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Ross Galloway

d Works 2012


Ross Galloway Selected Works 2012 ross.h.galloway@gmail.com University of Texas at Austin M.Arch I Candidate 301.335.2644


2


Academic Work

4

CAF Museum

6

Parasitic Changing Rooms

16

The Re-Burbia

22

Glover Park House

28

Marfa Live/Work Art Gallery

34

Migrant Worker/Thinker

40

Professional Work

46

Private High School Expansion

48

Microsoft Mid-Atlantic

54

Reston Heights East

58

425 Eye St.

64

Drawings/Sketches

68

Sketchbook: Italy

70

Process Work

72

Hand Renderings

74

Digital Renderings

78

Curriculum Vitae

82


Academic Work

University of Texas M.Arch Program


CAF Air Museum with Travis Avery Fall 2010 Critic - Vincent Snyder

The task of this studio was to design a museum for the Commemorative Air Force, an organization dedicated to the restoring, preserving, and, most importantly, flying of World War II aircraft. Included in their collection is the last remaining flyable B-29 bomber named Fifi. Initial studies quickly revealed that there is a conflict between the scale needed to service, operate and fly the different aircraft in the collection (with wingspans up to 140 feet) and the need to view and experience the aircraft as a museum-goer. In order to mediate between these scales and drawing on existing airplane sheds on the site, we conceived of the museum as a large covered shed where all museum functions exist within the thickness of the roof. By hoisting the planes up into the roof, the functional conflicts between viewing, servicing, and flying the planes

6

are separated, allowing all of them to be performed simultaneously with equal efficiency. The airplanes are viewed in their “natural state�: off the ground. The viewing catwalks meander sectionally and allow visitors to the museum to see the planes from all angles, above and below, creating a more intimate relationship between viewer and subject. A series of industrial cranes and tracks allow airplanes to be positioned as needed. Fifi, the B-29 hangs at the prow of the building and can be extended out over the catwalk to allow entry to its bomb bay and cockpit. Other program elements included are a grandstand to view air-shows, auditorium, restaurant, and offices for the museum. Important public spaces such as the auditorium and conference rooms are suspended from the superstructure similarly to how the airplanes are. Conditioned spaces are loaded toward the front of the museum, minimizing heating and cooling requirements. The structure consists of a 2-directional steel truss system that has a free span length of 160 feet and supports a 120 foot cantilever. It touches the ground on 4 trussed steel legs.


vertical circulation

program spaces

airplanes

catwalks

structural diagram

8


upper catwalks

museum level

ground floor


transverse section

10


longitudinal section

longitudinal section

transverse section


1

12

ENLARGED SECTION 1/4" = 1' - 0"


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK PRODUCED EDUCATIONAL BY ANPRODUCT AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

2

2

5.3

5.3

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

WALL SECTION

" = 1'-0"

2

WALL SECTION 1" = 1'-0"

wall section

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK PRODUCED EDUCATIONAL BY ANPRODUCT AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

14

1

1

5.3

5.3

1

WALL SECTION 1" = 1'-0"

1

WALL SECTION 1" = 1'-0"

wall section


CT

FORMED METAL COPING C CHANNEL COUNTERFLASHING MEMBRANE FLASHING GRAVEL BALLAST AND WATERPROOFING LAYER OVER RIGID INSULATION ON COMPOSITE CONCRETE DECKING CANT STRIP AND P.T. WOOD BLOCKING SHEAR STUD WELDED TO BEAM

ALUMINUM SKIN ON P.T WOOD PURLINS

WATERPROOFING MEMBRANE ATTACHED TO 1/2" PLYWOOD SHEATHING ON 6" METAL STUDS WITH RIGID INSULATION

TOP CHORD OF TRUSS

STEEL ANGLE KICKER

HEADER WATER DIVERTER SUSPENDED GYP. BOARD CEILING ON HAT CHANNELS STEEL MULLION

DETAIL detail 2

1

DETAIL detail 1

3" = 1'-0"

STEEL MULLION SEALANT AND BACKER ROD ALUMINUM FLASHING

WOOD BLOCKING

CARPET ON PAD

ALUMINUM SKIN ON P.T WOOD PURLINS

STEEL ANGLE TO SUPPORT EXTERIOR WALL

WATER DIVERTER

ALUMINUM SKIN

3" = 1'-0"

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

2


Parasitic Changing Rooms Spring 2011 Critic -Coleman Coker Shoal Creek is an often overlooked ecological system that exists directly adjacent to and within the urban fabric of Austin. As a studio, we were asked to create individual architectural interventions within or around the 1st mile of Shoal Creek before it empties into Town Lake. The program was left up to the students with the stipulation that it bring awareness to, and work within, the complex adaptive systems that exist at the intersection of City and Creek.

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In an attempt to both preserve the existing historical train trestle and minimize the impact to the creek bed, the building uses the trestle as its primary structure. Program elements are suspended from the trestle with new steel members attached to the underside of the existing deck and nestle themselves between the wooden piers. Enclosed program is housed within metal clad boxes, contrasting the texture of the trestle’s beams and columns. Circulation through the building is demarcated by the use of weathered steel, relating it to other pedestrian bridges nearby.

This project intends to correct and soften the perceived separation between the urban condition of the city and the natural condition of the creek. The site, where 4th Street crosses Shoal Creek is currently spanned by a pedestrian bridge and a decommissioned wooden railroad trestle. It is a confluence of natural and man-made systems as well as of historical and new pieces of the city. The bridges link new downtown development with Seaholm power plant, which is slated to be redeveloped.

The top surface of the trestle is given over to a platform that serves as both a viewing platform and an extension of the public square at the end of 3rd street. When the cafe and changing rooms are open, the platform sits near the center of the trestle and can be reached from both 3rd street and from the cafe below. When the cafe and changing rooms are closed, the platform slides on the existing rails toward 3rd street, creating an extension of the existing public square while closing off the building. At the same time, a gate below closes off the cafe while maintaining a public route between 3rd street and the creek below.

