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Florida

December 2020

ROOFING A Publication of FRSA – Florida’s Association of Roofing Professionals

Does ASCE 7-16 Really Change Everything? Roofing Warranties – Key Features Significant Changes to Roofing Requirements in FBC 2020 Roofing Apprenticeship Program via Online Learning CRSA Wins Community Service S.T.A.R. Award


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28 | CRSA Wins Community Service S.T.A.R. Award

Contents 14 | Roofing Warranties – Key Features 18 | Does ASCE 7-16 Really Change Everything? 30 | Significant Changes to Roofing Requirements in FBC 2020 40 | Roofing Apprenticeship Program via Online Learning

FRSA-Florida Roofing Magazine Contacts: For advertising inquiries, contact: Kelsey O’Hearne at: kelsey@floridaroof.com (800) 767-3772 ext. 127 All feedback including Letters to the Editor and reprint permission requests (please include your full name, city and state) contact: Lisa Pate, Editor, at: lisapate@floridaroof.com (800) 767-3772 ext. 157 Florida Roofing Magazine, PO Box 4850 Winter Park, FL 32793-4850 View media kit at: www.floridaroof.com/ florida-roofing-magazine/

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ROOFING Available Online at www.floridaroof.com/florida-roofing-magazine/

December 2020

Any material submitted for publication in Florida Roofing becomes the property of the publication. Statements of fact and opinion are the responsibility of the author(s) alone and do not imply an opinion or endorsement on the part of the officers or the membership of FRSA. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without permission from the publisher. Florida Roofing (VOL. 5, NO. 12), December 2020, (ISSN 0191-4618) is published monthly by FRSA, 3855 N. Econlockhatchee Trl., Orlando, FL 32817. Periodicals Postage paid at Orlando, FL. POSTMASTER: Please send address corrections (form 3579) to Florida Roofing, PO Box 4850, Winter Park, FL 32793-4850.

www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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FRSA LEGAL COUNSEL Cotney Construction Law

Saving Your Business During a Bad Business Divorce Gabe Pinilla, Attorney, Cotney Construction Law Businesses break up for about as many reasons as personal relationships do. In addition to the negative emotions that surround the fallout of a broken personal relationship, as a business owner, you also have to contend with trying to salvage what you can of your business. If your business is still viable or can be saved, litigation over disputes relating to the business can often have a disastrous effect on your ability to continue operating after a lawsuit. One way to avoid this fate is to not wait until the dust settles to have the Court decide who controls the business and what happens to business assets. With the right circumstances and experienced legal counsel, a preliminary injunction can give your business the stability it needs to weather the storm of business divorce litigation.

The “What”

When the Court enters an Injunction Order, it is mandating that something specific happens or stops happening. Injunctive relief is considered an extraordinary remedy and, to be awarded such relief, you must make a very strong and specific showing — most importantly, that without an injunction, irreparable harm will occur. Both the Florida Rules of Civil Procedure and Florida cases set forth these strict requirements.

The “How”

Rule 1.610, Florida Rules of Civil Procedure set the procedural requirements for an injunction. The Rule states that an injunction can be issued with or without notice. To justify entry of an injunction without notice, the moving party must show that giving notice will accelerate the injury at issue or that the time required to notice a hearing would actually permit the threatened irreparable injury to occur. Procedurally, an injunction can only be entered on the basis of verified allegations, such as an affidavit. A bond is also required to secure any losses by the other side in the event the injunction is found to have been wrongfully entered. The amount of the bond is determined by the court on a case-by-case basis. The evidence advanced in support of the injunction must establish the following factors: (1) irreparable harm; (2) absence of an adequate legal remedy; (3) a substantial likelihood of success on the merits; and (4) that considerations of the public interest support the

entry of the injunction. A trial court decides whether to issue the temporary injunction based solely on the pleadings and verified allegations presented. “Irreparable Harm” and having “no remedy at law” essentially mean the same thing: an injury that cannot be fixed by money. When it comes to a business, this can take the form of losing “customer goodwill” – relationships are irreplaceable once lost; you can develop new ones, but not the same ones. Irreparable harm can also come from any number of other ills that lead to the business losing its ability to meaningfully exist and continue to do business. The loss of key employees or of customer relationships are some examples, but anything that could lead to the business folding could potentially qualify. Cases involving tax irregularities or criminal fraud events are particularly suitable for injunctions. If the bad acts continue, the business may be destroyed based on the legal risks. Certain Florida Statutes may also provide the specific substantive basis for injunctive relief. For example, Florida’s Deceptive and Unfair Trade Practices Act (FDUTPA), section 501.211(1), Florida Statutes, and Florida's Uniform Trade Secrets Act ('FTUSA'), section 688.003, Florida Statutes, both provide injunctive relief as a specific statutory remedy. You will still have to meet the four-factor test outlined above, and all procedural requirements of Rule 1.610 still apply. However, you can rely on these statutes, as well as Florida cases, to show entitlement to an injunction in the event of a statutory violation. Finally, common law claims such as tortious interference can also serve as the basis for entry of an injunction. As with the statutory claims for injunctive relief, establishing the likelihood of an actionable common law claim is not enough on its own. You will still have to meet the four-factor test and comply with Rule 1.610.

