Your entry fee includes breakfast, lunch, a snack, towels and a chair to chill in when you are not snorkeling among 50 brilliantly colored varieties of fish, holding a parrot or a cockatoo or checking out the frolicking otters. Because total attendance on a given day is limited, one need not worry about being overrun by people in ways that you might experience at other theme parks. The cost for a day at the venue varies depending upon the level of the encounter you choose, but everyone departs Discovery Cove feeling that they got their money’s worth. Accommodations options are abundant along International Federal law prohibits Drive, the main artery in Orlando’s the touching of dolphins in the wild, entertainment district. If you are but that’s not so at visiting SeaWorld, a preferred SeaWorld’s Discovery Cove, where visitors destination is the newly renovated get an up-close DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel experience with them. The entry fee Orlando. Located on a large 28includes a chair in acre campus, this hotel is within which to relax, plus the chance to hold comfortable walking distance to exotic birds or check a stop where you can board a out frolicking otters. TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

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tram bound for SeaWorld’s Discovery Cove. Leave your care at the hotel and you will save a lot of time otherwise spent driving and parking; at the height of tourist season, getting in and out of SeaWorld can be a wee frustrating. The DoubleTree by Hilton comprises a high-rise tower and also a traditional two-story building where you can park right outside your room. All 1,020 guest rooms have been renovated and updated to provide for a luxury-hotel experience. Available are PURE Allergy Free Rooms wherein a seven-step process removes 99 percent of air pollutants with special airhandling units.

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Hotel amenities include two massive swimming pools surrounded by palm trees, and a recreation center where children enjoy a variety of games and activities. Food options abound. The centrally located Sonoma Lobby Bar offers signature drinks and small plates. The Laguna restaurant serves a breakfast buffet each day and specializes in an allday menu with a variety of appetizers, salads, signature sandwiches, steak and seafood. Ideal for families. Drop in at The Market for

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Starbucks coffee and quick bites, including pastries and sandwiches. Pets (under 25 pounds) are welcome at this spectacular, family-friendly destination which is well-suited for getaways, reunions or even weddings. Several room packages are available at this moderately priced hotel property located just a few minutes off Interstate I-4 at the west end of International Drive adjacent to the Orange County Convention Center. And, yes, the complimentary cookies are yummy. TM

COURTESY OF DOUBLETREE BY HILTON HOTEL ORLANDO AT SEAWORLD

DoubleTree by Hilton, near a tram to SeaWorld’s Discovery Cove park, features 1,020 guest rooms that have been renovated, and amenities include two massive swimming pools, plus complimentary cookies.


Don’t settle. Make it memorable. You deserve a getaway that’s better than OK.

Iconic attractions, outdoor adventures, award-winning restaurants, modern and sleek hotels and convenient access, all just 10 miles from Atlanta.

Start planning at cvbdunwoody.com TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

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PROMOTION

DECEMBER 8–9

TALLAHASSEE BALLET | The Nutcracker The Tallahassee Ballet presents one of the holiday season’s most treasured and adored traditions — The Nutcracker. From the Dew Drop Fairy and the Rat King to the handsome Prince and dancing Snowflakes, this production is truly extravagant. Performances will be held at Ruby Diamond Concert Hall with live music from The Tallahassee Ballet Orchestra.

For tickets, visit GetNutcrackerTickets.com or call (850) 224-6917.

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PHOTOS BY LAWRENCE DAVIDSON (BEST OF TALLAHASSEE), LOIS GREENFIELD (OPENING NIGHTS), ALAN64 / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS (CORKS) AND COURTESY OF TALLAHASSEE TURKEY TROT, JUNIOR LEAGUE OF TALLAHASSEE AND MEAGAN HELMAN (TALLAHASSEE BALLET)

PROMOTION

NOV/DEC 2018 For more events in Tallahassee, visit TallahasseeMagazine.com. compiled by KIM HARRIS THACKER and SARA SANTORA

NOVEMBER 1

BEST OF TALLAHASSEE → The 20th annual Best of Tallahassee event celebrates

the community’s best of the best, as voted by the readers of Tallahassee Magazine. The top two winning businesses or organizations from more than 100 categories will be announced live throughout the evening. Come enjoy decadent fare, specialty cocktails, live music and more while celebrating all that makes Tallahassee the best place to call home. Visit 850tix.com/events/best-of-tallahassee for tickets.

JANUARY 12

OPENING NIGHTS PARSONS DANCE COMPANY → Internationally renowned for its

energized, athletic ensemble work, the contemporary dance company and New York-based Parsons Dance Company will perform works selected from its vast and varied repertory of pieces created by David Parsons. Parsons has been heralded by The New York Times as “one of the great movers of modern dance.” With Parsons’ commitment to providing opportunities for more people to experience the wonders of dance, the company will perform a sensoryfriendly performance at 2 p.m., as well as its traditional, evening performance at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 12.

All tickets for the matinee are $10. Tickets for the evening performance are $12 to $50. Purchase tickets online at OpeningNights.FSU.edu or call (850) 644-6500.

NOVEMBER 28

ANDREW’S DOWNTOWN | CORKS & FORKS → Andrew’s Downtown hosts a delicious night of wine and tapas-style

food pairings downstairs in its new social setting — The Private Rooms at Andrew’s. Executive Chef Matt Varn will create an eclectic tasting menu to complement the night’s spectacular selection of wines. This night will be a casual gathering, so bring friends and meet new ones. Tickets can be purchased at 850tix.com/organizations/andrew-s-downtown

NOVEMBER 22

Tallahassee Turkey Trot → On Thanksgiving Day, thousands of hungry but grateful

runners will meet for the 2018 Tallahassee Turkey Trot, hosted by the Gulf Winds Track Club. Whether you want to run or walk, participants can choose from four courses — a 1 mile fun run/ walk, a 5k, 10k or 15k. Don’t miss the Turkey Trot Festival on Nov. 18, which is a fun way to register for the race while enjoying live music and fitness displays for the whole family.

Visit tallyturkeytrot.com for more information.

JANUARY 11

JUNIOR LEAGUE OF TALLAHASSEE | Sunshine State Ball → Hosted by the Junior League of Tallahassee at the Donald L. Tucker Civic Center during Florida’s inauguration week, the Sunshine

State Ball will host guests from around Florida, welcoming them to the Capital City to enjoy a black-tie dinner and live entertainment. All proceeds support JLT’s mission of improving the lives of children and families. To learn more, visit SunshineStateBall.com. 850tix.com/events/sunshine-state-ball TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

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NATIVE AMERICAN FESTIVAL

MUSIC | DANCES | CRAFT VENDORS | STORYTELLING ARCHERY | ASTRONOMY & MORE!

Florida’s Apalachee-Spanish Living History Museum 2100 West Tennessee Street, Tallahassee | 850.245.6406 | missionsanluis.org Adults $5

Seniors $3

Children 6-17 $2

160 November–December 2018 TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM Mission San Luis is administered by the Florida Department of State. Program support is provided by the Friends of Florida History, Inc.


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FLORIDA SEAFOOD FESTIVAL NOV. 2-3 Seafood lovers delight as the historic town of Apalachicola celebrates Gulf seafood served in all forms and varieties. The festival features seafood vendors, oyster eating and oyster shucking contests, a parade, the 5K Redfish Run, arts and crafts, musical entertainment and more. Floridaseafoodfestival.com

6TH ANNUAL FLORIDA TAP INVITATIONAL NOV. 2-3 Beer enthusiasts unite to enjoy two days of craft beers from throughout North Florida. Purchase of a general admission ticket provides admission to a Friday night kickoff party in CollegeTown. On Saturday, Proof Brewing will host the main event, a festival featuring over 40 handpicked Florida craft breweries pouring over 100 rare beers. Floridatapinvitational.com

THE MUSIC MAN NOV. 2-11 The Young Actors Theatre presents the awardwinning classic, “The Music Man.” The performance will delight with its original musical score, dynamic choreography, marching bands and family-friendly entertainment. Youngactorstheatre.com

NORTH FLORIDA FAIR

PHOTO COURTESY OF TALLAHASSEE MUSEUM

NOV. 8-18 Dizzying rides, tasty food, lively entertainment, children’s attractions, agriculture and more will be on display at the 76th annual North Florida Fair. Northfloridafair.com

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

PLANTATION WILDLIFE ARTS FESTIVAL NOV. 10-18 This festival, at various locations in and near Thomasville, pairs the community’s cultural history with great wildlife artists and art collectors. The main event, the Fine Art Show and Sale, takes place Nov. 17–18 at the Thomasville Center for the Arts. The festival also includes wildlife exhibitions, dinners, concerts, the Red Hills Rover Rally and Afternoon In The Field, featuring a concert by local acts. The popular Bird Dog Bash, held on Nov. 17 at the Sugar Hill Barn, is for ages 21 and over. Pwaf.org

LINDSAY LOU NOV. 12-13 Opening Nights Performing Arts presents Lindsay Lou and her band, which calls Nashville home. The band promotes its album “Ionia,” which showcases Lindsay Lou’s expansive range and the band’s bluegrass groove. Openingnights.fsu.edu

ANDREW’S DOWNTOWN CORKS & FORKS WINE FOOD PAIRING EVENT NOV 14 Andrew’s is a prime gathering spot for friends, families legislators, students, football fans and visitors from near and far. Come for a delicious night of wine and tapas-style food pairings downstairs in a social setting in The Private Rooms at Andrew’s.Executive Chef

Matt Varn will create an eclectic tasting menu to complement the night’s spectacular selection of wines. This is a casual gathering — bring friends and meet new ones! Tickets can be purchased at 850tix.com/organizations/ andrew-s-downtown

ANTHONY TRIONFO, FLUTE NOV. 15 Opening Nights welcomes Anthony Trionfo, a talented young flutist. Trionfo has performed at the Kennedy Center, New York City’s Merkin Concert Hall and numerous orchestras. He won first prize at the 2016 Young Concert Artists International Auditions.