Working in parallel to a classmate’s project which proposes turning the creek and it’s bed around the trestle into a series of park, water remediation, and energy generation spaces, this project serves as an entry pavilion from the street and houses changing rooms, a cafe, and a viewing platform for activities below.

Beyond a physical connection, the building attempts to contribute to the ecological systems around it. Composting toilets process and store waste which is slowly turned to safe topsoil and natural fertilizer which is used in the bioremediation and filtration gardens upstream of the trestle.


Upper Movable Platform

Existing Pedestrian Bridge

Top of Existing Trestle

Added Steel Beams

Entry Stair from 3rd Street

Existing Utility Pipe

Lower Seating Area Movable Gate

Coffee Shop / Ice Cream Stand

Changing Rooms / Bathrooms

Trestle Supports

building layers


open/closed and circulation diagrams

18


Exisiting Footbridge

Exisiting Train Trestle

Deck/Plaza

upper level plan

Waste Treatment

Men’s Locker Room

Women’s Locker Room

Cafe

lower level plan

longitudinal section

L

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


entry from hike/bike trail

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entry from hike/bike trail toward 3rd st.

coffee shop seating and stair to upper platform


The Re-Burbia Spring 2010 Critic -Larry Doll Inspired by the notion that the carbon footprint of an average Manhattanite is far lower than that of most rural and suburban residents and that Manhattanites on average use the same amount of gasoline as the average american from the 1920s, this project is a study of how to increase the density of downtown Austin to higher levels while holding on to certain aspects of American life that have become ubiquitous since the proliferation of the suburban model of urbanism. Designed into the project are a number of features that are often cited as reasons that families move to the suburbs. These are: The availability of good schools Safe communities Private exterior spaces Internal privacy

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Given the constraints of the site, these demands are met sectionally. Half of the first 3 levels of the building are occupied by a new elementary school. It is programatically separated from the residences by wrapping it around one of two interior courtyards and allowing access only via public square. The two courtyards work to foster safe communities by creating defensible semi-private spaces that serve as forecourts to the residential project and play areas for the school. Furthermore, the residential portion of the project is subdivided with vertical public spaces that serve as both circulation and communal space. Private exterior spaces are incorporated into most unit types, taking advantage of the sectional opportunities of double story units. Double story units also provide internal privacy and the separation of public and private. The suburban features of the project do not trump its uban nature. A public plaza, created by lifting and cantilevering part of the building, speaks to Republic Park across the street and mediates between the school, residences, and the street. The street is activated by retail spaces that face the square, and dialogue is created between the school and the community by allowing glimpses into the gym and main circulation spaces from the street.


Vertical “street� residential circulation zones break larger communities into smaller vertical neighborhoods

Randomized zinc panel curtain wall allows for extreme variability of solid and void where maintaining a consistent language

Steel and concrete truss support the cantilever over the public square

traditional concrete column and slab structural system is used everywhere else

Elementary school serves children of families living in the building as well as other families returning from the suburbs to downtown Public square mediates between the street and school as well as between the street and residences Seperate courtyards are provided for the school and residences Retail faces Republic Square, hiding parking nestled behind and under it.

Layering


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plaza and courtyard panorama


unit studies

26


unit cluster a

unit cluster a upper floor

unit cluster a lower floor unit cluster b

unit cluster b


Glover Park House Fall 2008 Personal Project I have a certain fascination with the townhouse typology that exist in many of the older cores of America’s eastern cities. In a society where everything new that we create comes with a built-in obsolescence, these houses have stood for centuries, often weathering abuse and neglect. As a design exercise, I searched the neighborhood I was living in for a suitable site to design a speculative townhouse that could incorporate many of the inherently sustainable and functional elements of the type while updating it to a contemporary design language.

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bus routes and stops

restaurants and bars

groceries and pharmacies

site amenities

building site


East Elevation

North Elevation

Solar gain is minimal as the broad face of the house faces north. The energy efficiency of house is kept high by maintaining a high degree of solid area on the skin and using Zinc panels and a Prodema panel rain screen system. These materials, while possibly having a higher embodied energy due to fabrication and transportation requirements than more local “green� materials, are extremely durable and will not need to be replaced and thrown out. Ideally, this house will weather as well, or better than its older neighbors.

30


2nd floor

The floor plans draw on the basic rowhouse layout type but eschew typical partition walls for an open floor plan in order to increase the perceived size of the house. On the first level, sliding and pivoting glass doors allow ventilation and open the house up to the outside. Natural light, let in from a skylight above the stairs, penetrates through the house and filters down into the basement. Upstairs, bedrooms have 2 sets of windows to maximize airflows and daylighting, and the stairwell skylight is operable to allow heat produced throughout the house to escape as it rises.

1st floor

green roof

basement

zinc panels

prodema rain screen


view toward living room

view toward dining room

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Marfa Live/Work Art Gallery Fall 2009 Critic- Russell Krepart Design Excellence Nominee - Vertical Studio

