__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

A Soft Artistic Touch Quia Atkinson brings clients’ ideas to life

Taking it to the Streets Public art breathes life into downtowns

+

Certificate Program at TCC Supplies Essential Industry with Truckers Ready to Roll


L

C

E EV

ICE

THIS

R LITTL

D

E EV

C A N FIX YO U R H E ART W I T HO U T SU RG E RY.


Your heart works hard every second of the day, pumping life-giving blood through your body. But for people with conditions like Aortic Stenosis, the heart may need a little help from experts trained in highly specialized procedures, like Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR).

At Tallahassee Memorial, you and your heart have access to the most cutting-edge treatment techniques available, from one of the most advanced heart programs in the Southeast. Our leading team of physicians performs more clinical research and complex procedures than any other program in our region, and we’ve been named a Best Hospital in Florida by U.S. News & World Report. For your heart, this means the highest level of care close to home, so you can get back to living life to the fullest.

Explore your options at:

TMH.ORG/HeartHealth

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

3


I t a ke yo u , i n d ay s we wo n’t fo r g e t

4

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


I t ake you, until forever Forevermark Engagement & Commitment Collection

3501 Thomasville Road Tallahassee, FL 850-893-4171 | www.gemcollection.com

Our vow to you is that each uniquely inscribed Forevermark diamond is beautiful, rare and responsibly sourced.

Forevermark Icon™ Round Diamond Engagement Ring in Platinum

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

5


6

March-April 2021

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


Contents

MAR/APR 2021

FEATURES

68

ON A ROLL

Recreational vehicle sales have spiked in the U.S. in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. For decades, they have appealed as an option to people who would rather not deal with reservation desks, check-out times or breakfast bars that serve that egg-like product that isn’t really eggs. Given the pandemic, they also do much to obviate concerns about sanitation. RVers in Northwest Florida enjoy a long list of parks and recreational areas to visit within comfortable driving distances. by KAREN MURPHY

76

ARTS ADVOCATES

At the Council on Culture & Arts in Tallahassee, executive director Kathleen Spehar and assistant director Amanda Karioth Thompson work to make the arts available to as many Tallahasseans as they can. They have redoubled those efforts in response to recent events, working with poets to place verse in take-out orders, making plans to embed the arts in health care settings and exploring the possibility of using art in de-escalating community tensions. by MARINA BROWN

80

NO VACANCY

In Thomasville, Georgia, the Center for the Arts has employed public art as a tonic that boosts civic pride, celebrates local history and culture, attracts visitors and spurs economic development. The Center, led by executive director Michele Arwood and public art coordinator Darlene Crosby Taylor, has turned abandoned areas of the city into arts oases. In particular, they took steps to sow a parcel that was lying fallow with murals and events and more, making it the UnVacant Lot. by STEVE BORNHOFT

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS

↖ Pine Forest and Woodpecker mural by Joe Cowdry’s

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

7


Contents

MAR/APR 2021

36

89 in the Commercial Driving School at Tallahassee Community College move from simulators to road work to lucrative employment.

36 CHAMPION Bystanders

went shopping for what’s new at local shops and discovered products that freshen furniture and faces.

64 GOOD EATS Soul food

GASTRO & GUSTO

55 LIBATIONS Suds

23

PERSONALITY Quia Atkinson’s artwork reflects her own vibrancy.

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

provides all sorts of people — including President Biden, as it happens — with a restorative that feels like home.

EXPRESSION

89 MUSIC Because no one

wants to experience the day the music died, performers, including members of the

92 BOOKS Marina Brown’s

latest novel, The Orphan of Pitigliano, inspired by the author’s experience with a patient experiencing a psychosomatic illness, explores extracorporeal phenomena in Tuscany during the run-up to World War II.

FEEDBACK PUBLISHER’S LETTER EDITOR’S COLUMN SOCIAL STUDIES DINING GUIDE POSTSCRIPT

A Soft Artistic Touch Quia Atkinson brings clients’ ideas to life

Taking it to the Streets

+

Certificate Program at TCC Supplies Essential Industry with Truckers Ready to Roll

Public art breathes life into downtowns

ABODES

101 INTERIORS Designers

offer advice on how best to decorate walls with pieces that will complement furniture, other fixtures and features in rooms.

TALLAHASSEEMAGAZINE.COM

guzzlers are discovering an appetite for hangover chasers — or eye-openers — that pair well with bacon and eggs. Craft brewers throughout the region are tapping into the breakfast beers trend.

10 16 18 122 127 130

Tallahassee Youth Orchestra are working around the pandemic and finding ways to safely rehearse and deliver concerts.

» TALLAHASSEE FOODIES » BREAKFAST BEERS

March-April 2021

52 WHAT’S IN STORE We

influencer Jennifer Leale, with her Tallahassee Foodies Facebook group and website, is focusing attention on the capital city’s restaurant scene.

IN EVERY ISSUE

TIE-DYE

tie-dye has been around for centuries and came to the fore during the psychedelic 1960s. Now, it’s back as a popular DIY activity that people largely sequestered by the pandemic can do at home.

60 DINING OUT Social media

the time to prepare gardens for spring and summer seasons of horticultural success.

MAR–APR 2021

43 FASHION The art of

112 GREEN SCENE Now is

TALLAHASSEE MAGAZINE

and paramedics saved Brittany Williams’s life when her heart stopped in New York City. Today, she is working to repay that debt as a volunteer and ambassador for the American Heart Association.

PANACHE

8

seen as staid, rulebound and slave to tradition, is becoming more receptive to bright apparel. Rodney Dangerfield in “Caddyshack” was just a little ahead of his time.

32 EDUCATION Students

Manufacturers have introduced to the market new types of siding that offer both durability and aesthetic appeal.

ON THE COVER:

Quia Atkinson grew up as the daughter of U.S. Marines and attended 11 K-12 schools around the country and the world. In Tallahassee, she has found a home that syncs up well with her sensibilities and whose support fuels her creative efforts. Photo by Alex Workman

PHOTOS BY SAIGE ROBERTS (36), ALICIA OSBORNE (60) AND ALEX WORKMAN (89, 23)

60

46 TRENDS Golf, often

323

108 EXTERIORS


auto loans

cash bonu get s up

300

$

R U O Y GET

to

1

when

you br from a ing an auto loan nother lender (Prom o Cod

R O T O M G N I N N RU

e: L30

0)

A WITH

loan o t u a t aymen xible p e fl h it Lw PROVA 2 ASY AP etitive rates E ATE , T S ANK” R „ FA omp B c “ d Y n N a A terms MATCH EAT OR B L ’L „ WE

START YOUR ENGINE! Apply online at campuscu.com/auto-loans Call 894-9098 and press 4 Curbside Service available – Visit any CAMPUS Service Center today! Killearn 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. | Governor’s Crossing 101 N. Blair Stone Rd. | Mahan Village 3122 Mahan Dr.

Membership is open to anyone in Gadsden, Jefferson, Leon, Madison, and Wakulla counties.3 Offer not available on existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. May not be combined with any other offer. Offer subject to change without notice. 1. Lines of Credit, Commercial Loans, CD/Shared Secured Loans, Signature Loans, and Real Estate Loans are not eligible. Cash bonus is 1.25% of amount financed up to a maximum of $300. Limit one per household. Must present offer at time of loan closing. 2. “Bank” means any local institution with the word “bank” in its name. Loan rate is subject to the current minimum Annual Percentage Rate (APR) available at campuscu.com/rates. 3. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Insured by the NCUA. TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

9


Contents

MAR/APR 2021

SPECIAL SECTIONS AND PROMOTIONS

Feedback

30

NATURAL HISTORY The Tallahassee

Museum creates experiences that celebrate the wonders of nature and bring to life periods in North Florida's past.

↑ARTS & CRAFTS The LeMoyne Chain of Parks Art

Festival, the region’s premier art show, is expanding this year to include a larger lineup of talent spread out over a 10-day schedule.

HIGHNOTES 98 ←HISTORICAL

40 CANNA CARES

The physicians and team at Canna Crusade Wellness specialize in tailoring medical cannabis recommendations to the needs of each patient.

BUILDABLE 50 →BAUBLES

Mix, match and stack. Assemble a timeless collection with components at The Gem Collection.

98

PROMOTING PCB

Working together, the Panama City Beach Convention & Visitors Bureau and Rowland Publishing produce a visitor’s guide that entices guests by highlighting the beauty of the beach and a bounty of attractions.

118 CALENDAR

Outdoor events and intimate performances headline the spring calendar. Highlights include Opening Nights, the LeMoyne Festival of Arts and the Word of South Festival.

NEXT ISSUE

Javacya Arts Conservatory celebrates and honors musicians of color with a new festival series.

106 CAMELLIAS CALORE

Esposito Lawn & Garden Center offers a superior selection of camellias, one of the most popular spring flowers.

114 DEAL ESTATE

A contemporary Northshire home didn’t stay on the market for long. Just listed is a 9,289-square-foot lakeshore dream home on 15 acres.

124 CHARITABLE INVESTING

The Community Foundation of North Florida helps residents achieve charitable giving goals while enjoying tax advantages. Lee Hinkle, former FSU vice president, shares her experience.

March-April 2021

Brian: I am writing to tell you that I really enjoyed the January/ February edition of Tallahassee Magazine. We live in a unique, interesting and diverse community of people and places. Reading the stories in the magazine reminded me that I never want to take for granted how lucky we are to live in Tallahassee. CALYNNE HILL TALLAHASSEE

Citizen of Style Steve: Thanks so much for the “Citizen of Style” article you wrote about me (Tallahassee Magazine, January/ February 2021). People have been reaching out to me all day and commenting that it was a great read. KEITH BOWERS TALLAHASSEE

Springtime Tallahassee ❘ Spring Gift Guide ❘ Professional Profiles ❘ Best of Ballot PROMOTION

10

Diverse Community

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE LEMOYNE CHAIN OF PARKS ART FESTIVAL (87), JAVACYA ARTS CONSERVATORY 9(8) AND THE GEM COLLECTION (50)

87


*Model

Creating a New

You Alfredo A. Paredes Jr., M.D. | Larry Harper, M.D., FACS | Jeffrey M. Rawlings, M.D., FACS LASER | FACIAL REJUVENATION | COSMETIC FACIAL SURGERY SKIN CARE | COSMETIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE BREAST SUGERY BODY CONTOURING | SKINCEUTICALS ADVANCED CLINCAL SPA

(850) 877-2126 TLHPLASTICSURGERY.COM TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

11


TALLAHASSEE MAGAZINE VOL. 44, NO. 2

MARCH-APRIL 2021

PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BRIAN E. ROWLAND

EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Steve Bornhoft MANAGING EDITOR Jeff Price CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Marina Brown, Riley O’Bryant, Hannah Burke, Darlene Crosby Taylor, Bob Ferrante, Les Harrison, Rochelle Koff, Tim Linafelt, Thomas J. Monigan, Rebecca Padgett, Audrey Post, Liesel Schmidt

CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY Daniel Vitter CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jennifer Ekrut ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Lindsey Masterson SENIOR PUBLICATION DESIGNERS Sarah Burger, Shruti Shah PUBLICATION DESIGNER Jordan Harrison GRAPHIC DESIGNER Sierra Thomas CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Steve Beaudet, Mallory Brooks, Perrone Ford, Desirée Gardner, Colin Hackley, Les Harrison, Scott Holstein, Bob Howard, Kira Derryberry Photography, Lindsey Masterson, Russell Mick, Nehemiah Nash, Alicia Osborne, PTF Photo, Saige Roberts, Alex Workman

SALES, MARKETING AND EVENTS VICE PRESIDENT/CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT McKenzie Burleigh SALES MANAGER, EASTERN DIVISION Lori Magee Yeaton SALES MANAGER, WESTERN DIVISION Rhonda Lynn Murray DIRECTOR OF NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, EASTERN DIVISION Daniel Parisi DIRECTOR OF NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, WESTERN DIVISION Dan Parker ADVERTISING SERVICES SPECIALIST Tracy Mulligan ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES David Doll, Julie Dorr, Darla Harrison MARKETING MANAGER Kate Pierson SALES AND MARKETING WRITER Rebecca Padgett SENIOR INTEGRATED MARKETING COORDINATOR Javis Ogden ADMINISTRATIVE & CUSTOMER SERVICE SPECIALIST Renee Johnson

Full Service Hearing Care Audiology Associates and Tallahassee ENT:

The only clinic in Tallahassee with both Doctors of Audiology hearing and ENTcare Physicians, Comprehensive means so you receive the OPERATIONS CUSTOM PUBLISHING MANAGER Sara Goldfarb most experienced and professionalPRODUCTION care. AND DISTRIBUTION SPECIALIST Melinda Lanigan

HEARING LOSS PREVENTION, DETECTION AND CORRECTION

STAFF BOOKKEEPER Amber Dennard

DIGITAL SERVICES DIGITAL EDITOR Janecia Britt

TALLAHASSEE MAGAZINE tallahasseemagazine.com facebook.com/tallahasseemag twitter.com/tallahasseemag instagram.com/tallahasseemag pinterest.com/tallahasseemag youtube.com/user/tallahasseemag

• 1405 Centerville Road, Suite 5400 ROWLAND PUBLISHING • 2625 Mitcham Drive rowlandpublishing.com

Experience you can trust 850.616.6796

EDITORIAL OFFICE 1932 Miccosukee Road, Tallahassee, FL 32308. (850) 878-0554

SUBSCRIPTIONS One year (6 issues) is $30. Call (850) 878-0554 or go online to tallahasseemagazine.com. Single copies are $3.95. Purchase at Books-A-Million and at our Miccosukee Road office.

Contact us now at 850-877-0101 www.TallahasseeHearingHelp.com • www.TallyENT.com

Two locations | 1405 Centerville Road #5400 | 2625 Mitcham Drive TallahasseeHearingHelp.com

12

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUBMISSIONS Tallahassee Magazine and Rowland Publishing, Inc. are not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photography or artwork. Editorial contributions are welcomed and encouraged but will not be returned. Tallahassee Magazine reserves the right to publish any letters to the editor. Copyright March 2021 Tallahassee Magazine, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited. Partners of Visit Tallahassee and Member, Greater Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce.


TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

13


u-vestfinancial.com

14

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


B I G B E N D | E M E R A L D C OA ST | F O R G OT T E N C OA ST | W E L L- C O N N E C T E D. H I G H LY E F F E C T I V E .

poolside play It’s not just your address. Your home is a place where memories and traditions are made. That’s why at Hill Spooner & Elliott, we learn about your needs. Not just the beds and baths, but your your “must-haves” – like finding the perfect spot for summertime fun. Then we focus on homes that don’t just fit your lifestyle, they’re tailored for your lifestyle. Live your best life.

HILLSPOONER.COM 8 5 0 . 9 0 7. 2 0 5 1 TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

15


from the publisher

ART FOR ALL OF OUR SAKES Creative efforts reflect diversity while they unite us

16

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

and deepening the cultural experiences that they offer. Elsewhere in our region, small towns, including Havana and Quincy, are employing art as a way to attract visitors and bring economic benefit. It seems that the pandemic, by limiting our activities in other ways, has brought about a surge in creative efforts. Craft supplies long buried in closets have made their way to dining room tables. And artists around the country have turned out works inspired by the pandemic and its impact on the world. The Washington Post collected a sample of such works in a recent article. Til Kolare, a digital artist in Germany, has doctored the “Creation of Adam” section of the Sistine Chapel by separating God and the first man. He retooled the cafe in Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks,” eliminating the diners. In Iowa, political cartoonist Noah Regan recreated “American Gothic” by socially distancing the pitchfork-toting farmer from his wife, seen in a mask. The artist Jennifer Markowitz of North Carolina hand-embroidered a silk facemask with a replication of a stimulus check. And, in Washington, furniture maker Kimberly Kelzer, with fir wood dyed black, cinder blocks and a six-foot rule from a tape measure, assembled a “Distancing Bench.” I have no doubt that artists in our town are creating their own takes on the pandemic and the political discord that ushered in the new year.

I remain grateful and happy to be living in an outstanding city in an outstanding state in an outstanding nation that remains a beacon of freedom. I suppose that if I were an artist, I might paint a shaft of light exiting clouds and shining on a bald eagle. And, as a nod to my passion for dogs, I’d include a couple of Labrador retrievers looking upward, their attention distracted by the shadow cast by the big bird above. Peace be with you,

BRIAN ROWLAND browland@rowlandpublishing.com

PHOTO BY SCOTT HOLSTEIN

Events, no matter how traumatic they may be, cannot cancel the desire and the inclination on the part of people to express themselves artistically. Art is a means by which we interpret the world and process steps in the evolution of history. Art both documents today and inspires us to look forward to tomorrow. And, importantly, it reflects the great diversity of perspectives among us. Art — both performing arts and art on display — affects us in ways that words alone cannot. Cave walls served as canvases for the earliest of artists. Editorial pages are home to political cartoons in addition to the output of opinion writers. The magazine that you are now reading would be dramatically less impactful without the contributions made by our talented team of in-house designers and freelance photographers. Art has the capacity to inspire wonder and bridge divides. Sometimes, it can even serve as an antidote to anger. In this edition of Tallahassee Magazine, we check in with the leaders of the Council on Culture & Arts here in Tallahassee and the Center for the Arts in nearby Thomasville, Georgia. All are committed to encouraging efforts by creatives and to bringing them to the attention of all of us. They are dedicated to enriching public spaces with the infusion of art. We are indebted to them and the artists they promote for adding beautiful texture to our communities


For more than forty years, the BMW 5 Series stood for uncompromising performance and dynamic driving. Now it takes its place as one of the most interactive and innovative vehicles in the BMW lineup. Gorgeous design and luxurious comfort make the 5 Series more than a statement piece – it’s a work of art. Special lease and finance offers available by Capital BMW through BMW Financial Services. Capital BMW 3701 W. Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 (855) 314-6658 Capital-BMW.com TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

17


from the editor

A GREAT ESCAPE

Art can take us where we need to be

18

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

its cousin the SARS virus,” reporter at large Lawrence Wright wrote in The New Yorker in January of this year. “This assumption was wrong. The virus in Wuhan turned out to be far more infectious, and it spread largely by asymptomatic transmission. ‘That whole idea that you were going to diagnose cases based on symptoms, isolate them and contact-trace around them was not going to work,’ (Robert) Redfield (director of the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta) told me. ‘You’re going to be missing 50 percent of the cases. We didn’t appreciate that until late February.’” The first of three critical mistakes, in Wright’s view, had been made in the U.S. The others would be the bungled rollout of testing and a failure to embrace mask mandates. So it was that the U.S. became the world leader in COVID-19 cases. So it was that our lives were undecorated, events were cancelled, traditions interrupted, businesses disrupted. Our lives were as stripped galleries. But art has gone on, demonstrating its irrepressibility at kitchen tables, at garage workbenches, in studios and in the open air. We have discovered anew the value of creation and expression as antidotes to destruction and depression. Not long ago, I delighted in building with my grandson Rivers, age 6, a bird feeder as a gift for a friend. Three hearts were warmed by the experience. I was heartened to read Marina Brown’s story in this edition of Tallahassee Magazine about the commitment to the arts on the parts of Kathleen Spehar and Amanda Karioth

Thompson at Tallahassee’s Council on Culture & Arts (COCA). I was inspired by my own conversations with Michele Arwood and Darlene Crosby Taylor at the Center for the Arts in Thomasville for a story about the public art emphasis there. These days, I pause a little longer each morning to admire the four pieces of art in my office: a mug embossed with sun, sea and surfer and crafted by Brenda Stokes of Holley Hill Pottery in Santa Rosa County; a photograph by David Moynahan of Wakulla Springs of a writhing pod of giant tadpoles, their heads nearly the size of tennis balls, taken at Econfina Creek; a painting by Pennsylvania artist Mark Susinno of an angry pike diving into a submerged tree and fighting to dislodge an Eppinger Dardevle lure; and a sculpted grouper-like fish head, purchased at an art fair in Chautauqua, New York. Art does not flit away like birds at a person’s approach but invites close inspection and presents a slightly different look every time it’s viewed. It’s a great escape. Take care,

STEVE BORNHOFT sbornhoft@rowlandpublishing.com

PHOTO BY SAIGE ROBERTS

My brother was in town for a weekend in which we would work to edit and otherwise prepare his manuscript — about the cultureflattening, homogenizing effects of technology and social media — for submitting to publishers. After a work session, we repaired along with my wife to a favorite sushi restaurant. There, Mark asked our waitress if she or any of her coworkers spoke Chinese. The waitress did not — as I recall, she was a speaker of Khmer — but she presently brought to our table a woman, Emily, who did. Here, then, was an opportunity for Mark to practice his conversational Chinese. Emily, meanwhile, appeared delighted to encounter a Caucasian American who spoke her native language. Mark works for the health information systems division of a multinational conglomerate, the 3M Company, which is headquartered in Minnesota’s Twin Cities, where he and I grew up. His role has necessitated travel to China, including visits to Wuhan, from time to time, and Mark is teaching himself Chinese. He repeatedly put his hands together and nodded deferentially, I thought, as if to say, “Sorry, I’m doing the best I can,” as he and Emily engaged in small talk. Wuhan was in the news. For the first time, American broadcast media were reporting the appearance of an unfamiliar respiratory virus there. Collectively, the four of us (in English) expressed relief that the outbreak was confined to the other side of the world. “The new pathogen was … thought to be only modestly contagious, like


To all the HealthCare Heroes, We see you. You have faced a frightening virus for more than a year, and we know it hasn’t been easy. You were there at the beginning, when we knew little about COVID-19, and you’re still there, working through exhaustion to take care of our community. You’ve saved many lives, and you’ve held many hands. We all owe you a debt we can never repay. You probably don’t consider yourselves heroes, but we do. We see your grit. We see your determination. We see your self-sacrifice, and we are so grateful. We see you, and we will not forget.

Visit TMH.ORG/Hero to learn how you can provide encouragement and support to healthcare heroes.

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

19


PROMOTION

TALLAHASSEEMAGAZINE.COM DIGITAL EXCLUSIVE

Plans for Temple are Taking Shape

Read more by visiting TallahasseeMagazine.com/ plans-for-temple-are-taking-shape.

A Unique Gift Shop

Comes to Town Through all of the ups and downs of the past year, Ralph Esposito continues to look toward the future, even deciding on a new addition to the already unique gardening experience: a 2,400-squarefoot gift shop. Visit TallahasseeMagazine. com/home-garden-links to read more.

JEWELRY, A LASTING GIFT OF MEANING

CHANGING YOUR SPOTS The summer sun has the effect of accelerating pigment production and highlighting brown spots, but they are best treated in the fall and winter, when people naturally spend less time outdoors. Learn more at TallahasseeMagazine.com/beauty-links.

TALLY TOP PET

Fine jewelry is the gift that keeps on giving all year long. Whether you’re celebrating a birthday, anniversary or other special occasion, The Gem Collection has the perfect recommendation for you. Learn more at TallahasseeMagazine.com/ style-links.