LOUISE PENNY, NO. 1 NYTIMES BESTSELLING MYSTERY AUTHOR READING

TALLAHASSEE MUSIC GUILD’S SING-ALONG MESSIAH CONCERT

NOV. 27

The Tallahassee Music Guild invites audience members to sing along to Handel’s “Messiah.” All attendance proceeds will provide scholarships for FSU and FAMU music students. A reception with refreshments and caroling will follow.

New York Times No. 1 Bestselling mystery author Louise Penny will hold a reading and conversation at Tallahassee’s Midtown Reader bookstore — her first stop on her “Kingdom of the Blind” tour. The first 150 ticket holders will be invited to a VIP signing and photo opportunity. MidtownReader.com

Openingnights.fsu.edu

THE TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY CHORUS PRESENTS EXULTATION NOV. 18 Begin the holiday season with exultation as the Tallahassee Community Chorus celebrates its 31st season with two of Baroque’s most-loved choral pieces — Bach’s “Magnificat in D major” and “Handel’s Messiah.” The performance will culminate with the “Hallelujah” chorus and the ushering in of the holiday spirit.

↑ 53RD ANNUAL MARKET DAYS DEC. 1-2 Tallahassee boasts one of the Southeast’s largest and best-juried craft shows with art from over 300 vendors. Art, furniture, ceramics, woodwork, jewelry, clothing, photography and more fill the fairgrounds. This event is a major fundraiser for the Tallahassee Museum and provides a great opportunity to buy cherished holiday gifts.

DEC. 4

Tallahasseearts.org

MANDY HARVEY DEC. 6 Opening Nights presents jazz singer and songwriter Mandy Harvey. She lost her hearing at age 18, but she hasn’t let that stop her pursuit of music. In 2017, she appeared on “America’s Got Talent” and earned Golden Buzzer status. Openingnights.fsu.edu

TALLAHASSEE SYMPHONY SOCIETY DEC. 7-8

A Tallahassee holiday tradition crafted for those who love giving unique gifts. Shop handmade works of art available from many local vendors.

A winter wonderland takes over Tallahassee with a night of twinkling lights, Christmas tunes, holiday treats, food vendors, children’s activities, the lighting of the trees at the Chain of Parks, the Jingle Bell Run and the City of Tallahassee Nighttime Holiday Parade.

The Tallahassee Symphony Society will again raise money for the Tallahassee Symphony Orchestra through its annual Tour of Homes. Houses will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days. Guides in each room will share interesting facts about the rooms and their contents. All homes will be decorated for the holidays, and live and recorded seasonal music will be provided. Cost of each ticket is $25, and they can be purchased from TSS members, the TSO office, Tallahassee Nurseries on Thomasville Road, Native Nurseries on Centerville Road and Esposito Garden Center on Capital Circle NE. TSS has raised over $800,000 for the symphony over the past 25 years.

Lemoyne.org

talgov.com/parks/parks-winter.aspx

tallahasseesymphony.org

Tcchorus.org

WINTER FESTIVAL DEC. 1

LEMOYNE ARTS 55TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY SHOW NOV. 23

Details of listings can change at the last minute. Please call ahead of time to confirm.

tallahasseemuseum.org/ marketdays/about

HAVE AN EVENT YOU’D LIKE US TO CONSIDER? Send an email to preinwald@rowlandpublishing.com.

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PROMOTION

DECEMBER 6–23

Emerald Coast Theatre Company Presents

It’s A Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play by Joe Landry → This beloved American holiday classic comes to life as a live 1940s radio broadcast. With the help of an ensemble that brings dozens of characters to the stage — plus live, onstage sound effects — the story of idealistic George Bailey unfolds one fateful Christmas Eve as he considers a world in which he’d never been born.

Visit EmeraldCoastTheatre.org or call (850) 684-0323 for more information.

REGIONAL

DECEMBER 8

WAKULLA COUNTY TOURISM DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY → Join us for a Wakulla County tradition — Christmas

in Sopchoppy! Come enjoy Christmas music as you visit with area food vendors and local arts and crafts retailers, featuring festive seasonal merchandise. And don’t forget a special visit from Santa Claus, who will pop in for a few hours to spend time with area children.

TALLAHASSEE BALLET’S THE NUTCRACKER DEC. 8-9 Treat yourself and your loved ones to one of the holiday season’s most treasured performances, The Tallahassee Ballet’s The Nutcracker featuring a live orchestra at Ruby Diamond Concert Hall. Performances are Saturday, Dec. 8, at 10:30 a.m. (Children’s abbreviated performance), Saturday, Dec. 8, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 9, at 2:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased on our website or by calling 850-224-6917, ext. 21. getnutcrackertickets.com

SOWETO GOSPEL CHOIR DEC. 11 The two-time Grammy-wining Soweto Gospel Choir brings their tour “Songs of the Free” to Tallahassee. This vibrant program celebrates the birth and life of Nelson Mandela, including South African classics, freedom songs and gospel music. Uplift your soul and spirit through South African music and dance. Openingnights.fsu.edu

THE BAREFOOT MOVEMENT DEC. 13 Nashville-based The Barefoot Movement presents soulful Southern acoustic tunes that encourage you to relax, kick off your shoes and stay a while. For the holiday season, the group has pulled together a mix of holiday classics from the jazzy “Run Run Rudolph” to the tender “O Holy Night.” Openingnights.fsu.edu

VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS REGIONAL

JANUARY 18-21

30A Songwriters Festival

→ More than 5,000 music lovers come together over Martin Luther King Jr. weekend to attend this

unique four-day music extravaganza. The festival will feature over 175 songwriters and musicians performing original songs in various genres, ranging from country and Americana to blues and soul — all held in over 30 dedicated listening rooms on historic Highway 30A in South Walton. All proceeds benefit the Cultural Arts Alliance of Walton County.

Visit 30ASongwritersFestival.com for tickets and additional information.

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DEC. 13-14 Stroll the streets of downtown Thomasville singing along with live caroling, enjoying horse-drawn carriage rides and dining via food and beverage vendors. The evening will feature various live performances and people in Victorian dress. Thomasvillega.com

PHOTOS BY COREY TUCKER (EMERALD COAST THEATRE COMPANY), SHELLY SWANGER (30A SONGWRITERS FESTIVAL) AND AND COURTESY OF WAKULLA COUNTY TOURISM DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL

REGIONAL


Meet two new additions to our family

Counseling, Education, Consulting, Employee Wellness & more. connectwithcapstone.com | 850-219-8985

Senior Care Management. Keeping Your Loved Ones Connected. goldenageathome.com | 850-878-0034

HAVE AN EVENT THAT NEEDS TICKETING AND MARKETING? Call Brian Rowland at (850) 878-0554 or visit 850Tix.com to learn more.

LOCAL TICKETS. ONE PLACE. 850Tix is your source for local events across Northwest Florida. From the same trusted award-winning team that has published Tallahassee Magazine for more than 39 years, our goal is to promote the community our readers know and love. From festivals and tours to sports and the arts, the event choices in Northwest Florida are endless and all on 850Tix.com.

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CELEBRATE and support our arts community at Tallahassee Community College

“ I embrace this chance to

help direct a campaign to broaden, widen, and deepen the cultural opportunities for TCC students and even for our community. The arts have the power to change lives and thereby change the world.” Donna Callaway Campaign Chair

To learn more, contact Heather Mitchell at mitchelh@tcc.fl.edu or (850) 201-6067 164

November–December 2018

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TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL HEALTHCARE

FOUNDATION Welcome

NIGEL ALLEN

PRESIDENT/CHIEF ADVANCEMENT OFFICER OF TMH FOUNDATION Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare (TMH) and the TMH Foundation are thrilled to share the announcement of the new President/Chief Advancement Officer for the TMH Foundation – Nigel Allen. In this role, Allen leads the Foundation’s fundraising efforts while working directly with donors to help increase the impact of their charitable giving and benevolence goals. He is responsible for cultivating relationships with philanthropists in our area and strengthening current donor and board relationships. Allen also manages the Foundation staff and directs day-to-day operations in support of the TMH Foundation’s mission to develop and sustain philanthropic support for TMH, and generate community understanding and involvement as a means to accomplish TMH’s mission, vision, goals and objectives. “The TMH Foundation's Board of Trustees and the staff are fully committed to the TMH mission of transforming care, advancing health and improving lives,” said Sam Lester, TMH Foundation Board Chair. “We look forward to Nigel’s leadership and vision to achieve our goals.” With an extensive background in fundraising, Allen’s experience includes the areas of capital campaigns, endowments and charitable gift annuities. He has been a part of several philanthropic initiatives and non-profits in Tallahassee, most recently at the Big Bend Hospice Foundation where he successfully led a capital campaign resulting in $2.8 million to medically upgrade the Margaret Z. Dozier Hospice House and build the Jean McCully Family House. He also increased the overall annual fundraising revenues by 93 percent in his first six years.

” Advertorial

Nigel has an accomplished history in the non-profit and fundraising industry with a strong understanding of healthcare.