This project is a live/work art gallery in Marfa, Texas, in which a portion of the proceeds of sold art go toward grants and micro-loans for local residents. Its aim is to create a direct connection between the economic stimulation of Marfa’s art scene and the native residents of Marfa. Residents would apply for loans or grants, and those chosen would get to choose, or commission, a work by one of the 2 resident artists who live and work on the site. The funds for the loan would be a portion of the revenue generated by the sale of the art. The program only occupies a portion of the site, in line with an existing concrete ruin. The rest of the site could be sold or developed and leased to raise funds for the gallery. The program is split into 2 parts, the public gallery space and the private residence and work spaces. They are separated by a public yard and event space, and the existing concrete

existing site condition

34

structure, which could serve as either a work space or exterior display space. The concrete structure defines a number of parameters for the buildings on the site including their maximum width as well as height. Taller elements on the site draw from the proportions of the existing tower; The gallery skylights are solid iterations of it, while the second floor of the residence is an extruded version of it. Appropriate ceiling heights are maintained by excavating into the site. This move, along with the exterior walls, serves to define and ground the project as it exists in a somewhat nondescript and flat landscape. Materials used are simple. Stucco, concrete, and cor-ten steel. A cor-ten steel wrapper announces the public entry to the gallery space. The gallery space then opens into a rear yard that can be used for a variety of events. The corten steel language of the entry reappears to create and wrap the bar and service area. There is an opportunity to project video or images onto the back wall of the gallery. Past the existing structure is the artists’ residence. It is separated into working and living spaces, both in plan and section, with a sunken private courtyard providing light to the sunken living spaces.


concept diagram

Hotel Dining Art/Judd Civic site

Presidio County Courthouse El Paisano Hotel Judd Workshops Chamberlain Building The Block Donald Judd’s House Thunderbird Restaurant Thunderbird Hotel

e 90 Rout

Dairy Queen

Site

Rou te 17

Marfa National Bank Pizza Foundation

Cochineal Restaurant Carmen’s Cafe

site analysis


second floor plan

outdoor work space

outdoor work space

private court

studio

private court

studio

C

section C

36


event/display space

gallery

event/display space

gallery

A bar

kitchen

mech/elec

office

bar

kitchen

mech/elec

office

B first floor plan

section A

Section B


gallery entrance

gallery space

38


artist residence/workshop


Migrant Worker/Thinker Fall 2009 Critic- Russell Krepart Located a on a rural site, a few miles northwest of Fort Davis, Texas, on Limpia Canyon Cattle Ranch, this project consists of housing for up to 4 migrant workers or 2 migrant families during calving season at the ranch. When migrant workers are not needed on the ranch, the buildings function as a retreat for “migrant thinkers.” The site is defined by a large number of cottonwood trees, which were originally spread across the area by early American workers/settlers travelling west to secure a brighter future and fulfill America’s “manifest destiny”. Cottonwoods are often grouped in circular patterns that originate from where seeds fell to the ground from settler’s wagon circles.

conceptual rendering

40


conceptual site model


design studies

The organization of the camp directly references the protective nature of these tree and wagon circles. Buildings are clustered around a central yard and the integrity of the circle is created by a combination of building and cottonwood. The buildings themselves are simple concrete boxes that sit off the ground on a wooden deck that both creates social spaces and keeps out critters. This decking serves as a second, man-made site topography, where furniture and spatial barriers are formed through augmentation of the surface.

kit of parts diagram

42


axonometric

floor plan


view of fire pit

44


view of dining space and caretaker residence

The decking and buildings are sliced by vertical planes, which break up massing, separate building function, and provide privacy where required. The camp is designed to be used similarly by both the migrant worker and the migrant thinkers.

conceptual model


Professional Work

Peter Gluck and Partners Architects SmithGroup


Private High School Expansion

designed to visualize the needs and goals of the school moving forward.

Peter Gluck and Partners 2011

I also assisted in documenting and presenting the current conditions of the physical plant of the school, which is spread over 3 buildings that have been added over the last hundred years as the school grew.

Peter Gluck and Partners (PGP) won the commission to strategically plan and design the expansion and renovation of a prestigious private all-boys school location in New York City’s Upper West Side. As an intern, I was a member of the project team during the programming phase of the project as well as during a lengthy strategic planning phase that was ongoing when I left. I worked primarily on a number of infographics presenting data collected from different constituencies in the school, including teachers, alumni, and parents. They were

Following the programming phase of the project, I worked on organizing and presenting numerous design options for decision makers at the school. The complexity of the existing buildings, phasing needs, and budget constraints made it very important to find a way to present the options in a simple, straight-forward manner that could be quickly understood by stakeholders without losing important information. I designed an interactive presentation that allowed PGP to easily present the layers of information necessary for that specific audience.

ATHLETICS FACILITIES SIZE

ATHLET NEEDS

LOWER SCHOOL

Too small

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Too small

Sufficient 0%

32%

41%

Sufficient 0%

Lar

Re

Lar UPPER SCHOOL

Too small

38%

Sufficient 0%

Inc

ATHLETICS FACILITIES QUANTITY LOWER SCHOOL

Not enough

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Not enough

3%

15%

Enough

Sw

Da 32%

2%

Enough

Squ UPPER SCHOOL

Not enough

34%

3%

Enough

Clim

48


COLLABORATION ACROSS DIVISIONS COLLABORATION AMONGST FACULTY AND STAFF ACROSS ALL DIVISIONS: 2% NO OPINION

INSUFFICIENT

11%

20% SATISFACTORY

for non-spatial reasons

...“I see it as one of the school’s strengths towards Dr. Levinson’s ideal ‘one school grades K-12’”...

2% NO OPINION

reasons

9% NO OPINION

9%

8% INSUFFICIENT for non-spatial

12%

18%

INSUFFICIENT for non-spatial reasons

14%

SATISFACTORY

...Active planning of curriculum across divisi less important than places to discuss pedag and to identify those teaching dilemmas tha close analogues across the divisions”...

22% 14%

SATISFACTORY

IMPRACTICAL

IMPRACTICAL

IMPRACTICAL

INSUFFICIENT because spaces

INSUFFICIENT because spaces

INSUFFICIENT because spaces

50%

55%

54%

LOWER SCHOOL

MIDDLE SCHOOL

UPPER SCHOOL

don’t allow for collaboration

don’t allow for collaboration

don’t allow for collaboration

...This is not emphasized from the top down. If interdivisional collaboration is a stated goal of the school, supportive guidance and oversight is provied, AND faculty members are held accountable...the physical plant will not hinder interdivisional collaboration”...