www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

5


The “Why� (For a Business Break-Up)

Entry of a preliminary injunction can be a powerful, even game-changing, event in litigation. In the context of a business divorce, a preliminary injunction can do any number of things, such as prohibiting certain parties from acting on behalf of the business, restricting access to bank accounts and business assets, limiting the sale of business assets and, perhaps most importantly, designating one party to manage the ongoing affairs of the business. Two business divorce cases I handled come to mind as great examples. In each case, we sought and obtained preliminary injunctions in favor of our clients. Obtaining the injunctions was a major turning point in each case and put our clients in a strong position. One of these cases settled quickly and very favorably for the client. The other handed complete control of the business to our client, who has been able to make a smooth transition into a new business platform as a result. With the right legal strategy, you can avoid the major pitfalls of a contentious business divorce and often save on the costs of years of litigation. At the same time, you can salvage your business or, at a minimum, put yourself in a position to transition smoothly

into your next venture. As a business person, you want control down to the end. By securing control of the business during the break-up, you have the best chance of steering the business divorce process in your favor.

FRM

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation. Gabriel "Gabe" Pinilla, Partner at Cotney Construction Law, is a seasoned, results-oriented business and construction law and litigation attorney. Cotney Construction Law is an advocate for the roofing industry and General Counsel of FRSA. For more information, visit www.cotneycl.com or call 866-303-5868.

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FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020


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FRSA LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL Chris Dawson

2020 Election Recap Counties. Senate Democrats were successful in defending Senate The 2020 election delivered all of the excitement, District 3, the sprawling intrigue and controversy that we expected from the North Florida Senate Presidential contest; from the top of the ballot all the District anchored by Leon way down to proposed Florida constitutional amendCounty. In that contest, ments at the bottom. A full week after the election, Representative Loranne ballots continued to be counted in numerous states Ausley (D – Tallahassee) around the country and in Florida’s very own Senate District 37, where an automatic recount was triggered defeated Republican Marva Preston despite a strong due to the very narrow margin between votes for incumbent Democratic Senator Jose Javier Rodriguez (D Republican push to flip – Miami) and challenger Republican Ileana Garcia. With this seat currently held by (most of) the political dust settled, let’s review the ma- term-limited Senator Bill Montford (D – Tallahassee). jor outcomes from this year’s contentious election. Lastly, Senate Republicans are looking to add to their majority in the Florida Republicans Gain in the Florida House of Senate with a flip of Senate District 37, currently Representatives held by incumbent Senator Jose Javier Rodriguez In the Florida House, the Republican majority grew its (D – Miami). Rodriguez’s bid for re-election was met by advantage over Democrats by picking up an additionstrong – and somewhat unexpected – resistance from al five seats. Headed into the 2021 regular session, Republicans now enjoy an advantage of 83 to 37 over the Senate Republicans who drafted Ileana Garcia for the Democrats. Most notably, House Republicans were the effort. The ongoing recount for this race will yield a successful in flipping three seats, ousting Democratic winner by a razor thin margin. incumbents seeking re-election. Republican Linda Amendment 2 to Raise Florida’s Minimum Chaney defeated Representative Jennifer Webb Wage Narrowly Passes (D – Gulfport) in Pinellas County’s House District 69. Despite a strong opposition campaign by Florida’s Republican Dana Trabulsy unseated Representative business community – including the construction Delores Hogan-Johnson (D – Fort Pierce) in St. Lucie industry – Amendment 2 just barely reached the 60 County’s House District 84. Lastly, Republican chalpercent approval threshold for passage. The measure lenger Tom Fabricio toppled Representative Cindy garnered 60.8 percent support statewide and now Polo (D – Miramar) in House District 103, which heads to the Florida Legislature for implementation. encompasses parts of Broward and Miami-Dade The Amendment will gradually raise the minimum Counties. wage for millions of Florida workers to $15 per hour by 2026. Senate Republicans Fend Off Democratic

