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Ross Galloway Selected Works 2011

ross.h.galloway@gmail.com University of Texas at Austin M.Arch I Candidate 301.335.2644


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Academic Work CAF Museum

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The Re-Burbia

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Glover Park House

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Marfa Live/Work Art Gallery

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Migrant Worker/Thinker

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Professional Work Microsoft Mid-Atlantic

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Reston Heights East

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425 Eye St.

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Drawings/Sketches Sketchbook: Italy

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Process Work

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Hand Renderings

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Digital Renderings

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Academic Work

University of Texas M.Arch Program University of Maryland BS.Arch Program


CAF Air Museum with Travis Avery Fall 2010 Critic - Vincent Snyder

The task of this studio was to design a museum for the Commemorative Air Force, an organization dedicated to the restoring, preserving, and, most importantly, flying of World War II aircraft. Included in their collection is the last remaining flyable B-29 bomber named Fifi. Initial studies quickly revealed that there is a conflict between the scale needed to service, operate and fly the different aircraft in the collection (with wingspans up to 140 feet) and the need to view and experience the aircraft as a museum-goer. In order to mediate between these scales and drawing on existing airplane sheds on the site, we conceived of the museum as a large covered shed where all museum functions exist within the thickness of the roof. By hoisting the planes up into the roof, the functional conflicts between viewing, servicing, and flying the planes

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are separated, allowing all of them to be performed simultaneously with equal efficiency. The airplanes are viewed in their “natural state�: off the ground. The viewing catwalks meander sectionally and allow visitors to the museum to see the planes from all angles, above and below, creating a more intimate relationship between viewer and subject. A series of industrial cranes and tracks allow airplanes to be positioned as needed. Fifi, the B-29 hangs at the prow of the building and can be extended out over the catwalk to allow entry to its bomb bay and cockpit. Other program elements included are a grandstand to view air-shows, auditorium, restaurant, and offices for the museum. Important public spaces such as the auditorium and conference rooms are suspended from the superstructure similarly to how the airplanes are. Conditioned spaces are loaded toward the front of the museum, minimizing heating and cooling requirements. The structure consists of a 2-directional steel truss system that has a free span length of 160 feet and supports a 120 foot cantilever. It touches the ground on 4 trussed steel legs.


vertical circulation

program spaces

airplanes

catwalks

structural diagram

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upper catwalks

museum level

ground floor


transverse section

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longitudinal section

longitudinal section

transverse section


1

12

ENLARGED SECTION 1/4" = 1' - 0"


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK PRODUCED EDUCATIONAL BY ANPRODUCT AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

2

2

5.3

5.3

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

WALL SECTION

" = 1'-0"

2

WALL SECTION 1" = 1'-0"

wall section

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK PRODUCED EDUCATIONAL BY ANPRODUCT AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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1

1

5.3

5.3

1

WALL SECTION 1" = 1'-0"

1

WALL SECTION 1" = 1'-0"

wall section


CT

FORMED METAL COPING C CHANNEL COUNTERFLASHING MEMBRANE FLASHING GRAVEL BALLAST AND WATERPROOFING LAYER OVER RIGID INSULATION ON COMPOSITE CONCRETE DECKING CANT STRIP AND P.T. WOOD BLOCKING SHEAR STUD WELDED TO BEAM

ALUMINUM SKIN ON P.T WOOD PURLINS

WATERPROOFING MEMBRANE ATTACHED TO 1/2" PLYWOOD SHEATHING ON 6" METAL STUDS WITH RIGID INSULATION

TOP CHORD OF TRUSS

STEEL ANGLE KICKER

HEADER WATER DIVERTER SUSPENDED GYP. BOARD CEILING ON HAT CHANNELS STEEL MULLION

DETAIL detail 2

1

DETAIL detail 1

3" = 1'-0"

STEEL MULLION SEALANT AND BACKER ROD ALUMINUM FLASHING

WOOD BLOCKING

CARPET ON PAD

ALUMINUM SKIN ON P.T WOOD PURLINS

STEEL ANGLE TO SUPPORT EXTERIOR WALL

WATER DIVERTER

ALUMINUM SKIN

3" = 1'-0"