...Difficult because teachers are genuinely to busy to really engage in cross-divisional wor even if they know it would be beneficial”...

COLLABORATION WITHIN EACH DIVISION ...Time/space/interest and a model of how real collaboration works all need to be provided”...

COLLABORATION AMONGST FACULTY AND STAFF WITHIN EACH DIVISION:

...It is (difficult) to do because of the four dif schedules (for) LS, 5/6, 7/8, and US.... it is a impossible to do with regularity”...

2% NO OPINION

35% IMPEDED

35%

SATISFACTORY

by a lack of gathering space

37% IMPEDED

36%

SATISFACTORY

by a lack of gathering space

32%

SATISFACTORY

by a lack of gathering space

COULD BE IMPROVED

COULD BE IMPROVED

30%

27%

LOWER SCHOOL

44% IMPEDED

COULD BE IMPROVED

22%

MIDDLE SCHOOL

UPPER SCHOOL

ATHLETICS FACILITIES NEEDS / WISH LIST Sufficient 0%

Sufficient 0%

Larger fitness center

44%

Regulation sized gym

41%

Larger locker rooms Sufficient 0% Increased spectator seating

3%

Enough

Swimming pool

Dance /acrobatics /yoga 2%

Enough

Squash court 3%

55%

50%

45%

38%

38%

52%

44%

29%

48%

40%

6%

9%

8%

6%

5%

4%

3%

2%

2%

2%

2%

Enough

Climbing wall

0%

faculty survey infographics


PLATTEN HALL

INFILL BUILDING

WEST END PLAZA

77TH STREET CHURCH BUILDING

W 77th STREET

WEST END AVENUE

GROSS AREA

NET AREA

GROSSING FACTOR

COLLEGIATE SCHOOL 260 West 78th Street, New York NY 10024 T 212 812 8500 www.collegiateschool.org

CIRCULATION AREA

MECHANICAL AREA

W.C. AREA

N.S.F.

% OF GROSS

S.F.

% OF GROSS

S.F.

% OF GROSS

S.F.

% OF GROSS

S.F.

41,639

23,105

55.5%

1.80

8,866

21.3%

6,689

16.1%

2,021

4.9%

958

2.3%

Platten Hall

75,094

42,646

56.8%

1.76

13,530

18.0%

14,181

18.9%

3,536

4.7%

1,201

1.6%

77th Street Church Building

19,835

12,675

63.9%

1.57

3,521

17.8%

2,743

13.8%

617

3.1%

279

1.4%

Total Collegiate Campus

136,568

78,436

57.4%

1.74

26,907

19.7%

22,613

16.6%

6,174

4.5%

2,438

1.8%

1.65

existing conditions

WALL/SHAFT AREA

G.S.F. West End Plaza & Infill Building

PETER GLUCK AND PARTNERS ARCHITECTS 423 West 127th Street, 6th Fl, New York NY 10027 T 212 690 4950 www.gluckpartners.com

WEST END PLAZA & INFILL BUILDING: Combined 12 Story and 6 Story Buildings Building(s) Gross Area: 68,468 GSF Gross Area Occupied by Collegiate: 41,639 GSF

% OF GROSS

GROSSING FACTOR: A multiplication factor applied to Net Area that derives Gross Area (Net Area x Grossing Factor = Gross Area) *The higher the grossing factor, the more ineffecient the building.

Industry Standard School Grossing Factor

1- BUILDINGS SUMMARY

A1

CAMPUS OVERVIEW

PLATTEN HALL 10 Story Building Building Gross Area: 75,094 GSF Gross Area Occupied by Collegiate: 75,094 GSF

77th STREET CHURCH BUILDING Combined 4 Story and 3 Story Buildings Building(s) Gross Area: 27,120 GSF Gross Area Occupied by Collegiate: 19,835 GSF

TOTAL Building(s) Gross Area: 170,682 GSF TOTAL Gross Area Occupied by Collegiate: 136,568 GSF

school buildings separated

COLLEGIATE SCHOOL 260 West 78th Street, New York NY 10024 T 212 812 8500 www.collegiateschool.org

50

PETER GLUCK AND PARTNERS ARCHITECTS 423 West 127th Street, 6th Fl, New York NY 10027 T 212 690 4950 www.gluckpartners.com

1- BUILDINGS SUMMARY

GROSS AREA

A2


BUILDING

FLOOR

West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill West End Plaza, Infill

C1 C1 C1 C1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6

CATEGORY

ROOM NAME

Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation

Corridor 1 Corridor 3 Freight Elevator 2 Stair 1 Corridor 2 Corridor 3 Elevator 3 Freight Elevator 2 Stair 1 Vestibule and Stair Elevator 3 Freight Elevator 2 Stair 1 Stair 2A, Corridor 1 Corridor 1 Elevator 3 Freight Elevator 2 Stair 1 Corridor 1 Corridor 2 Corridor 3 Elevator 3 Stair 1 Corridor 1 Corridor 3 Corridor 4 Elevator 3 Stair 1 Corridor 1 Corridor 3 Elevator 3 Stair 1

ROOM #

149

WEST END PLAZA & INFILL BUILDING: Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall Platten Hall

g

C2 C1 C1 C1 C1 C1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11 11

Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation

Stair 3 Auditorium Stair Corridor 2 Elevators 1,2 Stair 3 Stair 5 Elevators 1,2 Stair 3 Stair 4 Stair 5 Vestibule 1 Vestibule 4 Vestibule 5 Corridor 2 Corridor 3 Elevators 1,2 Stair 3 Stair 4 Elevators 1,2 Stair 3 Stair 4 Elevators 1,2 Stair 3 Stair 4 Corridor 2 Elevators 1,2 Stair 3 Stair 4 Corridor 2 Elevator 1,2 Stair 3 Stair 4 Corridor 3 Elevator 1,2 Stair 3 Stair 4 Corridor 2 Elevators 1,2 Stair 3 Stair 4 Elevators 1,2 Stair 3 Stair 4 Corridor 2 Elevators 1,2 Stair 3 Stair 4 Corridor 2 Corridor 3 Elevators 1,2 Stair 3 Stair 4

Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation

Corridor 4 Stair 6 Vestibule 6 Vestibule 7 Corridor 4 Corridor 5 Stair 6 Corridor 4 Corridor 5 Stair 6 Corridor 3 Stair 6

1,015 43 72 45 78 102 35 72 155 118 35 72 130 288 753 35 69 139 566 234 120 35 147 566 174 153 35 149 697 171 35 146

NOTES: Area numbers reect existing circulation which is not always to code. -West End Plaza corridors are too narrow -West End Plaza stairwells are too narrow -77th St Church Building corridors are too narrow -77th St Church Building is short one means of egress and is not ADA accessible (no elevator)

6,689 SF 143 81 259 150 287 130 150 273 69 97 131 114 34 383 144 150 297 382 152 305 225 151 284 226 929 152 299 226 929 152 299 227 297 151 290 229 782 152 304 227 152 299 227 632 151 287 227 196 70 144 299 235

14,181 SF

PLATTEN HALL: 77th Street Church Building 77th Street Church Building 77th Street Church Building 77th Street Church Building 77th Street Church Building 77th Street Church Building 77th Street Church Building 77th Street Church Building 77th Street Church Building 77th Street Church Building 77th Street Church Building 77th Street Church Building

AREA (NSF)

1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4

963 82 130 39 163 162 190 147 152 198 366 151

77TH STREET CHURCH BUILDING:

2,743 SF

TOTAL:

TOTAL Collegiate Circulation Area: 22,613 SF RATIO: 16.6% of Gross

22,613 SF

*See Page 22 for complete index of Collegiate spaces

COLLEGIATE SCHOOL 260 West 78th Street, New York NY 10024 T 212 812 8500 www.collegiateschool.org

PETER GLUCK AND PARTNERS ARCHITECTS 423 West 127th Street, 6th Fl, New York NY 10027 T 212 690 4950 www.gluckpartners.com

COLOR KEY circulation (gross) mechanical (gross) w.c. (gross) lower school middle school upper school science art music theater arts library technology athletics dining/food services administration service

1- BUILDINGS SUMMARY

circulation spaces A4

CIRCULATION AREA

NOTES: Area numbers reect existing condtions, which are not ideal. -No Air Conditioning -Inadequate Mechanical Space

WEST END PLAZA & INFILL BUILDING: Ratio: 55.5% of Gross Grossing Factor: 1.80

23,105 NSF

PLATTEN HALL: Ratio: 56.8% of Gross Grossing Factor: 1.78

42,656 NSF

77TH STREET CHURCH BUILDING: Ratio: 63.9% of Gross Grossing Factor: 1.57

12,675 NSF

TOTAL:

78,436 NSF

COLLEGIATE SCHOOL 260 West 78th Street, New York NY 10024 T 212 812 8500 www.collegiateschool.org

PETER GLUCK AND PARTNERS ARCHITECTS 423 West 127th Street, 6th Fl, New York NY 10027 T 212 690 4950 www.gluckpartners.com

TOTAL Collegiate Net Area: 78,436 NSF RATIO: 57.4% of Gross Grossing Factor: 1.74 1- BUILDINGS SUMMARY

NET AREA

A3

existing program spaces


THE OPTIONS 1

2

3

4

5

6

EXISTING

INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADE

RELOCATE

UPPER SCHOOL

CONNECT

EXPAND

SCHOOL TOWER W/ WECC

OFF SITE

NEW CONSTRUCTION

SIZE/EFFICIENCY

137,000 gsf 79,000 nsf 1.73 grossing factor 0% new

142,500 gsf 84,500 nsf 1.69 grossing factor 16% new

162,000 gsf 90,000 nsf 1.80 grossing factor 40% new

177,000 gsf 101,000 nsf 1.75 grossing factor 67% new

165,500 gsf 99,500 nsf 1.66 grossing factor 52% new

161,000 gsf 103,500 nsf 1.56 grossing factor 100% new

DESCRIPTION

Upgrade infrastructure only No change to: • program • space • size

• Renovate WEP 7-12 • Minimum to relocate upper school

• Renovate WEP 7-12 • 7 story addition to Infill Building • New 2 story Alley Building to enlarge lobby, cafeteria

• New 14 story Alley Building • 7 story addition to Infill Building • Renovate WEP floors 0-12 • Select interventions in PH

• New 12 story building on site of Alumni Gym • New 2 story Alley Building • WEP floors 0-12 remain as-is • Select interventions in PH

• New 10 Story Building on new site near 61st Street and West End Ave

QUALITY OF SPACE

• No improvement except air conditioning and cosmetic upgrades

• Upper School accommodated in WEP

• Improved entry and dining • Improved connections

• WEP all new and enlarged • Central core unifies bldgs • New cafeteria

• New tower • WEP floors 1-6 mostly unchanged

• All new • Lost connection to school history

PROGRAM

• No change

• No change

• Minor improvement to size and adjacencies • No change in WEP floors 0-6

• Improved size and adjacencies • Still does not address issues with Gym and Auditorium

• Improved size and adjacencies • Still does not address issues with Gym and Auditorium

• Ideal adjacencies • Improved size • Full size Gym and Auditorium

DISRUPTION/ CONSTRUCTION RISK

• Minimum school session disruption. • 3-4 aggressive summers

• Minor school session disruption • 3-4 aggressive summers • 2 years for WEP renovation