Winners, Losers and Outcomes of Florida’s General Election

Challengers

The 2020 contest for control of the Florida Senate was an epic battle with leadership of the chamber on the line. In the end, Republicans fended off Democratic challengers in the most hotly contested seats to maintain their current 23-18 majority and, pending the final outcome of the Senate District 37 recount, they may add to their advantage. Former Representative Jason Brodeur (R – Sanford) defeated attorney Patricia Sigman, a Democrat from Altamonte Springs, in Senate District 9 encompassing all of Seminole and parts of Volusia Counties. Representative Ana Maria Rodrigues (R – Doral) topped Representative Javier Fernandez (D – Miami) in Senate District 39, encompassing all of Monroe and parts of Miami-Dade 8

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020

A Smooth Election with Record Voter Turnout

In addition to the outcomes above, the 2020 election will be remembered due to the sky-high voter turnout. With all precincts counted, an astounding 11,118,926 Floridians cast ballots this year, representing a 76.99 percent voter turnout statewide. Further, Florida delivered results on time and without major incident on election night in stark contrast to numerous states around the country who continued to count votes many days after Election Tuesday. Perhaps a silver lining from the 2020 election is the end of Florida’s hanging chad stigma.

FRM


Industry Updates Stephanie Daniels Promoted to National Director of Business Development for Atlas Roofing Corporation’s Shingles & Underlayments Division

Atlas Roofing Corporation is proud to announce the promotion of Stephanie Daniels to National Director of Business Development for the Shingles and Underlayments Division. In this newly created strategic national role, Daniels will oversee product development, SKU rationalization and accessory product growth and will lead a crossdepartment committee focused on innovation, product management and operational efficiencies. She will take on the additional responsibility of leading the growth and evolution of Atlas Roofing’s professional contractor and loyalty programs. Daniels joined Atlas in 2006 as a Territory Sales Representative in Tennessee. In 2007, she relocated to Orlando, Fla., where she not only grew Atlas Roofing’s business in the state but built a viable sales region as she rose in the ranks as District Sales Manager. As Sales Director for the Southeastern US (her most recent role), she and her team earned multiple internal accolades for sales performance, including

10

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020

2017 Region of the Year. “Stephanie has hired and mentored many of our rising leaders and she’s built a great sales team over the past decade,” says Stan Bastek, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Atlas. “The credibility with distribution in the Southeast has never been better and the future is bright as Stephanie looks to pass the sales baton and take on a new challenge.” With Daniels’ departure from sales, the company will be reorganizing its sales regions, creating a North and South region, led by Sales Directors Darren Skaggs and Kevin Wilkie, respectively. Daniels’ position officially begins January 1, 2021. In the interim, she will be assisting Skaggs and Wilkie with a smooth transition in her region as well as working on prioritizing projects and goals for her new department.

Aaron R. Phillips Named ARMA’s New Vice President of Technical Services The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has named Aaron R. Phillips as its new Vice President of Technical Services, effective November 1, 2020. As Vice President of Technical Services, Phillips will serve as ARMA’s primary technical voice, assuring that asphalt roofing is


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accurately, equitably and appropriately represented in all scientific and technical discussions about residential and commercial roofing applications. He will manage all of ARMA’s technical-related activities and will also serve as the association’s technical liaison to organizations involved in the development of building standards. “Aaron has been involved with ARMA as a volunteer for more than 25 years and we are pleased to bring him fully onboard with the association in this role,” said Reed Hitchcock, ARMA’s Executive Vice President. “His expertise and comprehensive knowledge related to the technical aspects of the roofing industry will make him a valuable asset to ARMA.” Phillips was previously the Corporate Director of Technical Services at TAMKO Building Products and was employed by TAMKO throughout his career in the roofing industry. He spent 17 years in the research and development department before transitioning in 2005 to the technical services group to focus on technical support of all TAMKO product lines. Phillips has also served as the chair of ARMA’s Codes Steering Group.

CFS Roofing Welcomes Jonathan Wheeler as Controller

CFS Roofing is pleased to announce the addition of Jonathan Wheeler as Controller. Wheeler brings more than 10 years of financial accounting and controller experience to the CFS Roofing team.