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“Nigel has an accomplished history in the non-profit and fundraising industry with a strong understanding of healthcare,” said Mark O’Bryant, President & CEO of Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare. “These skills coupled with his ability to establish and grow relationships with donors makes him an excellent fit to lead the TMH Foundation.” Allen earned his Bachelor of Arts from Binghamton University in New York. He is a member of the Tallahassee Regional Estate Planning Council, and a board member for the Tallahassee Association of Fundraising Professionals and the Tallahassee Symphony Orchestra. He was a member of the Leadership

nteers,

Group t Private Wealth cal ssee Democrat ssee Magazine ssee Memorial al Therapy ssee ological Clinic ssee Plastic ery Clinic ssee an Magazine deral Credit Union an Partners cal Specialists gerson, DMD GLE SALES n Ulrich ity Physical cine Chiropractic & cal Care - Nicholas to, DC R. Vause Nights Surgical Solutions laude and e Walker nd Watson, MD

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Pensacola Class of 2012 and is a member of the Tallahassee Downtown Rotary. Allen was named Tallahassee’s Association of Fundraising Professionals 2015 Fundraiser of the Year. “It is such an honor to join the TMH family as so much of the care TMH provides to our community is made possible through the extraordinary generosity of many deeply committed donors,” said Nigel Allen. “I look forward to hearing their stories, honoring their support and working with them to help provide the best possible healthcare in the community we love.”

Community Events TEE OFF FOR TOTS Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare and its Foundation want to send a sincere thank you to everyone who came out and supported the 25th Annual Tee Off for Tots Par-Tee & Raffle and Golf Tournament. The proceeds from both events will be divided equally between the Proctor Endowment for Children with Diabetes who are served at the Physician Partners – Metabolic Health Center and Tallahassee Memorial Children’s Center, both of which will help children with a variety of conditions and treatment requirements. Thanks to the generosity, support and participation in this year’s events from the sponsors, donors and attendees, Tee Off for Tots will positively influence the lives and medical outcomes of thousands of infants and children and their families.

J. MCLAUGHLIN This September, the wonderful team of J. McLaughlin, a new women’s boutique located on Market Street, held a fundraising event for the Tallahassee Memorial Animal Therapy program. Of all the purchases made during the evening, 15 percent of proceeds were donated back to the program through the TMH Foundation. The event consisted of an evening of light fare and refreshments, chatter among friends, neighbors and the community, and of course, showcasing the Animal Therapy program with a few furry friends. Thank you to everyone who attended this event and to our friends at J. McLaughlin for their contributions!

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TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL HEALTHCARE AND ITS FOUNDATION SALUTE THE

2018 Cards for a Cure Sponsors, Donors, Volunteers, Committee and Honoree - Betsy Burgess TITLE SPONSOR:

HOSPITALITY SPONSOR: Physician Partners Cancer & Hematology Specialists Tim Broeseker, MD, Amit Jain, MD, MPH, Janice Lawson, MD, Jayan Nair, MD, Mitchell F. Peabody, DO, Jorge V. Perez De Armas, MD, Karen Russell, MD, FACP, and Jeannine Silberman, MD WINE & SPIRITS SPONSOR: Carr Allison AUCTION SPONSOR: Radiology Associates BAND SPONSOR: Physician Partners Radiation Oncology Specialists Philip Sharp, MD, Raj Bendre, MD and Ovidiu Marina, MD PHOTO SPONSOR: Gynecology & Obstetrics Associates, Inc. Jana Bures-Forsthoefel, MD and Shawn Ramsey, DO WINE GLASS SPONSOR: Tallahassee Ford Lincoln

JoAnne Adams Gary and Barbara Alford, MSN, RN Ameriprise Financial Jenny & Denis Nash Anesthesiology Associates of Tallahassee, Inc. Ausley McMullen Baker Donelson Brian Barnard's Flooring America Benson’s Heating & Air Conditioning Big Bend Hospice Shelby Blank, MD and David Burday, MD Janet Borneman Elizabeth Boyd Mildred and A. J. Brickler, MD Kathy Brooks and Gadi Silberman, MD Betsy Burgess Justina Burt, Realtor Capital City Womens Health Mary Calcote Darcy Cavell Suzanne and Armand Cognetta, MD Centre Point Dental Group Ronald G. Willis, DMD Centre Pointe Health & Rehabilitation Terese Combs Millie Creel Michelle and Chase Dickson Chollet Dunbar Carole Cox Covenant Care

CrossFit Tallahassee Veronica Donnelly Margarett C. Ellison, MD, MHA Ruth Figg James Floyd Florida Surplus Lines – Gary Pullen Rosanna M. Catalano Flury Fonvielle Lewis Messer & McConnaughhay Friedman & Abrahamsen Lisa C. Graganella - In Honor of Darcy Cavell Nicole Graganella - In Honor of Darcy Cavell Hancock Whitney Sarah Nan Haney Jan and Gregory Hartlage, MD Naomi Harris Haute Headz Salon Henry Buchanan, PA Homestead Village of Pensacola – Ann Brown Rebecca Hoppe Caroline Hudson Hueler-Wakeman Law Group, P.L. Elder Law Attorneys and Waldoch & McConnaughhay, PA. Robbie and Rebecca Hysong, MD IHeartMedia, Inc. Leigh Jenkins KWB Pathology Associates Katie’s Cakes and Catering Annie and Joe Kelley Ryan Kelly Allison Kinney

Mayra Klapetszky John Knap Lanigan & Associates P.C. Loli & the Bean Delia Fowler Roger and Bernadette Luca - In Memory of Brenda Luca and in Honor of Ella O'Bryan Luke Van Camp's Floors & More Steffany Lendon Hal Mardenborough Litzie Martin Malcolm Mason MasTec Utility Services Coleen and Jimmy Minor Missy Gunnels Flowers Shelley and Greg Nelson North Florida Women's Care Obstetrics & Gynecology North Public Relations Oertel, Fernandez, Bryant & Atkinson, P.A. Rebecca Parrish Party, Party, Party, LLC Pennington P.A. Amy Townley Phelps Toni Piper Tri-Eagle Sales Preventive Cardiology & Internal Medicine Sandeep Rahangdale, MD Deena and Judson Reppen Lee Satterfield Seven Hills Health & Rehab Center Laurie Shelfer

Summit Group Suntrust Private Wealth Medical Tallahassee Democrat Tallahassee Magazine Tallahassee Memorial Animal Therapy Tallahassee Neurological Clinic Tallahassee Plastic Surgery Clinic Tallahassee Woman Magazine TMH Federal Credit Union Physician Partners Surgical Specialists Neil Torgerson, DMD TRI-EAGLE SALES Cameron Ulrich University Physical Medicine Chiropractic & Medical Care - Nicholas Belletto, DC Tiffany R. Vause Vegas Nights Veritas Surgical Solutions Maye, Claude and Laurie Walker Nicole and Dean Watson, MD WCTV Laura Youmans Jessica Zeigler Ziffer Stansberry Communications Gail and Gil Ziffer

A Special Tribute of Thanks to the Students, Faculty, Staff, and Administration of Leon High School

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Lifeline Services

E THE

unteers,

With Lifeline from Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare (TMH), help is just the press of a button away. TMH is pleased to provide members of Tallahassee’s senior community with America’s most trusted medical alert service, and is able to do so thanks to the TMH Foundation and those in the community who help support the Foundation. For more than 40 years, Lifeline has enabled millions of people to live with greater independence, peace of mind and dignity in the place they feel most comfortable – their own homes.

it Group ust Private Wealth “Lifeline impacts the community in response and safety. If someone falls, the time frame that help arrives to assist them to the hospital or dical assee Democratjust assist them off the floor could be the difference between life and death,” said Felicia McCoy, Program Manager for Lifeline at TMH. “I assee Magazinehave heard stories of people falling and staying on the floor for days before someone would do a wellness check on them and discover what assee Memorial happened. Some of the outcomes were injuries that were far more critical because of the lapsed time, and some have even been death.” mal Therapy TMH offers two different Lifeline services, including a medical alert system – that offers different options to suit your lifestyle – and medication assee rological Clinic dispensing systems, to remove the guesswork from managing medications. No one wants anything to get in the way of their independence assee Plastic – not an accidental fall, not a medical issue, and gery Clinic not their caring loved ones concerned about assee man Magazine them living alone. With Philips Lifeline Medical ederal Credit Union Alert Service, users get fast, easy access to ian Partners - help 24 hours a day, 365 days a year – allowing gical Specialists users to continue enjoying life in the comfort of rgerson, DMD AGLE SALES their own home, and having the freedom to go anywhere with confidence. ron Ulrich rsity Physical “Lifeline is a service to protect and give security,” dicine Chiropractic & said Felicia. “And thanks to the TMH Foundation dical Care - Nicholas etto, DC and the donors who support the Foundation and y R. Vause this program, the Foundation is able to provide Nights financial assistance to individuals who meet a s Surgical Solutions certain income qualification and are in need of Claude and Lifeline Services but can’t afford the service.” rie Walker and n Watson, MD There are both on-the-go and in-the-home

Youmans a Zeigler Stansberry mmunications and Gil Ziffer

solutions. No matter what fits your lifestyle, you have comfort knowing that not only do you have 24/7 access to a trained professional from the Lifeline Response Center, but you also have a local TMH representative to help with any questions you may have.

Because the Lifeline service also helps family caregivers to balance the needs of their loved ones with the demands of their own busy lives, Lifeline is of immense benefit to them as well. “Lifeline saves lives but also gives caregivers and family members a sense of ease when they need it most, which allows them to go about their day and do daily things since they can’t always be with their loved ones every minute of the day,” said Felicia. “It also continues to give the elderly independence and a sense of comfort that allows them to stay comfortable in their own homes.”

