Page 1

Think about home improvements, inside and out

RedEye Coffee’s founder sees change brewing

Mimi’s Table serves as a salute to chef’s mother-in-law

Bright

Spots

How four Capital City neighborhoods embrace their sense of place


I T ’ S N O T J U S T B A B I E S W H O A R E B O R N H E R E.

MOMS ARE BORN HERE TOO.

I N T R O D U C I N G T H E R E G I O N ’ S O N LY ACC R E D I T E D •

BA BY-F R I E N D LY H O S P I TA L

and home to the area's only newborn intensive care unit Tallahassee Memorial is now the region’s only accredited Baby-Friendly Hospital and is still home to the area's only Newborn Intensive Care Unit. This means you and your baby receive the highest level of individualized care within an environment specifically designed for bonding, encouraging a calm transition from hospital to home. All with the support and education moms need from an experienced nursing team who assists you to care for your baby.

Learn more about Baby-Friendly | Take a Tour | Sign up for Sweet Peas Baby & Toddler Club

TMH.ORG/BabyFriendly

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

3


4

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

5


Now Available at Proctor Acura Schedule Your Test Drive Today ProctorAcura 3523 W. Tennessee Street Tallahassee, FL32304 850-574-6600 proctoracura.com

6

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


Contents

JAN/FEB 2019

FEATURES

68

GROUNDS FOR CHANGE

Entrepreneur Mark McNees, CEO of RedEye Coffee and a professor at Florida State University, believes his business is helping to make the world a better place, and he thinks other businesses and his students should aim to do the same. by PETE REINWALD

74

BEAUTIFUL DAYS IN THE NEIGHBORHOODS

We explore the historic neighborhoods of Frenchtown, Indianhead Acres, Lafayette Park and Myers Park, each of which boasts a character or charm of its own. by ROCHELLE KOFF AND ROSANNE DUNKELBERGER

photography by ALICIA OSBORNE

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

7


Contents

JAN/FEB 2019

22 106 GARDENING Your

guide on how to select and plant fruit trees.

33

115 GETAWAYS Take a wine vacation to Romania — yes, Romania.

36 HIS & HERS

Men and women take fashion notes from each other’s closets.

19 CHAMPION Katherine Preston supports the environment at Sustainable Tallahassee.

40 WHAT’S IN STORE

When decorating your home, remember that the world is yours.

22 RELATIONSHIPS

A couple and a friend create a pet project: Tally Cat Café.

43 DINING OUT A motherin-law inspires the name of a popular new restaurant.

students are helping to transform a neighborhood.

28 HEALTH & FITNESS

48 DINING IN The Instant

30 PETS

50 LIBATIONS Bar @

Your shoes could be at the center of what ails your feet.

Freshwater or saltwater? You’ve got colorful choices for an aquarium.

PANACHE

33 CITIZENS OF STYLE

For Dustin Daniels, a stepfather’s tie paved the way to fashion.

43 60 ART

On its way: a new performing arts center near FAMU Way.

GASTRO & GUSTO

26 EDUCATION How FSU

Pot isn’t your mother’s Crock-Pot or pressure cooker.

Betton offers relaxed atmosphere and shifting cocktail menu.

EXPRESSION

53 MUSIC What you get when four nice guys play Southern rock with an attitude.

IN EVERY ISSUE

ABODES

87 INTERIORS

Here’s how to shower yourself with a bathroom makeover.

14 137 149 154

96 EXTERIORS Need

a new or updated irrigation system? We can help.

Think about home improvements, inside and out

PUBLISHER’S LETTER SOCIAL STUDIES DINING GUIDE POSTSCRIPT RedEye Coffee’s founder sees change brewing

100 NEIGHBORHOODS

Cloudland Station draws Tallahassee residents northward.

Bright

64 Tallahassee author Peter Schweizer hits it big with another bestseller.

Spots

How four Capital City neighborhoods embrace their sense of place

ON THE COVER:

Tallahassee attorneys Chad and Jennifer Heckman are seen with children Everett, Juliette and Maddox outside their 3,700-square-foot home in the Capital City’s Lafayette Park neighborhood. “It’s a ‘forever’ house for us,” Chad says. Photo by Dave Barfield

8

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Mimi’s Table serves as a salute to chef’s mother-in-law

PHOTOS BY ALICIA OSBORNE (33), KEY MEYER PHOTOGRAPHY (22), SAIGE ROBERTS (43) AND COURTESY OF HARPER COLLINS (64)

323

DESTINATIONS


Sunny Days & Sandy Toes

ENJOY 25%OFF 4 NIGHTS OR MORE CODE: SPLASH

The # 1 Resort on F lorida’s Emerald Coast

Beach to Bay Accommodations • Four Championship Golf Courses • Year-Round Events Water Sports • Dozens of Shopping & Dining Options • Endless Free Amenities • Tennis

855.852.0151 Sandestin.com/tally TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

9


Contents

PROMOTION

JAN/FEB 2019

SPECIAL SECTIONS AND PROMOTIONS

144 58 OPENING NIGHTS

Songwriter and singer, Jimmy Webb will bring his tribute performance, “The Glenn Campbell Years,” to Tallahassee as part of FSU’s Opening Nights series. The two talents collaborated on songs including “Wichita Lineman” and “Galveston.”

66

BILL KEL LY, COUNCIL ON CULTURE & ARTS

the 2018 Best of Tallahassee event. The best of the best in local businesses danced, drank, dined and networked the night away at The Moon. Read about the winners and how they celebrated.

90

108

DEAL ESTATE A recently listed downtown condo in Plaza Tower, boasts beautiful views, sleek design and custom upgrades. Amenities include gated privacy and parking, concierge and a brand new gym. Off the market is an exquisite, European-style estate in Bobbin Trace, spanning 8,831 square feet.

→ MAYS-MUNROE Building, remodeling or simply seeking new appliances? Mays-Munroe, Inc., the only independent appliance store in Tallahassee, features a show-room with state-of-the-art appliances and an on-site service department. This family owned and operated company ensures quality care and products.

126 NEXT ISSUE 10

← FORGOTTEN COAST MAP

Our illustrated map orients you to a historic and picturesque region of the Gulf Coast that shies from the spotlight.

128 CALENDAR

A new year ushers in a new wave of exciting events. FSU’s Opening Nights series launches its 2019 season with a bevvy of talented performers, the Tallahassee Marathon races through the city, the first-ever Sunshine State Ball occurs and much more.

Your guide to Springtime Tallahassee and 2019 Northwest Florida Weddings

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PHOTOS BY LAWRENCE DAVIDSON (144) AND COURTESY OF MAYS-MUNROE (90), OPENING NIGHTS (58) AND COUNCIL ON CULTURE & ARTS (66)

COCA sat down for a Q&A with Bill Kelly, actor, radio personality, Tallahassee resident, father and Def Leppard fan. Read up on his favorite show, dinner spot and his creative process.

↑ BEST OF TALLAHASSEE RECAP Relive the celebrations and congratulations that occurred at


in

it

for

Yo u

“Our experience at CAMPUS USA Credit Union has been great. We feel like they can grow with us and our family.”

The Prieto Family Members since 2000

{

IN IT FOR

The Prietos

}

$150

Get a

Cash Bonus1

when you open a Free Checking Account with direct deposit 2

CHECKING ACCOUNTS • No monthly fee with no minimum balance requirement2 • CAMPUS Online and Mobile Banking • Instant-Issue Debit Cards

IN IT FOR YOU, TOO – FOR WHAT’S NEXT IN YOUR LIFE.

CHECKING ACCOUNTS

HOME LOANS

AUTO LOANS

CREDIT CARDS

HOME EQUITY

SAVINGS & CDS

Killearn 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. | Governor’s Crossing 101 N. Blairstone Rd. Mahan Village 3122 Mahan Dr.

Call 894-9098 and press 5

Membership is open to anyone in Gadsden, Jefferson, Leon, Madison and Wakulla counties!3

1. Credit approval required. Offer is for new checking accounts only. Offer subject to change without notice. Member must elect to receive eDocuments within the first 90 days and establish Direct Deposit of at least $200 per month. If the requirements are met and the account remains open after 90 days, the $150 bonus will be made available to the member. $150 is considered interest and will be reported on IRS Form 1099-INT. 2. Offer subject to change without notice. Credit approval and initial $50 opening deposit required. Member must elect to receive eDocuments within the first 90 days. 3. Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 is required. Federally insured by the NCUA. TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM January–February 2019

11


Buying or Selling?

Why not let one of the Top Realtors in Tallahassee assist you?

TALLAHASSEE MAGAZINE VOL. 42, NO. 1

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2019

PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BRIAN E. ROWLAND

EDITORIAL MANAGING EDITOR Pete Reinwald STAFF WRITER Hannah Burke CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Steve Bornhoft, Marina Brown, Rosanne Dunkelberger, Elizabeth B. Goldsmith, Rochelle Koff, McKenzie Burleigh Lohbeck, Michael Moline, Karen Murphy, Rebecca Padgett, Audrey Post, Rob Rushin, Liesel Schmidt

CREATIVE AGGRESSIVE strategies for an AGGRESSIVE real estate market! Make the RIGHT call today.

CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER Lawrence Davidson DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY Daniel Vitter CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jennifer Ekrut PUBLICATION DESIGNERS Sarah Mitchell, Shruti Shah GRAPHIC DESIGNER Amanda Brummet CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Dave Barfield, Janecia Britt, Lawrence Davidson, Kira Derryberry, Peter Guttman, Scott Holstein, Kaitlin Erica Photography, Kay Meyer Photography, Rochelle Koff, Michael Macork, Michael K. Photography, Alicia Osborne, Cindi Phipps, Pete Reinwald, Johnston Roberts, Saige Roberts, Charlene Trickey

SALES, MARKETING AND EVENTS

Mike Ferrie,

REALTOR®, SFR

850-566-8373 mIKEFERRIE.COM

When your loved ones only deserve

the best

VICE PRESIDENT/CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT McKenzie Burleigh Lohbeck SALES MANAGER, EASTERN DIVISION Lori Magee Yeaton SALES MANAGER, WESTERN DIVISION Rhonda Lynn Murray DIRECTOR OF NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, EASTERN DIVISION Daniel Parisi DIRECTOR OF NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, WESTERN DIVISION Dan Parker ADVERTISING SERVICES COORDINATORS Tracy Mulligan, Lisa Sostre ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES MaKenna Curtis, David Doll, Julie Dorr, Margaret Farris, Darla Harrison, Linda Powell MARKETING MANAGER Kate Pierson SALES AND MARKETING WRITER Rebecca Padgett SALES AND EVENTS COORDINATOR Mackenzie Ligas SALES AND EVENTS ASSISTANT Abby Crane SALES, MARKETING AND EVENTS INTERN Tayler Ronco INTEGRATED MARKETING COORDINATOR Javis Ogden CLIENT SERVICES COORDINATOR Charles Shelton

OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATION AND HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER Melissa Spear CUSTOM PUBLISHING MANAGER Sara Goldfarb CLIENT SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE/PRODUCTION SPECIALIST Melinda Lanigan CUSTOM PUBLISHING EDITOR Jeff Price STAFF ACCOUNTANT Jackie Burns ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT Amber Dennard RECEPTIONISTS Natalie Kazmin, Kirsten Terhofter

DIGITAL SERVICES DIGITAL EDITOR Janecia Britt TALLAHASSEE MAGAZINE tallahasseemagazine.com facebook.com/tallahasseemag twitter.com/tallahasseemag instagram.com/tallahasseemag pinterest.com/tallahasseemag youtube.com/user/tallahasseemag ROWLAND PUBLISHING rowlandpublishing.com

EDITORIAL OFFICE 1932 Miccosukee Road, Tallahassee, FL 32308. (850) 878-0554 SUBSCRIPTIONS One year (6 issues) is $30. Call (850) 878-0554 or go online to tallahasseemagazine.com. Single copies are $3.95. Purchase at Barnes & Noble, Costco, Books-A-Million, Walgreens and at our Miccosukee Road office. CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUBMISSIONS Tallahassee Magazine and Rowland Publishing, Inc. are not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photography or artwork. Editorial contributions are welcomed and encouraged but will not be returned. Tallahassee Magazine reserves the right to publish any letters to the editor.

850-385-7363 blossomsflowers.com 541 N. Monroe St., Tallahassee (Walker Building)

12

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Copyright January 2019 Tallahassee Magazine, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited. Partners of Visit Tallahassee and Member, Greater Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce.


Setting the Standard for Beautiful Smiles W

ayne had given Melody trips to Sydney, Monaco and Paris. Then, he gave her a lifetime of happiness. You see, Melody will wake up tomorrow looking gorgeous. She’ll smile at strangers “just because.” People will tell her she looks young and vibrant. She’ll feel young and vibrant. And next year, Melody will still be gorgeous. Wayne changed Melody’s life, forever.

Melody chose Dr. Oppenheim. Why? Was it Dr. Oppenheim’s ten gold medals in international cosmetic dentistry competitions, or that he’s one of only 63 AACD Fellows in the world, or that his patients have appeared on the cover of The Journal of Cosmetic Dentistry eight times? Melody says, “Yes it was!” Love someone. Change their smile and their life.

207 East Jackson Street

Before

Thomasville, GA 31792

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

13


from the publisher

NICK, CONNIE AND THEIR ANGEL, JULIE

14

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

given of herself so that Connie and Nick could spend as much time as possible with each other in the home they loved and so that each could die with dignity. Jill’s dedication to the Humphreys did not go unrewarded; she was made heir to their estate. Nick was a good man, and I am a better person and businessman for having known him. Now I’d like to introduce Pete Reinwald as the seventh editor in the 40 years of Tallahassee Magazine, Rowland Publishing’s flagship publication. Pete follows Steve Bornhoft, who elevated Tallahassee Magazine as editor and who — from his new home and base in Panama City Beach — maintains a crucial role as editor of two of our important proprietary publications: Emerald Coast Magazine and 850 Business Magazine. Pete joined us as managing editor in July. He moved here from Chicago, where he worked in various roles for the Chicago Tribune, including as an editor on the nation-world desk. It’s his second stint in Tallahassee, and he says he’s thrilled to be back. We’re delighted to have him. We think Pete’s newspaper background will bring a fresh perspective and unique viewpoint to our story choices and reporting. And I think you’ll find him eager to hear your thoughts and story ideas as he gets reacquainted with this beautiful Capital City of ours.

BRIAN ROWLAND browland@rowlandpublishing.com

SCOTT HOLSTEIN

Many years ago, my sole job each day was selling advertising for Tallahassee Magazine. I had the entire city as my territory and, on a typical day, I would call on 12–18 business owners in hopes that they would see the wisdom in promoting their brand and product or service in the magazine. I developed relationships with people who remain advertisers decades later and, for that, I am truly grateful. After retiring from the corporate world, Nick Humphrey and his wife Connie opened a ham store in Market Square. Connie’s Hams is still in operation today. Nick was a great, but tough, customer. He expected top-line service and drove a hard bargain. He was very particular about the appearance of his ads and where they appeared in the magazine. Soon, he and Connie were great friends and mentors of mine; I had immense respect for both of them. In time, a woman, Jill, came to work for Nick and Connie and became their most highly trusted and valued employee. When the Humphreys decided to retire and travel the country in their new motorhome, they sold (and financed) the store to Jill so that she could have a secure future. Jill had become a member of the family. In 2017, Connie was seriously ill. Nick, in his 80s, found the caregiving role to be extremely taxing, and Jill committed herself to helping. She visited the Humphreys every evening, tended to Connie, and ensured that Nick was all right. Months later, Connie’s final hour neared. In her last words to Jill, she encouraged her to take care of Nick and herself. Along with her mother, Jill did just that for the next six months. Mother and daughter combined to spend time with Nick, day and night, and most helpfully on Connie’s birthday and during the holidays when Nick’s grieving was most intense. Jill would take the night shift and, when her mother arrived in the morning, she would go to open the store. She awakened one morning to find that Nick had died during the night. I was moved to tears when, at Connie’s Hams, Jill told me about Nick’s death. She had compassionately


TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

15


PROMOTION

TALLAHASSEEMAGAZINE.COM ENTER FOR A CHANCE TO WIN

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE

One grand prize winner will get TWO TICKETS TO THE SOUTH WALTON BEACHES WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL at Grand Boulevard on the Emerald Coast from April 25–28 and a WEEKEND GETAWAY AT THE HENDERSON, A SALAMANDER BEACH AND SPA RESORT.

BE THE FIRST TO KNOW Receive exclusive giveaways, announcements, news or other goodies from your favorite businesses with Top of the Town. You’ll receive no more than three messages per month per business and be at the top of your town!

“LILLYTALLY”

“TMAG”

“NARCISSUS”

“TALLYMUS”

Find the Top of the Town businesses you wish to receive exclusive text announcements from (below) and text the keyword to 20673. Be sure to confirm with a “Y” reply. Text STOP to 20673 to opt out. Data rates apply.

16

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Benefitting Destin Charity Wine Auction, the 2019 South Walton Beaches Wine & Food Festival features celebrity winemakers, distillers, chefs, brew masters and entertainers for a four-day celebration benefiting children in need in Northwest Florida.

Giveaway closes: February 28 | Value: $1,000 SIGN UP FOR A CHANCE TO WIN AT:

TallahasseeMagazine.com/Giveaways

LET’S GET SOCIAL

Stay up-to-date with the latest happenings and biggest giveaways around town by following us on social media. Articles, the latest news and stellar images are at your fingertips.

FACEBOOK

Tallahassee Magazine

TWITTER

@TallahasseeMag

INSTAGRAM

@tallahasseemag

PHOTOS BY JANECIA BRITT (ONLINE EXCLUSIVE), MICHAEL K. PHOTOGRAPHY (THE HENDERSON) AND COURTESY OF SOUTH WALTON BEACHES WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL (WINE)

Be in the know with our weekly round-ups of can’t-miss events. Head to TallahasseeMagazine.com for everything from pop-up parties and concerts to bottomless mimosas and cooking classes.


TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

17


Think

Spring is the perfect time to dive into a beach vacation with your favorite people. Sink your toes in the sand, indulge in fresh Gulf seafood, launch to new heights on a parasail ride over looking the emerald waters or just relax and take in the spectacular views. Book now for the best availability and choose ResortQuest by Wyndham Vacation Rentals for the largest selection of Gulf front condos and spacious coastal homes in Northwest Florida.

Spring

877-558-8441 | ResortRentalVacation.com

#VacationDifferently

Fla. Seller of Travel Reg. No. ST-38182. Washington Seller of Travel Reg. No. 603118961. Wyndham Vacation Rentals and related marks are registered trademarks and/or service marks in the United States and internationally. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. 14 Sylvan Way, Parsippany, NJ 07054 / Š2017 Wyndham Vacation Rentals North America, LLC.

18

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


323

JAN/FEB 2019

PROFILING THE PURSUITS, PASSIONS AND PERSONALITIES AMONG US

THE

CHAMPION

GIVING BACK IN GREEN Preston trumpets environmental stewardship at Sustainable Tallahassee

Katherine Preston wanted to give back to the community. She found a way through Sustainable Tallahassee, which suits her professional background and passion.

RELATIONSHIPS photography by JOHNSTON ROBERTS

by ROB RUSHIN

The Purrfect Venture

|| EDUCATION

Creative Driveways

|| HEALTH & FITNESS

Advice for the Battered Sole

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

19


THE

323

K

atherine Preston was a workat-home professional with a young child when she moved to Tallahassee in 2015. Despite the connections of her husband’s family and friends, she found herself feeling isolated by her home-office work environment. So she employed a time-honored strategy: Give back to her community. And Sustainable Tallahassee seemed ready-made for her. “I wanted to find a way to get connected into the community,” she said. “And obviously given my work background and my personal interest in sustainability, I sought out this organization.” She began volunteering at Sustainable Tallahassee, whose mission is to “promote environmental stewardship and economic development through education and collaboration.” In 2018, she became board president. Her term ABOUT SUSTAINABLE TALLAHASSEE

20

January–February 2019

as president ended in December, but she remains on the board. Preston’s professional background and passion lies at the intersection of public policy and best practices for economic and environmental sustainability, especially in the transportation sector. After graduating from the University of Florida with a degree in international relations, she moved to Washington, D.C. She spent most of her time there in the aviation industry, beginning as a congressional liaison for an airlines trade association, where she would find her niche. At the time she worked for that organization, she said, “the Democrats had higher numbers in Congress, and there were some carbon cap-and-trade bills going on at the time. That was the hot issue of the day, and following that, the intricacies of that issue from the airline industry perspective were what got me into the environmental side.” She spent a decade navigating the D.C. labyrinth of lobbying and policy analysis for Boeing and the Airports Council International, earning an M.S. in environmental science and policy from Johns Hopkins University along the way. But after the birth of daughter Ellory, Preston and husband Drew — now Vice President of Corporate Relations for Associated Industries of Florida — decided they wanted to raise their daughter in a smaller, more relaxed environment. During the interview for this regular Tallahassee Magazine feature, which highlights people and the causes they champion, Preston expressed repeated reservations about being called a “champion,” emphasizing that she is “just a volunteer like anyone else.” “Our volunteers really make the group work,” she said, “and I really don’t deserve any special credit.” An outgrowth of a KCCI Community Catalyst project, Sustainable Tallahassee has had to rely on creative programming

to make an impact that belies its small budget and staff. “One of our most recognized activities is our Rags2Bags group,” Preston said. “These sewing circles meet regularly, and they get all donated materials. All the fabric, the sewing machines, everything is donated. They make reusable tote bags to give away free to anyone who wants one. It’s a kind of circular economy.” The organization over the years has given away “thousands and thousands” of these bags, she said. “And that’s something that people know us for and get excited about. “It seems like a “Our volunteers small thing, just handing out bags,” really make the Preston said. “But group work, and this educates indiI really don’t viduals to not use plastic shopping deserve any bags. Over time, I special credit.” think it helps cre– Katherine Preston, ate some awareness Sustainable Tallahassee and change behavboard member iors that can have a big impact.” Jim Davis, Sustainable Tallahassee’s executive director, notes that Preston’s professional background “brings additional credibility to our organization.” Her expertise, knowledge and even personality made her an “exceptional” board president, he said. Preston pointed out that she’ll remain on the Sustainable Tallahassee board for three more years. Asked about her plans for the future, she said: “I’m committed to working hard to keep our programs moving forward. But there are so many great organizations that I’d love to work with.” She cited Second Harvest of Big Bend as an example, and she emphasized how food aligns with her environmental interests, including issues of food waste and methods of composting. “It is a huge component of sustainability,” she said. TM

Sustainable Tallahassee says it works to promote environmental, economic and social sustainability in the Tallahassee regional area through education and collaboration. It says it’s especially focused on how sustainability impacts and is impacted by energy, transportation, water, waste and local food for today and the future. To learn more, visit sustainabletallahassee.org. TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

photography by JOHNSTON ROBERTS


WELL-CONNECTED. HIGHLY EFFECTIVE.

Discover a unique combination of market knowledge and personal relationships that can make all the difference in selling your current home or finding your next. No other team works harder to make your dreams come true! When it matters most, trust HILL SPOONER & ELLIOTT, INC. to deliver more.

EMERALD COAST

|

BIG BEND

|

FORGOTTEN COAST

HILLSPOONER.COM 850.907.2051 TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

21


THE

323

Katie Logue, left, and Josh and Courtney Kendrick opened a furry venture in the Tally Cat Café, which joins Fat Cat Café in the kitty coffee house business.

RELATIONSHIPS

The Purrfect Venture To young couple, their business partner and pet lovers, cat café is great mews by MARINA BROWN

T

ense? Overworked? Missing home? Or just plain bored? Perhaps you’re just in the mood to hold another warm body, to feel it respond and to connect with something adorably cute. If so, Courtney and Josh Kendrick, Katie Logue and the 15 or so feline residents of the Tally Cat Café are eager to roll out the welcome mat for you — a few may even roll on the welcome mat. And some of the furrier boarders may look so precious with all that rolling that you just may want to take one home.

22

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

“We love that,” Courtney Kendrick said. “We place four to five cats each week in new adoptive homes. Our kitties come from the Leon County Humane Society, and we usually have about 15 in the café at any one time, but the turnover is amazing.” Speaking of turnovers, the café on Tallahassee’s Northeast side has those, too. Entering the café, with its nearly dozen tables and sleek white chairs, you’re invited by Courtney or Katie to sample some of the doughnuts, cupcakes, croissants, vegan cookies or other delights and to hydrate with some Lucky Goat coffee. Then they will point you to the big glass windows

that separate the coffee shop from where the action is — the posh room filled with tumbling, jumping, strolling or drowsing cats. Inside the large adjacent space, there are wing-back armchairs, a loveseat and low tables for the humans. It smells sweet … like a home. Along mauve walls, you see shelves that with scrutiny turn out to be little slings

photography by KAY MEYER PHOTOGRAPHY


THANK YOU FOR VOTING US THE BEST OF TALLAHASSEE FOR THE 15TH YEAR

2018

221 E. 7TH AVE | 850.385.3700 | DRRAINEY.COM TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

23


THE

323

← A curious feline explores the cat room at the Tally Cat Café, using a “suspension bridge” to get from one resting place to another. ↑ The café counts on customers who have an eye and a taste for Lucky Goat Coffee, as well as goodies such as cupcakes, doughnuts and croissants.

in which kitties are resting, each connected to the other by “suspension-bridges” that must be fun to navigate if you’re a cat. On a recent day, seven or eight people were in the room, and like the cats, they were sitting in chairs, on tables or on the floor. It was quiet and peaceful, even as kittens tumbled from a little hammock that upends them and others leaped for feathery wands and strings held by the humans. In a corner, a girl and a dreamy calico cat seemed to have fallen in love. Courtney Kendrick, 25, one of the three owners, smiled over the little natural kingdom. Filled with facts, organized and eagerly articulate, she thinks the partners in the Tally Cat Café just might have created their own “perfect jobs.” She worked as an administrative assistant at the Department of Corrections, underutilizing her Florida State University degree in psychology and sociology,

24

January–February 2019

and she wondered with her husband and her friend, Logue, what a dream job might look like. Now, as a one-third owner of Tallahassee’s second kitty coffee house, joining Fat Cat Café, she is all entrepreneur and all in. Her husband, Josh, a bearded and bespectacled 29-year-old, looks like he could be a physics professor. His FSU degree was in physics, but he gave it up for his current job in the Florida Department of Education. “Physics just wasn’t what I thought it was going to be,” he said with a laugh. But handling the books for the café and being “father” to the couple’s three home-cats and their dog feels just right. But there was much to do before the cat café became reality. “Once we’d all sort of landed on a concept, we did our research,” Courtney Kendrick said. Visiting other cat cafes, the trio evaluated other similar businesses in Orlando, Atlanta and South Carolina.

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

“We spent lots of time with “An hour of yoga and an Ben Pautsch from Lucky hour with the kitties,” he Goat Coffee, who advised said. us on locations, starting The departure of Elsa, the costs and where to purchase café’s 100th cat to be adopted, to her new home spawned equipment,” she said. The a send-off party that sent trio then did a business plan donations to the Leon and secured a loan, she said. County Humane Society. Josh Kendrick admits the Back inside the cat room, Tally Cat Café was a leap of five young women snuggled faith, but having sent dozens cats or tickled them with of cats to permanent homes, the tip of a feather. Others the Kendricks said they’ve snapped selfies with their learned a lot and couldn’t be new friends. happier. It’s too soon to think The café charges $7 an about franchises or multihour per person to be in store expansions, the young the cat room. Inside, Josh business couple said. Kendrick said, a full-time For now, fostervolunteer acts as ing and adopting a sort of facilitaout kitties and tor and resource serving up yumperson. The café ADOPT A CAT mies to people also offers Cat The Tally Cat Café who leave reTrivia night on fosters cats and has sent dozens of them newed and reTuesdays and to permanent homes. freshed is not Cat Bingo on It also offers Cat Trivia only their dream We d n e s d a y s . Night on Tuesdays job, but it may be Plus, he said, and Cat Bingo on the dream-hangthere’s Movie Wednesdays. out for other busy Nights with cat TALLY CAT CAFE Tallahasseeans themes, as well 2218 N. Monroe St. just looking for a as Cat Yoga every tallycatcafe.com purr. TM other Sunday. photography by KAY MEYER PHOTOGRAPHY


TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

25


THE

323

EDUCATION

to develop a neighborhood plan for Griffin Heights. “We’re really trying to develop long-term investments in the ↙ A driveway on neighborhoods that are surGeorgia Street in the heart rounding FSU,” Jackson of Frenchtown shows the said. colorful effects of a partnership between the Ash Gallery and She added: “We helped FSU’s Department of the Frenchtown community Urban and Regional sort of mobilize on improvements Planning. that are important to them.” That includes Paint the Pavement. As of early November, artist Harris said three homeowners on Carolina Street wanted their driveways painted, and she said she’s pushing for more. “I want people to walk and look and see the change,” she said. One day soon, Harris said, Frenchtown could become known as the neighborhood that has all of the colorful driveways, just as Indianhead Acres has all of the Indian-name streets. The driveways certainly are treatment for her driveway, and before you getting good reviews. knew it, five houses on Georgia Street had their Menia Chester, owner of Desserts driveways painted in catchy colors and designs. by Latrell Bakery and Catering The Paint the Pavement project takes Company and a consultant for the place during the Frenchtown Heritage Frenchtown Heritage Hub, said Artwalk, an event that Harris launched on she thinks the artistic-driveways Georgia Street. project “softens the perception of With community members, Harris said, the community.” she and students outline a design and ask “I believe that you hear the homeowner what colors they want. Then ‘Frenchtown,’ and people go, ‘Oh, they start painting. Frenchtown,’ ” Chester said. “But For FSU, Jackson said, “It’s really meant to when people drive by and see these, be, one, a community-mobilization tool, to it kind of softens the perception. promote community building … and a way And it just makes people smile.” to get FSU students into the community and For Harris, the drive to revitalize become invested in the community.” hardly stops there. She said she’s In 2016, students from the FSU program also pushing for a neighborhood completed a Better Block project that common area, and she turned the showed policymakers changes that could backyard of her gallery into an area help create a more pedestrianwhere people of all ages friendly and livable area. can relax, play or gather FSU’s Jackson said the to hear live music. Department of Urban and She envisions the heart READ MORE ABOUT Regional planning also worked of Frenchtown as a place FRENCHTOWN IN on projects in the Providence where “you can just walk OUR NEIGHBORHOOD and South City neighborhoods the neighborhood and FEATURE ON PAGE 76. and now is working with the city enjoy yourself.” TM

REVITALIZATION THROUGH FLAIR Creative driveways draw visitors to Frenchtown by PETE REINWALD

A

community-driven wave of shapes and colors is turning heads and attracting visitors to one of Tallahassee’s most historic neighborhoods. Artist and community leader Annie Harris wants the Frenchtown wave to continue, from driveway to driveway and street to street. Take a walk or a drive along Georgia Street, and you’ll see driveways decked out in colorful and creative designs that give you the impression that somebody got the urge to doodle until the cars come home. “People get out of their car and take pictures,” Harris said. “It’s kind of cool to watch.” The driveway paintings mark a partnership between Harris’ Ash Gallery, on Georgia Street, and Florida State University’s Department of Urban and Regional Planning. Harris said she had talked with students of FSU assistant professor April Jackson about neighborhood revitalization. The students wondered how they could get involved and proposed painting driveways, Harris said. “And I said, ‘Why don’t we do mine?’ ” she said. Harris said a neighbor wanted the same

26

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS


TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

27


THE

323

HEALTH & FITNESS

ADVICE FOR THE BATTERED SOLE

Experts caution you not to run from your foot problem

The right shoes provide protection from not only running but also from “stepping out of bed in the morning, until getting in at night,” one doctor says.