“We are excited to have Jonathan join CFS Roofing. He complements our goals for continued growth and expansion and we believe his reputation for execution and achieving results makes him the right choice to lead our financial strategy,” said David Crowther, President of CFS Roofing. Prior to joining CFS Roofing, he served as Controller and HR Director at an industry-leading disaster relief firm in Southwest Florida. “Jonathan’s experience and expertise will be a great benefit for CFS Roofing and our plans for growth,” says Tammy Hall, Director of Marketing. “He’s also an avid volunteer, which fits right into our company’s community philosophy.” Wheeler earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Finance from Florida Gulf Coast University. He and his wife reside in Babcock Ranch.

FRSA Member and Roofing Contractor Paul Alfrey Elected as Mayor for City of Melbourne

With the backing of FRSA Members Trent Cotney and Cotney Construction PAC, Phillip Lane, Kevin Delaney and several other contractors, Paul Alfrey, Alfrey Roofing Inc., Melbourne, has won a four-person race for Mayor of the City of Melbourne, Fla. Alfrey currently serves as Melbourne Vice Mayor and District 5 Council Member and has worked to bring online building permits to the City of Melbourne. He was sworn in on November 24 for a four-year term.

FRM

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For more information, contact FRSA at 800-767-3772 ext. 127 12

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020


Lower Workers’ Comp Rates The Florida Office of Insurance Regulation (OIR) has announced lower workers’ comp rates by 10 percent for roofing and 6.6 percent overall. Rates will go into effect on January 1, 2021 or whenever your workers’ comp policy renews in 2021. Looking for workers’

comp insurance with exceptional customer service, a drug free workplace program and the potential for dividends? Call 800-767-3772 ext. 206 and speak with a representative from the FRSA Self Insurers Fund for more information.

FRM

Workers' Comp 2020/2021 Rate Comparison Classification

Code

2021 Rate

2020 Rate

(Decrease)

Sheet Metal Products Mfg. Only

3076

$4.04

$4.13

-2.18%

Sheet Metal Installation

5535

$7.35

$9.18

-19.93%

Heating, Ventilation, A/C, Refrig.

5537

$4.87

$5.34

-8.80%

Roofing – All Kinds & Drivers

5551

$13.30

$14.78

-10.01%

Executive Supervisor

5606

$1.17

$1.35

-13.33%

Sales Estimator

8742

$0.33

$0.35

-5.88%

Clerical

8810

$0.16

$0.17

-5.88%

Painting NOC

5474

$7.73

$8.32

-7.09%

Contractors Permanent Yard

8227

$6.01

$6.40

-6.09%

Carpentry Residential

5645

$13.56

$15.15

-10.49%

Carpentry NOC

5403

$7.29

$8.09

-9.88%

Masonry NOC

5022

$8.78

$9.39

-6.49%

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Roofing Warranties – Key Features Helene Hardy Pierce, FRCI, Vice President of Technical Services, Codes and Industry Relations, GAF Roofing contractors are oftentimes placed in the position of “subject matter experts” for property owners. This is especially true with re-roofing, which represents over 70 percent of the low-slope roofing market. Understanding what is and is not covered in any given warranty can help increase your ability to be that trusted advisor for a property owner and differentiate yourself from your competition. Whether it ultimately helps you secure a project or not, knowing what’s what with warranties and what they may and may not cover is one way to help property owners make better decisions and avoid problems in the future.

The “Golden Rule”

What a particular warranty or guarantee is called or titled may not reflect what it actually does or does not cover. The only way to know what any warranty or guarantee actually provides a property owner is to read it and understand the coverage and terms of that coverage. A good example of this is a “material and workmanship” warranty. What does “material and workmanship” actually mean? Does it cover defects in material and workmanship? Or does it just provide the material and labor to repair a defect in the material? Are the defects covered extensive or very narrowly defined? Are there limits on what the “remedy” is? If so, what are they? All of these questions can have very different answers depending on the specific warranty. Yet, many property owners think if they are getting a “material and workmanship” warranty at the completion of their project, they are getting equivalent coverage when several contractors bid their project and each agrees to provide a material and workmanship warranty.

Basic Differentiators

Listed in Table 1 below are common differentiators between several types of roofing warranties/ guarantees; this provides a simple table that shows how coverage can change depending on the actual document. Following is a closer look at what these different considerations are and what they actually mean for the property owner.

What is Covered

This is the starting point of understanding a specific document and usually it is found in the description of coverage. One caution is that coverage in any warranty or guarantee is also defined by what is specifically excluded from coverage. When coverage is not clear about workmanship deficiencies, a quick scan of the exclusions will often provide the answer. A requirement that the roofing system has to be installed in (strict) accordance with the manufacturer’s written instructions or, more clearly, that workmanship is specifically excluded, would classify that particular warranty as a “material defects” product warranty. The use of the phrase “material and labor” warranty can be found in a product warranty not because the installing workmanship is covered, but because the labor to repair a material defect is included in the coverage provided.

