Page 1

HOMES WITH

HISTORY

FALL FASHION STYLEBOOK plus FRONT ENTRY DECORATING IDEAS TO GREET THE SEASON (AND GUESTS!)


CELEBRATE LAUGH WOW TASTE RELAX DINE ENJOY

un closer to home FWOW TASTE RELAX DINE ENJOY

GAMBLINGPROBLEM?CALL---

WHEEL�OF�FORTUNE�•�PENNY�GAMES�•�VIDEO�POKER�•��BLACKJACK�•�MORE! For more FUN closer to home, discover the award-winning Oaklawn Gaming in Hot Springs National Park — voted Groups Today magazine’s number one Southern Casino. Enjoy more new Vegas-style games like Roulette and Poker. Visit Silks Bar and Grill to experience our signature Silks burger. Oaklawn Gaming is becoming famous for its free live music every Friday and Saturday night. With football season in full swing, be sure to watch your favorite team on one of Silks’ 30-plus big screen TVs! And because Hot Springs National Park is so close, you’ll have more time to relax an extra day in the Spa City.

GOODFORNEWMEMBERSONLYON INITIALSIGN-UPVALIDIDREQUIRED MUSTBEEXPIRES// ATHOME

For Hot Springs lodging, dining, and shopping information, visit HotSprings.org. ARKANSAS’FAVORITEPLACETOPLAYANDONLYMINUTESAWAY

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October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 1


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real brands.

Cole Haan Brooks Brothers Factory Store Chico’s Outlet Under Armour J.Crew | crewcuts Factory LOFT Outlet Christopher & Banks | CJ Banks G.H. Bass & Co. Gap Factory Store* Tommy Hilfiger* Nike Factory Store* and more!

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GRAND OPENING OCTOBER 16 October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 1


REBORN RELICS HOME AUTHENTIC REPRODUCTIONS by debi davis

2222 CANTRELL ROAD, LITTLE ROCK, AR | 501.221.2032 | RebornRelicsDesign.com 2 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


KAUFMAN By Design st We

FREE Interior Design Services! New Construction Design Consultants | Flooring Specialist Lighting Specialist | PARK HILL HOME Collection

Come visit our NEW SHOWROOM! 14900 Cantrell Rd. | Little Rock, AR | 501.673.3992 k a u f m a n b y d e s i g n October . c o m2015 | athomearkansas.com 3


custom builder program

Park Hill Home has partnered with builder, Bret Franks, for a Southern Living Custom Builder Program Showcase Home, opening October 2015. The Park Hill Home team of Todd Smith, Charlie Groppetti and Cheryl Watson-Hannink have collaborated to bring a fresh take on a cottage-style home with warm neutral colors, natural textures and thoughtful furniture placement. The unique appeal to this project is that all spaces will be decorated in the Park Hill Style with Park Hill Collection products. Proceeds from the event will go to Conway Regional Health Foundation’s Emergency Room expansion project and operation FINALLY HOME. 4 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


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October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 5


Contents O C T O B E R 2 015

29 Home

Style

56 Portrait of a Home

13 Finds

Photographer and home designer/ contractor Lance Johnston reinvigorates a century-old downtown Conway home for his young family.

63 Living Legend

In Magnolia, a homeowner and designer keeps the organic beauty and prized architecture of a house designed by Fay Jones intact.

Pillow Talk

16 L atest

Design Openings, Arrivals & Launches

19 Design Pattern Play

Life

Special Section 71 A rt & A ntiques Guide In Every Issue

10 A Note from the Editor in Chief 80 End Notes

on the cover

The entryway of the Lance Johnston family home in Conway. Photography by Rett Peek. See page 56.

28 H appenings

Events in The Natural State

29 Seasonal Welcome to Fall

34 Discover El Dorado

39 Flavor

Sweet & Savory Butternut Squash Soup

41 Fall Fashion Stylebook The New Romantics 6 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

Vol. 20, No. 9 © 2015 by Root Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. At Home in Arkansas™ (ISSN 1540-8914, USPS# 020-999) is published 11 times a year (January/February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December) by Root Publishing, Inc., 2207 Cottondale Lane, Little Rock, AR 72202. Periodicals Postage Rates are Paid at Little Rock, AR and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to At Home in Arkansas™; 2207 Cottondale Lane, Little Rock, AR.


ROGERS, AR October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 7


@athomearkansas.com On the Web this Month...

DIY Tips!

Step-by-step instructions to help you recreate the autumn entries in this issue.

PUBLISHER Kelly Fraiser (ext. 12) kelly@athomearkansas.com EDITOR IN CHIEF Chip Jones (ext. 11) chip@athomearkansas.com MANAGING EDITOR Tiffany Adams (ext. 15) tiffany@athomearkansas.com ART DIRECTOR Norma Edwards (ext. 10) norma@athomearkansas.com SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Laura LaRue llarue@athomearkansas.com CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Matthew Martin, Nancy Nolan, Rett Peek, Karen E. Segrave ONLINE CONTENT EDITOR Ashley Gill ashley@athomearkansas.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Jennifer Hay (ext. 14) jennifer@athomearkansas.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Emilie Reno (ext. 16) emilie@athomearkansas.com

Speak up and share your top picks from around the state in our Local Favorites poll! athomearkansas.com/local-favorites

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Bethany Robinson bethany@athomearkansas.com MARKETING COORDINATOR Debbie Tissue (ext. 13) dtissue@athomearkansas.com

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PRESIDENT Kelly Fraiser

athomearkansas.com 8 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Debbie Tissue


2212 Cantrell Road | Little Rock | 501.372.1886 | providenceltddesign.com | October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 9 Monday - Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


From The Editor in Chief

A few months ago I was invited to visit a residence designed by famed Arkansas architect Fay Jones. This was the first time I had set foot in one of Jones’s designs, and it did not disappoint. I have to confess straight away and tell you that I am quite a traditionalist at heart. But after spending some time at Stoneshadow (as the owner has named it), on the outskirts of Magnolia, I gained a new appreciation for a home that—although it was built in mid-century style—is now functioning in a very 2015 way. Once I recognized all of the thought and planning that went into this very unique home, I found it to be timeless, current, and extremely interesting all at once. Designer and homeowner Bruce Woodward had given me, in advance, some idea of the home’s detailed components, but even his tutorial could not convey just how amazing the structure is when you actually see it. I know that you will enjoy touring this south Arkansas jewel, and you’re sure to be amazed at how impeccably the original structure has been treasured and preserved. The family residence of photographer and home designer/contractor Lance Johnston is another such story. Although the space is new to the family, it has a history that they now see as part of their own. Previously owned and inhabited by just one family for more than 100 years, the Johnstons set about improving the house to make it work for them but were intentional about leaving as much character from the past intact as possible. Today, the house flows in a contemporary manner, putting a unique spin on open-floor-plan living that feels fresh and comfortable yet still traditional and homey. In addition to these graceful historic homes, we have three front porch designs that I know will inspire you to have some decorating fun this fall. From pumpkins, gourds, and mums to creative crafts and colorful ideas for keeping warm and cozy, these exteriors are sure to spark some ideas and get you thinking about your own seasonal décor. And, finally, this issue would not be complete without our annual fall fashion stylebook. Shot on location at Ferncliff Camp and Conference Center, our editorial team pulled together an amazing array of men’s and ladies’ fashions from some of Arkansas’s finest stores and boutiques to give you a preview of the latest looks as we all prepare for the crisp, fall air that is just around the corner. If you are as ready as I am for some relief from the heat and humidity of summer, I know you will enjoy this special preview of fall ideas, all selected to inspire your home style and lifestyle.

Chip Jones Editor in Chief chip@athomearkansas.com

10 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK

“The goal isn’t to live forever, the goal is to create something that will.” —Unknown


October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 11


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12 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


Style

T H E L AT EST I N

DÉCOR & DESIGN

PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK | STYLING: SHEB FISHER AND KATE TROTTER

Plush fabrics, warm colors, and graphic patterns make these throw pillows an essential for cozy fall nights. Photographed on location at Cynthia East Fabrics. All pillows available through Cynthia East Fabrics, Little Rock, (501) 663-0460, cynthiaeastfabrics.com

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 13


Style/Finds

Taylor King blue-, green-, and mustardhued, raised velvet pillow. Cantrell Furniture Design Center, Little Rock, (501) 225-0002, cantrellfurniture.com

Pink “Rhomba” linen pillow. Embellish Interiors, Little Rock, (501) 223-6965

“Manor” pillow. HOWSE, Little Rock, (501) 725-4719, thehowse.com

PILLOW talk

Brown, red, and orange striped throw pillow. Cantrell Furniture Design Center, Little Rock, (501) 225-0002, cantrellfurniture.com

Custom, Italian silk, cut-velvet pillow with down fill. Phoenix Interiors, Little Rock, (501) 225-0400

14 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

A new throw pillow is one of the easiest and quickest ways to dress up a sofa, club chair, or even your bed. Fluff up your look with a few of our favorites from local retailers PRODUCER Norma Edwards PHOTOGRAPHY Matthew Martin

Dark blue and turquoise geode pillow. Embellish Interiors, Little Rock, (501) 223-6965

Embroidered tapestry pillow with beading detail. Phoenix Interiors, Little Rock, (501) 225-0400

Cream-colored pillow with blue and taupe decorative design. Vivid Designs, Little Rock, (501) 225-3828


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L A - Z - B O Y

P R E S E N T S

FROM THE NEW URBAN ATTITUDES COLLECTION

Style is back with a whole new attitude. A living room stylish enough for a movie set doesn’t have to come with a movie star price tag. Meet the surprisingly affordable Urban Attitudes collection from La-Z-Boy. All the chic, urban-inspired style you want, with the La-Z-Boy comfort you expect. After all, why should movie stars have all the fun?