H

umans and their feet, it seems, have a complex relationship. Looking down on those far-off extremities, our sentiment ranges from fetish to scorn to shrug. And yet, the human foot again and again rises up to assert itself as something more than just a beast of burden. It is vital to our enjoyment of life. Feet take a beating. The effects of obesity and sedentary lifestyles, plus modern foot coverings — shoes — often not only fail to protect the foot but instead abuse the little darlings. And trouble can start early. Dr. George Merritt of Tallahassee Podiatry Associates said children frequently show an unnatural degree of pronation, an inward roll of the foot, and supination, an outward roll of the foot. He said such conditions can lead to gait problems and, later, orthopedic issues. Merritt, a runner, emphasizes the importance of wearing the right shoes, which he says provide protection from “stepping out of bed in the morning, until getting in at night.” So what are the right shoes? We asked Tyler Perkins, owner of Fleet Feet, a Tallahassee store that focuses on the perfect shoe for people who will cover hundreds of miles on

28

January–February 2019

foot or simply seek a comfortable, supportive shoe. The most common footwear mistake is to wear a shoe that is too small, he says. “People don’t understand that the foot will continue to grow and change over time,” he said. “What they wore at 25 is not what they should wear at 50.” Athletic shoes should be worn at least a full size larger than the barefoot measurement, he says. He says another tendency is to wear athletic shoes for too long. “Even a quality running or walking shoe worn regularly is only going to hold up for six months,” he said. “Beyond that, the cushioning system breaks down and won’t absorb the impact to the feet.” What if you’re not a runner? What if you’re a fashionable woman-about-town, and you have fabulous legs and want to show them off, right down to the tips of your toes? You might want to stay in the stilettos. But not so fast. “All things in moderation,” said Dr. Russell Rowan of Tallahassee Podiatry Associates. “Wear high heels but not all the time. Too long can lead to shortened Achilles tendons and pain on the balls of the feet.” Hammer toes, in which toes bend

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

downward, and bunions aggravated by ill-fitting shoes can be corrected by surgery or prevented via better-fitted shoes with lower heels. Nail funguses, most frequently found in the hot, moist environment of an enclosed shoe, can also develop between an acrylic nail and the nail itself. The same fungi that cause athlete’s foot can grow beneath your artificial toenails. Careful foot cleansing and change of shoes is important prevention. April Woodward of Millennium Nail & Day Spa says the most common issues she hears from her pedicure customers involve a desire for smoother skin on their heels and problems with ingrown toenails. “With soaking and proper trimming, we can address both of these,” she said. Woodward says that regular foot care, such as getting a pedicure, isn’t just for vanity’s sake. “The combination of soaking in warm water, massage and grooming of the toenails helps to maintain healthy feet,” she said. So take a stand, put your best foot forward and treat those tootsies right. TM

PHOTOS BY VALUAVITALY (FEET) AND LZF (RUNNER) / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

by MARINA BROWN


THE R E F I N E R Y

BARRE FITNESS STUDIOS

TM

5 WEEK S $99

2017 & 2018 BEST MONOGRAMMING/ EMBROIDERY SERVICES

TRULY UNLIMITED!

Award Winning

FIGURE PLEASING VOTED THE BEST

fitness studio

1817 THOMASVILLE ROAD R E F I N E RY B A R R E . C O M | 8 5 0 - 9 9 9 - 8 1 8 2 THE

BEST BARRE

AT A

BETTER PRICE

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

29


THE

323 PETS

ONE FISH, TWO FISH Add life with an aquarium by LIESEL SCHMIDT

30

January–February 2019

↗ Saltwater aquariums are known for the wow-factor in their colors, but keep in mind the startup costs and care concerns compared with freshwater aquariums.

Mexico, we are in proximity to some of characteristics of the fish, as that will the most fascinating marine life on the dictate the size of the tank needed. planet, so the world is almost your oyster Hoover pointed out that most of the when it comes to having your pick both fish that you see at pet stores are young for freshwater as well as saltwater fish, and will grow considerably. She said she though there are certain things to know considers only smaller tetras suitable for to ensure that your project is a sustainable a smaller tank. success — as well as one that’s fully legal. Some strongly suggest also keeping The first step would naturally be a so-called quarantine tank to ease the deciding which type of aquarium you’d transition and to ensure that impurities prefer, as both require very different and bacteria are filtered out and preventsystems as well as very different species. ed from causing complications. For the beginner, “I would definitely Regardless of which type of tank recommend freshwater over saltwater you’ve chosen to create, there are certain because the fish are more durable and legalities to observe, as there are strict less expensive,” said Carol Hoover, restrictions enforced by the authorities. “Anyone taking marine species for use in owner of Carol’s Critters on West a personal aquarium would need to adhere Pensacola Street. Also, she said, “Of the to our regulations, including bag limits, stuff that’s available, there’s more of a seasons and size limits for those species,” variety in freshwater than salt.” warns Amanda Nalley, Northwest Regional Setup costs for freshwater fish are lower, Public Information Specialist at the Hoover said, partly because most saltwater Division of Marine Fisheries Management. fish need much more space and thereby a “For those that are in our marine life rule, larger tank. “Most freshwater fish do fine they would also need to be landed alive — in a smaller environment,” she said. typically by use of an aerator. They’d also Saltwater aquariums are known for need to make sure they have a recreational their spectacular colors. If you’re looking saltwater fishing license. Also, once a for a wow factor in a freshwater aquarspecies is taken and maintained ium, you might want to try in a tank, it cannot be returned cichlids — but with caution. to the water.” “They’re large and impresTO GATHER MORE From curmudgeonly catsive, but they fight,” Hoover SPECIFICS fish to adorable angelfish, the said. “Everything has its Visit Florida Fish and quest is yours to create — and drawbacks.” Wildlife Conservation there’s a world of wonder Clearly, personality is a Commission’s website waiting for you to discover huge consideration; but so, at myfwc.com. just behind the glass. TM too, are the various physical

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PHOTO VOJCE / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

F

ish — perhaps really, even aquatic life as a whole — are a magnificent thing to behold in their natural environment, so peacefully flitting about through the water as they travel to and fro to some unknown destination, off on some mysterious quest that seems to be the only thing on their minds. And from their colors to their physical appearance to their strange little mannerisms, it is these very creatures of the deep that so captivate our attention and encourage us to stop and marvel at the wonder of it all — and to wish that we could all be so at peace, so freely floating through life as these unique little specimens whose home is full of oddities yet undiscovered. It is the desire to capture that essence, to take a living, breathing snapshot of the larger picture that drives people to create aquariums of their own, filling everything from fishbowls to massive tanks that take up entire walls with everything imaginable, every element of the depthless waters that they can possibly get their hands on, everything that soothes their soul and tickles their curiosity as they watch in awe while life plays out in living color behind the glass. For most, the tack followed for sourcing fish and other forms of aquatic life for the ultimate aquarium is a traditional one — trekking off to some big-box store offering scores of fish who have already been acclimated to the confines of their new life, standing to study them all, and then picking out the perfect ones to take home. But far more interesting, to be sure, is the more adventurous route, the more handson approach that requires literally diving in and getting your hands dirty. Or, to be more accurate, wet. Living near the northern Gulf of


ENTER THE 201 9

PET Y TOP TALLCONTES T

PHOTO

WIN GREAT PRIZES

WHILE SUPPORTING SPAY & NEUTER

THE TALLY TOP PET PHOTO CONTEST WILL BE HELD FROM FEBRUARY 19TH -26 TH

HOW DOES IT WORK? TAKE A PHOTO We know your pet’s adorable, but let’s show some proof.

ENTER ONLINE Upload your photo and tell us about your pet. The entry fee is just $10 at TallyTopPet.com.

VOTE ONLINE

TA

TO P LLY

P E T P H O T O CO N

Be The Solution, Inc.

TE

Voting is only $1, so invite your friends and family to show their support with a simple click.

ST

Spay & Neuter Today

WIN! In addition to a Grand Prize, winners will be chosen for four pet categories.

Learn More and Enter at www.TallyTopPet.com

BeTheSolution.us TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

31


32

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


panache JAN/FEB 2019

REGARDING MATTERS OF ALL THINGS STYLISH

CITIZEN OF STYLE

FLAIR SUITS HIM A stepfather’s tie informed Dustin Daniels’ fashion sense

Former Tallahassee mayoral candidate Dustin Daniels says “there’s something special about having to put on a tie, walk the walk and talk the talk.”

by MICHAEL MOLINE

HIS & HERS Role Reversal || WHAT’S IN STORE A World of Cool Concepts photography by ALICIA OSBORNE

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

33


panache

“My dad didn’t wake up and put on a suit every day. Everyone I knew — their parents didn’t wake up and put on suits every day. So there’s something special about having to put on a tie, walk the walk and talk the talk.” Daniels began talking the talk while a student at FSU, where he served as student body president. During an International Student Leadership Conference, he met Andrew Gillum, who ← later brought Daniels into Dustin Daniels, his mayoral campaign and who lectures in hired him as chief of international economics and social policy at staff. Florida State University, Daniels, who also quotes a Founding Father lectures in internationwhen it comes to his attire. al economics and social policy at FSU, stepped down from his city job to seek election as Gillum’s successor. That turned out to be John Dailey, who defeated Daniels in the November mayoral election. As evidence of his fashion style, Daniels wears a rather weighty Invicta watch on his left wrist. “It was a gift from my parents when I graduated from college,” he said in an interview before the election. That gift aside, a civil servant’s salary didn’t allow for a ustin Daniels’ first fashion crush was on a necktie — a lot of flash. Neither did growing green and purple number his stepfather wore to his uncle’s up among the working poor. wedding. In their working-class household in Weeki “I remember when I was Wachee, it was the only time he’d seen his stepfather wear growing up, begging my parents to a tie. buy me new clothes, name-brand “I always liked it, but it always sat at the back of his closet,” shoes, and we didn’t have it. I feel Daniels, a Tallahassee mayoral candidate in 2018, said in an like a jackass now, thinking about interview. the pain that I put my parents “My freshman or sophomore year, when I went to my first through, not understanding that formal dance in high school, he gave me the tie. I wore it, and they just didn’t have the means to still have that tie today.” do it,” he said. It sparked the taste for dressing — although he demurs when He learned to improvise. asked whether he qualified as a style icon. “It’s funny to me to “I had to be a little more hear you say that,” he said. creative with my style back “Formal wear was not something I grew up wearing,” Daniels then,” he said. “Style is a way said over a cup of joe at The Hideaway coffee house in Midtown. folks can express their culture

D 34

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

and different ideas. I’ve always been attracted to it.” Graduate study at the London School of Economics further informed Daniels’ dress sense. “When you’re in London, you’ve got to step your game up. You can’t just roll out of bed and put on a hoodie and go to class. This is the style capital of the world. That may have pushed my limits beyond what I was comfortable wearing. You have to. It’s a requirement.” Call Daniels a budget-minded dandy. “I am a whoever-has-asale guy,” he said. “I work for the public sector. You can’t just be stroking checks for highprofile attire. You don’t need to. JCPenney, Macy’s, Target has a suit sale? That’ll work.” Yes, he owns a tuxedo. No, it’s not Italian. “It’s just a regular JCPenney brand. The good news is that your style can be affordable — it doesn’t have to be expensive,” he said. Daniels doesn’t consider the tux a luxury. “When you rent a tuxedo for the third time and continue to pay rental costs, it’s more cost-effective to just go ahead and buy one. In this town, we have a lot of galas and formal events, so it’s good to have.” In dress — as in politics — Daniels takes his cue from a certain Founding Father. “Thomas Jefferson said, ‘In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock.’ In one sentence, that’s a pretty good description of myself,” he said. “You’ve got to keep up with the times, sure. It’s funny, because I guess I’m getting to the age when, stylistically, things that were cool back then are starting to be cool again. Style is cyclical.” TM photography by ALICIA OSBORNE


“Thomas Jefferson said, ‘In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock.’ In one sentence, that’s a pretty good description of myself.” — Dustin Daniels

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

35


panache

GET THE LOOK

Amanda Uprichard Silk Double-Breasted Blazer ($312), Spanx Faux Leather Leggings ($98), Gentle Souls Leather Slip-on Sneakers ($180), Coobie Lace Bralette ($22), Tory Burch McGraw Crossbody in black (pebbled leather) ($378) clothing from NARCISSUS

hair & makeup

KIRSTEN TERHOFTER

model

AMANDA BRUMMET

photography by

KIRA DERRYBERRY

36

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


ROLE

HIS & HERS

reversal Men and women take notes from each other’s closets by REBECCA PADGETT

PHOTO BY LIGHTFIELDSTUDIOS / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

W

earing your sweetheart’s jacket was once viewed as a rite of passage for the relationship. Now, you don’t even need the boyfriend to wear the jacket, or the jeans, for that matter. Gals and guys are taking notes and items from each other’s closets and incorporating them in everyday wear. It’s hard to pinpoint when and where it began, but the blazer may be a good indicator. The blazer started as menswear, part of the suit that men typically donned in business settings. In order to be regarded and respected in the same way men were, women began to wear blazers too; in an office setting they were paired as a pants suit or with a skirt. Now blazers are seen even in casual settings, accompanied by jeans and a pair of heels. The button-up shirt is another business-centric style that has made its way into casual closets. The fit is not as starched or staunched but more relaxed and flowing for the ladies. Whether crisp white, striped or patterned, dressed up with slim pants and heels, women are taking a bit of masculine and mingling it with feminine. Then there are jeans, a staple in any American’s closet. The boyfriend jean came to the scene as a relaxed fit that’s cozy, comfy and lived-in, and women loved them. Men’s jeans then took the trend to the opposite extreme, introducing the skinny jean for the guys. Tight and tailored, these jeans are beloved by fashion-forward men and not just of the rock star variety. Men’s clothing in general has tended towards the tighter fits. The secret is in the stretch. “Whether it’s shirts, slacks or denim, guys love anything with stretch,” said George Gavalas, owner of Nic’s Toggery.

Not only rock stars but fashionforward men love their tight and tailored skinny jeans. With men’s clothing in general, the secret is in the stretch.

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

37


panache

GET THE LOOK

Kenneth Cole White Sneakers with gold detailing ($120), Paige Boyfriend Crop Jeans ($229), Sundays NYC Heathered Grey Pullover with multi-colored stripe detailing ($188) clothing from NARCISSUS

hair & makeup

KIRSTEN TERHOFTER

model

AMANDA BRUMMET

photography by

KIRA DERRYBERRY

38

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


PHOTO COURTESY OF J BRAND

“Men enjoy wearing anything that has a slimmer look. They always come out of the fitting room and say, ‘I now know why my wife loves anything with stretch.’ ” Gavalas recommends 360 “These trends stretch denim by AG French are a great way Terry from J Brand; Ceramica from Alberto in the five-pocket to bring a little of style; and Mizzen+Main shirts work wear into with a four-way stretch. These your off time. … brands are sleek, comfortable and easy to care for. Mixing something We’ve talked tops and bottoms. masculine with Now let’s talk shoes. Women feminine is are stepping it up with sleek sneakers. From slip-on Vans to always a fun high-top Converse to Air Jordan, juxtaposition.” there isn’t a sneaker style that’s — Zoee Rosser, manager off limits to the female foot. and buyer at Narcissus Anything men can do, women can also do, whether in sporty sneaks or high heels. Loafers are another traditionally male footwear that women are now buying. “Loafers can be clean-cut or have fun embellishments like glitter, brass adornments or backless,” said Zoee Rosser, manager and buyer at Narcissus. “Wear them with jeans, boyfriend jeans and dresses alike.” Prints are a playful and prominent way to engage in a reversal of the roles. Dudes no longer shy away from bold prints and bright hues, as both are just another way to express style. Whether it’s subtly striped with pink or daringly different in mutli-colored polka dots, prints, patterns and an array of colors are here to stay. More recently, camouflage and plaid became top contenders for most popular print crossovers. Glen plaid in particular is appearing everywhere from runways to retail. Typically reserved for men’s suits, the print is classy yet cute on dresses, jumpers, blazers and fitted dress pants. Camouflage is standing out instead of blending in on cropped jackets, comfy T-shirts and accent pieces. “These trends are a great way to bring a little of work wear into your off time,” Rosser said. “At the same time, you can bring some of your off time such as sneakers and fun embellishments into the workplace. Mixing something masculine with feminine is always a fun juxtaposition.” Whether you wear these styles boldly and try multiple elements in one outfit or spotlight a certain gender transitional piece, fashion has no rules. Unisex style is intended to be whimsical, expressive and statement-making. When taking notes from each other’s style playbooks, there is no war of the sexes. TM

AD

The Kane Straight Fit, available at Nic’s Toggery, “sits comfortably on the hips with a mid-rise, and fits clean along the thigh and leg opening,” according to J Brand. Color seen here: Keckley Vursigh.

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

39


panache

GIVE THEM THE WORLD Have the world at your fingertips, literally, in the form of a beautifully ornate globe. MY FAVORITE THINGS stocks these stylishly sleek, revamped Mova Globes. The globes perpetually turn, much like the Earth itself, and there is a satellite option. They turn on their axis using ambient light, no cords or batteries required. The globe of your childhood classroom has received an upgrade to include swirls of white and red lines to depict ocean currents and green- and brown-shaded landmasses exhibiting terrain features such as mountain ranges and deserts. The globes are attractive and informative, making them ideal home or office décor.

 What’s In Store? by REBECCA PADGETT

Any way you serve it or slice it, a dish presented in Coton Colors’ neutral nouveau round casserole dish will be sure to impress. The set of three each has a unique design ranging from a subtle diamond pattern to a trio-colored sleek stripe to simplistic polka dots. The three dishes also vary in size, allowing endless possibilities from dips to cinnamon rolls to your favorite casserole. The medium is 9 inches, which perfectly fits your preferred pie. The set’s best and most sought-after feature is that it’s freezer- and oven-friendly. This is ideal for on-the-go — transitioning easily from your fridge to your friend’s oven and onto the table.

INTERCOASTAL COOL SOUTHERN TIDE’S

Intercostal sport shirts and pants are leaders in the line of performance fabrics. The styles are versatile, allowing you to transition from outdoor activities to an evening out on the town to a business meeting. The fabric dries quickly, is moisture wicking, has a two-way stretch and provides 50-plus UPF protection. Lightweight and easy to care for, they never need dry-cleaning. Don’t sweat it with these shirts and pants that are ideal for Florida seasons.

40

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

GOING GREEN Tallahassee has been gifted with the first GREENWISE MARKET, a concept brought about by Publix, featuring specialty, all-natural and organic products. The 29,000-square-foot store, designed with dark concrete and marble, is located on Gaines Street. Shop till you drop from a variety of cheeses, fresh produce, in-house made meats and more. Stop by one of the freshly prepped food stations including pizza, sushi, burritos, wings and pasta. Did we mention kombucha, coffee, juices, beers and ciders on tap? There’s even a lounge and outdoor patio to snack on your purchases and sip on your drinks.

PHOTOS BY LAWRENCE DAVIDSON (GREENWISE MARKET) AND COURTESY OF COTON COLORS AND MY FAVORITE THINGS

A roundup of retail happenings throughout Tallahassee


D O N ’ T W O R R Y. B E A C H H A P P Y.

(850) 553 3327 / 1350 MARKET STREET

WHERE FUN, FASHION AND LIBATIONS COLLIDE R E B E L S A B O U T I Q U E . C O M | 1 9 5 0 T H O M A S V I L L E R OA D, S U I T E 1 | 8 5 0 . 5 9 7 . 7 4 5 6 TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

41


DISCOVER TALLAHASSEE’S BEST CHOICE IN SENIOR LIVING

Enjoy a variety of residential and supportive options at Westminster Oaks to meet your changing needs. Choose from a wide variety of spacious choices in villa homes and garden apartments, all maintenancefree and enriched by access to beautiful campus amenities with services like dining and housekeeping. For those who need a little extra help we offer assisted living, with services including medication management and support with daily living activities. We can also get you back on your feet and doing the things you love with short-term nursing care and rehabilitation.

Learn all there is to smile about at Westminster Oaks

— Call us today at (850) 878-1136 or visit our new website at WestminsterOaksFL.org Westminster Oaks

4449 Meandering Way, Tallahassee

Ac t ive Liv i ng | Assisted Liv i ng | Sk i l led Nu rsi ng | Rehabi l itat ion 42

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


gastro&gusto JAN/FEB 2019

FROM THE SIMPLY IRRESISTIBLE TO THE PIÈCE DE RÉSISTANCE

SECOND COURSE: Miso ginger pork belly nigiri paired with Eagle Eye Infatuation at the Napa Valley Affair Wine Dinner

a tasty

newcomer DINING OUT

Mimi’s Table a welcome addition to fine-dining scene

by AUDREY POST

DINING IN photography by SAIGE ROBERTS

Not Your Mother’s Crock-Pot — or Pressure Cooker

|| LIBATIONS

Drink Glorious Drink

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

43


gastro & gusto

↑ Owner and executive chef William Lawson, above left, speaks to diners during a recent “Monday night wine-dinner series” event at Mimi’s Table. Meanwhile, diners enjoy a wine pairing to go with one of five California-inspired courses served on that night. Among them: octopus ceviche, above.

T

ake a French neighborhood bistro concept, toss in a experience in an array of cooking settings throughout little Italian cuisine and the flavors of the American the Southeast — from restaurants to health care facilities South, wrap the whole thing in a warm and to country clubs. welcoming atmosphere, and you get Mimi’s Table. For his first career, he worked in Florida politics and The fine-dining restaurant, which opened in late June governmental relations for about 10 years, beginning in on Miccosukee Road in the location formerly occupied the early 1990s. He divided his time between Sarasota by the Miccosukee Root Cellar, opens at 4 p.m. for and Tallahassee, where his mother, Regena Lawson, has drinks and appetizers Tuesday through Saturday, with lived for 30 years. dinner service starting at 5 p.m. The menu changes “Eventually, I got burned out with politics,” he said. slightly every day or two. He landed in Memphis, not far from his grandmother’s Owner and executive chef William Lawson said the home in Tupelo, Mississippi. concept and inspiration for the restaurant are based “I like to tell people that I earned a Ph.D. in French on his mother-in-law, Rebecca “Mimi” Johnson. cooking in 2 ½ years when I apprenticed “Family and friends are always with two French chefs in Memphis,” he welcome at her table,” he said. said. “They were extra hard on me the The restaurant’s details reflect the first six months” — making sure he was life path and values of Lawson and his serious about becoming a chef before wife and partner of eight years, Holly 1311 Miccosukee Road sharing their tips of the trade. (850) 999-8406 Lawson. Chefs Jean Christophe Blanc and Gene mimistabletally.com For the chef, the path wasn’t a straight Bjorklund of Aubergine Restaurant in 4–10 p.m. Tuesday shot to Mimi’s Table. This is his second Memphis schooled Lawson in every through Saturday career, and it has been peppered with aspect of a fine-dining French kitchen.

MIMI’S TABLE

44

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS


“I learned what I call European classical cooking,” Lawson said. “I didn’t realize it at the time, but we were doing some pretty forward-thinking things such as shopping at farmers markets, cooking sous-vide, trading flour and other pantry staples with Mennonite farmers in Middle Tennessee in exchange for produce and meat,” plus doing their own butchering. The Lawsons moved to Tallahassee four years ago, when Lawson was hired as head chef at Capital Regional Medical Center. It wasn’t a huge leap for him; he had overhauled the food service at two high-end assisted living and memory-care communities near Nashville, Tennessee. After two years at CRMC, he moved to Capital City Country Club, which he left after 1 ½ years to open Mimi’s Table. The owner/executive chef appears to be making a mark with the restaurant’s “Monday night wine-dinner series,” in which Mimi’s

Table pairs wine and food in regional and global themes. Take the November “Napa Valley Affair,” which featured five California-inspired courses and included the owners of a California winery who were in town to meet with the restaurant’s distributor. “It was the best night we’ve had here at the restaurant,” Lawson said in late November. The wine-dinner series includes a sommelier who describes the wines, discusses the winemakers’ location and philosophy and explains why the wine pairs well with the food. Lawson tells guests about the food, including flavor profiles and ingredients. The restaurant’s February event will focus on an Italian theme, Lawson said. Reservations are required. “It’s just nice from a standpoint of a chef and business owner that there’s a market for what we’re doing and that the wine series is highly popular and selling out in advance,” he said. TM

↑ Mimi’s Table gets its name from Rebecca “Mimi” Johnson, the motherin-law of owner/executive chef William Lawson. “Family and friends are always welcome at her table,” Lawson said.

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

45


ADVERTORIAL

Restaurant Spotlight

Bumpa’s Local 349 Bumps into Top Spot for Sports Pub As most interesting stories begin, it all started with a chicken wing — a wing so good, so unmatched in taste, that it inspired the concept of Bumpa’s Local 349. The chicken wing in question was first consumed by Bumpa’s owner Eddie Agramonte while visiting London. Then and there, he decided to bring the deliciousness stateside. While a chicken wing was the spark that lit the fuse for the brand new Bumpa’s, Agramonte is no stranger to the restaurant business. He began as a dishwasher at the age of 13 and worked all angles of the service industry before himself becoming an owner. Agramonte now owns multiple restaurants in Tallahassee, but he is most widely known for Tallahassee’s beloved

Cuban restaurant Gordos. With Gordos as the beacon of his success, he sought to venture into a different scene — sports bars. “I wanted to open a locally owned sports bar that isn’t a franchise,” said Agramonte. “Nothing is frozen or prepackaged, it’s all fresh and made in-house. Our food is locally sourced, and the craft beers are locally brewed.” Agramonte describes the menu as classic comfort foods with twists that make them even better. Prime examples are the Bumpa Burger, which is topped with housemade pimento cheese, pickled red onions, arugula and roasted jalapeno, and the Churrasco Tacos, filled with tender skirt steak, cilantro lime slaw and chimichurri.

Other crowd favorites include the fried ribs, lavash and, of course, the wings. The atmosphere is inviting with decor that nods to iconic sports movies. One talking point is the array of live-edge wood tables, including a pre-civil war cedar, and the iconic “Old Bumpy” — a tree that gnarled to form a face. A veteran in the industry, Agramonte considers those in the service industry to be some of best people in the world, therefore you can always expect exceptional service from his staff. “Some of my favorite moments are on nights when we are really busy, and we are all working together as a cohesive machine to provide great food and great service,” said Agramonte. “I get to

BUMPA’S 2738 Capital Circle NE | (850) 999-8652 | Bumpas349.com

46

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

witness those people smile while enjoying their food, the experience and the friends that surround them. Those moments are why I love this industry.”


GOVC 1125 - TALLY MAG AD NOV-DEC 2018

GOVERNORS CLUB

ADVANCED DERMAL

SOLUTIONS

TALLAHASSEE’S PREMIER

Wedding Venue INFORMATION AND ONLINE BOOKING AT

ADVDERMAL.COM • 850.906.9900 • Facials and Chemical Peels • Botox and Fillers

• Eyelash Extensions • 20 years of experience

• Microblading • Dermaplaning

3116 CAPITAL CIRCLE NE, SUITE 5 AT HERMITAGE BLVD. //

Elegant Ceremony & Reception Space WEDDING PACKAGE INCLUDES:

QR Code Generation and Mobile Websites ∙ CD / DVD Duplication and Full Color Label Printing ∙ Flashdrives with Loaded Data ∙ Document Scanning ∙ Oversize Scanning ∙ Photo Scanning ∙ Holiday Cards ∙ Calendars ∙ Invitations ∙ Custom Notepads ∙ Custom Notecards ∙ Promo Prodwith ucts ∙ Personalized Letters ∙ Postcards ∙ Bulk Business Mail ∙ “Lumpy” Mail & Fulfillment ∙ Newsletters ∙ Training Binders and Books ∙ Binding Options (Comb, Coil, Wire, Perfect, Tape, Booklets) ∙ Programs ∙ Presentation Signage / Foam Board Signs ∙ Event Tickets ∙ CDs / DVDs with Printed Full Color Labels ∙ Retractable Banner Stands ∙ Mailing ∙ Step & Repeat Backdrops ∙ Custom Lanyards and Nametags ∙ Postcards (Including Political Mail) ∙ Newsletters ∙ Flyers ∙ Small Posters ∙ Business Cards ∙ Catalogs ∙ Rack Cards ∙ Table Tents ∙ Menus ∙ Presentation Folders ∙ Artwork on Canvas ∙ Backlit Film ∙ Indoor/Outdoor Banners ∙ Foam Board Mounted Signage ∙ Magnetic Vehicle Signs ∙ Architectural Plans ∙ Posters ∙ Retractable Banner Stands ∙ Static Cling ∙ Window and Door Lettering ∙ Wall Decals, Fatheads, or Wall Words ∙ Yard Signs ∙ QR Code Generation and Mobile Websites ∙ CD / DVD Duplication and Full Color Label Printing ∙ Flashdrives with Loaded Data ∙ Document Scanning ∙ Oversize Scanning ∙ Photo Scanning ∙ Holiday Cards ∙ Calendars ∙ Invitations ∙ Custom Notepads ∙ Custom Notecards ∙ Promo Products ∙ Personalized Letters ∙ Postcards ∙ Bulk Business Mail ∙ “Lumpy” Mail & Fulfillment ∙ Newsletters ∙ Training Binders and Books ∙ Binding Options (Comb, Coil, Wire, Perfect, Tape, Booklets) ∙ Programs ∙ Presentation Signage ∙ Foam Board Signs ∙ Event Tickets ∙ CDs / DVDs with Printed Full Color Labels ∙ Retractable Banner Stands ∙ Step & Repeat Backdrops ∙ Custom Lanyards and Nametags ∙ Postcards (Including Political Mail) ∙ Newsletters ∙ Flyers ∙ Small Posters (12 x 18 or Smaller) ∙ Business Cards ∙ Catalogs ∙ Rack Cards ∙ Table Tents ∙ Menus ∙ Presentation Folders ∙ Artwork on Canvas ∙ Backlit Film ∙ Indoor/Outdoor Banners ∙ Foam Board Mounted Signage ∙ Magnetic Vehicle Signs ∙ Architectural Plans ∙ Posters ∙ Retractable Banner Stands ∙ Static Cling ∙ Window and Door Lettering ∙ Wall Decals, Fatheads, or Wall Words ∙ Yard Signs ∙ QR Code Generation and Mobile Websites ∙ CD / DVD Duplication and Full Color Label Printing ∙ Flashdrives with Loaded Data ∙ Document Scanning ∙ Oversize Scanning ∙ Photo Scanning ∙ Holiday Cards ∙ Calendars ∙ Invitations ∙ Custom Notepads ∙ Custom Notecards ∙ Promo Products ∙ Personalized Letters ∙ Postcards ∙ Bulk Business Mail ∙ “Lumpy” Mail & Fulfillment ∙ Newsletters ∙ Training Binders and Books ∙ Binding Options (Comb, Coil, Wire, Perfect, Tape, Booklets) ∙ Programs ∙ Presentation Signage / Foam Board Signs ∙ Event Tickets ∙ CDs / DVDs with Printed Full Color Labels ∙ Retractable Banner Stands ∙ Step & Repeat Backdrops ∙ Custom Lanyards and Nametags ∙ Postcards (Including Political Mail) ∙ Newsletters ∙ Flyers ∙ Small Posters (12 x 18 or Smaller) ∙ Business Cards ∙ Catalogs ∙ Rack Cards ∙ Table Tents ∙ Menus ∙ Presentation Folders ∙ Artwork on Canvas ∙ Backlit Film ∙ Indoor/Outdoor Banners ∙ Foam Board Mounted Signage ∙ Magnetic Vehicle Signs ∙ Architectural Plans ∙ Posters ∙ Retractable Banner Stands ∙ Static Cling ∙ Window and Door Lettering ∙ Wall Decals, Fatheads, or Wall Words ∙ Yard Signs

Yep!