” Lifeline is a service to protect and give security. Advertorial

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For more information on Lifeline Services at TMH, please visit TMH.ORG/Lifeline. To learn how you can support programs like Lifeline, visit TMH.ORG/Giving. November–December 2018

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Gifts AT WORK

Music Therapy

TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL HEALTHCARE AND ITS FOUNDATION SALUTE THE

2018 Cards for a Cure Sponsors, Donors, Volunteers, WHAT IS MEDICAL MUSIC THERAPY? Music therapy interventions are beneficial for people of all ages Committee and health Honoree - Betsy Burgess – infants, children, adults and seniors. Music therapists provide Medical music therapy is an established profession using music and music interventions to address physical,

services on all inpatient units (including intensive care units)

CrossFit Tallahassee Mayra areas. Klapetszky Summit Group Adams TITLE SPONSOR: and many outpatient emotional, cognitive and social needsJoAnne of children and adults Veronica Donnelly John Knap Suntrust Private Wealth Gary and Barbara with disabilities or illnesses. Music therapists participate in Medical Alford, MSN, RN Margarett C. Lanigan & Associates P.C. interdisciplinary treatment planning, ongoing evaluation WHAT MUSIC IS USED IN MUSIC THERAPY Tallahassee Democrat Ellison, MD, MHA KIND OFLoli Ameriprise Financial & the Bean and follow-up. Jenny & Denis Nash Tallahassee Magazine Ruth Figg SESSIONS? Delia Fowler Anesthesiology Associates Memorial James FloydAge-appropriate, Roger and Bernadette Luca patient-preferred music Tallahassee is most often used of Tallahassee, Inc. Animal Therapy - In Memory of Brenda Florida Surplus Lines – TARGET POPULATION/ WHO CAN BENEFIT: during music therapy sessions. Research has shown familiar, Luca and in Ausley McMullen Tallahassee Gary Pullen HOSPITALITY SPONSOR: of Ellaeffective O'Bryan in achieving preferred music toHonor be most desired goals. Music therapists target patients identified having a specific Rosanna M. Catalano Neurological Clinic Bakeras Donelson Flury Physician Partners Luke Van Camp's Tallahassee Plastic Brian Barnard's physical, emotional, cognitive or social need. Some examples of Fonvielle Lewis Messer & Cancer & Hematology Specialists Floors & More Surgery Clinic Flooring America McConnaughhay Timindividuals Broeseker, who MD, may be targeted include people who are: Steffany Lendon WHAT IS THE UKULELE CHOIR? Tallahassee Benson’s Heating & Amit Jain, MD, MPH, Friedman & Abrahamsen Woman Magazine Hal Mardenborough Air Conditioning • Anxious One of Janice Lawson, MD, Jayan Nair, MD, Lisa C. Graganella - Inthe many services TMH’s Music Therapy department TMH Federal Credit Union Litzie Martin Big Bend Hospice Mitchell F. Peabody, DO, Honor of Darcy Cavellis the Ukulele provides Choir. The group was originally started • Depressed Jorge V. Perez De Armas, MD, Physician Partners Malcolm Mason Shelby Blank, MD and Nicole Graganella - In to teach patients at the Tallahassee Memorial Cancer as a way Surgical Specialists David Burday, MD Karen Russell, MD, FACP, and Honor of Darcy Cavell MasTec Utility Services • Confused Center healthy and positive coping skills, develop support Jeannine Silberman, MD Neil Torgerson, DMD Janet Borneman Hancock Whitney Coleen and Jimmy Minor systems, and increase overall quality of life in a fun, • Agitated TRI-EAGLEnonSALES Elizabeth Boyd WINE & SPIRITS SPONSOR: Sarah Nan Haney Missy Gunnels Flowers threatening environment. It hasNelson expandedCameron to provide support Carr Allison Ulrich Mildred and Jan and Gregory Shelley and Greg • Understimulated A. J. Brickler, MD University Physical Hartlage, MD to staff, family and friends, and supporters throughout the AUCTION SPONSOR: North Florida Women's Care Medicine Chiropractic & • HavingAssociates difficulty communicating Kathy Brooks and Radiology Naomi HarrisTallahassee community. Obstetrics & Gynecology This group has been made possible by Medical Care - Nicholas Gadi Silberman, MD Haute Headzthe Salon North Public Relations Belletto, DC TMH Foundation, which purchased the 20 ukuleles used to BAND SPONSOR: Betsy Burgess • Having difficulty coping Henry Buchanan, PA Oertel, Fernandez, Bryant & meets Physician Partners Tiffany R. Vause start the group. The TMH Ukulele Choir at the Tallahassee Justina Burt, Realtor Homestead Village of Atkinson, P.A. Radiation Oncologypain Specialists • Experiencing Vegas5-7 Nights Cancer CenterParrish Gathering Place from pm on the PensacolaMemorial – Ann Brown Capital City Philip Sharp, MD, Raj Bendre, MD and Rebecca Veritas Surgical Solutions Rebecca Hoppe firstCaroline and third Thursdays of each month. • Undergoing Ovidiu Marina, MDa non-invasive procedureWomens Health Party, Party, Party, LLC Hudson Maye, Claude and Mary Calcote PHOTO SPONSOR: Pennington P.A. Laurie Walker Hueler-Wakeman Law Darcy Cavell Gynecology & Obstetrics Amy Townley Phelps Group, P.L. Elder Law Nicole If you’re interested in supporting the Musicand Therapy program, Suzanne and Armand Associates, Inc. Attorneys and Waldoch & Toni Piper Dean Watson, MD Cognetta, MD Jana Bures-Forsthoefel, MD and please TMH.ORG/Donate. McConnaughhay, PA. visitTri-Eagle WCTV Sales Centre Point Dental Group Shawn Ramsey, DO Robbie and Laura Youmans Ronald G. Willis, DMD Preventive Cardiology Rebecca Hysong, MD WINE GLASS SPONSOR: & Internal Medicine Jessica Zeigler Centre Pointe Health & Tallahassee Ford Lincoln IHeartMedia, Inc. Sandeep Rahangdale, MD Rehabilitation Ziffer Stansberry Leigh Jenkins Deena and Judson Reppen Communications Terese Combs KWB Pathology Associates Lee Satterfield Gail and Gil Ziffer Millie Creel Seven Hills Health & Rehab Michelle and Chase Dickson Katie’s Cakes and Catering Center Annie and Joe Kelley Chollet Dunbar Laurie Shelfer Ryan Kelly Carole Cox Allison Kinney Covenant Care

A Special Tribute of Thanks to the Students, Faculty, Staff, and Administration of Leon High School

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YOUR HOSP ITA L FOR L I F E

T M H F O U N DAT I O N U P DAT E

DONATING IRA ASSETS TO THE TMH FOUNDATION As 2018 draws to a close, please know how grateful the TMH Foundation is for all of your support. Last year, our donors made it possible for us to support essential patient and family programs such as music therapy, spiritual care, animal therapy, nursing scholarships and much more.

We would like to remind you that anyone over age 70½ can now make yearly gifts to the TMH Foundation without paying taxes on the amount transferred, when using the IRA Charitable Rollover. Under the “Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act” of 2015, charitably minded individuals like you can make gifts directly from their IRAs and exclude the amount of their gifts from gross income. To qualify, the following requirements must be met: • The donor must be 70½ years of age or older • The transfer must be made directly from the IRA to a qualified charity • Gifts cannot exceed $100,000 per taxpayer per year

A gift from your IRA also counts toward your required minimum distribution. A direct transfer from an IRA is an effective, tax-free way to support the mission of Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare and the TMH Foundation. For your convenience, please go to TMH.ORG/Giving and click on IRA Charitable Rollover to access the IRA charitable distribution letter to administrator and the IRA charitable distribution form letter, to initiate this process. Thank you for your support of the TMH Foundation. We are grateful for our donors who give so generously so that others may have a healthier life. For more information or questions on IRA gifts, please call 431-5389 or email Nigel.Allen@TMH.ORG.

• Gifts must be outright, not to donor advised funds, charitable remainder trusts, or charitable gift annuities

The TMH Foundation Update is produced by the Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare Foundation 1331 East Sixth Avenue, Tallahassee, FL 32303 | 850-431-5389 | Foundation@TMH.ORG

To make a secure online donation, we invite you to visit TMHFoundation.ORG.

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PROMOTION

SOCIAL STUDIES Tallahassee Magazine’s 2018 Top Singles JUL. 14 Tallahassee’s Top Singles reached higher than ever in 2018, breaking previous records and raising over $123,000 for 19 charities during a big night at the Donald L. Tucker Civic Center. The event raised $30,000 more than last year. Guests sipped specialty cocktails, posed for photos in front of the luxury Porsche provided by Capital Eurocars and enjoyed the musical talents of Kristan Mikala. Attendees bid on experiential packages that were paired with each single and their chosen charity.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF SELFIETALLY

1 Greg James, Quierah Caldwell, Shakinah Gunn, Brandi Thomas, Mutaqee Akbar, Taniya Refai and Barbara Walker 2 Brian Clark, Vanessa Ward, Laura Brewer and Sherrie Clark

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3 Patty Ballantine, Janelle Irwin, Michelle Hart and Ely Rosario 4 Rick Radford, Khanty Xayabouth, Dan Tayler and Tony Archer 5 Vanessa Fletcher, Allison Bubriski and Jennifer Stanford 6 Mayra and Cole Zimmerman 7 Summer and Christian Griffith 8 Rachel Uhland, Cecily Armengol and Kathryn Wolter 9 Sarah Strickland and Hollyn Palmer

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PROMOTION

SOCIAL STUDIES Tallahassee Magazine’s Sept/ Oct Popup Party at Andrew’s SEPT. 25 Andrew’s, Tallahassee’s downtown favorite, showcased its newly renovated private event space while Tallahassee Magazine celebrated the September/October 2018 issue and the magazine’s newly redesigned website. The new issue featured artist Eliza Schneider-Green, Purina cover girl Bailey the basset hound, plus divine bites from Andrew’s.