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la-z-boy.com/Little-Rock October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 15


Style/Latest ARRIVALS, OPENINGS & LAUNCHES

News From Around The Natural State

ARKANSAS LOVES ART Compelling Multimedia Exhibit Opens at Wildwood Park CELEBRATE THE GRAND OPENING OF DRAWL: SOUTHERN CONTEMPORARY ART Calling all art collectors and enthusiasts: Little Rock has a new gallery that’s on a mission to showcase the best of contemporary art of the American South. DRAWL Southern Contemporary Art represents emerging and established artists who were either born in or currently live and work in the region. Owner and artist Guy W. Bell says that his drive is to celebrate contemporary arts culture, to represent and support great talent around the South, and to inspire new artists. Artists currently exhibited in the gallery include Carl Joe Williams, Charlie Buckley, Linda Lopez, and Emily Galusha, among others. The gallery will host a grand opening celebration on October 9th, at 6 p.m., with live music and many of the gallery’s highly esteemed artists in attendance. The gallery is open to the public weekly Tuesday – Friday, 1 – 5 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., and by appointment. 5208 Kavanaugh Boulevard, Suite 5, Little Rock, (501) 240-7446, drawlgallery.com

16 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

“Park’s Pants” is a one-of-a kind interactive art event opening on October 10th at Wildwood Park. Little Rockbased photographer Nancy Nolan has documented each year of her son Park’s life by photographing him in the same pair of his father’s blue jeans. Prints of the images, which poignantly convey Park’s physical and emotional development from premature infant to grown man—as well as Nolan’s ever-evolving role as a mother—will be on display, along with images and film projected onto white denim. Central to the exhibit is a film created by Dave Anderson documenting the final mother-son photo shoot of the series and probing the complex relationship between photographer and subject, mother and son, and how it unfolds through this special bonding ritual. A public reception and documentary screening will take place on October 15 at 6 p.m., and Nolan will be a guest on a special Tin Roof Project episode of Tales from the South before a live audience at Wildwood on October 22. The exhibit will be open to the public from October 10 to November 22, Monday – Friday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 12 – 4 p.m. 20919 Denny Road, Little Rock, (501) 821-7275, wildwoodpark.org

Buy Art and Make a Positive Impact Brushes is a unique art studio and gallery now open in West Little Rock. Shoppers will find a variety of art and crafts, including canvas paintings, picture frames, masks, beadwork and much more. Clients of Independent Case Management (ICM), a non-profit organization that has been providing support for individuals with disabilities for over 25 years, produce all of the pieces in the store. ICM clients, who take part in the organization’s day-support program called BRAVO, attend art classes every weekday to work on their projects. Once complete, the pieces are priced, tagged, and displayed in the gallery. Clients get to keep most of the profit from the sale of their artwork. Brushes is open Tuesday – Saturday, 12 – 6p.m. 1525 Merrill Drive, Little Rock, (501) 228-0063, icmbrushes.com


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remarkable journeys that exceed expectations 727 W. Beebe Capps Expressway Searcy | 501-305-3780 877-305-3789 renee@rtaylortravel.com 18 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


pattern All fabrics and trim shown here are available through Cynthia East Fabrics, Little Rock, (501) 663-0460, cynthiaeastfabrics.com

PLAY

Style/Design

Three Arkansas-based designers share their favorite fabrics and offer expert advice on layering pattern, color, and texture for maximum style impact in every room of your home

PRODUCER Ashley Gill PHOTOGRAPHY Matthew Martin and Courtesy of Vendors

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 19


Style/Design

Debi PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK

DAVIS

What’s your signature design style?

Unstuffy sophistication. Our clients want a fresh, new look: bright, not dark, and beautiful but still livable.

Describe your approach to creating a fabric scheme.

I go to the client’s home and see how they live—whether they are single, have young children or pets, et cetera—and that gives me a starting point. Bottom line: Make sure the fabrics in your home work with your lifestyle. After we know a client’s needs, I tend to create monochromatic schemes with different patterns and textures, which really gives a room character.

What are your all-time favorite fabrics?

I love fabric. My favorites change each season, depending on what is happening in design. Color and texture are both a draw, and I especially favor Old World fabrics that have been modernized and reinvented. A silk damask is always a timeless choice, and it can go on furniture, drapes, or walls.

How do you select drapery fabric?

For drapes, I love lush and beautiful—never heavy. I do not like fussy drapes. Simple and classy silks and linens are always a good choice.

What eccentric or unusual uses of fabric do you like?

I like to do something unexpected, mixing old and new, like using cut velvet or damask on a contemporary chair. Another example: I recently bought a pair of beautiful, whitewashed antique settees and had them upholstered in a transitional fabric. The result was edgy, yet beautiful. Debi Davis, Debi Davis Interior Design, Little Rock, (501) 221-2032, danddinteriordesign.com

Monochromatic Magic

Odalisque by Lelièvre

20 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

Songbirds by Anna French for Thibaut

Concetti by Osborne & Little


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Enjoy Private Dining for Christmas Parties, Meetings or Rehearsal Dinners Starting Nov. 1st. October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 21


Style/Design

Laura

What’s your signature design style?

PHOTOGRAPHY: COURTESY OF DESIGNER

BULLOCK

I design rooms that are tailored, but with an edge. For instance, the furniture pieces I purchase typically have clean lines, but for fun I like to throw in a few unexpected items with a story.

Describe your approach to creating a fabric scheme.

An interesting room should draw you in with the softness of the fabric, but it should always be balanced with layers of other materials such as woods, metals, and textured elements. I never start in the same place when it comes to layering. While I’m making selections, I try to stay open minded to using fabric in unexpected ways. If I overthink it too much, or if I get too attached to a “perfect” fabric I’ve imagined, the space can become too staged.

Are there any fabrics you just cannot wait to use?

I’m really into fabrics with plush, nontraditional textures right now that have depth, dimension, and a subtle sheen. And I find I’m using more graphics and mottled fabrics. I love the idea of pairing these with my staple velvets and nubby viscose blends.

How do you select upholstery fabric?

I love using a mix of velvets, mohairs, and textured wovens on upholstered pieces within the same space. I stay close to solids that are in the same color family, or even neutrals, and play with patterns and accent colors in throws, pillows, and floor coverings. It’s easy to fall into color trends, but I am always cautious of using them on large investment pieces. Also, think practically: Furnishings that are used most frequently, such as a sofa, are best outfitted in a fabric that doesn’t crush—no textures that will show wear spots. However, that type of fabric would be perfect for an accent chair or bench at the foot of your bed. Laura Bullock, Laura Bullock Interiors, Fayetteville, (479) 387-1800, laurabullockinteriors.com

Simply Fabulous

Corallo by Osborne & Little

22 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

Channels by Kelly Wearstler for Lee Jofa Groundworks

Kirkham Sesame by Lee Jofa


Di-vine Bolts and bolts of beauty to climb throughout your home.

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Style/Design

Courtney STONE PHOTOGRAPHY: NANCY NOLAN AND KAREN E. SEGRAVE

What’s your signature design style?

A peaceful, organized mix of old and new— yet always with an element of surprise.

Describe your approach to creating a fabric scheme.

It really depends on the project, but I typically like to have a large-scale pattern, a medium-print fabric, and a textured, solid fabric all in the same room. I pull the room together by repeating the large-scale pattern at least twice in different applications. I also tend to focus more on selecting fabrics that work harmoniously together, rather than choosing any one fabric that might overpower the rest.

Are there any fabrics you just cannot wait to use?

When the right project presents itself, I hope to use a unique, faux-leather pattern for a banquette in a kitchen or bar area. I like that they are so durable and easy to clean as well as good-looking! I envision the banquette having a tall back and really being a statement piece.

What eccentric or unusual uses of fabric do you like?

In children’s rooms, any way of hanging fabric on the ceiling or creating a canopy over the bed is really fun and whimsical. Or, for a more formal look in a dining room, I really love an upholstered accent wall. Courtney Stone, Sydney Murphy Design, (870) 863-6625, sydneymurphydesign.com

Turquoise Love

Olsen by Tilton Fenwick for Duralee 24 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

Marrakech by Highland Court

Seismic Amalfi by Kravet Contract


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Life

PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK

CEL EB R AT I N G YO U R L I FEST YL E

FALL FASHION MUST-HAVES

Spartina 449 “Ellis” square phone wallet Full Moon, Little Rock, (501) 663-4367, thefullmoonlittlerock.com Steven Alan sunglasses BEIGE, Little Rock, (501) 904-2994, beigelr.com Zenzii gold geometric bracelet Accessory Gallery, Hot Springs, (501) 321-9168

Turn to page 37 for the complete fall fashion stylebook.

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 27


Life/Happenings HEAR IT. SEE IT. EXPERIENCE IT.