Clubhouse Wedding Space Balcony Private Bridal Suite Guest Tables & Chairs Service Staff & Bartenders Cake Cutting, Dance Floor & Linens Personal Event Coordinator

We can do that.

Call Nicole Carval, 850-205-0665 850.671.6600 www.targetprintmail.com

for a Tour & Additional Information

202 S. Adams Street � www.GovClub.com TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

1/2 V - 3.8125'' x 10''

January–February 2019

47


gastro & gusto

← In addition to slow-cookers and pressure-cookers, the latest pots function as rice cookers, steamers, yogurt makers, sautérs/searers, cake makers, sterilizers and warmers.

DINING IN

KITCHEN CRAZE Not your mother’s Crock-Pot — or pressure cooker by AUDREY POST

48

January–February 2019

initial investment of equipment has to be factored in,” said Kendra Zamojski, regional specialized agent in Family and Consumer Sciences for the University of Florida/IFAS Extension’s Northwest Florida district. Pressure cooking cuts the time to a fraction of stovetop or oven cooking, and it doesn’t destroy vitamins and minerals the way some other cooking methods, such as frying, do. But it’s important to start with healthy recipes, she said. Adding a lot of fat and sugar to healthy ingredients defeats the purpose. In addition to slow-cookers and pressure-cookers, the latest pots function as rice cookers, steamers, yogurt-makers, sautérs/searers, cake makers, sterilizers and warmers. The newest feature, Ultra, allows you to program the method of cooking, time and temperature manually. Because the lid locks tightly, it’s great for transporting food to potlucks and meetings. But there are safety concerns if you don’t use it properly, particularly the delayed-start setting. “You definitely don’t want to throw a bunch of meat in there and let it sit all day,” Zamojski said. “Use the slow-cooker function instead. And a pressure cooker should never be left alone.”

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Based on comments on the manufacturer’s Facebook user group and reviews on foodie blogs, you should take a class or have someone teach you how to use your multifunction device. While users love the pots, they almost unanimously bash the instruction manual as confusing and insufficient. Sue Williams got her Instant Pot for Christmas in 2017, and initially she was intimidated. She credits a friend who died last summer with teaching her how to use it. “She’d say, ‘Oh, it’s easy. Try this recipe,’” said Williams, a food prep assistant at KitchenAble, a Tallahassee cooking school and catering service. “I started out with Chinese chicken and broccoli.” She said making yogurt and then cheese from the yogurt is easy, just a long process. Despite the sauté function, she finds it easier to brown and sauté food in a skillet first. “I use the sauté function to thicken things afterward,” she said. She also said vegetables cooked in the pot tend to be mushy, unless they are part of a dish such as chicken and broccoli. Her favorite dish to prepare is barbecued pork ribs. TM

↑ Barbecued Pork Ribs INGREDIENTS

➸ 1 rack of ribs, seasoned to taste ➸ ½ cup apple cider vinegar ➸ ¼ cup water DIRECTIONS

Put the cooking rack in the bottom of the cooker. Pour in the apple cider vinegar and water. Lay out the ribs and roll up like a cinnamon roll and insert with bones standing up. Pressure cook on high for 18 minutes. Use natural release, not quick release, for at least 10 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400° F. Unroll the ribs onto a foil-lined baking sheet and glaze with your favorite barbecue sauce and bake for 5 to 10 minutes until brown. COOK’S NOTES: (1) She

likes the pre-seasoned ribs from Costco. (2) She has the 8-quart model and can add a second rib rack, overlapping the end of the first rack with the beginning of the second rack and continuing into one big roll. The amount of vinegar and water in the bottom stays the same.

PHOTOS BY ZELENO / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS AND COURTESY OF INSTANTPOT.COM

Y

ou might remember when the Crock-Pot slow cooker debuted. The redesigned 1950 bean cooker changed the way people cooked when it came on the market in 1971. But if you forgot to load the slow cooker in the morning, you still had an option: your trusty pressure cooker. The cast aluminum stovetop home pressure cooker from Presto was introduced at the 1939 World’s Fair in New York and quickly became a household staple. In 1991, an electric model was introduced. But it took a laid-off software engineer who was worried about feeding his children a more healthy diet to marry the slow cooker and the pressure cooker and create the latest craze in cooking: programmable multifunction pressure cookers. The first one hit the market in 2010, cooking up a craze that has continued to grow. While multiple brands remain on the market, Robert Wang’s original Instant Pot remains the industry leader. His first pot had five functions; his latest has 10. “Programmable pressure cookers can be part of a healthy and economical meal plan, but the


PRIVATE BANKING from Capital City Bank

Melissa Wright Private Banker

True private banking is about superior service and comprehensive solutions for you, your family and your business. Our experienced Private Banker and Accredited Wealth Management AdvisorSM, Melissa Wright, offers custom financial management, the highest level of personalized service and absolute confidentiality.

Call Melissa today: 402.7731 www.ccbg.com

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

49


gastro & gusto

Brothers Matt (left) and Eric Rodin

LIBATIONS

DRINK GLORIOUS DRINK Cozy space offers breakfast, coffee and — you bet — cocktails by ROB RUSHIN

Bar @ Betton

1950 Thomasville Road Opens at 4:30 p.m. Tue–Sat. Closes 10:30 p.m. Tue-Thu, 11:30 p.m. Fri–Sat. Small plates and desserts available.

50

January–February 2019

B

efore we get down to some serious drinking, let’s begin with a fact that really ought to blow your mind: Food Glorious Food, that perennial favorite of Tallahassee foodies, just celebrated its 36th birthday. That means 36 years of delivering high quality and service, innovating recipes to stay abreast of evolving ideas about food and innovating changes that keep the whole concept fresh and lively. Restaurant years are dang close to dog years, but you can take out-of-town guests to FGF and leave them thinking that Tallahassee is on the cutting edge of gustatory heaven. A recent innovation at FGF is the Bar @ Betton, slightly “upstairs” and behind the main dining room in what was, back in the day, the entirety of the restaurant. This cozy space serves triple duty. Aside from bar service, you can grab coffee and breakfast at Beans @ Betton or satisfy your sweet tooth any time with creations from the stellar FGF bakery. But this is about the bar, doggonnit, so let’s get to it. Stanwyck, my trusty libations consultant, is short on time. There’s a plane to catch to St. Kitts for her work, of which we must not speak. Look. Just forget about St. Kitts, OK? I forgot myself. Carry on. We settle in with Matt and Eric Rodin, Tallahassee-raised brothers who are FGF’s general manager and bar manager. The bar is modest but comfortable, with

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

seating for about 30 with another half dozen tables on the patio. It can get crowded, especially during happy hour (4:30–7.30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday), but the vibe is generally relaxed, with lots of walk-in regulars from surrounding neighborhoods. The cocktail menu is fluid (forgive me), shifting with seasonal tastes, menu changes and availability of certain herbs and vegetables growing in the FGF garden. Eric suggested the Apple Cider Mule for our consideration. FGF offers a variety of mule concoctions, and as it turns out, Stanwyck is something of a mule cognoscente. We were excited to see what emerged. What emerged was a propane torch and a smoking board, necessary tools for preparing this simultaneously warming and refreshing drink. Start with a fresh apple slice and coat it in cinnamon sugar. Then fire up the torch and brûlée that sugar-coated sucker on the smoking board until it is golden, crispy brown. Both sides, now. No shirking. Mix the ingredients from the accompanying recipe over ice in a copper mule cup. Toss once. Drop in two cinnamon sticks and drape that brûléed apple slice across ➸ 1.5 oz. Tito’s vodka ➸ .5 oz. St. George the top. Voila. The Apple Spiced Pear Cider Mule. Liqueur Stanwyck took one ➸ 2 oz. apple cider ➸ .5 oz. lime juice sip and offered that ➸ Top off with it seemed the kind of Gosling Ginger cocktail that would go Beer ➸ Toss once and nicely with dessert, garnish with 2 say an apple pie or cinnamon sticks crumble. Turns out the and a brûléed apple slice cocktail/dessert pairing is a standard at FGF, with offerings like the Almond Joy martini or the Key Lime Pound Cake martini, obvious partners to their namesake FGF desserts. Then Stanwyck snagged the apple, cursed her three times, fairly swooning over its crunchy surface and tart sweetness. Thus was I denied my ration of fresh fruit for the day, though it was worth it to see her savor that slice of serpent’s temptation, eyes closed, as it rained outdoors under a clear blue sky. TM

Apple Cider Mule

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS


BUY FRESH BUY WILD BUY SOUTHERN WE’RE THE BEST PLACE FOR ALL YOUR SEAFOOD NEEDS. 1415 TIMBERLANE ROAD in Market Square

850.893.7301 | SOUTHERNSEAFOODMARKET.COM TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

51


. X A EL

.R K IN

R D . EAT

850 422 0071

DAILY HAPPY HOUR FROM 4-7PM Enjoy savory tapas, refreshing drinks, and a relaxing atmosphere at Juicy Blue or our outdoor bar, AQUA. The happy hour menu features 2-4-1 pricing on select cocktails, wines, and local brews.

Four Points by Sheraton Tallahassee Downtown | 316 West Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32301 www.fourpointstally.com 52

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


expression NOV/DEC 2018

KEEPING TABS ON ALL THAT MUSES INSPIRE JAN/FEB 2019 KEEPING TABS ON ALL THAT MUSES INSPIRE

MUSIC

A TASTE OF JAM

Jon Bellamy & the Rebels play Southern rock with a bit of an attitude ↗

by PETE REINWALD

(Clockwise from top) Thad LeGette, Jon Bellamy, Adam Reichert and Julian Brown make up Jon Bellamy & the Rebels.

ART

A Big Nod to Performing Arts

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS

|| BOOKS

Continuing to Cut into Corruption

|| STAGE

Poignant and Prolific

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

53


expression ↘ From left, drummer

Julian Brown, guitarist and lead singer Jon Bellamy, lead guitarist Adam Reichert and bass player Thad LeGette quickly have become friends who bonded in their music.

T

o learn the genesis of Tallahassee’s new and rebellious Southern rock band, turn your assumptions away from the garage. Think bigger building, with lots of speakers. “I work in the Capitol, in the senate,” said Jon Bellamy, who referred to the Florida Senate’s Sergeant at Arms. “One of the guys who works in the sergeant’s office, I’d seen a guitar in his office, and I was like, ‘Hey, you play a little bit?’ ” Boom. One question launched a band that holds out hope that it one day could, in terms of commercial or touring success, make a statement. Since their formation in summer of 2016, Jon Bellamy & the Rebels have been writing songs, establishing their sound and moving up the charts in terms of where they fit into Tallahassee’s music scene. They remain regulars at venues such as

54

January–February 2019

Hurricane Grill & Wings, Fifth and Thomas and Thomasville’s Plaza Restaurant and Oyster Bar, where they keep feet tapping and proprietors clapping. They also have established a place on YouTube, with original songs such as “Bait Shack,” “American River” and “White Trash Dad,” which underscore that Southern dash of blues and country in their rock. As they consider what songs to write next, they’ve got rock, country and, of course, Southern rock covered. They put their own spin, often with a little extra voltage, on tunes from Muddy Waters, Creedence Clearwater Revival and Southern-rock influence Lynyrd Skynyrd, to mention a few. On a September night in Thomasville, patrons in a packed bar at Thomasville’s Plaza Restaurant bobbed their heads to an energetic version of Johnny Cash’s “Folsom Prison Blues,” and they crowded the dance floor for The Band’s “The Weight.”

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

When it came time for the latter song’s chorus and signature harmonization, they put the load right on themselves and delivered. “It’s not like we’re in Rolling Stone,” said Bellamy, the band’s rhythm guitarist, lead singer and songwriter. “But it’s been an awesome little journey so far.” A Florida State University political science major who minored in English, Bellamy would write poetry, short stories and a song here and there, but he’d never share his work. “You kind of forget about it, and it gets lost,” he said. He said he never sang in front of anybody until 2016, when he took the open mic at Salty Dawg Pub & Deli on North Monroe Street. It went well enough to dream. His greatest inspiration came during a trip to California, he said. He did some rafting on the American River, which starts at Folsom Lake near the prison that photography by SAIGE ROBERTS


More than a bank. People who care. At Synovus, relationships are important to us–after all, we’re your neighbors and friends. People from here who care about what’s important to you. And we’re here. For you. 1-888-SYNOVUS | synovus.com

Synovus Bank, Member FDIC. TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

55


McNEILL

PLUMBING

With over 35 years of experience, we’re your go-to Professional Plumbers.

L i c . # C F C 0 4 3 0 67

C H A S E M c N E I L L , G R E E N C E R T I F I E D P L U M B E R , L i c . # C F C 1 4 274 57

KEITH

State Certified Plumbing Contractor Residential & Commercial Construction Factory Trained Water Heater Technicians Green Certified Plumbers | Bathroom & Kitchen Remodeling High Pressure Sewer Line Cleaning | Storm Drain Cleaning Tankless Water Heater Experts | Slab Leak Location Experts Over 50 Employees | 24/7 Service Department mcneillplumbing.com (850) 562-5504

56

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

expression Johnny Cash turned into an icon. “That’s when I decided I wanted to start the band,” he said. In “American River,” he would write and sing: “I went on down that American River, “I let that water reach my mind.” “Life’s kind of like … it’s like a funnel, and the older you get, your opportunities start to fade away,” said Bellamy, 30. “It was kind of late in life, but I was like, ‘I’ll hate myself if I don’t do it.’ ” Bellamy and Adam Reichert, the lead guitarist whom he approached in the Florida Senate, went looking for a drummer. They found one Julian Brown, a friend of a friend who introduced them to a fellow Georgian, Thad LeGette, who would be their bass player. “I don’t want Other than Brown, who made music it to stop. I with his brothers before college, none think a band’s had significant experience playing in a band. success has You’d likely find all four exceedingly to do with polite, thrilled to be playing music longevity and together and delighted that you’d ask them about it. not giving up.” “It’s always been a dream of mine — Julian Brown, to quit my job and go on tour with a drummer, band,” said LeGette, 28, who works with Jon Bellamy & family members at Graco Fertilizer Co. the Rebels in Cairo, Georgia. “As of right now, I just enjoy hanging out and playing music with the guys whenever we have time to.” Their earliest influences span all of popular music since the dawn of rock and roll, from A (Allman Brothers) to Z (Led Zeppelin). Blend those influences, and you get Jon Bellamy & the Rebels — a name that emphasizes attitude, not division. “It’s saying we like doing what we do, and if you don’t like it, you don’t have to listen,” said Reichert, 28. They don’t always have time to play, not with a new baby for the lead singer and his wife, Amber. And with a new legislative session coming in March, half of the band expects to be focused more on bills than in where they’re billed. Yet they said they’ll find a way to play on as friends who met and bonded in music. “If that’s all it ever became, I’d be happy with that,” said drummer Brown, 27, executive director of the Joint Development Authority in Grady County, Georgia. “That being said, I don’t want it to stop. I think a band’s success has to do with longevity and not giving up.” As for banking on a big break, Bellamy said: “There’s a part of you that’s got to be a little realistic, and there’s the part of you that’s always got to dream.” TM


G HAIR

SALON

FLAGSHIP (Salon): 1435 E. Lafayette St. (Next to Pier1) Tallahassee, FL 32301 • 850-681-6681 MARKET DISTRICT (Salon+Spa): 1410 - C6 Market St. • Tallahassee, FL 32312 • 850-727-0482

www.Soleil7.com

THE ART AND SCIENCE OF PURE FLOWER AND PLANT ESSENCES

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

57


PROMOTION

Jimmy Webb In tribute show, he celebrates Glen Campbell

Presented by Opening Nights at Florida State University

W

hen Jimmy Webb arrived at Johnny Rivers Music in the mid-1960s, he had unrecorded songs in his pocket, including a ballad that Frank Sinatra would call the “best torch song ever written.” Rivers immediately recognized “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” as a stone cold hit. But with a song of his own, “Poor Side of Town,” topping the charts, Rivers made “Phoenix” available to rising star Glen Campbell and his producer, Al De Lory, at Capitol Records. De Lory was incredulous. “Why,” he asked of Rivers, “are you giving this away?” Replied Rivers, “You can only have one No. 1 song at a time.” At age 14, Webb had been intrigued by Campbell’s recording of “Turn Around, Look at Me.” After a day spent plowing an Oklahoma wheat field, Webb prayed that he might meet Mr. Campbell and, “Lord, if it’s not too much to ask, maybe he could record one of my songs.” When Campbell released “Phoenix” in 1967, Webb, a JIMMY WEBB

preacher’s kid, found himself thinking “prayer really works.” A close but improbable relationship between Webb and Campbell would survive 50 years until Campbell’s death from Alzheimer’s disease in 2017. “I was a left-wing hippie kid and he was an Orange County Republican,” Webb said. “Never would the twain have met, except, in the music room. It’s a level playing field and, in some crazy way, his voice and my songs were made for each other.” Those collaborations would come to include “Wichita Lineman” and “Galveston.” “Glen was a freakishly talented singer with an instrument that was good from bottom to top,” Webb said. “But his last two years may have been his best because of the bravery he displayed.” In March, Webb will bring his tribute performance, “The Glen Campbell Years,” to Tallahassee as part of FSU’s Opening Nights series. The show, produced by Webb’s wife, Laura Savini, combines storytelling, comedy, still photography, videos and music in what Webb said is the product of “meticulous research into Glen Campbell’s off-camera life.” About his own vastly prolific creative

process, Webb said, “It’s like the prostitute said. I’ve done it every way there is.” He wrote “Up, Up and Away”’ in 30 minutes. At other times, he has started with a title and worked on a song for a year. But in every case, he said, “you get to that point where you are locked in spiritually and it’s the best feeling in the world.” Webb once famously commissioned stainedglass windows featuring some of his chief inspirations — Joni Mitchell, Art Garfunkel, Paul Simon, Bob Dylan, George Harrison, John Lennon and Elvis Presley. If he could sit down to dinner with one of them tonight, who would it be? “Elvis, just me and him,” Webb said. “No Tom Parker, no hangers-on, no girls. I met him a few times. He was an intelligent guy with a deep interest in music. “Plus, he was a big Glen Campbell fan.”

Want to catch Jimmy Webb live? Jimmy Webb brings his tribute show, “The Glen Campbell Years,” to the Ruby Diamond Concert Hall on Tuesday, March 26, at 7:30 p.m. To get yours, go to openingnights.fsu.edu or call (850) 644-6500. For more information on all of the events in the Opening Nights performance series, visit openingnights.fsu.edu/events.

Tickets to Jimmy Webb’s performance are priced from $12-$50. To get yours, visit openingnights.fsu.edu or call (850) 644-6500.

58

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


MAYS-MUNROE & the sleep center THE ONLY NAME YOU NEED TO KNOW!

850.385.9495 2791 CAPITAL CIRCLE NE SHOWROOM HOURS MONDAY – FRIDAY 9–6 SATURDAY 9–5 SUNDAY CLOSED

SERVICE SELECTION SATISFACTION SINCE 1936 WE OFFER A WIDE VARIETY OF APPLIANCE BRANDS, AND WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL. TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

59


ART

A Big Nod to Performing Arts $1.8 million grant to pave way for venue near FAMU Way by ROB RUSHIN

A

new project called TLH Arts Inc. emerged during the summer as the big winner in a controversial grant awards process that could transform Tallahassee’s entertainment scene and access. TLH Arts received $1.8 million from the Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA, which also awarded $1 million to LeMoyne Arts and $189,000 to the John G. Riley Center and Museum, also known as the Riley House. TLH Arts plans a performing arts center adjacent to Anita Favors Thompson Plaza near FAMU Way. The organization aims to turn an existing city-owned 10,000-square-foot building into the home of a multiuse facility that will help alleviate one of Tallahassee’s most pressing arts challenges — the dire shortage of available performance venues. TLH ARTS TRUMPETS ITS PROJECT.

60

“We really think it has an opportunity to expose another segment of our community to a wide range of the arts,” said Jake Kiker, a co-founder of Tallahassee’s Domi Station business incubator and one of the project’s principal members. The proposed theater can transform into multiple configurations and sizes to accommodate a range of dance, theater and concerts. This component alone — and its promise to transform Tallahassee’s performing arts landscape — led multiple performing arts organizations to lend the TLH Arts application strong support. The CRA last year opened a grantapplication process to determine the best use for $3 million in hotel bed tax revenue that had been earmarked for a proposed performing arts center. Nine groups applied for a piece of it.

A citizen’s review panel recommended spreading the money among three projects: LeMoyne Arts, the Riley House and the Big Bend Community Development Corporation. A protest ← TLH Arts Inc. emerged, with the envisions a performing arts Leon County Tourist center with an Development Council entrance lobby and others reportedly that will double as an art gallery noting a lack of a and event space. performing project center Grants also among those three. provide boosts for LeMoyne Arts The CRA reevaluated and the Riley the applications, mainHouse. taining its award to the Riley House and cutting in half its award to LeMoyne. After placing fourth — out of the money — in the original assessment, TLH Arts emerged as the big winner. Through the re-evaluation, more information got out to the public, and more people got involved, said Kiker, of TLH Arts. “Everyone recognized the need for a performing arts space in Tallahassee,” Kiker said. “I think the fact that we were coming in and trying to provide a resource that was going to serve a broader section of the community … was one thing that certainly resonated with people.” The TLH Arts vision goes beyond the performance hall. In addition to the needed venue, the facility will feature an entrance lobby doubling as an art gallery and event space; a recording studio that doubles as a podcast garage; flexible artist studios; a photo/video studio with green screen; lecture and classroom space; and office space for nonprofit arts groups. Beyond that, TLH Arts envisions programs to provide direct educational opportunities and engagement to community youth. TLH Arts puts the total cost of the project at $5.6 million. The balance of the money will come through an aggressive fundraising campaign, Kiker said, telling Tallahassee Magazine that he expects to see strong participation from donors across the economic spectrum. The project already has received support from organizations such as Southern

“In addition to providing flexible space to perform, record, practice, teach and create, the organizers will leverage their experience and existing resources to provide direct educational opportunities and engagement to community youth, as well as entrepreneurial support and assistance (co-creating/co-working and incubation) to artists (existing and aspiring) to develop the business side of their chosen craft.” tlharts.com

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

RENDERING COURTESY OF FITZGERALD COLLABORATIVE GROUP

expression


Natural gas makes luxury affordable.

Natural Gas For Life! Discriminating home builders choose natural gas. Clean, efficient and reliable natural gas gives homeowners the pleasure of endless hot water on demand, gracious outdoor living, and precision cooking. Ask your builder for natural gas! For more information on natural gas appliances, availability, rebates and low interest loans, please contact us at For more information about natural gas appliances, rebates and availability, contact:

850-891-5112 or Talgov.com On Facebook at GetGasTally

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

61


The All New 2019 Honda now available at

Learn more at proctorhonda.com

Wealth Management and Financial Planning | Retirement Plans | Employee Benefits Estate and Business Succession Planning

Your future is our business 318 N Calhoun St, Tallahassee, FL 32301 | 850.894.2930 | barnescapgroup.com Securities offered through LPL Financial, member FINRA/SIPC. lnvestment advice offered through Independent Financial Partners (IFP), a Registered Investment Adviser. Barnes Capital Group and IFP are separate entities from LPL Financial.

62

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


CPERIO 1063 - TALLY MAG AD JAN-FEB 2019

expression

CAPITAL PERIODONTAL

↑ A May 2018

Shakespeare Company, the Mickee Faust Club and Tallahassee Nights Live, he said. “When I think about the range and diversity of groups who stepped up for us … it gives me confidence that we will see widespread community support,” Kiker said. Meanwhile, the venerable LeMoyne Center plans to build a new building on its Gadsden Street property. In addition to a visual arts and education center, the new structure will house a multipurpose room and event space to accommodate 100 to 150 people. Plans include a full catering kitchen to support a new events venue. LeMoyne also plans to refurbish its sculpture garden, an ambitious plan that includes demolition of several outdated buildings. The new and improved LeMoyne aims to offer an attractive venue for meetings and other special events. Kelly Dozier, president of LeMoyne Center for the Visual Arts, said the grant would “position LeMoyne and our community as a respected leader in the visual arts.” Dozier said the “new education center will greatly enhance the ability of LeMoyne Arts to offer more art education programing to our community and visitors.” The new facility will offer space for events including weddings, parties and conferences, she said. “People used to have weddings at LeMoyne all the time,” Dozier said. “We want to see that happening again.” LeMoyne puts the total cost of its project at about $3.2 million. Like TLH Arts, LeMoyne aims to make up the difference in funding through a fundraising campaign, this one called Art for Always, a name shared with LeMoyne’s master plan. Officials project completion of the LeMoyne and TLH Arts projects in 2020. The Riley House, one of Tallahassee’s underappreciated cultural gems, will use its award to install a series of 15 informational kiosks along the Frenchtown Heritage Trail. Visitors will hear oral histories collected by Althemese Barnes, founding director emeritus of the Riley House. These interviews spotlight the history of one of Tallahassee’s historic African-American neighborhoods. TM

RENDERING COURTESY OF CONN & ASSOCIATES INC. ARCHITECTS

rendering envisions a new LeMoyne Arts education center that will house a multipurpose room and event space.

Protecting a Lifetime of

Healthy Smiles with a Team You Can Trust

(850) 942-8111 www.CapitalPerio.com TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

63


expression BOOKS

CONTINUING TO CUT INTO CORRUPTION Tallahassee’s Schweizer pens another bestseller in ‘Secret Empires’ by KAREN MURPHY

64

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

ties between the couple and a Chinese company linked through Chao’s father to the Chinese government. The Wall Street Journal and several other publications detailed Schweizer’s findings on Biden, McConnell and other political elite spotlighted in Secret Empires. The book also targets President Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, and former Secretary of State John Kerry, among others. Earlier Schweizer books that earned bestseller status and affected U.S. politics included Clinton Cash: The Untold Story of How and Why Foreign Governments and Businesses Helped Make Bill and Hillary Rich; Extortion: How Politicians Extract Your Money, Buy Votes, and Line Their Own Pockets; and Throw Them All Out: How Politicians and Their Friends Get Rich Off Insider Stock Tips, Land Deals, and Cronyism That Would Send the Rest of Us to Prison.” Clinton Cash is widely blamed or praised, depending on the point of view, for contributing to Democrat Hillary Clinton's election loss to Trump in the 2016 presidential election. Reviewers of Secret Empires suggest it could be an equally potent weapon against a possible 2020 presidential bid for Biden. Schweizer also collaborated on a documentary film called “The Creepy Line,” about Google and Facebook and manipulation of news. It premiered in midSeptember in Washington D.C. and led to subsequent Congressional hearings on the subject. Schweizer investigative team members Eric Eggers and Seamus Bruner also released books recently about voter fraud and FBI corruption, respectively. “There are a lot of things we’re working on,” Schweizer said at a recent fundraiser for Tallahassee Reports, an alternative investigative-journalism newspaper. “I have an employee who’s a former Air Force pilot, and as he would say, it’s a target-rich environment,” Schweizer said with a laugh. TM

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Peter Schweizer said he discovered Tallahassee through the James Madison Institute, a free-market think tank headquartered in Tallahassee. He joined its Research Advisory Council in 2010. Schweizer is president of the Government Accountability Institute, which he co-founded in 2012. He lives in Tallahassee with his wife, Rhonda, and their children.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF HARPER COLLINS

F

ew authors strike fear in corrupt politicians’ hearts like Peter Schweizer. The bestselling investigative journalist and his team at the Government Accountability Institute take on political heavyweights on both sides of the aisle and across numerous government agencies and corporations, fearlessly wielding pen and laptop, breaking bombshell stories that affect American politics at the highest levels. Schweizer wages from Tallahassee his war against crony capitalism and government corruption. With eight researchers and 16 employees, the Tallahasseebased GAI advances its mission to “investigate and expose crony capitalism, misuse of taxpayer monies, and other governmental corruption of malfeasance.” Schweizer’s newest book, Secret Empires: How the American Political Class Hides Corruption and Enriches Family and Friends, debuted at No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller list in April, and it remained there for four weeks. In the book, Schweizer exposes how blatant corruption that involved stuffing hundred-dollar bills into a kitchen freezer has been replaced with sophisticated tactics that skirt financial disclosures and the law. With meticulous research and documentation, the book discusses how Vice President Joe Biden visited China in 2013 to confront the Chinese about their controversial exertion of air rights over the South China Sea. Biden’s adult son, Hunter, accompanied the vice president on the trip, and within two weeks, the son entered into a $1.5 billion deal with a subsidiary of the Bank of China, the book says. A senior editor-at-large for far-right news outlet Breitbart News, Schweizer has taken Democrats and Republicans alike to task for corruption, cronyism and hypocrisy, among other things. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and his wife, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, also found themselves in Schweizer’s crosshairs. Schweizer writes in his latest book about what he details as deep financial


SERVING FOR OVER 20 YEARS!

Serving our Clients... Serving our Community Divorce | Personal Injury | Bankruptcy | Probate/Estate | Family Law Foreclosure | Wrongful Death | Construction Law | Contracts | Insurance Claims

2014, 2016 and 2017 Best of Tallahassee winner

Offices in Tallahassee and Tampa | 1330 Thomasville Road, Tallahassee | TallahasseeTrialLawyer.com | P: 850-386-5777 | F: 850-386-8507

Join Us For Our Spring Productions

By Anne Washburn Score by Michael Friedman Lyrics by Anne Washburn “Mr. Burns, a post-electric play” is presented by special arrangement with SAMUEL FRENCH, INC.