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PHOTOS BY LAWRENCE DAVIDSON

1 Lynne and Mark Nonni with Chris and Ashley Chaney and Christina Nonni. 2 Brian and Jaron Webb with Brian and Cherie Rowland 3 Mike Munroe and Bailey 4 Paige Carter-Smith, Greg Tish, Katie Richardson, Patty Watson and Jon Jopling 5 Dean Faulkenberry, Marsha Doll and Dr. Russ Rainey

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PERSEVERANCE

Perseverance. A powerful element in fighting cancer. Edith Picallo has persevered through tough challenges in her 70 years – immigrating from Cuba, losing her husband to cancer, raising three kids alone and beating cancer twice. A new stage 4 lung cancer diagnosis had her wondering if she had what it took to beat it again. Her initial prognosis was severe – less than a year to live. But when she found Florida Cancer Specialists, her doctor conducted genomic testing to personalize her therapy. The result – her tumor shrunk 47 percent in just six months. Now, three years after her diagnosis, Edith’s story shows that when hope and science join forces, great outcomes can happen. “Florida Cancer Specialists did a genetic test to determine the right medicine for me and my lung cancer, and it is working.”

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PROMOTION

SOCIAL STUDIES Sweat Therapy Fitness Parkinson’s Update Luncheon SEPT. 14 A crowd of 215 guests attended the sold-out Parkinson’s Update luncheon at Capital City Country Club. Attendees included individuals living with Parkinson’s Disease, their caregivers and community advocates and health professionals, and the event featured socializing and vendor tables overflowing with Parkinson’s resource materials. Presenters at the event included Kim Bibeau, owner and founder of Sweat Therapy Fitness and head boxing coach at Rock Steady Boxing, and Dr. Melissa J. Armstrong, director of the Mangurian Clinical Research Center for Lewy Body and Parkinson’s Disease Dementia at the University of Florida.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SWEAT THERAPY FITNESS

Kim Bibeau, Judith Barrett, Amanda Fessenden, Dr. Melissa Armstrong and Brian Bibeau

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PROMOTION

SOCIAL STUDIES Old School FSU Tailgate SEPT. 22 FSU fans celebrated the return of football season with the latest tailgate by Old School, an elite club of Florida State fans and friends. Fans enjoyed live entertainment, complimentary food, beer and wine, plus access to a pool and 16-person hot tub.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF OLD SCHOOL SOCIETY

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PROMOTION

SOCIAL STUDIES Corks & Forks Wine Food Pairing Event SEPT. 26 Guests descended on downtown Tallahassee to enjoy a delicious night of wine and tapas-style food pairings in The Private Rooms at Andrew’s Downtown, the city’s newest boutique event space to host small and large gatherings. Executive Chef Matt Varn created an eclectic tasting menu to complement the night’s spectacular selection of wines.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANDREW’S/ CORKS AND FORKS

Adam Foster, Samantha Roth, TJ Roche and Morgan Hadden

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PROMOTION

SOCIAL STUDIES Elder Care’s Oktoberfest SEPT. 27 Elder Care’s 20th annual Oktoberfest, presented by Tallahassee Ford Lincoln, celebrated the faithful support of the Tallahassee community for seniors in need. Thanks to the generosity of over 750 guests, volunteers and sponsors, Elder Care Services raised over $115,000 to provide comprehensive care for the most vulnerable among us.

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PHOTOS BY ELLE BELLE PHOTOGRAPHY

1 (left to right) Tommy Mills, Dr. Maribel Lockwood, Sharon Weeden (emeritus board), Keith Bowers and Shaia Simmons 2 Amplify Entertainment DJ Nate Long leads guests and volunteers to the dance floor 3 Local oompah band Gesundheit entertains guests, David Kraus on trombone 4 ECS President and CEO Mark Baldino thanks sponsors and guests at the 20th Annual Oktoberfest

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PROMOTION

HEALTH and

PHOTO BY MONKEYBUSINESSIMAGES / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PHOTO BY KIEFERPIX / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS PLUS AND COURTESY OF TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL HEALTHCARE (KUBIAK)

FITNESS

I FITNESS from 1 to 100 The importance of an exercise routine for all ages BY REBECCA PADGETT

t is widely known that people from the ages of 18 to 55 should be engaging in some form of fitness. For the outlying age ranges, physical fitness is not as readily addressed, yet it is just as necessary that children and senior citizens develop health routines. Fitness for kids and seniors might differ in impact, intensity and length, but the physical and mental benefits are no less important. Being stagnant is never the optimal choice for any age group; whether the movements are large or small, it’s key to keep moving or get moving. With a surge in technology, more children than ever are exposed to screen time and less physical activity. It may seem as if children don’t need as much physical activity as an adult, but that’s a false assumption as properly instilled health habits can make a lasting impact throughout life. “Just like adults, kids need an outlet as well, and exercise is one of best ways for kids to

decompress,” said Melissa Johnson, owner of Kaos Group Training. “If physical activity can be taught to be a part of one’s life from a young age then, hopefully, as they get older they will continue to use exercise to relieve stress, stay strong and healthy and lead a positive lifestyle.” Irene Quevedo, director of operations at American Fitness, agrees on the importance of beginning fitness routines early on, stating that kids learn a great deal from the habits and activities of their families. Parents are vital in encouraging and promoting fitness activities for their children. Kaos Group Training, American Fitness and many fitness facilities throughout Tallahassee provide classes for families, teens and children. A noticeable difference between child and adult fitness is that, for a child, the activity needs to be engaging — otherwise they may not show interest and may not understand its influence on their life.

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PROMOTION

HEALTH and

FITNESS

Good nutrition choices promote wellness, consistency matters, and success becomes sweeter than sugar.

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Boxing Balance and Core, which includes a boxing component to assist with strength, cardio and cognition; and Rock Steady Boxing, a course designed specifically for those with Parkinson’s Disease. Premier Health & Fitness Center hosts a Brain, Body, Balance class focusing on fall prevention by addressing skills that decline with aging and contribute to injuries from falling. Research shows that honing in on strength, balance, reflexes, aerobic activity and cognition can reduce the rates of Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia. Alongside the physical benefits, it’s a way to make connections and engage socially. “We have a lot of power over how we age,” said Kathy Gilbert, fitness instructor at Premier Health & Fitness Center. “Our physical and cognitive health is significantly affected by our level of physical activity. Keeping active and maintaining your strength slows down the declines that occur with aging. I see many 90-plus-year-olds leading happy, fulfilling, independent lives, and these are the people who have stayed active their whole lives. We need to encourage our aging parents, friends and neighbors to stay active.” The research is undisputed, the benefits are vast and the resources are growing, proving it’s never too early or too late to engage in a fitness routine that benefits mind, body and soul.

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CHILDREN’S FITNESS CLASSES KAOS GROUP TRAINING 2755 Powermill Court, Suite B (850) 459-6082 AMERICAN FITNESS 6668-7 Thomasville Road (850) 907-3555 GIRLS ON THE RUN BIG BEND (850) 570-9560 NAMASTE YOGA 1369 E. Lafayette St., Suite B (850) 556-2625

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“We need to make physical activity fun,” said Quevedo. “Exposing kids and teens to different sports and activities will keep them active and allow them to have a say in which one they prefer. By becoming physically active in an activity they enjoy, kids and teens can reduce the risk of stress, depression and anxiety.” Through workouts, all ages can gain strength, improve cardiovascular health, improve balance and contribute to overall physicality. Those same physical activities can benefit mentally by elevating endorphins, ultimately boosting happiness and decreasing signs of stress and depression. “No matter what age or what capabilities someone has, they deserve to enjoy a high quality of life,” said Kim Bibeau, owner of Sweat Therapy Fitness. “As we live longer it is absolutely imperative that we remain active to ensure we have a high-quality life. Research proves that exercise does this time and time again, because the physical and emotional benefits of an active lifestyle are undisputed. It helps with attitudes, depression and cognitive sleep. People feel better, and they are happier.” Sweat Therapy Fitness offers a variety of senior adult fitness classes including: Forever Fit, a total body workout focusing on strength, core and cardiovascular activities;


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S E RV I N G U P T H E

HOLIDAYS How to make your dinner party succeed and even sparkle BY ROCHELLE KOFF

Planning a party involves your own style and philosophy, plus understanding how much time you have and what fits your entertaining skills. PHOTO BY JAMES STEFIUK

This is the year you’ve decided to throw a holiday party, but you’re filled with angst and questions: What to serve? Who to invite? How to set the table? Where to begin? Take a deep breath. We’ve got you, and your table, covered. We’ve asked the experts — seasoned entertainers, caterers and designers — for ideas about how to throw a fun holiday party. In these days of Pinterest and online potluck signups, you can certainly get lots of ideas for every step of the party process, from planning the menu to learning the lingo. For instance, what’s a charger? A clue: It’s not for your cell phone. Still, planning a party is also about deciding your own style, your philosophy and personal reality, as in what kind of party fits your time-management and entertaining skills. More questions: Do you want to have a casual gathering of a dozen besties or a formal affair for 200. Do you want a DIY-party or one with caterers, bartenders and bands? Do you want to carry on family traditions or try something different? WHERE TO START? LOOK IN THE MIRROR.