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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The Re-Burbia Spring 2010 Critic -Larry Doll Inspired by the notion that the carbon footprint of an average Manhattanite is far lower than that of most rural and suburban residents and that Manhattanites on average use the same amount of gasoline as the average american from the 1920s, this project is a study of how to increase the density of downtown Austin to higher levels while holding on to certain aspects of American life that have become ubiquitous since the proliferation of the suburban model of urbanism. Designed into the project are a number of features that are often cited as reasons that families move to the suburbs. These are: The availability of good schools Safe communities Private exterior spaces Internal privacy

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Given the constraints of the site, these demands are met sectionally. Half of the first 3 levels of the building are occupied by a new elementary school. It is programatically separated from the residences by wrapping it around one of two interior courtyards and allowing access only via public square. The two courtyards work to foster safe communities by creating defensible semi-private spaces that serve as forecourts to the residential project and play areas for the school. Furthermore, the residential portion of the project is subdivided with vertical public spaces that serve as both circulation and communal space. Private exterior spaces are incorporated into most unit types, taking advantage of the sectional opportunities of double story units. Double story units also provide internal privacy and the separation of public and private. The suburban features of the project do not trump its uban nature. A public plaza, created by lifting and cantilevering part of the building, speaks to Republic Park across the street and mediates between the school, residences, and the street. The street is activated by retail spaces that face the square, and dialogue is created between the school and the community by allowing glimpses into the gym and main circulation spaces from the street.


Vertical “street� residential circulation zones break larger communities into smaller vertical neighborhoods

Randomized zinc panel curtain wall allows for extreme variability of solid and void where maintaining a consistent language

Steel and concrete truss support the cantilever over the public square

traditional concrete column and slab structural system is used everywhere else

Elementary school serves children of families living in the building as well as other families returning from the suburbs to downtown Public square mediates between the street and school as well as between the street and residences Seperate courtyards are provided for the school and residences Retail faces Republic Square, hiding parking nestled behind and under it.

Layering


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plaza and courtyard panorama


unit studies

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unit cluster a

unit cluster a upper floor

unit cluster a lower floor unit cluster b

unit cluster b


Glover Park House Fall 2008 Personal Project I have a certain fascination with the townhouse typology that exist in many of the older cores of America’s eastern cities. In a society where everything new that we create comes with a built-in obsolescence, these houses have stood for centuries, often weathering abuse and neglect. As a design exercise, I searched the neighborhood I was living in for a suitable site to design a speculative townhouse that could incorporate many of the inherently sustainable and functional elements of the type while updating it to a contemporary design language.

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bus routes and stops

restaurants and bars

groceries and pharmacies

site amenities

building site


East Elevation

North Elevation

Solar gain is minimal as the broad face of the house faces north. The energy efficiency of house is kept high by maintaining a high degree of solid area on the skin and using Zinc panels and a Prodema panel rain screen system. These materials, while possibly having a higher embodied energy due to fabrication and transportation requirements than more local “green� materials, are extremely durable and will not need to be replaced and thrown out. Ideally, this house will weather as well, or better than its older neighbors.

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2nd floor

The floor plans draw on the basic rowhouse layout type but eschew typical partition walls for an open floor plan in order to increase the perceived size of the house. On the first level, sliding and pivoting glass doors allow ventilation and open the house up to the outside. Natural light, let in from a skylight above the stairs, penetrates through the house and filters down into the basement. Upstairs, bedrooms have 2 sets of windows to maximize airflows and daylighting, and the stairwell skylight is operable to allow heat produced throughout the house to escape as it rises.

1st floor

green roof

basement

zinc panels

prodema rain screen


view toward living room

view toward dining room

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Marfa Live/Work Art Gallery

structure, which could serve as either a work space or exterior display space.

Fall 2009 Critic- Russell Krepart

The concrete structure defines a number of parameters for the buildings on the site including their maximum width as well as height. Taller elements on the site draw from the proportions of the existing tower; The gallery skylights are solid iterations of it, while the second floor of the residence is an extruded version of it. Appropriate ceiling heights are maintained by excavating into the site. This move, along with the exterior walls, serves to define and ground the project as it exists in a somewhat nondescript and flat landscape.