April 5 14 Lab Theatre

tickets.fsu.edu • 850.644.6500

Book by Mark O’Donnell & Thomas Meehan | Music by Marc Shaiman Lyrics by Scott Wittman & Marc Shaiman Based on the New Line Cinema film written and directed by John Waters “HAIRSPRAY” is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI, 423 West 55th Street, New York, NY 10019 Tel.: (212) 541-4684 Fax: (212) 397-4684 www.MTISHOWS.com

tickets.fsu.edu • 850.644.6500 TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

65


PROMOTION

BILL KELLY

The Arts Live Here

By Erica Thaler, Council on Culture & Arts (COCA) Bill Kelly began his professional acting career in 2011 with roles in over 20 television and film productions and starred as “Eberhard Anheuser” in Budweiser’s Super Bowl 51 commercial. He has multiple projects in 2019 including the Netflix feature film “The Last Thing He Wanted” and a role in HBO’s “True Detective.” A Tallahassee resident since 1986, Bill has planted deep roots here, raising three kids and enjoying a 32-year career in radio. He and fiancé Nancy love the area beaches and all the Capital City has to offer.

What fictional character would you like to meet and bring to life? Tony Stark (Iron Man) because of his ingenuity and never-ending

supply of cool stuff. Turn on the jets and let’s fly! What music is playing in your car? Def Leppard — as loud as I can play it! AC/DC for those quieter moments. It’s time for dinner; where are we going to eat? My house! My fiancé is an incredible cook with some of the best recipes ever. However, if we’re painting the town red, it’s Coosh’s Bayou Rouge for crawfish or Brickyard Pizza for Italian food. If you were trapped in a TV show or movie for a month, which would it be? Bloodline! We weren’t finished telling that story by a long shot! I heard from

fans all over the world who were sad the show ended so quickly. (Note: Bill was a recurring character in nine episodes of “Bloodline” in seasons one and two.) What superpower would you like to have? Time travel to any place in the world. Just think of all the incredible stuff you could witness, firsthand — the building of the pyramids or events at Rome’s Coliseum! Of course, I’d bring a copy of “Grays Sports Almanac.”

What have your learned from failure? I don’t look at too many things as failures. Like Edison said, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” Reinvent yourself or reinvent the things you do. What do you hope you will be remembered for? Laughter. The plain and simple, gut-busting stuff. If I can make you spit Pepsi out of your nose a few times in my life, I’m good!

Want to learn more about Bill?

Visit tallahasseearts.org/artist/Bill-Kelly to learn more about Bill and over 950 artists of all creative disciplines in our Artist Directory.

Visit TallahasseeArts.org for a complete list of arts and cultural events, public art, arts education and more on the Tallahassee Arts Guide.

66

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ERICA THALER; COUNCIL ON CULTURE & ARTS (COCA)

What is necessary for your creative process?Seventy miles per hour and two inches off the ground! Kart racing gets my blood pumping and creative juices flowing. I do some of my best thinking on the track.


T a l l a h a s s e e

Plastic Surgery Clinic & Physicians’ Skin Care Clinic » Cosmetic Surgery of the Face, Eyes & Nose » Cosmetic & Reconstructive Breast Surgery -

T a l l a h a s s e e Reduction, Lifts & Breast Augmentation

Plastic Surgery Clinic & Physicians’ Skin Care Clinic

» Body Contouring - Tummy Tucks, Liposuction & Body Lifts » Fat Grafting for Face & Body

Introducing SkinCeuticals » Laser Hair Reduction & Laser Skin Rejuvenation » Botox & Injectable Dermal Fillers » Medical Skin Care, Facials, Chemical Peels, Lipo

T a l l a h a s s e e

Massage & Skin Care Products

Plastic Surgery Clinic & Physicians’ Skin Care Clinic

» Permanent Make-Up & Eyebrow/Eyelash Tinting

2018

( 8 5 0 ) 8 7 7-2 1 2 6 | T L H P l a s t i c S u r g e r y.c o m Board Certified Plastic Surgeons. T aWelaccept l amost h insurance a s splans. e eFinancing Plans available.

Plastic Surgery

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

67


Change is Brewing So says the maverick and socially conscious founder of RedEye Coffee PHOTO BY SERGEY NAZAROV / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

story by PETE REINWALD // photo by ALICIA OSBORNE

68

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


RedEye Coffee founder and CEO Mark McNees says he sees more people demanding that companies become rooted in social causes and environmental responsibility. He says he thinks companies that don’t “are going to suffer.”

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

69


That’s how it went for Mark McNees, founder and CEO of RedEye Coffee, a product of the church that he started. But he said he never set out to sell coffee, much less start a house of worship or another business. “We opened this business because we wanted, I wanted, to invite the community to participate in what we’re trying to create,” McNees said. “To me, RedEye is an idea.” It’s more than an idea. For McNees, RedEye Coffee is a living, percolating testament to his mission to help others through his work. It’s also an example of what he sees as the start of a revolution in business — a consumer demand that companies become rooted in social causes and environmental responsibility and that they establish significant limits on the pay of top executives. “Companies that are only in business to make money are going to suffer in the future,” McNees said. “I wholeheartedly believe that.” RedEye is hardly suffering. In midDecember, it boasted four Tallahassee locations as it actively sought to expand through “strategic partnerships to increase social impact,” as McNees put it. And it’s defending the territory that it shares with another popular local company, Lucky Goat Coffee, against a global behemoth. When Tallahassee folks need to meet up, they don’t default to Starbucks. They

70

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

often opt for RedEye’s bright, spacious and laptop-friendly Midtown location. “That RedEye is literally my second office,” said Ed Murray, president of NAI Talcor, which leases the space to RedEye. “I’m in there quite a bit. It’s always busy. It’s always fresh and clean.” McNees thinks he’s setting an example with RedEye, which follows companies such as Newman’s Own in giving away all of its profits — in RedEye’s case, all profit after rent, salaries and money needed to keep the business running and maintained. McNees says he takes no salary as CEO and that he adheres to a limit on how much money he allows himself to keep through any other work, including his position as an entrepreneur-in-residence at Florida State University’s Jim Moran School of Entrepreneurship. He says he now knows when enough is enough. “It was the best advice I ever got,” he said. “And I tell my students this, too.” McNees, 49, is a maverick, all right. A husband and father of two, he’s also a pastor who started Tallahassee’s Element3 Church, an author who is working on his third book, an Ironman triathlete who once swam from Alcatraz Island to San Francisco and an outspoken speaker who travels with a microphone. You’ll find him on YouTube touting “the next economic revolution,” his efforts to make “the world a better place” and “the best story in coffee.”

PHOTO BY ALICIA OSBORNE

To brew “the best story in coffee,” try this: Resolve that you aim for passion about people, not personal wealth. Sell your California company, move to Tallahassee and start your own church. You might find yourself the head of a coffee company that boasts it’s making the world a better place, one cup at a time.


RedEye Coffee’s Mark McNees says he takes no salary as CEO and that he adheres to a limit on how much money he allows himself to keep through any other work.

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

71


72

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

McNees would base the church on three values — faith, authenticity and emerging cultures — and would inspire it to help relieve local and global poverty and suffering. Element3 established partnerships in food, nursing and wellness programs in Tallahassee’s poorest neighborhoods, and it built homes in Guatemala. After the church’s founding, McNees said, he met a roaster who didn’t know how to sell coffee. He said that gave him the idea to buy, bag and sell coffee and give away the profits to Tallahassee charities. That also became the inspiration for RedEye Coffee, which the church created as its financial engine to do good in Tallahassee and around the world. “He is crystal clear on his mission, and he really stays loyal to it,” said Eric Case, now the lead pastor at Element3, which he says averages about 400 people at its Sunday services. RedEye opened its first location in 2009, and it continues to tout itself as a champion of the environment and of poor independent coffee farmers in developing countries. RedEye says it has purchased more than $1 million worth of what it calls ethically traded coffee for its stores. The company says it buys only organically grown coffee and sells it only in cups that it considers “earth friendly.” Through partnerships and its profits-to-charity model,

PHOTOS BY KAITLIN ERICA PHOTOGRAPHY

Here’s how it started: Around 2001, McNees said, he was in charge of his father’s business, a company in Long Beach, California, that rented construction equipment. It was doing well, and so was he — making the money he wanted, driving the car he wanted and living in the place he wanted, pricey Redondo Beach. He’d had enough of it. Tired of a life without significance, he said, he told his father and brother he wanted to try something different. “The farthest thing different was starting a church in the South,” he said. But he wanted to change lives locally and globally, he said. He spoke with friends in Illinois who wanted to start a church in Tallahassee and joined them here. He said he liked Tallahassee because he saw it as young, educated and transient, at least among its students. He figured that his influence on them and “investment in them” would go global, as he put it. A person of faith who believed that spirituality improves lives, he started the Christianity-based Element3 as founding pastor in 2004. He later would earn a D.Min. in organizational leadership. In addition to his role at RedEye, Mark McNees teaches as an entrepreneurin-residence at Florida State University’s Jim Moran School of Entrepreneurship.


RedEye says it has given away more than $100,000 to local and global empowerment organizations, most of it over the last four years. Projects include a special-needs school in Uganda and a nursing school in Haiti. The company’s slogan thereby boasts: “Drink Coffee Locally. RedEye founder Mark McNees Change Lives Globally.” says he teaches McNees said he holds no special at Florida State appreciation for coffee. “It’s not about University’s Jim Moran School of the coffee,” he said. “I believe we serve Entrepreneurship the best coffee in Tallahassee, and we’re because he wants trying to create the best story in coffee, “to invest in the next generation anyplace. But it’s about the people.” of leaders.” He That includes employees, he said. says he started McNees says he sees to it that RedEye RedEye because he wanted to employees make at least $12 an hour, help farmers including tips. and charitable Savana Osterbye, a barista who left organizations. the company in September to move to Atlanta, said it wasn’t only about the money. It was about the perks — the “impact we’re making,” she said, and working for a leader who nurtured when others might have admonished. Osterbye said she took on additional responsibilities at RedEye and sometimes felt that she fell short. “He would build me up,” she said of McNees. “He would encourage me and say, ‘I appreciate you for all you’re doing and for your attitude,’ which is so affirming.” McNees says he structured the company so that the highestpaid employee could never make more than seven times the salary of the lowest-paid employee. That goes to his belief that companies must rein in executive salaries and take steps to slash income disparity. He also believes that the super rich such as Microsoft founder Bill Gates and legendary investor Warren Buffett owe it to themselves and to society to cap their wealth well before they retire. “Warren Buffett and Bill Gates are a great example of what I think is a fake promise that a lot of us buy into: I’m going to go to work, I’m going to make a lot of money, and when I make a ton of money, when I’m old and have only a few years left, I’m going to give it away,” McNees said. “And what I say is, become a philanthropist now. I love the Gates Foundation, so I don’t want to take away, but I think that’s a very old paradigm. Why not be a philanthropist day one? Why not now?” The first time he hit his limit on earnings that he would keep for himself, McNees says he remembers thinking: “Am I actually going to just give all this away? And I was like, I love this. “I was on this track. I just wanted more and more and more, and the more I got, the more miserable I was. And fortunately, I had somebody who intervened in my life and said, ‘Hey time out. Let’s rethink your definition of success.’ It changed everything because it got to a certain level where it didn’t matter if I made any more money, because I was going to give it away, anyway.”

“It’s not about the coffee. I believe we serve the best coffee in Tallahassee, and we’re trying to create the best story in coffee, anyplace. But it’s about the people.” As an FSU professor and a CEO who takes no money from his business, McNees says he’s no longer close to reaching his keepfor-himself limit. He left his position as Element3 pastor two years ago to take the teaching job. In June, he’ll complete a three-year transition commitment as president of Element3. He said that will allow him to concentrate on his teaching and philanthropic roles. He also has been working on a deal to buy RedEye Coffee from the church, he said. McNees said he started the church because he believes spirituality improves lives. He said he started RedEye because he wanted to help farmers and local and global charities. He said he teaches at FSU because he wants “to invest in the next generation of leaders.” “Even though these things seem very different and very unrelated, they’re all really driven by the same core value,” McNees said. “I find significance, I find meaning, in helping other people find meaning. If it’s just about me and what I can accumulate … it’s very empty.” TM

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

73


In the Hearts of

TALLAHASSEE Four historic neighborhoods define Capital City STORIES BY ROSANNE DUNKELBERGER AND ROCHELLE KOFF PHOTO BY DAVE BARFIELD

RESIDENTS ADORE THEM FOR THE STORIES THEY HOLD, THE ACCESS THEY PROVIDE AND THE COMMUNITIES THEY INSPIRE. They’re four neighborhoods in the heart of Tallahassee, and each of them boasts a character or charm of their own: ▪ Frenchtown a spirited and creative rebirth amid encroaching construction; ▪ Indianhead Acres an eclectic mix of homes and residents and unique street names; ▪ Lafayette  Park a historic, tree-heavy setting where slow pace meets upbeat; and ▪M  yers Park a microcosm with a country club where residents unite on a cause. In the following pages, we share the history, characteristics, parks, events, amenities, attributes, concerns and, in some cases, growing pains of those neighborhoods. We share what defines them and what makes their residents proudly call them home. In Frenchtown, resident Ann Roberts says: “I was born in this house, in my mother’s bedroom.” In Indianhead Acres, neighborhood association president Grant Gelhardt

74

January–February 2019

says in a reference to those novel street names: “I’m always proud to say that I’m a ‘Nene-lander.’” In Lafayette Park, where residents embrace their park as much as the neighborhood named after it, resident David Chapman says: “I basically grew up going to Lafayette Park. My sons and grandkids have grown up playing in the park as well.” And in Myers Park, resident Dr. Jean Conner says: “I’ve been here for 40 years, and I know a lot of people who have been here for a lot longer. Those people and I all came here when we were youngsters — and we haven’t left.” Get the picture? Each of these neighborhoods says Tallahassee, and to the people who live there, each of these neighborhoods says home. And this is just a start. Make sure to pick up future editions of Tallahassee Magazine as we continue our exploration of the Capital City’s sometimes-growing, often-changing and always-beautiful neighborhoods.

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

75


FRENCHTOWN A ‘deep love’ of historic neighborhood drives residents BY ROCHELLE KOFF

A

nn Roberts has long watched history unfold from the living room window of her cozy Frenchtown home near the corner of Carolina and Macomb streets. “I was born in this house, in my mother’s bedroom,” Roberts said proudly. But her smile fades when she pulls back her lace curtains and looks at the new reality across the street: the noisy construction of The Standard, a $64 million building for nearly 1,000 students, a building she calls “a monster.” Roberts worries about the building’s effect on Frenchtown, considered the state’s oldest primarily black community. It’s a community fighting to preserve its identity and cultural heritage. Its best asset: loyal residents who won’t give up on their home. Frenchtown’s roots stretch back to 1825 when the U.S. government gave a Tallahassee township to French Gen. Gilbert du Motier, the Marquis de Lafayette, for his help during the Revolutionary War. According to accounts, French colonists came to Tallahassee and, facing extreme elements, many moved to New Orleans or back to France while others stayed in the area that would become known as Frenchtown. But there’s some dispute over whether the name is based on early farmers or another source. After the Civil War, Frenchtown was primarily settled by emancipated slaves who brought farming skills. In 1869, an all-black school, Lincoln Academy, opened in Frenchtown and offered children of all ages an education. It also taught vocational and trade skills to adults. Frenchtown grew into a bustling community, and by the 1940s and 1950s, jazz and blues made it lively. The neighborhood had a place on the famed Chitlin’ Circuit, a network of

76

January–February 2019

↑ As founder of Ash Gallery, artist-educator Annie Harris sponsors monthly “art walks” that showcase local artists. Frenchtown residents such as Harris are fighting to preserve the neighborhood’s identity and cultural heritage.

clubs in which black performers could play during segregation. The Red Bird Cafe on Macomb Street drew entertainers such as Ray Charles, Cab Calloway and Cannonball Adderley. Frenchtown was “a city within a city,” said lifelong resident Darryl Scott. There was “Mr. Sullivan’s grocery store,” said Jim Bellamy, who was born and raised in Frenchtown. There was a 5 & Dime, a tailor, a jewelry store, a furniture store and eateries including a place serving “the best sausage sandwich,” he said. By the 1970s, following integration and

Frenchtown

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

urban flight, Frenchtown saw a period of decline. Businesses closed, and so did Lincoln Academy, which is now a community center. Problems ensued. Improvements came after the 1994 distinction of Frenchtown as a historic area. A big boost came in 2005 with the groundbreaking of 23 mostly two-story homes as part of the Carolina Oaks development. Artist-educator Annie Harris, president of the Carolina Oaks Homeowners Association, opened the Ash Gallery on Georgia Street and sponsored “art walks.” There’s now a community garden and a weekly farmer’s market but no major grocery store. A homeless shelter on Tennessee Street closed in 2015. Residents now wonder about the threat of gentrification. Frenchtown’s proximity to downtown

ATTRACTIONS Ash Gallery: Founding artist Annie Harris sponsors a monthly Art Walk showcasing local artists. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 436 W Georgia St. facebook.com/Ash-Gallery. Check Facebook for dates; KitchenShare: The new facility offers kitchens, dry storage, a packaging room and incubator classes for entrepreneurial cooks. 524 North Martin Luther King Blvd. kitchensharetlh.com


↓ As is the case with many neighborhoods,

than half of the area’s 5,200 residents are renters, with a medium home value of $109,494, he said. Leavins and City Commissioner Nancy Miller met with a steering committee of about 10 residents and business owners monthly for nearly a year and a half to come up with an ambitious plan. “We were engaged throughout the entire process,” said Harris, the artisteducator. On Sept. 12, the Tallahassee City Commission adopted the Placemaking plan, which includes making roads safer, improving infrastructure, creating or rehabbing affordable housing and updating zoning codes. The city also voted to use $485,000 from the sale of city-owned land for The Standard to help implement the plan’s recommendations. The steering committee will become the Frenchtown Working Group and stay involved with bringing about what it considers desirable and the Capitol appeals to residents and changes. investors. It’s less than a mile from Florida The Standard is among three big projects Agricultural and Mechanical University, a transforming Frenchtown. The new five-story historically black university founded in 1887, Casanas Village apartments at Georgia and and it borders Florida State University. Macomb streets offers what it calls “affordable “Our biggest obstacle is we’re too close to urban living” in a “modern and energy-efficient FSU,” Bellamy said. “Where else are they going five-story design.” to expand?” The Frenchtown Gateway proposal, still Residents strongly opposed The evolving, would transform an area Standard student-housing project. that includes the former site of the As part of negotiations, the developer homeless shelter on Tennessee Street FRENCHTOWN agreed to add retail space on Macomb with condos, townhouses, office space, SINGLE HOMES SOLD*: 4 and a setting for a historic monument, retail and a much-needed grocery store. AVERAGE said Devan Leavins, special projects Staying put will be the landmark SQUARE FEET: administrator at the Tallahassee-Leon Economy Drugs, which has been owned 1,351 County Planning Department. by the family of pharmacist/manager AVERAGE LOT SIZE: .13 acre To address residents’ concerns, the Alexis Roberts McMillan since 1951. city launched a special Frenchtown “We’ll spruce it up, but we want to AVERAGE YEAR BUILT: 2005 Placemaking study to define the keep the same facade,” said McMillan, MEDIAN SELLING vision and needs of the neighborhood. whose mother, Geraldine Roberts, still PRICE: $163,750 The study covers a larger area than owns the drug store. “We don’t want to *Dec 1, 2016, through Dec. 10, 2018, in the historic Frenchtown. lose the flavor of what we have.” area that residents According to the U.S. Census And that’s what drives advocates. define as historic Frenchtown Bureau, the medium income in the “We have a deep love of Source: Hill Spooner study area in 2017 was $16,860, which Frenchtown,” resident Ann Roberts & Elliott, Inc., from data collected by the includes students and elderly on a said. “We want to stay in our Tallahassee Board of Realtors' MLS fixed income, Leavins said. More neighborhood.”

PHOTOS BY SAIGE ROBERTS AND COURTESY OF MUTAQEE AKBAR / MICHAEL MACORK AND DARRYL SCOTT

Frenchtown points to no official boundaries. But according to the Tallahassee-Leon County Planning Department, residents generally consider the borders of Frenchtown’s historic area as Tennessee Street to the south, Bronough Street to the east, Copeland Street to the west and Brevard Street to the north.

FOOD/ENTERTAINMENT B Sharps jazz club: 648 W. Brevard St.; (850) 766-0972; b-sharps.com Southern Velvet Café: 505 W. Georgia St.; southernvelvetcafe.com

EVENTS/FESTIVALS Frenchtown Farmers Market: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Saturday. 524 N. MLK Blvd., (850) 270-3573. frenchtownheritage.org; Frenchtown Heritage Festival: The annual event presents food, art, music and family events. frenchtownheritage.org

What do you like about Frenchtown?

“Frenchtown is home to me. It’s where I grew up. The people, the businesses that were in the area — I can’t imagine growing up anywhere else. There have been changes over the years, but I still love it.” Darryl Scott, Frenchtown resident, chairperson of the Greater Frenchtown Area Revitalization Council

“I like the fact that I can walk down the street and speak to everybody. I like the fact that people in the neighborhood appreciate what we do as a law firm in Frenchtown. There’s still a bit of culture here I appreciate being a part of. There’s a family atmosphere here, still.” Mutaqee Akbar, Frenchtown attorney, managing partner of the Na’im Akbar Justice Center, named for his father, who grew up in a house across the street.

SCHOOLS John G. Riley, Kate Sullivan and Ruediger elementary schools; Griffin and Raa middle schools; and Godby and Leon high schools

ASSOCIATIONS Frenchtown Neighborhood Improvement Association: Jim Bellamy, jmsbellamy@gmail.com; Carolina Oaks Homeowners Association: (850) 383-9915 TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

77


↓ Grant Gelhardt (below left) visits a community

garden located in the front yard of Brad Sharp (below right) in the Indianhead Acres neighborhood.

Grant Gelhardt, president of the IndianheadLehigh Neighborhood Association, proudly calls himself a “Nenelander.”

INDIANHEAD-LEHIGH

A mix of charm, community and, to nonresidents, confusion BY ROSANNE DUNKELBERGER

F

riendly. Welcoming. Involved. Diverse. And just a little bit, well … quirky. But when one mentions the in-town neighborhood of Indianhead Acres, perhaps the most common thought that springs to mind is, “Oh yeah, the place with all the weird names and Nenes.” “Nene,” for the uninitiated, means “trail” in the language of Florida’s original Seminoles. While the street names sound romantic — Chowkeebin Nene, Heechee Nene and Chocksaka Nene, for example — the translations are fairly ordinary — Fifth Trail, Tobacco Trail and Bridle Trail. In addition to the tongue-twisting names, the streets in Indianhead curve and meet at all angles, and they change names as one rides along them. “It’s not unusual to see somebody new to the neighborhood who’s like this,” said 28-year resident Sharon Kant-Rauch, as she mimicked a person quizzically looking back and forth. “They roll down

78

January–February 2019

their window, and you immediately know they’re ‘lost in the Nenes.’ ” Residents embrace their streets and their neighborhood. “I’m always proud to say that I’m a ‘Nenelander,’” said Grant Gelhardt, president of the Indianhead-Lehigh Neighborhood Association. “We like it that the roads are a little confusing. It keeps people from using the neighborhood as a shortcut.” The Indianhead neighborhood dates

IndianheadLehigh

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

to the early 1950s when builder George Koucky constructed about 200 homes there. During construction, the neighborhood association says on its website, “Indian artifacts were forever turning up.” While the houses were similar when originally built, homes in Indianhead now are an eclectic mix after a half-century of updates, additions and new construction. As families grew, residents say, carports got converted into extra living space. Many of the homes have original wood flooring and bathroom tiles in baby blue or mint green. Although the frontage may seem small, many of the lots can be a halfacre and very deep. The neighborhood also encompasses Lehigh Acres, built in the 1960s and beyond, with streets that connect to Indianhead but feature a different sort of house, usually brick, with smaller windows and at least a one-car garage. But despite its close-in location, reasonably priced homes and natural beauty, what makes Indianhead-Lehigh truly unique are its residents. They include artists, musicians, state workers and employees of Florida State University and Florida A&M University. Many bike to work, Gelhardt said.

ATTRACTIONS/SHOPPING Optimist Park: Features include basketball courts, beach volleyball courts, picnic tables, a playground and an open field. 1355 E. Indianhead Drive; Koucky Park: This 2.7-acre “pocket park” is great for sitting and enjoying the creek that runs through it. 1505 Chocksacka Nene; Governor’s Square Mall: The mall and other retail outlets (Best Buy, Pier One, World Market, Kohl’s) are nearby.


PHOTOS BY SAIGE ROBERTS

When not at work, residents here are all up in each other’s business — in a very good way. Terry Anne Kant, Kant-Rauch’s wife and partner in the firm Kant Realty, recalled what happened after Hurricane Irma in 2017 as fairly typical: “Everybody’s lights went out (and) somehow word got out and everybody met up the second day at Optimist Park with their grills and any leftover food they needed to get cooked and just shared with everybody. It’s just that kind of thing that we just do.” After Hurricane Michael in October, Gelhardt said, residents did the same thing. Kant said she and her spouse have had their wayward dogs show up on Facebook — or just get returned because pretty much everybody knows who they belong to. “Periodically people will put up a notice, ‘need help moving something’ or if somebody wants to get rid of something they’ll put it on the Facebook page, ‘It’s at my curb, come get it,’ and it’s gone,” Kant said. The neighborhood has sponsored a Halloween residents who have turned their front yards Party for decades, and Kant-Rauch and a group into community gardens, community compost, of friends started a monthly Sunday potluck yards certified as Wildlife Habitat Friendly, and supper. In the past 10 years or so, residents have an informal team of “Ardisia Slayers,” who work gathered in the spring for Nene Fest, a day of to rid the neighborhood’s coral ardisia and other music and a puppet play. The event started with nuisance plants from yards and public areas. larger-than-life-sized puppets that have been One of the newest projects is N3, short for added onto over the years “so that every kid Neighbor-to-Neighbor in Nenes. In the multiin the neighborhood who wants to participate, generational community, a group of residents participates,” Kant-Rauch said. is seeking out elderly neighbors who Election Day also is a “social thing” might need help to stay in their INDIANHEADin which the community gathers at the homes as long as possible as they age. LEHIGH polling place in Optimist Park, serves The group’s mission would be to refer refreshments and votes, Kant said. In elders to government services and SINGLE HOMES SOLD*: 77 the 2016 election, nearly 83 percent of to organize volunteers to help with AVERAGE registered voters cast a ballot. transportation, medicine deliveries SQUARE FEET: Indianhead-Lehigh was named or grocery shopping. 1,540 the Council of Neighborhood Association dues are a voluntary AVERAGE LOT SIZE: .38 acre Associations’ 2017 Neighborhood $10 a year, used to pay for things AVERAGE YEAR of the Year. And in June 2018, such as festivals, newsletters and civic BUILT: 1960 the neighborhood association was activities. In addition to gardens — MEDIAN SELLING named Sustainable Tallahassee’s first organic, of course — residents keep PRICE: $159,900 Sustainable Neighborhood of the chickens and even bees. *Dec 1, 2016, through Dec. 10, 2018 Year, lauded for its environmentally “I like to think of it as a nice Source: Hill Spooner friendly activities. little eclectic neighborhood,” said & Elliott, Inc., from data collected by the Activities to encourage people to Gelhardt, who moved to Indianhead Tallahassee Board of reduce, reuse and recycle include in 1989. “That’s why I’m here.” Realtors' MLS

FOOD/ENTERTAINMENT The neighborhood boasts proximity to a world of food — Mexican, Indian, American, Middle Eastern and more. Cascades Park is the site of citywide festivals, concerts and other performances. The Moon nightclub, on Lafayette Street, hosts live music performances as well as fundraisers and other special events.

EVENTS/FESTIVALS Community-wide events include Nene Fest, a Halloween party, the Holiday Lights Bike Ride and the Nene 5K and Fun Run.

Terry Anne Kant and Sharon Kant-Rauch on the back porch of their home in Indianhead Acres

What do you like about IndianheadLehigh? “It’s hard to find two houses the same in this neighborhood — even though they started out very similar.”

Resident Terry Anne Kant (above on left)

“The character of our neighborhood is defined in part by our beautiful canopy. Trees of many types and ages weave themselves into a verdant tapestry appreciated by residents, both of the human kind and critter kind. I have seen cuckoos, raccoons, cicadas, possums, foxes, owls, turtles, oak snakes, moths and even a turkey making this urban forest a home.” Resident Ryan Wilke

SCHOOLS Hartsfield Elementary School, Fairview Middle School, Rickards High School

ASSOCIATION Indianhead-Lehigh Neighborhood Association: ihlna.org, grant.gelhardt@gmail.com TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

79


LAFAYETTE PARK

An oasis of historic charm and recreation on the edge of trendy Midtown BY ROCHELLE KOFF

D

avid Chapman can trace his love for Lafayette Park to his youth, when he played Little League baseball and Pee Wee football in fields surrounded by grand oaks and tall pines. He would become a park camp counselor and eventually raise his two sons in a house right across the street. “I basically grew up going to Lafayette Park,” said Chapman, 66, former director of Tallahassee’s Parks and Recreation Department. “My sons and grandkids have grown up playing in the park as well.” The popular green oasis is the heart of the Lafayette Park neighborhood, known for its charming older homes, friendly residents and walkable streets. It’s the kind of place where neighbors throw potluck dinners, stop by for a chat or a glass of wine and help each other during calamities such as Hurricane Michael. It’s also a place of traditions, such as its annual Halloween celebration on Beard Street and Ingleside Avenue, which draws thousands of trick-or-treaters from throughout the city. The neighborhood can claim an important place in Tallahassee’s history. No surprise that the name comes from Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, who received a grant of land in Tallahassee for his help during the Revolutionary War.

Lafayette Park

80

January–February 2019

Lafayette never settled here, and by 1855, his family sold all of its interests in the land grant, according to the Lafayette Park Neighborhood Association. The neighborhood took off in the 1920s and 1930s, attracting movers and shakers such as Claude Pepper, a distinguished lawmaker who would serve as a U.S. senator and then a congressman until his death in 1989, and Mamie Eaton Green, elected to the post of railroad commissioner in 1928, the first woman elected to statewide office. The neighborhood is now home to 1,500 to 2,000 residents, many of them educators, lawyers, doctors and teachers who have young children. “We’ve gotten older and the neighborhood has gotten younger,” said Marge Norman, who has lived on Beard Street for 46 years with her husband, Tom. “It’s nice to see the babies and people pushing strollers, little children playing.” Property values have soared on the strength of attributes such as its schools, old-Tallahassee charm and proximity to Midtown and its trendy bars, coffee shops and eateries. “We love the organic growth of Midtown,” said Rachelle Jewel McClure, secretary of the Lafayette Park Neighborhood Association. She lauded the small, mostly locally owned collection of businesses that has emerged over the years. The commercial district’s transformation has drawn both cheers and criticism from Lafayette Park residents. “We’re a big advocate of what’s happened here,” said Chapman, who moved to a home on Washington Street in Lafayette Park with his wife, Diane, in 1975.