Events From Around The Natural State

2 festivals, ONE WEEKEND OKTOBERFEST AND STORYFEST OCTOBER 9 & 10 • FAIRFIELD BAY

VINTAGE MARKET DAYS OCTOBER 9-11 • BENTONVILLE

Featured in Country Living as one of the “7 Flea Markets and Barn Sales Not to Miss in 2015,” Vintage Market Days promises to be overflowing with furniture, home décor, original art, antiques, clothing, jewelry, and edible goodies. The open-air market will be held at the Benton County Fairgrounds. Purchase a Friday ticket to shop the early-bird sale, from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., before the weekend crowd arrives. Friday Early Buying Event pass, $10; General admission, $5. Once purchased, tickets are good for the remainder of the show. nwarkansas.vintagemarketdays.com

22ND ANNUAL KOMEN ARKANSAS RACE FOR THE CURE OCTOBER 10 • LITTLE ROCK

Lace-up your running shoes for a good cause! This Saturday-morning, downtown 5K is a local favorite for runners, walkers, and anyone who wants to support, encourage, and cheer on individuals who are fighting breast cancer. 75% of the net proceeds raised stays in Arkansas to fund breast cancer education, screening and treatment grants; the remaining 25% goes directly to fund treatment and cure research at the national level. Sign up for the race and find more information on their website. (501) 202-4399, komenarkansas.org

28 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

5th Annual Pooches & Pumpkins OCTOBER 17 • LITTLE ROCK

Grab your best friend—man’s best friend, that is—and head to The Good Earth Garden Center on Highway 10 for a day of fall fun. The garden center will host a pet costume contest, provide free hot dogs, popcorn, and beverages, offer designated fall-themed areas for family photos, and have live music. Plus, all kids dressed in a costume will receive a free small pumpkin. Events will be held from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Join the event on Facebook to stay up-todate on all the activities. (501) 8684666, thegoodearthgarden.com

PHOTOGRAPHY: COURTESY OF THE GOOD EARTH GARDEN CENTER

The Fairfield Bay Conference and Visitor Center will be the site of this first-ever combined festival weekend. Drawing on a desire to bring back the area’s traditional OktoberFest event, officials decided to couple it with StoryFest to create one big, weekend-long extravaganza. StoryFest, which is touted as a celebration of professional storytelling, will be held in two sessions, 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., on Saturday. Each session will feature tales from Sean Buvala and Minton Sparks, who will be accompanied by guitarist John Johnson. StoryFest tickets are $10 in advance or $15 at the door. One ticket is good for both performances. OktoberFest activities will take place on both Friday and Saturday. This traditional German festival will include a German Biergarten—serving classic German fare such as brats, sauerbraten with spaetzle, and sauerkraut—as well as arts and crafts booths, live music, a motorcycle rally, a Volkswagen show, and more. Find a full schedule and more information on the website. (501) 884-4202, FairfieldBayStartsToday.com/Oktoberfest


Life/Seasonal

welcome to

fall! PREPARE YOUR PORCH FOR AUTUMN CELEBRATIONS WITH IDEAS AND ADVICE FROM THREE LOCAL DESIGNERS

P H O T O G R A P H Y: R E T T P E E K

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 29


CHEERFUL, WARM & ECLECTIC DESIGNER: K AT H R Y N J . L E M A S T E R Owner and Principal Designer at Kathryn J. LeMaster Art & Design

Her Fall Décor Philosophy:

Fall is my absolute favorite time of the year! There’s just enough of a crisp chill in the air that I think spaces should feel extra warm and inviting. Your décor for this season should welcome everyone with comfort—like a big hug! My favorite way to achieve this vibe is to add some handmade elements.

What She Did:

I created burlap ribbon wraps for the pumpkins and made a burlap-and-twine, pennant-like banner; this adds the handmade touch I love for fall. I accessorized with Kantha quilts and pillows that were handmade from recycled Indian saris and added rugs to “warm up” the floors—just as you would inside your home. I also added a ton of pumpkins because they are so iconic of the season and seem to say “fall is here.”

Handmade Elements

How This Look Matches Her Everyday Style:

I think the common denominator between my everyday style and seasonal style is livability. My look is always inviting, never too perfect, and there’s usually a playful touch of whimsy.

Special thanks to Arkansas Yoga Collective (arkansasyogacollective.com) for use of their Kantha quilts and pillows and Cynthia East Fabrics (cynthiaeastfabrics.com) for use of the area rugs. Learn more about Kathryn and see her work at kathrynjlemaster.com. 30 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


COZY, SIMPLE & BUDGET-FRIENDLY DESIGNER: CARA HAZLEWOOD Principal broker and realtor with The Property Group and DIY and home blogger at "Live the Home Life"

Her Fall Décor Philosophy:

Life is busy, and while I love to decorate for every season, I need my décor choices to be relevant for more than a week or two. Fall decorations that can easily transition into holiday or winter décor are my favorite finds.

What She Did:

Painted Gourds

As a DIY and home blogger, I love having the opportunity to inspire others to mold their surroundings into a space that they can be proud of—no matter what the budget may be. I built a super-simple accent table from just a few 1- x 8-inch boards and used it to create a backdrop for the seating area. Next, I painted gourds in shades of white and pale blue for a colorful and playful take that’s a bit different than the season’s traditional colors. Ornamental kale plants and a rosemary topiary add a hint of green that’s natural and seasonally appropriate.

Fall Staple She Returns to Each Year:

Lanterns. They are so versatile and can be used year-round. I usually opt to either fill them with seasonal items, like the miniature white pumpkins I used here, or keep it simple with a pillar candle. Learn more about Cara and her style at livethehomelife.com

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 31


TRADITIONAL, FESTIVE & LAYERED DESIGNER: JANA H U NTER Owner and principal designer at Jana Hunter Interiors

Her Fall Décor Philosophy:

As the seasons change, so does the exterior of our home. During autumn, I like to introduce warmer tones along with traditional elements such as pumpkins, gourds, and garlands of fresh fall leaves to add a layer of warmth and comfort.

What She Did:

I absolutely love displaying cornstalks each year, and the four columns on our front porch provide the perfect backdrop. Bunches of Indian corn displayed on our front doors are a nod to my childhood and adding wheat tied with vibrant orange ribbon makes it my own. I also add tons of mums, pansies, ornamental cabbage, and garlands of fresh fall leaves to continue the natural, layered look. Learn more about Jana and view her work at janahunter.com.

Ornamental Cabbage

How She Keeps Her Autumn Entry Design Fresh Each Year:

The purple mums are a new addition to our fall décor this year. This fun pop of purple blends beautifully with the foliage of the ornamental cabbage. An unexpected color—mixed with your goto décor staples—can give you a refreshed feel from year to year.

32 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


Much like her personality, the interiors Jana Hunter creates are inviting, accessible, and personable. She strives to design traditional and transitional spaces with an authentic air. For Jana, designing is more than just a profession—it’s a passion. Jana Hunter Interiors | Little Rock, Arkansas | 501.690.2234 Visit the all-new janahunter.com! Launching September 20 Follow Jana Hunter Interiors on Instagram @janahunterinteriors

design@sydneymurphydesign.com | 870.866.6777 | www.sydneymurphydesign.com October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 33


Diners enjoy a cup of coffee and dessert at the marble counter at Elm St. Bakery.

PRODUCER Tiffany Adams PHOTOGRAPHY Karen E. Segrave 34 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


Life/Discover

discover EL DORADO A CHARMING SQUARE, A WALKABLE DOWNTOWN AREA, AND PLENTY OF CULTURE, MUSIC, AND ART MAKE FOR LARGE LIVING IN THIS SMALL TOWN

EATS & SWEETS Ask any local where you should grab breakfast and “Spudnuts” (810 West Faulkner Street, 870-863-9914) is sure to be the first response. The iconic, no-frills doughnut shop has a monopoly on morning pastries, and it’s easy to see why. The locals are right about the taste; we suggest ordering a dozen, because you’re sure to want more than one. Once part of a chain with hundreds of stores nationwide, the El Dorado location is one of few surviving shops and a true landmark in the city. If you’re the type that longs for a gourmet coffee to get you going in the morning, head to Elm St. Bakery & Coffee Bar (116 East Elm Street, 870-881-8844), which is located on the town square in what is known as the Garrett Building. This property

was used as a post office until 1921, at which time it became occupied by Hall’s Pharmacy. Today, you can enjoy a flavored coffee at their historic marble soda-fountain counter and admire the 110-year-old stamped metal ceiling tiles and mahogany cabinetry. This is also a popular midday lunch stop, where you’ll want to grab one of their “super sweet baked goods” to save for an afternoon snack. If you’re in town for a weeknight dinner, try Fay Ray’s (110 East Elm Street, 870-863-4000, fayrays.com). Also located on the square—and a few doors down from Elm St. Bakery—Fayray’s is a comfortable spot for a business dinner, gathering with friends, or a date night. You’ll find staples such as brined pork chops and traditional steaks alongside seafood selections, including

their signature Snapper Fayrays, on the menu. If your sweet tooth must be indulged after dinner, continue walking around the square until you reach El Dorado Creamery (106 West Main Street, Suite 101, 870-875-1409). The frozen yogurt shop, which is a favorite of kids and adults alike, has every flavor and topping under the sun, allowing you to create the exact concoction your heart desires. We couldn’t resist the “Birthday Cake” yogurt topped with colorful candy sprinkles. LOCAL FINDS The design work of the full-service firm, Sydney Murphy Design (111 East Main Street, 870-863-6625, sydneymurphydesign.com), has graced the pages of At Home in Arkansas more than once; and impeccable china, October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 35