• Minor school session disruption • 2 aggressive summers • 2 years of construction

• School to be confined to Platten Hall for 2 years • 3 aggressive summers • 2 years for WEP renovation

• Minor school session disruption • 3-4 aggressive summers • 2 years for construction

• No disruption

NEGOTIATION WITH WECC

• Requires renegotiation of upper school building lease • 0 years to occupancy

• Utilities • 3 years to occupancy

• Utilities • Tax lot consolidation • 4 years to occupancy

• Requires purchase of FAR from WECC • 5 years to occupancy

• Requires negotiation to build on WECC land • 6 years to occupancy

• None • 3 years to occupancy

REGULATORY RISK

• None

• Minimal

• WEP subject to LPC review • Minor egress issues • Lot coverage issues

• WEP subject to LPC review • Minor egress issues • Lot coverage issues

• Alteration to WECC • Shared egress issues • Non-conforming

• Value of land based on ability to demolish Platten Hall

WEP TO PH

AND OPTIMIZE PROGRAM

Infrastructural Upgrade Gut Renovation New Construction

COST

incl. deal

$44.5 million

$60 million

$80 million

$106 million

$111 million

$101 million

-

$1,672/nsf

$1,577/nsf

$1,351/nsf

$1,732/nsf

$976/nsf

bang for your buck

QUALITY OF SPACE 1

2

3

4

5

6

EXISTING

RELOCATE

CONNECT

EXPAND

SCHOOL TOWER

OFF SITE

INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADE

%NEW

(includes renovation)

0% NEW

UPPER SCHOOL

16% NEW

34 total 4 ideal 28 undersized 4 compromised by columns 3 compromised proportions

67% NEW

NEW CONSTRUCTION

100% NEW

85,859 new gsf 165,520 total gsf

35 total 8 ideal 25 undersized 4 compromised by columns 3 compromised proportions

44 total idea l 7 ideal 30 undersized 6 compromised by columns 12 compromised proportions

45 total ideal 19 ideal 15 undersized 8 compromised by columns 2 compromised proportions

43 total ideal 18 ideal 20 undersized 4 compromised by columns 4 compromised proportions

45 total ideal 45 ideal 0 undersized 0 compromised by columns 0 compromised proportions

40 office nsf / faculty member

46 office nsf / faculty member

69 office nsf / faculty member

76 office nsf / faculty member

61 office nsf / faculty member

66 office nsf / faculty member

2 undersized gyms # of spectators 6 teaching spaces

2 undersized gyms # of spectators # teaching spaces

2 undersized gyms # of spectators 6 teaching spaces

2 undersized gyms # of spectators 6 teaching spaces

2 undersized gyms # of spectators 6 teaching spaces

# of spectators 8 teaching spaces

DINING

# of seats # of serving lines

# of seats # of serving lines

# of seats # of serving lines

# of seats # of serving lines

# of seats # of serving lines

# of seats # of serving lines

DOES SCHEME UNIFY BUILDINGS?

NO

NO

SOME IMPROVEMENT

IMPROVED

IMPROVED

YES

l

ea

FACULTY OFFICES

office nsf / faculty member

Industry Standard 50-75 Brearley Expansion 66

PHYS. ED

• No change to existing • Long, inconvenient commute for US

ideal

• No horizontal connection between upper WEP & PH

• Horizontal connection between upper WEP & PH

• Long, inconvenient commute for US

• Misaligned WEP & PH floors require indirect circulation

• Improved horizontal connections throughout building • New core addresses floor misalignment

161,171 new gsf 161,171 total gsf

Competition size gym

• Tower expands existing PH floor plates • No improvement to horizontal connections between WEP & PH

ENTRANCE

78th Street (no change)

78th Street (no change)

78th Street (enlarged)

West End Avenue (new)

West End Avenue (new)

Freedom Place South between W 61st & 62nd

CIRCULATION/ CORE

2 separate cores

2 separate cores

2 separate cores

1 unified core

1 compromised core

1 unified core

Presentation slides

clicking specific boxes take you to slides with detailed information by project, as seen on right.

52

W/ WECC

52% NEW

117,689 new gsf 176,840 total gsf

id

22,880 new gsf 142,516 total gsf

AND OPTIMIZE PROGRAM

65,051 new gsf 161,755 total gsf

CLASSROOMS

0 new gsf 137,061 total gsf

WEP TO PH

40% NEW


ANALYSIS OF HARD COSTS Connect WEP to PH

WEST END PLAZA (INCL ALLEY & INFILL) 85,930 gsf 21% New 18,120 sf $701/sf 41% Reno. w/ Infra. Upgrades

$12.7M

34,831 sf

$577/sf

$20.1M

32,979 sf

$210/sf

$6.9M

85,930 sf

$462/sf

$39.7M

Renovation $7.3M Infra. Upgrades $12.8M

38% Infra. Upgrades Only SUBTOTAL PLATTEN HALL 75,395 gsf 0% New 15% Reno. w/ Infra. Upgrades

-

-

-

10,961 sf

$434/sf

$4.8M

64,434 sf

$289/sf

$18.6M

75,395 sf

$310/sf

$23.4M

Renovation $1.6M Infra. Upgrades $3.2M

85% Infra. Upgrades Only SUBTOTAL

$20.1M 34,831 sf $577/sf

11% New 28% Reno. w/ Infra. Upgrades

18,120 sf

$701/sf

$12.7M

45,792 sf

$577/sf

$24.9M

$18.6M 64,434 sf $289/sf

97,413 sf

$262/sf

$25.5M

161,325 sf $395/sf

$63.8M

$210/sf

Infrastructure Upgrades Only Renovation w/ Infrastructure Upgrades

Renovation $8.9M Infra. Upgrades $16M

61% Infra. Upgrades Only

New

$.8M

Pre-Construction Costs

TOTAL

Breakouts:

$12.7M 18,120 sf $701/sf

All Numbers shown are union, non union numbers 20%-25% less. See Gorton & Partners document for all backup.