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She often recommends Mediterranean-inspired dishes, with seafood and fresh vegetables as well as curries. If your family loves sweet potatoes topped with marshmallows, you can add some varied sides such as Brussels sprouts, root vegetables and roasted potatoes with bacon and rosemary, said Suber, of Black Fig. A traditional potluck supper ensures a variety of dishes, and that takes pressure off the host, Bright McMullen said. “Don’t be afraid to allow other people to bring something. Covered dishes are getting to be a lost art, but it’s a wonderful, wonderful way to entertain.” To avoid having 10 people bring potato salad, she said, “you do need to have an idea of what people are bringing. Communicate well.” Some time-pressed entertainers are turning to SignUpGenius, an online service to help coordinate sign-up lists. As for beverages, spiked eggnog is a tradition, but also consider a signature cocktail or two, along with wine and beer. Don’t forget craft beer from Tallahassee breweries. For your teetotaling friends, provide some options to water and soda, including hot apple cider, iced tea and non-alcoholic cocktails.

SETTING THE TABLE Decorating the table is one of the most exciting elements of throwing a party, but first more decisions. Do you dig out your crystal, linen tablecloths and fine silver, or do you consider disposable cutlery and plates? “You should definitely pull out your fine china,” said Lauren Teal, owner of the My Favorite Things boutique. “What are you saving it for? If you can make memories with your pieces, then that’s what will be passed down from generation to generation. “I don’t want my grandmother’s china that’s in an attic that I’ve never seen before. Someone has to start using it.” Hostesses can be creative with their china and flatware, she added. “You can mix and match. You don’t have to have 12 of everything.” As for new additions, gold, bronze and copper silverware are gaining popularity, and so are creative

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PHOTO BY ROCHELLE KOFF

chargers, she said. Chargers are decorative plates placed under your dinnerware that add a more formal touch to your table setting. Local design expert Everett Thompson also suggests getting your nice things out of the cabinet or closet. “I think you should use that stuff even if you’re having hot dogs and pizza,� he said. “It’s no more work than everyday stuff. It’s not doing any good sitting in a cabinet, and it can be a conversation starter. ‘Where did it come from?’ � Business management consultant Miller said she uses sterling silver, crystal, china and silver flatware at her large parties “and I’ve never had one china plate broken,� she said. Hosts who don’t have the fancy stuff or don’t want to use it for a huge dinner party often opt for paper or plastic. Green-minded entertainers are using trendy biodegradable products such as plates made from bamboo or fallen palm leaves. Thompson said he is a fan of tablecloths, preferably “a solid tablecloth that you can decorate with colorful items and plates.� For a fun alternative, he said, “You can wrap the top of the table with wrapping paper.� For a creative twist, buy inexpensive, polyester white tablecloths, he said, and have your kids, family and friends “write down ADVICE FROM THE EXPERTS what they’re thankful for, or their New Year’s resolutions. Use permanent markers so it doesn’t come out when it’s washed. It’s fun to go back and read what people wrote.� When it comes to the “You should definitely centerpiece, anything goes. pull out your fine china. What are you saving Designers are turning to it for? If you can make nature for inspiration, usmemories with your pieces, then that’s what ing real plants and greenwill be passed down ery to brighten tables. from generation to Thompson suggests generation.� combining greenery and — Lauren Teal, owner of My Favorite ornaments in a large, decThings boutique orative bowl. Spraying branches or stacking pine cones, plentiful in Tallahassee, in a tall glass vase also adds an elegant touch, said Rich, of Klassic Katering. “You can collect these sprigs and branches yourself,� she said. “I really like to bring the outside inside.� It may sound like a lot of work, but don’t sweat it, said the experts. Throwing a holiday party is ultimately about sharing a joyous time. “Just bring people together,� Johnson said. “A celebration will surely unfold.� TM



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PROMOTION

2018 TOP SINGLES EVENT

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STORY BY REBECCA PADGETT / PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAWRENCE DAVIDSON

warm night turned hotter at the 2018 Top Singles event, which shattered previous records by raising over $123,000 for 19 charities during the July 14 event at the Donald L. Tucker Civic Center. The fundraising efforts of the Singles, the generous support of sponsors, including presenting sponsor Tallahassee Plastic Surgery Center, and the lively participation from an audience totaling 800 made this Tallahassee Magazine’s most charitable and enthusiastic event yet. “Tallahassee Plastic Surgery Clinic is proud to sponsor such a charitable event that brings the community together,” said Beth Fink, Cosmetic Coordinator of Tallahassee Plastic Surgery Clinic. “The event was spectacular from start to finish. We look forward to future events.” The party theme was “Hot Summer White,” and the heat was on as attendees arrived in sleek white styles that matched the decor by John Gandy Events. The Singles were dressed in their best thanks to styles provided by Elle Market and Nic’s Toggery, hair and makeup from Fuel Salon + Store and dazzling designer jewelry provided by The Gem Collection. “Elle Market loved supporting Top Singles,” said Carrie McNeil, owner of Elle Market. “It provided us with an opportunity to mesh giving back to the Tallahassee community with fashion. Working alongside and bonding with women who were raising money for such worthy causes added elevated meaning to our daily work culture. Watching them each uniquely stand out on stage in custom-picked looks was amazing!”

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PROMOTION

THE TOP SINGLES AND THEIR CHARITIES

Shannon Colavecchio

Leon County Humane Society

Monique Ellsworth CESC, Inc.

Sarah Strickland Big Bend Hospice

Tori Cruce

Junior League of Tallahassee

Wendi Cannon

Girls on the Run (GOTR)

Carly Watson

Donate Life: Florida

Samantha Marrone

City Walk Urban Mission

Jasmine Denise Adams Alzheimer’s Project

Natasha Hartsfield

Tallahassee Museum Preschool

Samantha Loebig Boys Town North Florida

Jermaine Miller Girls2Divas

Brandon Simpkins TMH Foundation: Neuro ICU

Mutaqee Akbar The Boys Choir of Tallahassee

Arthur Huynh

Boys and Girls Club of the Big Bend

Brian Kendall

Ronald McDonald House

Mark Bonn, Ph.D. RIPITT

Travis Poppell

Each Single had a unique runway routine with coordinated music spun by GT Entertainment, which included choreographed dances, special guests and even a puppy. The Singles were paired with experiential packages — including relaxing weekend getaways provided by ResortQuest by Wyndham Vacation Rentals and rafting adventures from Whitewater Express/Columbus Georgia Whitewater. The bidding was lively and competitive as auctioneer Jason Taylor, from radio sponsor iHeart Radio, and emcee McKenzie Lohbeck, from Tallahassee Magazine, encouraged bidders. It was hard to believe the Singles first met months ago at Hotel Duval to be photographed together for Tallahassee Magazine’s Top Singles spread. Leading up to the event, the Singles supported each other through fundraisers around town. “I enjoyed connecting with so many people who were uniting for one cause,” said Eddie Kring, the evening’s top fundraiser with over $32,000,

which will benefit his charity, Capital City Youth Services. “We were able to witness so many people who genuinely care for our community and then expand that reach throughout the state — and even the country. It was inspiring that this event gave people the opportunity to contribute and make such a vast impact.” Added Samantha Marrone, another topfundraising Single: “My favorite part of the Top Singles experience was being able to represent a local charity (City Walk Urban Mission) run by two wonderful directors who wholeheartedly believe in their mission and work day in and out to make the Tallahassee community a better place.” It was apparent that the enthusiasm was shared by the Singles as they excelled in raising funds and shared congratulatory cheers as the final total was announced. All attendees danced and toasted the night away in honor of the giving hearts that compose the Tallahassee community.

Eddie Martí Kring

A GRAND TOTAL OF $123,000 WAS RAISED BENEFITING 19 LOCAL CHARITIES.

Going Places Street Outreach, Capital City Youth Services (CCYS)

Chris Giaritelli Refuge House

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Hang Tough Foundation


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dining guide AMERICAN ANDREW’S CAPITAL GRILL AND BAR

After 40 years, Andrew’s is still an energetic, casual, see-and-be-seen spot. House favorites include a popular lunch buffet, hamburgers, sandwiches, salads and pasta dishes. Downtown delivery. Mon-Thurs 11:30 am-10 pm, Fri-Sat 11:30 am-11 pm, Sun 10:30 am-9 pm. 228 S. Adams St. (850) 222-3444/Fax, (850) 222-2433. $$ B L D

CAFE TAVERNA

Fri-Sat 11 am-2:30 pm, 5:30-9:30 pm; Sun 10 am-2:30 pm, 5:30-9 pm. 1950 Thomasville Rd. (850) 224-9974. $$ L D

HOPKINS’ EATERY ★

Hopkins’, a Best of 2018 winner, provides more than just your average sandwich. Favorites such as the Ultimate Turkey and the Linda Special, and a variety of salad meals keep customers coming back for more. And the food is healthy, too! Multiple locations. Hours vary. hopkinseatery.com. $L

Our cafe offering Southern cooking with a Latin twist is now open in Midtown. We serve brunch and dinner while offering a full bar and Lucky Goat coffee and espresso. Tue.-Thur. 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m., 5-9 p.m.; Fri. 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m., 5-10:30 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 5-10:30 p.m.; Sun. 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 5-9 p.m. 1019 N. Monroe St. (850) 999-8203. $$ B D

ISLAND WING COMPANY ★

CYPRESS RESTAURANT ★

JUICY BLUE

To make a special evening a cut above the rest, bring the celebration to Cypress. Known for its sophisticated take on Southern cuisine, this restaurant won readers’ votes in 2014–2018 as Best Celebration/ Special Occasion and Best Fine Dining restaurant. Mon-Thurs 5-9:30 pm, Fri-Sat 5-10 pm, Sun Closed. 320 E. Tennessee St. (850) 513-1100. $$$ D