This project is a live/work art gallery in Marfa, Texas, in which a portion of the proceeds of sold art go toward grants and micro-loans for local residents. Its aim is to create a direct connection between the economic stimulation of Marfa’s art scene and the native residents of Marfa. Residents would apply for loans or grants, and those chosen would get to choose, or commission, a work by one of the 2 resident artists who live and work on the site. The funds for the loan would be a portion of the revenue generated by the sale of the art. The program only occupies a portion of the site, in line with an existing concrete ruin. The rest of the site could be sold or developed and leased to raise funds for the gallery. The program is split into 2 parts, the public gallery space and the private residence and work spaces. They are separated by a public yard and event space, and the existing concrete

existing site condition

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Materials used are simple. Stucco, concrete, and cor-ten steel. A cor-ten steel wrapper announces the public entry to the gallery space. The gallery space then opens into a rear yard that can be used for a variety of events. The corten steel language of the entry reappears to create and wrap the bar and service area. There is an opportunity to project video or images onto the back wall of the gallery. Past the existing structure is the artists’ residence. It is separated into working and living spaces, both in plan and section, with a sunken private courtyard providing light to the sunken living spaces.


concept diagram

Hotel Dining Art/Judd Civic site

Presidio County Courthouse El Paisano Hotel Judd Workshops Chamberlain Building The Block Donald Judd’s House Thunderbird Restaurant Thunderbird Hotel

e 90 Rout

Dairy Queen

Site

Rou te 17

Marfa National Bank Pizza Foundation

Cochineal Restaurant Carmen’s Cafe

site analysis


second floor plan

outdoor work space

outdoor work space

private court

studio

private court

studio

C

section C

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event/display space

gallery

event/display space

gallery

A bar

kitchen

mech/elec

office

bar

kitchen

mech/elec

office

B first floor plan

section A

Section B


gallery entrance

gallery space

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artist residence/workshop


Migrant Worker/Thinker Fall 2009 Critic- Russell Krepart Located a on a rural site, a few miles northwest of Fort Davis, Texas, on Limpia Canyon Cattle Ranch, this project consists of housing for up to 4 migrant workers or 2 migrant families during calving season at the ranch. When migrant workers are not needed on the ranch, the buildings function as a retreat for “migrant thinkers.” The site is defined by a large number of cottonwood trees, which were originally spread across the area by early American workers/settlers travelling west to secure a brighter future and fulfill America’s “manifest destiny”. Cottonwoods are often grouped in circular patterns that originate from where seeds fell to the ground from settler’s wagon circles.

conceptual rendering

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conceptual site model


design studies

The organization of the camp directly references the protective nature of these tree and wagon circles. Buildings are clustered around a central yard and the integrity of the circle is created by a combination of building and cottonwood. The buildings themselves are simple concrete boxes that sit off the ground on a wooden deck that both creates social spaces and keeps out critters. This decking serves as a second, man-made site topography, where furniture and spatial barriers are formed through augmentation of the surface.

kit of parts diagram

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axonometric

floor plan


view of fire pit

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view of dining space and caretaker residence

The decking and buildings are sliced by vertical planes, which break up massing, separate building function, and provide privacy where required. The camp is designed to be used similarly by both the migrant worker and the migrant thinkers.

conceptual model


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Professional Work SmithGroup


Microsoft Mid-Atlantic Headquarters SmithGroup - 2009 IIDA Mid-Atlantic 2010 Silver Award Winner SmithGroup won the commission to complete the interior design and build out of Microsoft’s new 120,000 sf MidAtlantic Headquarters just outside of Washington DC. The project schedule was very aggressive in order to correspond with the expiring lease that Microsoft held for their current space. I joined the team in January of 2009, near the end of the design development stage of the project, and worked on

pantry/lounge space under construction

conference room under construction

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the project through its substantial completion in July of 2009. I worked on all parts of the project, from design, construction documents, millwork design, finish selection, construction administration, contractor and client meetings, consultant coordination, and quality control and punchlisting. Near the beginning of construction, almost half of the project team was laid off, including the project architect. Working with the project manager and design principle, I picked up many of the responsibilities left vacant by the personnel losses. I was charged with the design of a number of millwork pieces for the space. The largest of these was a bar/hub piece that would serve as a focal point in the lounge spaces on each floor. Different colored backlit glasses were used as identifying elements for each floor.