Structural Modification

$3.2M

Phasing

$1.7M

Overtime

$1.3M

Contingencies

$11.9M

scheme cost breakdown

CONNECT WEST END PLAZA TO PLATTEN HALL PROGRAM AREA COMPARISON PROVIDED EXISTING 8,807 SF 9,608 SF

ADMINISTRATION L EXISTING 5,758 SF

M H

PROVIDED 6,679SF

LM H PROVIDED 12,384 SF

L EXISTING 4,354 SF

EXISTING 14,224 SF

C E

PROVIDED 15,781 SF

SPECIALS L EXISTING 6,003 SF

M

H

PROVIDED 7,639 SF

SCIENCE LMH

EN L

O

H

L/M H

EXISTING 7,607 SF

PROVIDED 11,801 SF

L EXISTING 7,661 SF

M

BASIC “L”

MEDIUM “M”

IDEAL “H”

SCHEME 0 8,807

Administration

9,608

9,699

10,873

11,348

Dining

5,758

6,850

6,960

7,624

6,679

Athletics

15,553

15,553

16,264

18,997

12,384

Library

4,354

4,900

4,900

5,485

5,233

Specials

14,224

16,764

18,248

21,212

15,781

Science

6,003

8,160

8,300

8,585

7,639

Upper School

7,607

11,725

13,750

16,750

11,801

Middle School

7,661

9,910

11,035

12,770

11,535

Lower School

8,290

11,045

11,305

11,625

10,022

79,058

94,606

101,635

114,395

89,880

TOTAL

UPPER SCHOOL

H

O

M

LIBRARY

L

O O

EXISTING

PROVIDED 5,223 SF

H

PROVIDED 11,535 SF

MIDDLE SCHOOL L

O L

H

EXISTING 15,553 SF

ATHLETICS

C

A ET N IA R A IN TIO IC R LS G N Y S

DINING

EXISTING 8,290 SF

O

H

$4.8M 10.961 sf $434sf

$6.9M 32,979 sf

TOTALS 161,325 gsf

PLATTEN HALL 75,395 gsf

WEST END PLAZA (INCL ALLEY & INFILL) 85,930 gsf

M

H

PROVIDED 10,022 SF

LOWER SCHOOL LM H 0 SF

5,000 SF

10,000 SF

15,000 SF

20,000 SF

scheme programmatic comparisons


Microsoft Mid-Atlantic Headquarters SmithGroup - 2009 IIDA Mid-Atlantic 2010 Silver Award Winner SmithGroup won the commission to complete the interior design and build out of Microsoft’s new 120,000 sf MidAtlantic Headquarters just outside of Washington DC. The project schedule was very aggressive in order to correspond with the expiring lease that Microsoft held for their current space. I joined the team in January of 2009, near the end of the design development stage of the project, and worked on

pantry/lounge space under construction

conference room under construction

54

the project through its substantial completion in July of 2009. I worked on all parts of the project, from design, construction documents, millwork design, finish selection, construction administration, contractor and client meetings, consultant coordination, and quality control and punchlisting. Near the beginning of construction, almost half of the project team was laid off, including the project architect. Working with the project manager and design principal, I picked up many of the responsibilities left vacant by the personnel losses. I was charged with the design of a number of millwork pieces for the space. The largest of these was a bar/hub piece that would serve as a focal point in the lounge spaces on each floor. Different colored backlit glasses were used as identifying elements for each floor.


photos courtesy of Max Mackenzie


bar/hub detail

56


bar/hub


Reston Heights East SmithGroup 2007-2008 Reston Heights is a one million sq. ft. mixed use office and retail development in Reston, Virginia. The biggest complications of the project were the developer’s desires to create architecture that works at 2 scales. The scale of the highway needed to be addressed along the north of the site, which backed up to the Dulles Toll Road, a major artery serving Dulles International Airport. On the interior of the site, the project needed to address the human scale and create a destination for retail. To further constrain the site, suburban parking counts required parking for over 3000 cars. We overcame this problem by utilizing the slope of the site and continuing the ground datum from the west over the service road and onto the green roofs of the retail component. The office building design reflects both the desire to maximize rentable space and market desirability while trying to create an iconic architecture highly visible to the “river of cars” flowing directly by it. Color became the team’s tool for creating a striking architecture without playing significantly with the building footprint. Different colored glasses and treatments of shadow boxes differentiates the three office towers, but at the end of the conceptual design phase, the appearance of them remained up in the air.

58


site plan rendered by Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects


One of the main tasks that I was charged with was developing an architecture for the retail component of the project. An environmental theme incorporating geological ideas drawn from the landscape design by Nelson Byrd Woltz, and a desire to transition to a sleeker corporate architecture above, created the juxtaposed use of wood, stone gabion wall, and metal panels.

retail elevation

60


retail elevation

early massing model

pavilion studies


full retail elevation


office drop-off and retail


425 Eye St. SmithGroup 2008-2009

425 Eye Street is an existing office building about two blocks from the Convention Center in Washington DC. The client chose SmithGroup to renovate the building, update finishes and mechanical systems, and re-skin the south and east facades. This was the first project in the Workplace Studio to be completed entirely in Revit. I worked on or assisted with most aspects of the project in one capacity or another. These include conceptual sketching, Revit Model management, bathroom finish selection (the layouts were, for the most part, existing) modelling in Revit, redlines, detailing, elevator cab design, and miscellaneous rendering. I was the main contact on the team for managing and troubleshooting the Revit model I was one of 4 people working on this project. I joined the project team at the beginning of the implementation of Revit. A preliminary schematic design had been completed in 2006. Many features of the original schematic package were changed when the project was revisited.

before

64


after - professional rendering

elevator cab refinishing studies


1' - 8 1/2"

1' - 3 1/2"

1' - 3"

MP-1 BEYOND MP-1 JOINT BEYOND

S

CONC. PAVERS ON SETTING BED EXISTING CONC. CURB TO BE REMOVED MP-1

VARIES - COORD W/ WINDOW SCHEDULE

NEW SLAB ON GRADE

2"

COMPACTED GRADE PROTECTION BOARD

6"

1

EXIS

curtain wall at grade detail

66


3' - 1 1/4" 1' - 9"

WRAP SHEET MEMBRANE FLASHING UNDER ALUM. COPING

MTL PANEL COPING LAP 2" MIN.