Final Round Voting is Underway!

TALLY TOP PET Which furry companion do you think should win the coveted distinction of 2020–21 Tally Top Pet? You can help decide by voting in the final round! The final two pets will duke it out from March 3–10. To vote for your favorite of the two, visit TallahasseeMagazine.com/tally-top-pet. May the best pet win!

P H OTO CO N T E ST

20

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PHOTOS BY ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS: PROSTOCK-STUDIO (BEAUTY) AND COURTESY OF GEM COLLECTION (RING), ESPOSITO GARDEN CENTER (GIFT SHOP) AND INTELLECTUAL RESERVE, INC (DIGITAL EXCLUSIVE)

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has announced that a new temple will be developed at 2440 Papillion Way in Tallahassee on a 4.9-acre site located across from the church’s meetinghouse on Thomasville Road.


Here for the moments that matter most. Here is a place in our heart. Where caring and sharing build relationships that last a lifetime. We’re Synovus, and we see banking as an opportunity to lift our community and the people who live here. 1-888-SYNOVUS synovus.com

Synovus Bank, Member FDIC.

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

21


22

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


323

MAR/APR 2021

PROFILING THE PURSUITS, PASSIONS AND PERSONALITIES AMONG US

THE

PERSONALITY

COLOR HER VIVID ↓

Quia Atkinson’s creations light up faces by ROCHELLE KOFF

→ Quia Z. Atkinson, pictured standing in front of one of her large-scale pieces, began focusing on her artistic talents seven years ago and discovered an ability to bring people joy.

EDUCATION photography by ALEX WORKMAN

Gearing Up for Work

|| CHAMPION

Her Beat Goes On

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

23


THE

323

→ Atkinson’s garage serves as her creative space. Her works present varying levels of abstraction and often involve mixed media.

24

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

photography by ALEX WORKMAN


T

he pandemic has caused slowdowns and shutdowns for so many, particularly those in the arts, but Quia Z. Atkinson has bucked the trend. “It was slow in March and April, but since then it’s been nonstop,” said Atkinson, a Tallahassee artist who specializes in three-dimensional, mixed media paintings and decor. “People are going crazy trying to renovate their homes and do stuff indoors because that’s where they are. They’re painting rooms and overhauling their spaces and that includes buying new art.” But to her fans, Atkinson’s work means more than an addition to their homes. She conveys a spirit as dynamic as the vivid colors and sparkling gems that enliven her paintings. “Her vibrancy, her positive outlook, her artwork itself — the colors and the way they explode off the canvas are what caught my attention,” said Jim Taylor, president and founder of Auto Data Direct in Tallahassee. “She’s such a positive person. Her kindness shows up on her canvases.” Atkinson sold her first painting, titled “Blue Storm,” to Taylor in 2016. And when he was set to retire in September 2020, his employees asked her to create another picture for him. “Just a beautiful piece,” said Taylor. “I love that I’m creating something that makes someone happy just by looking at it,” said Atkinson. “That’s the biggest gift, the biggest takeaway from what I do.” She’s not one to ignore suggestions from her clients, either. “My clients are such an inspiration,” Atkinson said. “I like to bring their ideas to life.” Atkinson’s repertoire includes decorative items like coasters, cheese boards and luxury trays, priced from $60 to a few hundred, as well as paintings that vary in size from minis to large, three-piece installations, ranging from $150 to about $8,000. Aside from her striking hues, Atkinson’s work is known for embellishments like gold leaf, crystals, gems and crushed glass. “Once I found resin, it enabled me to knock it out of the park,” she said. “It added that luxurious look that I love for my work.”

↑ Works on display at Atkinson’s QZ Design Gallery serve to demonstrate her versatility as an artist and her positive outlook and vibrancy as a person.

Atkinson began focusing on her artistic abilities about seven years ago, reviving a love of art that first surfaced when she was a little girl. “I liked to draw things, but I never thought I was talented enough to think of it as a career,” said Atkinson. She started doing sketches of Disney characters as a child, one way she amused herself during travels with her parents, both U.S. Marines, and her two siblings. “I went to 11 different schools from kindergarten to high school,” said Atkinson. “I lived in Pennsylvania three separate times, in three different cities. We’d move every year-and-a-half to three years.” The family resided in several countries, from Rabat, Morocco, to Oslo, Norway, experiencing many cultures as well as life in varied U.S. locations, including Manhattan, Illinois, Virginia and Florida. Her family faced trying times when her younger sister was diagnosed with brain cancer at age 9, while they were living in military housing in Pennsylvania. Atkinson was 13 at the time and her brother was 12. “That pretty much turned everything upside down,” she said. “After surgery, my

sister was paralyzed on her right side. She had to learn to write and walk again.” Her sister, who survived her illness, is “definitely my hero. When I think about complaining, I think about what she went through at 9 years old. I never ever remember her complaining or whining. She was a miracle child, and now she’s a miracle adult.”

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

25


WE ARE HIRING Be the change you want to see Paid academy sponsorship with salary and benefits Hiring bonus up to $11,000

Talgov.com/police

TA L

2020

S E’

SSEE MAGAZ HA IN LA

BEST TA L

of

L A H A SSE

E

Air Conditioning / Heating

Season After Season

Benson’s Is Here For You! 26

March-April May–June 2020 2021TALLAHASSEEMAGA TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM ZINE.COM

BensonsHVAC.com | (850) 562-3132

FL: CMC056269 | GA: CN208982 Financing Available


THE

323

↑ Atkinson’s spirited, fanciful creations range from small to grand in size. She says she finds inspiration in ideas furnished by her clients.

Atkinson and her family moved to Virginia when she was in high school. With a military scholarship, she attended Florida A&M University, where she earned a degree in health care management, and stayed in Tallahassee. “I’ve lived here longer than any other city,” said Atkinson. “It’s home.” When she went out into the job market, she put aside her artistic bent until she began renovating her house. “I painted one canvas,” said Atkinson. “Then I could not stop painting. Painting became this thing I really loved to do. It was an outlet for me.” After selling her first painting to Taylor in 2016, she launched QZ Design Gallery — the Z stands for Zhamer (pronounced Shamere). For now, the artist works in the home she shares with husband Morgan Atkinson, son James, 16, her daughter Camryn, 15, and step-daughter Olivia, 9. Atkinson also teaches art classes in her home, though due to the pandemic, she’s reduced class size to one or two students at a time. Aside from painting and family, she is also passionate about helping others. Atkinson donates art pieces to be auctioned for local fundraisers. And influenced by her parents’ efforts to help orphans in Morocco, she has become an ardent supporter of an orphanage in Jinja, Uganda. “I’m a regular contributor of what they need — if the kids are out of shoes or beans or mosquito nets. I want to visit them one day and lay my eyes on every one.” Closer to home, Atkinson said she has found her niche after years of searching. “I’ve found what I love to do in regard to the media I use and the look I’m going for,” she said. “People now tell me they can recognize my work when they walk into a room. That feels really good.” TM

Capital Periodontal Welcomes

Dr. Will Baldock, Jr. Tallahassee’s Newest Periodontist

“I’m looking forward to serving my hometown as a periodontist and providing modern oral surgical care for my patients.” - Dr. Will Baldock, Jr. (850) 942-8111 | CapitalPerio.com 2621 Mitcham Drive, Suite 101 TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

27


Looking FOR A DOCTOR?

TMH Physician Partners is a community based,

easy by selecting highly qualified physicians, and

multi-specialty provider network available through

staffing our offices with the best available nurses

Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare (TMH), the

to offer you an approachable environment for care

leading hospital in the Big Bend for exceptional

and service.

care, health services and advanced technology. Choosing a doctor is an important decision – the right physician and a capable staff can make a huge difference in your life! We make the task

28

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

TMH PHYSICIAN PARTNERS


Florida State University College of Medicine Internal Medicine Residency Program at Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare Claudia Kroker-Bode, MD, Ingrid Jones-Ince, MD, Raymond J. Shashaty, MD, Susan Manson, MD, Nakeisha Rodgers, MD As a clinic, we measure our success on our ability to focus on each patient as an individual and customize their care based on their needs. At the Internal Medicine Residency Program, we provide both hospital-based and ambulatory care for adult patients. Our area of specialty is the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of adult diseases with a goal of providing excellent care to our patients — both in the hospital and in the clinic.

Tallahassee Memorial Family Medicine Residency Program Ron Machado, MD; Phillip Treadwell, PharmD; Tanya Evers, MD; Gina Hope, MD; Joseph Mazziotta, MD, Klive Forde, MD; Ed Forster, MD; Rick Levy, PhD; Donald Zorn, MD; Michael Allison, MD; Julia Weeks, MD; David Paul Robinson, MD; Russell Cole, MD; B. David Robinson, MD; Gregorie Elie, MD; Maria Andrews, MD

Cortney Whittington, MD

TMH Physician Partners – Primary Care LOCATED AT MAHAN OAKS

Cortney Whittington, MD TMH Physician Partners – Primary Care is accepting patients of all ages, including infants, children, adults and seniors at the Mahan Oaks location.

The Family Medicine Residency Program offers

We provide comprehensive care for illnesses

primary medical care for the entire family with

in addition to physical exams, sports physicals,

specialty services including maternity care/

immunizations, minor surgical procedures, routine

delivery, gynecological procedures, skin surgery,

screenings, disease management and patient

cardiac stress testing, as well as behavioral and

education. We approach healthcare not simply

nutritional interventions. We also provide medical

as the treatment of a particular illness, but with

training for physicians who have chosen the

a focus on prevention, health education and the

specialty of family medicine.

wellbeing of the family as a whole.

To learn more about each practice, visit TMHPhysicianPartners.org. TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

29


PROMOTION

Exploration and Education

I

at the Tallahassee Museum

magine being a bird, taking in the sights of Tallahassee — the tops of majestic oaks, the blue water of Lake Bradford, a settlement of buildings reminiscent of old Florida, the flash of a fox’s tail. While it might not be realistic to gain wings, the Tallahassee Museum can grant you access to all of these sights and more, even from a heightened vantage point. The Tallahassee Museum occupies 52 acres of scenic Tallahassee topography offering three tree-to-tree zipline adventure courses, wildlife exhibits, an aviary, historic buildings, a Jim Gary dinosaur collection, an active farm and more. The museum opened in 1957 honing in on the history, native wildlife and cultures that are unique to the Big Bend region. Whether it’s your first time or 50th, if you’re in grade school, a grandparent or anyone in between, the Tallahassee Museum specializes in creating experiences that cater to the endless wonders that nature and history present by providing educational opportunities for children, students, adults and seniors.

“The property is relaxing and restorative because you’re surrounded by nature, which helps you to slow down and take in the beauty of it all,” said Katherine Ashler, vice president of philanthropy at the Tallahassee Museum. “Our hope is that when visitors come, they find a new way to not only connect with nature and history, but also with those in their community. By providing our visitors with the knowledge of and appreciation for our natural environment and history, we hope they will be better equipped to address the challenges they face today and tomorrow.” With social distancing and masks in tow, guests can enjoy fresh air, whether they’re walking the paths and boardwalks to view bears, wolves, deer and other Florida wildlife, or they’re taking to the trees on one of the three Tree to Tree Adventures zipline courses. Two new wildlife additions in March 2021 include the three African civets — part of the guest animal program — and a newly constructed aviary that replaces

and updates the one destroyed by Hurricane Michael. The animal action continues at the Big Bend farm, which has authentic 1880s farm buildings with a bevy of farm animals. The farm also allows a glimpse into rural industries, such as turpentining, blacksmithing, milling and syrup-making. Continue with your journey to a bygone era by viewing Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church, the Seaboard Airline Caboose, the Concord Schoolhouse and the Bellevue House, where Catherine Murat, George Washington’s grandniece, once lived. “We can still keep the core essence of the history of this region, but we also need to keep innovating and reinterpreting stories as times and perspectives change,” said Ashler. “We need to tell the truth of the narrative and adapt.” To accomplish continued education of Florida’s past and to enhance its present, guests can become members of the museum, which not only grants them special discounts, such as free admission, but also allows them to become partners in the success of this nonprofit museum. The Tallahassee Museum provides a bird’s eye view of the region’s history while encouraging continued education that will help us soar into the future.

TA L L A H A S S E E M U S E U M 3 9 4 5 M U S E U M R O A D, TA L L A H A S S E E | ( 8 5 0 ) 5 7 5 - 8 6 8 4 | TA L L A H A S S E E M U S E U M .O R G

30

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


Meet The Nova Group Realty Trust, Experience, Results.

Nick Renaud CEO/Owner

Amber Renaud Broker/Owner

(850) 570-8242

Amber@tngrealty.com

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

31


THE

323

↑ Brown demonstrates a simulator that provides commercial driving program students with valuable virtual experience before they take the real wheel.

So, in 2016, TCC leadership went to the Florida Legislature seeking ← multi-year funding to get its new Instructor James commercial driving venture off Brown and Jessica the ground. It came away with Griffin, director of TCC’s annual vehicle only a year’s worth. driving program, That, however, turned out are dwarfed by a big not to matter much. rig that serves as a rolling classroom. After just a year of training and churning out new truck drivers, it was clear that TCC had a winner on its hands. Four years later, the TCC Commercial Vehicle Driving Career and Technical Certification program has spring-boarded dozens of new drivers — about eight to 10 in each eight-week, 320-hour course — EDUCATION onto highways across the country. It’s one of a few dozen professional certifications that TCC offers. “We provide that pathway,” said Kimberly Moore, TCC’s vice president for workforce innovation. “The whole idea of getting someone at the onset of by TIM LINAFELT eight weeks, and then eight weeks later they have a career? Where else can you allahassee Community College’s schools closest to Tallahassee located in do that?” commercial vehicle driving program Chipley and Jacksonville. But don’t confuse “quick” with “easy.” was born of a great idea that came Planting a new truck-driving The program’s director, Jessica Griffin, about the way great ideas often do. program at TCC only made sense. and instructor James Brown have created Out of necessity. The college caters to thousands across a demanding, rigorous curriculum based With online shopping and coast-tothe region, and although its two-year on input and standards from other coast trade more popular than ever, the degree guaranteeing admission to state commercial driving school and industry last few years have seen an unprecedented universities is still a major calling card, leaders, as well as the state Department demand for commercial truck drivers — it has also recently focused efforts on of Transportation and the Department and far too few drivers to fill those roles. workforce development and connecting of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, North Florida and South Georgia people who want to work with the skills and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety were particularly underserved, with the and certifications that lead to careers. Administration.

GEARING UP FOR WORK At TCC, trucking program is on a roll

T 32

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS


Setting the Standard for Beautiful Smiles. Experience the transformation with a smile designed by Dr. Thomas Oppenheim.

“People compliment me. I’m more self confident. It’s worked wonders in my life!”

Before

After

e

William, actual patient of Dr. Oppenheim.

207 East Jackson Street, Thomasville, GA 31792

CALL: (229) 226-1631

WWW.SIGNATURESMILES.COM TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

33


THE

323

Each student learns the extensive pretrip inspection process, navigates the challenges of backing their rig through tight spaces, and hits the road for hours of driving in city traffic, on rural back roads and high-speed freeways. By the time they’re finished, students will have logged at least 1,000 miles behind the wheel. “We spend the whole day in the truck,” said Brown, noting that students also get a few days of warehouse training. “Our goal always is getting them comfortable with the truck. The more comfortable you are, the more proficient you’ll be.” That part takes time, too. “They have the jitterbugs getting into the truck,” Brown said with a laugh. Those nerves typically fade before long. And in less than half the length of a traditional college semester, students are on their way to new jobs. And, in some cases, new lives. The program has helped several students overcome difficult circumstances — some returning to society after incarceration, some homeless and some just down on their luck. When they enroll in TCC’s commercial driving program, they not only find

BUT FIRST 34

March-April 2021

practical instruction and certifications. They also find friends and mentors. “When you tell us what your goals are, we hold you accountable to that,” Griffin said. “We’re there to assist them, we’re there to support them. We’re there to see them through. We work hard to not let them give up.” Added Brown: “It sounds weird but it’s just true — I love to see when the students come back through the door when they’ve completed our course. The new cars that you can see pull up in the parking lot. Or when they tell you the story of how they bought their first home.” Demand for truck drivers shows no signs of slowing down, and with millions pursuing new work in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, neither does demand for driving education. Those within TCC’s program believe that the industry will continue to evolve and fill its ranks with people not traditionally associated with big rigs — the profession is employing growing numbers of minorities and women. “I’ve always thought of it as a ‘male’ industry,” said Griffin, who started her career in information technology

↑ By the time they complete TCC’s commercial vehicle driving program, students log more than 1,000 miles at the wheel of an 18-wheel tractor-trailer rig.

before becoming what Moore called the “architect” of the TCC program. “I had a vision of what a truck driver looked like,” Griffin said. “I’d ridden in trucks prior to now, but I never considered females in the industry or anything of that nature. But since starting this program, it’s really shined a brighter light. There is a shortage of truck drivers, and they feel like women — and I love this part — are the solution to the problem.” Much like TCC’s commercial driving program is a solution to people in need of a career path. “I think of all the work we do in workforce development as opening a door or creating a ‘comma,’” Moore said. “Because a lot of people have been a ‘period, period, period.’ “This provides a pathway and a launching pad for so many other things.” TM

Students seeking admission to the commercial driving program must have at least a standard high school diploma or GED; be at least 18 years of age; provide a seven-year driving history free of major traffic violations; and pass a Department of Transportation physical exam and drug test. TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS


The Tallahassee Community College Heroes in Public Safety Program is proud to honor individuals who have made a significant impact in the public safety sector and who are graduates of one or more of the many public safety programs offered at TCC. Congratulations to the 2021 TCC Heroes in Public Safety Program Honorees: Lifetime Achievement

Hall of Fame

Chris Connell Merit Award

Thomas Coe Retired Chief, Tallahassee Police Department

Robert Boissiere

Rico Cooper

Retired, Leon County EMS

Chief Probation Officer, Department of Juvenile Justice

Brent Coughlin

Sally Davis

Retired, Leon County Sherriff’s Office

Major, Leon County EMS

Britton Corbin

E. E. Eunice

Dixie Fosler

Executive Director, Florida Public Safety Institute, TCC

Asst. Secretary for Detention Services, Florida Department of Juvenile Justice

Law Enforcement Officer, Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission

Leon Gill, Jr.

Michael Terhune

Florida Highway Patrol

Lieutenant, Tallahassee Fire Department

Timothy Niermann Deputy Secretary, Florida Department of Juvenile Justice Jennifer Cook Pritt Assistant Commissioner, Florida Department of Law Enforcement

Chad Davis CIOOS Squad Officer, Tallahassee Police Officer

John R. Schilling Trooper, Florida Highway Patrol

George Smyrnios

Trooper, Florida Highway Patrol *Awarded Posthumously

Thomas Quillin Retired Chief, Leon County EMS Michael Randolph* Interim Chief of Training, Tallahassee Fire Department

Nominations are open for the 2022 class of honorees: TCC.FL.EDU/TCCSAFETYHEROES TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

35


THE

323

CHAMPION

Her Beat Goes On Following cardiac arrest, Brittany Williams becomes CPR advocate by RILEY O’BRYANT

36

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

cardiac arrest. She was diagnosed with Long QT syndrome, a rare condition causing an electrical malfunction of the heart, and received an implantable defibrillator designed to save her in the case of another episode. Brittany was 24 years old and, prior to this incident, in perfect health. She ran nearly five miles a day, ate a healthy diet and, as she puts it, did “everything in life that you’re told you’re supposed to do to stay healthy.”

↑ Brittany Williams was 24 when she suffered a cardiac arrest brought on by a rare condition known as Long QT Syndrome. Bystanders and paramedics combined to save her life.

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WILLIAMS FAMILY (HOSPITAL)

L

ike many Tallahassee residents, Brittany Williams settled in to watch Florida State football play Georgia Tech in the ACC Championship Game on Dec. 6, 2014. She and her family were vacationing in New York City, where they managed to find a table at a bustling sports bar near Times Square. Brittany, however, never saw one televised play. “No sooner do we sit down,” Brittany’s mother, Vicki, recalled, “than I look over at her, and it looks like she’s having a seizure.” Her family sought help from other patrons of the bar. Two young men came to Brittany’s aid. They laid her on the floor. “All I could hear them say was ‘no pulse,’” Vicki said. The men, both optometry residents who did not know each other previously, began to perform CPR. Meanwhile, bystanders searched for an automated external defibrillator (AED). Neither the bar, nor any nearby establishment, had one. CPR kept oxygen flowing to Brittany’s brain until paramedics arrived with an AED. “CPR saved her life, literally,” Vicki said. Paramedics rushed Brittany to Mt. Sinai Hospital. There, she and her family discovered that she had suffered sudden


Thank you to those who helped make the 2020 Capital Medical Society Foundation Virtual Holiday Auction a success!

Over $ 65,000 was raised in support of the CMSF mission “to support the charitable efforts of physicians and others, increase access to healthcare, promote education, and serve the community’s health needs through innovative projects that are exemplary, affordable and dignified.”

Title Sponsor

Presenting Sponsors

Supporting Sponsors Yvonne and Steve Brown Carroll and Company, CPAs Dermatology Associates of Tallahassee Dr. and Mrs. H. Avon Doll Grossman, Furlow & Bayó, LLC Henry Buchanan, P.A.

KWB Pathology Associates Barbara B. Leadbeater, D.M.D., PL MagMutual Insurance Company John and Barbara Mahoney in honor of the Tallahassee Sette of Odd Volumes Radiology Associates of Tallahassee Southern Medical Group

SYNOVUS Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic Tallahassee Primary Care Associates TMH Federal Credit Union TMH Physician Partners - Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Specialists Vascular Surgery Associates

Event Sponsors Acentria Advanced Urology Institute, LLC Anonymous in honor of Avon & Louie Doll Bastien Dental Care Bean Team Big Bend Hospice Capital City Bank Capital Medical Society Alliance

Capital Periodontal Associates, P.A. Capital Regional Surgical Associates Digestive Disease Clinic Elder Care Services, Inc. Encompass Health Rehabilitation Hospital of Tallahassee Eye Associates of Tallahassee FMI Printing & Distribution Gynecology & Obstetrics Associates of Tallahassee

Hancock Whitney Rohan Joseph and Elizabeth Medley Nancy Loeffler, M.D. NAI TALCOR North Florida Women’s Care Northwestern Mutual-The Gantt Financial Group Southern Vitreoretinal Associates Thomas Howell Ferguson, P.A., CPAs

In-Kind Sponsor Gandy Printers

Individual Sponsors Jonathan Appelbaum and William Morowski Paul Arons, M.D. Dr. and Mrs. Efren Baltazar Tim Bolek and Rene Craig Jana Bures-Forsthoefel, M.D. and Michael Forsthoefel, M.D. Walter and Marybeth Colón Charles Cooper, M.D. Brittney K. Craig, D.M.D. Dr. Elizabeth Dickens Karen Wendland Dix

Bill and Caryl Donnellan Dr. and Mrs. Jerry Ford Paula and Tim Fortunas Stanley Gwock, M.D. Jerry Harris, M.D. Dr. Tracey E. Hellgren Dr. David and Dottie Jones Dr. Arjun Kaji and Diane Kaji Sarah Ko and Joseph Farenden Amulya Konda, M.D.