Chapman said he and his wife work out regularly at Sweat Therapy Fitness. They also like the music scene and enjoy walking to bars and restaurants, he said. “We simply love Midtown,” he said. “It might be a different viewpoint from some of our neighbors.” Indeed. Some cite increased noise and traffic. “I liked it better before Midtown,” said Tom Norman, who has lived in Lafayette Park for 46 years. His concerns include efforts “to jam in condos” in the area. His wife, Marge, said she doesn’t appreciate “cars cutting through the street, going up and down faster.” She said a former restaurant used to valet park cars in front of their house, a battle the couple fought and won. Lafayette Park residents have been vigilant about urging smart development and protesting projects that could further affect the community. “The neighborhood is certainly currently feeling pressure from development,” said

ATTRACTIONS/LANDMARKS Lafayette Park provides tennis and pickleball courts, a playground, softball field, basketball court, picnic shelter and a one-mile fitness trail. It also features the Sue Herndon McCollum Community Center and an arts and crafts program, 501 Ingleside Ave., (850) 891-3946. The building at 805 N. Gadsden housed Johnston’s hospital, believed the city’s first hospital, built in 1924. Lawmaker Claude Pepper, a Florida political icon, lived at 402 Wilson Ave. Mamie Eaton Greene, the first woman to be elected to a statewide office in Florida, lived at 816 Cherry St. Lawton Chiles, who served as governor and a U.S. senator, lived at 607 E. Sixth St.

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


What do you like about Lafayette Park?

PHOTOS BY DAVE BARFIELD (HOME) AND SAIGE ROBERTS (PLAYGROOUND), ROCHELLE KOFF (SEDGWICK) AND COURTESY OF PAMELA RICCO

← Tallahassee attorneys Chad and Jennifer Heckman, seen with children Everett, Juliette and Maddox, bought their Lafayette Park home in 2002 and converted it from one story and about 1,800 square feet to two stories and about 3,700 square feet, Chad says. They say they stay active in a connected neighborhood, talking to neighbors, walking to nearby Midtown and decking out their house for the big annual neighborhood Halloween celebration. “Here, you probably know everybody on a first-name basis for two or three blocks in most directions. Not everyone but most everyone,” Chad says. Says Jennifer: “This whole neighborhood is our home.” The neighborhood takes its name from a park that features activities for all ages.

Ellery Sedgwick, president of the Lafayette natural area with the Sue Herndon McCollum Park Neighborhood Association. Community Center. Some larger lots have been subdivided in “Lafayette Park transcends Midtown,” said recent years, and several houses have been “torn Ashley Edwards, director of Parks, Recreation down to build anew, also sometimes to subdivide and Neighborhood Service in Tallahassee. She the property,” he said. said the neighborhood “has its own identity.” At an association meeting in November, some Built in 1957, the center boasts a rich history, residents expressed concern about a proposed fiveonce teaching kids circus skills and presenting level parking garage at Fifth Avenue shows, thanks to McCollum, who as LAFAYETTE PARK a student peformed in Florida State and Thomasville Road that could SINGLE HOMES accommodate more than 300 spaces. University’s Flying High Circus. SOLD*: 36 Some see it as “out of scale” with the The center offers an active AVERAGE neighborhood and that it could bring a adult coed volleyball league, kids’ SQUARE FEET: lot of traffic to the area, Sedgwick said. recreational sports, a big gymnasium, 1,940 The proposal remains in early an afterschool program, a summer AVERAGE LOT SIZE: .21 acre stages and has to be considered by a camp and an arts and crafts center AVERAGE YEAR new City Commission, said Wayne offering an array of classes, a pottery BUILT: 1947 Tedder, an assistant city manager. lab and three kilns. MEDIAN SELLING “The process is designed to allow staff “You can’t beat having a really PRICE: $258,600 to work closely with citizens and get beautiful, well-maintained and *Dec 1., 2016, through Dec. 10, 2018 their input prior to the commission diverse park across the street,” David Source: Hill Spooner making a final decision.” Chapman said. “I was lucky to grow up & Elliott, Inc., from data collected by the One constant in Lafayette Park has having the park, and have my kids and Tallahassee Board of Realtors' MLS been the park itself, combining a lush grandkids there, too.”

FOOD/ENTERTAINMENT The neighborhood borders Midtown, packed with restaurants, bars, coffee shops, smoothie spots, boutiques and a book store.

“The location is amazing. You can walk to restaurants and bars. We have a beautiful park one block over. One thing I really love is that you can sit on your front porch and neighbors walk by and wave. Everybody knows each other, says hello and stops by to chat.” Resident Pamela Ricco, chief operating officer of the Florida Bankers Association

“While it sounds cliché, we were attracted by its older houses, tree-lined streets and the sense of community that still exists. In the past few years, we’ve gotten to know, at least casually, almost everyone on the street, as well as dozens of folks from around the wider neighborhood. We’ve borrowed a lawn mower and butter from neighbors, and in turn we’ve loaned tools, rolled the neighbors’ trash cans to the curb and collected their paper while they are away. The park is, of course, another big amenity, and one we enjoy almost daily.” Resident Ellery Sedgwick, president of the Lafayette Park Neighborhood Association

EVENTS/FESTIVALS For Halloween, thousands of trick-or-treaters head each year to blocked off sections of Beard Street and Ingleside Avenue. Taloofa Fest, sponsored by the Midtown Merchants Association, features a Lafayette Park “adventure challenge” and a block party, history and science fair and live music on Thomasville Road.

SCHOOLS Kate Sullivan Elementary, Elizabeth Cobb Middle School and Leon High School

ASSOCIATIONS Lafayette Park Neighborhood Association: lafayetteparkneighborhood.org/, LafayetteParkNA@gmail.com TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

81


↙ Dr. Jean Conner has lived for 40 years in one of the Myers Park

community’s first houses. She calls the neighborhood today “a microcosm of what a city should be.” Myers Park residents boast easy access to city parks and facilities, including Wade Wehunt Pool.

W

hen writing the history of Tallahassee’s Myers Park neighborhood, one must first ask two questions: How far back do we want to go? And what exactly is Myers Park? Let’s take the last question first. For starters, while there is a city park called Myers Park — with its public swimming pool and tennis courts, pond and wooded area — there is no subdivision of the same name. There is, however, a Myers Park Historic District. This “overlay,” designated in 2001, encompasses about 120 early 20th century houses located within a block or two of the community’s largest feature, the Capital City Country Club and its rolling golf course. It includes the subdivisions Country Club Estates, Units 1 and 2 of Golf Terrace, parts of Woodland Drives, Myers Park itself, and other historic features including the Civil War-era

MYERS PARK City ‘microcosm’ carries historic distinction

Myers Park

BY ROSANNE DUNKELBERGER

82

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

earthworks fort — the “fort” in Old Fort Park. But the neighborhood’s boundaries are somewhat loosely defined, with some saying it reaches to Lafayette Street on the north, South Monroe Street on the west, Magnolia Drive on the south and into Woodland Drives on the east. Its streets are designated by brown signs adorned with a graphic oak tree similar to the magnificent specimens that line the main thoroughfare, Golf Terrace Drive. The original history of the property dates to the Apalachee Indians. Hernando de Soto stopped by for the winter in 1539-40, creating an encampment about a mile and a half away from where the Florida Capitol now stands. The properties that comprise today’s Myers Park were once a farmstead and plantation. Its current incarnation started in the mid-1920s, when developers began envisioning

ATTRACTIONS Capital City Country Club: The 18-hole course has a long and sometimes controversial history. 1601 Golf Terrace Dr.; Myers Park: The 32-acre facility includes Wade Wehunt Pool, open green spaces, tennis courts, a walking trail with fitness stations, playground, picnic areas and ballfields. 912 Myers Park Rd.; Cascades Park: The 27-acre storm-water retention area doubles as a top-ofthe-line park. It includes landscaped lakes and waterways, a public amphitheater, paved walkways, restaurants and a children’s play area. 1001 S. Gadsden St.


PHOTOS BY SAIGE ROBERTS

a country club-style community just beyond the city limits. One of them offered a drawing for four free lots, if the winners would agree to begin building a $5,000 house within six months, according to Dr. Jean Conner. Conner has lived in one of those first houses for 40 years. As a young assistant history professor at Florida State University, she fell in love with the home’s cypress siding, 10-foot ceilings, plaster walls and interior trim work milled in Apalachicola. Now retired, Conner is a fount of knowledge about the history of the community and its inhabitants. “This is funny and not completely accurate, but the people who moved here in the ’20s were as people sell off lots that were purchased by the some prominent people, like the head of Capital original owners as extra yard space. City Bank — who was another one that got a The neighborhood also is benefiting from free lot. There were several Supreme Court improvements underway nearby, most notably justices,” Conner said. “But there were also Cascades Park but also as South Monroe Street a bunch of academics, department chairmen, continues to revitalize. Improved sidewalks and faculty members, state workers … And guess trails make it easy to connect to downtown and who lives here now? Department chairmen, beyond. faculty members, state workers,” she continued “FAMU Way is wonderful. I walk it a lot and with a laugh. “And we have students now. see people biking,” Conner said. “I walk over Graduate students like to be here a lot. to Railroad Square and have coffee. It’s a mile, “It’s also kind of a very mixed bag in many ways but you can easily walk to Gaines Street Pies … but it’s also a microcosm of what a city should and all kinds of stuff from here.” It’s also within be. There’s kind of everyone. There’s old people walking distance of several stores, restaurants and young people and rich people and and Governors Square Mall. poor people and renters and property A number of neighborhood MYERS PARK owners, and we live in harmony,” she associations cover the area. But AREA continued. “And people tend to come when they need to unite, residents SINGLE HOMES here and stay. I’ve been here for 40 present a formidable force. The SOLD*: 53 years, and I know a lot of people who community joined to turn down the AVERAGE have been here for a lot longer. Those volume at events at the Cascades Park SQUARE FEET: people and I all came here when we were amphitheater, and they assembled 1,762 youngsters — and we haven’t left. The 400 red-shirt-wearing residents to AVERAGE LOT SIZE: .32 acre city talks about ‘young professionals.’ descend on a city meeting to stop a AVERAGE YEAR Well, that’s what we were.” proposal to rezone a portion of Myers BUILT: 1962 The housing mix is eclectic: Elegant Park for residential development. MEDIAN SELLING estate houses surrounding the golf “I was scared to death that no one PRICE: $200,000 course, smaller bungalows on the side would show because the weather *Dec 1, 2016, through Dec. 10, 2018 streets interspersed with duplexes and was so dreadful, but it was standingSource: Hill Spooner apartments of more recent vintage. room only,” recalled Mary Frederick, & Elliott, Inc., from data collected by the Conner said new houses are also president of the Woodland Drives Tallahassee Board of Realtors' MLS popping up between established homes Neighborhood Association.

FOOD/ENTERTAINMENT Myers Park is Tallahassee’s seventh most walkable neighborhood, with about 26 restaurants, bars and coffee shops nearby, says Walkscore.com. Options include wieners at Dog Et Al on Monroe Street, bistro fare at Lucilla’s and upscale dining at the Cascades Park landmark restaurant, The Edison. Also nearby: The Moon nightclub.

EVENTS/FESTIVALS Woodland Drives Neighborhood Picnic: The neighborhood association hosts semi-annual gatherings at Old Fort Park in the spring and fall. It features a covered dish meal, bouncy house, entertainment and door prizes contributed.

Piers Rawling touts Myers Park for its low-density housing “this close to the center of town.”

What do you like about Myers Park? “I do a lot of swimming, and the Wade Wehunt pool is two blocks away from me. I run in the winter, and Cascades Park is a great place to go running. You can walk to Cabo’s. And you can walk to downtown quite easily. It’s a very unique situation to have a neighborhood with this sort of low-density housing this close to the center of a town. I think it’s a real plus.” Piers Rawling (above), president of Myers Park Neighborhood Association

“Whenever I talk to neighbors, we always agree that our in-town location and quality of life is unsurpassed: quick commutes, gorgeous homes, greenbelts that provide plenty of trees and wildlife, nearby parks and historic sites, and friendly neighbors.” Mary Frederick, president Woodland Drives Neighborhood Association

SCHOOLS Hartsfield Elementary School, Fairview Middle School and Rickards High School

ASSOCIATIONS Myers Park Neighborhood Association: myersparkna.org; Woodland Drives Neighborhood Association: wooddrives.com, marycfrederick@aol.com TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

83


84 January–February TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM 84 February–March 20162019 EMERALDCOASTMAGAZINE.COM


A SESSION WITH CHEF

ALEX GUARNASCHELLI Thursday, February 28 | 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. Turner Auditorium at Tallahassee Community College A Session with Chef was created with the home cook in mind and is the second part of the Tallahassee Community College Foundation's signature culinary experience. The event includes a live cooking demonstration with Chef Alex Guarnaschelli with recipes from her cookbooks Old-School Comfort Food: The Way I Learned to Cook and The Home Cook: Recipes to Know by Heart.

Tickets are available at cleaverandcorktcc.com TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

85


86 January–February TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM 86 February–March 20162019 EMERALDCOASTMAGAZINE.COM


Abodes

JAN/FEB 2019

TRENDS FROM FLOOR TO CEILING, FRONT TO BACK

Frameless glass shower doors add a luxurious look and easy clean-up.

INTERIORS

READY FOR A CLEAN SWEEP?

PHOTO COURTESY OF KOHLER CO.

Shower yourself with a bathroom makeover

by ELIZABETH GOLDSMITH

EXTERIORS

Spring into a New Irrigation System

|| NEIGHBORHOODS

Home in the Clouds

|| GARDENING

How to Select and Plant Fruit Trees

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

87


abodes

Y

ou might be thinking your bathroom needs a new look. Give it a boost with a little DIY or go full out with a total makeover. Start with inspiring ideas and a budget. HomeAdvisor says that a bathroom remodel in Tallahassee costs on average $9,789, with a range from $2,500 to $25,000. Jim Bennett, who says he has been in the plumbing business for “coming up on 50 years,” says a basic remodel for a 5-by-8 bathroom is $8,500, and that includes ceramic-tile floors and walls. Bennett says figure three weeks for a whole bathroom redo, meaning layout and selecting supplies, tile, fixtures, mirrors and lights.

Master Bathrooms Here are some tricks and tips to get the bathroom of your dreams. Master bathrooms are full of indulgence while offering efficiency (i.e., two sinks) at the same time. More homeowners now ask for supersized showers. Frameless glass shower doors add a luxurious look and easy cleanup. Remove those mold collector gold-tone or chrome frames that clank every time you shut them. Multiple showerheads or a steam feature, requiring a door that seals tightly on all sides, are upgrades. Maybe you prefer a whirlpool

88

January–February 2019

or deep-soaking tub. Make sure it is roomy enough and doesn’t strain your back. Whether tub or shower, install slipresistant flooring for stability and freedom from falls. Add grab bars and easy-to-reach controls. A bench seat is up to you. An inset or shelf for holding shampoo and soap is a must. You’ve probably seen advertisements for one-day installations of custom manufactured and professionally installed showers, tubs or both. These are called replacement tubs and showers, and they vary in quality and price. The speed is certainly attractive, and in-home design consultations are free from multiple companies. Floating vanities make a room feel airy by adding open space between the floor and the vanity — a perfect place to put slippers or attractive containers with supplies. The vanity can be outfitted with drawers, cabinets and cubby holes. A cushioned chair, ottoman or bench below a window provide handy places to sit or to throw a bath towel or robe. Drapes or blinds can dramatically change the appearance of the accompanying window. Soft music can set the mood. Install a sound system or stash an mp3 player on a shelf. Too calming? How about waking up with a water-resistant television blaring the latest news? Walls can be painted, or they can feature

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

specially designed bathroom wallpaper. Currently in vogue is a subtle spa-like grayish blue grid pattern. Consider glass mosaic or tile walls. In a large master bath, combine several of these for a unique look. Keeping the pattern to a minimum will expand the space. Tile-less bathrooms are also in vogue. So when you remove that ’60s blue or pink tile, don’t immediately replace with it neutralcolor tile; explore the other options. Even the most aesthetically minded homeowner can use an assist from store salespeople and interior designers.

Small Bathrooms Make a tiny bathroom look larger by indulging in updated fixtures, storage niches and colorful accents. A striped area rug will elongate. Contrary to logic, large tile squares with fewer grout lines will make a small space seem bigger. Pedestal sinks and towel bars take up less floor space than a chunky vanity cabinet. Powder Rooms and Dog Showers In a two-story home, a powder room with a sink and toilet is most likely located on the first floor off a hallway or tucked under the staircase. Designers used to go wild installing bold wallpaper. The reasoning was it is a small space where you dash in and out, have fun with it or go for the “wow” reaction. In a remodel it might be prudent to bust out a wall and add a shower, making it more usable for a first-floor bedroom or washing the dog. In high-end homes, a dog shower is often placed near the back door. Storage Solutions Mix open and closed storage or try frosted glass door inserts; break up a wall of cabinets when you can. Bathrooms get overloaded with shampoos, hairdryers and cosmetics — give them storage space and clean out those hotel samples and gifts-with-purchase at least once a year. Mirrors and Lighting Skylights, windows, chandeliers, soft flattering side-of-vanity lights — your pick. The right lighting will help with all types of grooming and give you a lift. The bathroom is an important part of the house. Have fun with it! TM

PHOTO COURTESY OF KOHLER CO.

You can significantly transform a bathroom with the right tub, lighting, wallcover and flooring. As you consider a redesign, keep in mind that tile-less bathrooms are in vogue.


Live your style NEW YEAR ... NEW LOOK

Brian Barnard’s Chris, Brian and JR Barnard

2731 Capital Circle NE Tallahassee, FL 850.386.8689

1501 E. Jackson St. Thomasville, GA 229.226.7438

barnardsflooring-america.com TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

89


SPONSORED REPORT

MaysMunroe, Inc. APPLIANCES AWAIT AND ABOUND by REBECCA PADGETT

A

ppliances provide a gentle hum, a steady warmth or a welcomed cool. They clean, they cook, they comfort. In essence, our appliances provide services that keep our lives progressing and pleasant. Mays-Munroe, Inc., the only independent appliance dealer in Tallahassee, features a showroom with state-ofthe-art appliances and an on-site service department. The knowledgeable staff assists customers by educating them on their options and has the capabilities to service those appliances long after purchase. “Our goal is for every customer to leave with a product they are happy and satisfied with,” said Mike Munroe, sales manager of Mays-Munroe, Inc. “Customers should feel like they were aware of all options and selected the appliance that best fit their needs. The selection process should be as effortless and enjoyable as possible.” When visiting the showroom, a member of the sales department will help you assess your needs and wants, present you with options, schedule delivery or installation and process your payment all in one day. For building or remodeling

Always dreamed of a customized kitchen? Mays-Munroe can make those dreams come true by allowing you to handselect which appliances match your lifestyle, needs and overall aesthetic.

90

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


SPONSORED REPORT

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

91


SPONSORED REPORT

92

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


SPONSORED REPORT

Bosch and Thermador are leaders in sleek, stylish and functional kitchen appliances. Mays-Munroe takes pride in carrying these two brands as they continuously provide cutting-edge and quality products. For example, Bosch’s ultra quiet dishwashers display exemplary cleanliness, and the Thermador Masterpiece collection features touchscreen ovens.

projects, appointments are advised to ensure time and resources can be allocated to you. Because the staff contains a wealth of product knowledge and are detail conscious, they have become a trusted community resource for refrigerators, cooktops, ranges, ovens, washers, dryers, mattresses, home furnishings and more. It doesn’t hurt their reputation that the company has been selling appliances to Tallahasseans since it first opened under the ownership of Hugh Mays in 1936. Upon Mays’ passing in 1973, the Munroe family bought the company and opened under the Mays-Munroe name in 1974. The company is managed by second generation Munroes, and several third generation members work in the showroom. The familial presence is demonstrated through their pillars — great service, quality products and ycustomer care. The service-oriented nature allows them to be price competitive. Because they are collectively larger than chain stores and are independently owned, they are able to provide services that others cannot. “People trust us because we’ve proven our product quality, our easy process, our ability to solve service issues and our commitment to finding the best products for your lifestyle,” said Munroe.

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

93


SPONSORED REPORT

Both Bosch and Thermador offer sideswing ovens, which are gaining popularity not only for their pleasing design but also for prime functionality. Side-swing ovens guarantee easier access and optimal safety when placing and removing food. Modular units are highly requested, such as the Thermador Freedom collection, which allows clients the ability to mix, match and style fridges, freezers and wine coolers in whichever way they please. Bosch ovens and microwaves are classic and clean with black glass fronts. Thermadoor has ventured into gray glass fronts, should you prefer the monochrome look.

94

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


SPONSORED REPORT

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

95


S STREAM EXTERIORS

OF TECH Spring into a new irrigation system by ELIZABETH B. GOLDSMITH

pring is the time most homeowners update or install irrigation systems. Installation can happen any time of year, but the season before summer is when most people have it on their minds, said Kevin Ashley, owner of Shamrock Nursery, Landscape and Irrigation. Reasons to install a sprinkler system include:  Construction or additions such as pools and decks.  A change to landscape, weather or turf conditions.  A realization that some places are too dry or too wet — too wet can cause fungus.  A desire to conserve water.  A desire to update technology.

Ashley says most homeowners overlook the change in the seasons or add too much water, “which can be as damaging as too little.” Each homeowner’s needs are different, so systems should be customized, he says. For example, azaleas need a lot of water, and daylilies need practically none, which explains why they thrive in highway medians. Rotating nozzles for sprinkling systems are visible in the grass. Meanwhile, water lines are

96

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PHOTOS COURTESY OF HUNTER INDUSTRIES INCORPORATED

abodes

↗ Hunter Industries offers irrigation systems that

include a Wi-Fi controller that, using your phone, you can turn on from anywhere.

buried six inches to eight inches deep, with eight inches the most common. New irrigation systems are easily adjustable to weather conditions. The area saw lots of rain over the summer, so “even at the nursery where we usually water twice a day, we had to cut back,” Ashley said.

Getting Technical Clarence Gibbs of SiteOne Landscape Supply says the size of pipe matters. For a half-acre lot, he said, he would use 1-inch PVC pipe for the main line and 1-inch for lateral for volume to cover six zones. For a quarter acre, he would install pipes and sprinklers for four zones, he said. Flowerbeds do well with drip or micro-irrigation or with spray-out adjustable nozzles.


850.562.1234

AIR CONTROL

aircontrolheatingandcooling.com LIC. #CAC1817885

HEATING AND COOLING

LIC. #CCC049353

Residential • Commercial • All Types • Roof Repair • Fully Insured • FREE ESTIMATES • Financing Available We have been serving Tallahassee for over 60 years! We take pride in our customers.

RAIN, SUN OR SALT, WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED

CALL US AT 850-562-8366 • TALLAHASSEEROOFINGINC.COM TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

97


abodes

the real estate market is hot!

how much is your home worth? call today to find out.

Innovative systems could be what you want or need if your system is always breaking down or squirting water in the wrong direction — for example, watering the street instead of your plants. You’ve seen what I mean. This adds to your water bill and helps no one. Properly functioning rain sensors shut off the sprinklers when it is raining.

Gary Bartlett Broker/Owner Bartlett Real Estate Group 2940 East Park Avenue (850) 443-5887

BartlettREG.com

ryBak realty, llC, realtorS reSidential and CommerCial SaleS

®

| long and Short-term rentalS

Broker/owner

HEATHER RYBAK “Be it ever so humble, there’s no place like home.” - John Howard Payne 850-692-3872

98

HRybak@RybakRealty.US

January–February 2019

Gibbs and Ashley point to new technologies from Hunter Industries, which has rolled out advanced remote controls. Hunter’s PHC 1200, with a Wi-Fi controller, can be turned on from anywhere from your phone. Here is a list of other innovations in irrigation systems:  Lighting zoning, dimming and color with LED technology.  Rotating multi-stream, multi-trajectory nozzles that conserve water.  Advanced weather sensors that adjust irrigationcontroller schedules for varying weather conditions.  A no-dig solution providing easy access to service rotor components.

RybakRealty.US

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Xeriscaping Daylillies are examples of water-conserving or droughttolerant perennial plants, so it makes sense to work with irrigation system installers who know plants that conserve water. These might not necessarily be native plants. Xeriscaping refers to landscaping and gardening that reduces or eliminates the need for extra watering. Start by examining your existing property for areas that consume the most water. Lawns usually guzzle most of your water, so a reduction of your lawn area may help. Then visit local nurseries and talk with them about plants and designs. Rethink turf and perennial beds, views and slopes and the need for screening from neighbors or roadways. Above all, avoid wind drift and replace broken rotary spray nozzles or gear-driven rotors. Inefficient mechanisms are a waste of time and money. Switching from rotary sprinklers to MP Rotators can save 15 percent to 20 percent on water bills, Ashley said. Time of Day and How Often The worst time to water is in the heat and sun of summer at midday. This encourages water loss through evaporation. Mulching around bushes, trees and plants also helps reduce water loss. What you want is to water deeply and properly to develop deep roots. Gibbs recommends 30 minutes for turf and 15 minutes for flower beds three days a week except in winter, when homeowners should cut back to one or two times a week. “When it gets 75 degrees or higher then you have to stay on top of it three times a week to every day in high heat,” he said. Enjoy our beautiful spring and rethink your outdated irrigation system. Make things easier for yourself, your yard and the planet. TM


jan-feb19_final.pdf 1 10/26/2018 11:01:05 AM

FLOOR, CEILING AND WALL INSULATION

ENERGY STAR REFLECTIVE ROOFING OUTDOOR LIGHTING

C

M

RANGES, GRILLS & FIRELOGS

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

FIND SAVINGS IN EVERY CORNER OF YOUR HOME The City of Tallahassee offers five percent interest financing for more than 25 energy-efficient appliances, measures and systems, including solar. Take advantage of the City of Tallahassee’s loan program to save energy, water and money. Visit Talgov.com for more information.

NATIONALLY

KNOWN LOCALLY

GROWN CARPET TILE & GROUT HARDWOOD FURNITURE AIR DUCTS

FOR A CLEANER & HEALTHIER HOME™ ... CALL STANLEY STEEMER 850.656.1777

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

99


abodes

A

NEIGHBORHOODS

HOME in the Clouds

Former Tallahasseean’s mountain community hits home with Capital City residents by REBECCA PADGETT

100

January–February 2019

bout 15 years ago, John Tatum envisioned a neighborhood that marked a throwback to a day when community meant neighbors and connections referred to lasting relationships. Consider that during a time when community means bloggers and connections refer to Facebook friendships. “My vision was to create a place where relationships could be sustained and enhanced while making memories,” Tatum said. “It’s a legacy community, built to last and be handed down.” Tatum, a developer and a Tallahassee native, and others from Tallahassee believe he has created that in Cloudland Station, a gated community of 450 acres in the lush mountains of northern Georgia. The community in Chickamauga, near the Tennessee line, features primary homes, second homes and summer homes in a setting of natural wonders. Residents embrace a romanced sight of a mountain sunset, the peace of a babbling stream and a chance to disconnect in order to reconnect.

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

“In everyday life, there is so much competition for our time and attention,” said Tatum, CEO of Firefly Communities, Cloudland Station’s development company. “But here, you’re presented with the chance to slow down and do activities that bring people together. Cloudland Station is a calling to connect.” Tatum grew up in Tallahassee and attended Florida State University. He moved to Atlanta but missed the sense of community and slower pace that his former home offered. He feels as though he has regained those qualities of life in Cloudland Station, which opened in 2008. There, he says, he cherishes family time, reconnects with old friends and welcomes new ones. Several current and former Tallahassee families own property in the community, a six-hour drive from the Capital City. Phil Hartsfield, a Cloudland Station property owner who says he vacations there with his wife, Julie, and their four daughters, said he grew up with Tatum in Tallahassee.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CLOUDLAND STATION

← John Tatum’s Cloudland Station is a gated community in Chickamauga, Georgia, that features primary homes, second homes and summer homes in a setting of natural wonders. “Cloudland Station is a calling to connect,” Tatum says. Several current and former Tallahassee families own property in the community, near the Tennessee line.


Upgrade Your Experience

Audio Video Connections PROFESSIONAL DESIGN & INSTALLATION OF

HOME THEATER NETWORKING HOME AUTOMATION

Mark Ice, Owner (850) 251-4931

www.markice.net

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

101


abodes

(850) 656-2856 | NORTHFLORIDA.INVISIBLEFENCE.COM

Start the New Year in a New Home!

Tour Lexington Parc. Models open Saturdays and Sundays 1-5. Your new home starting at $246K!

Residential | Commercial | Investment Properties

Tiffany Hamilton, Owner/Broker CALL 850.727.4743

102

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

↑ Cloudland Station homes and neighborhoods provide various sites, vibes, themes and options. Developer John Tatum, a Tallahassee native, says his company plans to build 350 homes there.

“When he held a meeting about his vision for Cloudland Station, we were in,” Hartsfield said. “He was creating a place that brought people back to older, simpler times where we focus on family, friends and truly building a community.” Hartsfield said Cloudland Station lacks commercialization and, for the most part, technology. That “allows families to utilize the property amenities together and create memories,” he said. Tatum said in early November that 20 homes had been built and that five more were under architectural review. He said he has focused mainly on building common amenities and now is turning his attention to sales. His company plans 350 Cloudland Station homes. The village features a general store, a café, a sweet shop, a town hall, an opera house and recreation parks. Residents can hike and bike miles of wooded trails, swim in the infinity pool, canoe through the swimming hole and shoot hoops at the basketball court. Should they wish to get a quick taste of the city, Chattanooga, Tennessee, awaits 20 minutes away. Homes and neighborhoods vary, providing various sites, vibes, themes and options, including a large custom home or a small rustic cabin. Calling it a “labor of love,” Tatum said he and his team “handcrafted every stone and piece of timber to add special touches to the community.” Interested buyers can select from a pre-approved house plan, a semi-custom home or a full custom home. Home sites range from scenic hilltops with 360-degree views to valley plots next to meandering creeks. “It’s truly picturesque,” Julie Hartsfield said. “I take a lot of photos every time we are there, and the beauty still isn’t properly captured. It’s a restful place for quality time that slows you down from our fast-paced culture.” TM

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CLOUDLAND STATION

PROTECTING PETS FOR 315 DOG YEARS.


THANKS FOR VOTING US BEST IN TALLAHASSEE FOR THE PAST 10 YEARS! 2018

5 CERTIFIED ARBORISTS ON STAFF RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL TREE SERVICE

WE’LL GO OUT ON A LIMB FOR YOU!

(8733)

850-894-TREE

24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE | MillerTreeSrv.com | admin@millertreesrv.com | 4951 Woodlane Circle Canopy

Premier’s NEWEST Community, conveniently located between MOORE Pond & Ox Bottom Manor,

is due to be released in JANUARY! Zoned for very desirable School Zones- Hawks Rise, Deer Lake & Chiles!

PRELIMINARY PLAT, subject to change without notice, contingent on final plat approval.