SLOPE

5"

T.O. PARAPET

CONT. CLEAT SHEATHING STL. CHANNEL. SEE STRUC.

MEMBRANE FLASHING

2' - 10 1/2"

3' - 6"

ALUM. CURTAINWALL SYSTEM

CANT PT WD BLOCKING

6" METAL STUDS W/ 1/2" EXTERIOR SHEATING ON BOTH SIDES

PREFORMED ALUM. SILL

ROOFING OVER TAPERED INSULATION

ALUM. INFILL PANEL - PTD

4 1/2"

S

ROOF 125' - 6" ALUM. INFILL PANEL - PTD

2' - 4 1/2"

BOND BEAM. SEE STRUC.

EXIST. CONC. SLAB

INS-1

3-5/8" METAL STUD W/ 5/8" GWB W/ INS-1

2' - 6"

INS-3

L SUPPORT AND KICKERS SEE STRUC. STL. ANGLE SEE STRUC. ALUM.CLOSURE PANEL BY WINDOW SUPPLIER

PREFORMED ALUM. BLIND POCKET

REBAR. SEE STRUC.

column cladding detail

CMU ALUM. SILL EXTENSION BELOW

INS-1

E.O. CMU WALL BELOW

5/8" GWB ON 3-5/8" MTL STUDS W/ SEMI-RIGID FOIL FACED INSULATION.

1ST FLOOR 46' - 6"

WW-1

S

S

MP-1

3' - 0"

NEW CONC. SLAB OVER INS-5

10"

5"

5/8" GWB ON 2 1/2" METAL STUDS

AIR/WATER BARRIER

1' - 0"

1' - 0"

ST. CONC. SLAB AND FOUNDATION WALL

SEAL ALL AIR BARRIER PENETRATIONS 1' - 6"

1' - 6"

FRAMING AS REQUIRED TO SUPPORT METAL PANEL

curtain wall detail


Drawings, Sketches, etc.


Sketchbook: Italy These sketches and studies were completed in Florence, Rome, Vicenza, Venice, and Como on a 6 week trip during the summer of 2006. Emphasis was placed on the use of sketching to better understand and diagram the experiences of spaces and buildings.

70


Process Sketches windmill sketches for prongorn tracking center - 2009 academic opposite page - above and right migrant worker/thinker sketches - 2009 academic opposite page - bottom left sketches for a mixed-use apartment building in Baltimore - 2006 academic below

72


Hand Rendering

74


76


Digital Rendering

ipods

78


apartment building

sunlit room


conceptual building hybrid render and line

80


Ross Galloway

urriculumvita

ross.h.galloway@gmail.com 301.335.2644

303 W 40th St. Apt. 108 Austin, TX 78705

Education 2009 - Present University of Texas - Austin Master of Architecture | May 2012 3.85 GPA 2003-2007 University of Maryland - College Park Bachelor of Science of Architecture | May 2007 Graduated Summa Cum Laude Award for Academic Achievement at the Baccalaureate Level

Skills Hand - sketching | physical modelling | rendering [graphite. colored pencil. marker. watercolor] Digital - Revit | Autocad | Sketchup | Rhino | Photoshop Illustrator | Indesign | 3dsmax | Kerkythea | Processing | Partworks 2D/3D Languages - Fluent in Spanish

Work Experience references available upon request Peter Gluck and Partners, Architects | New York, NY | June. 2011 - Dec. 2011

Intern Architect

Worked on the programming and strategic planning phases for the expansion and renovation of a 135,000 sq. ft private school in New York City. Participated in many aspects of the design process: graphic design and infographic creation test fit design presentation development model building

SmithGroup | Washington, DC | Aug. 2007 - Aug. 2009 Intern Architect Worked on the conceptual design of a 1 million square foot office and retail development, the renovation and reskinning of an existing office building, and the IIDA award winning interior design and fit out of 4 floors of a high end office building. Participated in all aspects of the design process: conceptual modelling and sketching construction documentation rendering client, consultant, and contractor meetings construction administration Spearheaded the implimentation of Autodesk Revit software within SmithGroup’s workplace studio

The University of Texas | School of Architecture| Austin, Texas | Jan. 2010 - Present Design II | Design Assistant Visual Communications | Teaching Assistant

Assist in teaching 1st year architecture students the basics of design, drawing techniques, rendering, and drafting

IO central | Austin, Texas | Jan. 2009 - Dec 2010 Staff Member Taught introductory Revit courses Provided technical support and maintained digital technologies such as laser cutters and 3d printers

Awards Selected Works 2010 chosen as a blurb.com Editor’s pick portfolio UTSOA Vertical Studio Design Excellence Nominee IIDA Mid Atlantic 2010 Silver Award for Microsoft Mid-Atlantic Headquarters (SmithGroup) 1st place award- National Building Museum Inter-School Student Design Competition Charrette Recipient of the Joy & Morin Scott/Sally & John Byram Graduate Fellowship Recipient of the University of Maryland School of Architecture Faculty Scholarship


Selected 84


Selected Works 2012