Joel Kramer, M.D. Albert and Tiffany Lee Dr. Alma and Mr. Gentle Littles Maribel U. Lockwood, M.D. Dr. and Mrs. Charles Long Terence P. McCoy, M.D. Laura McManama David and Janet Miles Michelle Miller, M.D. Faisal and Nola Munasifi

Jitendra and Kokila Padalia Manu and Nila Padalia Terence and Marilyn Reisman Temple O. Robinson, M.D. Dr. Raleigh and Gloria Rollins Steve and Teresa Sarbeck W. Paul and Jonette Sawyer Philip and Karen Sharp Wende and Brian Sheedy Dr. David and Kathleen Smith

Dave and Gillian Stewart Frank and Lynn Walker Dean and Nicole Watson Dr. and Mrs. Tony Weaver Dr. and Mrs. Charles D. Williams Drs. Dennis and Barbara Williams Don and Taska Zorn

Item Donors AAA Auto Club Group Allergy & Asthma Diagnostic Treatment Center – Ron Saff, M.D. Anonymous Mrs. Emerlinda Baltazar Betsy Barfield Photography Bond Community Health Center, Inc. Yvonne T. Brown Olga Burroughs Canopy Road Café Capital Medical Society Foundation Capital Regional Medical Center Chicken Salad Chick Coton Colors Dermatology Associates of Tallahassee Dermatology Specialists of Florida/Aqua Medical Spa Diane’s 2202 a Salon Eye Associates of Tallahassee, P.A. From the Collection of Thomas L. Hicks, M.D. & Robert Stuart

FSU College of Medicine FSU BehavioralHealth FSU PrimaryHealth FSU SeniorHealth Glory Days Grill Healthy Solutions Anne Hempel Charles J. Holland, M.D. Pam Irwin J. Alan Cox Law Office Dr. David and Mrs. Dottie Jones Dr. Dan and Mrs. Rita Kaelin Dr. and Mrs. John N. Katopodis Killearn County Club KWB Pathology Associates Peter Loeb, M.D. and Cecilia Drew Loeb Dr. and Mrs. John Mahoney Charles F. Manning, Jr., M.D.

Mathnasium of Tallahassee E. Lynn McLarty, D.D.S. Cynara Miller Michelle Miller, M.D. Native Nurseries North Florida Women’s Care PRP Wine International Publix Radiology Associates of Tallahassee Seymour Rosen, M.D. Steve Sarbeck, M.D. Frank and Karen Skilling David and Kathleen Smith SoDOUGH Baking Company Sonny’s Real Pit Bar-B-Q James Stockwell, M.D. Strauss Gallery Tallahassee Ear, Nose & Throat-Head & Neck Surgery, P.A.

Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare Tallahassee Nurseries Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic Tallahassee Plastic Surgery Clinic – Skin Care Clinic Tallahassee Primary Care Associates The Gem Collection – Don and Dorothy Vodicka The Prepared Table Tires Plus Vascular Surgery Associates Frank Walker, M.D. Tony and Tanya Weaver Wild Birds Unlimited Nature Shop Dr. and Mrs. Charles Williams Judith Wills Jeanie Wood Dr. Richard and Mrs. Kathy Zorn

1204 Miccosukee Road, Tallahassee, FL 32308 • (850) 877-9018 • capmed.org TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

37


THE

323

She sees her story as a cautionary tale, one that highlights both the need for every individual to take their heart health seriously and the life-saving importance of knowing CPR. In the years following her cardiac arrest, Brittany has taken advantage of every opportunity to share that message.

Reunited with heroes A few months after coming home from New York, Brittany received a call from the Fire Department of New York (FDNY). They invited her and her family on an all-expenses-paid trip to FDNY’s annual Second Chance Celebration, where Brittany got to meet the paramedics and the two optometry residents who saved her. “It was really heartwarming just to be able to hug them and thank them. I did not want to let go,” Brittany said. Not long after, the American Heart

38

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Association of Tallahassee became aware of her story, reached out and invited her to be the honoree of that year’s Heart Ball. “After that,” Vicki said, “things just started snowballing.” Advocacy work is a big part of Brittany’s life. She frequently spoke at the invitation of the American Heart Association (AHA) of Tallahassee for years before moving to St. Petersburg, where she does the same for the Tampaarea AHA. She has been a guest at Fox and Friends, WCTV, a Times Square AHA event and a medical conference for a company whose device was used on her during surgery. Occasionally, Brittany gets nervous in front of a group. “Some days,” she kidded, “my heart’s racing so fast that I’m like — wow, I might shock myself.” But she has innate confidence. “It’s my story. It’s me. Once I get the first

one or two sentences out, it just comes so naturally,” she said. Brittany encourages people to listen to their bodies. She experienced symptoms a few days prior to her own cardiac event. She was working one of her two jobs when the left side of her body went numb and tingly. She typed her symptoms into a search bar and found that they were consistent with stroke, heart attack and cardiac arrest. “I sat back and said, ‘There’s no way. I’m so young.’ Three days later, I was lying on the ground with no pulse.” To illustrate the importance of CPR, Brittany tells a story about someone she spoke to who completed a required CPR training one morning at work, then saved someone who collapsed at Publix a few hours later. “I got chills,” she said. And, of course, she has her own story. Her mother, Vicki, puts it in simple terms: “My daughter is here today because someone knew CPR. It only takes a few minutes.” As for the future, Brittany plans to stay on message. “It’s been six years, and I’m just going to continue sharing this story on and on and on.” TM photography by SAIGE ROBERTS

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WILLIAMS FAMILY (FIREFIGHTERS & #KEEPTHEBEAT)

← Brittany, at far left, stands with Nick Farber, who performed CPR on her in New York City and now lives in Tallahassee. During a visit to New York, Brittany renewed acquaintances with firefighters and was a featured speaker at a Keep the Beat event.


LTHE O W V ISAME SION OR BLIND? GREAT Programs for every age. Learn solutions & strategies for PEOP L E Ilife V Aindependently. LUES I SERVICES I SMILES I MISSION living your

3071 850-942-3658 |l SeeingIndependence.org SeeingIndependence.org 3017 Highland Highland Oaks Terrace l| Tallahassee, FL 32301 l| 850-942-3658 Tallahassee Mag ad.indd 1

7/14/19 5:51 PM

Richard J-P Bastien, DMD Lauren A. Weir, DMD W. Harrison Miller, DMD

GIVING TALLAHASSEE A REASON TO SMILE! Family & Cosmetic Dentistry

Quality Classic Unique Jewelry Since 1995 Betton Place 1950- Thomasville Road (850) 422-1373 Above Food Glorious Food Wednesday - Friday 10-6 Saturday 10-4 RobertsJewelry.net

Bastiendentalcare.com 1433 Piedmont Dr. East, Tallahassee, FL • (850)-425-1300 TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

39


PROMOTION

H

Canna Crusade Wellness

ealth is community wealth, and Andrea Anderson, owner and founder of Canna Crusade Wellness, aims to bring the best possible options to Tallahassee. Canna Crusade Wellness offers medical cannabis recommendations for all ages, with a unique focus on pediatric care. As a result of personal experiences and years of industry knowledge, Anderson sought to educate her community on the benefits of cannabis therapy by putting scientific research and education at the forefront, setting this cannabis clinic apart. “While it is decreasing, there is still a stigma attached to cannabis use, and my purpose is to present education based on scientific data and research,” said Anderson. Anderson works to bridge the education gap between doctors and patients by initially connecting them and then continuing to promote the multitude of benefits that come from medical cannabis.

Those interested in cannabis therapy must first schedule an appointment with an on-staff, state-certified physician. The physicians assess each patient’s history and symptoms to determine if they have qualifying conditions. Once the patient has received the physician’s approval, Anderson and her staff will help the patient apply for their medical card through the Florida Department of Health. Treatment plans and product option discussions takes place immediately after seeing the physician. Anderson works with each patient to determine what options are best for them, whether it is an adult with a terminal illness, a teenager experiencing anxiety or a child with autism. Each consultation revolves around current, scientific findings and is tailored to your specific needs and intended outcomes. Anderson’s background includes working in dispensaries, being a medical cannabis ambassador for a Florida cannabis brand and doing consulting work for cannabis support nonprofits.

A few years ago, Anderson was able to take her son off of ADHD medicines and switch to cannabis therapy. Inspired by her son, she is in the process of creating Crusader Kids, a nonprofit that provides financial assistance and education to those on their cannabis journey.

ANDREA ANDERSON, FOUNDER

CANNA CRUSADE WELLNESS 1350 MARKET ST., SUITE 202 | (850) 655-0141 | CANNACRUSADEWELLNESS.COM

40

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


D HAIR

SALON

FLAGSHIP (Salon): 1435 E. Lafayette St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 • 850-681-6681 MARKET DISTRICT (Salon+Spa): 1410 - C6 Market St. • Tallahassee, FL 32312 • 850-727-0482

www.Soleil7.com

THE ART AND SCIENCE OF PURE FLOWER AND PLANT ESSENCES

Tallahassee’s Best Gift Boutique for over 35 Years Specializing in gifts for the Home, Body and Family. Personal services in Bridal Registry, Stationery & Invitations. (850) 681-2824 | (800) 983-2266 1410 Market St, C3 | ShopMFT.com Follow us @shopmft

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

41


42

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


panache MAR/APR 2021

REGARDING MATTERS OF ALL THINGS STYLISH

David Lowery’s tie-dye creation suggests a summer sky. While the term “tie-dye” was coined in the 1960s, the technique it describes has been around since fifth-century China.

FASHION

TO DYE FOR

DIYers crafts shirts of many colors by STEVE BORNHOFT

↓ FASHION Putt for Dough, Dress for Show || WHAT’S IN STORE Retail Roundup photography by LINDSEY MASTERSON

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

43


panache

Once, tie-dyeing shirts was simple, and there was no right and wrong Had I somehow as a kid independently arrived at the spiral tie-dye technique that yields a pattern not unlike that which is disclosed when a chambered nautilus is cross-sectioned, I would for some days have been the grooviest kid in the neighborhood. The technique is simple, really, like so many things once revealed. Pinch a moistened T-shirt and twist it into a swirl. Apply rubber bands to the shirt to keep it from unfurling and to define pie-slice shaped pieces of the whole. Dyes of various bold colors are then applied to the wedges. A few hours later, the dye now processed, the shirt may be unwrapped, revealing a pattern like something you might find at the end of a kaleidoscope. My childhood approach to tie-dye, however, was the basic one and random. Along with a boy named Brad, who died young, and one whose last name, Stone, was just a letter short of perfect for him, I would tightly wrap rubber bands around portions of T-shirts to create spaces that the dye would not penetrate. The shirts were then bathed in a dye solution. Among the resulting designs, it was not possible to call one any better than the next.

44

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

In coloring the shirts, we were not trying to emulate anyone. We were not trying to be more like Jerry or to arrive at emblems of a counterculture. Rather, we dyed shirts because it was something to do and easy to do, the very same motivations that attach to people who, upon growing tired of feeding sourdough starter, sought to tie-dye their way through the pandemic. TM

↑ Mary Madsen’s tie-dye shirt of subdued hues appropriately reflects life in a subtropical state where citrus grows.

photography by LINDSEY MASTERSON


DIY Tie-Dye WHAT YOU'LL NEED: ➺ Tie-dye kit or dye ➺ Gloves ➺ Metal bowl and grate (to catch excess dye) ➺ Rubber bands ➺ Fork ➺ Plastic Bags ➺ Disposable table cloth or newspaper (to protect surfaces)

1 Lay your fabric down flat and place your fork in the center and twist. 2 Make sure the fabric is

in a tight circle and secured with a rubber band.

3 Evenly space 3–5 rubber bands onto the fabric. 4 Choose 3–5 dyes.

Dampen fabric with water so dye sticks. Saturate the fabric with dyes of your choosing. Place in plastic bag, and let it sit 8 hours or overnight for more vibrant patterns.

1

2

3

4

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

45


panache

TRENDS

PUTT FOR DOUGH, DRESS FOR SHOW Bright colors are invading golf fashion by HANNAH BURKE

46

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

T

eeing up at the final hole of the 2020 Master’s Tournament with a five-shot lead, Dustin Johnson, clad in fitted navy Adidas performance wear, looked as sure as his short game. Johnson’s style, he said in a recent interview with Golf Digest Magazine, can be the difference between a good day and bad day on the links. Clashing colors make him “feel all messed up” and unable to focus on his game. A scuffed shoe is unacceptable. “Black, white, grey, blue — that’s about the extent of the color palette in my closet,” Johnson said. “I’ll wear a little bit of color every once in a while, but I always have to match.” Though his new Masters green jacket will offer a welcome pop to his wardrobe, Johnson’s penchant for the monochromatic has long been consistent

with much of the apparel available at your local pro shop. But with the new year comes a new wave of tee time trends. “What used to be a conservative game with conservative apparel in solids and stripes has changed into one with more colorful prints and whacky designs,” said Jason Bench, general manager of Capital City Country Club. “Apparel has become way more vibrant. Things we would buy as a draw-in piece for a line we’re trying to sell is all people want now.” Still, golfers should be mindful that “a little goes a long way.” Think Tiger Woods’ signature red Nike polo, which the golfer typically pairs with a solid black pant, cap and shoes. All-over print polos and sweaters, no matter their hue, can be dressed down with traditional khaki, grey and black neutrals for a modern, sophisticated look.

PHOTO BY REUTERS / ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

Consistent shotmaking may be the biggest key to successful golf. Consistent also describes the oncourse wardrobe of 2020 Masters tournament champion Dustin Johnson, who doesn’t stray from black, white, gray and blue.


One banker. One call. Solutions for all your financial needs. With more than two decades of banking experience, Accredited Wealth Management Advisor® Melissa Wright is a highly skilled private banker who assists high-net-worth clients with their everyday financial needs and plans for meeting their future goals. Melissa is committed to a one banker, one call level of service to simplify managing finances and to provide custom solutions that meet the demands of personal wealth and business. Call Melissa today: 850.402.7731

Melissa Wright Private Banker

Serving Leon County ccbg.com

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

47


panache

↑ Tonal Heather women’s shortsleeve polo features Opti-Dri stretch and cooling technology. At right, TrueScript postcard print skirt by Callaway blends retro aesthetic with the latest performance construction.

48

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

and women, as they allow for the easy adjustment of air circulation throughout the game. Puma, Travis Matthew and FootJoy apparel, Raymer said, are among Edwin Watts’ best-selling brands and incorporate the latest active-wear technology in their apparel. Bench also counts FootJoy among his favorite suppliers at the Capital City Country Club Pro Shop. In recent years, golf shoes have taken on the sporty, comfortable feel of running shoes. The FootJoy Flex shoe, for example, is lightweight, supportive and wearable both on and off the course. Not limited by the multi-year deal that Johnson has with Adidas, we do have the freedom to mix and match brands that best suit our body and play. Find which lines work for you, and don’t worry about committing any fashion fouls with clashing logos. “Younger brands such as johnnie-O offer a tighter, more athletic fit and are more fashion-forward,” said Bench. “But Clutter and Buck styles come with a larger fit to the shoulder, cater to different body types and are more of a classic design.”

Raymer advises those new to the game simply to find their style through experimentation. “Come in and try stuff on to find what’s most comfortable for you. You’ve got to look good to play good.” TM

↑ Men’s all-over chev grid polo is made with high-gauge recycled polyester blend fabric and Swing Tech construction designed to maximize comfort and keep scores low.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CALLAWAY

At Edwin Watts in Tallahassee, store manager J.P. Raymer, too, has seen a surge in flamboyant designs. “We’re selling anything from floral and geometric patterns to conversation pieces. Prints such as mini golf clubs and other designs have become more widely accepted,” Raymer said. So, while the loud patterns of argyle sweater vests and tweed knickerbockers may be making a comeback, heavy fabrics and knitted creations are not. “I don’t think I’ve bought a cotton shirt to sell in about six years,” said Bench. “Nearly all of our apparel is a tech fabric. A lot of people like a performance blend that is 95 percent polyester and spandex and 5 percent cotton. You want a material that keeps you cool and dry.” Performance fabric has even made its way to shorts, skirts and pants. Stretchy, sweat-wicking material provides easy ventilation, while sticky, silicone-lined waistbands keep shirts tucked in and secure through even the most powerful tee shots. There has also been significant demand for zipper-fronted tops for both men


TO FIND THE RIGHT REALTOR, JUST LOOK FOR A SIGN TA L

2020

S E’

SSEE MAGAZ HA IN LA

BEST TA L

of

L A H A SSE

E

2015-2020

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

49


PROMOTION

Building Blocks FOR GROWN UP GIRLS! Remember playing with blocks or stacking toys when you were a kid? Maybe you built wonderful things to capture the imagination, like houses or castles. Now we grown-up girls play a little differently — we build wardrobes of clothing and jewelry. Here are some beautiful pieces that have enough personality to wear on their own, but when stacked with others, can build a multi-piece wardrobe that changes each time you add or subtract a piece. Once you have your basics down, you can build a great look for every occasion simply by mixing and matching your stackable jewels. All items featured are available at The Gem Collection or GemCollection.com … so come on and let’s play!

1

3 5

2 4

50

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


PROMOTION

1. SAPPHIRE AND DIAMOND BAND BY BEVERLY K 14-karat

white gold with 1.00-carat sapphires and 0.34-carat diamonds $2,490

2. ROUND TANZANITE AND

DIAMOND EARRINGS 14-karat white gold with 1.97-carat tanzanites and 0.29-carat diamonds $775

7

3. 18KW “ROUND ORBITS”

DANGLE EARRINGS with 4.30-carat of diamonds $9,850

6

4. DIAMOND ACCENT BAND BY BEVERLY K 14-karat white

gold $590

5. THINNER SAPPHIRE AND DIAMOND BAND BY BEVERLY K 14-karat white gold with 0.71-carat sapphires and 0.19-carat diamonds $1,490

6. ANNA BECK GOLD MINI BAR NECKLACE Vermeil/ sterling silver dotted textured center and wired-trim reversible mini bar necklace 16–18” by Anna Beck $125

7. ANNA BECK GOLD

VERMEIL CHAIN Gold vermeil/ sterling silver long turquoise multidisc station necklace $495

8. ANNA BECK SHORT

GOLD VERMEIL TEARDROP NECKLACE Gold vermeil/sterling

9

9. ANNA BECK NECKLACE GOLD VERMEIL/STERLING SILVER Dotted textured center and wired-trim reversible adjustable necklace by Anna Beck; adjustable length 16–18” $185

8

GO

silver dotted textured center and wired-trim reversible teardrop necklace by Anna Beck $295

➺ The Gem Collection 3501 Thomasville Road | (850) 893-4171 | GemCollection.com

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

51


panache Rebels’ Midtown Boutique ➸ This spring, feminine and masculine merge and business meets casual. This trend is seen in boxy blazers, pleated shorts, big belts and bold buttons paired with crop tops, dainty jewelry, and light and cool colors. This dusty lavender BOYFRIEND BLAZER paired with matching PLEATED SHORTS and cream CROP BRAMI is a look that is becoming a springtime staple. It possesses the power of a suit with the fun, flirty feeling that spring always brings about.

The Hare & The Hart

↓ What’s In Store?

A roundup of retail happenings throughout Tallahassee by REBECCA PADGETT

Elevate your Easter tablescape with the new Easter collection from Coton Colors. Gentle curves of the signature ruffle edges along with the speckle pattern and hand-drawn rabbit pattern create playful yet elegant looks. The Easter collection includes a variety of plates, bowls, and cups and can be easily paired with your own table settings or other Coton Colors, pieces. This whimsical tableware will likely become a cherished holiday heirloom.

PASTELS WITH POP Gypsy Rose Boutique predicts that PASTELS will be present all spring and summer. Sunshine and daffodil

yellows, lilac and lavender, and fuchsia and blush are fiercely feminine hues that will make everyday wear pop this spring.

52

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

➸ Jewelry is one of the best wardrobe investments, especially when it tells a story. ASHLEY OGDEN OF SHORELINE ANGEL creates beautiful artisan jewelry handcrafted from sea glass and pottery that she collects from the east coast of Scotland and England. Each piece is one of a kind with its own story likely dating back hundreds of years. Whether they were once part of a Victorian dining experience or a bottle of fine perfume, each piece has been transformed into an exclusive work of wearable art. ➸ Invest in the skin you’re in with products that are proven to withstand the test of time. SAVON DE MARSEILLE FRENCH SOAP has been trusted for generations to cleanse everything from linens to little faces. Its purity and moisturizing properties make it ideal for all skin types. Dermatologists especially recommend it for use on dry skin. Savon de Marseille has been made the same way since 1688 and is stamped with its weight in grams — a practice left over from years ago which allowed households to compare prices and plan their inventories. Savon de Marseille is biodegradable, requires little packaging and its manufacturer is environmentally friendly.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF COTON COLORS (TABLEWARE), REBELS’ MIDTOWN BOUTIQUE (BLAZER), THE HARE & THE HART (RING AND SOAP)

➸ If you’re looking to revive your favorite furniture, consider a fresh coat of paint. FUSION MINERAL PAINT is a professional paint for the everyday DIYer and is applicable to furniture, floors, front doors and more. With exceptional ease of application, minimal prep, zero VOC (non-toxic) formulation, high hiding coverage and a built-in topcoat, it’s easy to add a pop of color to any project. The paints are available in over 50 stunning shades at The Hare & The Hart’s store and online.


Locally Owned & Operated

Serving Tallahassee for Over 40 Years

Lawson & Lawson Electrical Services, Inc.

850-562-4111

850-75ALARM

EC13002050 • EC13002151 • EN213938

FL #EC13004698 • GA #EN213938

FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL & SECURITY NEEDS

Your Patient-Centered Medical Home Thank you to the many families who allow us to participate in the lives of their precious children. The honor you have bestowed upon us is overwhelming.

SSEE MAGAZ HA IN LA

2020

S E’

SHOP.JLYNNSBOUTIQUECONSIGN.COM 2887 KERRY FOREST PARKWAY, SUITE 4 | NEXT TO STARBUCKS (850) 765-0342 | JLYNNSBOUTIQUECONSIGN.COM

TA L

Shop online

BEST TA L

of

L A H A SSE

E

NorthFloridaPeds.com (850) 877-1162 3606 Maclay Boulevard, Ste. 102

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

53


panache

TALLAHASSEE’S BEST CHOICE IN ACTIVE SENIOR LIVING Discover an active lifestyle emphasizing wellbeing and lifelong learning among 90 wooded acres in Tallahassee when you choose Westminster Oaks. Enjoy maintenance-free living with stellar services at your fingertips like flexible dining options, housekeeping, 24-hour security and so much more. Our community features a wide variety of spacious choices in villa homes and garden apartments with park, forest and garden views. No matter what choice you make, you’ll fall in love with maintenance-free living and the assurance of a full continuum of care, including assisted living, nursing care, therapy and rehabilitation, if it should be needed.