Spend the day walking from shop to shop along El Dorado’s town square.

serving pieces, and gift selections from the storefront of the same name never disappoint. On this visit, we were delighted to see their new line of Clementine Hunter-inspired pieces, including plates, platters, pillows, and tea towels—all of which feature reproductions of the work of the acclaimed contemporary American artist who captured the story of life at Melrose Plantation, where she worked and lived. Each piece featured in this line is handmade. If you’re looking to be pampered while in town, continue down Main Street to Spa on Main (209 East Main Street, 870863-7546, spaonmain.com). On the day we visited, we found the owner, Laura Barrow, testing a new Bare Minerals makeup product on store employee—and promising singer/songwriter—Emily Cole. While the array of services—from massages and manicures to facials and airbrush tanning—offered at the spa were tempting, we found there are two more facets of this conveniently located business that were equally appealing— the Zen Den yoga studio, which offers classes throughout the week, and the Refinery Dry Bar at Spa on Main, where you can get a blowout or styled look for a night out or a special occasion.

HAPPINESS WITH A CHERRY ON TOP!

THE WALMART MUSEUM

36 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

AREA ATTRACTIONS While there’s no shortage of music, art, or theatre in this town, one event takes center stage each October. MusicFest El Dorado 28 (Union Square, 870-862-4747, musicfesteldorado.com) will be held Friday, October 2 and Saturday, October 3. This year’s lineup features more than 30 acts including headliners 3 Doors Down, country superstar Dwight Yoakam, hip-hop duo Kid ‘n Play, and piano-legend Jason D. Williams. If you can’t make MusicFest, be sure to mark your calendar for the Mayhaw Festival (870-8629890, mayhawfestival.com), which will take place May 1 in 2016. With live music, 5K and 10K races, and—of course—an opportunity to purchase locally made Mayhaw jelly, it’s a day that’s not to be missed.


1 020 O A K ST R EET • D O W N T O W N C ONWAY • 5 0 1 . 5 0 4 . 6 8 8 0 • BELLA NDSWA R D. COM October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 37


2919 Kavanaugh Blvd. • Little Rock, AR 501.663.5251 shophauswerk.com

CELEBRATING

13 YEARS OF STYLE HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO US

PLEASE JOIN US

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1ST 10AM-6PM FOR CHAMPAGNE & CONFECTIONS 581 7 KAVANAUG H B LVD. LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 72207 501.614.7343

38 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


Life/Flavor

SWEET & SAVORY BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP An easy-to-make fall favorite, this warm and healthful dish is sure to be a hit at the dinner table PHOTOGRAPHY Matthew Martin PRODUCER Norma Edwards

INGREDIENTS 1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and chopped 1 medium yellow onion, diced 1 red bell pepper, chopped 1 medium Granny Smith apple, peeled and diced 3 ½ tablespoons olive oil Salt and pepper to taste 2 ½ cups chicken stock (may use more, depending on desired consistency) 4 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled (reserve one for topping) 1/4 cup goat cheese, crumbled (for topping) PREPARATION Preheat oven to 425°F. Cover a baking sheet with foil and spray with nonstick cooking spray. Place the butternut squash, onion, bell pepper, and apple in a bowl and toss with 2 ½ tablespoons of olive oil and salt and pepper. Arrange in a single layer on the baking sheet, and cook for 25 minutes or until tender. Heat a large skillet over mediumhigh heat. Add bacon and cook until crisp. Set aside. Heat the remaining tablespoon of olive oil in a large stockpot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add cooked vegetables and cook for 2 minutes, stirring continuously. Stir in chicken stock and then puree the entire mixture using an immersion blender. Remove the immersion blender and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until slightly thickened, about 5-10 minutes. If the soup is too thick, add more chicken stock as needed, until desired consistency is reached. Garnish with goat cheese and additional bacon; serve immediately. October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 39


o u r fav o r i t e l o o k s f o r fa l l

2020 Central avenue • hot springs 501.321.9168 • 10-5 Mon - sat www.faCebook.CoM/shopag

j.duke & co.

j.duke & co. Located in the Pleasant Ridge Shopping Center, across from the Pleasant Ridge Mall

501.219.2040 • jdukeandco.com

40 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


BLAKEMAN’S FINE JEWELRY

Gumuchian “Nutmeg” three-row earrings and five-row ring in yellow gold with diamonds, Plevé mosaic bib necklace in yellow gold set with 2.00 carats of fancyshaped diamonds Blakeman’s Fine Jewelry, Rogers, (479) 845-0088, blakemansfinejewelry.com

Clothing shown here provided by Tulips

the

{NEW} romantics

A RETRO COLOR PALETTE COMBINES WITH CLASSIC SILHOUETTES AND BOLD EMBELLISHMENTS TO GIVE FALL’S NEWEST STYLES AN OLD-SCHOOL APPEAL P H O T O G R A P H Y: R E T T P E E K | S T Y L I N G : R O S E M A R Y H A L L M A R K | A R T D I R E C T I O N : N O R M A E D WA R D S HAIR AND MAKEUP: ANGEL A ALEX ANDER M O D E L S : K E L S E Y M Y E R S , S C U L P A G E N C Y; S A M U E L H E AT H , S C U L P A G E N C Y S H O T O N LO C AT I O N AT F E R N C L I F F C A M P & C O N F E R E N C E C E N T E R October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 41


GRAND ON OAK

Alberto Makali laser-cut suede cardigan and Lola and Sophie silk tank with JamesJeans “High Class Skinny” jean, G. Spinelli freshwater pearl necklace, G. Spinelli cameo necklace, and G. Spinelli cherry blossom bead bracelets with Lucchese “Shortie Mosaic” cowboy boot Grand on Oak, Conway, (501) 499-6436, grandonoak.com

42 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


TULIPS

Paul & Joe Sister collared crochet dress, Zenzii cocktail ring, and felt hat Tulips, Little Rock, (501) 614-7343, tulipsarkansas.com

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 43


COMPANIONS

Quinn leather and knit jacket over a Quinn blush blouse paired with Henry & Belle jeans, gold agate necklace, stone bead wrap necklace, Dolce Vita “Arlynn� bootie in Brandy Leather, and Monserat De Lucca silver clutch Companions, Little Rock, (501) 868-8484, companionsclothier.com

44 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


BAUMAN’S

Plaid shirt, sweater, wool hat and paisley tie, all by Luciano Barbera, shown with a Doriani cashmere jacket, and Peter Millar brown twill cotton pant and suede boot Baumans, Little Rock, (501) 227-8797, baumans.com

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 45


ACCESSORY GALLERY

Tribal Jeans cable-knit sweater with chain detail, LyssĂŠ ankle leggings, Aratta silk print shirt, Charleston Shoe Co. bootie, and Zenzii pewter bracelets Accessory Gallery, Hot Springs, (501) 321-9168

46 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


BEYOND COTTON

Miraclebody by Miraclesuit blue jeans paired with a Cynthia Ashby linen blazer, B. Aston bead necklace, bracelets, and multi-bead necklace with agate detail Beyond Cotton, Little Rock, (501) 221-9195, beyondcotton.com October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 47


BEIGE

Oskar the Label fleece vest, Rachel Zoe turtleneck and Rachel Comey laminated tweed skirt with a Paige Novick “Miranda” tassel necklace, Charmed Circle leather link bracelet, Jerome Dreyfuss felt handbag, and Emerson Fry “Sterling” mule BEIGE, Little Rock, (501) 904-2994, beigelr.com 48 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


BELL & SWARD

True Grit indigo check shirt with a Peter Millar quilted vest, Citizens of Humanity Man “Atticus” jeans, Johnston & Murphy brown leather belt and Trask “Brady” boot Bell & Sward, Conway, (501) 504-6880, bellandsward.com

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 49


BLAKEMAN’S FINE JEWELRY

Milano gold necklace, bracelet, and ring in yellow gold with pavé set diamonds paired with Roberto Coin link earrings Blakeman’s Fine Jewelry, Rogers, (479) 845-0088, blakemansfinejewelry.com Clothing shown here provided by BEIGE

50 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


J. DUKE & COMPANY

Vince chambray shirt and Empire wool coat with a Tallia knit scarf, AG “The Graduate” pant, and Martin Dingman leather belt J. Duke & Company, Little Rock, (501) 219-2040, jdukeandco.com October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 51


HAUS WERK

Origami crochet long vest with fringe and CP Shades chambray shirt, Big Star corduroy pants, Bed|Stü “Craven” boots, leather wrap bracelet, pendant necklace, and leather and opal necklace Haus Werk, Little Rock, (501) 663-5251, shophauswerk.com

52 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


M a d e - t o - M e a s u re av a i l a b l e B AUMANS 8 2 0 1 C a n t r e l l R o a d , L i t t l e R o c k , Te l . 5 0 1 . 2 2 7 . 8 7 9 7 , b a u m a n s . c o m

Fall is here and we've got looks you'll love.