DOG ET AL ★

Get baked! Tally’s Best Wings 2018 won’t serve you up greasy, fried wings; instead, they bake them and prepare them fresh. They don’t stop at wings, either: Try the mac ‘n cheese, burgers and tacos paired with a cold beer. Mon-Thurs 11 am-12 am, Fri-Sat 11 am-2 am, Sun 11 am-12 am. 1370 Market St. (850) 692-3116. $/$$ L D Located in the Four Points by Sheraton Downtown, this cool lobby restaurant offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. Unique dishes include tapas with a twist, such as the Georgia peaches with caramel. Sandwiches, salads and a nice variety of seafood, pasta and chicken dishes round out the menu. Mon-Fri 7 am-11 pm, SatSun 7 am-midnight. 316 W. Tennessee St. (850) 422-0071. $ B L D

For the ultimate in comfort food, Dog Et Al offers hand-held deliciousness for the “down to earth” and “uppity” dogs in us all. Foot-long and veggie entrees alike grace this award-winning menu. If the entire family is down for the dog, be sure to ask about their incredibly valued family packs. Mon-Fri 10 am-7 pm, Sat 10 am-6 pm, Sun Closed. 1456 S. Monroe St. (850) 222-4099. $L D

KOOL BEANZ ★

THE EDISON

Part restaurant, part cheese shoppe, part lounge — Liam’s features locally grown and harvested foods, expertly made cocktails, craft beer, artisan wines & cheeses and friendly service. Lunch: Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.2 p.m.; Dinner: Tues.-Sat., 5 p.m.-close; Lounge: Tues.-Fri. 5 p.m.-late., Sat.: noonmidnight. 113 E. Jackson St., Thomasville, Georgia. (229) 226-9944. $$/$$$ L D

A Tallahassee relaxed fine dining establishment, The Edison is so much more than just a pretty face. Equipped with a beer garden, wine cellar, casual café, open-air alternatives and a gorgeous view, this historic building and restaurant has quickly become a Tallahassee favorite. Mon-Thurs 11 am-11 pm, Fri 11 am-midnight, Sat 10 ammidnight, Sun 10 am-11 pm. 470 Suwannee St. (850) 684-2117. $$/$$$

FOOD GLORIOUS FOOD ★

The name says it all! This restaurant boasts a palate-pleasing combination of personalized service, eclectic ambiance and award-winning cuisine and is the Best Desserts winner for 2017 and 2018. Tues-Thurs 11 am-2:30 pm, 5:30-9 pm;

THE KEY

★2018 Best

of Tallahassee Winner

Eclectic and edgy, both in menu and atmosphere, Kool Beanz delights in art present both on the walls and your plates. This offbeat alternative won Best Casual Dining in Tallahassee. Dinner Mon-Sat 5:30-10 pm, lunch Mon-Fri 11 am-2:30 pm, brunch Sun 10:30 am-2 pm. 921 Thomasville Rd. (850) 224-2466. $$ L D

The ‘eyes’ have it.

VOTED TALLAHASSEE’S BEST SEAFOOD MARKET SINCE 2002

LIAM’S RESTAURANT

MADISON SOCIAL ★

Whether it’s for a social cocktail, a quick lunch or a place for alumni to gather before home football games, Madison Social offers something for everyone. Madison Social earned Best Happy Hour honors in 2018. Mon-Fri 11:30 am-2 am, Sat-Sun 10 am-2 am. College Town, 705 S. Woodward Ave. (850) 894‑6276. $$ B L D

All Great Seafood Dishes Start with Great Seafood

The restaurants that appear in this guide are included as a service to readers and not as recommendations of the Tallahassee Magazine editorial department, except where noted. $$ Moderately B Breakfast/ Outdoor Dining L D

Brunch Lunch Dinner

Live Music Bar/Lounge $ Inexpensive

Expensive

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BEST SEAFOOD MARKET

1415 Timberlane Road in Market Square 850.893.7301 southernseafoodmarket.com TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

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SAGE RESTAURANT ★

MASA ★

SALTY DAWG PUB AND DELI ★

OSAKA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE AND SUSHI BAR ★

Sage’s menu masterfully melds regional influences, including Southern and French. The setting is gorgeous but cozy, and the outdoor patio sets a charming, romantic tone for a relaxed evening. Mon Closed; Tues-Sat 11 am-3 pm, 6-10 pm; Sun 11 am2:30 pm. 3534 Maclay Blvd. (850) 270-9396. $$$ B L D Low-key hangout with a family atmosphere, serving burgers, wings, cheesesteaks and reubens. Mon.–Thur. 11 a.m.–Mid., Fri. 11 a.m.–2 a.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–1 a.m., Sun. Noon–11 p.m. 3813 N. Monroe St. (850) 562-6500. $ L D

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TABLE 23 ★

This “Southern porch, table and bar” is cozied up among oak trees on one of Tallahassee’s favorite street corners. Serving lunch, dinner, Sunday brunch, fabulous cocktails and craft beers. Lucky Goat coffee-rubbed ribeye and Schermer pecancrusted chicken are among the regionalproduce offerings. Mon-Tues 11 am-2 pm, 5 pm-9 pm, Wed-Fri 11 am-2 pm, 5 pm-10 pm, Sat 5 pm-10 pm, Sun 10 am-3 pm. 1215 Thomasville Rd., (850) 329-2261. $$$ L D

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE CAFE ★

Serving a variety of smoothies and a selection of healthy alternatives, such as wraps, bowls, flatbreads and sandwiches. Multiple Locations. Hours vary. $ L D

UPTOWN CAFÉ

Uptown Cafe and Catering, locally owned and operated for more than 30 years, is famous for its all-day brunch menu and lunch fare. Specialties at the bustling, family-run café include apricot-glazed smoked salmon, one-of-a-kind omelets, banana bread French toast and flavorful sandwiches. Mon-Sat 7 a.m.-3 p.m., Sun 8 a.m.-2 p.m. 1325 Miccosukee Road (850) 219-9800. $ B L

THE WINE LOFT WINE BAR ★

Chosen as a Best of winner in 2017 and 2018, Midtown’s Wine Loft offers a superb wine list, creative cocktails, quality beer and tasty tapas. Mon-Thurs 5 pm-2 am, Fri-Sat 4 pm-2 am, Sun Closed. 1240 Thomasville Rd., #100. (850) 222-9914. $$  D

VERTIGO BURGERS AND FRIES ★

Vertigo is home to some of the juiciest, funkiest burgers in town. The modern building provides a no-frills setting to enjoy such favorites as the Vertigo Burger — a beef patty served with a fried egg, applewood bacon, grilled jalapeños, sharp cheddar and Vertigo sauce. Mon-Sat 11 am-9 pm, Sun 11 am-6 pm. 1395 E. Lafayette St. (850) 878‑2020. $$ L D

HOME OF THE

ASIAN Open Christmas Day Every Night Happy Hour 4–9 p.m. Thursday Night all wines 2 for 1 4–9 p.m.

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KIKU JAPANESE FUSION ★

From tempura to teriyaki and from sushi to sashimi, Kiku Japanese Fusion fuses vibrant flavors with fresh ingredients. There’s a reason Kiku was voted Best Sushi in 2018. Mon-Sat 11 am-1 pm, Sun 12-11 pm. 800 Ocala Rd. (850) 575-5458, 3491 Thomasville Rd. (850) 222-5458. $$ L D

In 2018, Masa earned the title of Best Asian in town — and with good reason. Their menu offers a creative blend of Eastern and Western cuisines. Mon-Fri 11 am-3 pm, 4:30-9:30 pm; Sat-Sun 12-3 pm, 4:30-9:30 pm. 1650 N. Monroe St. (850) 727-4183. $/$$ L D

Rated Best Hibachi for 2018, Osaka provides dinner and a show, with the chefs seasoning and preparing your meal right in front of you. It’s a meal that’s sure to leave you satisfied as well as entertained. Sun-Thurs 11 am-10:15 pm, Fri-Sat 11 am-10:45 pm. 1690 Raymond Diehl Rd. (850) 531-0222. $$$ D

BBQ MISSION BBQ ★

Rated Best BBQ in 2018, Mission features features memorabilia honoring soldiers and first responders while offering smoked brisket, pork, turkey and more. Mon.–Thur. 11 a.m.–9 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 11:30 a.m.–8 p.m. 216 S. Magnolia Drive. (850) 702-3513. L D

WILLIE JEWELL’S OLD SCHOOL BBQ

Smoked for hours and served in minutes, Willie Jewell’s promises the best BBQ experience you have ever had. Platters, sandwiches or by the pound, Willie Jewell’s offers smoked brisket, pork, turkey, sausage, chicken and ribs with a bevy of Southern sides. Daily 11 a.m.-9 p.m. 5442 Thomasville Rd. (850) 629-4299. $ L D

BREAKFAST/ BRUNCH/BAKERY CANOPY ROAD CAFÉ ★

Traditional breakfasts, fluffy omelets, skillets, French toast and sweet potato pancakes keep customers coming back. Breakfast is the main event but Canopy goes all out on lunch favorites, too, including salads and steakburgers. MonSun 6:30 am-2:15 pm. Multiple locations. (850) 668-6600. $ B L

THE EGG CAFÉ AND EATERY ★

When you’re looking for breakfast favorites, even if it’s lunchtime, The Egg is the place to be. Their made-to-order items use the finest ingredients, and they were voted Tallahassee’s best 16 times, including the 2018 award for Best Brunch. Second location now open in Kleman Plaza. Multiple Locations. (850) 907-3447. $$ B L

TASTY PASTRY BAKERY ★

Tallahassee’s original cakery features fresh breads, bagels, pies, cakes and more. Catering available. Mon.–Sat. 6:45 a.m.–6 p.m. 1355 Market St., No. A-5. (850) 893-3752. $  B L D