Call (877) 311-8316 today to learn more.

www.WestminsterOaksFL.org

4449 Meandering Way, Tallahassee, FL

ACTIVE LIVING | ASSISTED LIVING | SKILLED NURSING | REHABILITATION 54

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


gastro&gusto MAR/APR 2021

FROM THE SIMPLY IRRESISTIBLE TO THE PIECE DE RESISTANCE

DINING OUT

opening eyes

BEERS AT DAWN-THIRTY Breakfast brews are BY THOMAS J. MONIGAN

DINING OUT photography by ALEX WORKMAN

Foodie of Influence

|| DINING IN

Fellowship Fare TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

55


gastro & gusto

Luke Pinter dramatically adds syrup to a breakfast of chicken and waffles at Madison Social. He is prepared to wash it down with a “Biergarita,” made with tequila, orange juice, lime juice and Shock Top beer.

S

heryl Crow, in her 1994 hit, “All I Wanna Do” — recall I like a good beer buzz early in the morning / And Billy likes to peel the labels from his bottles of Bud — may have unwittingly anticipated a trend. Not so long ago, chugging suds for breakfast usually resulted from staying up all night drinking with friends. Today, not necessarily. Throughout North Florida, from Tallahassee to Pensacola, imbibers are quaffing cold ones with the sun in the east. Area breweries are adding breakfast beers to their menus of craft creations, sometimes on a seasonal basis.

56

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Here’s a sampler. Bryan Smith of Proof Brewing Co., which became Tallahassee’s first craft production brewery in 2012, described their version of what has become the popular “beermosa.” Its main ingredient is the Strawberry Lemonade Evil Kiss, a fruited Berliner Weisse (alcohol by volume, 4.5%) “that has the tartness of lemonade with a touch of fresh strawberry sweetness.” The rest of the recipe: “Use two-thirds beer and one-third orange juice or your favorite juice. You can add a splash of champagne to kick it up a notch or add a dash of bitters for balance.”

Elsewhere in Tallahassee, Mike Raynor Jr. of Mike’s Liquor & Beer favors Founders Breakfast Stout (8.3% ABV). “It has notes of oats, chocolate and two different types of coffee,” Raynor said. “It’s the perfect flavor portfolio for any time of a day. It is also infused with nitrogen to give it a smooth creamy finish. It has the distinct ability to pair well with desserts, especially ice cream. I will offer a warning, though, that it tastes so smooth and full that the drinker may forget it even has alcohol in it.” At The Craft Bar in Panama City Beach, Cody Ward touted “Toppling Goliath Nitro Mornin’ Latte,” an imperial photography by ALEX WORKMAN


TA L

2020

S E’

SSEE MAGAZ HA IN LA

BEST TA L

of

L A H A SSE

E

Asian

A fresh take on Pan-Asian cuisine and sushi. Join us for lunch & dinner. Extensive selection of wine, beer & sake

Masa 1650 N. Monroe St. (850) 727-4183 Little Masa 619 S. Woodward Ave., #105 (850) 727-8909 MasaTallahassee.com

Changing lives one Patient at a time Dr. James Walton III & Dr. David Cardman General & Cosmetic Dentistry | Implants | Crowns & Bridgework | Invisalign | Sealants | Whitening 1280 Timberlane Rd (850) 893-2136

drswaltonandcardman.com

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

57


coffee milk stout brewed with lactose and a careful blend of cacao nibs and aromatic coffee. “With this style stout, there is a smooth and full body texture leaving just a very small head on the beer almost looking like a fresh brewed espresso or cold brew coffee.” For the record, the ABV is 8.9%. “My favorite breakfast beer depends on the hour of the day,” said Joseph Frasier Hansen at Idyll Hounds Brewery in Santa Rosa Beach. “Right away, I would say Joe, our coffee vanilla porter. Joe is brewed with fresh coffee and conditioned on copious amounts of vanilla beans. It hits the spot with coffee aromas and sweetness from the vanilla. It’s an easy-drinking porter at 7.5% ABV.” Third Planet Brewing in Niceville offers Boggy Bayou Stout. Brewed with lactose, vanilla and cacao nibs, the brew intermingles notes of roast, dark fruit and caramel with bittersweet chocolate and vanilla. This stout’s modest strength and body also provide the opportunity to enjoy more than one pint. ABV is 5.5%. Chelsea Taylor at Destin Brewery said its Breakfast Beer is proving popular. “It’s a light crisp ale, almost lager-like with pink grapefruit,” she explained. “Because of its low ABV of 5% and tangy citrus blast, it pairs with every meal, including of course, breakfast.” At World of Beer in Destin, general manager

58

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Cody Knowles noted that “most breakfast beers are going to be stout, imperial stouts, porters or some other type of dark, possibly barrel aged beer. “What makes a good breakfast beer? The maltiness of an imperial stout that pairs with a pancake syrup? Bitter coffee flavor paired with a nice lactose stout? There isn’t a wrong answer here.” Knowles said his favorite is DuClaw’s Sweet Baby Jesus Porter, ABV 6.2%. According to the World of Beer website, the brew features a “smooth, dry finish and just enough hops to balance aromas and flavors of roasted malt, chocolate and rich peanut butter.” At Kelley’s Beach Liquors in Fort Walton Beach, Chuck Kelley singled out something new from Oyster City Brewing Company out of Apalachicola — the Port St. Joe Porter draft beer with an ABV of 5.7%. “It’s a peanut butter porter,” Kelley said, “and for breakfast you can let it warm up to room temperature and just enjoy all the flavors.” Reed Odeneal at Perfect Plain Brewing Co. in Pensacola didn’t hesitate when asked about his favorite breakfast beer. “Ommegang’s American Farmhouse Ale, Hennepin, is one of the perfect beers to enjoy as a beermosa at breakfast,” he said. “Its spicy, phenolic aromas and champagnelike effervescence pair well with fresh-squeezed Florida orange juice.” The ABV is 7.7%. TM

←↑ JAM-UP BREAKFAST Madison Social’s Jam Benny — poached eggs, hollandaise drizzle, fried green tomatoes, Canadian bacon, sweet potato tots, English muffin, tomato jam — is paired here with a Ciderboys Peach County hard cider.

WHAT THE LOCALS RECOMMEND BRYAN SMITH, PROOF BREWING CO. ↓ ⅔ Proof’s Strawberry Lemonade Evil Kiss, a fruited Berliner Weisse (alcohol by volume, 4.5%) added to ⅓ orange juice or your favorite juice

MIKE RAYNOR JR., MIKE’S LIQUOR & BEER ↓ Founders Breakfast Stout (8.3% ABV) with hints of oats, chocolate and two different types of coffee


Here’s How The Fix Thrift Shop

Supports Spay & Neuter

Shop or donate to the Fix Thrift Shop

The Fix

THRIFT SHOP

VET

Every Gently Used Item sold at The Fix Thrift Shop funds Be The Solution

With Be The Solution, You Can Get an Affordable Spay/Neuter Voucher for Your Pet

Your Pet is Fixed for Life!

Support Be The Solution by Shopping or Donating to the Fix Thrift Shop 1208 Capital Circle SE, Unit D Tues. - Fri.11 am - 6 pm & Sat. 10 am - 6 pm 850.298.1129 BeTheSolution.us/TheFix TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

59


gastro & gusto

DINING OUT

FOODIE OF INFLUENCE Blogger helps restaurants survive hard times by LIESEL SCHMIDT

60

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

S

ocial media influencer. We’ve all heard those three words before, but not everyone really knows what they mean. How does one achieve such status? What function does an influencer serve? It’s all rather vague. Some social media influencers seem to serve no purpose other than fanning the flames of their own egos, but there are those who do just what their title implies: They influence things. Jennifer Leale’s presence on social media has done a great deal for the

community — specifically, Tallahassee’s restaurant scene. An avid blogger since the advent of the blogosphere in the early 2000s, her first foray into blogging was dedicated to fashion. Successful in generating a following, she felt herself grow beyond the confines of her subject and sold the blog, determined to start a new one that would incorporate all of the facets of her life, including her passion for cooking. Cheekily called Fab Fatale, the blog gained national attention and attracted the attention of major photography by ALICIA OSBORNE


↑ Jennifer Leale makes selections at

SoDough — doughnuts and a BLT kolache — before sitting down to work on updating the Tallahassee Foodies Facebook group page.

brands including Target, Overstock and Wayfair. Life (and motherhood) eventually became a priority over keeping up with the fast-paced world of blogging in addition to her regular job as a web developer for Florida State University, and Leale departed the ranks of influencers — though the interest never went away. Fortunately for the social media maven, her talents were given a chance to shine once again through her creation of Tallahassee Foodies. Nearly 10 years after she’d started her first blog, Leale found herself searching for a way to stay in touch with her “lunch buddies” after she moved from one department to another at FSU in 2018. Naturally, she turned to the forum she knew best: social media. Using Facebook, she created the Tallahassee Foodies Facebook Group, and the rest, as they say, is history.

“I had hoped that maybe a few people would eventually join in to offer us recommendations specific to our preferences for a particular day and our location in town,” said Leale. “Eventually, my friends shared the group with their friends, who shared it with their friends. It just blew up from there. Last summer, I found myself approving over 1,000 new members every 11 days. It was wild!” Wild, indeed. The Facebook group has grown to include six moderators and boasts an impressive 25,000 members. The Tallahassee Foodie brand — as it well and truly has become a brand — offers, as Leale puts it, “a full-on interactive, conversational experience where readers gain knowledge.” As one would expect, that knowledge is all about eats. It is available across a number of platforms: the Tallahassee Foodies blog, a TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

61


gastro & gusto

Facebook group dedicated to the restaurant scene, a Facebook group for home chefs, a newsletter and an informative Facebook page. In an effort to keep everyone engaged in the original Facebook group, Leale offered fun activities like meet-ups and giveaways that members couldn’t seem to get enough of. Naturally, the pandemic halted many of those gatherings, but the importance of the blog continues. The economic impact Tallahassee Foodies has made is undeniable, and the country has taken notice. It has been featured on “The Today Show” and even gained attention from Facebook Corporate. Clearly, the mission of giving foodies a place to come together over their shared love of food and join in a positive dialogue is a success. So, too, is providing a platform to bring restaurant owners together with their guests in a more direct way. “It really is a win for all, and our local economy has been fueled in a way that would be greatly lacking, especially during the pandemic, without this entire experience,” Leale said. “The smart operators I see harness the listening power of the group,” said Matt Thompson, managing partner of For The Table Hospitality, Tallahassee’s largest hospitality company. “If the group starts talking about a type of food they like or want to see in Tallahassee, operators have a clear insight to the consumer mindset. To me, that’s invaluable.” Obviously, Leale has created something truly dynamic — and the foodies of Tallahassee are eating it up. TM

FOOD NEWS 62

March-April 2021

↑ Leale samples offerings at Table 23, where she is a good friend of owner Mandy Lemon. Fare included fried green tomatoes, Southwest eggrolls, blackened tuna and fig, a ’23 burger and truffle tots. She enjoyed, too, a few sips from a berry bruised cocktail.

Keep up with the latest news by joining Tallahassee Foodies on Facebook at facebook.com/groups/ TallahasseeFoodies or visit their website, tallahasseefoodies.com. Jennifer Leale keeps pace with restaurant openings and closings, cooking classes and events that revolve around food while also supplying tasty, tempting recipes.

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

photography by ALICIA OSBORNE


Feline Friendly Gold Status Our veterinary staff is trained to approach and handle cats in a gentle, empathetic, and caring manner. Rest assured that your cat will be given exceptional care and attention through all phases of the visit including examinations, procedures, and/or hospitalization.

(850) 329-7340 | OxBottomAH.com | 2728 Ox Bottom Road

THE FUTURE IS NOW

TALLAHASSEECBD.COM

Pastries • Cakes • Quiche • Lunch Market Freezer Including Housemade Gourmet Entrees, Soups, Ice Cream and More!

(850) 320-6465 TALLAHASSEECBD | 1410 MARKET STREET, C-4

2766 Capital Circle NE | 850.765.0811 | trevas.net Across From Esposito

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

63


gastro & gusto

Fellowship Fare Soul food is the stuff of heartfelt gatherings by ROCHELLE KOFF

W

hen it comes to soul food, you’ve got to have that fried chicken, collard greens, mac ’n’ cheese and cornbread. That’s just for starters. Stop at Olean’s Cafe, open on Adams Street for 26 years, and you’ll also find smothered pork chops, green beans swimming in pot liquor, oxtail, chitlins and catfish, all served to a soundtrack of gospel music. The venerable restaurant is a storied place that has been visited by both President Obama and President Joe Biden; both have dishes bearing their names.  “Biden loves soul food, too,” said owner Olean McCaskill. She learned to cook when she was just a girl, watching her mom and grandma cook on a wood stove in Conecuh County, Alabama. By age 14, McCaskill was working in Tallahassee restaurants. To this day, she cooks from the heart.   “Soul food is something that is good for

64

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

your soul, and it makes you feel like home,” said McCaskill. “Customers, students, they come to Olean’s and they get soul food, they get gospel music, they get everything they need.” Jennifer Young understands the connections. For her, soul food has been synonymous with family and fellowship. “It was all about bringing family together

↑ The three young women who founded Bourne Brilliant in Tallahassee prepare for sale plant-based dishes like this one (recipe at right), baked goods and natural products.

↙ Sauteed

Kale & Sweet Potato  Leaves

( from Bourne Brilliant) ➸ 1 bunch curly kale and 1 bunch of sweet potato leaves, washed, drained and torn into small pieces ➸ 3 tablespoons sunflower oil ➸ 1 medium red onion, chopped ➸ 5 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped ➸ 2 tablespoons tamari ➸ 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast ➸ 1 cup water ➸ 1 scotch bonnet pepper (poke holes in it, rather than slicing) Place the kale and sweet potato leaves in a large pot with all of the ingredients. Add one cup of water. Make sure all of the leaves are coated by tossing them together. Let simmer for 1 hour. Remember to remove the scotch bonnet before serving.

PHOTO BY NEHEMIAH NASH (BOTTOM) COURTESY OF BOURNE BRILLIANT AND REZ-ART / GETTYIMAGES / ISTOCK (TOP)

GOOD EATS


WOMEN UNITED ENGAGEMENT EVENT

Feed Your Mind 03/11/2021 | 5:30 PM A WOMEN UNITED EVENT

Join us to feed your mind with a virtual panel of creative women and learn more about Women United. Enjoy an inspiring conversation about mental health and incorporating mindfulness and intentionality into your daily life!

LEADING THE CHARGE | INSPIRING THE CHANGE

TA L

2020

S E’

SSEE MAGAZ HA IN LA

BEST TA L

of

L A H A SSE

E

Brunch Frozen Treat

TA L

2020

S E’

SSEE MAGAZ HA IN LA

BEST TA L

Lofty Pursuits Brunch & Ice Cream A Tallahassee tradition for 27 years, serving an award-winning brunch and ice cream all day. Brunch and ice cream in a toy store? Of course. Enjoy outdoor seating on either of our patios. Uniquely Tallahassee and uniquely fun. Hours and menu at LoftyPursuits.com Eat at Lofty Pursuits or have us deliver brunch to you Pick-up available

of

L A H A SSE

E

With over 40 years of experience, we’re your go-to Professional Plumbers. McNeillPlumbing.com (850) 562-5504 | 3505 N. Monroe St. Lic. #CFC043067 Chase McNeil, Green Certified Plumber, #CFC1427457

1355 Market St., A11 | (850) 521-0091 | LoftyPursuits.com TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

65


gastro & gusto

Pound Cake ( from TC Bakery)

BUY FRESH BUY WILD BUY SOUTHERN WE’RE THE BEST PLACE FOR ALL YOUR SEAFOOD NEEDS. NEEDS.

TA L

2020

S E’

SSEE MAGAZ HA IN LA

BEST TA L

of

L A H A SSE

E

1415 TIMBERLANE ROAD in Market Square

850.893.7301 | SOUTHERNSEAFOODMARKET.COM

NEW LOCATION IN MARKET SQUARE NOW OPEN

66

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

for Sunday dinners,” said Young, owner of TC Bakery on Tallahassee’s Southside. “It was all about fellowship.” When she was a little girl, Young’s mother and father ran a popular soul food restaurant in Tallahassee called Ma Mary’s Kitchen from 1989 to 1994, in the same location where Young now has her own bakery. She was 10 years old when her mother, Tommie C. Williams, passed away in 1994 at age of 45. Young’s dad, Isaac, then taught her how to cook her mom’s recipes, which were  “passed down from generation to generation. I have five children, and I hope to pass these recipes down to them.” Young originally served soul food as well as baked goods in her cafe, but since the pandemic, she now sticks to her cakes, cupcakes and cheesecakes. “I’m the only bakery on the south side with a Southern soul,” she said. Soul food has a rich history immersed in the AfricanAmerican culture. A style of cooking “now associated with comfort and decadence, was born out of struggle and survival,” Vanessa Hayford wrote in an article titled “Humble History of Soul Food” for the site “Black Foodie.” To Syrheda La Shae, “soul food, like soul music, makes you feel good, is addicting and carries the fondest memories for each person who consumes it.” She is the mother of three daughters — Lyrica Leo, 13, and sisters Zaira, 12,  and Nadira, 9 — who founded a business called Bourne Brilliant. The young entrepreneurs cook plant-based dishes, baked goods and natural products for sale at a cafe on Orange Avenue and in a shop in Railroad Square. “Soul food can be whatever you interpret it as — there are no longer any rules,” said Zaira. “It represents your culture, as well.”

PHOTO BY BEATRIZ MONTES DURAN / GETTYIMAGES / ISTOCK (POUND CAKE) AND COURTESY OF OLEAN’S CAFE (HEADSHOT)

➸ ½ tsp salt ➸ 2 sticks of butter ➸½  tsp baking ➸ 3 cups of sugar powder ➸ 6 large eggs ➸ 2 tsp pure ➸ 1 cup heavy cream vanilla extract ➸ 3 cups all-purpose flour   Make sure all ingredients are room temperature. Cream butter and sugar until fully incorporated. Next, add eggs one at a time, beating after every addition. In a separate bowl sift flour, salt and baking powder. Alternate flour mixture and heavy cream, beginning and ending with flour mixture. Beat after every addition. Be sure not to overly mix. Once finished, stir in vanilla extract. Pour batter in a well-greased Bundt pan on 325 degrees. Make sure the oven is not preheated. Bake for and hour and 15 minutes. Insert a clean knife to check for doneness. If clean, cake is done.


Freshest. Purest. Tastiest. Smashing!

Ultra-premium olive oil, aged balsamic vinegars, honey, almond butter, body butter, gifts sets, gift cards and more!

While foods like collards and kale are packed with vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants, there are concerns that they become unhealthy when cooked in fatback or with lots of salt. Southern cooking may have similarities “but soul food and Southern cooking are not exactly the same things,” said La Shae. “In our opinion, soul food speaks to the struggles that African-Americans have faced with gaining access to healthier or alternative foods.” “We were used to being given the scraps, the most unhealthy or undesirable portions of animals, the waste, and so now that translates to our gravitating towards heavily processed foods and beverages,” La Shae said. While her daughters are learning healthy alternatives, they do have family favorites based in longstanding culinary traditions. “We are lovers of mac ’n’ cheese, mixed greens and candied yams,” they wrote in an ➺ OLEAN’S CAFÉ 1605 S. Adams St. email. “All of these things re(850) 521-0259 mind us of gatherings of our family that are located here in ➺ TC BAKERY 614 Eugenia St. the States. Our Nonnie has al(850) 577-1776 ways made the best baked mac ’n’ cheese; she even changed many ➺ BOURNE BRILLIANT CAFE of her recipes to accommodate 618 McDonnell our dietary choices. So, her mac Drive (at 242 E. ’n’ cheese is now mac ’n’ pleeze.” Orange Blvd. and shop in  the “I feel soul food evokes emoBreezeway Market tions when eating,” added Lyrica.  at Railroad Square And for Nadira: “Soul food Art District) (850) 391-8541 just tastes very yummy.” TM

(850) 270-9971 | SmashingOlive.com 3425 Thomasville Rd, Suite 11, Tallahassee, Florida Receive a 10% discount on $50+ purchase when you mention this ad

Spring

Dine outside with us this

IF YOU GO …

Catering also available. From weddings to at-home gatherings to office lunches and events, experience makes the difference. Catering@AndrewsDowntown.com (850) 644-2767 | AndrewsDowntown.com

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

67


RVing Travelers’ Answer to Social Distancing STORY BY KAREN MURPHY // PHOTO BY COLIN HACKLEY, VISIT FLORIDA


After last year’s lockdowns, mandates, CDC guidelines and self-isolating, many long for a little time away from it all. A vacation. Fresh air. Sunshine. The wide-open road before you. No set schedule. No particular place to be at any particular time. No one’s rules but your own. Ahhh, freedom.


O

ver 40 million Americans, especially Floridians, find that freedom, touring the backroads, coastlines and natural parks of our massive country in a recreational vehicle (RV). Following a year of severe travel restrictions due to a pandemic and traveler unease with hotels, cruise ships and airlines, this year is expected to be a record year for those in the RV business. The Recreational Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA) sees North American RV sales surging 19.5 percent in 2021 with 507,200 units sold. That would be the industry’s best year ever.

Topsail Hill Preserve State Park

70

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

RVIA President Craig Kirby said that 2020 was the fourth-best year on record, surpassing 2019 by nearly five percent, despite the nearly two-month shutdown last spring. And Florida ranks fourth in sales of RVs, behind Indiana, California, and Texas. Who is buying all these RVs? Elderly couples, with little dogs? Well, yes, but it’s not just them. Generation X and Baby Boomers are still the biggest segments of the industry, but Millennials make up approximately 38 percent of campers. The average RV owner in the U.S. is 48 years old, according to the RVIA. Households in the 35-54 age demographic, with a yearly income of about $62,000, are the most likely to own an RV in the U.S., according to the association. Erwin Jackson, the owner of three RV parks in the Panhandle, says his parks have been packed since the COVID-19 lockdowns were eased in Florida in May 2020. “I think the popularity of RVing right now has a few main reasons. Baby Boomers are retiring and traveling. It really caught on, especially with people who like to travel with their pets. Then COVID hit.” RVs provided travelers with their own safe, personal mobile cocoons. It was a way to travel large distances while still social distancing.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF VISIT SOUTH WALTON (TOPSAIL HILL PRESERVE STATEPARK) AND VISIT FLORIDA: COLIN HACKLEY (RV), RUSSELL MICK (ST. GEORGE ISLAND)

St. George Island

Big Bend Scenic Byway (U.S. 98), Leonard Landing, Alligator Harbor


10 of Florida’s Great RV Parks 1 Florida Caverns State Park, Marianna 2 Topsail Hill Preserve State Park, Santa Rosa Beach 3 Anastasia State Park, St. Augustine 4 Fort Pickens Campground, Pensacola 5 St. George Island State Park 6 Juniper Springs National Recreation Area, Ocala 7 Disney’s Fort Wilderness Resort, Orlando 8 Fort De Soto Park, St. Petersburg 9 Lion Country Safari KOA, Loxahatchee 10 Bahia Honda State Park, Florida Keys Source: Visit Florida

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

71


RVs BY THE #s Millennials make up approximately

38%

of campers Average age of RV owner in U.S.