Table 1 – Common Roofing Warranty/Guarantee Differentiators Type of Warranty/Guarantee

14

Product Warranty

System Warranty

What does it cover?

Material defects

Material defects

Material & workmanship defects

Material & workmanship defects

Unlimited dollar amount for covered repairs

Generally no

Generally no

Generally no

Yes

Includes replacement material

Yes, often pro-rated

Yes

Yes

Yes

Includes cost of labor to correct Generally no problem?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Fee for warranty/guarantee

Yes

Yes

Yes

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020

No

Roof Guarantee

NDL Roof Guarantee


PROUDLYREPRESENTING THE

ROOFING INDUSTRY

COTNEYCL.COM

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MAIN OFFICE: TAMPA

(866) 303-5868


Unlimited vs. Limited Dollar Amount for Repairs

While every warranty/guarantee is “limited” by the terms of the coverage itself, and by such things as the exclusions, notice provisions, etc., our industry uses the term “NDL” to define guarantees with no limit on the dollar amount that will be spent for covered repairs. Conversely, a warranty or guarantee that is not an NDL will specifically call out a limitation on coverage, such as repairs shall not exceed the original installed cost of the roofing system or the original cost of the material. Another item to pay attention to regarding repair limitations, is whether the coverage is “pro-rated” over time or has a cumulative or per incident maximum. Proration of coverage is common with standard product warranties, where coverage is reduced based on the service the material/system has provided.

Length of Coverage – Is there a clearly stated length of coverage? Even for longterm lengths (generally in excess of 20 years), is the length defined or does the owner have inordinate responsibilities to actually have coverage for the full term implied? More clearly stated, a 5-year + 5-year + 5-year + 5-year + 5-year roofing system guarantee can have quite different responsibilities placed on the property owner, or even the roofing contractor, than a straight 25-year roofing system guarantee.

Exclusions from Coverage – As discussed above, every warranty and guarantee is “limited” in its coverage simply by the terms and conditions for coverage. Another area that is often misunderstood is the area of exclusions. The reason for this misunderstanding is whether an exclusion is something that if it causes the problem/leak, then the repair is not covered OR does that exclusion become the basis for cancellation of all coverage and the warranty/guarantee itself? Other Key Provisions and Specifics Obviously the first type of exclusion is often acceptIn addition to what is covered and whether there is a able and reasonable because problems caused on the monetary limitation, warranties and guarantees have roof that are not attributable to material or workmanmany other key provisions that owners need to be ship deficiencies, such as an earthquake or abuse by aware of when understanding whether a particular other trades, simply should not be covered by a waroffering fits their needs or may seem unreasonable. ranty or guarantee that provides coverage for material Following are several provisions that may be contained or workmanship defects. Yet exclusions that can cause within a warranty or guarantee and questions that a warranty or guarantee to be cancelled unilaterally should be asked to understand those provisions. may seem less reasonable to a property owner. Terms of Notice – How quickly is the owner responCause of Cancellation – What can cause a warranty sible for notifying the manufacturer or issuer that or guarantee to be cancelled? Lack of maintenance? there may be a leak or problem? Is it a reasonable time Failure to provide notice? Is the warranty or guaranframe? How must this contact be made? Often this tee cancelled or is it suspended? Suspension may be time frame is 30 days, but it can be a very short time utilized to require the property owner to fix items that (e.g., 48 hours) and if the time limit passes, there may are not covered and yet can be very damaging to the be no responsibility on the part of the issuer to actually roofing system if not addressed in a timely manner. cover the problem on the roof, even if it would have Specificity of Coverage – In addition to standard been covered if notice was made in the defined time product and system warranties and guarantees, there frame. are some that can be very narrowly focused, usually Description of “Roofing System” – In a Roofing covering a specific cause of damage or leaks, such as system guarantee. Does it cover all of the materials wind damage or impact damage. This type of coverage installed or does it cover only those provided by the may be provided as a standalone warranty or guaranissuer? tee or coverage may be offered through an addendum to a standard warranty or guarantee. Even with a Owner’s Responsibilities – Is the owner responsible specific type of coverage document, all of the other for preventative maintenance? If so, how is that deprovisions need to be understood, such as what the fined? If it is not done, is it a cause for cancellation of the warranty or simply that a leak that results from the remedy is, how it is limited, what the exclusions from coverage are and what the owner’s responsibilities are lack of maintenance is not covered? If the owner fails to notify the issuer of any problems (this relates to the to obtain a remedy in the event a covered item/event occurs. terms of notice), is that also cause for cancellation? Transferability – Is the warranty or guarantee transClarity Comes from Reading and ferable? If so, what are the specific steps that must be Understanding taken to transfer the warranty? Are they reasonable Quite simply, being a trusted advisor for property and customary or do they place a burden on the owner, owners can result in great partnerships and great such as a requirement beyond routine maintenance? roofs being installed. In the area of roofing material Is there a fee and, if so, how much is it? warranties and system guarantees, all of which are by Continued on page 39 16