14810 Cantrell Rd | Little Rock 501.868.8484 October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 53


find your own style

10700 N. RodNey PaRham | LittLe Rock, aR 72212 | (501) 221-9195 b e y o N d c ot to N . c o m

johnny was Downtown Conway | 1101 Oak St. | 501.499.6436 | GRANDONOAK.com 54 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


Home PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK

H OM ES WITH H ISTO RY

The dining room of Stoneshadow, a Magnolia home designed by architect Fay Jones and completed in 1970. See page 59 for the full story.

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 55


56 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


home

PORTRAIT OF A A C E N T U RY- O L D CO N WAY H O M E M A I N TA I N S I T S U N I Q U E C H A R M A S I T I S R E N OVAT E D TO M E E T T H E N E E D S O F A C R E AT I V E FA M I LY O F FO U R S T O R Y: A S H L E Y G I L L | P H O T O G R A P H Y: R E T T P E E K | S T Y L I N G : C H I P J O N E S

WHAT DO PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY and home building have in common? A lot, according to Lance Johnston, who engages in both pursuits with a spirit of passion and innovation. He, his wife Melissa, and their daughters Mary Dean (15) and Anne Ryan (13) live in a 1907 Queen Anne farmhouse right in the heart of Conway that Johnston has transformed into a timeless treasure. As a licensed contractor with a new building business called Reform Design + Build—a partnership with his friend Michael Harrison—Johnston sees the connections between his two professions clearly: “The philosophy behind the design + build business is exactly the same as the photography business—to create new-classic work that people will enjoy for generations.” BACK IN TIME The family relocated to the historic home, after living for 13 years in a dwelling the couple designed and built in west Conway and which they believed at the time would be their “forever home.” “We moved back into town as a lifestyle choice, more than anything,” Johnston says; “Our life is all in this area. We went from being 20 minutes away from everywhere to never going more than five minutes away for most everything we do. It’s a different lifestyle living downtown.” Initially, the couple had every intention of buying a downtown lot and erecting a new home with classic appeal. That was the plan, that is, until they had a first look inside this historic house; “We knew we couldn’t build a new house with this much character, even if money were no object,” Johnston says. Albert Lachowsky, an immigrant from Germany, built the farmhouse in 1907, and his family lived in the home for one hundred five years, until his daughter Agnes, the last living resident, passed away in 2012; that makes the Johnstons only the second owners of the property. “We saw these hundredyear-old hardwood floors and all of the other details this house has, and we knew we couldn’t recreate that feeling,” Johnston says. All of the original window and door locks were still intact, as well as the original window glass. The doorbell, which still works, is also original, and the claw-foot bathtub was relocated from the home’s only existing bathroom into the Johnstons’s new master bath addition. After purchasing the home, they embarked on a conscientious renovation that would preserve the house’s charm yet accommodate their space needs and provide the comforts of a modern home. October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 57


The wraparound pantry/butler’s pantry/laundry room allows the food preparation elements of the kitchen to stand alone, not obstructing the open living, cooking, and dining space with heavy cabinetry or visual clutter. A classic china cabinet, from Park Hill Collection, houses the family’s everyday tableware. The kitchen island has a sleek marble countertop and two turned legs, which give the impression of furniture rather than cabinetry. Facing page: The long, narrow dining table that now sits in the newly enclosed “dining porch” was an antique find that once served as a display table in a store. The wide opening between the dining space and the kitchen was created to be an ideal width to showcase the table.

There is not a single

ROOM OR, FOR THAT MATTER, A SINGLE SQUARE INCH OF THIS HOUSE THAT WE DON’T USE EVERY DAY—NO WASTED SPACE ANYWHERE. ­—LANCE JOHNSTON

58 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


A GRACEFUL EVOLUTION The most integral change the Johnstons made was to open up the home’s three, small, primary living areas to combine them into a single space that is now a continuous kitchen and living room. Johnston describes his goal of creating a design that could offer the practicality of an open-plan house, without sacrificing authenticity to the home’s character: “Dinner time is such a big part of our day. We wanted to be able to eat and visit and cook—to be in the living room and the kitchen and still be together.” However, it was a priority of Johnston's to keep the look very traditional, even as he removed the adjoining walls. The former kitchen is now a wraparound pantry/butler’s pantry/laundry room that also houses the refrigerator. “Not having any kitchen cabinets in our living space makes it feel more like the kitchen is in the living room—rather than feeling like the living room is in the kitchen,” Johnston says. He also enclosed an existing back porch and converted it into a long, narrow dining room. A 12-foot cased opening between the kitchen and “dining porch,” in addition to a short step down, defines the zones. “Sure, we could have taken all the walls out, but even just having these suggestions of rooms helps divide the space and maintain the look of an older home,” he notes. WASTE NOT, WANT NOT Though the Johnstons added (through additions and enclosures) 1,400 square feet to the original 1,600 square-foot footprint of the home, paring down possessions and streamlining the design was a necessity, when moving from their former home, which was 4,500 square feet. “In that house, we had four rooms we never went in. That bothered me. One of my favorite things about this house is that there is not a single room or, for that matter, a single square inch of this house that we don’t use every day—no wasted space anywhere. That feels responsible to me,” Johnston says. In addition to the master bath and dining room, a large studio with an office loft was annexed to the house; it serves as a home base for Johnston’s portrait photography business. A generous, enclosed breezeway also provides closet storage, of which the home originally had very little. Other responsible measures—including cutting-edge insulation, LED lights, and a tankless water heater—reduce the home’s environmental impact, though Johnston says he doesn’t like to be pigeonholed as a “green” builder. “I prefer to think of it as sensible-green, more than anything,” he says. “The greenest thing you can do is just use the stuff you have. I’m amazed at how many of the materials we’ve used are recycled from the house itself or from architectural salvage yards.” What’s clear is that the family’s love for their new, old home is closely tied to the design ethic that led them to make the choices they’ve made in its renovation. Johnston reflects: “It’s really that balance between a timeless and classic aesthetic and the way we live our lives that has driven every design decision we’ve made.” October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 59


60 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


Lance's

Tips for

Preserving Character in a

HISTORIC HOME PAY ATTENTION TO SCALE

To keep an old home’s charm intact, it’s essential to keep the scale authentic to what’s typical for that time period. Door openings were traditionally narrower, ceilings higher, and windows much more expansive. Functional elements, like fireplaces, should also adhere to traditional proportions: smaller mantels and surrounds were common, whereas fireboxes were much larger.

DIG THE DETAILS

“Small” things—like window and door hardware, light fixtures, and switches—can make a big difference. Restore and use any original items you can, if you are renovating an old home, or find sources for distinctive accents. You’ll find unique, historic trim, doors, and cabinets at architectural salvage yards, and—often—it can be a budget-friendly alternative to buying new.

CHOOSE APPROPRIATE MATERIALS

To achieve an authentic look, when making additions or updates, pay close attention to the textures you choose. Original glass in windows, with its rippling and distortions, adds lots of charm. Shiplap, beadboard, or board-and-batten paneling add classic architectural interest. In kitchens and bathrooms, marble, soapstone, and butcher block give countertops a more traditional feel.

CREATE NATURAL ADDITIONS

In older homes, you’ll usually find more—and much smaller—rooms, which aren’t necessarily very functional for the way we live today. Opening walls but leaving cased openings can give the suggestion of separate rooms yet still give a home a much larger feel. When renovating an older home, consider enclosing an existing porch rather than making a large addition; oftentimes it can add much-needed space in a way that feels more natural. Think about how your family will live in the space, how you’ll entertain, and then create spaces that will encourage togetherness.

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 61


Clockwise from top left: Twelve-foot ceilings and generous windows create an open and bright atmosphere in the master bedroom. The master bath addition now houses the home’s original claw-foot bathtub alongside a custom, marble-topped, dual vanity. The home’s existing garage was removed, and in its place now stands Johnston’s new office and studio space, which also serves as an all-purpose room during teen sleepovers and Razorback games. With their unique proportions, the exterior doors to the addition were finds at architectural salvage yards. 62 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

Design Resources Contractor and kitchen design Reform Design + Build, Conway, (501) 499-2814, reformdesignbuild.com Appliances Metro Appliances & More, Jonesboro, (870) 933-7800, North Little Rock, (501) 758-1988, Springdale, (479) 750-2200, metroappliancesandmore.com Art Heather Mainord, Local Colour Gallery, Little Rock, (501) 265-0422, localcolourgallery.com Cabinetry Elms-Clowers Construction Inc., Conway, (501) 329-8600, elmsclowers.com Countertops Moix Marbleworks, Inc., Conway, (501) 329-4883 Fireplace Cullum Brothers Masonry, Conway, (501) 514-1843 Fixtures Conway Winnelson, Conway, (501) 329-7172 Floral Tipton Hurst, locations throughout central Arkansas, (501) 666-3333, tiptonhurst.com Flooring Ozark Hardwood Flooring, Marshall, (870) 448-5775, ozarkhardwoodfloors.com Furniture Jennifer's Antiques, Conway, (501) 765-1311; Park Hill Home, Conway, (501) 358-3537, parkhillcollection.com; White Goat, Conway, (501) 504-6643, Little Rock, (501) 603-9460, whitegoatstyle.com Paint Benjamin Moore, locations statewide, benjaminmoore.com; Sherwin-Williams, locations statewide, sherwin-williams.com Painting and tile Reform Design + Build, Conway, (501) 499-2814, reformdesignbuild.com Rugs White Goat, Conway, (501) 504-6643, Little Rock, (501) 603-9460, whitegoatstyle.com


living

LEGEND O N T H E O U T S K I R T S O F M AG N O L I A , A H O M E D E S I G N E D BY FA M E D A R K A N S A S A R C H I T EC T FAY J O N E S I S C E L E B R AT E D FO R I T S O R G A N I C B E AU T Y A N D I CO N I C D E S I G N