photos courtesy of Max Mackenzie


bar/hub detail

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bar/hub


Reston Heights East SmithGroup 2007-2008 Reston Heights is a one million sq. ft. mixed use office and retail development in Reston, Virginia. The biggest complications of the project were the developer’s desires to create architecture that works at 2 scales. The scale of the highway needed to be addressed along the north of the site, which backed up to the Dulles Toll Road, a major artery serving Dulles International Airport. On the interior of the site, the project needed to address the human scale and create a destination for retail. To further constrain the site, suburban parking counts required parking for over 3000 cars. We overcame this problem by utilizing the slope of the site and continuing the ground datum from the west over the service road and onto the green roofs of the retail component. The office building design reflects both the desire to maximize rentable space and market desirability while trying to create an iconic architecture highly visible to the “river of cars” flowing directly by it. Color became the team’s tool for creating a striking architecture without playing significantly with the building footprint. Different colored glasses and treatments of shadow boxes differentiates the three office towers, but at the end of the conceptual design phase, the appearance of them remained up in the air.

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site plan rendered by Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects


One of the main tasks that I was charged with was developing an architecture for the retail component of the project. An environmental theme incorporating geological ideas drawn from the landscape design by Nelson Byrd Woltz, and a desire to transition to a sleeker corporate architecture above, created the juxtaposed use of wood, stone gabion wall, and metal panels.

retail elevation

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retail elevation

early massing model

pavilion studies


full retail elevation


office drop-off and retail


425 Eye St. SmithGroup 2008-2009

425 Eye Street is an existing office building about two blocks from the Convention Center in Washington DC. The client chose SmithGroup to renovate the building, update finishes and mechanical systems, and re-skin the south and east facades. This was the first project in the Workplace Studio to be completed entirely in Revit. I worked on or assisted with most aspects of the project in one capacity or another. These include conceptual sketching, Revit Model management, bathroom finish selection (the layouts were, for the most part, existing) modelling in Revit, redlines, detailing, elevator cab design, and miscellaneous rendering. I was the main contact on the team for managing and troubleshooting the Revit model I was one of 4 people working on this project. I joined the project team at the beginning of the implementation of Revit. A preliminary schematic design had been completed in 2006. Many features of the original schematic package were changed when the project was revisited.

before

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after - professional rendering

elevator cab refinishing studies


1' - 8 1/2"

1' - 3 1/2"

1' - 3"

MP-1 BEYOND MP-1 JOINT BEYOND

S

CONC. PAVERS ON SETTING BED EXISTING CONC. CURB TO BE REMOVED MP-1

VARIES - COORD W/ WINDOW SCHEDULE

NEW SLAB ON GRADE

2"

COMPACTED GRADE PROTECTION BOARD

6"

1

EXIS

curtain wall at grade detail

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3' - 1 1/4" 1' - 9"

WRAP SHEET MEMBRANE FLASHING UNDER ALUM. COPING

MTL PANEL COPING LAP 2" MIN.

SLOPE

5"

T.O. PARAPET

CONT. CLEAT SHEATHING STL. CHANNEL. SEE STRUC.

MEMBRANE FLASHING

2' - 10 1/2"

3' - 6"

ALUM. CURTAINWALL SYSTEM

CANT PT WD BLOCKING

6" METAL STUDS W/ 1/2" EXTERIOR SHEATING ON BOTH SIDES

PREFORMED ALUM. SILL

ROOFING OVER TAPERED INSULATION

ALUM. INFILL PANEL - PTD

4 1/2"

S

ROOF 125' - 6" ALUM. INFILL PANEL - PTD

2' - 4 1/2"

BOND BEAM. SEE STRUC.