48

Typical household income for RV owner

$62,000 Source: The Recreational Vehicle Industry Association

St. Andrews State Park in Panama City Beach is a popular stop for campers touring the South in their RVs.

72

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


PHOTOS BY DESIRÉE GARDNER (ST. ANDREWS STATE PARK) AND COURTESY OF VISIT FLORIDA: MALLORY BROOKS (ST. AUGUSTINE) AND STEVE BEAUDET, BOSHOOTS.COM (FLORIDA CAVERNS)

Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine

RVs also allow families a way to go camping that is easier than traditional camping options — no tents or air mattresses. These families spend an average of four weeks each year using their RV in some way, according to RIVA. RVing is also over 60 percent cheaper than a traditional vacation at a hotel, bed and breakfast, or similar type of accommodation. There are about 16,000 campgrounds and parking facilities throughout the country, both public and private, which support RV camping. Florida is “one of the most popular RVing and camping destinations in the nation. It has beautiful beaches, lakes and rivers, unlimited recreational activities, fine dining restaurants, shops and attractions, professional and college sporting events, world-class fishing and amazing weather; but most importantly, Florida has hundreds of the best RV parks and campgrounds in the world,” according to the Florida Association of RV Parks and Campgrounds. Many of the best RV parks in Florida are right here in the Panhandle. Florida Caverns State Park in Marianna is a breathtaking destination for RVers. The park’s cave tours take folks underground to discover stalagmites, stalactites and other formations. The park offers hiking, biking, equestrian camping and kayaking on the Chipola River. There is also a nine-hole golf course. One of Jackson’s RV parks is also right down the road. Florida Caverns Resort at Merrit’s Mill Pond has luxury and premium RV sites, many of which sit next to the water and offers kayaking, paddleboarding, canoeing, a pool, restaurant and more. At the Gregory E. Moore RV Resort in Topsail

Hill Preserve State Park in Santa Rosa Beach, a person can take a tram down to one of the most unique beaches in the state. Hiking trails lead to Morris and Campbell lakes, two rare coastal dune lakes, found only in a few places in the entire world. Even closer to home is St. George Island, often ranked as one of the best beaches in the country. For history buffs, Fort Pickens Campground in Pensacola and Anastasia State Park in St. Augustine can take you back in time. Both are close to the forts and other historic sites as well as the beautiful beaches and hiking trails. For those wanting to wander a little further and go “wild,” try Disney’s Fort Wilderness Resort in Orlando, or even wilder, wake up to the roar of lions and the screeching of monkeys at Lion Country Safari KOA in Loxahatchee. For a different kind of wild, escape to the very most southern part of Florida to Bahia Honda State Park on Big Pine Key in Key West. With all these destinations, call well in advance to secure reservations, or you might find yourself camping in a Walmart parking lot. Lots of people do. TM

Florida Caverns State Park

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

73


PHOTOS BY SAIGE ROBERTS (SPRAY PAINT), BOB HOWARD (EXPERIENCE ASIA FESTIVAL), AND COURTESY OF COCA, LEMOYNE CENTER FOR VISUAL ART, TALLAHASSEE BALLET AND TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY CHORUS

COCA’s

74

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


Despite pandemic and funding challenges, hearts must be fed BY MARINA BROWN

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

75


Amanda Karioth Thompson, assistant director at COCA

Kathleen Spehar, executive director of COCA

76

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

From them flows a cascade of ideas and flexible plans that they can adapt to shifting city and county priorities, variable budgets, even a pandemic. But their end goal is set in stone: to support the arts, their availability and enjoyment by as many Tallahasseans as possible. The women have built relationships that allow music, the visual arts, dance, choral music, theater and literature to thrive in the capital city at a time when funding, gifts and grants cannot be taken for granted. Ask anyone who has been to the Tallahassee Symphony, the Tallahassee Ballet, the LeMoyne or the Riley House museums, each of which receive financial grants through COCA, or ask individual artists who see their work reproduced and biographies posted on the COCA Arts Guide, or their paintings hung at the City Hall or Airport Galleries, and you will glimpse the breadth of COCA’s ability to connect the city to the wealth of art available, and to add to that supply. For both Thompson and Spehar, a commitment to the artistic “muses” arrived early. Florida-born Thompson was raised in a household where the arts played a major part. “My father, Gerald Ensley, was a journalist, my mother Sally Karioth, a speaker, performer and educator,” Thompson said. “They say I attended my first play when I was a few days old, and ‘acted’ in one a few months later!” With a grandmother who was a professional musician, a school environment filled with visual art, music and theater, and an elementary school art teacher who gave her “a voice to let me communicate what couldn’t be said,” Thompson knew early on that art would always be in her life in some way. Spehar also found the world opening to her though music, dance and choral music. She was born in Chicago and lived in Detroit, a baby boomer whose parents introduced a piano into her life.

Muralist Matt Ketchum created Coexist in collaboration with Matthew McCarron; Tselote Holley and Elton Burgest provided general assistance; Street Art Tallahassee’s Chiara Saldivar served as curator, mural designer and project organizer; Daniel McCluskey painted backgrounds and was the production/ operations manager. Photos at bottom, from left: W. Stanley Proctor’s bronze sculpture, Florida’s Finest, at the Governor’s Mansion; the Pas de Vie Ballet, a recipient of Leon CARES funding; the Tallahassee Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Maestro Darko Butorac.

PHOTOS BY SAIGE ROBERTS (COEXIST), PTFPHOTO (PAS DE VIE BALLET), PERRONE FORD (TALLAHASSEE SYMPHONY), KIRA DERRYBERRY PHOTOGRAPHY (KARIOTH AND SPEHAR) AND COURTESY OF COCA (FLORIDA’S FINEST)

ou can’t actually see them, but if you’re near the downtown office of the Council on Culture & Arts (COCA) on Martin Luther King Boulevard, you might sense the vibrations, feel the enthusiasm, and hear the hums of optimism that emanate from two petite, but mighty, women who step each day into their roles as warriors for the arts. And the arts are grateful. Amanda Karioth Thompson, the assistant director at COCA, is responsible for the nonprofit’s arts education and public art programming functions. Kathleen Spehar, the recently appointed executive director of the organization, brought to COCA a lifetime of experience in arts administration and collaboration with city and state entities. Together, the women are the two most prominent of the four full-time arts advocates working at COCA.


TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

77


78

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

year our budget was to have been over $1 million for re-grants. Fortunately, while the pandemic’s effect on tourism has caused that to decrease over the last months, the city and county have offered additional funding through LEAN and CARES Act grant programs.” Spehar and Thompson are optimistic and filled with new plans. “We’ve already worked with the restaurant industry, having poets create short works to include in each take-out order,” Spehar said. “I would like to embed the arts into health care settings, perhaps in policing and de-escalation situations. And planning for the 2024 bicentennial has already begun!” Listening is a big part of Spehar’s job. “We want to hear from the public and artists, too, about what they need to keep art in their lives. Art has always been about resiliency, now more than ever. Artists have always had it. Now we’re all improvising,” she laughed. “It’s a good skill to have!” TM

PHOTOS BY SAIGE ROBERTS

“I was an artsy kid, in a modern dance club, playing the flute, loving choral music and even becoming a drum majorette,” she said. Time only heightened her desire to participate in activities that “fed her heart.” At the University of Minnesota, she earned a master’s degree in arts administration, having been attracted to the variety of possibilities such a degree would bring. Thompson holds the same degree, earned in Florida. So credentialed, the two women advocate for all the arts and assist artists along the way. Thompson began working part time at COCA 15 years ago, when the organization was already 20 years old. From assistant arts education coordinator, to later, assistant director, the dynamic Thompson said she prefers to be “the support person behind the one who is out front,” sounding delighted with every project in which she’s involved. “I love that we can direct arts education grants to individual art teachers,” she said. “Twelve different teachers received grants, totaling $6,000, this year. Through our online galleries, we have teacher guides and lesson plans. We have also begun a wonderful relationship with the media where I can report on art projects and awards to school-age children.” Not all plans made before the pandemic were shelved. “COCA is working with Blueprint 2000 on a Capital Cascades Trail and on a History and Culture Trail where exterior sculpture pieces will eventually be placed,” said Thompson, who clearly believes that art should be a public encounter. Spehar brings 13 years of national and international experience working in education, and with legislatures, granting agencies and nonprofits, often advocating from an “artistic tourism” perspective. “COCA receives funding through a public arts contract with the City of Tallahassee and Leon County, and also through the Office of Tourism, from which it receives one cent of tourist development taxes,” Spehar explained. “From those sources, we then issue re-grants to nonprofit organizations which apply. This


COCA, in partnership with the City of Tallahassee’s Sustainability and Community Preservation Department, is taking a creative approach to addressing graffiti with its Graffiti Abatement Mural Program. Artists who submit proposals that are selected receive a stipend from the city, and their completed murals are finished with a graffiti-proof topcoat. COCA manages the submission and selection process and works with artists to facilitate installations. Sarah Painter, in photo, created Magnolias with assistance from Cosby Hayes and Matt Shanaghan.


80

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


Michele Arwood, left, the director of the Thomasville Center for the Arts, and public art and marketing coordinator Darlene Crosby Taylor, stride past Joe Cowdry’s Pine Forest and Woodpecker mural on West Jackson Street in Thomasville.

Art

AT ITS C E NT E R

Thomasville runs on creative talent

I story by

STEVE BORNHOFT

n December, news media from around the country and the world were captivated by the story of a prank that went down in Peoria. An artist, Joshua Hawkins, for an agreed-upon sum, painted a mural of Sesame Street’s Cookie Monster on a commercial building in that central Illinois city. The work was commissioned by a man who identified himself as “Nate” and dictated that the mural include three Russian words that translate to peace, land, cookies. Hawkins, joined by two helpers, completed the job, collected his fee and later found out that he had been

dealing with a man who was not a Nate at all and not the building’s owner. The real Nate Comte was unamused and moved without delay to white out Hawkins’s work, thus saddening and even angering some members of the Peoria arts community. “Now I’m the evil Grinch,” Comte frustratingly told The New York Times. Michele Arwood and Darlene Crosby Taylor are respecters of property rights. The manner in which they carry out public-art projects in Thomasville, Georgia, makes that clear. But sentimentally they would almost certainly align with those who were disappointed that Cookie Monster was a treat that lasted little longer than a dessert.

photography by SAIGE

ROBERTS

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

81


Arwood is the executive director of the Thomasville Center for the Arts, an entity that was known throughout most of its 30+ years as the Thomasville Cultural Center, but pivoted in a significant way 10 years ago. Taylor is the Center’s public art and marketing coordinator and has raised its profile in ways including the bombing of trees with yarn. “The organization was founded by an amazing group of preservationists who saved our historic building, which was once an elementary school,” Arwood said, “and we had been doing

82

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

our well-supported Wildlife Arts Festival for about 15 years when we saw an opportunity to expand upon our network of patrons and sponsors.” In so doing, Arwood et al worked to engage the Thomasville community more generally in the Center and to employ the arts as an economic driver. The Center committed to making public art a priority, invested in the development of a creative district and focused on the importance of art education. For many, their chief associations with Thomasville may include setters, springers, bobwhite quail and exquisite

shotguns with gold inlays. The Wildlife Arts Festival has reinforced the connection between the community and sports afield. “The hunting world we live in is part of our identity,” Arwood said. But the Center is additionally passionate about experimenting with various types of art and discovering how they may generate conversation, bring people downtown and stimulate commerce. “When people are connected and working together, that ultimately has a positive impact on the economy, and art


← The Imagination Playground, far left, encourages artistic expression and purposeful activity; the Center houses sculptures including one of long-billed curlews, We Three Kings, fashioned from bronze by Walter Matia; torrents of students populated the halls of the Center building during its days as an elementary school; Arwood and Taylor, with the Center in the background.

has the power to unite them,” Arwood has found. As an example, she pointed to a multifaceted event conducted in 2014, which served to revitalize a part of town known as The Bottom. The Center assembled a display of 25 murals related to the history of that neighborhood, which was decorated with black-and-yellow tape to suggest a construction zone. Bright yellow

bicycles were positioned around town to encourage use of city trails that link its parks. Further, the Center saw to it that The Bottom, once a vibrant Black and Jewish part of town, became an opportunity zone. “There were 27 empty storefronts on West Jackson Street,” Taylor said. “Historically, it was home to businesses from barbershops to banks. We wanted

to bring that back without changing the neighborhood’s historic demographics.” In The Bottom, located in a depression that was once a river bed, you could buy a Sno-Ball, but not a meal. The Center’s Pop It Up event would change that. The Center contacted owners of the idle properties and obtained permission to use them for the initiative. The spaces were cleaned and painted and made available free of charge as business sites for 30 days. Twenty-two businesses popped up. And, when the month-long event had concluded, nine of them entered leases and stayed. “Performance, public art, exhibitions, education — everything we do we do as a way to undergird the community as a whole,” Arwood said. “All of our projects involve collaboration. We may partner with the city or the History Center or Thomasville Landmarks, our historic preservation organization. It may be the Girls Club.” That approach has paid dividends by engendering the trust of community residents. TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

83


← Students in the fine arts program at Scott Elementary School regularly visit the Center; at right, two works by Cindy Inman, Night Life (owl) and Color Me Beautiful, enliven the corner of West Jackson and Stevens streets; an edition of THOM Magazine (inset).

“We listen to them and respond to their needs,” Arwood said. The Center has worked with the local school district to establish an arts integration program at Scott Elementary School and to deliver fine arts curricula at its headquarters building. “Each child at Scott gets two days a week in fine arts instruction, and that’s unheard of just about anywhere,” Arwood said. As she spoke, visiting students in a dance class kicked up such a commotion that Arwood had to

84

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

move to another room to continue the conversation. The Center’s Creative District adjoins The Bottom. As part of it, the Center acquired use of a vacant lot and brought in lights and seating. Today, the “UnVacant Lot” hosts art exhibits that are far from predictable. “People have come to expect something new and dynamic there,” Arwood said. At Grassroots Coffee on Broad Street, the Center displays works of emerging artists, many of them exiting the College of Fine Arts at Florida State University. “They are growing as we are presenting,” Arwood said. When the pandemic forced cancellation of traditional Wildlife Arts Festival exhibits and gatherings scheduled for last November, the Center opted for a public art alternative. The Tall Timbers research institute identified 25 plants that benefit from controlled burns, an activity that also creates habitat favored by many types of wildlife. Artists then painted the 25 flora on sections of stove pipe that were

placed on lampposts in the downtown area. Murals, meanwhile, depicted fauna. Taylor recalls with fondness a yarn bomb tree project that began with a modest goal. “We were hoping to have two trees decorated with crocheted yarn, and we wound up with 28,” Taylor said, adding that grandmothers approached the Center seeking permission to dress up a tree as something they could do with their grandchildren. “I discovered a tribe of fiber artists,” Taylor enthused. “You can bring in


artists to do installations, but public art works best for me when a lot of people come together for the greater good.” Interviewed in December, Taylor, an architect by training, was seeking permission and making plans to restore faded advertisements and business identifiers painted on downtown buildings decades ago. In her vision, the “ghost images” would be made readable but retain a distressed look. To her credit, Arwood, who left Atlanta for Thomasville years after telling her husband on her wedding day that she

would never move to South Georgia, has seen to a diversification of the Center’s funding. The Center has always enjoyed strong private foundation support, but counts state and federal grants, corporate support, local sponsors, tuition and art sales as additional revenue sources. Seven years ago, the Center partnered with the Savannah College of Art and Design to launch THOM Magazine, a vehicle for “profiling and showcasing creatives.” A Thom Summit, expected to take place this year, will bring together creative talents from around the country who are leveraging art to make a difference in their communities. Taylor plans to make murals and

pole wraps available to small towns, including Pelham, Cairo, Metcalf and Boston for display there. As it happens, Arwood’s taste in art runs to the emotional and abstract. Her personal collection includes works by Rebecca Cabassa and John Gleason of Thomasville; Jeff Distefano and Denise Boineau of Tallahassee; and Billy Newman of Atlanta. Among the five, perhaps Boineau, whose subjects include fox hunters, might know the difference between a quail and a woodcock. But give Arwood time. She hangs around South Georgia long enough, she may one day own a Jim Rataczak or a Tom Wosika. TM TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

85


Have Another Inspiring Season! Proud Supporter of the Arts

ave Another Inspiring Season! HHurstBoiler.com

Hurstboiler.com

1379 timberlane rd

brushandpalettestudio.com info@brushandpalettestudio.com

893-1960 est 1975

children‘s

Affordable Expert Local IT Support Established in 1978 Working with us is like having your own virtual IT department Unlimited IT Support

Vendor Management

Data Security Solutions

IT Disaster Planning

Cloud Services

Website Management

Reliable Remote Support

Hardware Procurement

HIPAA and PCI Compliance Reviews

(850) 385-7000 | Support@t3crew.com | T3crew.com

86

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Summer Art Camp painting drawing

collage mixed media sculpture

Accepting children who have completed Kindergarten-age 15. Offering full and half-day camps. See website for full camp listings.


LeMoyne’s Chain of Parks Art Festival Returns with Expanded Lineup

Celebrate Culture with 10 days of the Region’s Premier Art Festival

L

eMoyne’s Chain of Parks Art Festival is North Florida’s premier outdoor fine art festival. Located in downtown Tallahassee along Park Avenue, the festival is free and open to the public. The festival has expanded this year, offering new and exciting programs to bring unique fine art experiences to the community in a COVID-safe way. The newly expanded event kicks off with the Zerbe Zelebration, a 10-daylong citywide celebration of renowned artist Karl Zerbe from April 9–18. The “Zelebration” will include physical and virtual exhibits, lecture discussions, interactive social media activities and a custom crafted beer from Proof Brewing. Other exciting news for this year’s festival includes FSU’s Opening Nights Special Presenting Artist event with muralist Michael Rosato on

April 15 and Artist Workshops with printmaker Jim Sherraden at LeMoyne Arts on April 15 and 16 (virtual and physical tickets available). All of these events will be leading up to the festival weekend with Artists in the Park from April 17–18. Expect to have a first-class, funfilled outdoor cultural experience at the Chain of Parks Art Festival. View amazing, original and one-ofa-kind works of art in a delightful Southern outdoor setting. Enjoy a wide variety of live entertainment, professional chalk artists, a host of local food trucks and vendors and libations served enthusiastically at the festival bar. You can also register as a sponsor to help support the festival and have access to the coveted VIP tent (go to ChainOfParks.com for more information). Nationally ranked

in the Top 100 Fine Art Festivals by Sunshine Artist Magazine for six years running, this annual two-day festival in the parks draws tens of thousands of people from the Big Bend and the Southeast to see 125-plus artists who have traveled from all over the country to display their original artwork. As the world copes with the challenges of COVID-19, the Chain of Parks Art Festival will be implementing new safety practices and requirements to keep our artists and community safe. The festival will follow current scientific and governmental guidelines for safety. Some examples include limited festival entrances at key check-in locations, required face coverings, hand-washing stations, directional walking paths and more. For more information on the festival activities and safety guidelines, please visit ChainOfParks.com.

L E M OY N E A RT S 1 2 5 N . G A D S D E N S T. , TA L L A H A S S E E | ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 2 - 8 8 0 0 | L E M O Y N E .O R G PROMOTION TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

87


America the Beautiful

THE MONUMENTAL LANDSCAPES OF CLYDE BUTCHER

Clyde Butcher, Oxbow Bend 63, 2006, Silver Gelatin Print AP1/3, 52 x 100 inches

AmericA the BeAutiful: the monumentAl lAndscApes of clyde Butcher JAnuAry 15–April 3, 2020 Gadsden Arts will host 15 exhibitions in 2021, including: 44th Southern Watercolor Society Exhibition, April 23 – June 19, 2021 33rd Art in Gadsden Juried Exhibition, July 9 – September 18, 2021 Women Artists: Four Centuries of Creativity, October 8 – December 18, 2021 Organized by the Reading Public Museum, Reading, PA Information www.gadsdenarts.org / 850.875.4866 13 N. Madison St., Quincy, FL • Just 20 miles from Tallahassee

Sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture. Funding for this program was provided through a grant from the Florida Humanities with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this exhibition do not necessarily represent those of Florida Humanities or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

88

May–June 882020 March-April TALLAHASSEEMAGA 2021 TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM ZINE.COM


BOOKS

Magic Afoot in Tuscan Hills

expression

MAR/APR 2021

KEEPING TABS ON ALL THAT MUSES INSPIRE

MUSIC

PLAN B COMES TO THE FORE Musicians, crafters, actors perfect pandemic pivots by BOB FERRANTE

Kye Richardson, 11, a winner of the Big Bend Community Orchestra’s concerto competition, rehearses with the Tallahassee Youth Orchestra at The Moon.

photography by ALEX WORKMAN

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

89


expression

B

etty Proctor began Obsessions Gifts in Railroad Square as a way to connect with her daughter, Nijah. Their small storefront showcased handcrafted items, and Betty looked to help Nijah, who is autistic, develop an interest in arts and crafts and gain entrepreneurship and communication skills. “We have the gift shop, and we were doing arts and crafts workshops,” Proctor said. “People were starting to recognize us — and then it just fell apart.” Increasing foot traffic to the shop produced optimism that was then suddenly dashed by the pandemic. Betty quickly developed a Plan B, however, turning to the sewing skills that she had learned

90

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

from her mother. In turn, Betty trained Nijah to sew facemasks and jean purses. The Proctors received help from art therapy students at Florida State, who are leading workshops. “We started taking the workshops outside on our patio,” Proctor said. “We’re being safe. We’re taking temperatures. We have hand sanitizer. We’re social distancing. We’re being safe and doing the workshops. We are offering them because people need something to do. Offering them online and in the shop. That’s something that is keeping us going.” The pandemic has challenged small and large businesses and dramatically affected musicians, orchestras, performers and artists. They have all needed to find ways to move from a world that featured theaters, auditoriums and venues with every seat taken to one where social distancing has often ruled out live audiences. If Zoom and FaceTime kept you connected to family and friends, live-streaming has been the lifeblood of musical groups and performers. The Tallahassee Youth Orchestra began rehearsing at The Moon, where owner Scott Carswell has been “fantastic” at rearranging the venue, said TYO’s Jeanette Edwards. TYO was able to accommodate a full group of 81 students in the fall for its concert series, which featured a variety of events (including a holiday performance in December). All of them were livestreamed on Facebook and available on demand. As a

↖ Cellist Marina Edwards, 18, and clarinetist Lucy Whitehead, 15, work to perfect their sounds. ↙ Tallahassee Youth Orchestra conductor Chris Miller has worked with a full complement of 81 musicians despite the pandemic.