S T O R Y: T I F FA N Y A D A M S P H O T O G R A P H Y: R E T T P E E K ST YLING: CHIP JONES October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 63


64 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


NUMBER OF FAY JONES'S DESIGNS THAT HAVE BEEN BUILT

129

IT’S NOT EVERY DAY YOU STUMBLE UPON A HOME DESIGNED BY AN ARCHITECTURAL ICON,

especially when the structure is located in a heavily wooded area on the outskirts of a town with a population of fewer than 12,000 residents. For M. Bruce Woodward, happening upon such a dream home seemed to be in fate’s hand. “My family is from Magnolia, and I had known for years there was a Fay Jones house here but had never seen it,” he says. “A good friend and client of mine who is an attorney was going to do some depositions in Magnolia. She asked if I would go with her. We had some time to kill, so I said there’s a Fay Jones house on the other edge of town—let’s go see if we can find it. I drove up to it and there was this big ‘For Sale’ sign. So it was really kind of weird…I really felt like it was meant to be,” Woodward says of the experience. WORTH THE WAIT Though it had seemed too good to be true, what Woodward and his friend saw on their day trip in 2010 proved to be beyond expectation, so he began to dig deeper to learn more about the property. Turns out he wasn’t the only one who waited a substantial amount of time to see the home. The original owners, Janice and James Polk, waited a year from the date of their initial request to be able to talk with Jones—who by this time had been heavily influenced by the work of his friend and mentor Frank Lloyd Wright—about the possibility of building the home. After that, the project took four years to design and construct before its completion in 1970. The Polks were the only owners before Woodward purchased the house and surrounding property, which now serves as a country home for the Little Rock resident. BLURRING THE LINES In line with Jones’s style of blending interiors and exteriors by using an uninterrupted flow of materials in the two spaces, Woodward notes that the home has “a sense of continuity throughout the entire structure.” He goes on to say, “[All of Jones’s houses] were designed to go inside and outside, so the lines between the spaces are completely blurred and as much attention is given to the exterior space as the interior. That’s one thing that really makes the houses special to me.” Stone flooring runs from the home’s exterior walkways and pool surround into the home’s interior borders and into the sun trellis that is situated along the façade. “Because the sun trellis continues indoors, this continuation is a trick for the eye,” Woodward adds. A guesthouse, which sits at the south end of the home, has a walkway that leads to the sun trellis, giving October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 65


NUMBER OF RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, EDUCATIONAL, RELIGIOUS, AND OUTDOOR PROJECTS (OF WHICH WE KNOW) JONES DESIGNED IN HIS LIFETIME

218 Clockwise from left: A small sitting room and kitchenette services visitors staying in the guesthouse. A separate, cozy seating nook is positioned behind the main house's living room fireplace. The millwork along the ceilings continues into the master bedroom, adding to the home’s continuous flow.

66 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


FAY JONES: THROUGH THE YEARS 1921 1954-1998

Euine Fay Jones is born in Pine Bluff Practiced architecture in a small studio in Fayetteville

1966

Named the first chair of the architecture department at the University of Arkansas

1974

Named the first dean of the new school of architecture at the University of Arkansas

2000

Recognized by the American Institute of Architects as “one of the ten most influential architects of the twentieth century.”

2004 2009

Jones passes away at his home in Fayetteville The University of Arkansas School of Architecture is named after Jones Source: The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture

guests a way to enter the home without coming through the master bedroom (which is positioned next to the guest house). The interesting play of light and shade created by the home’s clerestory—which serves as a natural light source—is most evident in the living room. The feature led Woodward to name the home Stoneshadow. “Some of [Jones’s] houses had names from the getgo and some didn’t. With the stonework and the shadowing in the house, we thought that was fitting, and I think this went with his thinking and philosophy,” Woodward says. HISTORICAL FEATURES AND FURNISHINGS “A big thing for Fay Jones was the fireplace. It’s the center of the space,” Woodward says of the architect’s signature approach. Stoneshadow is no different; a large fireplace is centrally installed in the living room and can be seen from a number of vantage points and nearby rooms. Woodward has also reviewed a number of the documents associated with the home’s construction to glean insights into the architect’s reasoning. “In Jones’s notes, it said [the Polks] liked exposed beams. The ones used in the home are steel and have been covered with wood; so [the house] is steel-beam construction. This allows for the expanse [of the elongated structure]. They also

liked low-to-high, and they were big on having a sunken space,” Woodward adds. This fondness for sunken space is evidenced in the home’s main living area, which is terraced down from the rest of the floor plan. In addition to architectural details, Jones was equally thoughtful when it came to flourishes and functional pieces. Wood shavings in a scrollwork-like shape are encased in glass windows and door openings throughout the house (see the image above); built-in storage lines the hallways in an artistic yet practical manner; and light fixtures that echo the millwork seen on the walls and ceilings illuminate the rooms. In furnishing the home, Woodward brought in pieces that fit perfectly with the time period and style of the house. He consulted with local antique and vintage shops, and also incorporated a number of items he had amassed following a downsize move to a new Little Rock residence. In a nod to his love for the state, he filled the walls with works by Arkansas artists, including Ann Downs who is from Magnolia. The dining room furniture was left by the original owners, and Woodward kept it intact, thus honoring their style. While every detail of the home is intentional, perhaps what is most inspiring is Woodward’s intentional commitment to preserving the structure and its history for generations to come. October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 67


The back of the home was intentionally plotted to overlook a small pond and rolling landscape. A leaf-shaped pool mimics the environment and adds to the home’s organic appeal.

NUMBER OF FAY JONES'S STRUCTURES BUILT IN ARKANSAS

84

Design Resources Interior design M. Bruce Woodward, M. Bruce Woodward Interiors and Design, Little Rock and Magnolia, (501) 681-4630 Antiques Roy Dudley, Little Rock, (501) 666-5856, roydudleyestatesales.com Carpet Magnolia Carpet One Floor & Home, Magnolia, (888) 609-3056, magnoliacarpetonemagnolia.com Florals Becky Clement, Inspired by Nature, Keo, (501) 945-7226 Furniture—sofa Bassett Furniture, Little Rock, (501) 217-3860, littlerock.bassettfurniture.com Furniture—vintage Sweet Home Furnishings/Clement, Little Rock, (501) 296-9198, sweethomefurnishings.net Lamps The Shade Above, Little Rock, (501) 374-3555, theshadeabove.com Roof WDR Builders, Inc., Magnolia, (870) 234-2121 68 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


Great Smiles

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An “Arkansas DeltaMade” product Catering To You, Little Rock • Mack’s Prairie Wings, Stuttgart • Flowers and Home, Bryant & Hot Springs • Shepherd’s Florist, Pine Bluff • The Lower Deck, Jonesboro • Dean’s Pharmacy, Marianna • Handworks, Helena • Antique Rose, Forest City • Julie Shaw in Fabulous Finds, Little Rock • Gallery Central, Hot Springs • New Leaf Florist, Dewitt • Panache/Aromatique Gift Gallery, Heber Springs • The Winthrop Rockefeller Institute Gift Shop, Petit Jean Mountain Sowell’s Furniture, Searcy • Clinton Museum Store, Little Rock

Hwy 65S • Dumas, AR • 870-382-5277 www.millersmudmill.com October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 69


a rt. a n t i q u e s . i n t e r i o r s .

Marshall RiveRdale

1509 R e b s a m e n P a R k R o a d 501.663.1828

70 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

CleMents Pleasant Ridge

11525 C a n t R e l l R o a d , s u i t e 105 501.954.7900


The Art & Antiques

GUIDE

The hunt for a one-of-a-kind find can be as much fun as displaying the piece in your home. An oil from a local artist, a desk from the 1800s, a piece of ornate silver, or a side table with a history all its own—whatever you’re searching for there’s no shortage of shops and purveyors to assist you. Turn the page for our exclusive guidebook to the state’s best selections.

