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Sea Shapes (#1), c. 1960s Oil on fiberboard 60 x 48 in.


BEATRICE MANDELMAN

AND THE

SIXTIES

JANUARY 18 – APRIL 1, 2017

19 E AST 66 TH S TR EET

N EW Y O R K , NY 10065

212.202.3270

W W W. R O SE N B E R GC O . C O M


Courtesy of The Beatrice Mandelman and Louis Ribak Papers, The University of New Mexico Libraries, Center for Southwest Research


introduction

i

t is an unmitigated joy to show the vibrant works of Beatrice Mandelman. She was and

remains a singularly engaging character — a woman with her own style, determination,

energy, and fearlessness. She was her own painter, and her works reflect intensity and beauty, strength and fragility. The Sixties’ counter-culture was an important backdrop

for Mandelman’s convictions and her artistic expression. Beatrice Mandelman’s work is dynamic and convincing. It is our honor to work with The University of New Mexico Foundation to highlight Mandelman’s important contributions. After her death, the Foundation became the repository of the works of Mandelman as well as those of her husband, Louis Ribak. We are dedicated to working with the Foundation to enhance Mandelman’s legacy. We can only express here our profound delight in finding at the Foundation such enthusiasm for and understanding of art. The Foundation’s mission is to support excellence in education, including through scholarships to students. The combination of art and education is just perfect. Henry Nemcik, as the President of The University of New Mexico Foundation, should be applauded for his vision of education and his confident leadership of the Mandelman/Ribak project. This exhibition, however, could not have happened without the unrelenting support and talent of Suzanne Awen, executive project officer at the Foundation. Our appreciation as well to Giulia Urquhart, counsel to the Foundation, who enabled this special and longterm cooperation with Rosenberg & Co. Beatrice Mandelman has found a new home and we are honored to welcome her.

MARIANNE ROSENBERG

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beatrice mandelman and the sixties “Paint life, not theory of life.” B EAT RIC E M AN D ELMAN

b

eatrice Mandelman and The Sixties is a solo exhibition dedicated to Beatrice Mandelman’s works from the 1960s, a time when she may arguably have

been at the pinnacle of her career, working across different media and

genres while remaining resolutely dedicated to her singular vision. The 1960s

were a decade of change, counterculture, and upheaval, giving rise to Pop Art, Op Art, Minimalism, and Conceptualism. Mandelman herself was a champion of the leftist ideas of the time but her artwork did not fall within any simple category and was instead the product of the unique confluence of her experience and influences. In 1944, Beatrice Mandelman and her newlywed husband, fellow artist Louis Ribak, moved from New York City to New Mexico with only 1,200 dollars in their pockets. In the land of vast, dry vistas and sun-baked earth, the couple joined the ranks of numerous artist-emigrants who had and would make New Mexico their home over the course of the twentieth century. For their own pilgrimage, Mandelman and Ribak first stopped in Santa Fe, where they stayed for three weeks. During a visit to Taos, however, they sensed that an incipient art scene was arising there, and they packed up their bags and moved. The two would live in Taos for the rest of their lives; Louis Ribak passed away in 1979, and Beatrice Mandelman nearly two decades later in 1998. Shortly after arriving in Taos, the young couple began to shape the town into a supportive art community for themselves. They befriended the art critic and Taos resident Mabel Dodge, along with Emil Bisttram and Andrew Dasburg, who were the only other Modernist artists in the area. Only three years after arriving, the couple opened the Taos Valley Art School, which was a key factor in enticing more artists to Taos, such that, through the 1940s up until the mid-1950s, nearly two dozen other artists joined them, including Thomas Benrimo, Edward Corbett, Ted Egri, Louise Ganthiers, Agnes Martin, John Puy, Robert D. Ray, Oli Sihvonen, Clay Spohn, Earl Stroh, and Cady Wells. Later, these artists, along with Bisttram, Dasburg, Mandelman, and Ribak, would become known as the Taos Moderns — a group of artists aligned due to their respect for and indebtedness to European Modernism. Through their art school and unwavering energy, Mandelman and Ribak quickly became the veritable epicenter of the group.