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020


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Does ASCE 7-16 Really Change Everything? Mike Silvers, CPRC, Owner, Silvers Systems, Inc. and FRSA Director of Technical Services on outside corners) were the same depth (distance extending in from the edge) as the perimeters (rectangular shaped areas between corners) and everything else was field. This was the approach used in ASCE 7-10 which defined these as: Gable Roofs 0 < 10 degrees (less than 2/12) and was used for the past several FBC code cycles (see figure 1).

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FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020

a

3

2

3

2

1

2

2

1

2

3

2

3

a

Obviously, ASCE 7-16 doesn’t change everything. But it does change almost everything about how we attach roof coverings. More specifically, it changes the uplift (or negative pressures –referred to as "pressures" in this article) that roof coverings are required to resist. ASCE, the American Society of Civil Engineers, creates the structural standards that are referenced in the major building codes. ASCE 7 is called the Minimum Design Loads and Associated Criteria for Buildings and Other Structures. That’s a mouthful. The 7-16 is due to the year it was promulgated. A slightly modified version of ASCE 7-16 is the most recently adopted version in the Florida Building Code (FBC) 7th Edition (2020) that goes into effect December 31, 2020. All roof coverings except asphalt shingles and metal shingles will be impacted. Asphalt shingles use the FBC’s Classification of Asphalt shingles Table 1507.2.7.1 (R905.2.6.1). Metal shingles use the FBC’s Classification of Metal Roof Shingles Tested in Accordance with ASTM D3161 Table 1504.3.3 (R905.4.4.1). These tables use wind speed in miles per hour (mph) instead of pressure. All other roof coverings and roof systems must meet the FBC’s requirements for components and claddings in ASCE 7-16. ASCE 7-16 didn’t change the wind speeds, however it did change the coefficients used in the calculations that generally increases the pressures. The information included here should allow you to determine the proper pressures on most jobs without doing the actual calculations. Low slope roof systems are where most contractors became familiar with roof pressure zones. For many decades we had three zones: corner (3), perimeter (2) and field (1). Corner zones (square shaped areas

Figure 1 – ASCE 7-10 Gable Roof Less than 2/12

The zones for low slope roofs are more complex in ASCE 7-16. First, they are now defined as: Gable and Flat Roofs 0 < 7 degrees (less than 1.5/12), Zone 3 (corners) are now L-shaped and the depth is equal to 20 percent of the building height. The length of the L is equal to 60 percent of the building height. These are the areas that have the highest pressures and will require additional attachment. Zone 2 (perimeter) will extend further into the roof and inside the corner zones. The depth of Zone 2 is equal to 60 percent of the building height. Zone 2 will have the second highest pressure and will also require additional attachment. Zone 1 is located inside of Zone 2. The depth of Zone 1 is also equal to 60 percent of the building height. This is considered the base zone for the required uplift resistance. ASCE 7-16 has a new zone referred to as Zone 1 prime or 1’, also called the interior zone. If the building height is relatively low when compared to a fairly large footprint, the roof may have this Zone 1’. Zone 1’ will have slightly lower pressures than Zone 1 (see figure 2, next page). Depending on the height and outside dimensions the layout of the zones can vary greatly (see figure 3, next page).


Figure 2 – ASCE 7-16 Gable and Flat Roofs 1.5/12

Mean Roof Height

0.6h

2

3

0.6h

1

0.2h

Θ

0.6h 0.6h

h

3

MRH

B 2

1

Width

2

1

1'

B = Horizontal dimension of the building in feet. h = Mean Roof Height (MRH) in feet (eave height plus ridge height divided by 2). 1

3

Θ = Angle of roof plane from horizontal (slope or pitch).

3

2

Figure 3 – ASCE 7-16 2

3

1

2

3

3

1

1'

1

3

2

2

1 2 Buildings with least horizontal dimension greater than 2.4h.