Original Zac Woodiel painting: acrylic and oil on wood in a 19th-century carved wood frame. Providence Design, Little Rock, (501) 372-1886, providenceltddesign.com

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 71


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8 1// Eastlake Victorian burl-walnut wardrobe, circa 1878-1890. Morris Antiques, Keo, (501) 842-3531, morrisantiques.com 2// Painting of a ship on stormy waters with ornate gold frame. Morris Antiques, Keo, (501) 842-3531, morrisantiques.com 3// 19th-century needlepoint-tapestry-covered canapé. Marshall Clements, Little Rock, (501) 663-1828, West Little Rock, (501) 954-7900, marshallclements.com 4// Clear demijohn bottle. French Quarters, Fayetteville, (479) 443-3355, french-quarters.com 5// Louis XV side table with antique Aubusson top. French Quarters, Fayetteville, (479) 443-3355, french-quarters.com 6// 19th-century Louis XVI-style gilt wood banquette with curved arms, circa 1860. French Metro Antiques, Fayetteville, (479) 587-0804, frenchmetro.com 7// Framed oil painting entitled “Arkansas Hay Bales” by Martin Peerson of Fort Smith. Art on the Green, Conway, (501) 205-1922, artonthegreen.net 8// 19th-century bronze candlesticks. Providence Design, Little Rock, (501) 372-1886, providenceltddesign.com 9// American, walnut pierced-carved chair, circa 1920. Morris Antiques, Keo, (501) 842-3531, morrisantiques.com

72 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


ANTIQUES

6 TIPS FOR

SHOPPING AN ANTIQUE OR VINTAGE SHOW

A WORD ON INVESTMENT PIECES AND VALUE A good antique will always hold its value and even appreciate if it is truly an “investment” purchase. An investment antique will have clues to determine its worthiness. For instance, always note the basic construction: there should be obvious, hand-made joinings, pegs, and possibly square, hand-forged nails or saw-tooth strips of wood used for shelving which would most likely be hand-hewn. Find a good antique dealer you can trust and learn even more regarding its history to determine if it’s a worthy investment for you.

QUESTIONS TO ASK TO DETERMINE VALUE: 1// Where did it come from (i.e., what region specifically)?

2// What woods were used in construction? 3// What is an approximation of when, as the French say, the antique was “born”? 4// Note escutcheons and hinges, if there are any on the piece, and pull out a drawer to examine it closely; is it dovetailed, or obviously joined? These can be age and craftsmanship clues, which can help determine value. —Chris Bronson, Owner, French Quarters

1

The early bird gets the worm! Arrive a little before the show opens to be one of the first in line so you don’t miss out on the best finds.

2

Bring a shopping tote or cart with some packing material so you won’t have to carry multiple bags.

3

Have a small notebook on-hand or use your phone to record the booths where you purchase items. You can leave your larger items with exhibitors and come back later so your hands are always free, and you don’t have to make multiple trips to your vehicle.

4 5 6

Wear comfortable shoes. This is obvious but so important. You’ll most likely spend at least a couple of hours at an antique show to see everything, so you need to be comfortable! Bring cash. Cash is king when it comes to getting the best price for your finds. Download the eBay app on your phone. If you find an item that you or the exhibitor are unfamiliar with, you can try different search terms to learn more about the piece. You can also determine a little about the value of the item as well, but I wouldn’t suggest relying too heavily on the eBay selling price because condition, design, edition, shipping, and other characteristics may come into play that can skew the value of items.

HOW TO CARE FOR YOUR

ANTIQUE AND WOOD-CONSTRUCTION FURNITURE CLEANING: We recommended dusting with a soft cloth. Avoid using cleaners with silicone; over time these will cause a film-like build up on your furniture. If you want to use a cleaner, look for one that is silicone-free. SMALL SCRATCHES AND KNICKS: These are inevitable with normal wear and tear over time. I’ve found the best way to remedy this is with a furniture touchup marker. They come in a variety of tip sizes and colors, so you can match the width of the scratch and the wood color on your piece. Be sure to test the color on an area of the piece that is not highly visible, and keep a rag close by to wipe it away if it’s not a match. Many furniture stores and antique dealers have these markers in stock. I recommend keeping one on hand for a fast fix. LARGER SCRATCHES AND RESTORATION: Pieces with scratches that are deep into the woodgrain, that have a thick build-up or are cracked may need to be restored by a professional. We have been operating a full-service restoration and refinishing shop for almost 50 years, and I think we’ve seen it all! Many times people think a piece is too far gone to be saved, but we can match broken carvings, give a piece a new finish, and replace leather tops on desks and end tables. When we restore a piece, we do our best to make it ready for another hundred years. —Lewis Morris, Owner, Morris Antiques

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 73


Antiques: WHERE TO SHOP ANTIQUE ALLEY ARKANSAS ANTIQUE SHOW 505 East Oak Street, Conway, (501) 230-5728 antiquealleyarkansas.com Held at the Conway Expo Center, this show (which will take place the first weekend in November and three times in 2016) offers the opportunity to shop booths from more than 200 vendors. THE ANTIQUE CO. 1408 Rebsamen Park Road, Little Rock, (501) 666-0339 Direct importers of fine antiques from across the world and a go-to source for some of Arkansas’s most unique antiques. ANTIQUE WAREHOUSE OF ARKANSAS 9256 Highway 65 North, Botkinburg, (501) 745-5842 antiquewarehouse.com Shop 90,000 square feet of antique furniture, collectibles, and framed stained glass. BELLA RUSTINA VINTAGE MARKET 1 Stadium Drive, Little Rock bellarustina.com The concourse at War Memorial Stadium plays host to this new—and highly popular—show that is held in the spring and fall. The next market will be held March 11-13, 2016. BLUE GOOSE ANTIQUES 3660 North Front Street Suite 3, Fayetteville, (479) 443-2664 This new shop specializes in antiques, vintage wares, decorative paints, and gifts.

74 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

DEBI DAVIS INTERIOR DESIGN 2222 Cantrell Road, Little Rock, (501) 221-2032 danddinteriordesign.com A trusted source for European antiques and architectural fragments; the team can also reinvent any antique find to create a modern-day treasure. ELLEN GOLDEN FRENCH ANTIQUES 5701 Kavanaugh Boulevard, Little Rock, (501) 664-7746 You’ll find art, antiques, and decorative pieces at this beloved shop in the heart of the Heights neighborhood. FABULOUS FINDS ANTIQUE AND DECORATIVE MALL 2905 Cantrell Road, Little Rock, (501) 614-8181 fabulousfindsantiques.com Visit more than 40 thoughtfully curated booths with everything from silver and jadeite to armoires, chests, and serving pieces. FRENCH METRO ANTIQUES 200 West Dickson Street, Fayetteville, (479) 587-0804 frenchmetro.com One of Arkansas’s best sources for all things French. From large armoires to small collectibles, this quaint antique shop is a must-see. FRENCH QUARTERS 11 North Block Avenue, Fayetteville, (479) 443-3355 french-quarters.com Direct importers of fine French and European pieces from the 18th and 19th centuries. Shopping here is a fun experience with a definite French flair.

JENIFER’S ANTIQUES 1003 West Oak Street, Conway, (501) 764-1311 jenifersantiques.com From primitive and rustic to Victorian and mid-century pieces, the booths at this downtown shop are stocked with a variety of styles. KAHLER PAYNE ANTIQUES 700 North Van Buren, Little Rock, (501) 663-0608 kahlerpayne.com Shop a wide collection of vintage, estate, and antique pieces. MARSHALL CLEMENTS 1509 Rebsamen Park Road, Little Rock, (501) 663-1828 marshallclements.com An established central Arkansas shop known for impeccable quality pieces that will add character to any space. MORRIS ANTIQUES 50 Antique Way, Keo, (501) 842-3531 morrisantiques.com A true warehouse of antiqueand-vintage finds, featuring 60,000 square feet of French, English, and American furniture, decorative items, and collectibles. PAINTED TREE VINTAGE MARKET 24351 I-30, Bryant, (501) 205-1330 paintedtreevintage.com A vendor-supplied marketplace filled with decorative elements from antique to current-day.

PROVIDENCE DESIGN 2212 Cantrell Road, Little Rock, (501) 372-1886 providenceltddesign.com Specializing in French country style, this full-service design firm also offers an everevolving stock of inventory. ROY DUDLEY ESTATE SALES 3721 Cantrell Road, Little Rock, (501) 666-5856 roydudleyestatesales.com Known for amazing estate sales—often featuring prized and highly collectible pieces— in both homes and at their Design District warehouse. RUSTONIA ESTATE SALES AND CONSIGNMENTS 9809 West Markham Street, Little Rock, (501) 519-1555 rustoniaestatesales.com Offering estate sale and consignment pieces in a range of styles. CLEMENT. / SWEET HOME FURNISHINGS 1324 South Main Street, Little Rock, (501) 296-9198 sweethomefurnishings.net A distinctive mix of antique, vintage, and modern pieces for the home. TILLMAN’S FINE ANTIQUES AND ESTATE JEWELRY 118 Central Avenue, Hot Springs, (501) 624-4083 tillmansantiques. squarespace.com A Hot Springs staple featuring rare jewelry and collectibles. Fine European antiques, many with unique historical backgrounds make stopping here more than just a shopping experience.


The Best Selection of Fine Antiques & Decorative Items in Central Arkansas 2905 Cantrell Road Little Rock • 501-614-8181 fabulousfindsantiques.com

Come explore our store!

Over 40 dealers with items just for you!

Art on the Green

The Art Vortex for skilled artists and art lovers.

A

Representing artists including:

rt on the Green’s team delivers what you need when you need it. We will research and prepare client targeted presentations; find styles, and artists to fit your client needs; same day delivery and installation; with ten day approval.

Carolyn Baker Nina Ruth Baker Elizabeth Bogard Parilee Croft

We are open: Monday - Friday, 10 AM - 5 PM

Katrina Dolislager Lois Giorgis

Prefer a private show? Call us and we will open just for you.