EXIST. CONC. SLAB

INS-1

3-5/8" METAL STUD W/ 5/8" GWB W/ INS-1

2' - 6"

INS-3

L SUPPORT AND KICKERS SEE STRUC. STL. ANGLE SEE STRUC. ALUM.CLOSURE PANEL BY WINDOW SUPPLIER

PREFORMED ALUM. BLIND POCKET

REBAR. SEE STRUC.

column cladding detail

CMU ALUM. SILL EXTENSION BELOW

INS-1

E.O. CMU WALL BELOW

5/8" GWB ON 3-5/8" MTL STUDS W/ SEMI-RIGID FOIL FACED INSULATION.

1ST FLOOR 46' - 6"

WW-1

S

S

MP-1

3' - 0"

NEW CONC. SLAB OVER INS-5

10"

5"

5/8" GWB ON 2 1/2" METAL STUDS

AIR/WATER BARRIER

1' - 0"

1' - 0"

ST. CONC. SLAB AND FOUNDATION WALL

SEAL ALL AIR BARRIER PENETRATIONS 1' - 6"

1' - 6"

FRAMING AS REQUIRED TO SUPPORT METAL PANEL

curtain wall detail


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Drawings, Sketches, etc.


Sketchbook: Italy These sketches and studies were completed in Florence, Rome, Vicenza, Venice, and Como on a 6 week trip during the summer of 2006. Emphasis was placed on the use of sketching to better understand and diagram the experiences of spaces and buildings.

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Process Sketches windmill sketches for prongorn tracking center - 2009 academic below and right migrant worker/thinker sketches - 2009 academic bottom right sketches for a mixed-use apartment building in Baltimore - 2006 academic opposite page

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Hand Rendering

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Digital Rendering

ipods

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apartment building

sunlit room


conceptual building hybrid render and line

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Ross Galloway

urriculumvita

ross.h.galloway@gmail.com 302 W 38th St. Apt. 110 Austin, TX 78705 301.335.2644

Education

Skills

2009 - Present University of Texas - Austin Master of Architecture | May 2012 3.85 GPA

Hand - sketching | physical modelling | rendering [graphite. colored pencil. marker. watercolor]

2003-2007 University of Maryland - College Park Bachelor of Science of Architecture | May 2007 Graduated Summa Cum Laude Award for Academic Achievement at the Baccalaureate Level

Digital - Revit | Autocad | Sketchup | Rhino | Photoshop Illustrator | Indesign | 3dsmax | Kerkythea Languages - Fluent in Spanish

Work Experience

SmithGroup | Washington, DC | Aug. 2007 - Aug. 2009 Intern Architect Worked collaboratively on 3 projects with design teams of 4 to 5 Assisted in the conceptual design of a 1 million square foot office and retail development, the renovation and reskinning of an existing office building, and the IIDA award winning interior design and fit out of 4 floors of a high end office building. Participated in all aspects of the design process: conceptual modelling and sketching construction documentation rendering client, consultant, and contractor meetings construction administration Spearheaded the implimentation of Autodesk Revit software within SmithGroup’s workplace studio

The University of Texas | School of Architecture| Austin, Texas | Jan. 2010 - Present Visual Communications | Teaching Assistant | Jan. 2010 - Present Assist in teaching 1st year architecture students the basics of drawing techniques, rendering, and drafting

IO central | Austin, Texas | Jan. 2009 - Dec 2010 Staff Member Taught introductory Revit courses Provided technical support and troubleshooting assistance for students Maintained digital technologies such as laser cutters and 3d printers Assisted in the general upkeep of the computer lab

Awards Selected Works 2010 chosen as a blurb.com Editor’s pick portfolio UTSOA Vertical Studio Design Excellence Nominee IIDA Mid Atlantic 2010 Silver Award for Microsoft Mid-Atlantic Headquarters (SmithGroup) 1st place award- National Building Museum Inter-School Student Design Competition Charrette Recipient of the University of Maryland School of Architecture Faculty Scholarship


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Selected Works 2011  

Architectural Portfolio of Academic and Professional Work

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