PHOTOS BY KATIE SIMON

• Screen & Window Repair & Replacement • Mirrors & Furniture Tops • Fogged Windows millerglassco.com

| 1961

• Custom Shower Enclosures • Quick Turnaround on Residential Insulated Glass Replacement

raymond diehl road

| 850.224.6030

Call Jeff today to get preliminary information & schedule a time to own a home here before they are gone!

850-545-4747

“You say where, I’ll be there!” JeffDoxsee1@gmail.com

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

103


104

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


K | W Stephanie Eldridge 850 251 3567 @uetlh @gbghconstruction @architects_lw TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

105


abodes Your Monthly Garden Chores

GARDENING

HOW TO SELECT AND PLANT FRUIT TREES

JANUARY

➸ Plant your holiday Amaryllis bulbs in your yard after they’ve finished blooming.

JANUARY AND FEBRUARY ARE THE BEST MONTHS FOR PLANTING MOST TREES, and it’s the ideal time

to start a food forest in your yard. What’s a food forest? It’s a mix of trees and shrubs that produce edible fruit and nuts. Of course, the first rule of edible gardening is to plant what you like to eat. The second rule is work smart, not hard: It’s easier on you and the trees to plant in cooler months. 1 Deciduous fruit trees, meaning those that lose their leaves in winter, should be planted now. They include figs, persimmons, chestnuts, pecans, apples, pears, peaches and plums. It’s also a good time to plant blueberries. Make sure you select varieties that do well in our area. Local nurseries and your county extension office can guide you on the best varieties.

2 Make sure you plant the tree no deeper than it was in its pot, and loosen the root ball if it has become wound around itself.

➸ Prune summerblooming trees and shrubs such as crape myrtles. They are dormant now and have lost their leaves, so you can see where limbs are dead or diseased, or crossing and rubbing. Don’t prune spring bloomers such as azaleas or forsythia, though, or you’ll cut off the flower buds. FEBRUARY

➸ Prune your

3 Build a berm of soil about two feet out from

the trunk all the way around to create a basin so the water will drain into the root zone. Keep the soil uniformly moist but not soggy. An inch of water every other day for several weeks should help it get established, but watch the weather. If it turns hot early, you’ll need to water more.

4 Wait until mid-April to plant citrus trees, or else

be prepared to baby and protect them until all danger of frost has passed. Even citrus labeled “cold hardy” must be protected for the first two years to get established.

Insects and other critters, good and bad: Clover mites

Clover mites, Bryobia praetiosa Koch, are tiny insects that just love lush vegetation, particularly if it’s close to the house. They cause small silver streaks on foliage and grass blades, and sometimes flowers, when they feed. In large numbers, they can injure the lawn to the point it looks like winter kill. They usually show up in spring and fall, because CLOVER MITES they don’t like weather extremes. Leaving an unplanted strip about the foundation of buildings can discourage them from taking up residence. Giving extra water to areas around foundations, especially if the wall faces the sun, can reduce populations. Planting marigolds, roses, chrysanthemums and zinnias can discourage them, too. They move indoors when it gets too hot or too cold, or too wet. When they move inside, they’re more annoying than dangerous, leaving a red smear when crushed against a wall, door or floor. Don’t confuse them with their beneficial predator cousin, Balaustium spp., which has been found to be an effective way to control insect pests.

PESKY PESTS

106

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

roses. An easy way to remember is to think about Valentine’s Day and its connection to roses. ➸ Set out tomato plants in late February, but be prepared to protect them from frost or freeze. We usually have plenty of mild days in February, and planting early gives tomatoes a head start — before insects have hatched. ➸ Plant potatoes and peas this month, giving the peas a lattice or trellis — give them something to hold onto as they grow.

©2015-2019 PostScript Publishing LLC, all rights reserved. Audrey Post is a certified Advanced Master Gardener volunteer with the University of Florida/ IFAS Extension in Leon County. Email her at Questions@MsGrowItAll. com or visit her website at msgrowitall.com. Ms. Grow-It-All® is a registered trademark of PostScript Publishing.

ILLUSTRATION BY NADZEYA DZIVAKOVA (FRUIT TREES), STEVENELLINGSON (CLOVER MITE) AND PHOTO BY US24 (TOMATO PLANT), TSEKHMISTER (ROSES) ISTOCK / GETTYIMAGES PLUS

BY AUDREY POST, MS. GROW-IT-ALL®

➸ Start tomato plants from seed indoors so they’re ready to transplant in late February.


Rooted in Tallahassee for

Tallahassee’s trusted source for a southern classic

Camellias

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

107


PROMOTION

DEAL ESTATE

JUST LISTED

Downtown Tallahassee Condo Boasts Amazing Views Professionally designed and loaded with custom upgrades throughout, Plaza Tower is a luxury residential condo building in Kleman Plaza, nestled between the Capitol and FSU’s campus. Building amenities include: luxury lobby, concierge, new gym and secured access with private gated parking.

LISTED PRICE: $315,000 ADDRESS: 300 S. Duval St., Unit 1802 SQUARE FOOTAGE: 1,188 BEDROOMS: 2 YEAR BUILT: 2009 FEATURES: Custom closet, built wine bar, designer finishes, reclaimed wood wall, recessed TVs APPEAL: Designer details and touches CONTACT: Omar Hajjar, Realtor (850) 339-9830 omar@edenandcompany.com

108

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PHOTOS COURTESY OF WADE BISHOP WITH 323 MEDIA GROUP

BATHROOMS: 2


2018

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

109


PROMOTION

DEAL ESTATE

JUST SOLD

Exquisite Luxury in Bobbin Trace This magnificent European-style estate in Bobbin Trace is a dream home. Spanning over 3.8 acres and 8,831 square feet, this residence is graced with soaring ceilings, extensive millwork, a grand foyer and too many extraordinary features to list. The sprawling outdoor entertaining space includes a terrace with pool, summer kitchen, fire pit, tennis court, pavilion with a vaulted beamed ceiling and a stream passing through the backyard. SOLD PRICE: $3,550,000 ADDRESS: 3891 Windbrook Court SQUARE FOOTAGE: 8,831 BEDROOMS: 5 BATHROOMS: 5 Full, 3 Half YEAR BUILT: 2001. The kitchen, master suite, dining room, family room and guest house all underwent a very recent renovation.

APPEAL: This stunning estate home is located on over 3.8 acres of beautifully manicured gardens just minutes from Tallahassee’s Market Street District. This level of luxury is unmatched in Tallahassee. Every construction detail, finish and system in this home is top-of-the-line. CONTACT: Hettie Spooner, Broker/Owner, (850) 509-4337, hettie@hillspooner.com

110

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PHOTOS COURTESY OF NICK RENAUD, 323 MEDIA

FEATURES: 1,200-bottle wine cellar, Elan Home Automation system, whole house generator running guest house, walk-in safe room/vault that doubles as a panic room, custom Cantera wrought iron doors, custom Bischoff foyer glass at main house and guest, recirculating stream covering length of backyard, water purifying system by Life Source, advanced home security system including 15 exterior cameras, La Cornue custom range and hood in kitchen, 24,000 square feet of pavers, 3,600 linear feet of stone wall wrapping backyard, 2017 gas tankless water heater, 2017 Lennox A/C units


REAL ESTATE REDEFINED EDENANDCOMPANY.COM

SARAH EDEN

OMAR HAJJAR

BROKER (850) 933-9600

REALTOR (850) 339-9830

A FULL-SERVICE REAL ESTATE GROUP

BUY, SELL, SEARCH WITH US | SERVING LEON COUNTY AND SURROUNDING AREAS 3520 Thomasville Road — Fifth floor | Tallahassee, FL 32309 | (850) 222-3075 |

Meet our team... Specializing in Homes, Land, New Construction and Development PrimeSouthRealty.com

Abbie Sirmans REALTOR® 445-4868 abbiesirmanss@netzero.net

Ada Feliciano REALTOR® 545-3870 adarealtor@aol.com

Dixie Russell REALTOR® 566-9285 dixielrussell@gmail.com

Kenny Ayers REALTOR® 508-5500 shrkbait@infionline.net

Bob Fish REALTOR® 800-7449 realestatetally1@gmail.com

David MacLeod REALTOR® 284-6760 dmacleod@nettally.com

Margaret Steele Marvin Goldstein REALTOR® Broker Assoc. 556-3774 294-0029 msteele050@gmail.com marvinagoldstein@gmail.com

Debbie Gerber REALTOR® 545-8164 deb@debgerber.com

Fran Ferenchick Bettie Bedell REALTOR® Broker Assoc. 545-6767 570-0181 franferenchick@gmail.com bcmbedell@embarqmail.com

Mike Ferrie REALTOR® 566-8373 mike@mikeferrie.com

Stacy Harnett Sedita Cayson Broker Assoc. REALTOR® 510-6017 933-6973 stacyharnett10@gmail.com thelandman2@gmail.com

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

111


ADVERTISEMENT

Yes, you can afford a home on St. George Island! Conveniently located close to restaurants and shops, and just one block to the bay and 3 short blocks to the beach. Sweet 2 bedroom, 2 bath interior island home. Updated in 2016, it is light and bright and has an open great room with a vaulted ceiling and a fireplace. Generously sized bedrooms with ensuite bathrooms are on either side of the great room and a laundry room is upstairs as well. Decks on the front and the back of the home give a glimpse of the Bay. It is just steps to the Bay and 3 blocks from the beach. This well-built home stood strong and had no damage from Michael. Don’t miss the opportunity to own a home on St. George Island at this low price!

LISTPRICE: PRICE:$320,000 $320,000 LIST ADDRESS:305 305Quinn QuinnStreet, Street, ADDRESS: St.George GeorgeIsland Island St. SQUAREFOOTAGE: FOOTAGE:1228 1228 SQUARE BEDROOMS:2 2 BEDROOMS: BATHROOMS:2 2 BATHROOMS: YEARBUILT: BUILT:1992 1992 YEAR FEATURES:On Onpilings, pilings,front frontand andback back FEATURES: decks,vaulted vaultedceiling ceilinginingreat greatroom, room, decks, sliding glass doors, real wood burning sliding glass doors, real wood burning fireplace,ensuite ensuitebathrooms, bathrooms,inside inside fireplace, laundry room, just steps to the bayand and laundry room, just steps to the bay shortblocks blockstotothe thebeach beachand andclose closetoto 3 3short restaurants and shops. restaurants and shops. APPEAL:This Thishome homeisisone oneofofthe themost most APPEAL: inexpensivesingle singlefamily familyhomes homesononthe the inexpensive island. It is move in ready, and the great island. It is move in ready, and the great roomisislarge largeand andlight, light,with witha apractical practical room layout for kitchen dining and family areas. layout for kitchen dining and family areas. Slidingglass glassdoors doorsopen opentotothe theback backdeck deck Sliding from both bedrooms and the great room. from both bedrooms and the great room. Don’twait wait- you - youcan canhave haveyour yourisland island Don’t getaway! getaway! CONTACT INFORMATION: Catherine Korfanty, Licensed Real Estate Broker,850-510-8009, ckorfanty@outlook. com and Barbara Morris, Realtor, 813CONTACT 514-7937,INFORMATION: flamorr@msn.com Catherine Korfanty, Licensed Real Estate Broker, 850-510-8009, ckorfanty@outlook.com and Barbara Morris, Realtor, 813-514-7937, flamorr@msn.com

112

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


ADVERTISEMENT

Make Life at the Coast a Reality for 2019 Gulf front front St. St. George George Island Island home home on on the the east east Gulf end with with a a full full acre acre and and expansive expansive water water views. views. end 4 bedrooms, bedrooms, 2 2 baths. baths. Vaulted Vaulted ceilings ceilings in in huge huge 4 great room. room. Sundeck Sundeck overlooking overlooking the the gulf gulf great and white white sandy sandy beach. beach. Outside Outside shower, shower, fish fish and cleaning sink sink and and porch porch swing swing are are under under the the cleaning home. $899,900 $899,900 home.

2.49 acres acres with with 107 107 feet feet of of frontage frontage on on Scipio Scipio 2.49 Creek offering easy access to the Apalachicola Creek offering easy access to the Apalachicola Bay and and ready ready for for your your dock. dock. High High and and Bay always dry dry home home site site on on wooded wooded lot lot with with always mature trees, trees, and and a a gentle gentle slope slope to to Scipio Scipio mature Creek. Conveniently Conveniently located located just just minutes minutes to to Creek. downtown Apalachicola, Apalachicola, yet yet on on a a secluded secluded tree tree downtown lined road. road. $169,000 $169,000 lined

River front front lots lots above above beautiful beautiful Carrabelle Carrabelle River on the the Crooked Crooked River. River. Minimum Minimum covenants, covenants, on permanent views views of of Tate’s Tate’s Hell Hell Forest, Forest, and and permanent abundant wildlife. wildlife. Nature Nature lovers lovers dream. dream. abundant Because the the lots lots are are 2 2 miles miles from from the the Gulf Gulf and and Because the winding winding nature nature of of the the river river the the lots lots incurred incurred the no damage damage from from Michael. Michael. no Prices range from $45,000 to $499,000 – 2+ acres to over 11 acres.

Catherine Korfanty Licensed Real Estate Broker 850-510-8009 ckorfanty@outlook.com

Apalachicola Bay Apalachicola Ba y Realty Realty

Barbara Morris Realtor 813-514-7937 flamorr@msn.com

APALACHICOLABAYREALTY.COM APALA CHICOLAB AYREALT Y.COM

Apalachicola Bay Realty | 850-510-8009 | Apalachicolabayrealty.com |

@Apalachicola Bay Realty

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

113


QUALITY

EXPERIENCE

PEACE OF MIND

Better Business Bureau A+ Rating Storm Damage Experts Metal Roofing Options

KNOWLEDGE

Owens Corning Platinum Contractor Licensed & Insured Residential & Commercial

4740 MAHAN DRIVE | TALLAHASSEE | 850.728.8101 | TALLAHASSEEROOFINGCOMPANY.NET

114

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


destinations

JAN/FEB 2019

VISITING NOTEWORTHY PLACES NEAR AND FAR

Bran Castle, also known as Dracula’s Castle, requires a walk up a steep hill and features a museum that once served as a torture chamber.

GETAWAY

MAKE IT COUNT

PHOTO BY EMICRISTEA / ISTOCK EDITORIAL / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

Visit Romania, drink lots of wine and visit Dracula’s Castle

by MCKENZIE BURLEIGH LOHBECK

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

115


destinations A historic clock tower remains the focal point of Sighisoara, a popular tourist destination in Romania’s Transylvania region.

W

e know what you’re thinking: a wine-focused tour through Romania, Maldova and Transnistria? Why not visit France, Italy or Chile? You’re also thinking, what and where is Transnistria? We have the answers for you, and we think you’ll be impressed. My husband and I recently took a nineday trip to this region of southeastern Europe, and we returned with an appreciation and a better understanding of the region’s natural beauty, its castles, sheep, cuisine (Ever eat an ostrich?) and, most of all, its wine. We encountered warm and generous people, and we visited the supposed home of a fictional person who wasn’t known particularly for his hospitality: Dracula. Maybe you’d like to go on a virtual nineday visit of your own.  If so, hop aboard!

Day 1 My husband, Steven, and I landed in Bucharest in the morning and awaited Rasvan, our travel guide with tour operator

116

January–February 2019

Cultural Romtour. That night, we enjoyed some terrific Romanian wine and began to hear about the country’s wine-making traditions, some of the oldest in the world. Romania boasts a wide range of grape varieties and consistently ranks among the world’s top 15 wine-exporting countries.

Day 2 We found the drive to our first destination, Peles Castle in Sinaia, breathtaking. I had the windows rolled down as we swerved through the Carpathian Mountains, whose sounds and smells reminded me of my native Utah. Originally built in 1873 as a summer retreat and hunting lodge for King Carol I and Queen Elisabeth of Romania, the building holds one of the finest art collections in Eastern and Central Europe, including paintings, statues, furniture, arms and armor and oriental rugs. Not too far down the canyon was Azuga Rhein Cellars, where we stopped to enjoy lunch, a sparkling wine tasting and to tour the facility. I found it interesting that the facility continues to hand-turn its bottles as part of the fermentation process. We ended our day in Bran, Transylvania,

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

↗ Peles Castle in Sanaia, Romania, offers breathtaking photo opportunities and holds one of the finest art collections in Eastern and Central Europe. It was built as a summer lodge for King Carol I and Queen Elisabeth of Romania.

to visit Bran Castle, also known as Dracula’s Castle. Built on a cliff in the 14th Century as a defense against Ottoman raids, this fortress is worth the hike up an extremely steep hill. The structure is said to have fit the description of the castle that author Bram Stoker described in his novel “Dracula,” and it’s indeed a creepy place: The site includes a museum that once served as a torture chamber.


PHOTO BY MOUSSA81 / ISTOCK EDITORIAL / GETTY IMAGES PLUS (PELES CASTLE) AND VEMICRISTEA (SIGHISOARA) / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

Souvenirs? We saw a scary amount. Vendors lined the streets outside the castle and sold hats, sweaters and memorabilia that had a bite to them.

Day 3 We took off in the morning on a beautiful countryside car journey to Sighisoara. On the way we stopped in Fagaras to have lunch with a friend of Rasvan’s, Chef Daniela

Graura, who prepared a meal based on traditional and new Romanian recipes. We became quick friends over the appreciation of food. Neither of us spoke each other’s language, so thank goodness for Rasvan, who translated and made it easy to connect. We indulged on truffle mushroom soup, eggplant hummus, scalloped potatoes with prosciutto and fresh sliced tomatoes from the garden. I asked Daniela about the herb

in the dish. She said it was cimbrisor, also known as wild thyme. I found it so much better than any thyme I’d ever tried. Of course, chef Daniela paired everything with Romanian wines. We enjoyed hearing her tell stories about her dedication to her village and about her children’s cooking school, which teaches nutrition and culinary skills. What an inspiration and treat this afternoon was to us.

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

117


destinations

↑ Sheep and the Carpathian Mountains make up prominent parts of a drive through Romania. Herds on this trip numbered in the hundreds. The people who live there will tell you that each herd includes sheep that belong to multiple families, who take turns watching them.

We continued our day with a visit to Cincusor Fortified Church, a beautiful medieval citadel. Driving through the countryside, we saw one heard of sheep after another, always with a shepherd. Rasvan told me that the sheep belong to multiple families and they take turns watching them. The herds that I saw included hundreds of sheep. Maybe a dozen or so belong to each family. I wanted to grab one and put it in the back seat, but my husband told me that might not be such a good idea. We continued our way through the impressive sheer limestone walls of the Bicaz Gorge in the eastern Carpathian Mountains. Rasvan informed us that this is the region’s roadside marketplace, so we stopped. I found the most beautiful all-white cowhide that was 12 feet across, prompting me to wonder how big this cow was when it was alive. After a little negotiation, I walked away with it for roughly $250, about a quarter of the asking price for a similar one that I saw in Destin. I felt great about this buy, as I know the farmer used every square inch of this cow and that it wasn’t raised just for the hide.

118

January–February 2019

We stopped at the Varatec Monastery for a private lunch cooked by Romanian Orthodox nuns, who also served blessed wine and sherry. Our lunches tended to include sherry. Locals there claim that it “cleanses the pallet,” but I think it grows hair on your chest. It was so strong that even my husband couldn’t finish it. He must have gotten all of his chest hair from somewhere else.

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

The lunch included homemade soup and smoked trout. The sisters grew all vegetables for the soup on the monastery grounds. They also raised and caught the trout there. We spent the late afternoon in Iasi, an important historical, economic and cultural center in northeastern Romania. We spent the night at Hotel La Domenii, the site of a beautiful vineyard and farm of chickens,

PHOTOS BY TUTYE (SHEEP) AND ROCTER (CARPATHIAN MOUNTAINS) / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

Day 4


2018

B ridal R egistry S tationery & G ifts H ome A ccessories

Follow us @shopmft ShopMFT.com 8 5 0 - 6 8 1 - 2 8 24 · 8 0 0 - 9 8 3 - 2 26 6 1410 Market Street , C3 · Tallahassee, Florida TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

119


destinations birds and rabbits. For dinner, I ate ostrich for the first time. It was delicious but guiltinspiring: The next morning, I visited what I’m sure were its brothers and sisters. Let me say one more thing about ostriches. They’re massive, and you don’t want to mess with them. Eat them, but don’t mess with them.

Day 5

← The Varatec Monastery is run by Romanian Orthodox nuns who raise their own vegetables and raise and catch their own trout for meals. ↑ The Epoca de Pirate winery and cellar is set inside an old limestone mine. The cellar features endless majestic caverns of perfectly etched stone.

120

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PHOTOS BY WANAH (VARATEC MONASTERY) / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS AND PETER GUTTMAN

We began our journey to the Maldovan city of Soroca, known for its sizable Roma minority. Roma people often are referred to as Gypsies, a term that some consider derogatory. Rasvan brought us to the home of a Roma community leader, who explained through Rasvan that we needed to “break bread” before any conversations commenced. He poured us half-fermented wine that his wife had made, along with fresh fruit and shots of vodka. He shared with us his dreams for his people and pointed to strong signs that his community soon would have a stronger political voice. I plan to stay apprised of developments there.  We ended our day with the Hanganu family at their bed and breakfast in Lalova, Moldova, in the mountains overlooking the Dniester River. This historical site celebrates life long before the cell phone or air conditioner. Fresh air — and fresh air only — flowed through all six guest rooms, and wood stone ovens kept the rooms warm at night.  Our hosts showed us the cellar, where their own vegetables lined the hallway


Forward...

from this day

The Clubs by JOE offers three exceptionally unique and breathtaking locations for your vow renewal, commitment ceremony or wedding celebration: | Shark’s Tooth Golf Club | WaterSound Beach Club | Watersound Origins In addition, The Clubs by JOE offers luxury amenities to you, your wedding party and guests staying at one of our highly-awarded boutique hotels. Access to private golf courses, beach clubs, watersports and more awaits you and your guests during your time of celebration. THE CLUBS BY JOESM WEDDING EXPERIENCE | EVENTS@STJOECLUB.COM | 850.249.3042

Caregiving can be a stressful

Business Insurance Specialists: Will Croley, Angie Hearl, Mary Katharine (Croley) Lawler, Doug Croley

role. Let us handle the details while you work on the bigger picture – creating valuable memories with your loved ones.

goldenageathome.com | 850-878-0034

We Focus on Your Insurance So You Can Focus on Your Business 2814 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, FL 850-386-1922 • www.dougcroleyins.com TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

121


This is our everyday... Explore the benefits of a PK - 8th grade education & learn about our nationally recognized program. Now enrolling for the 2019-20 school year. Schedule a visit, today!

80 ACRE CAMPUS • PK3-8TH GRADE • WWW.HCES.ORG • 3 & 5-DAY OPTIONS IN PK3

YOUR LOCAL Your Local Low VisionSTORE Store LOW VISION •

Home Products

Kitchen Aids

SolarShield Glasses

Personal Care

Magnifiers

Talking Watches

• Home Products

• SolarShield Glasses

• Magnifiers Electronics

• Electronics

• Kitchen Aids • Personal Care

• Talking Watches Talking Clocks • Talking Clocks

Low vision aids at discounted prices! Twenty20 Vision Aids is supported by Lighthouse of the Big Bend. LOW VISION AIDS AT DISCOUNTED PRICES! Twenty20 Vision Aids is supported by VISIT US TODAY at 3071 Highland OaksBig Terrace | Tallahassee, FL 32301 | Open Monday–Friday 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Lighthouse of the Bend. VISIT US TODAY at 3071 Highland Oaks Terrace • Tallahassee, FL 32301 • Open Monday–Friday 9 am–5 pm

122

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


destinations → A wine festival in Chișinău, Maldova’s capital, featured over 100 wineries in elaborate setups. Perhaps surprisingly to some, the region is serious about its wine and features its share of vineyards and wineries.

walls. The back of the cellar featured Mr. Sergeii Hanganu’s masterpiece: jars and jars of homemade liquor. Moonshine? Hardly. Various fruits were in those jars. I recognized watermelon, cranberry and cherry, and the jars also included different varieties of cherries, plums and apricots. This stuff tasted as good as the ostrich — but maybe with a stronger kick.

Day 6 We began our day visiting Epoca de Pirate, a winery and cellar in Branesti, Romania. Set inside an old limestone mine, the cellar and soon-to-be underground hotel and spa features endless majestic caverns of perfectly etched stone. Wine racks built into the rock lined the halls, with endless bottles stored at 55 degrees Fahrenheit, often cited as the ideal temperature. We attended a private luncheon with wine pairings, and we thoroughly enjoyed the experience and the atmosphere. We had no internet access or cell service, so everybody engaged in the moment and experience with each other. We stopped for lunch in Old Orhei, a quaint Maldovan town where the locals live and dress as if it were 100 years ago. Then we hiked up to an Orthodox cave monastery called St. Maria Dormata, which has been preserved for centuries. I found myself in another place and time — and in awe of the Moldovans’ dedication to preserving history and tradition.

PHOTOS BY PETER GUTTMAN

Day 7 There would be no resting on the seventh day for us, as Rasvan had another idea in mind — you guessed it, wine. We visited Chateau Vartely for a wine tasting and then stopped at Cricova, an underground wine city — yes, city. We then arrived in Chișinau, Maldova’s capital, for a wine festival that featured over 100 wineries in highly elaborate setups. Each winery set up walls, tables and chairs that matched the winery brands and color, giving guests a virtual visit to each winery.

We ended the day eating and staying at Vinaria Et Cetera, a new bed and breakfast with an adjoining winery and farm. We took tours and enjoyed farm-to-table cuisine, including the best rabbit I have ever had. We found this the most luxurious property of the trip and a great place to end our seventh day, with a full night’s rest. Better yet, I awoke to find no sign of my dinner’s fuzzy-tailed brothers and sisters.

Day 8 Our final tourist day of the trip, we crossed into Transnistria, a self-declared republic that broke from Maldova. Make sure you have a travel guide when visiting. This separatist region has its own border crossing and currency, and it doesn’t appear particularly enthused about visitors, but we’re glad we went. We visited a caviar processing plant that harvests black caviar of sterlet, bester, Russian sturgeon and beluga and observed the cultivation of sturgeon, including the “milking” of the roe.  The fish are pregnant for about two years before they are ready to “milk.” This facility allows each fish to be pregnant up to seven times, or approximately 14 years. In a conservation effort, the facility then recirculates the fish into the wild.  Fun fact: Beluga sturgeon can live up to 118 years, we learned.

Day 9 We drove back to Bucharest so we could catch our plane the following morning. What an adventure this trip was. Steven and I experienced such diverse people and cultures on our out-of-the-ordinary travel expedition. I’ll carry the memories, the faces and the places forever. People greeted us warmly, with lots of meat, sherry, wine and stories that helped us understand people from another place — a people who value friends, family, food and — you bet — wine. Thank you, Romania, Moldova and, of course, our new friend Rasvan. We love you! TM

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

123


GET TO KNOW OUR TEAM Dr. Shane Burkhead, D.V.M. Veterinarian at NFAH

Tallahassee’s preferred residential electrician for over 35 years ...

LAWSON & LAWSON Electrical Services, Inc. #1 in Tallahassee since 1979

M

eet Shane Burkhead, who graduated from Auburn in 1996 and was the first of 27 technicians over the past 22 years who worked at NFAH and went on to receive their doctorate in veterinary medicine. Dr. B was not only driven to become a DVM, but an owner/partner of this “Best of Tallahassee” 2006-2018 practice. He has a passion for helping pets with upper airway disease, which includes surgical repair of laryngeal paralysis, tracheal and soft palate repair. He has enhanced our diagnostic capabilities by years of experience in diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound guided procedures as well as endoscopic, soft tissue and orthopedic surgery. When he does get down time from his many duties at our practice, it is spent outdoors with his family. His love for camping and fishing led him to the Cape San Blas and Mexico Beach areas where he and his wife enjoyed sharing a love and respect for our beautiful coastline with their four children. Recently, he has been active in delivering much needed supplies to these areas hardest hit by Hurricane Michael. His dedication to our practice is surpassed only by his past services on several boards such as Florida Veterinary Medical Association, Big Bend Veterinary Medical Association and Father Flanagan’s Boys Town of North Florida. Call to visit Dr. Shane Burkhead for your pet’s best health! 2701 N. MONROE ST. | (850) 385-5141 | NFLAH.COM

124

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Call “The Good Guys” Today! 850-562-4111 www.LLElectrical.com

2018


PLAY • SHOP • DINE • STAY

at the Forgotten

Coast Events Calendar The Recollections – In Concert Jan. 13, 3 p.m. Cat Pointe Music, 29 Island Drive Eastpoint Apalachicola Oyster Cook-Off Jan. 18–19 Apalachicola Riverfront Park, Apalachicola Shaken and Stirred – In Concert Jan. 20, 3 p.m. Cat Pointe Music, 29 Island Drive Eastpoint Butts & Clucks Cook-Off on the Bay Jan. 25–26 Battery Park, 1 Bay Ave., Apalachicola

SAIGE ROBERTS

Carrabelle History Museum’s Speaker Series Program Jan. 26, 10 a.m.–noon C-Quarters Marina

OYSTER CITY BREWING COMPANY

LENSMEN / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

For a region desperately in need of a drink or two, it didn’t take Oyster City long to get up and running following Hurricane Michael’s impact on the Forgotten Coast. After five days of healing and helping, Oyster City reopened its taps to appreciative locals still recovering from the storm. The Apalachicola-based brewery has carved out a name for itself, both with its locally iconic name and standout brews. With brews available around the Panhandle, get a taste of the coast with their Apalach IPA (6.8 percent abv.), the Mill Pond Dirty Blonde Ale (5.2 percent) or their award-winning Hooter Brown Ale (8.4 percent), an imperial brown ale made with local Tupelo honey. The Hooter Brown recently won a silver medal at the 2018 U.S. Open Beer Championship.

APALACHICOLA OYSTER COOKOFF JAN. 18–19

Earl David Reed Jan. 26, 8 p.m. Dixie Theatre, 21 Ave. E, Apalachicola Douce Ambiance – Jazz with a Gypsy Flavor! Jan. 27, 3 p.m. Cat Pointe Music, 29 Island Drive Eastpoint The Dixie Theatre Presents: American Pie Revisited Feb. 2, 8 p.m. Dixie Theatre, 21 Ave. E, Apalachicola The Adventures of Annabelle Lyn Feb. 3, 3–5 p.m. Cat Pointe Music, 29 Island Drive Eastpoint The Dixie Theatre Presents: A Tribute to the Music of Willie Nelson Feb. 9, 8 p.m. Dixie Theatre, 21 Ave. E, Apalachicola Mardi Gras on BourBone Street Feb. 10, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Apalachicola Riverfront Park, Apalachicola

APALACHICOLA’S 9TH ANNUAL OYSTER COOK-OFF will be held Friday and Saturday, January 18–19, in downtown Historic Apalachicola. The event will feature a silent auction, oysters galore, shrimp, smoked mullet, hot dogs, hamburgers, local beer, live music, kids’ activities, dancing performances and a 5K run! Enter your best recipe and be a contestant in the oyster cookoff or just come out and enjoy the day.