CAJUN COOSH’S BAYOU ROUGE ★

This Best Cajun Restaurant winner for 2017 brings the best of the Bayou State right to your table. The menu is jam-packed with Louisiana-style dishes, including favorites like jambalaya, crawfish etouffee, po’boys and seafood gumbo. Not


in a Cajun mood? Coosh’s also offers classic hamburgers, salads and chicken wings. Mon-Tues 11 am-10 pm, Wed-Fri 7 am-10 pm, Sat 8 am-10 pm, Sun 8 am-9 pm. Multiple Locations. (850) 894‑4110. $$ B L D

CATERING TASTEBUDZ CATERING ★

Their slogan is, “Holler if you need your taste buds tantalized.” Cases in point: Moroccan chicken with lemon spinach, beef tips with burgundy mushroom sauce, and Caribbean sweet potato and black bean salad. Serving lunch and dinner. Open daily. 2655-12 Capital Circle NE. (850) 309‑7348. $$ L D

GREEK SAHARA GREEK & LEBANESE CAFÉ ★ Sahara’s fusion of Greek and Lebanese cuisines is unmatched in the area. A large menu and friendly staff cater to all tastes. And don’t forget to order the falafel! MonWed 11 am-9 pm, Thurs-Fri 11 am-10 pm, Sat 12-10 pm, Sun Closed. 1135 Apalachee Pkwy (850) 656‑1800. $$

ITALIAN/PIZZA BELLA BELLA ★

Take your taste buds to Italy with a trip to Bella Bella, voted Best Italian in 2015, 2017 and 2018. This locally owned and operated restaurant has a cozy atmosphere and serves all the classics to satisfy your pasta cravings. Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm, Sat 4-10 pm, Sun Closed. 123 E. 5th Ave. (850) 412-1114. $$ L D

MOMO’S ★

After devouring a slice “as big as your head” at this 2018 Best Pizza winner, chain pizza simply is not gonna cut it. From the black-and-white photos to the bathrooms decorated in album covers, the restaurant has an unmistakable and enjoyable “hole in the wall” vibe. Multiple locations. Hours vary. (850) 224‑9808. $ L D

MEXICAN EL JALISCO ★

In the mood for sizzling enchiladas and frozen margaritas? Make your way to the 2018 Best Mexican/Latin American Restaurant, El Jalisco, where they do Mexican cuisine to perfection. Multiple locations. Hours vary. $L D

SEAFOOD/STEAK THE BLU HALO ★

Blue Halo is a high-end culinary experience featuring dry-aged steaks and fresh seafood along with fine wines and a martini bar. The gourmet farm-to-table menu selections include a wide variety of small-plate appetizers and high-end chops.

A private dining room for up to 20 guests is available. Mon-Thurs 4-10 pm; Fri 4 pm-close; Sat 8 am-2 pm, 4 pm-close; Sun 8 am-2 pm, 4-10 pm. 3431 Bannerman Rd., #2 (850) 999-1696. $$$ L D

BONEFISH GRILL ★

Bonefish is devoted to serving great seafood including shrimp, oysters, snapper and swordfish in a vibrant setting, along with top-shelf cocktails and housemade infusions crafted by expert mixologists. Mon-Thurs 4 pm-10:30 pm, Fri 4 pm-11:30 pm, Sat 11 am-11:30 pm, Sun 10 am-9 pm. 3491 Thomasville Road Ste. 7, (850) 297-0460. $$ L D

The Coast is Here!

CHOP HOUSE ON THE BRICKS

This family-owned, upscale restaurant serves local organic and sustainable meats, seafood, poultry and produce. Craft beers, fine wines and specialty drinks complement dishes such as the Bone-In Ribeye, Plantation Quail and Chop House Burger. Their Knob Creek Bourbon Bread Pudding is a dessert favorite. Tues-Sat 5-9:30 pm, Sun-Mon Closed. 123 N. Broad St., Thomasville, Ga. (229) 236-2467. $$ D

HARRY’S SEAFOOD BAR & GRILL

Harry’s Seafood Bar & Grille, established in 1987, serves Southern, cajun and creole flavors in classic and modern dishes. Full bar is available at each location and offers beer, wine, liquor and unique cocktails. Sun-Thurs 11 am-10 pm, Fri-Sat 11 am-11 pm, and holiday hours. 301 S. Bronough St., in Kleman Plaza. (850) 222-3976. $$ L D

MARIE LIVINGSTON’S STEAKHOUSE ★

Dining at Marie Livingston’s is upscale yet comfortable and always a special treat. Not just a restaurant that serves up savory cuts of prime rib or marbled steaks, this 2018 Best Steakhouse winner is a Tallahassee tradition, and newcomers owe it to themselves to make it a priority to visit. Mon-Fri 11 am-2 pm, 5-9 pm; Sat 5-9 pm; Sun Closed. 2705 Apalachee Pkwy. (850) 562-2525. $$ L D

SHULA’S 347

The legendary Miami Dolphins’ head coach brings the quest for perfection to the dining table at his namesake restaurant, located in Hotel Duval. Keep it light and casual with a premium Black Angus beef burger or a gourmet salad, or opt for one of their signature entrées — a “Shula Cut” steak. Reservations are suggested. Sun-Thurs 5-10 pm, Fri-Sat 5-11 pm. 415 N. Monroe St. (850) 224-6005. $$$  L D

SOUTHERN SEAFOOD ★

Whether you’re looking for fish, shrimp, oysters, scallops, crab or lobster, these guys have you covered. The 2018 Best Seafood Market winner brings the ocean’s freshest choices to Tallahassee’s front door. Mon-Fri 10 am-7 pm, Sat 10 am-6 pm, Sun 12-6 pm. 1415 Timberlane Rd. (850) 668‑2203.

WAHOO SEAFOOD GRILL ★

Bringing the coast to Tallahassee, fresh seafood options mix with steak and classic Cajun dishes. Mon.–Thur. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Fri.–Sat. 11 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–1 p.m. 2714 Graves Road. (850) 629-4059. $$ L D

’Tis the season for catering The holidays are here and that means parties galore. Let us do the work and cater to your needs! From big events to groups ordering lunch in, it would be our pleasure to serve you. Both casual and formal options are available. Get a head start on stocking stuffers with a FREE $20 gift card when you purchase $100 in Wharf gift cards!

Order online! WharfCasualSeafood.com Bannerman Crossing 850-765-1077

Visit our comprehensive, searchable dining guide online at tallahasseemagazine.com/Restaurants.

Costco Shopping Center 850-668-1966

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postscript

EXPRESSING THANKS AFTER A TERRIBLY COLD RIDE UP NORTH by PETE REINWALD

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for another Publix. We busted out the sweaters in January and warmed up to shorts in March. We loved it here, at least I did. Rado liked it here just fine but yearned to move to the Midwest and next to her family in Cleveland. So in summer 2001, we both landed jobs in Chicago. I loved Chicago, for 5 ½ months. Then came the middle of December, and the novelty froze. The snow was cool and everything, but zero degrees? No shorts until June? No sun until noon? No trees? No tropics? No green? No Publix? I wanted out of there, and fortunately, it took only 17 years. I told Rado that, when we got back to Tallahassee, I wanted to ride a bike to work. I wanted to bask in the sun, which I hadn’t regularly seen in the new millennium. To avoid sweating and offending my new colleagues, I opted for a bike that wouldn’t require pedaling, and that means I get to talk more now about ed. Ed is a rock star with a kickstand. As she carries me, she draws smiles and stares, comments and queries: “ You mean you don’t have to pedal?” No. I can if I want to. But I don’t want to. “How far on a charge?”

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

About 20 miles! “How fast does it go?” About 20 miles per hour! “How much for one of those?” How dare you. Ed gets two things in Tallahassee that she never would have gotten in fast and furious Chicago: love and respect. Love? We get caught in the rain sometimes, and one day in late August, we really got caught. We were waiting desperately at the corner of Miccosukee and Magnolia when the deluge suddenly, miraculously, stopped. I turned my watery gaze away from the fuzzy red traffic light to see a young woman standing next to me, holding an umbrella over my head and ed.

“Just thought I’d help,” she said, smiling. Respect? Drivers hold off on the horn, and they slow down as they approach from behind, in step with this city’s patience, politeness and bicycle culture. In my first week here, a tire blew on our car in front of Lake Ella, and two people stopped to help. But back to my bike and what she and Tallahassee have given me. I love the morning sun and the breeze in my face. I love the hills, the trees and the slower pace. I love the conversations with neighbors and the kindness of strangers. As we embark on the holiday season, I express my thanks for ed and the city that she cruises, the city that I so dearly missed. TM

Managing editor Pete Reinwald’s new electric bike gets two good things here that she never would have gotten in Chicago.

PHOTO BY LAWRENCE DAVIDSON

P

lease call her ed. That’s ed with a little “e.” You might say in an email: “Hey, I saw you and Ed on Tuesday over by Uptown Café.” I might reply: “Hey! I think we were on our way to lunch!!! Her name’s ed, by the way.” Ed already puzzles you, I know. She’s weird that way. If you regularly drive a stretch of Miccosukee Road that includes Kate Sullivan Elementary School and Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare, you might have seen her going to and from Rowland Publishing on her way from and to her home in Lafayette Park. A couple of people tell me she looks kind of odd, and I’m like, how dare you?. I think she looks terrific. Plus she’s strong and sturdy, and she’s got good handlebars on her shoulders. She’s my electric bike, and I love her. Ed came into my life in July, shortly after I moved back to Tallahassee with my wife of 31 years, whom I call Rado. That’s Rado with a capital “r.” Rado and I worked as journalists here for most of the ’90s. One of our three kids was born at TMH, and the five of us did what Tallahassee people do. We drove to the Gulf and surfed on canopy roads. We watched football and rooted


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Tallahassee Magazine - November/December 2018  
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