Lorinda Gray Linda Henderson

Art on the Green Sells Art. Located in Littleton Park Conway, Arkansas

Judy Falkoff Linda Flake Jacquelyn Kaucher

Visit our website: artonthegreen.net

Denise Kimbrough Wendy Leonard Trey McCarley Martin Peerson’s “Peonies” 24” x 20”, 31” x 27” framed

AotG_AtHomeAd_20150910_01.indd 1

William McClanahan Bonnie McKay Mary Lynn Nelson Ava Jane Newell Sheila Parsons Martin Peerson Haley Proctor Emelene Russell Kelly Shipp Marty Smith Cody Sublett Mary Ann Stafford Patricia Wilkes

December 2015: C. Ford Riley

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 75

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1// Dutch salvaged, wooden doors with original iron inserts. Providence Design, Little Rock, (501) 372-1886, providenceltddesign.com 2// “Creation� by Buddy Whitlock. Howse, Bentonville, (479) 657-6211, Little Rock, (501) 725-4719, thehowse.com 3// Demilune entry piece with an 18th-century center section and custom-made top, base, and feet with a coordinating chipped Old World finish. Debi Davis Interior Design, Little Rock, (501) 221-2032, danddinteriordesign.com 4// Prayer bench. French Quarters, Fayetteville, (479) 443-3355, french-quarters.com 5// Large basket. Morris Antiques, Keo, (501) 842-3531, morrisantiques.com 6// Colorful cow painting by Lauren Meredith. White Goat, Conway, (501) 603-9460, Little Rock, (501) 504-6643, whitegoatstyle.com 7// Large wooden bench. Morris Antiques, Keo, (501) 842-3531, morrisantiques.com 8// Early 20th-century French portrait. Marshall Clements, Little Rock, (501) 663-1828, West Little Rock, (501) 954-7900, marshallclements.com 9// Original Peter Keil abstract painting. Providence Design, Little Rock, (501) 372-1886, providenceltddesign.com

76 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


ART A WORD ON LOCAL ART’S AESTHETIC VALUE AND CREATION Art is extremely personal. At Art on the Green, we always encourage our buyers to select pieces they love that they would want to pass on to friends and family. Our artists’ work is created from their hearts, not a copy of another’s work. Because our gallery has a diverse group of artists and because they don’t do “assembly line” art, anyone who visits can expect to browse a sampling of authentic and inspirational pieces that have been created over time. For example, we can’t expect William McClanahan’s work to be created in a day or a week. William will sometimes need a year for a single painting. That’s part of what makes it so brilliant and attractive to Arkansans who desire to own a piece of art created in the state. — Brenda McClain, Gallery Director, Art on the Green

4 TIPS FOR FRAMING

1

Choose a frame that enhances the piece of art and don’t worry about matching other frames or décor in your home.

2

Size matters. Consider using large mats with a 3- to 5-inch border whenever possible. It will help to pull the eye into the art and makes the art look important.

3

Keep it simple. Sleek and clean lines are on trend, and this helps show off your art. I like to use mats that are cream, white, or light colored. This makes your art very user-friendly if you change your mind on where you want to display it.

4

A lot of art now is painted on gallery wrap canvas. We have very simple, sleek floater frames that can showcase the piece and give it a finished look. These frames will also help to keep the canvas from bowing or warping during temperature changes.

THE DOS AND DON’TS OF STORING AND DISPLAYING ART

If you find you need to store a few favorite pieces away, or if you are moving from one home to another and will need to transport your art, keep these tips in mind: DON’T Expose your painting or other works of art to moisture and heat. This is especially not good for works on paper. It can cause warping of the wooden stretcher bars on canvas pieces. DO Wrap your works in a thin piece of plastic sheeting. DO Store works on paper (that are not mounted or framed) by laying them flat with paper or velum between the pieces. DON’T Store or—even prop—paintings in a front-to-back fashion. This can scratch and indent the paintings. Always store or lean them face-to-face or back-to-back. When you’re considering a place in your home to display artwork, keep these points in mind. DON’T Position the pieces where they will be exposed to direct UV light. It is not good for 2D art, such as paintings or works on paper. For example, I don’t recommend hanging art in a place where it will receive direct sunlight most of the day. DO Consider your composition. When I hang art in my gallery or in my own collections, I like to use abstracts as visual breaks between realism pieces. DO Frame works on paper by having them mounted on acid-free mat board and covered with a UV-protected glass DO Consider adding art lights that are either mounted to the piece or on tracts on the ceiling to illuminate the work. Recessed spotlights are also a great look. —Kyle Boswell, Owner, Boswell Mourot Fine Art

October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 77


Art: WHERE TO SHOP BOSWELL MOUROT FINE ART 5815 Kavanaugh Boulevard, Little Rock, (501) 664-0030 boswellmourot.com Featuring art by local, national, and international artists for the established or emerging collector. CANTRELL GALLERY 8206 Cantrell Road, Little Rock, (501) 224-1335 cantrellgallery.com Featuring art by over 30 established and emerging local/regional artists.

“The Women Gathered” by Delita Martin Courtesy of Boswell Mourot Fine Art

ALISON PARSONS FINE ART 802 Central Avenue, Hot Springs, (501) 625-3001 alisonparsons.com Showcasing works by Parsons featuring Hot Springs’s landmarks, flora, fauna, and abstract imagery as the subject. ART ON THE GREEN 1100 Bob Courtway, Suite 1, Conway, (501) 205-1922 artonthegreen.net An art gallery devoted to showcasing the works of internationally acclaimed artists in the heart of Conway.

78 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015

DRAWL SOUTHERN CONTEMPORARY ART 5208 Kavanaugh Boulevard, Suite 5, Little Rock, (501) 240-7446 drawlgallery.com Represents a selection of the best emerging and established artists from— and/or working in—the American South. GALLERY CENTRAL 800 Central Avenue, Hot Springs, (501) 318-4278 gallerycentralfineart.com Offering paintings, sculpture, and glass works from a number of Arkansas artists. GREG THOMPSON FINE ART 429 Main Street, North Little Rock, (501) 664-2787 gregthompsonfineart.com A gallery specializing in the genre of Southern regionalism and in the works of prestigious modern artists of the 20th Century.

JUSTUS FINE ART GALLERY 827 A Central Avenue, Hot Springs, (501) 321-2335 justusfineart.com Exhibiting a wide range of styles and media from the work of outstanding established and emerging artists. POOR RICHARD’S ART GALLERY 101 West Walnut, Rogers, (479) 636-0417 poorrichardsart.com An artist collective featuring original art and fine craft pieces. SARA HOWELL GALLERY 405 South Main Street, Jonesboro, (870) 935-6336 sarahowellgallery.net Offering glass, jewelry, paintings, and other works of art. THE SHOWROOM 2313 Cantrell Road, Little Rock, (501) 372-7373 theshowroom.us.com Providing art, mirrors, and custom framing to the central Arkansas area for over 29 years. WHITE GOAT 1008 Oak Street, Conway, (501) 504-6643 5624 R Street, Little Rock, (501) 603-9460 whitegoatstyle.com Custom art from local artists that appeals to almost any age. A colorful palette reigns throughout this boutique making their personally selected art feel right at home.


The

showroom 2313 Cantrell Road (by Cajuns Wharf)

Little Rock • 501-372-7373 Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. For all your art, mirror and framing needs.

“Welcome to my World” Artist: Sandy Hubler

Representing over 25 local artists. Dennis McCann, Mima’s Motel and Cafe 30” x 42”

Furniture restoration by Morris Antiques is available for your family heirlooms! Tues-Sat by appointment

Boswell Mourot Fine Art is a contemporary gallery with locations in Little Rock, Arkansas and Miami, Florida featuring works by local, national and international artists for the established and emerging collector.

{Est. 1967}

Antique Showroom Hours Saturday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Or by Appointment MorrisAntiques.coM • 50 Antique WAy • Keo, Ar • (501) 842-3531

5815 Kavanaugh Boulevard • Little Rock, AR 72207 (501) 664-0030 www.BoswellMourot.com

Named “One of the Best 200 Places to Shop in the South” by Southern Living

SHOWCASING 100+ DECORATORS, DESIGNERS, CRAFTSMEN & ARTISTS on I-30, three miles south of the little rock outlets, between bryant & little rock

501.205.1330 | OPEN DAILY: MON-SAT 10-6 & SUN 1-5

www.french-quarters.com 11 N. Block | Fayetteville | 479.443.3355 October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 79


STYLING: JANA HUNTER | PHOTOGRAPHY: RETT PEEK

End Notes

mum’s

the word On front porches around the state, garden chrysanthemums—available in a wide range of hues—often signal the arrival of fall holidays. Whether it’s delightful little trick-or-treaters dropping by for a handful of candy or loved ones gathering to celebrate a season of gratitude, the flowers not only greet guests but also serve as a reminder of autumn’s bounty.

80 At Home in Arkansas | October 2015


Your wardrobe fits. Shouldn’t your closet?

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the art of organization

©2015 Closet Factory. All rights reserved. October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 69


October 2015 | athomearkansas.com 69

At Home in Arkansas | October 2015  
At Home in Arkansas | October 2015