3

3

3

2

1

3

3

Buildings with least horizontal dimension greater than 1.2h but less than 2.4h.

Under ASCE 7-10, gable shaped roofs with slopes greater that 1.5/12 (7 degrees) to 12/12 (45 degrees) used the same three zones as low slope roofs described above (see figure 4, page 20). Under ASCE 7-10, hip-shaped roofs with slope greater that 1.5/12 (7 degrees) to 6/12 (27 degrees), also used the same three zones as low slope roofs described above (see figure 5, page 20). With ASCE 7-16, it is considerably more complex. For roofs with slopes from 1.5/12 (7 degrees) to 12/12 (45 degrees), there are also new zones. For gable roofs, there are now six zones: 3r, 3e, 2e, 2r, 2n and 1. Zone 3r (r = ridge) typically sees the highest pressures. These are significantly higher than under ASCE 7-10

3

2

2

2

3

3

3

2

3

Buildings with least horizontal dimension less than 1.2h and largest horizontal dimension greater than 1.2h.

3

3

Buildings with largest horizontal dimension less than 1.2h.

for the same roof areas. Zones 3e (e = eave), 2e, 2r and 2n (n = neutral) see intermediate pressures. The severity can interchange between zones depending on mean roof height, roof slope and building dimensions. Zone 1 sees the least amount of pressure (see figure 8, page 22). For hip roofs under ASCE 7-16 there are now four zones: 3, 2e, 2r and 1. Again, Zone 3 sees the highest pressures. Zones 2e and 2r see intermediate pressures. Zone 1 sees the least (see figure 7, page 20). You can see that an understanding of how these zones are defined and configured is critical for installing roof systems that meet the building code requirements. Hopefully, the above information and www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

19


diagrams have helped with this. The next step is to determine the pressures that need to be resisted in these zones and how to get that information. With new construction, this information should be shown on the plans. This should include the size and locations of the zones. Make sure you are

looking at the values for components and cladding. These should be for Vasd –Allowable Stress Design (ASD) which is 60 percent of the Vult – Ultimate Stress Design (ULT). This is due to the Design Wind Speed Conversion in the standard. More on ASD and ULT later.

Figure 4 – ASCE 7-10 Gable Roofs 1.5/12 to less than 12/12

2

3

2

1

2

3

2

3

3

2

3

2

1

2

3

2

3

2

2

2 2

2

1

2

2

3

2n

1

2n

3r

2r

3r

3r

2r

3r

2n

1

2n

3e

2e

3e

a

2e

3

1

2e

2r 1

2r

1

2e

1 3

2e

3

■ Roof slope or pitch (rise in run or degrees) ■ Mean roof height (eave height + ridge height / 2) ■ Building width and length (not including overhangs) ■ Risk Category (I, II, III or IV) ■ Exposure Category (B, C or D) ■ Roof system type ■ Applicable design wind speed for the site

a

3

a

a

3e

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020

1

3

What about reroofing? If you are the prime contractor on the alteration (a reroof is a Level 1 alteration) then you must have a way to establish this information. Roofing contractors are very fortunate to have some great free resources available to help figure this out. Before we can get the results, we need to have general information about the specific job. These include:

20

3

1

a

2e

■ Roof shape (flat, gable or hip)

2

Figure 7 – ASCE 7-16 Hip Roofs 1.5/12 to less than 12/12

3e

■ Job address including the county

a

1

a

Figure 6 – ASCE 7-16 Gable and Flat Roofs 1.5/12 to less than 12/12

a

3

3

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

Figure 5 – ASCE 7-10 Hip Roofs 1.5/12 to less than 6/12


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Let’s start with risk categories I, II, III or IV. The risk categories are based on use or type of occupancy of the building.

Figure 8 – FBC Chapter 16

■ Risk Category I – low risk: temporary, storage or agricultural facilities, etc. ■ Risk Category II – typical buildings: homes, apartments, stores, offices, manufacturing and warehouses, etc. ■ Risk Category III – substantial hazard: most schools, high occupancy buildings, nursing homes and other important buildings that are not risk category IV. ■ Risk Category IV – essential facilities: medical facilities with surgery or emergency services, fire and police stations, emergency shelters and emergency operation centers, etc. Understanding which risk category applies to your building will allow you to find the proper design wind speed map or enter that information in the programs we will discuss later. Once you have the proper map, you can find the site location and follow the contour lines to find the design wind speed (see figure 8). You can interpolate between the wind speed but keep in mind that some counties use the higher wind speed for the entire county. This is sometimes true even for counties that are split by wind speeds contours.