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With the arrival of new artists, the Taos art scene blossomed. In 1951, Beatrice Mandelman and the artist Barbara Graham opened the Ruins Gallery — an artist cooperative and exhibition space. A year later, the Taos Artist’s Association (later renamed the Taos Art Association) was born. The member artists of the association began exhibiting together, which helped to raise awareness of Taos’s burgeoning art scene. In 1963, the association bought an old house, which they converted into the Stables Gallery. Part historical museum, part meeting place, and part cooperative gallery, the Stables Gallery gave the Taos artists fertile grounds for the exchange of ideas. In 1982, Mandelman reminisced about it: “The artists had the opportunity to show what they wanted to show at what time they wanted to show it, and they were in control. One had a chance to move ahead in one’s work without the stamp of a dollar. In the [commercial] gallery you’re the victim of the gallery dealer’s taste and you have to comply with it. Whereas, at the Stables, you had a chance to show what you wanted to show — and no one could judge, which was really freedom of the artist.” Along with these two cooperatively-run galleries, Mandelman and Ribak also opened their own exhibition space. In the late 1940s, the couple bought a house — a large, 150-year-old converted adobe stable. In the middle of the house was a wide, open living room that Mandelman and Ribak turned into Gallery Ribak, an exhibition space where they organized shows for their own works as well as work by their friends. One of those friends was Agnes Martin, who lived in Taos during the 1950s. Although celebrated for her later Minimalist grids, at the time her works were similar to Mandelman’s, featuring abstract, amorphous forms. Throughout her life, Martin was an intensely private person, and her time in Taos was no different. She rarely spoke to anyone there, except for Mandelman and Ribak to whom she had taken a liking. Almost every night, after she had finished painting in her studio, she would visit the couple at their home, where they would stay up late talking about art. In 1955, Mandelman and Ribak invited her to exhibit with them at Gallery Ribak in a three-person show. Two years later, Martin moved back to New York. Agnes Martin’s 1957 departure from Taos was only the first of many. Mandelman and Ribak watched as many of their closest friends left Taos — Clay Spohn left in 1958 and Oli Sihvonen in 1967. By the mid-1960s, there were very few of the original Taos Moderns left in the town. Instead, an influx of new artists began to arrive — artists who sold traditional landscapes and exotic portraits of Native Americans to tourists. As Mandelman described in a 1964 interview, “Before in the early days when we first came here, there were some isolated artists, and there was a feeling for art, but it’s gotten out of hand.” She described the art being made as a “sort of buckeye painting,” which she considered crass and tasteless. And yet, although the 1960s were a lonely time for Mandelman, they were also the years when she did some of her most sophisticated work, reflecting in part the social and political movements of the time. The 1960s was a period of virtually unprecedented upheaval in American history. It was the decade of the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Panthers, the

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No. Thirteen, c. 1960s Acrylic and collage on canvas paper 15.88 x 11.88 in.