Safely distanced, Tallahassee Youth Orchestra musicians receive direction from conductor Chris Miller during a rehearsal at The Moon.

result, family members from around the globe have been able to watch. “Our first concert was just amazing because it allowed us to share the concert with people that normally wouldn’t be able to come,” Edwards said. “We had people from different countries and all over the U.S. watching our concert. Grandparents that had never been able to watch a concert were able to watch. It was really neat.” Organizers were also able to separate the music students at The Moon so they could comfortably perform. Seven cameras at various locations allowed for sections of the orchestra to be featured without anyone being ignored. “We have to adhere to the best information out there for distancing music students,” Edwards said. “We’ve capped the number of people based on room size so that we can safely spread the kids out and clean between performances. We have kids who come every week, and photography by ALEX WORKMAN

their parents are just so grateful. It may be the only thing they’re doing outside the house this year.” For countless people, going outside has been a welcome option when the weather allows. When the temperatures are comfortable and there’s no rain, making music in the sunshine has provided performers with a breath of fresh air and much-needed income. “I started playing retirement homes during the week for extra money a few years ago,” musician Corey Johnson said. “Two of them started having me back in the summer because it was outdoors. I was far enough from the residents.” Johnson said a number of his winter bookings were postponed as outdoor events were scuttled due to colder weather or rain, illustrating the challenges many musicians have faced. He and other musical groups have also weighed the expense of driving to St. George Island to perform there.

Tallahassee Community College opted to stay indoors and was able to bring the classic “It’s a Wonderful Life” to virtual life with a live-stream performance. The 11-member cast, featuring nine students and two alumni, offered a performance for a $12.95 streaming fee, which will help fund the school’s future theater productions. In an otherwise closed auditorium, performers stood at microphones, spaced out across the stage. Some even wore masks when they didn’t have lines or weren’t singing. It was very different, but the show must go on. “I think a lot of performers are aching in these times to just get up and get to do their craft. It is live theater,” said producer Eva Nielsen, the director of theater at TCC. “Performers feed off that audience response. It is hard, but we just do what we can to somehow make the best out of what the situation is. I think the community is doing an excellent job.” TM TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

91


expression

BOOKS

MAGIC AFOOT IN TUSCAN HILLS Marina Brown’s latest novel explores evil and its antidotes

by STEVE BORNHOFT

Author Marina Brown, a frequent contributor of articles to Tallahassee Magazine, drew upon her encounter while working as a psychiatric nurse with a psychosomatic patient as the basis for her novel, The Orphan of Pitigliano.

Y

ou learn about Marina Brown that she is a sailor, a painter, a cellist, a traveler, a former professional ballet dancer and a one-time nurse. You learn further that she is a writer of poems, short stories, novels and newspaper stories. And, then, as you get to know the woman beyond the sketch on her book jackets, you discover that she has a passion for pingpong, and you are not all that surprised. Brown, of Tallahassee, is not the sort of woman for whom anything goes, but she is someone for whom many things go. Knowing that, I should have studied the busy cover of her latest novel, The Orphan of Pitigliano, a little more closely than I did before reading the work. There was sure to be something there beyond the depiction of a Tuscan hilltop town and ochre figures and objects suggestive of cave paintings. And there was. The “O” in Orphan as it appears in the title on the cover is not merely an “O.”

92

March-April 2021

It is an easily overlooked eyeball with a bright blue iris, unblinking of course, and a wee disturbing — a representation of il malocchio. Brown, in Orphan, will not be confined to a single genre. It is not her nature or style. Instead, she artfully pingpongs between historical fiction and romantic fantasy. Complicating the latter is a jealous sort, Rebekah, with a bum leg and a superpower: She is possessed of an evil eye whose withering effects may be reversed only by people wielding artifacts infused with the magic of the past. Brown, at intervals, recounts the progress of World War II and in so doing, demonstrates convincingly her familiarity

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

with Italy and a command of history. She reminds us of mankind’s capacity for the most craven inhumanity and depicts wrenchingly the lengths to which Jews went to avoid death at the hands of the Germans and their allies, lengths that included abandoning one’s identity, assimilating to the outlook of the enemy and carrying out its wishes. Genocide provides the novel’s backdrop, and in the foreground, bitchiness advances the plot. There is much badness about, so much so that protagonist Giuliana, seen by her malevolent cousin Rebekah as a rival, concludes that “in the end, it is evil that triumphs and the powers of good that fall impotent.” photography by SAIGE ROBERTS


Relaxation Awaits Escape to Destin, Florida’s sole adults-only boutique hotel for an intimate vacation featuring rest and relaxation. Named one of the top 25 hotels in the United States by Tripadvisor, this 37-room, all-inclusive beachfront sanctuary gives its guests the opportunity to make memories, from toasting to a well-deserved break at the in-house restaurant, Beach Walk Cafe, to enjoying breathtaking views of Destin’s emerald green waters from the comfort of their suites. Call 888-853-9050 or visit www.hendersonparkinn.com to book your relaxing getaway today!

photo by Scott Holstein

2700 Scenic Highwa y 98, Destin, Florida 32541 | www .hendersonparkinn.com | 888-853-9050

BROOKS LAW ATTORNEYS AT LAW

School of Dance

OLIVIA M. BROOKS DIVORCE | FAMILY LAW

NOW ENROLLING SUMMER CAMPS AND SUMMER/FALL CLASSES FOR 2021 AGES 18 MONTHS-ADULT

1232 Timberlane Road · (850) 893-5900 · SharonDavisDance.com

(850) 201-0942 TALLAHASSEE - ATLANTA ADMITTED IN FLORIDA & GEORGIA BROOKSTRIALLAWYERS.COM TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

93


expression

↑ Characters in The Orphan of Pitigliano encounter evil adversaries in tight quarters — Etruscan caves turned tombs. Author Marina Brown once explored such a cave during a trip to Italy but left it undisturbed.

The novel opens in 1975 in Boston where we meet Giuliana, a long-shot war survivor about whom Brown’s book quite literally revolves. She has been rendered all but lifeless by Rebekah who, compelled by her nature to undo any success or joy that Giuliana experiences, has subjected her to an il malocchio spell. Sylvie and Carlo, who mistakenly believe that they are brother and sister — war and the separations it imposes can blur family lines — take care of their bedridden “aunt” Giuliana and make plans to travel to Italy to consult the mysteriously gifted Rosetta.

The novel then flashes back to war-torn Italy where it spends most of its time. Pivotal is an encounter between a band of Jewish refugees seeking shelter from the Nazi storm and young-buck members of the Armed Vigilance Corps of the Fascist Youth. The displaced include Giuliana, her parents and her cousins, Rebekah and Simon, and their parents. Rosetta, serving as their guide, has agreed to lead them through a tunnel that runs through the mountain of Pitigliano to safety within the walls of the city’s ghetto. The encounter turns deadly. Giuliana’s mother is clubbed to death after her Jewishness is detected, and her father is shot and killed after he retaliates by killing his mother’s attacker with a rock. Giuliana flees the scene with Rosetta, and the others survive by pretending to be Nazi sympathizers. The novel, at turns, is above and below ground as the reader becomes immersed in the lives of characters with assumed identities and of Giuliana who becomes effectively the adoptive daughter of Rosetta. She falls in love with her son Sergio and joins him in retrieving Etruscan trinkets from caves — some would call it grave robbing — and helping him lead Italian partisans versus Axis forces. Too, Giuliana becomes something of an understudy to Rosetta, who makes a part-time living in the war’s barter economy by undoing spells. Brown said she is not a believer, really, in il malocchio and such, but owns (just in case) totems, added to a keychain or serving as a light pull, that may neutralize an evil eye.

The novel derives from Brown’s own experiences. Working as a psychiatric nurse in an Italian neighborhood in Boston, she visited a bed-bound woman with a psychosomatic illness. “She had been visited by a priest who recommended that a swatch of her clothing be sent back to the old country,” Brown said. And, after the bit of nightgown reached Italy, the woman sat up and took nourishment. She once spent a night exploring an Etruscan cave and was influenced by a “magician” she met in Italy. Orphan earned Brown 2020 “Book of the Year” honors and a gold medal in historical fiction from the Florida Writers Association. In the novel, Rebekah surfaces repeatedly, a bad witch, a trip wire, a cold heart repelled by the warmth and moral consistency of Giuliana. Because Giuliana has won the heart of Sergio, she must steal him. Even Rebekah, however, recognizes Giuliana’s superiority as one “who survived with not guile, but grace.” Finally, when Giuliana succeeds in turning Rebekah’s evil against her, the bad seed succumbs. Still, there is a preponderance of evil in Orphan, evil of a sort that sadly cannot be repelled with goodness, necessitating resorts to magic. There is the intimation of Nazi atrocities, and the book has much to do with the preparedness of hard-hearted people to rationalize cold acts as “doing what one must.” But Giuliana survives, like a flower that germinates in a battlefield. TM

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Marina Brown is a former ballet dancer and nurse whose passions include art — she is a watercolorist — music and travel. Plus, she is a fair pingpong player. She has written for newspapers and magazines for 20 years and has collected writing awards, including first place in the Porter Fleming Short Story Contest and second place in the Loren Hemingway Contest for Short Stories. Her novel, The Orphan of Pitigliano, won 2020 Book of the Year honors from the Florida Writers Association.

94

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS


TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

95


PROMOTION

Javacya Arts Conservatory Presents Afro-Caribbean Arts Fest Series

T

hroughout history, music is an art form that unites us in the human experience. While this is true, music should also awaken us to its diversity, accentuating all races and cultures’ impact. Especially in their Afro-Caribbean Arts Fest series, this is a founding tenet of Javacya Arts Conservatory. Founded in 1981, Javacya Arts Conservatory is a college preparatory institute for ages 3 to 18, specializing in educational programs and private lessons. As a leading advocate for diversity in the performing arts, Javacya Arts Conservatory exists to allow students of color to participate in quality music education. The highly accomplished and impressive staff leads with the motto that they treat every student as if they will become a professional musician. The events hosted by Javacya serve as showcases to promote the wealth

of talent evident in these young, flourishing musicians. The Afro-Caribbean Arts Fest series will be the first time Javacya has devoted an entire series exclusively to showcasing the musical accomplishments of people of color. The makeup of the orchestras and featured composers will be solely racial minorities. “What this series will put on display is the diversity that often gets overlooked,” said Patrice Floyd, founding director of Javacya. “American symphonies are losing their audiences and money because they lack diversity. In this series, we are bringing to the forefront talented artists who deserve respect so audiences can experience their performances and recognize their existence in a society where there is a dearth of information about black and brown people in the arts.” On Sunday, March 21, Ralph Jean-Paul — Javacya senior conductor, tubist, Florida A&M University

professor, and Ph.D. candidate at Florida State University — will perform a joint solo classical tuba recital with Hope Ward, a talented 17-year-old violist under the conducting baton of Jean-Paul at Javacya. Ward has an impressive musical resume ranging from principal violist of Javacya Elite Chamber Orchestra to Tallahassee Youth Orchestra to Sphinx Academy at the Juilliard School. The concert will take place virtually, and all proceeds directly benefit students by funding programs, purchasing instruments and private lessons. “At the end of our concerts, people don’t leave their seats because they’ve experienced a journey,” said Floyd. “This series will be uplifting with diverse representation, and I’m looking forward to people broadening their understanding of who is performing in this world.” To learn more or donate, visit javacyaarts.com.

JAVACYA ARTS CONSERVATORY 1100 TANNER DRIVE | (850) 590-1517 | JAVACYAARTS.COM

96

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


Formerly Florida Disabled Outdoors Association Weekly Virtual Fitness and Active Leisure Activities In-Person Inclusive Recreation Activities

Discover

SportsAbility.org (850) 201-2944

Inclusive Recreation

$159 Off Initial Records when you mention this ad drb4braces.com | (850) 656-3917 3051 Highland Oaks Trail, Suite 4, Tallahassee TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

97


PROMOTION

Entice, Excite and Expand Your Target Audience Visitors Guide captures the beauty, vibrancy and variety of Panama City Beach

R

owland Publishing has long been a partner in the evolution of the Visitors Guide published by Visit Panama City Beach, the promotional arm of the Panama City Beach Convention & Visitors Bureau. Today’s brilliantly illustrated Visitors Guide provides an inviting sampler of all that the home of the World’s Most Beautiful Beaches offers, from events and attractions to accommodations and daytrips and, of course, the glorious white sandy beach itself. RPI has worked

with Visit Panama City Beach by generating content for the magazine, selling advertising and serving as a distribution consultant. Throughout the relationship, RPI has joined in occasional redesigns of the publication to ensure that it remains fresh and consistent with Visit Panama City Beach’s latest marketing campaigns. Thousands of people throughout the United States and beyond have used the Visitors Guide to plan some of the most memorable vacations of their lives.

» DO YOU NEED HELP WITH A CUSTOM PUBLISHING PROJECT? Contact us today to learn how Rowland Publishing can help make your upcoming project a success. For more information, visit RowlandPublishing.com.

98

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Over the years, Visit Panama City Beach has developed a strong working relationship with the team at Rowland Publishing. They have been engaged every step of the way in the transition of our Visitors Guide. Together we have exponentially grown our subscriber list, created eye-catching material and visually encompassed everything the Real. Fun. Beach. has to offer! The team at Rowland Publishing is incredibly reliable, efficient and professional.

JAYNA LEACH VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKETING


Learn to soar like an eagle with three pulse-racing aerial adventure courses, all offering captivating views of Florida’s natural wilds. Zip through canopied oaks to towering pine trees with our Soaring Cypress, Canopy Crossing and kid-friendly Treemendous Adventures. All are sure to bring out your wild side.

tallahasseemuseum.org

TM-0004_AirBorn-TallahasseeMagazine_v4.indd 1

1/8/21 10:43 AM

Thompson, Crawford, Brown & Smiley is pleased to announce that Mallory Brown has been named a partner. Congratulations, Mallory! Protecting our clients and promoting our community for over 25 years.

D SPONSOR O OU PR HASSEE MAGAZ F TA L

2020

IN

S E’

LA

BEST

Divorce | Employment Law | Bankruptcy | Probate/Estate | Business Law Personal Injury | Family Law | Foreclosure Construction Law | Contracts

TA L

of

L A H A SSE

E

Attorneys Admitted to Practice in Florida and Georgia | Offices in Tallahassee and Tampa 1330 Thomasville Road, Tallahassee | TallahasseeTrialLawyer.com | P: 850-386-5777 | F: 850-386-8507 TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

99


PHOTOGR APHY: COLLEEN DUFFLE Y

THE PRIDE OF A MASTER CR AFTSMAN When old-world craft meets new-world technology, an unprecedented level of quality is birthed. At E. F. San Juan, the quality and long-term function of our woodwork are the keys to creating elements that will transform a house into your dream home.

E F SA N J UA N .COM

100

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


Abodes

MAR/APR 2021

TRENDS FROM FLOOR TO CEILING, FRONT TO BACK

INTERIORS

HANG IN THERE ↓

In decorating walls, your own instincts may be best by MARINA BROWN

PHOTOS BY KATARZYNABIALASIEWICZ / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

Gallery arrangement of different sizes of framed art makes for a nice visual break from uniformity.

EXTERIORS

Siding by Siding Comparison

|| GREEN SCENE

Brightening the Spring Landscape

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

101


abodes →

W

hen Aunt Minnie passed on, Sara, a homeowner, was faced with what to do with the dozen family photographs Minnie had bequeathed her along with a note saying she hoped they would all go on Sara’s wall. Next door to Sara, Betty, another homeowner, stood staring at an empty wall, while a stack of framed awards, a billboard-sized abstract painting and a swatch of tattered weaving she’d found in Tibet sat brooding at her feet. Indecision prevailed, and at this point Betty felt like dumping the whole lot in the closet with her 20 never worn straw hats. Both of these women — we may have made them up, but their circumstances are real enough — needed to know how to “hang” a wall? Designers know about furnishings and rugs. But they also know about color, volume, balance and focus — all the things needed for the task. So, we asked a few. Jackie McHaffie of Designs Unlimited said, “Wall hangings are like accessories. Get everything else in place first, including your color scheme and furniture arrangement.”

102

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

McHaffie said that while grouping according to a theme like “flowers” or “horse paintings” may work well, it’s also energizing to have an “eclectic” wall with no theme at all. “Because rooms in contemporary homes are often open to other nearby spaces, it’s also important to consider how your wall hangings will sync with other rooms that feed into them.” Rachel Bowden of Rachel Bowden Design, agrees and says that while there’s no hard rule, every wall doesn’t actually need something on it. “The eye needs someplace to rest, to have a wall without a visual stimulus,” she said. However, on the walls you do decorate, you can make mixed sizes work well together as in a “gallery” arrangement with a variety of shapes and sizes mounted together. “Or use only two or three larger pieces, like a triptych or diptych, or perhaps above a sofa, one large work that can stand alone.” Tracy Williams, owner of Decorating Den Interiors, is careful to lay out any art before putting a hole in a wall.

Plates, displayed singly or in groups, can make for good, eye-catching conversation starters.

PHOTOS BY ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS: KATARZYNABIALASIEWICZ (TOP) ANDALISLUCH (PLATE)

Designer Jackie McHaffie recommends that wall hangings be added to a room after other elements, including furniture and a color scheme, have been established.


WE’LL GO OUT ON A LIMB FOR YOU! 5 CERTIFIED ARBORISTS ON STAFF | RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL TREE SERVICE ASK US ABOUT TREE FERTILIZATION AND PINE BEETLE TREATMENTS

2009–2020

24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE MillerTreeSrv.com admin@millertreesrv.com 4951 Woodlane Circle Call us for a FREE NO CONTACT ESTIMATE. We are committed to following all CDC guidelines to keep you and our team safe.

850-894-TREE (8733)

WHAT’S ON YOUR HOME IMPROVEMENT WISH LIST? save

ENERGY

save

MONEY

save

WATER

The City of Tallahassee Utilities offers a variety of rebates, grants and loans that help make your savings wish list come true. Visit Talgov.com to learn more.

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

103


BUYING OR SELLING THIS SPRING? CALL JOAN FOR EXPERT SERVICE!

abodes

↑ Murals add a dramatic aspect to rooms and can be applied to walls with adhesives that do not leave a mark.

Joan H. Raley, REALTOR® CRS, CDPE, SFR, e-PRO, GRI, ABR, CHMS, WCR | Home Economist, Broker/Owner

Mobile & Text: 850.545.9390 JOAN@JOANRALEY.COM | JoanRaley.com

“I use craft paper cut to a picture’s size and stick it up with painter’s tape to see the display on the wall, or I lay the whole design out on the floor first.” She emphasizes balance, especially in groupings. “The strips of wall you see between the art should be equal to give cohesion, even if what is displayed is varied.” Other art experts suggest it’s fun to be bold. To be adventurous. Hang on your walls the unexpected: Mirrors expand a room and draw in light. A wall covered in a variety of mirror sizes and shapes can be sheer art. ■  Murals can cover a wall and be mounted with removable adhesive, turning a tiny alcove into a flowered bower or a boys’ playroom into a brilliant beach. ■  Plates, especially beautifully painted or antique platters, become conversation pieces and may even capture memories of family, ancestors or even a favorite novel. ■  Basket groupings provide an organic, casual feel when wall-mounted. And just for fun, they can be moved around from nail to nail or have some fresh flowers placed inside. ■  And don’t forget shelves. If your prized possessions are glass or metal, perhaps their linear display is just the dramatic focus your wall needs.

BUILDING TRUST WITH QUALITY WORK

WE GET THE JOB DONE! » MOLD REMEDIATION (LIC#MRSR3457)

» FIRE/SMOKE DAMAGE & RESTORATION

» CONTENTS/PACK-OUTS

» FULL-SERVICE CLEANING » TRAUMA & CRIME SCENE CLEANUP

» DEMOLITION &

REPAIR SERVICES (LIC#CRC1328335)

RECON Restoration & Reconstruction, LLC 5772 Mandy Lane, Tallahassee (850) 755-0628 • Recon-Restoration.com

104

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

So, what about Sara and Betty? With the advice of a couple of good designers, Sara culled some of Aunt Minnie’s faded photos, arranging them in a book instead, and created a sophisticated black-and-white picture grouping on her verdigris wall. And Betty? Betty had a revelation as she tossed her possibilities into the closet and gathered up the hats from the floor instead. Now, scattered across her wall are the memories of dozens of summers, straw circles that seem to dance in the sun and shade. TM

PHOTOS BY KATARZYNABIALASIEWICZ / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS


BEFORE

OUR BENEFITS

One Day Installations‡ ‡Most Bath Fitter tub installations are completed in one day. Some exceptions apply. See location for full details.

Two Million Installs

THE BATH YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED Installed in as little as one day Every Bath Fitter bath is installed quickly, safely and beautifully, with a lifetime warranty. Go from old to new. From worn to wow. The beautiful bath you’ve always wanted — done right, installed by one expert technician all in one day. We’ve been creating moments like these for 35 years — and we’re here to help you get started. Book your FREE design CONSULTATION today!

No Demolition

B AT H F I T T E R . C O M

850-641-8640 1570A CAPITAL CIRCLE NW, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 License # CFC1427382. TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

105


Esposito’s TA L L A H A S S E E ’ S #1 C A M E L L I A S O U RC E

S I N C E 1969

Ray Gentry

Ray Gentry Var.

Elizabeth B. Hunt Anne Hightower

Campari

Carter’s Sunburst

Jenny Maphis

Randolph Maphis

Fannie Maphis

Vince Dooley

Daikagura

Debutante

Frank Houser

Frank Houser Var.

Hulyn Smith

Holy Pure

Fashionista

Governor Mouton

Evening Glow

Alba Plena

Betty Sheffield

Black Magic

Kramer’s Supreme

Laura Walker

Black Tie

Bob Hope

Bobbie Fain Var.

Brilliant

Marie Bracey

Purple Dawn

Royal Velvet

Sawada’s Dream

Sea Foam

Tomorrow Var.

Tomorrow’s Dawn

Victory White

W W W. E S P O S I TO G A R D E N C E N T E R . CO M 106

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


As Tallahassee’s most progressive gardening resource, Esposito’s maintains the best selection of Camellias around. We have a fantastic assortment of early, mid, and late season bloomers for sun or shade, in a wide range of sizes to suit any garden. From crowd-pleasing classics to new and improved specimens, there are literally hundreds of beautiful Camellias to choose from. Need help getting started? Stop by Esposito’s for an in-person tutorial! We’ll help you choose the most beautiful specimen in the nursery, teach you when to fertilize, and show you how to prune your Camellias like a pro.