Clayton Mathis – Cat Pointe Gospel Feb. 10, 3–5 p.m. Cat Pointe Music, 29 Island Drive Eastpoint Fogotten Coast Chef Sampler Feb. 10, 6–9 p.m. Fort Coombs Armory, 4th St. & Ave. D, Apalachicola NOTE: Because of the effects of Hurricane Michael along the Florida coast, some events are subject to change.

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

125


TALLAHASSEE’S COASTAL REAL ESTATE CONNECTION

VISIT THE

Forgotten Coast 1

The kitchen store and more since 1994! Gifts and necessities for the kitchen, garden, home and gourmet. We offer free gift wrap.

Melissa Spear REALTOR® (850) 879-0687 Weichert Realtors, The H2 Group

L

ives and businesses are being rebuilt along the Forgotten Coast after the devastating effects of Hurricane Michael in early October. As the healing process continues, please lend your support to this region and remind them that they are never forgotten by their friends and neighbors.

(850) 653-1023 268 Water St., Apalachicola

8

DOC MYERS’ PUB & SPORTS BAR

Come out to Doc Myers’ tiki bar in paradise! Hang out with people of all ages to watch your favorite sports team, play trivia or try your hand at cornhole in the yard. Nightly music, happy hours and a wide range of food and beverages in beautiful beach surroundings. Open seven days a week. Oyster happy hour Mon.–Fri. from 3–4 p.m. (850) 799-1930, docmyersislandpub.com 36 W. Pine Ave., St. George Island 3

A distinctive upscale atmosphere for the 21+ crowd with quiet dining. Offering extensive martini and wine lists, signature cocktails and expanded menu of lunch and dinner plates. Come in to experience Chef Richard’s creative combinations of ingredients and excellent tableside service. Open Tuesday–Saturday. (850) 653-4888, upthestairs.me 76 Market St., Ste. F, Apalachicola

Serving Tallahassee residents who are buying or selling a second home or investment property on the Forgotten Coast.

BETSY’S SUNFLOWER

Betsy Doherty

2

UP THE STAIRS

15

9

MEXICO BEACH

4 15

St. Joseph Peninsula State Park

1

PORT ST. JOE

St. Joseph Bay

11 APALACHICOLA

GULF SPECIMEN AQUARIUM

A unique experience to get up close with sharks, sea turtles, starfish, octopus and other sea life from the Gulf of Mexico. One of the largest touch tanks exhibits in the U.S. Open Mon.–Fri. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. and Sat.–Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

Cape San Blas

5 St. Vincent Island

Apalachicola Bay

(850) 984-5297, gulfspecimen.org 222 Clark Drive, Panacea 4

HOLE IN THE WALL

5

Family-owned and operated raw bar serving the world’s best oysters with a full menu of Gulf of Mexico seafood, including fried shrimp, grouper and crab. Also serving kids items and daily specials. Open Tuesday through Saturday in downtown Apalachicola. (850) 653-3222 23 Ave. D, Apalachicola

126

January–February 2019

INDIAN PASS GENERAL STORE

There’s a pristine spot reserved for your next RV adventure at the edges of Indian Lagoon! An old-timey general store on-site sells local merchandise and stocks a supply of grocery items and spirits. Visit us online to reserve. Located across from worldfamous Indian Pass Raw Bar! (850) 229-8600, watersedgervpark.net 8300 County Road 30A, Port St. Joe

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

6

LYNN’S QUALITY OYSTERS

Enter as strangers, leAve. as friends at this familyowned and operated raw bar and local seafood market. Dine in or on the back deck. Open seven days. Bar is closed Sunday, but you can still buy fresh catch! (850) 670-8796, lynnsqualityoysters.com 402 Highway 98, Eastpoint


14 ST. GEORGE ISLAND TRADING COMPANY

13

SGI Trading Company has everything you need to go to the beach. Buy a new bathing suit, T-shlrts by Simply Southern and Salt Life and beach toys for the kids at this one-stop shop. (850) 927-2252 101 Franklin Blvd., St. George Island

ST. GEORGE ISLAND REALTY

12

St. George Island Realty was established in 2002 and is locally owned. Contact our educated and seasoned professionals to help you find your next investment property, building site or beautiful island home. (800) 344-7570, sgirealty.com 139 E. Gulf Beach Drive, St. George Island

LIVE OAK POINT Apalachee Bay

3 Ochlockonee Bay

LANARK VILLAGE

6

ALLIGATOR POINT

12

13 7

7

14

St. George Island

TALLAHASSEE

2

THE NAUMANN GROUP

Your local real estate experts with decades of experience — ready to help you find your perfect beach getaway. Look for the company Tallahassee knows and trusts! (850) 799-1230, 139 W. Gulf Beach Drive, St. George Island

9

8

RED PIRATE GRILL

Make this family-owned sports bar featuring mini golf your first stop for fun! With good food, grog, plus a game room, there’s something for everyone! Crab legs and oysters on the half shell served nightly and live entertainment by its house band on Fridays. Open seven days. Mini golf discount with any meal. (850) 670-1090, redpirategrill.com 236 Highway 98, Eastpoint

Dog Island

EASTPOINT

The company that introduced you to the thrill of Florida fishing can help make Florida’s Forgotten Coast your next vacation spot or permanent home. Offering fully furnished vacation rentals and residential or commercial properties. Let us show you why it’s a great place to visit, and an even better place to live! (850) 653-1653 44 Ave. E, Apalachicola 10

CARRABELLE

10

This new, lively beach lounge features a menu inspired by the flavors of Mexico and Latin America. Its house-made infusions using fruit are showcased in its signature cocktails and seasonal sauces. Every day is Taco Tuesday, and desserts change daily! Open Tuesday–Saturday 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Sunday 12–8 p.m. (850) 927-2222, stgeorgecantina.com 37 E. Pine Ave., St. George Island 11 ROBINSON REAL ESTATE COMPANY

CRAWFORDVILLE

PANACEA

ST. GEORGE CANTINA

THE NAUMANN GROUP

Your local real estate experts from Tallahassee thru to the Emerald Coast. Located next to Shades Restaurant at 30A. (850) 933-0328 10952 E. County Hwy 30A, Inlet Beach

OYSTER CITY BREWING CO.

Sample award-winning local beers on the most social street corner in town! Enjoy handcrafted beers from 12 taps of brewery staples and rotating seasonals. Sit in the open air and enjoy the sights and sounds of lovely Apalachicola, or sip your beers on the brewery floor and watch our fine folks create the only local beer on the Forgotten Coast. Growlers and crowlers available to go. Open seven days, starting at noon. (850) 653-2739, oystercitybrewingco.com 17 Ave. D, Apalachicola

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

127


PROMOTION

MARCH 12

OPENING NIGHTS The Michael Feinstein Trio  Prepare to spend an unforgettable evening with one of the most celebrated classical musicians of our time — five-time Grammy® Awardnominated Michael Feinstein at 7:30 p.m. at Ruby Diamond Concert Hall. He has built a dazzling career bringing the music of the Great American Songbook to the world and is one of the most important musical forces today. Tickets start at $25. Get your tickets online at OpeningNights.FSU.edu or by calling (850) 644-6500.

128

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


calendar PROMOTION

JAN/FEB 2019 For more events in Tallahassee, visit TallahasseeMagazine.com. compiled by REBECCA PADGETT

FEBRUARY 21–24

THOMASVILLE ANTIQUES SHOW

→ More than 30 of the country’s most prestigious

antiques exhibitors attend the 30th annual Thomasville Antiques Show, offering casual and serious collectors the opportunity to purchase exquisite antiques — including furniture, paintings, rugs, jewelry, tableware, accessories and collectables. Guests will enjoy lectures and events by renowned guest speakers Charlotte Moss, DeJuan Stroud, Ray Booth, C. Brandon Ingram and Mallory Mathison.

JANUARY 26

For the City Events | Field Day Music Festival PHOTOS COURTESY OF OPENING NIGHTS (THE MICHAEL FEINSTEIN TRIO), CYNDI PHIPPS (THOMASVILLE ANTIQUES SHOW), FOR THE CITY EVENTS, EMERALD COAST THEATRE COMPANY, PROFFITT PR (LA LUMIERE) AND WAKULLA COUNTY TOURISM DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL (ST. MARKS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE)

→ For the City Events and presenting sponsor

Capital City Bank host the third annual Field Day Music Festival at Alfred B. Maclay Gardens State Park. Have a field day complete with bands, a beer garden, food trucks and family-friendly games, all to benefit the Judy Field Memorial Foundation. The family of the late Judy Fields started the foundation to raise funds and awareness for pancreatic cancer. Featured musical guests include The Vegabonds (Nashville), The Mulligan Brothers (Mobile) and local support from Slow Low Crow. The event will take place from 3–8 p.m. with music starting at 3:30 p.m.

Visit 850tix.com for ticket information. Kids 12 and under enter free.

FEBRUARY 24

TALLAHASSEE’S 2ND ANNUAL RECYCLED WEDDING MARKET

For more information, visit ThomasvilleAntiquesShow.com.

REGIONAL

JANUARY 17–FEBRUARY 3

Emerald Coast Theatre Company presents Dancing Lessons → Come see the

story of Ever, a young man with Asperger’s syndrome, who seeks the instruction of a Broadway dancer to learn enough dancing to survive an awards dinner. The dancer, Senga, however, is recovering from an injury that may stop her dancing career permanently. As their relationship unfolds, they’re both caught off guard by the discoveries — both hilarious and heartwarming — that they make about each other and about themselves.

For tickets and showtime info, please visit EmeraldCoastTheatre.org.

REGIONAL

FEBRUARY 8–10

La Lumiere: Party of the Gods → Broker Associate Hannah Martin of The

Premier Property Group hosts her fifth annual birthday fundraiser — titled La Lumière: Party of the Gods — to benefit South Walton Academy, Special Olympics Florida–Walton County and Westonwood Ranch.

The weekend will include a Friday night “Feast of the Gods,” Saturday night “Party of the Gods” and a Sunday “Brunch of the Gods.”

→ The Recycled

Wedding Market is unlike any event in Tallahassee — it is a flea market, of sorts, for all things wedding-related! After a successful first year, the Recycled Wedding Market is back in a bigger location. Tickets are $5 if purchased online before Jan. 15 and $7 if purchased online after Jan. 15. Online ticket sales close at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 23.

Tickets may also be purchased at the door for $7 (plus two cans of food for Second Harvest) or $10 with no cans. Cash only at the door. Visit 850tix.com for ticket information.

REGIONAL

FEBRUARY 12

ST. MARKS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE’S HERITAGE & OUTDOOR FESTIVAL → Seeking to “Connect People with Nature,” the St. Marks

National Wildlife Refuge’s Heritage & Outdoor Festival has grown into one of Wakulla County’s largest displays of outdoor culture. From wildlife exhibits and dog-hunting demonstrations to turkey-call contests, fly-fishing and archery tutorials, this festival has a little bit of everything. Local food vendors and nature-based businesses are always on hand, and each festival features live music and wildlife artwork from area artists.

For more information, call the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge at (850) 925-6121. TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

129


calendar

JAN/FEB 2019

30th Anniversary

SKERRYVORE – PRESENTED BY OPENING NIGHTS JAN. 9 Scottish band Skerryvore blends folk, rock and pop for a sound that’s as eclectic as its eight members. Skerryvore is a two-time winner of Scotland’s Traditional Music “Live Act of the Year” Award, 2016 and 2011. openingnights.fsu.edu/events/skerryvore

THE SAVANNAH SIPPING SOCIETY JAN. 10–27

February 21 - 24, 2019 Benefiting Children’s Programs Thomasville Fairgrounds

T h o m a s v i l l e A n t i q u e s S h o w. c o m

Theatre Tallahassee presents “The Savannah Sipping Society,” a comedy featuring four Southern ladies who form a bond and reclaim their lives through an impromptu happy hour. This feel-good play follows the characters through adventures, blossoming friendships and plenty of laughs.

dance company, internationally renowned for its energized, impressive ensemble work. Building on its mission of delivering inspiring dance experiences, Parsons Dance ensures a targeted performance that connects all audience members with the universal language of dance. openingnights.fsu.edu/events/parsonsdance-company

BELA FLECK & ABIGAIL WASHBURN JAN. 14 Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn are two people with seven banjos creating one unified and innovative sound. The pair earned a Grammy in 2016 for Best Folk album and have been delighting audiences ever since. openingnights.fsu.edu/events/belafleck-abigail-washburn

tallahasseearts.org/event/savannahsipping-society

Giving Tallahassee a Reason to Smile

SUNSHINE STATE BALL JAN. 11 This black tie dinner, complete with live entertainment, invites residents from throughout Florida to join in supporting the Junior League of Tallahassee’s mission, improving the lives of families and children. sunshinestateball.com

SCITURDAY – SUPERHERO SCIENCE JAN. 12 SCIturdays at the Challenger Learning Center emphasizes family learning and fun. This Saturday revolves around creating your own superhero with its own set of unique powers. challengertlh.com/sciturdays

Family & Cosmetic Dentistry · Same Day Crowns Latest Technology · Professional & Caring Team 2621 Mitcham Drive, Tallahassee · 850.425.1300 · BastienDentalCare.com Monday–Thursday 8am–noon and 12:30pm–4:30pm · Closed Friday

130

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PARSONS DANCE COMPANY – PRESENTED BY OPENING NIGHTS JAN. 12 Parsons Dance is a contemporary American

7TH ANNUAL TALLY SHORTS FILM FESTIVAL JAN. 25–26 The Tally Shorts Film Festival introduces unique, independent films to the region with the goal of promoting film as a cultural and economical asset. The event features a vast variety of local and international films. tallyshorts.com

FITNESS AND FOOD FESTIVAL JAN. 26 The Tallahassee Fitness Festival introduces guests to an array of physical activities, health and nutrition options and information that will


CELEBRATE and support our arts community at Tallahassee Community College

To learn more, contact Heather Mitchell TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM at mitchelh@tcc.fl.edu or (850) 201-6067

January–February 2019

131


When you retire, calendar your money should keep STEPHEN C.working. HUGGINS

JAN/FEB 2019

improve their quality of life. Over 50 vendors Senior Vice President will be on-site to conduct Financial Advisor free health screenings, Someday you’ll stop working, and at that provide health and fitness 3520 Thomasville Rd, Suite 100 information and product 850.422.8707 point, you’ll have to depend on your retirement samples. © 2013 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC.

tallyfitnessfest.com income. Member SIPC.To work toward building that income, CRC588469 (12/12) CS 7338805 MAR013A 03/13

you’ll need a strategy. Stephen Huggins Senior Vice President Financial Advisor

BACH PARLEY WINTER CONCERT

timberlane 1379 With more than 26 years of rdexperience, I brushandpalettestudio.com info@brushandpalettestudio.com

JAN. 27 Performing on period-style

instruments, the Bach Parley can help you create a strategy for goals like offers unique, exceptional

893-1960

experiences aimed retirement, estate planning and leaving a concert legacy. to educate and engage. The

est. 1 9 7 3

3520 ThomasvilleARd, d uSte l t100 Ch i l d r e n Preschool Let’s put your money to work. Tallahassee, FL 32309 +1 850 422-8707 set up an appointment. stephen.huggins@morganstanley. com www.morganstanley.com/fa/ oil watercolor acrylic drawing mixed media stephen.huggins

Art Classes cartooning home-school custom framing birthday parties

group performs the music of Call me today Johannto Sebastian Bach. tallahasseearts.org/event/back-parleywinter-concert

JOSHUA BELL – PRESENTED BY OPENING NIGHTS JAN. 28

Joshua Bell is highly respected as a classical violinist, chamber musician, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC, its affiliates and Morgan Stanley Financial Advisors do not provide recording artist and tax or legal advice. Clients should consult their tax advisor for matters involving taxation and tax conductor. During his 30 planning and their attorney for matters involving trust and estate planning and other legal matters. years as a soloist, he has recorded more than 40 CDs, © 2013 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. CRC588469 (12/12) CS 7338805 MAR013A 03/13 which have won countless awards and prizes.

Club. Run through the hills and the bustling downtown in either the full- or halfmarathon race. tallahasseemarathon.com

PRISM – PRESENTED BY OPENING NIGHTS FEB. 3 Featuring students from Florida State’s top-ranked College of Music, PRISM offers a wide array of entertainment from Chamber Winds, Symphonic Band, jazz ensembles, the Marching Chiefs and many more exciting groups. openingnights.fsu.edu/events/prism

WILLY WONKA: THE MUSICAL FEB. 8–17 The performance is sure to be sweet as the audience follows the candy man, Willy Wonka, through candy land at the Young Actor’s Theatre. Roald Dahl’s classic book is set to stage with the same inspiring, eccentric and lovable characters, set to music and chocolaty fun surprises. tallahasseearts.org/event/willy-wonkamusical

openingnights.fsu.edu/events/joshua-bell

Joan H. Raley, REALTOR® CRS, CDPE, SFR, e-PRO, GRI, ABR, CHMS, WCR | Home Economist, Broker/Owner Mobile & Text: 850.545.9390 | JOAN@JOANRALEY.COM | JoanRaley.com

FRIDAYS 7:00 A.M. FREEDOM

93.3

132

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

CASHORE MARIONETTES – PRESENTED BY OPENING NIGHTS FEB. 1 The Cashore Marionettes, created by Joseph Cashore, are puppetry unlike you have ever imagined — entertaining, surprising, inspiring and theatrical. The performance of “Life In Motion,” is a series of scenes taken from everyday life and set to beautiful music by composers such as Beethoven, Vivaldi, Strauss and Copland. openingnights.fsu.edu/events/cashoremarionettes

TALLAHASSEE MARATHON FEB. 3 Run through the beautiful Capital City at the 45th annual Tallahassee Marathon, hosted by Gulf Winds Track

SCITURDAY – ICY EXPLORATION FEB. 9 Brrr! Chill out during a family day at The Challenger Learning Center. Examine the properties of dry ice and liquid nitrogen, make Boo Bubbles with CO2 and excavate a LEGO from an ice sculpture. challengertlh.com/sciturdays

FARRUQUITO – PRESENTED BY OPENING NIGHTS FEB. 9 Farruquito dazzles with his performances of the purest form of flamenco on stages around the world. He has been dancing and performing Raíces Flamencas since the age of 15, which showcases his talent and traditions of the dance. openingnights.fsu.edu/events/farruquito


Welcome Dr. Alvarez Left to right: Dr. Maci McDermott, Dr. Sarah Alvarez, Dr. Anna Koeppel, Dr. Robert Kickish

NorthFloridaPeds.com | (850) 877-1162 3606 Maclay Boulevard, Ste. 102

ALL YOU NEED TO SEE Ophthalmic Services • Cataract–Offering the latest Premium ORA Technology • Routine Eye Care • Diabetic Retinopathy

• Pediatric • iLASIK • Cosmetic Procedures • Eyelids, Tear Duct and Orbit

• Glaucoma

• Dry Eyes

• Cornea

• LipiFlow

2020 Fleischmann Road, Tallahassee · 333 N. Byron Butler Pkwy., Perry (850) 878-6161 · EyeAssociatesOfTallahassee.com

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

133


An independent insurance agency with multiple resources. We work hard to find you the right coverage at the best price.

410 E 6TH AVE | 850.385.8811 MIDTOWNINS.COM

calendar

JAN/FEB 2019

THE BOSTON POPS ON TOUR

BREHON FAMILY SERVICES (BOOTS FOR BABIES)

FEB. 14 This evening will feature excerpts from the composer John Williams’ best-loved scores, as well as some lesser-known gems. No one plays the music of America’s favorite composer like America’s favorite orchestra, The Boston Pops. openingnights.fsu.edu/events/theboston-pops-on-tour

TOM RUSH Tom Rush, a gifted musician who shaped the revival of folk music, puts on a show complete with beautiful storytelling, impressive guitar playing, witty humor and gritty tunes. openingnights.fsu.edu/events/tom-rush

T.O.U.R. GUIDE – ALFRED B. MACLAY GARDENS FEB. 17 Wander through the intricately landscaped grounds of Alfred B. Maclay Gardens, during the awardwinning T.O.U.R. Guide Program, which encourages residents to visit local attractions for free or reduced admission. Be your own tour guide to friends and family for a weekend. visittallahassee.com/seasons/tour-guide

THE JULIAN BLISS SEPTET FEB. 21 Julian Bliss and his septet perform a show that combines over 200 years of musical history, including classical and jazz. They will perform the music of Benny Goodman. openingnights.fsu.edu/events/julianbliss-septet

134

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Brehon Family Services is a local nonprofit agency celebrating 41 years of child abuse prevention services in Tallahassee and the Big Bend. Brehon provides shelter to homeless, pregnant women and their infants. Boots for Babies is a spring 2019 fundraising event for Brehon Family Services. brehonfamilyservices.org/fundraisingevents

FEB. 17

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

MAR. 7

RED HILLS INTERNATIONAL HORSE TRIALS MAR. 7–10 Saddle up for this notable, four-day equestrian event showcasing dressage, show jumping, cross country riding and more. Some of the world’s best competitors will gallop their way through Tallahassee. rhht.org

BRIDGING THE MULTIGENERATIONAL GAP FEATURING ALICIA RAINWATER MAR. 8 Leon County, the TallahasseeLeon County Office of Economic Vitality and other community partners host the latest entry in their Training our Talent speaker series, which seeks to explore innovative ideas for rapid and sustainable organization behavior and change across all business sectors. This part will be titled ‘Bridging the Multi-Generational Gap: Meet the Future Talent,’ featuring nationally recognized speaker Alicia Rainwater from the Center for Generational Kinetics. 850tix.com

Details of listings can change at the last minute. Please call ahead of time to confirm.

HAVE AN EVENT YOU’D LIKE US TO CONSIDER?

Send an email to preinwald@rowlandpublishing.com.


Creating Beautiful Smiles is What We Do Best Happy 2019!

Marci Marano Beck, DMD, MS

Cosmetic, General & Implant Dentistry

Glenn Beck, Jr., DMD

Brian R. Beck, DMD, MS

Smiles by Beck & Bailey

Julie Bailey, DMD

Now Accepting New Patients

2929-B Capital Medical Blvd. • Tallahassee, FL 32308 • 850.656.2636 • smilesbybeck.com • facebook.com/smilesbybeck



Like and follow us on Facebook for behind the scenes content.

Subscribe to us on YouTube for full episodes.

LIVE! In Tallahassee is the weekly entertainment show that keeps you updated on what’s happening in our region.

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

135


results to

love With unique complementary expertise, board-certified physicians Ben J. Kirbo, M.D., Laurence Z. Rosenberg, M.D. and Chris DeRosier, M.D. are compassionate and committed to providing outstanding patient care. They stay up-to-date with technological advancements that enhance your experience for exceptional results.

not actual patient

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Breast Enhancement Tummy Tuck Facelift Liposuction Nasal Reshaping Hair Transplants

Results-oriented medical spa treatments are also given by experienced professionals at the SPA at Southeastern Plastic Surgery featuring miraDryÂŽ, laser hair removal, injectables, facials, laser therapies and more!

Ben J. Kirbo, M.D. ~ Laurence Z. Rosenberg, M.D. Chris DeRosier, M.D. CERTIFIED BY THE AMERICAN BOARD OF PLASTIC SURGERY

850.219.2000

2030 Fleischmann Rd. ~ Tallahassee, FL 136

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK! January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

www.se-plasticsurgery.com


PROMOTION

SOCIAL STUDIES Leadership Tallahassee Distinguished Leadership Awards SEPT. 28 Leadership Tallahassee, a program of the Tallahassee Chamber, announced the 2018 winners of the Distinguished Leadership Awards, presented by Centennial Bank. More than 400 community and business leaders attended the event, which recognized the best in community leadership. All proceeds from the event benefit the Youth Leadership Tallahassee program for high school juniors.

2

1

3

4

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANDREA JONES

1 DLA Award Winners Darrick McGhee Leadership Pacesetter, Virginia Glass - Lifetime Leadership, Kathy Bell - Servant Leadership and Byron Burroughs - Leader of the Year 2 Betty Jensen, Hon. Curtis Richardson, Melanie Lee and Mark Baldino 3 Hon. Bryan Desloge, Charles Belvin, Flecia Braswell, Frank Mercer, Jon Blanton and Chris Jensen 4 Joel Sillver, Lisa Bretz, Heidi Otway, Marsha Doll, Kenneth Pratt and Rachel Pratt

1

Cards for a Cure OCT. 6 Nearly 600 people attended the Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare Foundation’s 13th annual Cards for a Cure event at the Donald L. Tucker Civic Center. The pink-tie optional event, benefiting the Tallahassee Memorial Cancer Center and cancer programs, featured a program highlighting breast cancer survivor Betsy Burgess, this year’s honoree. The evening also included live entertainment, silent and live auctions, heavy hors d’oeuvres and more.

2

3

PHOTOS COURTESY OF UNIQUE VIDEO CREATIONS

1 Andrea Rossetto, Raj Bendre, MD, Nicole and Dean Watson, MD, Kathy Brooks, Janice Lawson, MD, and Matt Lawson, MD 2 Karen Russell, MD, Andrea Friall, MD, and Zaneta Batchelor 3 Betsy Burgess, Laura Youmans and Alex Glorioso

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

137


PROMOTION

SOCIAL STUDIES Women United Women’s Leadership Breakfast OCT. 30 Women United hosted its second annual Women’s Leadership Breakfast, which featured CNN’s Lisa Ling. The event served as a call to action for women and all community members to create positive change through sharing their time, talent and treasure. Ling delivered an impassioned collection of stories, covering such topics as the rise in incarceration of mothers and its effect on the children left behind, sex trafficking and poverty.

1

2

3

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHARLENE TRICKEY, TRICKEY PHOTOGRAPHY

1 A crowd of over 200 women leaders in business and philanthropy 2 Lisa Ling, executive producer and host of CNN’s “This Is Life with Lisa Ling” 3 Dena Sokolow and Michel Gregory 4 Audra Price Pittman and Lisa Ling

4

5 Molly Lord, Ron Book, Sarah Gosselin, Lisa Ling and Katrina Rolle 6 McKenzie Burleigh Lohbeck, Michelle Ubben, Lisa Ling, Sen. Lauren Book and Katrina Rolle

6

138

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

5


1

THE ONLY COMMUNITY ONCOLOGY PRACTICE RECOGNIZED AS A BLUE DISTINCTION CENTER FOR CANCER CARE IN FLORIDA ACCESS TO

110+

PATIENT SATISFACTION: EARNED NET PROMOTER SCORE OF

87%

NATIONAL CLINICAL TRIALS

Scores above 75% are exceptional

PHASE 1, 2 & 3

72,000

NEARLY

100

NEW PATIENTS TREATED THIS YEAR

LOCATIONS

Your best choice for quality cancer care. We are Florida Cancer Specialists. As the largest independent community oncology and hematology practice in the U.S., we provide more care to more patients in more communities across Florida than any other cancer treatment organization. Our patients trust us and would recommend us to friends and family — awarding us a world-class Net Promoter Score exceeding 87%, putting us among the top customercentric companies worldwide. We’ve been selected as a participating vendor in the value-based programs for Oncology Care Model, United Healthcare and Cigna, as well as a Blue Distinction Center for Cancer Care, recognized for our high-quality care and improved patient outcomes. These distinctions, along with cutting-edge technologies and innovative clinical trials, allow us to do what we do best every day: provide world-class, compassionate care to our patients. See how we’ve been leading the fight against cancer for over 30 years at FLCancer.com

Where Hope is Powered by ScienceTM

World-Class Medicine. Hometown Care.

Proud to serve patients at our two Tallahassee locations. Tallahassee East: 1600 Phillips Road, Suite 300, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 • Call: (850) 877.8166 Tallahassee North: 2626 Care Drive, Suite 200, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 • Call: (850) 219.5830 Viralkumar Bhanderi, MD

Paresh Patel, MD

Scott Tetreault, MD TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

139


PROMOTION

SOCIAL STUDIES Tee Off for Tots OCT. 28–29 The 25th annual Tee Off for Tots Par-Tee and Golf Tournament celebrated its anniversary by raising money for the Proctor Endowment for Children with Diabetes and the Tallahassee Memorial Children’s Center. The night-before Par-Tee was held at the Proctor Subaru dealership on Capital Circle Northeast, and the golf tournament was held at the Golden Eagle Golf Course. Through the TMH Foundation, TOFT funds help to provide positive distractions for hospitalized children and their families, and the Proctor Endowment helps to provide scholarships to families with limited financial resources, giving their children an opportunity to attend the Florida Diabetes Camp in Gretna.

2

1

3

4

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JUDI WILLS

1 Carpet Studio golf team (left to right), Jeremy Cochran, James Cochran, David Eshe and Charles Maphis 2,3 Tee Off for Tots golf teams 4 Winning team for PM Flight – Southern Medical Group (left to right) Kenneth Kato, MD, and Frank Gredler, MD

1

2

Ronald McDonald House NOV. 2 Ronald McDonald House Charities of Tallahassee hosted its 20th annual Stone Crab Fest, and proceeds went to the pediatric patients and families staying at the Ronald McDonald House. The event was held at Eagle Hill at W.C. Dover Farm, where stone crab claws were piled high in ice-filled boats. Guests enjoyed a seated dinner accompanied by musical entertainment and silent and live auctions.

3

PHOTOS COURTESY OF RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE CHARITIES OF TALLAHASSEE, INC.

1 Ashley Leggett, Takila Brooks and Bobbie Warren 2 Tocamos Mas 3 Board Member, Rian Meadows and friends 4 Allison Tant Richard and Erin Silvaroli

140

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

4


Congratulations to Kelly S. Dozier and Paula S. Fortunas for receiving

2018 PINNACLE AWARDS. Thank you for tirelessly supporting the health of our community.

Kelly Dozier

Paula Fortunas

TMH Board Member

TMH Foundation President (retired)

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

141


PROMOTION

SOCIAL STUDIES Tallahassee Turkey Trot NOV. 22 After poor weather kept many people at home a year earlier, the 2018 running of the annual Turkey Trot saw nearly perfect blue skies and cool temperatures as more than 5,440 participants finished one of the day’s four races. SouthWood’s lakes, streets and trails were dressed in their best, creating the perfect background for this year’s race.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF TALLAHASSEE TURKEY TROT

2

1

2

3

4

1 The Turkey Trot training group 2 Stephanie Liles, Felton Wright and Jamie Wright 3 Tony Guillen, winner of 1 mile run 4 The number“1” was presented to Capital Health Plan in honor of Dr. Nancy Van Vessem, a victim of a Nov. 2 mass shooting at Hot Yoga Tallahassee. Mary Gobler wore the number.

Be Roadtrip Ready... Even If It’s A Trip Across Town. ™

The All New 2019 Subaru now available at

Learn more at proctorsubaru.com

142

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


MULTI-FUNCTION PRINTERS (SALES & SERVICE) | 3D PRINTING | BUSINESS PRINTING | CUSTOMER SERVICE

“CopyFax has been a wonderful partner to Capital Area Community Action Agency. Many companies offer a good product, but Copyfax backs it with great rates and even better customer service. They share our mission of helping people and changing lives. The CopyFax team is family.” - Tim Center, Chief Executive Officer, Capital Area Community Action Agency CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER TIM CENTER

3135 ELIZA ROAD, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32308 TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

850-671-6663 January–February 2019 143


144

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


Best of Tallahassee Stages a Big Night at The Moon By Pete Reinwald

W

hen you’re at Tallahassee’s biggest annual business and social event and you spot the biggest person in the room, you must walk over and introduce yourself. And because you’re 5-foot-7 and you like to make big people feel good, you must tell him that he’s the biggest person in the room. On Thursday night at The Moon, that person was William Jefferson, who wore all black and a cowboy hat that made him look 6-foot-6. “Well, thank you,” Jefferson said with a humble laugh. Politeness, humility, recognition and triumphant cheers summed up the 20th annual Best of Tallahassee awards celebration of the Capital City’s best businesses, as voted on by readers of Tallahassee Magazine. About 800 people attended on an evening that involved dancing, drinking, networking and, at least in one case, cowboy-hat wearing. “I’m here representing Boot Barn,” said Jefferson, the store manager. The clothing store features Western wear, which explained the cowboy hat. And hats off to Jefferson and Boot Barn, which won Best of Tallahassee in the Men’s Shoes category. Speaking of big, consider what happened to businesses that won awards in two categories. Coldwell Banker Hartung and Noblin was among them, winning for Commercial Real Estate Agency and for Residential Real Estate Agency. “This is huge,” said Bruce Foster, 23, a “Top 30 Under 30” agent for Coldwell Banker. “Best of Tallahassee is one of the most prestigious awards in Tallahassee, and this is our fourth year in a row getting commercial and residential. That’s massive for us.” Pink Narcissus knows the feeling, becoming a repeat winner in the Store and Teen Clothing Store categories. “It allows us to be able to put the Best of Tallahassee logo next to our name, and we love being able to do that year after year,” store manager Laura Wittenberg said. Attendees mingled and partied in a hip setting designed by John Gandy Events, but they stopped in their tracks when it came time to announce the winners and runners-up, which appeared on screens in the music and entertainment venue. Response to the results ranged from polite applause to, in the case of Bumblebee Waxing & More, rather wild woots. The company won again for Day Spa and for Hair Wax/Laser Services.

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2019

145


“We have a lot of fun when we’re at work, and it does solidify our collaboration and that what we’re doing is working,” said Amber Swartz, the company founder. “And for us, it’s a lot of fun. It’s a lot of fun to get dressed up and come out together.” The evening featured entertainment by Top Shelf Band, a Tallahassee-based group that kept heads bobbing with classic pop and rock hits. The night also featured much activity around a Selfietally selfie machine that looked like an oldfashioned gas pump, dispensing photos of happy faces on demand. “How cool is this? Self-serve,” a man remarked as a couple posed for a photo. The couple was smiling, of course. Who wasn’t? “This is a great event. It’s an extremely valuable event,” said Kyle Phelps, an executive at Capital City Bank, which served as Best of Tallahassee’s presenting sponsor. “It’s not easy for us to get to know a lot of businesses in our community and what they’re doing. This is a good event to mingle and get to know folks who otherwise we’d not see and also to see some people recognized for doing really, really well that may have been overlooked.” Thomas Howell Ferguson, a Tallahassee-based certified public accountant firm, served as official ballot counter and saw to it that the winners and runners-up reflected the votes of readers of Tallahassee Magazine, said CPA Brian Walgamott, a director in the company’s tax services department. “We really like the structure of this award,” he said. “The fact that you guys would have an accounting firm, whether it’s us or someone else being the ones to count the ballots to make sure it’s credible … lends credibility to the award itself.” Of the event, Walgamott said, “These are the top businesses in Tallahassee. Why wouldn’t you want to be here?”

146

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

El Jalisco will second that. As he watched results for Best Mexican/Latin American Restaurant appear, founder Jesus Carranza, a Mexican immigrant, hugged family members and colleagues amid cheers. His restaurant had become a repeat winner. Asked what Best of Tallahassee status means to the business, Maria Carranza, daughter of the founder, said: “Everything.”


THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

presented by

To see all the images, video highlights and the complete list of winners visit TALLAHASSEEMAGAZINE.COM/BESTOFTALLAHASSEERECAP18

presenting sponsor

sponsors

a.m. break WITH

ANN

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

AUDRA

January–February 2019

147


Benefiting Children in Need in Northwest Florida

OFFICIAL LODGING PARTNER

148

January–February 2019

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


dining guide AMERICAN ANDREW’S CAPITAL GRILL AND BAR

After 40 years, Andrew’s is still an energetic, casual, see-and-be-seen spot. House favorites include a popular lunch buffet, hamburgers, sandwiches, salads and pasta dishes. Downtown delivery. Mon-Thurs 11:30 am-10 pm, Fri-Sat 11:30 am-11 pm, Sun 10:30 am-9 pm. 228 S. Adams St. (850) 222-3444/Fax, (850) 222-2433. $$ B L D

BUMPA’S LOCAL #349

Featuring burgers, sandwiches, pastas, fried ribs, tacos and wings, this new neighborhood bar and grill has something for everyone. Mon.–Thu. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Fri.–Sat. 11 a.m.– Midnight, Sunday 11 a.m.–10 p.m. 2738 Capital Circle N.E. $ L D

CAFE TAVERNA

Our cafe offering Southern cooking with a Latin twist is now open in Midtown. We serve brunch and dinner while offering a full bar and Lucky Goat coffee and espresso. Tue.Thur. 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m., 5-9 p.m.; Fri. 11 a.m.2:30 p.m., 5-10:30 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 5-10:30 p.m.; Sun. 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 5-9 p.m. 1019 N. Monroe St. (850) 999-8203. $$ B D

CYPRESS RESTAURANT ★

To make a special evening a cut above the rest, bring the celebration to Cypress. Known for its sophisticated take on Southern cuisine, this restaurant won readers’ votes in 2014–2018 as Best Celebration/Special Occasion and Best Fine Dining restaurant. Mon-Thurs 5-9:30 pm, Fri-Sat 5-10 pm, Sun Closed. 320 E. Tennessee St. (850) 513-1100. $$$ D

DOG ET AL ★

For the ultimate in comfort food, Dog Et Al offers hand-held deliciousness for the “down to earth” and “uppity” dogs in us all. Footlong and veggie entrees alike grace this awardwinning menu. If the entire family is down for the dog, be sure to ask about their incredibly valued family packs. Mon-Fri 10 am-7 pm, Sat 10 am-6 pm, Sun Closed. 1456 S. Monroe St. (850) 222-4099. $ L D

THE EDISON

A Tallahassee relaxed fine dining establishment, The Edison is so much more than just a pretty face. Equipped with a beer garden, wine cellar, casual café, open-air alternatives and a gorgeous view, this historic building and restaurant has quickly become a Tallahassee favorite. Mon-Thurs 11 am-11 pm, Fri 11 ammidnight, Sat 10 am-midnight, Sun 10 am-11 pm. 470 Suwannee St. (850) 684-2117. $$/$$$

FOOD GLORIOUS FOOD ★

The name says it all! This restaurant boasts a palate-pleasing combination of personalized

THE KEY

★2018 Best

of Tallahassee Winner

service, eclectic ambiance and award-winning cuisine and is the Best Desserts winner for 2017 and 2018. Tues-Thurs 11 am-2:30 pm, 5:309 pm; Fri-Sat 11 am-2:30 pm, 5:30-9:30 pm; Sun 10 am-2:30 pm, 5:30-9 pm. 1950 Thomasville Rd. (850) 224-9974. $$ L D

HOPKINS’ EATERY ★

Hopkins’, a Best of 2018 winner, provides more than just your average sandwich. Favorites such as the Ultimate Turkey and the Linda Special, and a variety of salad meals keep customers coming back for more. And the food is healthy, too! Multiple locations. Hours vary. hopkinseatery.com. $ L Get baked! Tally’s Best Wings 2018 won’t serve you up greasy, fried wings; instead, they bake them and prepare them fresh. They don’t stop at wings, either: Try the mac ‘n cheese, burgers and tacos paired with a cold beer. MonThurs 11 am-12 am, Fri-Sat 11 am-2 am, Sun 11 am-12 am. 1370 Market St. (850) 692-3116. $/$$ L D

JUICY BLUE

Located in the Four Points by Sheraton Downtown, this cool lobby restaurant offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. Unique dishes include tapas with a twist, such as the Georgia peaches with caramel. Sandwiches, salads and a nice variety of seafood, pasta and chicken dishes round out the menu. Mon-Fri 7 am11 pm, Sat-Sun 7 am-midnight. 316 W. Tennessee St. (850) 422-0071. $ B L D

KOOL BEANZ ★

Eclectic and edgy, both in menu and atmosphere, Kool Beanz delights in art present both on the walls and your plates. This offbeat alternative won Best Casual Dining in Tallahassee. Dinner Mon-Sat 5:30-10 pm, lunch Mon-Fri 11 am-2:30 pm, brunch Sun 10:30 am-2 pm. 921 Thomasville Rd. (850) 224-2466. $$ L D

LIAM’S RESTAURANT

Part restaurant, part cheese shoppe, part lounge — Liam’s features locally grown and harvested foods, expertly made cocktails, craft beer, artisan wines & cheeses and friendly service. Lunch: Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.2 p.m.; Dinner: Tues.-Sat., 5 p.m.-close; Lounge: Tues.-Fri. 5 p.m.-late., Sat.: noon-midnight. 113 E. Jackson St., Thomasville, Georgia. (229) 226-9944. $$/$$$ L D

MADISON SOCIAL ★

Whether it’s for a social cocktail, a quick lunch or a place for alumni to gather before home football games, Madison Social offers something for everyone. Madison Social earned Best Happy Hour honors in 2018. Mon-Fri 11:30 am-2 am, Sat-Sun 10 am-2 am. College Town, 705 S. Woodward Ave. (850) 894‑6276. $$ B L D

Brunch Lunch Dinner

Live Music Bar/Lounge $ Inexpensive

Expensive

$$$ Expensive

WEEKEND BRUNCH SUN–SAT

SPECIALS

ISLAND WING COMPANY ★

The restaurants that appear in this guide are included as a service to readers and not as recommendations of the Tallahassee Magazine editorial department, except where noted. $$ Moderately B Breakfast/ Outdoor Dining L D

OPEN DAILY FOR LUNCH–DINNER MON–FRI

TAVERNA TUESDAY 20% OFF SMALL PLATES WINE & WHISKEY WEDNESDAY HALF OFF SELECT WINES AND WHISKEYS

WEEKEND EARLY BIRD SPECIAL BUY ONE GET ONE HALF OFF BRUNCH ITEMS 9–11 AM

THIRSTY THURSDAY HALF OFF DRAFT BEER

SUNDAY APPETIZER SPECIAL HALF OFF SELECT APPS HAPPY HOUR EVERY DAY 4–7 PM

CHECK OUT

MASA’S

2018

Specials

NEW DAILY

SUNDAY FUNDAY

ALL DAY KIDS EAT FREE WITH THE PURCHASE OF A REGULAR ENTREE

MONDAY APP NIGHT

HALF OFF SELECT APPETIZERS FROM 4:30–CLOSE

TUESDAY

TUNA TUESDAY FROM 4:30–CLOSE

WEDNESDAY LADIES NIGHT 20% OFF BOTTLES OF WINE OR A FREE DESSERT FROM 4:30–CLOSE

Everyday happy hour 4:30–7 SPECIALS ARE DINE IN ONLY 1650 N. Monroe St. | (850) 727-4183 | masatallahasee.com TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2018

149


THE BEST LITTLE STEAKHOUSE IN TALLAHASSEE 2018

SAGE RESTAURANT ★

Sage’s menu masterfully melds regional influences, including Southern and French. The setting is gorgeous but cozy, and the outdoor patio sets a charming, romantic tone for a relaxed evening. Mon Closed; Tues-Sat 11 am-3 pm, 6-10 pm; Sun 11 am-2:30 pm. 3534 Maclay Blvd. (850) 270-9396. $$$ B L D

SALTY DAWG PUB AND DELI ★

Low-key hangout with a family atmosphere, serving burgers, wings, cheesesteaks and reubens. Mon.–Thur. 11 a.m.–Mid., Fri. 11 a.m.– 2 a.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–1 a.m., Sun. Noon–11 p.m. 3813 N. Monroe St. (850) 562-6500. $ L D

TABLE 23 ★

This “Southern porch, table and bar” is cozied up among oak trees on one of Tallahassee’s favorite street corners. Serving lunch, dinner, Sunday brunch, fabulous cocktails and craft beers. Lucky Goat coffee-rubbed ribeye and Schermer pecan-crusted chicken are among the regional-produce offerings. Mon-Tues 11 am-2 pm, 5 pm-9 pm, Wed-Fri 11 am-2 pm, 5 pm-10 pm, Sat 5 pm-10 pm, Sun 10 am-3 pm. 1215 Thomasville Rd., (850) 329-2261. $$$ L D

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE CAFE ★

Serving a variety of smoothies and a selection of healthy alternatives, such as wraps, bowls, flatbreads and sandwiches. Multiple Locations. Hours vary. $ L D

UPTOWN CAFÉ

Uptown Cafe and Catering, locally owned and operated for more than 30 years, is famous for its all-day brunch menu and lunch fare. Specialties at the bustling, family-run café include apricot-glazed smoked salmon, one-of-a-kind omelets, banana bread French toast and flavorful sandwiches. Mon-Sat 7 a.m.-3 p.m., Sun 8 a.m.2 p.m. 1325 Miccosukee Road (850) 219-9800. $B L

Join us for lunch and dinner at our beautiful location on Apalachee Parkway. Our steaks are not only the best in Tallahassee, but USDA choice Midwestern corn-fed beef, specially selected, aged to our specifications and cut daily. We also serve fresh jumbo shrimp and fish — grilled, blackened or fried. So please join us for lunch and dinner or just meet up for drinks at our fully stocked bar.

MARIE LIVINGSTON’S STEAK HOUSE

2705 Apalachee Parkway | Tallahassee, FL (850) 270-9506

January–February 2018

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

MISSION BBQ ★

Rated Best BBQ in 2018, Mission features features memorabilia honoring soldiers and first responders while offering smoked brisket, pork, turkey and more. Mon.–Thur. 11 a.m.–9 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 11:30 a.m.–8 p.m. 216 S. Magnolia Drive. (850) 702-3513. L D

WILLIE JEWELL’S OLD SCHOOL BBQ

Smoked for hours and served in minutes, Willie Jewell’s promises the best BBQ experience you have ever had. Platters, sandwiches or by the pound, Willie Jewell’s offers smoked brisket, pork, turkey, sausage, chicken and ribs with a bevy of Southern sides. Daily 11 a.m.-9 p.m. 5442 Thomasville Rd. (850) 629-4299. $ L D

BREAKFAST/ BRUNCH/BAKERY CANOPY ROAD CAFÉ ★

Traditional breakfasts, fluffy omelets, skillets, French toast and sweet potato pancakes keep customers coming back. Breakfast is the main event but Canopy goes all out on lunch favorites, too, including salads and steakburgers. Mon-Sun 6:30 am-2:15 pm. Multiple locations. (850) 668-6600. $ B L

THE EGG CAFÉ AND EATERY ★

Chosen as a Best of winner in 2017 and 2018, Midtown’s Wine Loft offers a superb wine list, creative cocktails, quality beer and tasty tapas. Mon-Thurs 5 pm-2 am, Fri-Sat 4 pm-2 am, Sun Closed. 1240 Thomasville Rd., #100. (850) 222-9914. $$  D

When you’re looking for breakfast favorites, even if it’s lunchtime, The Egg is the place to be. Their made-to-order items use the finest ingredients, and they were voted Tallahassee’s best 16 times, including the 2018 award for Best Brunch. Second location now open in Kleman Plaza. Multiple Locations. (850) 907-3447. $$ B L

VERTIGO BURGERS AND FRIES ★

TASTY PASTRY BAKERY ★

Vertigo is home to some of the juiciest, funkiest burgers in town. The modern building provides a no-frills setting to enjoy such favorites as the Vertigo Burger — a beef patty served with a fried egg, applewood bacon, grilled jalapeños, sharp cheddar and Vertigo sauce. Mon-Sat 11 am-9 pm, Sun 11 am-6 pm. 1395 E. Lafayette St. (850) 878‑2020. $$ L D

ASIAN From tempura to teriyaki and from sushi to sashimi, Kiku Japanese Fusion fuses vibrant flavors with fresh ingredients. There’s a reason Kiku was voted Best Sushi in 2018. Mon-Sat 11 am-1 pm, Sun 12-11 pm. 800 Ocala Rd. (850) 575-5458, 3491 Thomasville Rd. (850) 222-5458. $$ L D

MASA ★

In 2018, Masa earned the title of Best Asian in town — and with good reason. Their menu offers a creative blend of Eastern and Western cuisines. Mon-Fri 11 am-3 pm, 4:30-9:30 pm; Sat-Sun 12-3 pm, 4:30-9:30 pm. 1650 N. Monroe St. (850) 727-4183. $/$$ L D

OSAKA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE AND SUSHI BAR ★

Rated Best Hibachi for 2018, Osaka provides

150

BBQ

THE WINE LOFT WINE BAR ★

KIKU JAPANESE FUSION ★

F

dinner and a show, with the chefs seasoning and preparing your meal right in front of you. It’s a meal that’s sure to leave you satisfied as well as entertained. Sun-Thurs 11 am-10:15 pm, Fri-Sat 11 am-10:45 pm. 1690 Raymond Diehl Rd. (850) 531-0222. $$$ D

Tallahassee’s original cakery features fresh breads, bagels, pies, cakes and more. Catering available. Mon.–Sat. 6:45 a.m.– 6 p.m. 1355 Market St., No. A-5. (850) 893-3752. $  B L D

THE BADA BEAN

Greeting sunrise with Tallahassee residents for over 10 years, find your favorite breakfast, brunch and lunch specials any time of day. For your daily pour, Bada Bean features lattes, cold brew, cappuccinos, espresso and Mighty Leaf teas. Mon. 6:30 a.m.–2 p.m., Tue.–Fri. 6:30 a.m.–3 p.m., Sat.–Sun. 7:30 a.m.–3 p.m. 2500-B Apalachee Pkwy. (850) 562-2326. $B L

CAJUN COOSH’S BAYOU ROUGE ★

This Best Cajun Restaurant winner for 2017 brings the best of the Bayou State right to your table. The menu is jam-packed with Louisiana-style dishes, including favorites like jambalaya, crawfish etouffee, po’boys and seafood gumbo. Not in a Cajun mood? Coosh’s also offers classic hamburgers, salads and chicken wings. Mon-Tues 11 am-10 pm, Wed-Fri 7 am-10 pm, Sat 8 am-10 pm, Sun 8 am-9 pm. Multiple Locations. (850) 894‑4110. $$ B L D


THANK YOU FOR VOTING US

BEST HIBACHI

HIBACHI

HIBACHI | SUSHI

HIBACHI

18 Hibachi tables Sushi bar Private dining Large parties welcome Open daily for lunch and dinner

DESTIN | 34745 Emerald Coast Parkway | 850.650.4688 TALLAHASSEE | 1690 Raymond Diehl Road | 850.531.0222 PANAMA CITY BEACH | 15533 Panama City Beach Parkway | 850.588.8403 WWW.THEOSAKASTEAKHOUSE.COM

#BrunchDowntown

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2018

151


CATERING TASTEBUDZ CATERING ★

The Coast is Here!

Their slogan is, “Holler if you need your taste buds tantalized.” Cases in point: Moroccan chicken with lemon spinach, beef tips with burgundy mushroom sauce, and Caribbean sweet potato and black bean salad. Serving lunch and dinner. Open daily. 2655-12 Capital Circle NE. (850) 309‑7348. $$ L D

CUBAN GORDO’S

Tallahassee’s top Cuban spot for over 30 years, Gordo’s features favorites such as croquetas, papas rellenas, empanadas and pressed sandwiches like their classic Cubano. Mon.– Sat. 11 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–10 p.m. 1907 W. Pensacola St.; Mon.–Thu. 11 a.m.– 10 p.m., Fri. 11 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–9 p.m. 1460 Market St. Suite #3-4. $ L D

GREEK SAHARA GREEK & LEBANESE CAFÉ ★ Sahara’s fusion of Greek and Lebanese cuisines is unmatched in the area. A large menu and friendly staff cater to all tastes. And don’t forget to order the falafel! MonWed 11 am-9 pm, Thurs-Fri 11 am-10 pm, Sat 12-10 pm, Sun Closed. 1135 Apalachee Pkwy (850) 656‑1800. $$

ITALIAN/PIZZA BELLA BELLA ★

Take your taste buds to Italy with a trip to Bella Bella, voted Best Italian in 2015, 2017 and 2018. This locally owned and operated restaurant has a cozy atmosphere and serves all the classics to satisfy your pasta cravings. Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm, Sat 4-10 pm, Sun Closed. 123 E. 5th Ave. (850) 412-1114. $$ L D

MOMO’S ★

served blackened, broiled, or crispy Join us for fresh seafood in our relaxed atmosphere where kids eat free on Thursday nights. And if you’re looking for a taste of the coast for your next event, give us a call! From big events to groups ordering lunch in, it would be our pleasure to serve you.

After devouring a slice “as big as your head” at this 2018 Best Pizza winner, chain pizza simply is not gonna cut it. From the blackand-white photos to the bathrooms decorated in album covers, the restaurant has an unmistakable and enjoyable “hole in the wall” vibe. Multiple locations. Hours vary. (850) 224‑9808. $ L D

MEXICAN EL JALISCO ★

In the mood for sizzling enchiladas and frozen margaritas? Make your way to the 2018 Best Mexican/Latin American Restaurant, El Jalisco, where they do Mexican cuisine to perfection. Multiple locations. Hours vary. $ L D

SEAFOOD/STEAK THE BLU HALO ★

Order online! WharfCasualSeafood.com

Blue Halo is a high-end culinary experience featuring dry-aged steaks and fresh seafood

along with fine wines and a martini bar. The gourmet farm-to-table menu selections include a wide variety of small-plate appetizers and high-end chops. A private dining room for up to 20 guests is available. Mon-Thurs 4-10 pm; Fri 4 pm-close; Sat 8 am-2 pm, 4 pmclose; Sun 8 am-2 pm, 4-10 pm. 3431 Bannerman Rd., #2 (850) 999-1696. $$$ L D

BONEFISH GRILL ★

Bonefish is devoted to serving great seafood including shrimp, oysters, snapper and swordfish in a vibrant setting, along with top-shelf cocktails and housemade infusions crafted by expert mixologists. Mon-Thurs 4 pm-10:30 pm, Fri 4 pm-11:30 pm, Sat 11 am11:30 pm, Sun 10 am-9 pm. 3491 Thomasville Road Ste. 7, (850) 297-0460. $$ L D

CHOP HOUSE ON THE BRICKS

This family-owned, upscale restaurant serves local organic and sustainable meats, seafood, poultry and produce. Craft beers, fine wines and specialty drinks complement dishes such as the Bone-In Ribeye, Plantation Quail and Chop House Burger. Their Knob Creek Bourbon Bread Pudding is a dessert favorite. TuesSat 5-9:30 pm, Sun-Mon Closed. 123 N. Broad St., Thomasville, Ga. (229) 236-2467. $$ D

HARRY’S SEAFOOD BAR & GRILL

Harry’s Seafood Bar & Grille, established in 1987, serves Southern, cajun and creole flavors in classic and modern dishes. Full bar is available at each location and offers beer, wine, liquor and unique cocktails. Sun-Thurs 11 am-10 pm, Fri-Sat 11 am-11 pm, and holiday hours. 301 S. Bronough St., in Kleman Plaza. (850) 222-3976. $$ L D

MARIE LIVINGSTON’S STEAKHOUSE ★

Dining at Marie Livingston’s is upscale yet comfortable and always a special treat. Not just a restaurant that serves up savory cuts of prime rib or marbled steaks, this 2018 Best Steakhouse winner is a Tallahassee tradition, and newcomers owe it to themselves to make it a priority to visit. Mon-Fri 11 am-2 pm, 5-9 pm; Sat 5-9 pm; Sun Closed. 2705 Apalachee Pkwy. (850) 562-2525. $$ L D

SHULA’S 347

The legendary Miami Dolphins’ head coach brings the quest for perfection to the dining table at his namesake restaurant, located in Hotel Duval. Keep it light and casual with a premium Black Angus beef burger or a gourmet salad, or opt for one of their signature entrées — a “Shula Cut” steak. Reservations are suggested. Sun-Thurs 5-10 pm, Fri-Sat 5-11 pm. 415 N. Monroe St. (850) 224-6005. $$$  L D

SOUTHERN SEAFOOD ★

Whether you’re looking for fish, shrimp, oysters, scallops, crab or lobster, these guys have you covered. The 2018 Best Seafood Market winner brings the ocean’s freshest choices to Tallahassee’s front door. Mon-Fri 10 am-7 pm, Sat 10 am-6 pm, Sun 12-6 pm. 1415 Timberlane Rd. (850) 668‑2203.

WAHOO SEAFOOD GRILL ★

Bringing the coast to Tallahassee, fresh seafood options mix with steak and classic Cajun dishes. Mon.–Thur. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Fri.–Sat. 11 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–1 p.m. 2714 Graves Road. (850) 629-4059. $$ L D

Bannerman Crossing 850-765-1077 Costco Shopping Center 850-668-1966

152

January–February 2018

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Visit our comprehensive, searchable dining guide online at tallahasseemagazine.com/Restaurants.


our mission is the same as our passion: to serve the most delicious mexican cuisine at four great locations. we invite you to stop by for our world-famous fajitas.

southwood

3740 Austin Davis Ave. Tues–Sun 7 am –2 pm (850) 765-0703

727-0094 |

Great Food Great Friends Warm & Inviting Atmosphere Upscale Tastes at Affordable Prices

capital circle ne

385-9992 |

north monroe

878-0800 |

kerry forest

668-1002 |

crawfordville

926-4329

Visit our new location 300 South Duval St. Tues-Sun 7 am-2 pm (850) 907-EGGS (3447)

HOME OF THE

Every Night Happy Hour 4–9 p.m. Thursday Night all wines 2 for 1 4–9 p.m. 2018

New Location!

Killearn Shopping Center • Ocala Corners WWW.KIKUFUSION.COM TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

January–February 2018

153


postscript

I WAS CURIOUS, HE WAS OUT THERE, AND I HAD TO FIND HIM by PETE REINWALD

“Even from the hall, the overpowering stench told me the dingy caramel glow in his office would be from a ten-thousand-cigarette layer of nicotine baked on a naked bulb hanging from a frayed wire in the center of a likely cracked and water-stained ceiling, but I was broke, he was cheap, and I had to find her.” Indeed, true craftspeople build their work on such foundations. Brockett, who grew up in Tallahassee, hardly sought national or even local recognition. He lives in his RV on a wooded lot off a dirt road in Jefferson County. He said he worked with a brother in the real estate and construction businesses, buying homes and restoring them for profit, before the uncertainty of the housing market crash and Great Recession prompted him to buy his current home. “I like it out here, kind of off the grid,”

154

January–February 2018

he said. “I don’t really like to have a big profile.” He never imagined himself winning a writing contest, for bad sentences or otherwise. A Navy veteran, he said he read constantly during his nine years of service. He gained an appreciation for hard-boiled fiction, detective stories known for their sex, violence and seedy urban settings. As a petty officer, he wrote reports that required precision, helping him avoid wordiness and redundancy, he said. Brockett now spends time on online political forums that he says inspire him to further improve as a writer. Even though he uses a pseudonym, he said, “The extent of my writing is to not look like a fool on these political forums.” And to know bad writing, he points out, you must know good writing. A few years ago, he said, he and another forum member decided to do their own version of the Bulwer Lytton contest. He posted a few entries on the forum and then decided to enter them in the real deal. “I totally forgot about them,” he said. Then he received an email notification that judges had deemed no entry better — or worse — than one of his. He also got a $250 check. Brockett’s awfully good sentence got its inspiration from the hard-boiled fiction that its author had learned to devour. “The character goes in looking for a private detective in a shitty little … you know, he’s cheap and I’m broke and I need to find her,” Brockett said. “So that was basically trying to set that mood.” We at Tallahassee Magazine had set out to learn what became of the man who had received national recognition for writing

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

↑ Barry Brockett, who grew up in Tallahassee, became a national champion for his ability to compose a bad opening sentence to an imaginary novel.

poorly on purpose, and I’m glad that we did. I like him. On my visit to his home, I like that he felt no need to change out of his shorts and T-shirt and try to be somebody he wasn’t. I like that he had a guitar in his living room and played me a few solid bars of “Tennessee Whiskey.” I like that he shared with me one of his favorite pastimes — watching clips of TV talent contests on YouTube. “You know, you see this young guy or girl,” he said. “They’re nervous. They get on a huge stage like that, and they just kill it. There’s just something about that that just touches me. “A lot of it is just the promise.” Not surprisingly, Brockett stayed in his RV during Hurricane Michael, losing electricity but not much else. “A few tree limbs lost their battle,” he wrote in a text message, “but all in all, I feel very fortunate.” TM

PHOTO BY PETE REINWALD

N

o, Barry Brockett said, life hasn’t changed much in the more than two years since he became a national champion. “Not one bit,” he said. “It’s still hot as hell … and heat is killing me even more doing construction work.” A building contractor and selfproclaimed jack of all trades, Brockett in 2016 proved himself extremely handy at crafting a beautifully lousy sentence — winning the grand prize in the annual Bulwer Lytton Fiction Contest. The competition, sponsored by San Jose State University, challenges entrants to “compose bad opening sentences to imaginary novels.” With his entry, Brockett, 57, of Wacissa, gave the contest’s “panel of undistinguished judges” everything but the kitchen sink:


Tallahassee’s Best Selection of Leather Furniture

A great leather piece is the perfect combination of quality, comfort and style. At Turner’s, shop the area’s best selection of leather sofas, chairs, recliners, sectionals and more. From traditional to many unique color options, Turner’s designers are here to help you choose the best leather look for your home.

(850) 210-0446 | TurnerFurniture.com Mon–Fri 10am–8pm | Sat 10am–6pm | Sun 1pm–6pm 2151 US Hwy 319 (10 Minutes North of Chiles High School on Thomasville Hwy)


Remember Last Year?

We’ve Got You Covered! Urgent Care

7 Days a Week

7 Convenient Locations . . . all with flu tests!

Appointment • Walk-in • Check-in Online • PatientsFirst.com

Profile for Rowland Publishing, Inc.

Tallahassee Magazine - January/February 2019  

For more than 36 years, the award-winning Tallahassee Magazine has been capturing the essence of Florida’s vibrant capital to share with rea...

Tallahassee Magazine - January/February 2019  

For more than 36 years, the award-winning Tallahassee Magazine has been capturing the essence of Florida’s vibrant capital to share with rea...