Weathermen, and grievous, grief-inducing political assassinations; it was also the decade that ushered in the women’s liberation movement, intense protests against the Vietnam War, and the rejection of conventional societal norms. Counter-culture roiled the establishment and the turmoil affected the political, artistic, and societal fabric. Beatrice Mandelman was born to a left-leaning family in New Jersey, worked as an artist for the Works Progress Administration between 1935 and 1942, and later married Louis Ribak, who was very leftist. And like many liberals in those years, Mandelman was a determined protester of the Vietnam War. The war had precipitated a proliferation of violent images, the extent of which was unprecedented in American media. And Mandelman, like many Americans, was profoundly affected by the civil injustices that she witnessed in the news. In the mid-1960s, Mandelman made a series of anti-war collages, stating at a 1969 exhibition of these works, “I was jolted into this, man must speak up. People’s callousness, indifference, despair and fear moved me to begin this series two years ago. I was dazed by the indifference and the horror of what was happening. It was therefore urgent that I say something about war, peace, violence, and survival. This is the time.” Collage No. 9 [pg. 22], an archetypal work from the series, depicts a model’s face, clearly lifted from a glossy women’s magazine. Mandelman partially defaced the cut-out visage with rips and tears through the lips and nose, and surrounded it with explosive swirls of color and the words “revolution,” “war,” and “help!” epitomizing the zeitgeist of that generation. Untitled (Eye to Eye) [pg. 25] is a more somber commentary on the war. An amalgamation of disparate images — dead children, moviegoers gazing at an unseen screen, a Picasso-esque sketch of huddled figures in deliberation, and a t-shirt with the slogan “Let us all see eye to eye” — are all superimposed with thick strokes of blood-red paint, a dark reminder of the war’s death toll. The anti-war collages of Beatrice Mandelman make for a striking comparison to the contemporaneous works of Martha Rosler and Andy Warhol. Concurrently to Mandelman, Rosler was making her own series of anti-war collages entitled House Beautiful: Bringing the War Home (c. 1967-1972), which juxtaposed images of idealized domestic life with those of war, death, and destruction. Like Mandelman, Rosler was shocked by the public’s complacency to American acts of violence and perceived imperialism, and this catalyzed her reflections on American apathy. Similarly to Rosler, Andy Warhol also exposed American apathy through the deadening effect of replicated images. As Susan Sontag would later argue in her influential book On Photography, through the repetitive act of viewing horrific images, the images themselves are rendered banal. By screen-printing serialized images of car crashes and electric chairs, Warhol exposed the tedium of death. Although there is a unifying political current to the three artists’ oeuvres, unlike Rosler and Warhol, Mandelman’s art remained anchored in a largely abstract but emotionally wrought construct. During a period when many artists seemed to resign themselves to irony as a form of critique, she believed in the power of images, color, and art to jolt a lethargic public into action.

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Nevertheless, by the 1960s the majority of Mandelman’s oeuvre was not politically explicit, despite her beginnings as a social realist artist. Due to the proliferation of images in the media and on television, by the mid-century artists no longer needed to rely on figurative or realistic depictions to express their beliefs. Instead many, like Mandelman and later her husband Ribak, turned to abstraction as a means of conveying their emotional reactions. And yet, despite the seemingly unobjectionable appearance of their art, the couple fell victim to the government’s suspicion of left-wing artists. Although the couple never spoke about it, in 1944, only a few weeks after the two of them moved to New Mexico, their apartment in New York was searched by FBI agents, leading historian David Witt to surmise that it was FBI harassment, more so than any other purported unhappiness with the New York art world, that caused Mandelman and Ribak to flee to New Mexico. Unfortunately, the FBI followed the two to Taos, and an FBI informant later enrolled in their Taos Valley Art School. In the mid-1950s, Mandelman and Ribak learned that they, along with the other Taos Modern artists, were on a government list of known Communist-sympathizers. A Freedom of Information Act Request, filed in 1987 by the aforementioned historian David Witt, revealed that the FBI spent thousands of dollars and over two decades spying, especially, on Emil Bisttram and Louis Ribak. Even under the scrutiny of the FBI, Mandelman and Ribak continued to make art, and by the 1960s Mandelman had developed a sophisticated, abstract vocabulary that reflected her own personal history. Two of the most significant years of her life were 1948 and 1949, during which time she studied in Paris under Fernand Léger and befriended Francis Picabia. In Paris, she experienced European Modernism first-hand and, despite her proximity to Léger and Picabia, she was more inspired by the bright colors of Henri Matisse. In the 1960s, Matisse’s influence was still apparent in Mandelman’s oeuvre. In Sea Shapes (#1) [pg. 18] and Sea Shapes (#2) [pg. 19], for example, the tangled organic shapes evoke both the works’ namesake — the ocean’s flora and fauna — while also bearing resemblance to Matisse’s later cut-outs. Yet whereas the shapes Matisse used in his cutouts remained separated from one another, Mandelman layered shape upon shape, or interlocked shapes together, resulting in visually complex works. Despite living in Taos, Mandelman had a very cosmopolitan outlook. Along with her time studying in Paris, Mandelman and Ribak would also travel extensively. Starting in the late 1940s, the couple would spend almost every summer in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, a

city known for its brightly painted buildings and colonial Spanish architecture. Furthermore, whenever Mandelman or Ribak sold a work, they would use the funds to travel. As Mandelman wrote in a letter to the art historian Robert Hobbs, “Louis liked to play chess and paint. I always wanted to go see the world, cultures, and peoples. I had to practically break every window in the house to get him going. I was the adventurous one, and believed in total freedom. He loved it once he got started. I let him do the worrying and the planning, but I had the joy, adventure, temperament of always looking for the unknown. I was more in tune with the unknown. Our lives were spontaneous. When we sold a painting, we took off the same afternoon.”

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Notwithstanding their frequent travels, it is clear that Mandelman was influenced by her New Mexican surroundings. Although her works rarely contain overtly Southwestern motifs, the intensity of the desert sun pervades her imagery. She never considered herself a Southwestern artist, but she acknowledged the power of New Mexico’s landscape on her work. As she said in a 1985 interview, “I’m not a regional artist. At all. Stravinsky lived in Santa Fe. I heard him conduct. But he’s a Russian. Georgia O’Keefe is much more regional than I am. And yet it comes out. That sense of space and time.” That sense of space and time seems evident in her c. 1967 work Gypsy Morning [pg. 21], in which magenta and periwinkle shapes jumble along the edges of a white expanse, leaving a vast, empty void at the center. Like Gypsy Morning, Mandelman intentionally unbalanced many of her compositions. As she explained, “Off center means to me that a person has to give my work thought, it has to be looked at, it has to be given energy. The message and essence of the work doesn’t come right away.” When seeing her body of work in the aggregate what becomes most apparent about her artistry, more so than her unique compositional choices or plurality of shapes, is her mastery of color. As she once said, “My whole world is about light and color surrounding me. Everything is overflowing with color.” For her, color symbolized happiness, and she translated this happiness through bright, saturated paints. Sun Painting [pg. 20], for example, features velveteen versions of the three primary colors: rich gold, lush crimson, and cool, slate blue combine into a buttery smooth palette; while an untitled work from the 1960s [pg. 28] has sharp-edged shapes of cerulean, emerald, and lemon that dance across the composition. Beatrice Mandelman’s political collages, large scale canvases, and exuberantly colorful compositions from the 1960s reveal her talents as a free-spirited artist who, while remaining unswayed by the trends of the time, was able to reflect the ethos of her generation. Her art — with its explosion of color and its sharp, geometric abstraction — spoke of the resistance and self-determination of the 1960s. In 1955, Mandelman wrote a mantra in her journal, “Paint life, not theory of life.” It becomes clear through her works from the following decade that Mandelman excelled in “painting life” — the paintings, collages, and mixed media sculptures included in Beatrice Mandelman and The Sixties uniquely reflect her experiences of this turbulent and revolutionary time in American history.

R O SENBERG & C O .

Selected Bibliography Fauntleroy, Gussie. “Perspective: Beatrice Mandelman [1912-1998]”. Western Art and Architecture. October — November 2012. Hobbs, Robert. Beatrice Mandelman: Taos Modernist. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1995. Interview by Sylvia Loomis, 20 July 1964, Taos. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Scherch, Meg. “Painter in the North.” Taos Arts ‘85 [Taos News]. October 1985, p. 11. Clippings from artist’s file. Witt, David L. Taos Moderns: Art of the New. Santa Fe: Red Crane Books, 1992. Witt, David L. Modernists in Taos: From Dasburg to Martin. Santa Fe: Red Crane Books, 2002.

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Untitled, c. 1958 Gouache and collage on wood block 7.25 x 5.75 x 3.88 in.

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Untitled, c. 1958 Gouache and collage on paper 19 x 24.75 in.

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Untitled, c. 1958 Gouache and collage on wood block 6.5 x 21.75 x 2 in.

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Untitled, c. 1958 Gouache and collage on paper 25.5 x 19 in.

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Russia, c. 1958 Collage on canvas 13.75 x 19.63 in.

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Untitled, c. 1958 Gouache and collage on wood block 6 x 6 x 2 in.

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Collage No. 22, c. 1960s Casein and collage on Masonite 24.5 x 12.5 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Acrylic and collage on cardboard 10 x 8 in.

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Sea Shapes (#1), c. 1960s Oil on fiberboard 60 x 48 in.

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Sea Shapes (#2), c. 1960s Oil on Masonite 72 x 48 in.

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Sun Painting, c. 1960s Oil on Masonite 48 x 24.25 in.

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Gypsy Morning, c. 1967 Acrylic on canvas 56 x 32 in.

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Collage No. 9, c. 1960s Mixed media and collage on matboard 15.63 x 19.63 in.

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Space Series #30, c. 1960s Mixed media and collage on matboard 19.75 x 15.75 in.

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Space Series #23, c. 1960s Mixed media and collage on matboard 15.75 x 20 in.

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Untitled (Eye to Eye), c. 1960s Mixed media and collage on paper 12.5 x 17 in.

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Untitled (Freaks), c. 1960s Mixed media and collage on paper 19.44 x 12.19 in.

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No. Twenty One, c. 1960s Mixed media and collage on paper 7.5 x 14 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Gouache on paper 27.5 x 39.5 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Mixed media and collage on paper 9.63 x 11.75 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Fabric, collage, and paint on paper 11.88 x 17.88 in.

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No. Thirteen, c. 1960s Acrylic and collage on canvas paper 15.88 x 11.88 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Collage on canvas paper 16 x 19.88 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Acrylic and collage on paper 25.5 x 19.63 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Acrylic and collage on paper 24.88 x 38 in.

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Black Shape, c. 1960s Collage on matboard 11.5 x 15.75 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Collage and ink on paper 7 x 14 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Collage and gouache on canvas 11.75 x 14 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Collage and gouache on paper 14 x 22 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Collage on cardboard 23.88 x 17.88 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Collage and acrylic on paper 9.25 x 11.13 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Mixed media and collage on paper 9.5 x 11.63 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Gouache on paper 27.5 x 19.5 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Collage and acrylic on paper 19.13 x 27.75 in.

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Grey Time, c. 1960s Oil and painted paper collage on canvas 40.13 x 36 in.

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Grey Abstract Composition, c. 1960s Oil on canvas 74 x 50 in.

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No. 7 (aka Sand), c. 1960s Casein, collage, and mixed media on cardboard 27.75 x 22 in.

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Untitled, c. 1960s Gouache on paper 28 x 40 in.

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The Man, c. 1965 Collage and acrylic on canvas 19.75 x 13.75 in.

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beatrice mandelman b. 1912, Newark, New Jersey d. 1998, Taos, New Mexico

b

eatrice Mandelman was born in Newark, New Jersey, the daughter of Jewish immigrants from Austria and Germany. While still a child, she was introduced

to art by her parents’ friend Louis Lozowick, and began taking classes at the

Newark School of Fine and Industrial Art. As a young woman, she studied

at Rutgers University and then later at the Art Students League in New York. During the Great Depression, she worked for the Works Progress Administration, first as a muralist and then as a screenprinter. In 1942 she married the painter Louis Ribak. Two years later they moved to Taos, New Mexico, where they would live for the rest of their lives. In Taos the young couple became the center of a group of artists known as the Taos Moderns, which included Emil Bisttram, Edward Corbett, Agnes Martin, Oli Sihvonen, and Clay Spohn. Mandelman and Ribak opened the Taos Valley Art School, using the income they made from teaching classes to support their art making. In 1948, Mandelman moved to Paris for a year to study under Fernand Léger, and during this time she befriended Francis Picabia. While she was in Paris, Ribak purchased a sprawling adobe house for himself and Mandelman. They created an exhibition space in their living room, which they called “Gallery Ribak.” The couple organized mini-exhibitions there, including a three-person show for themselves and their friend Agnes Martin in 1955. During her lifetime, she exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago; the Dallas Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Today, her works are included in public collections across the United States, including such venerable institutions as the Art Institute of Chicago; the Denver Art Museum; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.; works are also on long-term loan at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

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selected public collections Art Institute of Chicago, IL Denver Art Museum, CO Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum, Minneapolis, MN Harwood Museum, University of New Mexico, Taos, NM Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe, NM Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Photograph by Jennifer Haas c. 1990, courtesy of The Beatrice Mandelman and Louis Ribak Papers, The University of New Mexico Libraries, Center for Southwest Research

Sea Shapes (#1), c. 1960s Oil on fiberboard 60 x 48 in.


selected group exhibitions

1939

Seventh Annual Exhibition, Lithography and Wood Engraving, Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois, November 10 – January 15

1940

Color Prints, Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York

Second Painting Biennial, Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, South Carolina, April 5 – 10

1941

Silk Screen Prints by New York Artists, Everhart Museum of Natural History, Science, and Art, Scranton, Pennsylvania

Taos Moderns ‘59, Museum of New Mexico Art Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Watercolor Exhibition, National Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., May 15 – June 4

Alcove Show, Museum of New Mexico Art Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Five Women, Five Painters, Five Methods, A.C.A. Gallery, New York, New York, September 21 – October 4

Taos Now, Esther Robles Gallery, Los Angeles, California, September 14 – October 3

1947

National Serigraph Exhibition, Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, Texas, January 15 – February 15

John Heller Gallery, New York, New York

1948

59th Annual American Exhibition, Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois

Second Annual Exhibition of Southwest American Art, Oklahoma Art Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, September 24 - October 30

First Southwestern Print Exhibition, Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, Texas, February 1 – 29

Taos Moderns ‘60, Museum of New Mexico Art Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico, October 2 – 31

1949

Second Southwestern Exhibition of Prints and Drawings, Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, Texas, March 6 – 27

1960 Circle Invitational Exhibition, Roswell Museum and Art Center, Roswell, New Mexico

1950

American Art Today, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York, September

1961

Sixty-seventh Annual for Western Artists, Denver Art Museum, Colorado, August

1951

38th Annual Exhibition of New Mexico Artists, Museum of New Mexico Art Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

1962

Southwestern Artists Biennial, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, New Mexico, May 6 – June 10

1952

39th Annual Exhibition of New Mexico Artists, Museum of New Mexico Art Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

11th Exhibition of Prints and Drawings, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, New Mexico 1958

1960

Seventh Annual Invitational Exhibition, New Mexico Highlands University, Las Vegas, New Mexico, November 4 December 7

Taos Painting, Yesterday and Today, Colorado Springs Fine Art Center, Colorado, March

1954

1955

1956

Sixth Exhibition of Graphic Arts in New Mexico, Museum of New Mexico Art Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

1966

Group 7, Jonson Gallery, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, October

Fact and Fantasy ‘54, Bertha Schaefer Gallery, New York, New York, June 4 – August 27

1969

Fourteenth Annual Sun Carnival Art Exhibition, El Paso Museum of Art, El Paso, Texas, December

Annual Exhibition of New Mexico Artists, Museum of New Mexico Art Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

1970

Southwest Fine Arts Biennial, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Three-artist show with Agnes Martin and Louis Ribak, Gallery Ribak, Taos, New Mexico

1975

“Fiesta de Mujeres” (Festival of Women), Williams Gallery, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico, August 23 – September 5

1982

1982 Invitational, Roswell Museum Art Center, Roswell, New Mexico

1985

Taos Modernist Art of the 1950s, The Harwood Foundation of the University of New Mexico, Taos, New Mexico, January 12 – April 13

1986

Roswell Museum and Art Center, Roswell, New Mexico

1988

Harwood Foundation Museum of Art, Taos, New Mexico, May – June

Three-artist show with Edward Chavez and Byron Goto, John Heller Gallery, New York, New York, April 3 – 21 Whitney Annual Exhibition, Whitney Museum of Art, New York, New York, April 18 – June 10 Taos Moderns, Museum of New Mexico Art Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico, November 1 – 30

1957

Southwestern Artists Annual, Museum of New Mexico Art Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico, June 2 – 30 Alcove Show, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, New Mexico, July

Sragow Gallery, New York, New York

Second Annual Invitational Exhibition of New Mexico Artists, New Mexico Highlands University, Las Vegas, New Mexico

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Rosenberg & Co. ©2016

1953

The Southwest: Painting and Sculpture, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas, December 7 – January 20, 1963


Untitled, c. 1958 Gouache and collage on paper 25.5 x 19 in.


Beatrice Mandelman And The Sixties  

Rosenberg & Co. is pleased to present Beatrice Mandelman And The Sixties, an exhibition dedicated to Beatrice Mandelman's works from the 196...

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