Christmas

Dahlonega

Prof. Charles Sargent

Bev Ritter

Deep Purple

Don-Mac

Pink Perfection

Our Linda

Gunsmoke

Helen Bower

Tea Camellia

Shi Shi Gashira

Formal Double

Sadaharu Oh

Man Size

Margaret Davis

Yule Tide

Magic Carpet

Crimson & Clover

Magic Ruby

Morning Glow

Mrs. RL Wheeler

Leslie Ann

Lavender Pink

Pink Anemone

White Shi Shi

Grape Soda

Star Above Star

Omega

Mine-no-Yuki

Irrational Exuberance Taylor’s Perfection

Local Delivery, Professional Installation & Maintenance Available! Call 850-386-2114 for details.

O P E N 7 D AY S A W E E K  2 7 4 3 C A P I TA L C I R C L E N E TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

107


abodes

EXTERIORS

SIDING BY SIDING COMPARISON Maintenance-free options may lack durability by THOMAS J. MONIGAN

108

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

S

iding is a key element in the overall appearance of a house, and contemporary options are attractive. Scott Williams, a sales manager at NRG Industries Inc., and Debbie Reynolds, owner of Reynolds Home Builders, suggest alternatives to traditional materials such as wood, metal, brick and stone. “Nowadays, there are three main types of siding,” Williams said, “PVC composite, vinyl and fiber cement, or what most people refer to as Hardie board.” In his experience, most clients pick a siding based on their household budget. While vinyl may be the most cost-effective and maintenancefriendly option, many new homeowners are electing to invest in fiber cement. However, this material does

need to be refreshed with paint every six to eight years. “I’ve had fiber cement on my house for the past 20 years,” Reynolds added. “So long as you keep it caulked and painted, it will last. It won’t rot, and you won’t have any problems with wood-boring bees or termites.” Unlike vinyl, fiber cement siding is usually created to mimic another material, typically natural wood. Its composition consists of cement, sand and cellulose fiber. While durable and aesthetically pleasing, it is harder to install than composite siding made of other materials. A composite, Oriented Strand Board (OSB), is made from sawdust with a bonding agent for extra strength. It resembles natural wood, making it a popular option, but OSB may be susceptible to water damage

PHOTOS BY PC PHOTOGRAPHY / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

↖ Fiber cement board, pictured here, presents some installation challenges but typically comes with a 30- or 40-year warranty.


CONVENIENCE AND CONTROL

Audio Video Connections PROFESSIONAL DESIGN & INSTALLATION Home Theater | Networking | Home Automation

MARK ICE, OWNER

(850) 251-4931 | MarkIce.net | Mark@MarkIce.net

TA L

2020

S E’

SSEE MAGAZ HA IN LA

BEST

EXPERIENCE

TA L

of

L A H A SSE

E

KNOWLEDGE

QUALITY

PEACE OF MIND

Better Business Bureau A+ Rating Storm Damage Experts Metal Roofing Options

Owens Corning Platinum Contractor Licensed & Insured Residential & Commercial

4740 MAHAN DRIVE | TALLAHASSEE | 850.728.8101 | TALLAHASSEEROOFINGCOMPANY.NET

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

109


abodes

EVERYTHING FOR THE BACKYARD BIRDER BIRD FOOD | FEEDERS | GARDEN ACCENTS | UNIQUE GIFTS

2098 Thomasville Road | (850) 576-0002 Shop online at MyWBU.com/Tallahassee

and is one of the most expensive sidings on the market. However, you won’t have to paint this product, and Reynolds recommends investing in quality to achieve longevity. When choosing your siding, it’s important to seek a reputable company with years of experience and references for proper installation. Reynolds further recommends a trip to a local paint store that offers durable paints in stylish hues from companies, including Sherwin Williams and Benjamin Moore. “You’ll want to select a high-quality paint that can withstand sun exposure and won’t chalk up on you as fast,” Reynolds said. Lastly, it is important to consider your home’s location. In sunny, humid and hurricane-prone Tallahassee, you’ll need a siding that can withstand the elements. Vinyl, while cheap and trendy, can come with its own share of problems. “Vinyl has to be properly installed because it tends to swell and contract depending on the weather,” said Reynolds. “It cracks, fades and, if you have hurricane damage, you will find it difficult to replace the exact vinyl on your house with a matching product.” “You’re not allowed to use any vinyl products in St. George anymore due to the fact every time a storm comes through, it sucks it right off,” added Williams. “Everlast composite siding is the only exterior siding that has a hurricane rating, so it’s a very good product for coastal application.” Hurricane Michael in 2018 had a major impact on the local siding market. People have discovered that if a storm blows your siding into the street, it’s no longer maintenance-free. “The cheapest product doesn’t always equal the best,” Williams said. TM Hannah Burke contributed to this story.

110

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PHOTOS BY VOLGARIVER / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

↑ Vinyl siding, once popular because it is so easily maintained, has proven to be a poor match for powerful storms.


Join Air Control Club and take advantage of our new maintenance program for as low as $110 per year.

AIR CONTROL HEATING AND COOLING

850.713.5567 CAC1817885

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

111


abodes

GREEN SCENE

BRIGHTENING THE SPRING LANDSCAPE Season of renewal is time for plants of many colors by

LES HARRISON

S

pring is truly the season of renewal in Tallahassee, heralding the return of blooms and activities in the garden and about the yard. Now is the time to prepare for horticultural success. At the top of the list for managed landscapes is the installation of annuals and bedding plants. Moderate temperatures will make the work almost a pleasure. Warm season annuals offer an almost infinite variety of color, texture and plant forms that can be used to brighten landscape beds and add a splash of color to a porch, deck or patio if placed in containers. A few also make good cut

AGAPANTHUS

flower selections to enhance interior environments. In North Florida, most flourish for only a single season. These annuals can be damaged by late frosts or freezes, so they should be planted after the potential for frost has passed but with enough time to reach their peak maturity. March is typically an ideal time to plant bulbs in the home landscape. Some like caladiums can be planted all year but run the risk of damage if not protected from a late frost. Dahlias, crinums and agapanthus are also good candidates.

There are a number of cool season crops that can be replanted for FRUITS AND another round of production. Radishes are almost guaranteed to VEGETABLES have time to produce another crop. Other potential second harvests include kale, cabbage, broccoli and other brassicas. Of course, the yield will depend on the weather remaining cool long enough for the plants to properly develop. While February is too early to prune citrus trees, it is time to get the first round of fertilizer applied. Pruning will stimulate growth that could cause damage to the tree if there is a late frost or freeze. Wait until late March, at the earliest, to prune. This is the month to plant Irish, white or new potatoes, but hold off on sweet potatoes or yams. Potatoes prefer loose, well-drained soil with a slightly acidic pH in the range of 5.0 to 6.0. Care must be taken to ensure the root zone has adequate drainage. Areas of the home garden subject to periodic flooding should not be used for growing this tuber.

112

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

RADISH

Some native trees add to spring’s splendor. Sparkleberries produce hundreds of tiny bell-shaped blooms that give the plant the appearance of a frosty wrap. Sparkleberry (Vaccinium arboretum) is the only North American member of the blueberry genus capable of reaching the height of a small tree. Mature specimens can reach up to 30 feet in height and will take full sun or partial shade. Their bark is thin, flaky and brownish red, and often covered in lichens. The trunk may be multi-stemmed and given to wildly twisting shapes that SPARKLEBERRY offer a distinct contrast to straight trunked trees. The flowering dogwood, Cornus florida, is a subcanopy tree that grows in much of the eastern and southern United States. Blooms are commonly white, but there are pink and DOGWOOD red cultivars. The pink and red varieties are difficult to establish in North Florida. Sub-canopy trees commonly grow under much taller species and thrive in partial shade. Dogwoods reach about 30 feet in height but can handle direct sun. CRABAPPLE These trees are most commonly found in fertile, well-drained soil. They do best in neutral to slightly acidic soil with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.0, and they have a low tolerance for salinity. Local crabapples produce pink blooms with five dainty petals. The southern crabapple, Malus angustifolia, shares many characteristics with dogwoods. These sub-canopy trees reach about the same height, and both bloom at approximately the same time in spring. While usually found under taller trees, they, too, can handle full sun. Both trees provide food for wildlife in the form of their fruit, retaining the product of their blooms well into the autumn. Crabapple fruit has been used as the basis of jellies for hundreds of years but not for fresh consumption. Related to larger apples, the astringent, bitter taste of crabapples eliminates any possibility of it being a snack option.

Les Harrison is a retired University of Florida/ Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Wakulla County Extension Director.

PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON (SPARKLEBERRY AND CRABAPPLE) AND ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS: NAHHAN (AGAPANTHUS), STEPHANIEFREY (DOGWOOD), IRINA_GIRICH (RADISH)

Flowering native trees


Everything You Need for Spring

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

113


PROMOTION

DEAL ESTATE

JUST SOLD

Beautiful Contemporary Style Home Just Sold! This beautiful contemporary home, located on a 3-acre lot in Northshire, is now off the market. Featuring three bedrooms and 2½ baths, this gem overlooks the lake and its gorgeous sunset views. As soon as you walk through the front door, original hardwood floors lead to a large living and dining area — perfect for any holiday gathering. The beautifully updated kitchen boasts granite countertops and stainless-steel appliances while overlooking a separate family room. Upstairs, you’ll find a spacious master suite with a fantastic view. This is the perfect house for all your entertaining needs. SOLD PRICE: $455,000 ADDRESS: 8045 Tennyson Drive SQUARE FOOTAGE: 3,538 BEDROOMS: 4 BATHROOMS: 2.5 YEAR BUILT: 1984

APPEAL: This home is perfect for a family — big or small. You will want to spend a good amount of time in the updated kitchen. All the amenities make this home perfect for gatherings and get-togethers. CONTACT INFORMATION: Coldwell Banker, Lisa Montgomery-Calvert, (850) 556-1226, lisamcalvert@outlook.com

114

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PHOTOS COURTESY OF 323MEDIA

FEATURES: This home has 9-plus-foot ceilings, a two-car garage, original hardwood floors throughout, updated kitchen with granite countertops and stainless-steel appliances, a spacious master suite and many other outstanding features. In addition to three bedrooms, there is an office that can be a fourth bedroom if desired. Home includes multiple fireplaces and is located on three acres with a spacious back deck overlooking a landscaped backyard.


3303 Thomasville Road · 850.386.6160 · cbhartung.com

sPRINGTIME tALLAHASSEE 1970

PHOTO cOURTESY OF fLORIDA mEMORY

Celeating er 40 ears of service!

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

115


PROMOTION

DEAL ESTATE

JUST LISTED

Experience the Richness and Warmth of this Lakefront Sanctuary on 15 Acres Located in northeast Tallahassee, this homesite offers ample room for horses and features a lighted tennis court. The main house features a chef’s kitchen with bar-top seating and opens to a formal dining room, living room with wet bar, den with word-burning fireplace and formal study. Guest house includes a bedroom, bathroom, kitchenette, gym, large living/game room and two-car garage. Sit back and relax on the multiple covered porches or walk-out brick terrace, and enjoy family dinners beneath the pergola.

SOLD PRICE: $1,530,000 ADDRESS: 7233 Anhinga Farms Road SQUARE FOOTAGE: • 9,289 total square feet • 7,585 SF, heated and cooled • 5,585 SF, air-conditioned space • ,304 SF, covered porches (main house) • 2,400 SF, guest house • 1,980 SF, barn BEDROOMS: 6 BATHROOMS: 6 full, 2 half YEAR BUILT: 1970, fully renovated in 2016

APPEAL: Nestled in Northeast Tallahassee, this luxury residence welcomes you home with over 15 waterfront acres. Pastures allow ample room for horses, and the property offers over 700 feet of private lake frontage. CONTACT INFORMATION: Hettie Spooner, (850) 509-4337 hettie@hillspooner.com

116

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PHOTOS COURTESY OF 323MEDIA

FEATURES: The main house offers approximately 6,889 GSF of indoor and outdoor living space (5,585 SF conditioned space; 1,304 SF covered porches). The home underwent a complete renovation in 2016. Main house includes 5 bedrooms, 5 ½ baths, den, study and covered porches on both levels, front and rear. The guest house offers approximately 2,400 GSF of indoor living space (2,000 SF, conditioned space). This space underwent a complete renovation in 2016. The barn offers approximately 1,980 GSF of storage space (1,560 SF enclosed; 420 SF covered parking) and was constructed in 2016 with two overhead doors and double sliding barn doors; 12-foot ceiling height. Fiber cement siding and metal roof. Tennis court with lights and Pro Dunk basketball goal.


MAYS-MUNROE & the sleep center THE ONLY NAME YOU NEED TO KNOW!

(850) 385-9495

I

2791 CAPITAL CIRCLE NE

SHOWROOM HOURS MONDAY–FRIDAY 9–5, SATURDAY 9–5, SUNDAY CLOSED

SERVICE

SELECTION

SATISFACTION

SINCE 1936

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

117


calendar PROMOTION

MAR/APR 2021 For more events in Tallahassee, visit TallahasseeMagazine.com. compiled by JAVIS OGDEN and REBECCA PADGETT

J’NAI BRIDGES, MEZZO-SOPRANO MARCH 1 The Thomasville Entertainment Foundation welcomes heralded rising star J’nai Bridges to the stage as part of its classics series. The plush-voiced American mezzosoprano has graced the world’s top opera and concert stages. tefconcerts.com

MAX WEINBERG’S JUKEBOX

MAR. 27

STREETLIGHT CADENCE

→ Streetlight Cadence is a fun, fresh, energetic group known for their “punk-folk” style. The band creates their signature sound with violin, cello, accordion, guitar, drums and outstanding vocals. Don’t miss this exciting evening of great music for the whole family on March 27 at The Moon.

OpeningNights.fsu.edu/events/streetlight-cadence.

Rock & Roll Hall of Famer Max Weinberg, known for his nearly 44-year association with Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band, brings power, dynamism, versatility and chops to all of his musical aggregations. Max Weinberg’s Jukebox is loaded with a wide range of classic songs that engage the audience in a truly interactive concert experience. openingnights.fsu.edu

JEANNE ROBERTSON MARCH 6 APR. 9–18

LeMoyne Chain of Parks Art Festival

→ The LeMoyne Chain of Parks Art Festival, held each

spring in downtown Tallahassee, has been expanded for 2021 to include the Zerbe Zelebration, artist workshops and an event featuring the presenting artist for FSU’s Opening Nights performing arts series in addition to the Artists In the Parks event on April 17 and 18.

For more information and COVID-19 safety guidelines, please visit ChainofParks.com.

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

118

March-April 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic may affect the events listed here. Consult websites to obtain the latest information on their status.

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Jeanne Robertson is 77, has attracted more than 100 million YouTube views and has published four books. Robertson’s witty depictions of everyday situations never fail to have her audiences rolling with laughter. openingnights.fsu.edu

SPRINGTIME TALLAHASSEE FESTIVAL & GRAND PARADE MAY 14–15 Celebrate spring with over 100

HAVE AN EVENT YOU’D LIKE US TO CONSIDER? Send an email to sbornhoft@rowlandpublishing.com.

PHOTOS BY SAIGE ROBERTS (LEMOYNE CHAIN OF PARKS ART FESTIVAL) AND COURTESY OF OPENING NIGHTS (STREETLIGHT CADENCE)

MARCH 4


MULTI-FUNCTION PRINTERS (SALES & SERVICE) | 3D PRINTING | BUSINESS PRINTING | CUSTOMER SERVICE

“We count on COPYFAX. Having COPYFAX as our partner is knowing that we have a team member who is easy to work with, reliable, and dependable. Top-notch products and service from the COPYFAX team helps Coppins Monroe, P.A. provide topnotch service to our clients, which is our No. 1 priority.” — Holly Dincman, Attorney at Law, Coppins Monroe, P.A 3135 ELIZA ROAD, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32308 | 850-671-6663 HOLLY DINCMAN TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

119


calendar

$20 OFF HAIR COLOR!

VISIT THE AVEDA INSTITUTE TODAY FOR $20 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!

2020 W PENSACOLA ST TALLAHASSEE, FL 32304

OFFER VALID AT AVEDA INSTITUTES TALLAHASSEE FOR FIRST-TIME GUESTS ONLY. USE CODE: TALLYMAG. CALL (850)576-4287 OR VISIT BEAVEDA.COM TO BOOK.

MAR/APR 2021

floats, marching bands, dance groups and the lively Springtime Krewes. The event kicks off Friday night with main stage entertainment in Kleman Plaza. Saturday’s festivities include the Grand Parade, the Kids’ Park and Jubilee in the Park — under the oaks in the gorgeous Downtown Chain of Parks. springtimetallahassee.com

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA LIVESTREAM MARCH 19 Listen and enjoy from the comfort of your couch as Florida State University’s College of Music presents the University Philharmonia Orchestra.

Business Insurance Specialists: Will Croley, Angie Hearl, Mary Katharine (Croley) Lawler, Doug Croley

We Focus on Your Insurance So You Can Focus on Your Business We Focus on Your Insurance So You Can Focus on YourGreen Business Circle 2814 Remington

• (850) 386-1922 • dougcroleyins.com

2814 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, FL 850-386-1922 • www.dougcroleyins.com

Committed, Trusted, Local

tallahasseearts.org/event/florida-stateuniversity-philharmonia-orchestra-livestream

AN EVENING IN PARIS MARCH 25 Top prizewinners at several international competitions and currently Lisa Arnhold Fellows at Juilliard, the dynamic Ulysses Quartet collaborates with renowned Canadian violin soloist Lara St. John and innovative pianist Matt Herskowitz to perform chamber works by French composers Ravel, Debussy and Chausson. tefconcerts.com

MÁIRÉAD NESBITT ENSEMBLE APRIL 1 2020

For more than a decade, Grammyand Emmy-nominated artist and composer Máiréad Nesbitt has enchanted millions of fans around the world as the Celtic violinist. In her new production, “Celtic Spells,” Nesbitt tells the story of star-crossed lovers who are forbidden by their religions from being together. 

S E’

TA L

SSEE MAGAZ HA IN LA

BEST TA L

of

L A H A SSE

E

openingnights.fsu.edu

SPORTSABILITY 2020

Thank you for voting Paul's Pest Control the BEST! It is an honor to serve Tallahassee. 254 E 6th Ave | (850) 222-6808 | CallPauls.com 120

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

APRIL 8–10 Join the Florida Disabled Outdoors Association for three days of virtual and live programs. SportsAbility enhances the lives of people with disabilities by promoting active living and providing

firsthand access to resources and activities designed to encourage participation regardless of age or ability level. fdoa.org/sportsability-tallahassee

WORD OF SOUTH FESTIVAL APRIL 9-11 Writers, musicians and artists converge to explore and celebrate the relationships among these disciplines by combining spoken word and live music performances. The event will be socially distanced while providing an outstanding lineup of artists and performers. wordofsouthfestival.com

COUNT BASIE ORCHESTRA APRIL 13 They’ve played for kings and queens, appeared in movies and on TV and collected 18 Grammy awards. Under FSU Professor Scotty Barnhart’s direction and celebrating 85 years, the Count Basie Orchestra still swings and shouts the blues with precision, maintaining their reign as “the most explosive force in jazz.” tefconcerts.com

MICHAEL ROSATO APRIL 15 Michael Rosato specializes in designing and painting largescale murals for public and private spaces. Mr. Rosato has been commissioned to create artworks for display in museum exhibits, corporate headquarters, retail spaces, restaurants, sports arenas, outdoor venues and private residences. He is this year’s Chain of Parks Art Festival’s presenting artist. openingnights.fsu.edu

SONS OF MYSTRO APRIL 16 Siblings and violinists Malcolm and Umoja are the Sons of Mystro. Mentored by iconic violin/viola duo Black Violin, Sons of Mystro are garnering national attention for their fresh and fun interpretation of classic songs. They use their violins to interpret reggae classics, American pop songs and their own creations accompanied by a DJ and a drummer. openingnights.fsu.edu


During these challenging times, we remain open and dedicated to safely serving our cancer patients.

Your treatment.

Our Journey.

You don’t plan for a cancer diagnosis. You begin to worry about your family, friends, work and health. Florida Cancer Specialists will be by your side — throughout the journey. Our doctors and nurses provide personalized, targeted treatment and clinical expertise so you can have peace of mind. And with world-class care that’s close to home, we’re always here to help. We’ll give you the strength to move forward — every step of the way.

Proud to serve patients at our three Tallahassee locations. Tallahassee East: 1600 Phillips Road, Suite 300 Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Call: (850) 877-8166

Tallahassee North: 2626 Care Drive, Suite 200 Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Call: (850) 219-5830

Viralkumar Bhanderi, MD Paresh Patel, MD

Paresh Patel, MD Scott Tetreault, MD

Gynecologic Oncology of Tallahassee, A Division of Florida Cancer Specialists: 2626 Care Drive, Suite 101, Tallahassee, FL 32308 Call: 1-888-GYNONC1 FLCancer.com

Margarett Ellison, MD

TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

121


PROMOTION

SOCIAL STUDIES Tallahassee Turkey Trot NOV. 26 On Thanksgiving Day, the crowd that usually occupies SouthWood was scattered across Tallahassee due to COVID-19. For the 2020 Tallahassee Turkey Trot, runners were asked not to pack together but instead to pick their own time and place to run. Race organizers hope to be back on Esplanade next year.

1

2

PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY VARIOUS RACE PARTICIPANTS

1 Back Row – Brent Johnson (Gramps), Andrew and Alexis Bakofsky with Mark Mathias; Front Row – Jane Johnson (Grams), Mycah Mathias, Hayden Mathias, Josephine Bakofsky, Leo Bakofsky and Kara Mathias 2 Sherri Wise and Hal Davis 3 Mickey and Shane Moore 4 Jack McDermott and Joe Vega

TA L

SSEE MAGAZ HA IN LA

2020

S E’

WORLD CLASS FEATURES & SERVICE

3

BEST

of (850) 999-8182 REFINERYBARRE.COM 1894 THOMASVILLE ROAD CAPITAL PLAZA TA L

L A H A SSE

IN-STUDIO CLASSES / ZOOM CLASSES / ON DEMAND VIDEO LIBRARY OF CLASSES ALSO AVAILABLE

122

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

E

4


FACIAL REJUVENATION

results to

not actual patients

embrace

CELEBRATING

YE A R

S

CELEBRATING YE A R

S

where expertise matters

Achieve stunning results with personalized facial procedures to improve sagging in the midface, loss of volume tone that results in jowls, loose skin or fatty deposits under the chin and jaw or deep creases below eyelids or near the nose or mouth. Facial rejuvenation services include: ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Facial Implants Lower Facial Surgery Facial Fat Grafting Eyelid Surgery Brow Lift

~ ~ ~ ~

Ear Surgery Neck Lift Rhinoplasty Physician Performed Chemical Peels

LEARN MORE AND WATCH DR. KIRBO DISCUSS SURGICAL FACIAL REJUVENATION ON OUR VIDEO GALLERY AT

www.se-plasticsurgery.com

Ben J. Kirbo, M.D. ~ Laurence Z. Rosenberg, M.D. Chris DeRosier, M.D. CERTIFIED BY THE AMERICAN BOARD OF PLASTIC SURGERY

Creative Solutions Crushed Deadlines Amazing Outcomes WE'LL HELP YOU

STAY ON TARGET

850.219.2000

2030 Fleischmann Rd. ~ Tallahassee, FL

8 5 0 . 6 7 1 . 6 6 0 0 | W W W. TA RG ET P R IN T MAIL.CO M TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

123


PROMOTION

Investing in the Community

with the Community Foundation of North Florida

and its donors, and I’m surprised that it remains one of Tallahassee’s best kept secrets. Five years ago, they showed me how I could invest in our community in a way that reaps dividends, not just for the organizations I care about, but for my own bottom line. It’s a smart way to give back, and I’m certain Cliff would be proud.” Contact the Community Foundation of North Florida to learn more about how they can assist you in achieving your charitable giving goals while benefitting from the greatest tax advantages allowed by law.

COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF NORTH FLORIDA 3600 MACLAY BLVD. S., SUITE 200 | (850) 222-2899 | CFNF.ORG

124

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRITTANY MORGAN PHOTOGRAPHY

T

he importance of investing in our community is something Lee Hinkle knows firsthand. The retired FSU vice president shared a passion for education, sports and the arts with her late husband Cliff, a retired wealth manager, and together they supported each other and their causes for years. “Fortunately, we were successful in our careers, so it was always important to us that we give back,” Lee said. “A lot changed when Cliff became ill, but one thing that didn’t was our commitment to this community. For years, we’d written checks to support the organizations we cared about. With his background in financial advising, we frequently gave gifts of appreciated stock, but when Cliff died, the way I gave changed. I was looking for a simpler, more streamlined option for giving. The Community Foundation of North Florida was the perfect solution.” Using the sale of appreciated stock, Lee set up a Donor Advised Fund and earned an income tax deduction without incurring any capital gains taxes. She says this fund helped simplify her efforts to support the organizations that are important to her. “Not only is the process easy, it’s also beneficial to nonprofit organizations that may not have the ability to accept a gift of stock,” says Lee. “I am so thankful for the staff at the Community Foundation. They are professional, helpful and keep my needs and those of the charitable organizations in our community in mind. “I’ve seen firsthand the value the Community Foundation of North Florida can bring to our community


BRING YOUR PACK TO MEET OURS. Wolves are just the start. With 52 acres of natural wonders, high-flying zipline adventures, historic buildings and more, there’s no better place to discover and learn about North Florida’s rich history, natural environment & diverse culture.

tallahasseemuseum.org

Youtube.com/liveintallahassee Facebook.com/liveintallahassee

“I love Tallahassee, and it is a constant thrill to produce and host a show that celebrates all of the good things that happen here. Tallahassee has proven in recent months to be a model city in America with our residents doing what they can do to stay safe and our businesses doing what they can do to stay open and keep providing for our residents. Thank you to everyone. Let’s keep it up, Tallahassee! Stay positive!” - Joel Silver

Live! In Tallahassee TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

Every Thursday at 10:30pm on Fox49 March-April 2021

125


BEST TA L

of

L A H A SSE

E

our mission is the same as our passion: to serve the most delicious mexican cuisine at five great locations. we invite you to stop by for our world-famous fajitas.

southwood

727-0094 |

capital circle ne

385-9992 |

north monroe

878-0800 |

kerry forest

668-1002 |

crawfordville

926-4329

PHOTO BY JENNIFER G PHOTOGRAPHY

TA L

2020 2018

S E’

SSEE MAGAZ HA IN LA

Know someone recently engaged or in the process of planning a wedding? Visit NorthwestFloridaWeddings.net to submit their information so we can send them a congratulations package, including the Northwest Florida Weddings Magazine! They will also be submitted for a chance to be covered in the magazine after their wedding!

NorthwestFloridaWeddings.net

126

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM


dining guide AMERICAN ANDREW’S DOWNTOWN

After 40 years, Andrew’s is still an energetic, casual, see-and-be-seen spot. House favorites include a popular lunch buffet, hamburgers, salads and pasta dishes. Downtown delivery. (850) 222-3444/Fax, (850) 222-2433. $$ B L D

BACKWOODS CROSSING ★

Sit down at this 2020 Best of winner for fresh gourmet food at Tallahassee’s farm-to-table, destination concept restaurant featuring locally caught and produced soft-shell crabs, sausage, duck and blueberries. 6725 Mahan Dr.

(850) 765-3753. $$ L D

BUMPA’S LOCAL #349

Featuring burgers, sandwiches, pastas, fried ribs, tacos and wings, this new neighborhood bar and grill has something for everyone.

2738 Capital Circle NE. (850) 599-8652. $L D

DOG ET AL ★

Foot-long and veggie entrees alike grace this award-winning menu. Also ask about their incredibly valued family packs. 1456 S. Monroe St. (850) 222-4099. $L D

This relaxed fine dining establishment is equipped with a beer garden, wine cellar, casual café, open-air alternatives and a gorgeous view that has become a Tallahassee favorite. 470 Suwannee St. (850) 684-2117. $$/$$$

FOOD GLORIOUS FOOD ★

The name says it all! This restaurant boasts a palate-pleasing combination of personalized service, eclectic ambiance and award-winning cuisine and is the Best Desserts winner for 2017–20. 1950 Thomasville Road. (850) 224-9974. $$ L D

HOPKINS’ EATERY ★

A Best of 2020 winner, Hopkins’ provides favorites such as the Ultimate Turkey, the Linda Special and a variety of salads to keep customers coming back. Multiple locations. Hours vary. $

ISLAND WING COMPANY ★

Get baked! Tally’s Best Sports Bar for

★ 2020 Best B

of Tallahassee Winner

$L

JUICY BLUE

Located in the Four Points by Sheraton Downtown, this cool lobby restaurant offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. Unique dishes include tapas with a twist, such as the Georgia peaches with caramel. 316 W. Tennessee St.

(850) 422-0071. $ B L D

KOOL BEANZ ★

Eclectic and edgy, both in menu and atmosphere, Kool Beanz delights in art present both on the walls and your plates. This offbeat alternative won Best Casual Dining in Tallahassee. 921

Thomasville Rd. (850) 224-2466. $$ L D

LIBERTY BAR AND RESTAURANT ★

Carefully crafted unique cocktails mixed with a gourmet menu that features fresh, local produce. 1307 N. Monroe, Unit No. 2.

Spreading love with food for over 37 years 1325 Miccosukee Road (across from TMH) (850) 219-9800 • www.Uptown.Cafe

Mon.-Sat. 7 AM to 3 PM • 8 AM to 2 PM

(850) 354-8277. $$ D

LOFTY PURSUITS ★

This old-fashioned soda fountain serves ice cream, milkshakes and candy — plus brunch dishes and a selection of vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options. 1355 Market St.,

A11. (850) 521-0091. $ B

MADISON SOCIAL

THE EDISON

THE KEY

2020 won’t serve you up greasy, fried wings; instead Island Wing bakes them fresh. 1370 Market St. (850) 692-3116.

Whether it’s for a social cocktail, a quick lunch or a place to gather before home football games, Madison Social offers something for everyone. 705 S. Woodward Ave. (850) 894‑6276. $$ B L D

MIDTOWN CABOOSE ★

Outrageous burgers in a laid-back atmosphere — Wells Bros. lives on at this burger joint, voted Tallahassee’s best for 2020. 1406 N. Meridian Road.

(850) 521-1933. $$ L D

OVERUNDER BAR ★

Two experiences under one roof, OverUnder features specialty cocktails plus curated food and drink pairings and is a 2020 Best Wine List/Wine Bar winner. 1240 Thomasville Rd.

BE IN THE KNOW Be the first to read the next issue before it hits mailboxes!

Sign up for our e-newsletter and get updates about our website, online exclusive articles and additional offers.

(850) 597-7552. $$

R&R EATERY

Located in Hotel Indigo, R&R Eatery is a modern American restaurant with fresh takes on classic dishes and a mix of signature craft cocktails. 826 W. Gaines St.

(850) 210-0008. $$ B D

The restaurants that appear in this guide are included as a service to readers and not as recommendations of the Tallahassee Magazine editorial department, except where noted. L D

Breakfast/ Brunch Lunch Dinner

Outdoor Dining

$ Live Music $$Bar/Lounge $$$Inexpensive

Moderately Expensive Expensive

Go to tallahasseemagazine.com/newsletter and sign up today! TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

127


ROOTSTOCK

With an ever-changing menu of unique flavors, Rootstock offers shareable plates, artisan cocktails and a selection of 25 wines by the glass. 228 South Adams. (850) 518-0201. $$$ D

SAGE RESTAURANT ★

Sage’s menu masterfully melds regional influences, including Southern and French. The setting is gorgeous but cozy, and the outdoor patio sets a charming, romantic tone for a relaxing evening. 3534 Maclay Blvd. (850) 270-9396.

$$$ B L D

SAVOUR

Downtown fine dining with a vision for seasonally inspired, regionally sourced and creatively prepared cuisine, such as bourbon-brined pork chops, Gulf Coast bouillabaisse or miso marinated grouper. 115 E. Park Ave.

NEW LOCATION COMING SPRING 2021

2226 N Monroe St 1241 Apalachee Parkway | (850) 671-2722

CraftyCrabRestaurant.com/location/tallahassee

(850) 765-6966. $$$ D

TABLE 23 ★

This “Southern porch, table and bar” is cozied up among oak trees on one of Tallahassee’s favorite street corners. Lucky Goat coffee-rubbed ribeye and Schermer pecan-crusted chicken are among the regional offerings. 1215 Thomasville Rd. (850) 329-2261. $$$ L D

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE CAFE ★ At this 2020 Best Juice Bar/Smoothie restaurant, experience an array of flavorful and health-conscious smoothies paired with toasted wraps, sandwiches, grilled flatbreads and gourmet salads. Multiple locations. $L D

UPTOWN CAFÉ

Specialties at the bustling, family-run café include apricot-glazed smoked salmon, one-of-a-kind omelets, banana bread French toast and flavorful sandwiches. 1325 Miccosukee

Rd. (850) 219-9800. $ B L

ASIAN AZU LUCY HO’S

Enjoy an extensive array of classic dishes with a modern flare, including gyoza dumplings, crab rangoon, General Tso’s chicken and Szechuan beef, all in a relaxed setting. 3220 Apalachee Pkwy., Ste. 13. (850) 893-4112. L D

Tree Trimming PALMS • OAKS • PINES Ben Vasilinda 850.228.7208

Landscaping & Lawncare, LLC.

Licensed & Insured - Commercial & Residential

Lawn Maintenance . Tree Trimming . Debris Removal Roof & Gutter Clean-outs . Pressure Washing Overgrown Lot Clean-ups . 44-foot Bucket Truck

BORU BORU

A fast casual eatery inspired by Japanese cuisine, featuring sushi bowls, poke bowls and sushi burritos. 1861 W. Tennessee St., #290. (850) 270-9253. $$ L D

KIKU JAPANESE FUSION ★

From tempura to teriyaki and sushi to sashimi, Kiku Japanese Fusion, voted Best Sushi in 2020, fuses vibrant flavors with fresh ingredients. 800 Ocala Rd. (850) 575-5458, 3491 Thomasville Rd. (850) 222-5458. $$ L D

MASA ★

A 2020 Best Asian winner, Masa’s menu offers a creative blend of Eastern and Western cuisines.

1650 N. Monroe St. (850) 727-4183. $/$$

NAGOYA STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI Dine in or takeout, Nagoya offers a wide variety of authentic Japanese

128

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

cuisine, including hibachi, salads, sushi and sashimi. 1925 N. Monroe St. $/$$ L D

OSAKA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE AND SUSHI BAR ★ Rated Best Hibachi for 2020, Osaka provides dinner and a show, with the chefs seasoning and preparing your meal right in front of you. 1489 Maclay

Commerce Dr. (850) 900-5149. $$$ D

BBQ WILLIE JEWELL’S OLD SCHOOL BBQ ★

Platters, sandwiches or by the pound, Willie Jewell’s, the 2020 Best Barbecue winner, offers smoked brisket, pork, turkey, sausage, chicken and ribs with a bevy of Southern sides. 5442 Thomasville Rd.

(850) 629-4299. $ L D

BREAKFAST/ BRUNCH/BAKERY CANOPY ROAD CAFÉ ★

Traditional breakfasts, fluffy omelets, skillets, French toast and sweet potato pancakes keep customers coming back to this 2020 Best Breakfast winner. Canopy also goes all out on lunch favorites. Multiple locations. (850) 668-6600. $ B L

THE EGG CAFÉ & EATERY

When you’re looking for breakfast favorites, even if it’s lunchtime, The Egg is the place to be. Second location now open in Kleman Plaza. Multiple

Locations. (850) 907-3447. $$ B L

TASTY PASTRY BAKERY ★

Tallahassee’s original cakery and 2020 Best Bakery winner features fresh breads, bagels, pies, cakes and catering. Mon–Sat 6:45 am–6 pm. 1355 Market St., No. A-5. (850) 893-3752. $  B L D

TREVA’S PASTRIES AND FINE FOODS

Specializing in sweet treats, cakes, pastries and croissants, this bistro-style pastry shop and fine foods store also uses 100% natural ingredients to make savory sandwiches, salads and soups. 2766 Capital Circle NE. (850) 765-0811. $$ L

CAJUN COOSH’S BAYOU ROUGE ★

This Best Cajun Restaurant winner for 2020 brings a menu jam-packed with Louisiana-style dishes, including favorites like jambalaya, crawfish etouffee, po’boys and seafood gumbo. Multiple locations.

(850) 894‑4110. $$ B L D

CATERING SIMPLY ENTERTAINING ★

This 2020 Best of Tallahassee winner is ready to cater your next big event or intimate party with locally and organically grown ingredients; can accommodate vegan, gluten-free and other special dietary requests. 1355 A-10 Market St. (850) 668-1167.


CUBAN GORDOS

Tallahassee’s top Cuban spot for over 30 years, Gordos features favorites such as croquetas, papas rellenas, empanadas and pressed sandwiches like their classic Cubano. 1460 Market St. Suite #3-4. $L D

Restaurant, El Jalisco, where they do Mexican cuisine to perfection. Multiple

locations. $ L D

EL PATRON MEXICAN GRILL & CANTINA

Find all your authentic Mexican classics such as tacos, quesadillas, fajitas and burritos, or take a sip of a yardstick margarita. 1170 Apalachee

Pkwy. (850) 656-7264. $$ L D

LITTLE PARIS RESTAURANT

Authentic French cuisine in a relaxing casual atmosphere; try classics such as escargot, foie gras, duck leg confit, beef burgundy, wild sea bass and so much more. Curbside available. 1355 Market St. (850) 765-7457. $$$ L D

ITALIAN/PIZZA BELLA BELLA ★

Voted Best Italian in 2020, this locally owned and operated restaurant has a cozy atmosphere and serves all the classics to satisfy your pasta cravings. 123 E. 5th Ave. (850) 412-1114. $$ L D

IL LUSSO ★

Homemade pasta, local seafood and a choice of prime steaks define this downtown fine dining experience. 201

E. Park Ave., Suite 100. (850) 765-8620. $$$ D

MOMO’S ★

After devouring a slice “as big as your head” at this 2020 Best Pizza winner, chain pizza simply is not gonna cut it.

SEAFOOD/STEAK THE BLU HALO ★

Blu Halo is a high-end culinary experience featuring dry-aged steaks and fresh seafood along with fine wines and a martini bar. A private dining room for up to 20 guests is available. 3431 Bannerman

Rd., #2 (850) 999-1696. $$$ L D

CRAFTY CRAB

Offering the freshest seafood and most authentic recipes in the area, including crab, crawfish, calamari, lobster, oysters, mussels, scallops and more. 1241

Apalachee Pkwy & 2226 N. Monroe St. (850) 671-2722. $$ L D

GEORGIO’S FINE FOOD & SPIRITS

George Koikos has over 50 years of experience in Tallahassee restaurants, and his hands-on commitment has made this upscale restaurant a local favorite featuring local seafood, prime steaks and banquet rooms for private parties. 2971

Apalachee Pkwy. (850) 877-3211. $$$ D

RICCARDO’S RESTAURANT

Located in Hotel Duval. Keep it light and casual with a premium Black Angus beef burger or a gourmet salad, or opt for one of their signature entrées — a “Shula Cut” steak. Reservations suggested. 415 N. Monroe

MEDITERRANEAN SAHARA CAFE MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE ★

This 2020 Best Ethnic Restaurant winner is a family owned and operated restaurant. Sahara Cafe has been serving homemade Greek and Lebanese food to Tallahassee for 15 years. 1135 Apalachee Pkwy.

(850) 656-1800. $$ L D

3740 Austin Davis Ave. Tues-Sun 7am-2pm (850) 765-0703

Visit Our New Location Kleman Plaza Tues-Sun | 7am-2pm (850) 907-EGGS (3447)

Serving Southern, Cajun and Creole flavors in classic and modern dishes since 1987. Full bar is available at each location. 301 S. Bronough St., in Kleman

Plaza. (850) 222-3976. $$ L D

(850) 386-3988. $$ L D

Great Friends

HARRY’S SEAFOOD BAR & GRILL

Multiple locations. (850) 224‑9808. $L D

A Tallahassee tradition since 1999, Riccardo’s features savory Italian classics, from pasta and pizza to homemade subs and calzones — plus a wide-ranging selection of wines and craft brews. 1950 Thomasville Rd.

Great Food

SHULA’S 347

St. (850) 224-6005. $$$ L D

SOUTHERN SEAFOOD ★

Whether you’re looking for fish, shrimp, oysters, scallops, crab or lobster, the 2020 Best Seafood Market winner brings the ocean’s freshest choices to Tallahassee. 1415 Timberlane Road. (850) 668‑2203.

TALLY FISH HOUSE & OYSTER BAR

Locally owned seafood restaurant boasts a raw bar and a bevy of fresh seafood such as catfish, stuffed Gulf grouper, shrimp, red snapper and more. Takeout available. 6802 Thomasville Rd. (850) 900-5075.

BEST

$$ L D

MEXICAN EL JALISCO ★

In the mood for sizzling enchiladas and frozen margaritas? Make your way to the 2020 Best Mexican/Latin American

WHARF CASUAL SEAFOOD ★

A Tallahassee institution, the Wharf will fill your need for the coast with fresh seafood, salads, seafood tacos and po’boys. Also available for catering. 3439 Bannerman Rd. and 4036 Lagniappe Way. (850) 765-1077 and (850) 668-1966. $$ L D

Visit our comprehensive, searchable dining guide online at TallahasseeMagazine.com/restaurants.

2020

S E’

SSEE MAGAZ HA IN LA

TA L

FRENCH

TA L

of

L A H A SSE

E

CARRY OUT AVAILABLE Killearn Shopping Center (850) 222-5458

Ocala Corners (850) 575-5458

KIKUBOGO.COM

KIKUTOGO.COM

SAFETY & QUALITY ARE PRIORITY TALL AHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

March-April 2021

129


postscript

THE UNVACANT LOT

A once lifeless space now pulses with creativity by DARLENE CROSBY TAYLOR

W

hat happens when an incredibly creative community and aspiring entrepreneurs mix ingenuity, paint, sweat and talent with determination? You get the kind of success that results in a place where creatives can gather with scholars, exchange ideas and freely collaborate on work that causes you to stop, look, and think. In 2011, Thomasville Center for the Arts made the decision to take art to the public and created experiences in the heart of our historic downtown, challenging our community to rethink the way that they view art. We believed that by having our own presence in the Creative District, we would be in a position to actively engage our neighbors through experiences that featured unexpected ideas. Because of this, in 2015, the Center adopted a vacant lot located adjacent to a new amphitheater and trailhead facility on the West Jackson Street corridor, with the blessing of the property owners, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Stone. We decided to test our thinking about the possible impact of public art on people and neighborhoods. We discovered that we were onto something. Six years later, at what has come to be known as the UnVacant Lot, we have installed 17 exhibits, hosted 13 events, partnered with nine nonprofits, exposed both public and private schools to this creative design laboratory, created and supported new job opportunities, collaborated with independent groups including Brookwood School’s Foundations of Innovation class and Florida State University’s Public Art, Interior Design and Design One teams, received a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and garnered the support of the City of Thomasville. Thanks to forward-thinking community leaders, sponsors and our presenter, Hurst Boiler, this space, which is accessible to everyone both day and night at no charge, is equipped with furniture, WiFi, power and shade sails. The Thomasville community has embraced public art in The UnVacant Lot as a conversationstarter that leads to collaborative thinking, both local and regional, and this experience is what makes

our town unique. We make sure to pay homage to the former downtown businesses, including enterprises operated by African-American, Jewish and Greek residents, which once populated West Jackson Street and give the Creative District its historical backdrop. We want to hang on to the spirit of those neighbors and how their diversity added to their interests. As an arts community, we gather, we communicate and we do. This year, despite the challenges related to COVID-19, we will keep going. Our presence in the Creative District is and will remain strong. Our plans to have a stronger virtual and community presence will engage more people. We will embrace and mentor young and emerging artists, both local and regional. We will touch more families. We are proud of our past, and we look forward to our future. We are grateful for this incredibly creative, regional community that is supportive of arts and culture, and we welcome its input. What will you do here? How will you be a game-changer in our neighborhood? We are excited for another decade of artistic expression with you. TM ↘ Joe Cowdry’s mural, “Morning in the Tall Pines,” graces the UnVacant Lot in Thomasville.

Darlene Crosby Taylor is the public art director at Thomasville Center for the Arts. Learn more about the Center’s UnVacant Lot public art experience by visiting thomasvillearts.org/public-art/. Or stop by the Center’s historic home at 600 E. Washington Street in Thomasville.

130

March-April 2021

TALLAHASSEEMAGA ZINE.COM

photography by SAIGE ROBERTS


Outdoor Living at Its Best TA L

2020

S E’

SSEE MAGAZ HA IN LA

BEST TA L

of

L A H A SSE

E

Turner’s offers the area’s best selection of quality wood, wrought iron, wicker and aluminum outdoor furniture. Whether it’s a space to relax or entertain, our design experts will help create your outdoor oasis. Visit Turner’s and start enjoying outdoor living today! (850) 210-0446 | TurnerFurniture.com Mon–Fri 10am–8pm | Sat 10am–6pm | Sun 1pm–6pm 2151 US Hwy 319 (10 Minutes North of Chiles High School on Thomasville Hwy)


NEW LOCATION on 3446 Thomasville Rd

Profile for Rowland Publishing, Inc.

Tallahassee Magazine March/April 2021  

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded