Page 1


KAUFMAN By Design st We

FREE Interior Design Services! New Construction Design Consultants Flooring Specialist | Lighting Specialist 14900 Cantrell Rd. | Little Rock, AR | 501.673.3992 kaufmanbydesignwest.com

Hardware: Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. • Saturday 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Flooring-Lighting-Furniture: Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. • Saturday 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.


HEALING HEMP O

F

A

R

K

A

N

S

A

S

LI T T LE ROCK’S FIR S T CBD SPECI A LT Y SHOP

Never sourced from overseas, Healing Hemp’s CBD oil comes directly from western United States farms. Our CBD oils are lab-certified and tested for quality, purity and consistency.

HE ALINGHEMPOFARK ANSA S.COM 8210 C A N T R EL L R OA D, L I T T L E R O C K , A R • 501. 313. 524 3

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 1


PC

HARDWARE &

DESIGN Introducing Kitchen and Bath designs by:

Introducing Home Audio Services by:

DESIGNS

DESIGNER PLUMBING FIX TURES · FIRE PL ACES · GA S LOGS C A BINET & DOOR H A RDWARE · OUTDOOR GRILL S · MIE LE DE ALE R Corner of Markham & Rodney Parham pchlittlerock.com • 501.224.1724 • facebook.com/PCHardwareHome 2 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


richardharphomes.com | 501.690.4277 facebook.com/RichardHarpHomes November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 3


PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL BAXLEY

debidavisinteriordesign.com 2222 Cantrell Road • Little Rock • 501-221-2032 • Monday-Thursday 9-5, Friday 9-3 4 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


enaissance Homes, Inc.

Renaissance Homes, Inc. is a premier home builder in the Central Arkansas area. We specialize in the construction of distinctive, high-quality homes. When choosing Renaissance Homes, you are choosing our commitment to quality and customer service.

NEW HOMES & RENOVATIONS RENAISSANCE HOMES, INC. Office: 501-753-5006 | Cell: 501-351-3822 7000 Crystal Hill Road, Suite 1 // NLR 72118 brandon@renaissancehomesonline.com

RenaissanceHomesOnline.com //

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 5


PARADISE IN YOUR BACKYARD

| JEFFSELFPOOLSANDSPAS.COM | 21941 I-30, BRYANT, ARKANSAS

6 At Home in501.847.6990 Arkansas | November 2018


The perfect place to call

home

Exceptional

NEW HOMES & NEIGHBORHOODS IN NORTHWEST ARKANSAS. At Buffington Homes, our goal is to make you happy. That’s why we build the very best homes in communities and towns you’ll love. Come visit and we know you’ll agree. Bentonville

From the $240’s

Cave Springs

From the $200’s

Centerton From the $300’s Fayetteville From the $370’s Rogers From the $370’s November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 7


Contents N OVEM B ER 2018

60 Home

Style

Special Section

43 CREATING COZY

15 FINDS

Homebuilders

At Home in Arkansas art director, Lauren Cerrato, and her husband, Casey, renovate a Hillcrest cottage to make it suit their style.

50 FARMHOUSE FRESH

In Mountain Home, a couple creates a fresh and airy farmhouse on their family’s beloved property.

60 THE COMFORT OF HOME

Designer Katie Rees helps a family from upstate New York create a comfortable residence in Northwest Arkansas.

Overnight Essentials

18 LATEST

In Every Issue

19 DESIGN

12 WELCOME 80 END NOTES

Events, Openings & Launches Inside Out

Life 26 GET TO KNOW

Textile Mavens

31 GARDEN

Feels Like Fall

35 ENTERTAINING

All Set for Guests

8 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018

72 TRENDSETTERS

On The Cover The hearth room of a Fayetteville family’s home. Design by Katie Grace Designs. Photography by Rett Peek. See page 60. Vol. 23, No. 10 © 2018 by Root Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. At Home in Arkansas™ (ISSN 1540-8914, USPS# 020-999) is published 11 times a year (January/February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December) by Root Publishing, Inc., 2207 Cottondale Lane, Little Rock, AR 72202. Periodicals Postage Rates are Paid at Little Rock, AR and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to At Home in Arkansas™; 2207 Cottondale Lane, Little Rock, AR.


NATHANCOOPERHOMES.COM LIT TLE ROCK • 501.658.9114 facebook.com/RiverValleyBuilders @rivervalleybuilders November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 9


PUBLISHER Kelly Fraiser (ext. 101) kelly@athomearkansas.com EDITOR Stephanie Maxwell Newton (ext. 102) stephanie@athomearkansas.com MANAGING EDITOR Tiffany Adams (ext. 104) tiffany@athomearkansas.com ART DIRECTOR Lauren Cerrato (ext. 103) lauren@athomearkansas.com SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Jessie Fuchs (ext. 107) jessie@athomearkansas.com CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Beth Hall and Rett Peek CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Amy Vaughn CONTRIBUTING STYLIST Hope Johnstone SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Jennifer Hay (ext. 105) jennifer@athomearkansas.com MARKETING AND DISTRIBUTION COORDINATOR Debbie Tissue (ext. 100) debbie@athomearkansas.com

HOW TO REACH US 2207 Cottondale Lane Little Rock, AR 72202 501.666.5510

athomearkansas.com AT HOME IN ARKANSAS SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES: Call 800.927.6847 or subscribe online at www.athomearkansas.com. Annual subscription rate: $12.95. Canada and Mexico add $24.00 per year. Single copy price: $3.95 plus shipping and handling.

ALWAYS ON THE CORNER OF RODNEY PARHAM & WEST MARKHAM 105 N. RODNEY PARHAM, LITTLE ROCK 501.223.9026 • LIGHT-INNOVATIONS.COM 10 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation 1. Publication Title: At Home in Arkansas2. †Publication No.: 020-9993. Filing Date: 9/28/18 4.Issue Frequency: Jan/Feb, Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sept, Oct Nov, Dec 5. No. of Issues Published Annually: 11 6. Annual Subscription Price: $12.95.7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not Printer):Root Publishing, 2207 Cottondale Ln, Ste 3, Little Rock, AR 72202-2042. Contact Person: Debbie Tissue, 501-666-5510. 8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (not printer): 2207 Cottondale Ln, Ste 3, Little Rock, AR 72202-2042. 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor: Publisher: Kelly Jackson Fraiser, 2207 Cottondale Ln, Ste 3,Little Rock, AR 72202-2042. Editor: Stephanie Maxwell Newton, 2207 Cottondale Ln, Ste 3,Little Rock, AR 72202-2042. Managing Editor: Tiffany Adams,2207 Cottondale Ln, Ste 3, Little Rock, AR 72202-2042.10. Owner (If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.): Kelly Jackson Fraiser, 2207 Cottondale Ln, Ste 3, Little Rock, AR 72202-2042. 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities: Root Publishing, 2207 Cottondale Ln, Ste 3, Little Rock, AR 72202-2042. 12. Tax Status: For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates. The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months.13. Publication Title: At Home in Arkansas14. Issue date for circulation data below: Sept 2018.15. Extent and nature of circulation: A. Total no. copies (Net Press Run): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months,14,033. No. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 14,018. B. Legitimate Paid and/or requested distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail):1. Outsidecounty Paid/Requested mail subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541. (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing and internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertisers proof copies and exchange copies): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 3764. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 3,836. 2. In-county Paid/Requested mail subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541. (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing and internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertisers proof copies and exchange copies): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 1,229. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 1,216.3. Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, counter sales, and other Paid or Requested Distribution Outside USPS: Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 1675. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 1,853. 4. Requested Copies Distributed by Other Mail Classes Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable. C. Total paid and/or requested circulation (Sum of 15b(1), (2), (3), and (4)): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 6,668. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 6,905. D. Nonrequested Distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail):1. Outside-county Nonrequested Copies on PS Form 3541 (Include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 3,646. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 3,988. 2. In-county Nonrequested Copies on PS Form 3541 (Include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 640. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 708. 3. Nonrequested Copies Distributed Through the USPS by Other Classes of Mail (e.g. First-Class Mail, Nonrequestor Copies mailed in excess of 10% Limit mailed at Standard Mail or Package Services Rates): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable.4. Nonrequested Copies Distributed Outside the Mail (Include Pickup Stands, Trade Shows, Showrooms and Other Sources): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 1,506. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 972. E. Total Nonrequested Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 5792. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 5,668. F. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and e): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 12,460. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 12,573. G. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4, (page #3): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 1,573. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 1,445. H. Total (Sum of 15f and g): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 14,033. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 14,018. I. Percent paid and/or requested circulation (15C divided by f times 100): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 54%. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 55%.16. Electronic Copy Circulation.A. Requested and paid electronic copies: Average No. copies each issue nearest to filing date: N/A Actual No. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: N/AB. Total requested and paid print copies (line 15f) + requested /paid electronic copies (line 16a) Average No. copies each issue nearest to filing date: N/A Actual No. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: N/AC. Total requested copy distribution (line 15f) + requested /paid electronic copies (line 16a) Average No. copies each issue nearest to filing date: N/A Actual No. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: N/AD. Percent paid and/or requested circulation (both print & electronic copies) (16b divided by 16c x 100) Average No. copies each issue nearest to filing date: N/A Actual No. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: N/A I certify that all 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are legitimate requests or paid copies.17. Publication of Statement of Ownership for a Requester Publication is required and will be printed in the Nov 2018 issue of this publication. I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties). Kelly Jackson Fraiser, Owner.


Dillon Homes CUSTOM HOMES ADDITIONS & REMODELS 501-650-4180 • DillonBuilds.com

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 11


W E L C O M E

PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK

come on in!

Growing up, our Thanksgiving gatherings were a sprawling family affair. Hosting responsibilities rotated between the cities and homes of my dad and his two brothers, and the holiday always brings back memories of houses filled with cousins, laughter, food, and card games. From year to year, no matter the location, the aftermath always looked the same: In the post-dinner lull, you could find people using every square inch of the house taking naps, watching football on TV, or snagging a second (or third) slice of pie. I don’t doubt that many of you have similar memories this time of year. November is a time of togetherness, and, with that, there’s a feeling of comfort in being with people you love. I guess that’s why this month seemed like a perfect fit for our Relaxed & Refined issue. We purposefully touched on hospitality in almost every story in this issue, including tips for creating a welcoming guest room (page 15) and hosting friends for Harvest Mimosas (page 35). What we didn’t anticipate was how much the themes of comfort and warmth would repeat throughout the homes featured, from Fayetteville to Mountain Home to Little Rock. Our very own Lauren Cerrato, art director, said about her house (page 43), “The best compliment you can give me is to curl up and make yourself at home.” In the South, we talk a lot about hospitality and making others feel welcome—and while that might be a host’s goal year-round, it feels especially important this time of year. Next time a guest helps herself to another serving or doesn’t ask before grabbing a throw blanket off the back of the couch, you’ll know you’ve made her feel comfortable enough to do so.

Stephanie Maxwell Newton, editor stephanie@athomearkansas.com

12 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018

DIGITAL EDITION

Take us with you anywhere. Visit athomearkansas.com.

@ATHOMEARKANSAS

Follow along on social media for more home inspiration, news, and behind-the-scenes sneak peeks.


STYLE THAT WILL BE REMEMBERED

Today’s Lighting Classics

Campbell

SAVOY HOUSE 800.801.1621 SavoyHouse.com

Providing unsurpassed personal attention to every detail. CHANDELIERS & PENDANTS | CEILING FANS | BATH | SCONCES | OUTDOOR 9221 Maumelle Blvd, North Little Rock, AR 72113 | (501) 758-5483 | www.tecelectric.com November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 13


BRICK STONE HARDSCAPE PAVERS FIREPLACES GRILLS & APPLIANCES CASUAL FURNITURE HOME DÉCOR 1609 E. 9th St. Little Rock, 72202 501-375-0060 AntiqueBrickInc.com

GW LIGHTING 1225 Military Road | Benton 501.315.2400 gwlightingandhome.com

14 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


Style

PRODUCER: STEPHANIE MAXWELL NEWTON | PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK AND COURTESY OF VENDORS

T H E L AT E S T I N

DÉCOR & DESIGN

BE OUR GUEST

Overnight Essentials As you prep your guest quarters for the holidays, here are a few suggestions to help your loved ones feel at home. Turn the page for more inspiration and sources.

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 15


S T Y L E

F I N D S 4

1

PREVIOUS PAGE Lili Alessandra “Chloe” king coverlet in Fawn Velvet, Alaskan Hawk faux fur pillow, Yves Delorme “Berlingot” pillow, Zestt organic cotton knit throw, and Roland Pine room spray. Jayson Cain Interiors, Little Rock, jaysoncaininteriors.com

3

2

Embossed antique brass lamp with linen lampshade. The Shade Above Lighting Collection, Little Rock, theshadeabove.com Box with purple agate. Art of Design, Little Rock, shadavari.com

NOTHING SAYS “WELCOME” LIKE FRESH-CUT FLOWERS ON YOUR GUEST’S BEDSIDE TABLE.

5

1 Dreamtime eye mask. Rejuvenation Clinic Day Spa, Little Rock, rejuvenationclinic.com 2 & 3 This Works “Deep Sleep Heavenly Candle” and “Deep Sleep Pillow Spray.” Pout, Little Rock, poutoflr.com 4 “Echo Dust” wall clock. Kaufman by Design, Little Rock, kaufmanbydesignwest.com 5 Visual Comfort “Weller ZigZag” lamp in Denim with paper shade. Blu D’or, Jonesboro, bludorinteriors.com

14

6 Jill Rosenwald “Brooks Plaid” peony vase. Bear Hill Interiors, Little Rock, bearhillinteriors.com

13

6

12

7 & 8 Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours by P. Syme and “You Are Magic” trinket tray. Domestic Domestic, Little Rock, domesticdomestic.com 9 “Marco” cotton throw blankets. Cobblestone & Vine, Little Rock, cobblestoneandvine.com

7

10 Corson Beauty cream cleanser, toner, day moisturizer, and night oil. Corson Beauty, Little Rock, corsonbeauty.com

11 8

11 Tom Dixon hand-tufted abstract pillow. Core iD, Little Rock, coreidhome.com 12 & 13 “Newport” throw and “Neela” hand-blocked pillow. Phoenix Interiors, Little Rock, phoenixlittlerock.com 14 “Belmont” bedside table. Ransom Interiors, Little Rock, ransominteriors.com

9

10 This pure, plant-derived line of beauty products is based in Little Rock.

16 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


aBC BlOCk

6902 Brodie Ln. • Little Rock 501-455-2027 • 800-455-2027

aBC SHOwROOM

7720 Interstate-30 • Little Rock

Other locations: Searcy, Hot Springs, Fayetteville, Springdale, Russellville, Harrison, Ft. Smith, Mablevale, Bossier City, Conway www.aBCBlOCk.COM | www.aBCSHOwROOM.COM November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 17


S T Y L E

L AT E S T

ARRIVALS, OPENINGS & LAUNCHES NEWS FROM AROUND THE NATURAL STATE

SEASONAL DÉCOR WORKSHOPS Learn from the professionals at one of these central Arkansas classes

OUTRAGEOUS WREATHS PLANTOPIA

Nov. 17 at 9:30 am Learn how to create elegant wreaths and garlands using garden materials with Hannah Allen of Plantopia. Class is free; some materials provided. Register and find out more information at plantopianlr.com.

CHRISTMAS WREATH WORKSHOP TIPTON & HURST

Nov. 17 at 2 p.m. Join Chris Norwood at the Heights location for a handson workshop on creating the perfect Christmas wreath. Class is $75; all materials provided. Register at tiptonhurst.com.

BLOOMS & BUBBLY CABBAGE ROSE

Nov. 19 at 6 p.m. Cabbage Rose and Festive Haus team up to lead a Thanksgiving centerpiece and table design workshop. Class is $50; materials and champagne provided. Register at cabbageroseflorist.com.

18 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018

ANTIQUE BRICK OUTDOORS INTRODUCES HANGING BED BRAND

After years of looking for the perfect hanging beds for the Antique Brick Outdoors showroom, colleagues Loren Layton and Megan Thomas decided to design their own. “We always get requests at Antique Brick for outdoor hanging beds,” Loren explains. “We attend market every year, but we’ve never found a source where we loved the design. So we decided to start MELO.” The name, Melo, reflects the names of its creators—“me” for Megan and “lo” for Loren. The duo, both central Arkansas natives, created four designs named after local neighborhoods—Heights, SoMa, Hillcrest, and Argenta—that tend to feature historic homes with front porches. “We picture these beds on porches where people enjoy them year-round,” Loren says. “We named them after these neighborhoods because they are designed and manufactured here, and we wanted them to reflect that.” Melo made its debut at Casual Market Chicago in September. Visit meloliving.com for more information.

K. LEWIS INTERIOR DESIGN OPENS STUDIO AND SHOWROOM

Little Rock designer Krista Lewis of K. LEWIS INTERIOR DESIGN has become known for her timeless, polished interiors over the past 17 years. She has now entered another stage of her residential design business by opening a studio in Little Rock’s Riverdale Design District. “We wanted a space where we could meet with clients, receive furniture and store it, and have a small showroom,” Krista says, noting that the shop’s offerings will continue to grow over time. You can visit K. Lewis Interior Design at 2305 Cantrell Road. Go to klewisinteriordesign.com for more information.


Inside Out WINDOWS, DOORS, & HARDWARE

FROM THE FRONT DOOR TO YOUR KITCHEN CABINETS, THESE ELEMENTS ARE AMONG THE HARDEST WORKING IN THE HOME P R O D U C E R : T I F FA N Y A D A M S PH OTO G R A PH Y: R E T T PEEK & CO U R T E S Y O F V EN D O R S

Custom iron entry doors. Manhattan Iron Door Company, mirondoors.com (Interior design by Casey Sarkin Interior Design.)

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 19


S T Y L E

D E S I G N 1

2

3 1 Custom iron entry door and surround designed by client. Arkansas Custom Iron Doors, eliteirondoors.com 2 Jeld-Wen’s “Birkdale” Shakerstyle interior door. Available in various heights. Kaufman By Design, kaufmanbydesignwest. com; Lumber One Home Center, lumberonehomecenter.com; The Millwork Co., themillworkco. com; PRO Millwork, Inc., promillworkinc.com; SCI Millwork, scimillwork.com

5 4

3 Weather-Shield recently debuted a number of new furniture-grade stain options for windows, including “Harvest Wheat,” shown here. The Millwork Co., themillworkco.com; S&S Home Center, sshomecenter. com; Valley Aluminum Products, valleyproducts.net 4 The Architect Series from Pella features wood patio doors that lift and slide for a dynamic performance and ease of use. Available in traditional and contemporary styles and a number of configurations. Pella Windows and Doors, pella.com 5 The Therma-Tru SmoothStar Shaker-style door line now features expanded options, including this solid recessedpanel style. Kaufman By Design, kaufmanbydesignwest.com; Lumber One Home Center, lumberonehomecenter.com; Ridout Lumber, ridoutlumber.com

20 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


Jones Glass custom mirrors custom shower Doors & more

18421 Interstate 30 south • Benton, ar 501.315.6600 • myjonesglass.com

Pella® Architec t Series® Reser ve™ windows and patio doors evoke the craf tsmanship of previous generations. But it’s today’s conveniences and your unique vision that can turn traditional into timeless. We’d call this new of fering a modern-day classic.

E XPLORE ARCHITEC T SERIES | THE COLLEC TION

© 2017 Pella Corporation

PELL A WINDOW & DOOR SHOWROOM 8 74 0 M A U M E L L E B O U L E V A R D N O R T H L I T T L E R O C K , A R 7 2 113 (501) 758-5050

PellaLittleRock.com November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 21


S T Y L E

D E S I G N 1

2

3

1 Emtek Select introduces new levers for interior doors, including a variety of finishes as well as textures. Kaufman Lumber, kaufmanlumber. com; Lighting Emporium, lightingemporium.com; PC Hardware, pchdwe.com; Sanders Supply Inc., sanderssupply.net; TEC Electric, tecelectric.com 2 Top Knobs “Devon” collection adds a polished look to cabinetry. Advanced Bath & Kitchen, advancedbk.com; Distinctive Kitchens & Baths, kitchensofarkansas. com; Duke Custom Cabinets, dukecustomcabinets.com; Inside Effects, insideeffects.com; Kaufman Lumber, kaufmanlumber.com; Kitchen & Bath Ideas, kitchenandbathideas. biz; Lighting Emporium, lightingemporium.com; Lumber One Home Center, lumberonehomecenter. com; PC Hardware, pchdwe.com; Ridout Lumber, ridoutlumber.com; Sanders Supply Inc., sanderssupply. net; TEC Electric, tecelectric.com 3 Baldwin’s “Evolved Soho” handleset in Satin Nickel is a transitional style for your front entry that works with a fob, mechanical key, or app for remote access. Lumber One Home Center, lumberonehomecenter.com; PC Hardware, pchdwe.com

22 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018

4 & 5 Hardware Resources “Alvar” pull in Satin Bronze and “Mirada” knob in Matte Black. Closet Factory, closetfactory.com; Gilmore’s Custom Kitchens, gilmoreskitchens. com; GW Lighting & Home, gwlightingandhome.com; Inside Effects, insideeffects.com; Kitchen and Bath Concepts, kbc1.biz; Kitchen & Bath Ideas, kitchenandbathideas. biz; Kitchen Distributors, kitchendistributorsinc.com; Lighting Emporium, lightingemporium.com; PC Hardware, pchdwe.com; Ridout Lumber, ridoutlumber.com 6 Stone Harbor Hardware’s “Zurich” lever in Matte Black. Encore Flooring and Building Products, encoregroupusa.com; PC Hardware, pchdwe.com; Quality Millwork, qualitymillwork.net; Ridout Lumber, ridoutlumber.com 7 Emtek’s “Rustic Modern” entry set. Kaufman Lumber, kaufmanlumber. com; Lighting Emporium, lightingemporium.com; PC Hardware, pchdwe.com; Sanders Supply Inc., sanderssupply.net; TEC Electric, tecelectric.com

7

4

5

6


479.366.6409 | sales@mirondoors.com | @irondoors

Making your house a home.

Royal Overhead

Door Inc.

PINE BLUFF ROYAL OVERHEAD DOOR OF NWA OVERHEAD DOOR 943 S. 40th Street, Springdale 870-247-2502 478-927-9990

ROYAL OVERHEAD DOOR 10725 Otter Creek East Blvd Mabelvale Sales: 501-943-3667 Service: 501-455-3667 November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 23


The Shade Above Lighting Collection

The re-invented recliner by American Leather ®

Lamp Shades • Lamp Repair • Custom Lamps • Accessories

SAVE 10% OFF ANY TWO RE-INVENTED RECLINERS. NOW THROUGH JUNE 29 TH

theshadeabove.com 2208 Cantrell Road, Little Rock • 501.374.3555 theshadeabove@gmail.com •

1504 Rebsamen Park Road • Little Rock • 501.280.3200 Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

www.mertinsdykehome.com E XPE RTLY C RAFTE D IN DALLAS, TE XAS. americanleather.com

Showroom 2314 Cantrell Road Little Rock | 72202 Showroom Showroom 501.372.1886 2314providenceltddesign.com Cantrell | LittleRoad Rock | 72202 2314 Road Cantrell

501.372.1886 | providenceltddesign.com

Little Rock | 72202 501.372.1886 providenceltddesign.com

24 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


Life

PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK

C E L E B R AT I N G YO U R L I F E S T Y L E

FALL FOR IT

Go With Your Gourds Orange, and white, and green—oh my! Good Earth Garden Center employs a bountiful harvest of pumpkins to bring the look of autumn to a Little Rock home’s entry. Turn to page 31 to read the story.

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 25


MEET BEA APPLE & TRISHA LOGAN

Textile Mavens

THIS PAIR OF ENTREPRENEURIAL-MINDED WOMEN RECENTLY OPENED HILLFOLK, A DESTINATION TEXTILE STUDIO AND SHOP I N T E R V I E W : T I F FA N Y A D A M S | P H O T O G R A P H Y : B E T H H A L L

26 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


L I F E

G E T

T O

K N O W

Connect with Trisha and Bea to learn more about Hillfolk (including the shop’s address and hours) at hillfolk.com or on Instagram (@hillfolkshop).

Q. Prior to opening Hillfolk, you two met through your experiences as entrepreneurs in Northwest Arkansas. Tell us a bit about these endeavors. Trisha Logan: I am the current owner and founder of a

paper store and invitation studio in Fayetteville known as Shindig Paperie. Shindig is now in its sixth year, and I have been feeling the pull to do something new for a few years and follow another passion of mine, textiles. I really love coming up with concepts for new businesses and brands and hope to continue to create them. Bea Apple: I never thought of myself as an entrepreneur! I graduated with an electrical engineering degree and worked in that field for 10 years. After I had my first kid, I started toying with the idea of striking out on my own with the intention of spending more time at home, which eventually led me and my husband to open Pressroom, a restaurant, coffee shop, bar, and community hangout on the Bentonville town square.

Q. Why did a textiles business seem like the next natural fit for you? Trisha: Textiles have always been my first true love. I

studied apparel and textiles at the University of Arkansas for undergrad and continued with a graduate degree in design and merchandising with a focus on textiles at Colorado State University. My background is not as focused in the maker area but more on textile design, history, and cultural traditions. We feel that Hillfolk is a great fit for the community because textile and fiber art traditions are woven into the fabric of the Ozarks. Through our studies and travel, commonalities between cultures and traditional fiber arts begin to emerge, which excite us. We want to preserve the traditions of our area while celebrating the common threads shared by all cultures.

Q. Have you always had a fascination with textiles or crafting too, Bea? Bea: I was a shy, bookish kid growing up in the Bronx, and

I was fascinated by The Little House on the Prairie series. Growing up in poverty, I was so drawn to the idea that you could make something beautiful with something so basic as a needle and thread. I would walk to our local library, check out all kinds of crafting books, and struggle through teaching myself how to knit, crochet, and sew. I never stopped making things. In college, I made hats for my friends, and have made dozens of creations for my family.

A stack of indigo scarves from Mali are among the shop’s ready-to-wear goods. Left: Bea and Trisha use natural dyes, including madder root and osage orange wood, in their work.

Q. How does this translate into the offerings you have at Hillfolk? Bea: Trisha and I laugh all the time about our eclectic assortment

of goods. Our main ethos is we want to carry lines that are produced ethically by small companies and artisans. In the maker space, we are carrying a line of Hillfolk-exclusive yarn that we worked with ranchers and mills in Colorado and Wyoming to develop. We are also carrying a small assortment of beautiful fabric by the bolt and a variety of notions so that you can pick up everything you need for your project right at the shop. Trisha: We also carry a curated and inspiring mix of handcrafted goods and textiles for the home by some of our favorite local and international artisans. This includes quilts, candles, apothecary goods, ceramics, books, and more.

Q. Tell us a bit about the community and educational opportunities at Hillfolk. We hear you’ll be offering workshops in addition to wares. Trisha: Yes, we will be hosting weekly craft nights at the store

where anyone can drop in after work, hang out, and make things together. We feel that as society grows more digital, the value of human experience increases. We want to offer a deep maker experience that is practical, traditional, and contemporary all at once, and we believe that fits well with the emerging cultural hub of 8th Street Market, where our shop is located. While a food theme dominates the market currently, our mission dovetails nicely with what's happening there. Food, textiles, and fiber arts—they all make up the folkways of a culture. We want to teach people how to make, give them options for sourcing sustainably and locally, and showcase the people around the U.S. and the world who are carrying on those traditions.

Q. OK, you have to tell us where you got the name “Hillfolk.” Trisha: We came across the name “Hillfolk” in a book about

the Ozarks, and it resonated with us. It’s evocative of the people in this particular region, but the name is also universal because every country has “hillfolk” that have passed down textile traditions for centuries. You’ve got backstrap weavers in Central and South America, indigo dyers in Mali and Japan, block printers in Jaipur, the quilters of Gee’s Bend, and so on.

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 27


pout

Cosmetics. Skincare. Gifts.

NOW FEATURING

11525 CANTRELL ROAD, SUITE 903 LITTLE ROCK, AR 72212 POUTOFLR.COM | 501.224.8222

CHANTECAILLE | DIPTYQUE | LAURA MERCIER | L’OCCITANE | TRISH MCEVOY | EMINENCE ORGANICS FACIALS | WAXING | DERMAPLANING | PERFECT DERMA PEEL | MICRONEEDLING 28 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


BENTONVILLE 1301 SE Walton Blvd (479) 271-9933

www.seasidepools .com

SPRINGDALE 4686 N Thompson (479) 756-6543

New Pool Construction (Gunite & Vinyl) • Pool Remodels • Spa Sales Maintenance & Repairs • Retail locations with chemicals, toys, etc.

T IN G CELEBRA YEARS OVER 50 ES OF BUSIN

S!

WEST LITTLE ROCK GLASS LLC. 1903 Hinson Loop Rd. • Little Rock • 501-223-3034

248 W. Dickson St. - Fayetteville, AR 72701 479-443-9289 November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 29


You can transform the life of a child. Referring a child for a wish takes just five minutes. I wish to explore a tropical paradise Izaiah, 10 brain tumor

We are Jonesboro’s Exclusive Quorum dealer

Refer a child for a wish today! Call 800-264-9474 or visit midsouth.wish.org/refer To qualify for a wish, children must be between 2 1/2 and 18-years-old and have a critical illness. Family members, medical professionals and children themselves can refer.

Arkansas’ Largest Lighting Gallery · Lighting & LED experts Give us a call today at (888) 910-5267 · thelampoutlet.com Located in Bono, Arkansas

TiptonHurst.com

501-666-3333

Guaranteed Satisfaction Since1886

Heights | North Little Rock Conway | Baptist | Pine Bluff

30 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


SEASONAL STATEMENT

Feels Like Fall WELCOME GUESTS WITH FALL FOLIAGE AND ACCENTS THAT CAN EASILY TRANSITION TO WINTER MONTHS S TO RY: S T EPH A N I E M A X W EL L N E W TO N PH OTO G R A PH Y: R E T T PEEK

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 31


Gibson of Little Rock’s Good Earth Garden Center says the front-door display at coworker Billie Shields’s house has been on Billie’s to-do list for some time. “She has always wanted a pumpkin fall entrance, and this is the first house she’s lived in where she could do it,” Jennifer says. “And if you are going to have an eye-catching pumpkin display, you need the rest of the accents to complement it!” Starting at the base of Billie’s front steps, the duo filled low, square planters with Plumosa fern, Creeping Jenny, Berries ’N Cream Mix Cool Wave pansies, Dolce ‘Silver Gumdrop’ Heuchera, Celosia ‘Intenz’, and red cabbage (seen at top right of page 33). “The fern is fine textured and gives a whimsical, wild touch, and it can be brought in and overwintered indoors ennifer

32 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018

as a houseplant,” Jennifer says. “The cabbage and Heuchera provide foliage color, and the Celosia was chosen because of the outstanding bloom color. It’s nice to see fall color beyond the mum. Celosia is a great alternative as a fall annual.” Jennifer notes that the Celosia and Plumosa ferns can be changed out for Autumn ferns, rosemary, and Heucheras to transition the planter from fall to winter and even into spring. At the top of the steps, Jennifer and Billie echoed the containers at the base by repeating three of the plantings—Creeping Jenny, Celosia ‘Intenz’, and red cabbage—in smaller, upright containers (bottom left of page 33). ‘Degroot’s Spire’ arborvitae planted in vintage olive buckets flank the front doors and provide evergreen color. “They should live in there for at least a year, perhaps longer, then they can be planted in the landscape,” Jennifer says.

A pair of lanterns and an abundance of pumpkins of all shapes and sizes round out the display. Billie aimed to replicate the seasonal flair of her home’s entrance on the back porch, where she spends time yearround with her family. “My husband and I will have our coffee out there in the mornings. We have movie nights; we work on homework after school,” she says of the space. She and Jennifer decorated the hearth and mantel with a similar array of colorful pumpkins, then accessorized the cozy seating area with black-and-white plaid and neutral accessories, which will transition easily to Christmas décor come December. “I wanted an approachable design,” Billie says. “So many people are intimidated by decorating, and I just use simple materials and pull from what I have. Anyone could do this; I’m just finding simple pieces or pieces that I love that can be versatile.”


“It’s nice to see fall color beyond the mum. Celosia is a great alternative as a fall annual.” —Jennifer Gibson, Good Earth Garden Center

Pumpkin varieties in this display include Jarrahdale, Hooligan, Lil’ Pump-Ke-Mon, Snowball, Baby Boos, Knucklehead, Pie Pumpkins, Fairytale, and Marina Di Chioggia, the especially warty green one.

Orange berry sprigs in a white container are perfect for November, but are easy enough to swap out with holly or evergreens for simple Christmas décor.

Design Resources DESIGN Jennifer Gibson and Billie Shields, Good Earth Garden Center ACCESSORIES AND PLANTINGS Good Earth Garden Center FURNITURE Family Leisure and Midtown Vintage Market

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 33


W do i al.

Thankful for 25 wonderful years! FURNISHINGS | DESIGN | GIFTS | BEDDING

Little Rock • 501.664.4249 • cobblestoneandvine.com The Heights & Pleasant Ridge Town Center

FABRIC • DESIGN • LABOR • EVERYTHING! Upholstery | Pillows | Drapery | Headboards | Wallpaper | Home Accessories 10:00-5:30 Mon-Fri, Sat 10:00-4:00 • 1523 Rebsamen Park Rd Little Rock • 501-663-0460 • cynthiaeastfabrics.com

THE HEIGHTS

thankful for a kitchen full of family

5100 Kavanaugh Boulevard | Little Rock | 501.664.4249

PLEASANT RIDGE TOWN CENTER

11525 Cantrell Road | Little Rock | 501.219.3676

Arkansas’ largest selection of interior bar stools!

COZY UP THIS FALL! LARGE SELECTION OF GAS LOGS ON DISPLAY! Pleasant Valley Plaza • 11220 N Rodney Parham, Suite 14 • 501.663.1818 • kenrashsoutdoorfurniture.com Casual Furniture • Wicker • Bar Stools • Gas logs • Grills • Accessories • Like us on Facebook 34 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


ALL SET FOR GUESTS GIVE THANKS

DESIGNER SHAYLA COPAS SETS THE TABLE (AND THE SCENE) FOR A GLAM YET GROUNDED THANKSGIVING CELEBRATION S T O R Y : T I F FA N Y A D A M S PH OTO G R A PH Y: R E T T PEEK

PLEASING PALETTE

Shayla describes the style of this room as “Southern Glam.” She used a neutral palette to complement the rest of the home’s décor while still giving the space a current look. “I also selected the palette because it is easy to work with during any season,” Shayla says of the hues’ flexibility.

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 35


L I F E

E N T E R TA I N I N G

Following their Thanksgiving lunch, Shayla Copas and her husband, Scott, have a tradition they look forward to each year. “We have an after-5 soirée and invite friends and family to drop by from 5 p.m. until we go to bed,” the designer says. Inspired by her love for this gathering, Shayla decided to help her clients, Shirley and Bill Miller, recreate the event in their dining room, which Shayla designed. Read on to see how she turned the space into the perfect place—complete with a delectable menu— for an autumn fête.

36 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018

GLUTEN-FREE GOODIES

Shayla notes her menus are gluten-free, but that doesn’t mean pastries and confections are off-limits. She had downtown Little Rock’s Dempsey Bakery create gluten-free pumpkin pie, iced pumpkin cookies, chocolate cookie dough cheesecake, and a chocolate cake with white frosting and ganache. Chocolates and chocolate-covered strawberries from Cocoa Belle Chocolate (yes, Shayla loves chocolate!) complete the sweet offerings. In addition, the designer whipped up two savory appetizers, antipasto skewers and rosemary cranberry cheese truffles, along with a signature cocktail (see page 38).


L I F E

E N T E R TA I N I N G

WARM FEELING

Traditional, warm tones accent the neutral space for the Thanksgiving Day party. “My main inspiration was orange,” Shayla says. “I paired it with blue to provide an unexpected feel to the space and to add a punch of color,” she says of the complementary color.

A distressed mirrored table featuring a metallic champagne finish gives the narrow dining room the illusion of more space.

HELP YOURSELF

A buffet-style meal lends a down-to-earth vibe to the evening spent with loved ones. “I like to entertain buffet style so that guests can come and go as they please,” Shayla says. Using the orange color scheme, Silks A Bloom created centerpieces featuring a mix of warm-hued and cream blooms along with pumpkins and fresh grapes, which seem to fit the holiday celebration perfectly.

Little Rock’s By Invitation Only created menu cards for the evening. Shayla notes the blue ribbon is reflective of the party’s accent color, while the flocked damask mimics the room’s wallpaper in an understated way.

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 37


L I F E

E N T E R TA I N I N G

Take with Shayla Coffee or Wine? Wine. I love any Caymus wine. Must-Have Entertaining Essential? Trello! It is a

project management app I use to keep things organized for my design projects and for entertaining. I could not entertain without it.

What would you eat first from this gathering’s menu? I would eat the

Want to see more hostess tips and party ideas from Shayla?

chocolates from Cocoa Belle Chocolates. My addiction to chocolate is well known!

Watch for her book, Four Seasons of Entertaining, which is scheduled to release in spring 2019.

Dressed Up or Dressed Down? Dressed up AND

dressed down ‌ ha! I love to pair a sweater and Chanel pearls with my favorite pair of jeans and heels.

Favorite Thanksgiving Tradition? My husband,

Scott, and I have always cooked the meal together. We enjoy the time in the kitchen, sipping wine and listening to holiday music.

GET THE RECIPE

Harvest Mimosas Makes 12 Servings SHOP >>> 16 ounces apple juice Gold sugar, for rim 12 ounces tangerine juice 12 ounces apple cider 12 ounces cranberry juice 1 bottle Veuve Clicquot champagne Cinnamon, for garnish Cinnamon sticks, for garnish Apples, cut into slices for garnish

PREPARE >>> Pour 4 ounces of apple juice into a mediumsized bowl. Pour the gold sugar into a separate medium-sized bowl. Dip the lip of a glass in the apple juice, then roll in the sugar to coat the rim. Do this for each of the 12 glasses, fill with ice, and set aside. Add a splash each of apple juice, tangerine juice, apple cider, cranberry juice, and champagne. Stir gently. Garnish with a dash of cinnamon, a cinnamon stick, and a slice of apple on the rim. Note: Gold sugar can be purchased through local cake and hobby stores.

Design Resources DESIGN Shayla Copas, Shayla Copas Interiors CHOCOLATES AND CHOCOLATE-COVERED STRAWBERRIES Cocoa Belle Chocolates DESSERTS Dempsey Bakery DINNERWARE The Everyday Chef FLORAL DESIGN Silks A Bloom PAPER GOODS (MENU CARD) By Invitation Only

38 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


Casa BlanCa Granite Custom KitChens & Bathrooms south mexiCo south ameriCan style

8124 STAGECOACH ROAD LIT TLE ROCK , AR 72210 NEW SHOWROOM

13320 i-30 LIT TLE ROCK , AR

NOW OPEN!

monday - Friday 8 am - 6 pm saturday 8 am - 2 pm 501.455.2520 • 501.744.0387 CasaBlanCaGranite.Com

Huge Christmas Selection! 14300 Cantrell Road • Little Rock

501.868.9333 Mon - Friday 10am - 6pm Saturday 10am - 5pm

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 39


2206 Cantrell Rd (In front of Cajun’s Wharf) Little Rock, AR • 501.399.9909 • www.candfcarpet.com

WWW.CONGOFP.COM

Subscribe: 800.927.6847 or athomearkansas.com 11 issues: $12 | Promo Code: HOLIDAY

40 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


The Scent of the Se ason

J. Lawrence Design • Commercial & Residential Pavilion in the Park • 8201 Cantrell Road, Suite 360 Little Rock • (501) 804-2391 • jlawrencedesign.com

FULL SERVICE DESIGN & REMODELING - KITCHENSOFARKANSAS.COM NEW SHOWROOM: 2218 CANTRELL ROAD, LITTLE ROCK, AR - 501.666.7756

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 41


42 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


Home THE RELAXED & REFINED ISSUE

DOWN-TO-EARTH RENO

Feels Like Home

PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK

At Home art director Lauren Cerrato and her husband, Casey, turned a Hillcrest fixer-upper into a nature-inspired cottage where they enjoy hosting friends and will soon raise their family. Turn the page to read the story.

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 43


Creating Cozy A LOVE OF THE OUTDOORS AND A DESIRE FOR MINIMALIST, UNCLUTTERED STYLE LED LAUREN AND CASEY CERRATO TO GIVE THIS CRAFTSMAN COTTAGE NEW LIFE S T O R Y : T I F FA N Y A D A M S PH OTO G R A PH Y: R E T T PEEK S T Y L I N G : L A U R E N C E R R AT O

44 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018

“Everything came down to the studs in the kitchen,” Lauren says. The beam in the center of the room is where the previous kitchen ended and a catchall room and laundry space began. The couple kept this original marker in place both for style and as a reminder of the home’s character. The connected mudroom space (seen at right) provides an entrance from the driveway.


Behr’s “North Woods”

DEEP DARK STYLE

“Organic modern.” That’s how At Home in Arkansas art director Lauren Cerrato describes her personal style and the vibe of the 1920s Hillcrest Craftsman cottage she shares with her husband, Casey, their pup, Hush, and the baby boy they’ll welcome this spring. However, this inspired-by-nature aesthetic is one she’s come to over time. “In our previous house, the walls were mint green and my office was yellow. It was all over the place; but I really like color. I remember talking about our dream house, and Casey would say, ‘Let’s just do gray and white and wood,’ and I would think, that sounds so boring and sad.” As fate would have it, their “dream house” wasn’t too far in the future. In December 2016 they stumbled upon this home while visiting Casey’s brother and his family. “My brother-in-law and sister-in-law live right next door, so we knew about this house before it even went on the market. We liked that it was old and had character and charm and was a fixer-upper that we could get for a good price,” Lauren says. Today, “boring and sad” are far from the terms used to describe the Cerratos’ abode. Their nearly yearlong renovation included a full kitchen remodel and the removal of several interior walls along with numerous cosmetic updates—much of which they accomplished with their own hands. Now, they are settling into a space that’s reflective of their love of nature—evidenced in elk sheds from their family trips to Colorado, deer mounts from Casey’s successful hunts, and wood pieces from a sawmill near Lauren’s hometown in Illinois. “My style has evolved, and I found a way to have warmth and color,” Lauren says, noting her use of muted tones throughout the home.

“I went with dark green for our base cabinets,” Lauren says. “We were thinking about navy, and I feel like that is a more obvious choice, but I wanted to do the hunter green because it’s reflective of the outdoors and was just another nod to our inspiration from nature,” she adds. She also chose matte black fixtures throughout the room. “It was hard to decide what metal wouldn’t go out of style, so I did a lot of black with little bits of gold throughout. I felt like matte black was a safe neutral.”

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 45


Aside from incorporating their love of the outdoors into the design, it was also important to the Cerratos to honor the soul of the house. The previous homeowner had lived there for 66 years, and while they were never able to meet her, they felt a strong tie to her and her family. “The previous owner’s children were very attached to this house, and we got to know them well. We were honored that they entrusted us with it,” Lauren says. To this end, they’ve incorporated subtle touches as a nod to them. For example, the Cerratos kept the trim, beams, and doors in the living room the same black hue; the light over the desk in the home office and the wooden box-turned-wall-art over the bar cart were relics they discovered in the backyard shed. “The hardest part of the entire renovation was getting the nerve to go for it,” Casey says. “Once we did, it was full of ups and downs but was totally worth it in the end. It was fun, rewarding, and we learned a ton.” “In our relationship, I’m the dreamer and he’s the realist, and that’s why we work great together,” Lauren says. “I push him out of his comfort zone at times and he reels me in when I need it. I saw character and potential in the house and he saw dollar signs and a lot of work. We were both right,” Lauren says. “We are going to hire a contractor for the next one, though!” Casey laughs.

A far corner of the living room serves as a home office. Casey created the hanging desk and the light fixture was a find from the backyard shed.

46 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018

Enlarged prints of Lauren and Casey’s thumbprints are the first thing guests see upon entering the front door. They signify “that we’ve put our stamp on the house,” Lauren says.

WARM AND INVITING

In the living room, the couple used concrete to cover imperfections in an existing fireplace. A pair of bookcases had flanked the fireplace during the previous owner’s tenure, and the Cerratos decided to recreate this look with their own aesthetic, having Anthony Billingsley of Iron Paws create a set from white oak and black iron. The coffee table is a slab from a sawmill near Lauren’s hometown that was raised on hairpin legs, while the antique rug was a find from Little Rock’s Kahler-Payne Antiques.


“My goal is a cozy, inviting home. The best compliment you can give me is to curl up and make yourself at home.” —Lauren Cerrato, homeowner

Behr’s “Warm Onyx”

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 47


GATHER AROUND

Know the Cerratos and you’ll know they want you to feel both comfortable and relaxed in their home. To this point, Lauren wants everyone to have a chair. “Casey makes fun of me because I just keep buying seating, but I always think of people coming over, and I want them to have a place and feel comfortable and cozy,” she says. Lauren notes they could’ve had even more seats around the table but she opted for padded armchairs in hopes guests would feel at ease and want to linger over dinner.

A church pew—which they received after Casey’s grandmother fell in love with it, purchased it, and soon realized it was too long for her office—offers another character-filled seating option. The “Tempest Waves” wallpaper is meant to mimic water, while the light fixture echoes the influence of branches moving in different directions.

48 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


OUTSIDE INFLUENCE

While raw materials and organic pieces are ever-present throughout the house, you’ll also see hints of mid-century design influencing the style. Case in point, the master bedroom’s chest, which, along with the dining table and sofa in the living room, was a find from Article. The deer print is from Casey’s childhood room. “I decided it was now old enough to be a cool vintage print for our room,” Lauren says.

“This room has taken on a lake vibe,” Lauren says of the nursery, which features driftwood and a vintage Field & Stream decorative plaque.

The home’s previously white siding was painted navy and columns were replaced with cedar beams for warmth and contrast. “I believe the exterior was the biggest transformation from when we bought the house,” Casey says. “I like the rustic, Colorado feel it gives.”

Design Resources ART Lauren Cerrato, Iloh Design CABINETRY R&R Custom Cabinets COUNTERTOPS Akel’s Design Center and The Countertop Store FABRIC Evo Business Environments FURNITURE (BOOKSHELVES) Iron Paws by Anthony Billingsley OUTDOOR FURNITURE Antique Brick Outdoors PAINTING Alexander Painting & More PLANTINGS Hocott’s Garden Center PRINTING (ARTWORK) Arkansas Graphics RUGS Kahler-Payne Antiques and South Main Creative TILE The Tile Shop UPHOLSTERY Cynthia East Fabrics WALLPAPER (INSTALLATION) Mike Mace

SEE THE BEFORES Visit athomearkansas.com to see what Lauren and Casey’s house looked like before its makeover.

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 49


FARMHOUSE FRESH S TO RY: S T EPH A N I E M A X W EL L N E W TO N PH OTO G R A PH Y: R E T T PEEK ST YLI N G: H O PE J O H NSTO N E

50 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


A MOUNTAIN HOME COUPLE RELAXES INTO THEIR FOREVER-HOME FARMHOUSE

French doors adorned with magnolia leaf wreaths offer a timeless entry. Below: One of many collected vignettes in the Burges home.

The house Traci and Steve Burges call home is a “farmhouse” in more than one sense of the word. Yes, it has the comfortable, traditional appeal of the farmhouse aesthetic; more literally, though, the house sits on eight acres of Traci’s family’s farmland, with a red barn out back and miles of pastures in view. “This farm has been in our family since I was 5 or 6. We had cattle growing up, and I’d help my dad on the farm,” Traci recalls. These days, there are no herds to tend, but the Burges house is right at home on top of a hill overlooking the land. Traci and Steve decided to build this house (and stay put for a while) after years of building, moving in, selling, and moving out. Traci tells it like this: “When we first got married, we were very young and Steve was just out of college. Dad was a builder and he hired Steve to frame houses and work on the job sites. After about six months, he laid him off so he’d go get his real estate license—he said, ‘Trust me, he’s good with people’—so that’s what Steve did. He started working at Gilbert Realty, and we built and sold houses on the side for about 10 years.” During this time, Traci and Steve started a family, and they decided it was time to put down some more permanent roots. “We had a lot in town, but decided we wanted to live on our family farm, where we’d spent time since we’d dated,” Traci says. They started with a Southern Living plan, “Cottage of the Year,” then tweaked it as needed, changing the height of the ceilings here and the size of the rooms there. While Traci incorporated some elements from their old home into the décor, others she acquired at antiques stores and auctions, refurbishing to fit her palette of creams and whites. Neither Traci nor Steve is afraid of a DIY project, and they left their mark in every room of the house—sometimes with the help of their children, Megan, Cameron, and Edward. The result is a home that doesn’t feel like a new addition to the farm—but rather one that’s always been there.

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 51


EASYGOING ELEGANCE

A neutral palette with blue accents and natural textures are a constant throughout the design. “Neutrals are just comfortable to me,” Traci says. “I love the serenity of it—it feels peaceful.” Blue plates displayed in a hutch are from an antique set of Currier & Ives given to Traci by Steve one Christmas. Traci notes that she’s been known to change out the blue rug layered over a larger jute rug from time to time, and she’ll swap out the blue pillows for something seasonal, like red-and-black buffalo check, come Christmas.

52 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


PORCH PERFECTED

The back deck features a pool and two seating areas, one of which is pictured here, and gets used almost as often as the indoor living spaces. This fireplace is a plan from Meek’s Lumber, tweaked and personalized with reclaimed 100-year-old beams used to make the mantel. The coffee table was a dining table used in the couple’s previous home. “We didn’t have anywhere for it here, and I thought it would go perfectly in front of the hearth, so Steve cut the legs off and made it a coffee table,” Traci says. When the couple entertains, they use the console tables on either side of the fireplace as sideboards for serving food.

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 53


REFRESH & REFINE

Many of Traci’s dark brown furnishings from her previous house, including the dining table, received a coat of paint and some light distressing to help them find a place among this home’s airy hues. In fact, several other pieces in the dining room benefitted from Traci’s knack for giving new life to old pieces: The cane wingback host and hostess chairs were Traci’s grandmother’s, which she recovered and painted; the mirror was a garage sale find, also repainted; and the shutters came from a friend. “She was getting rid of them, and we ended up trading—I gave her some custom pillows I was getting rid of. After I painted the shutters, she was like, ‘Can I have those back?’”

One of the family’s biggest DIY projects was hand-weathering the hardwood floors. “We laid all the floors, had them sanded, and I wanted them to look a little more reclaimed,” Traci says. “We went through the house with axes, chains, and tools that we could use to scrape some wood back to show more grain. We did it on and off for about a week, and with a dark walnut stain, it really gave them that older look.”

54 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


Traci used Park Hill’s “Feedsack” chalk paint and light distressing to refresh her dining room table.

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 55


While granite covers the kitchen surround, the island is topped in butcher block the couple found in Springfield, Missouri, then distressed and stained.

56 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


KITCHEN STATEMENT

By using a tumbled tile for backsplash and building a mantel over the stovetop, Traci gave the range the look of a hearth and created a meaningful focal point for the kitchen. “I used shiplap here and in the mantel behind the television [in the living room] to give them the impression of an older home,” Traci says. The painting over the mantel was an antique store find. “It had a slight hole, and I repaired and painted over it just enough, then re-painted and waxed the frame. It’s one of my very favorite things in my whole house.” November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 57


LAYERED COMFORT

Exposed beams in the master suite showcase more of the couple’s attention to detail: “The rafters were specially milled by a sawmill in Dumas for us. Because the expanse of the bedroom was so big, we had to find timber that was long enough,” Traci explains. “We painted them white, and they seemed too white, so Steve got up there and sanded it all down.” Accessories from Park Hill and Magnolia fill out the space, as well as pieces Traci has collected over time, such as the pair of framed bird illustrations.

58 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


I’ve always enjoyed the relaxed atmosphere of a farmhouse. I grew up on a farm, and I find the style so comfortable.” —Traci Burges, homeowner

Traci chose Delta’s “Victorian” faucet for the fixtures in both her bathroom and kitchen. “They look so timeless but with a pretty flair,” she says.

GRACEFUL RETREAT

The suite’s exposed beams continue into the master bath, which is flanked by vanities and centered around a built-in tub with a view overlooking the property. A large shower covered in white subway tile to the right of the bath was an addition to the original house plan. The chandelier and sconces from Lighting Emporium match the home’s vintage farmhouse vibe. Design Resources CONTRACTOR Alan Pinkston, Pinkston Construction CABINETS Rick Simpkins, RS Kitchen ACCESSORIES Park Hill Home FURNITURE Butler Furniture and Park Hill Home LIGHTING Lighting Emporium PAINT Sherwin-Williams RUGS Butler Furniture UPHOLSTERY RC’s Quality Upholstery & Furniture

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 59


THE COMFORT OF

HOME S T O R Y : T I F FA N Y A D A M S PH OTO G R A PH Y: R E T T PEEK ST YLI N G: H O PE J O H NSTO N E

60 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


At the front entrance of the Craftsman-style home, stamped concrete floors give the look of real wood and offer the durability to stand up to years of wear-andtear with little maintenance.

A YOUNG FAMILY BRINGS THEIR LOVE OF DOWNTO-EARTH STYLE WITH THEM AS THEY SETTLE IN TO A NEW NORTHWEST ARKANSAS HOME Moving from upstate New York to Northwest Arkansas, the owners of this Fayetteville home were eager to bring a few of their favorite things to their new location—namely the style of their previous home. “We had a Craftsman house in New York, and I really wanted to stay with that style for our next home,” one of the homeowners says. However, after online real estate searches proved to be unfruitful, she and her husband realized they would need to build to get the look they desired. “I began Googling house plans and found a Southern Living one that I loved,” the homeowner says. “It had a huge front porch, and I thought, ‘I’m going to the South so I have to have a front porch,’” she adds. She and her husband began working with Celtic Custom Homes to build. “When I first talked with the husband, he told me his wife already had the plan she wanted and she even brought me a picture of their home in New York for inspiration,” recalls Lee Scarlett, owner of Celtic Custom

Homes, who also helped the couple find their lot. During the framing process, the couple realized they needed help selecting finishes and ultimately furnishings and turned to Katie Rees of Katie Grace Designs. From there, Katie and her team member Corrie Rusch worked alongside the homeowner on the interiors. “She has great style and taste; she just needed our guidance to keep the vibe cohesive and translate from her mind to the house,” Katie says. Part of this came in defining the style of the home. “I wouldn’t call it total farmhouse; it’s more refined and transitional. There are a lot of cottage details throughout this house, and that’s something Corrie and I came to realize the owners wanted throughout the process.” Ultimately, it was this personalized blend that makes the family feel at home in their new town and their new residence. “This house would not look the way it does without Katie and her team,” the homeowner says. “They helped me to make every room work for our family.”

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 61


Katie and her team adjusted the kitchen’s floor plan to give the family a dedicated pantry and the openness they desired. The pantry door was a find from Round Top Antiques Fair and is thought to be from the 1800s.

COOKING UP STYLE

Craftsman influence carries over to the kitchen with a mix of natural materials and practical style. Here, engineered wood floors (which run the expanse of most of the home) pair with cream cabinetry and a light gray island, which Katie says brings out the veining in the quartz countertops. Furniture-style cabinetry on the far wall features cremone bolt hardware and tidily hides small appliances, while panels reduce the number of visible large appliances thus giving a simplified feel. 62 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 63


THE GATHERING PLACE

A hearth room (below) connects to the kitchen and functions as the central hangout for the family. The corbels on the mantel echo the design of the wood framing seen in the kitchen’s entryway (above). The two-story room features two sets of windows, allowing an abundance of natural light to spill into the space.

The repetition of a shiplap treatment on the walls and ceilings is present throughout much of the home. “We worked with trim carpenters for months to get this right,” Katie says. “It was a balance to figure out which rooms would get which treatment and how to make it all feel cohesive; we didn’t want to overdo it.”

64 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


ELEGANTLY INVITING

The formal living room is one of the first spaces you see upon walking through the front door, thus it needed to be equally pretty and welcoming. “The homeowner knew she wanted an all-neutral palette, and we really liked the idea of going monochromatic and bringing in interest through texture,� Katie says. The light fixture, which Katie notes is the anchor of the room, complements the serene hues and the wooden antique artwork seen over the fireplace. Built-in shelves house a mix of personal and stylistic finds.

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 65


DOWN-TO-EARTH DINING

“She didn’t want the dining room to be too formal; she was thinking classy but a little more casual,” Katie says of the homeowner’s vision. The approachable design is grounded in the same neutral hues seen throughout the home, but accented with more vibrant punches of color as seen in the rug and the artwork, which was created by Northwest Arkansas-based artist Allison Hobbs.

66 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


SUBTLE SOPHISTICATION

“This is one of my favorite rooms,” Katie says of the galley-style master bath. “So much detail went into it but, at the same time, it’s all really simple.” A casual, on-trend matte black finish was used for the mirrors, sconces, and door hardware while champagne-bronze fixtures and cabinetry hardware bring a slightly more refined element to the design. “We knew we wanted a gold statement chandelier,” Katie says. “It was the perfect center point in the vaulted ceiling and really completes the space.”

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 67


68 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


RESTFUL RETREAT

“Fresh and light” are the words the designer uses to describe the master bedroom. White walls and linens lend a clean feel while wood accents relate back to the home’s natural elements—seen throughout the interior as well as the exterior. The ceiling was white washed to allow for wood texture without an overwhelmingly dark hue. Its color complements the window coverings and the room’s accent color—green.

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 69


GET CRAFTY

The basement of the three-level home is dedicated to the couple’s 9-year-old twin daughters. A craft room is one of the highlights. Utilitarian elements such as large tiles that give the look of concrete, a shiplap accent wall, and a light wall color allow the girls’ work to stand out.

Design Resources CONTRACTOR Lee Scarlett, Celtic Custom Homes INTERIOR DESIGN Katie Rees and Corrie Rusch, Katie Grace Designs ACCESSORIES, LIGHTING, MIRRORS, AND RUGS Katie Grace Designs APPLIANCES Metro Appliances & More ART Allison Hobbs Art BEDDING Katie Grace Designs and Sheryl’s Sewing Room CABINETRY Verser’s Cabinet Shop CARPET, FLOORING, AND TILE Encore Flooring and Building Products COUNTERTOPS New Century Counter Tops FABRICS Fabric Gallery FURNITURE Abide Furniture, Katie Grace Designs, and Howse HARDWARE Hearth and Home PAINT Sherwin-Williams PAINTING (DECORATIVE) Visual Harmony UPHOLSTERY Roger Fletcher Upholstery WINDOW COVERINGS Baker Window Coverings and Fabric Gallery

70 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


SAY GOODBYE TO CLOGGED GUTTERS!

Get LeafGuard gutters, a unique patented system designed to stay clog free. LeafGuard is the only seamless, one-piece leaf protection gutter system on the market.

501.508.6474 • 479.234.4147 877.848.2422

leafguardandmore.com

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 71


T R E N D S E T T E R S

trendsetters R E A DY TO B UIL D YO U R DR E A M H O M E? CA L L O N O N E O F T H ES E H O M E B U I L D E R S T O H E L P Y O U E V E R Y S T E P O F T H E W AY. A Special At Home in Arkansas Promotion

PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK 72 At Home in CARRIE Arkansas | November INTERIOR DESIGN: KIDD ARCHITECT: YEARY LINDSEY ARCHITECTS

2018


T R E N D S E T T E R S

LITTLE ROCK

Parkinson Building Group, Inc Led by Bill Parkinson, Parkinson Building Group was founded in 1999 and originated from a focus on remodeling work in the Hillcrest area. Through the years, their work has evolved to include new-construction homes in addition to renovations. “As a custom homebuilder we take the approach that we are here to advise and be a resource for our clients but ultimately we are here to serve them in whatever fashion they have need of us on the project,” Parkinson says of his team’s guiding role. They start each renovation or new build with a top-notch team who gathers information and creates a plan to meet the client’s goals. “From there it looks different based on the project, but we follow proven methods developed over the years to create the best result we can offer based on desire and budget,” Parkinson says.

trendsetters A BLEND OF JOB SITE EXPERIENCE AND BUILDING EXPERTISE MAKES PA R K I N S O N B U I L D I N G G R O U P A L E A D E R I N T H E H O M E B U I L D I N G I N D U S T R Y Bill Parkinson | Parkinson Building Group | 501.954.8570 | parkinsonbuildinggroup.com | Instagram: @parkinsonbldg

November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 73


T R E N D S E T T E R S

T R E N D S E T T E R S

LITTLE ROCK

BenRo Construction, Inc. Ben Robles grew up in the construction business, so it comes as no surprise he would continue this legacy with BenRo Construction. “I have an eye for design and enjoy creating unique and high-quality designs,” he says. Robles notes that for each project he tackles, he evaluates the space alongside the client’s desired outcome to achieve results. “I take into consideration their color choices, family make-up, and space provided and involve my clients in the process along the way,” he says.

He notes that he also looks for ways to reduce maintenance costs and efforts for the client and make their homes user-friendly for all ages and stages of life. Robles offers reasonable, competitive pricing and the ability to complete a multitude of jobs from full construction on new homes to smaller remodeling projects and even roofing and painting. “My ultimate goal for each client is to create the highest quality product to my client’s complete satisfaction,” he concludes.

trendsetters

Photo courtesy of Karen E. Segrave

TURN TO BENRO CONSTRUCTION, INC. FOR ALL YOUR HOMEBUILDING NEEDS — F R O M F U L L R E M O D E L S A N D N E W B U I L D S T O R O O F I N G A N D PA I N T I N G . Ben Robles | BenRo Construction, Inc. | 501.952.7277 | benroinc@gmail.com

74 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018


“Building Your Dreams Where Quality Is The Standard” Hennard Custom Homes Roland, Arkansas (501) 944-3452 • www.hennardcustomhomes.com November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 75


Clark McCarley 501.940.0229 McCarleyCo.com

New Construction, Remodels & Additions

QU A L I Y

VA LU E

3075 N. Market, Ste. 1 • Fayetteville • 72703

6309 Southwind Drive | North Little Rock, 72118 | (501) 758-1212 | summerwoodinc.com | 76 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018

I N T EGR IT Y

celticcustomhomes.com • 479-582-1142

SummerwoodHomesAR


Tree Trimming & Removal Excellent Clean Up

Free Estimates & Insured for Your Protection

Matt Marshall Owner, Certified Arborist

Let us “Arrest” your tree troubles

MEMBER

501-570-0554 • www.treemarshall.com

CarlGrayHenson builders

Southern Living CuStom BuiLder for 17 yearS 30 yearS experienCe BuiLding Southern homeS 501.413.8341 | www.CarLgrayhenSon.Com November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 77


“For 30+ years I’ve been remodeling and building custom homes. I offer hands-on, personal service from design through completion.” —Frank Curtis, President

CUSTOM HOMES & REMODELING 501-868-8900 CURTISCUSTOMHOMES.COM |

HIRE AN HBAGLR MEMBER. GAIN PEACE OF MIND. Your home and the people who live inside it are your most important assets. The Home Builders Association of Greater Little Rock (HBA-GLR) is in place to ensure you receive excellent care in the housing industry. We are a non-profit trade organization in place to serve our community. 501.758.3646 | 2901 Main Street, North Little Rock | hbaglr.com

78 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018

Photography: Rett Peek | Contractor: Richard Harp, Richard Harp Homes

It is your right to know if a builder, real estate agent, banker, or supplier is a good fit for you and your family. Did you know that it only takes $100 for a builder to become licensed? They are also not required to carry certain types of insurance. If damage occurs to your home by one of these builders, you may end up paying the price. Or worse, if a builder fails to pay for materials used, that supplier could take your home even if you have done your part in paying the builder. By asking the contractors you work with, “Are you a member of the Home Builders Association?” you eliminate these nightmare scenarios and can make your decision confidently knowing you have hired a properly licensed and insured professional who has been background checked and has the backing of a 140,000-member base nationwide.


“Ridout Lumber was my first choice for building material when I built our first home back in college. Now, twenty years later, Ridout Lumber is still my choice for construction material in every custom home I build. From start to finish, Ridout is always there. My company couldn’t be a success without them.” — Luke Porter, Luke Porter, Inc.

Luke Porter, builder Luke Porter, Inc.

BATESVILLE • BENTON • CABOT CONWAY • FAYETTEVILLE • JONESBORO JOPLIN • ROGERS • RUSSELLVILLE SEARCY • LITTLE ROCK

Mike Kimbrel Ridout Lumber Company

Arkansas’ Number One Lumber Company Chain WWW.RIDOUTLUMBER.COM November 2018 | athomearkansas.com 79


E N D

N O T E S

AT HOME WITH

ERIN WOOD her ’hood

Benjamin Moore’s “Blue Lagoon”

The Heights in Little Rock

her favorite room

erin wood

Director of Et Alia Press

PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK

My home library—I love the color. When I’m in it, I’m surrounded by books and things that are important to me. Whether times are happy or hard, I always find good company in books. The art in this room speaks to me as well. One of Donald Roller Wilson’s famous “Cookie” paintings, which was given to me as a 25th birthday present, reflects many decades as a fan of his as well as my lifelong interest in primates.”

her home’s style English-inspired cottage built in 1925

why turquoise? “I wanted something really lively and vibrant, a color that touched me and made me feel confident and happy.”

80 At Home in Arkansas | November 2018

After a short career in law, Erin earned her masters in writing. Soon after, she helped found Little Rock-based Et Alia Press, which publishes books about emerging artists, health and wellness, and local histories. “These shelves are filled with books that I used more in years past—researching for college or grad school papers, heavy case books for law school, and high school favorites that have my notes in the margins.”

what’s next from et alia press? A collaboration with ESSE Purse Museum, What’s Inside: A Century of Women and Handbags, 1900–1999, will be released Nov. 8 in conjunction with the museum’s fifth birthday party.


A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING!

CALL FOR YOUR FREE DESIGN CONSULTATION

2216 Cantrell Road 501.907.7105 // 866.833.2105 Proudly Organizing Arkansans’ Homes for Over 13 Years! Little Rock • closetfactory.com


At Home in Arkansas | November 2018  
At Home in Arkansas | November 2018