Hazards by Location

ATC Hazards by Location (https://hazards.atcouncil.org) is a great free tool that will allow you to enter an address and then it will produce a windspeed and wind map for that location. The wind speed is shown based on the risk category I, II, III or IV. Remember, it will usually be category II. The map makes it easy to see the next higher windspeed contour line. You can use this windspeed to be conservative (safe).

It also states whether or not you are in a wind-borne debris region. Note the wind speed and risk category for the next step. Save the report for your job file. We now have our appropriate windspeed, but before we can move on to the next website that will give you a final report, you will need another piece of information. What exposure category is the building in? The exposure categories are B, C and D. They are based on surface roughness, which are also categories B, C and D. ■ Surface Roughness B – urban and suburban areas, wooded areas or other terrain with numerous closely spaced obstructions having the size of single-family dwellings or larger. ■ Surface Roughness C – open terrain with scattered obstructions having heights generally less than 30 feet. This category includes flat open country and grasslands. ■ Surface Roughness D – flat unobstructed areas and water surfaces. This category includes smooth mud flats, salt flats and unbroken ice. ■ Exposure B – shall apply where surface roughness B prevails in the windward direction for a distance of at least 2,600 feet or twenty times the height. For buildings whose mean roof height is less than or equal to 30 feet, the upwind distance may be reduced to 1,500 feet. ■ Exposure C – shall apply for all cases where Exposure B or D does not apply. ■ Exposure D – shall apply where surface roughness D prevails in the upwind direction for a distance of greater than 5,000 feet. Exposure D shall also apply where the ground surface roughness immediately upward of the site is B or C and the site is within a distance of 600 feet or 20 times the building height, whichever is greater, from an Exposure D condition.

22

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020


Generally, most typical sites will be Exposure B. Areas that adjoin ponds and lakes, golf courses etc. may be Exposure C. Others that are on open water, such as oceans, gulfs, bays and larger lakes – or perhaps a highway or runway – will probably be Exposure D. If in doubt, use the next higher exposure category to be conservative. Make a note of the exposure category you’ve decided on. If you are installing a tile roof covering, refer to the 6th Edition of FRSA-TRI Florida High Wind Concrete and Clay Tile Installation Manual or the High Velocity Hurricane Zone (HVHZ) Roofing Application Standard (RAS) 118, 119 or 120. For other than tile and the shingle roofs mentioned earlier, the final step is finding the size of the roof zones and their pressures. Again, we have a great free tool to help us: NRCA provides www.roofwinddesigner.com. With the information we now have, we can go on the site and set up an account (a very simple process). Once that’s done, enter a roof area name (main roof, etc.), job name, address, city, county and zip code. Then enter the building length, width, mean roof height, roof configuration and slope and parapet walls if applicable. Next enter the building configuration: enclosed or open (note: partially enclosed buildings will require

additional engineering calculations). Most typical buildings are considered enclosed. The Exposure Category B, C or D is then entered. The Risk Category I, II, III or IV (usually II) is entered next. Then enter the wind speed from the wind maps or from the ATC site prepared earlier. And finally, the roof deck type and roof covering type need to be entered. The site is user-friendly and will provide much of

www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

23


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ASCE 7-16 Notes Applies to all roof coverings except asphalt shingles and metal shingles Wind speeds did not change between ASCE 7-10 and 7-16 but the coefficients used in calculations increased pressures Vasd – Allowable stress design

Roof Zones

Vult – Ultimate stress design

r – ridge

B – Horizontal dimension of the building in feet.

e – eave

h – Mean Roof Height (MRH) in feet (eave height   plus ridge height divided by 2).

n – neutral

Θ – Angle of roof plane from horizontal (slope or pitch).

Risk Categories

Exposure Categories

Risk Category I – Low risk, temporary, storage or agricultural facilities, etc.

Surface Roughness B – Urban and suburban areas, wooded areas or other terrain with numerous closely spaced obstructions having the size of a single-family Risk Category II – Typical buildings – homes, apartments, stores, offices, manufacturing and warehouses, dwelling or larger. etc. Surface Roughness C – Open terrain with scattered Risk Category III – Substantial hazard – most schools, obstructions having heights generally less than 30 feet. This category includes flat open country and high occupancy buildings, nursing homes and other grasslands. important buildings that are not risk category IV. Surface Roughness D – Flat unobstructed areas and Risk Category IV – Essential facilities – medical facilities with surgery or emergency services, fire and water surfaces. This category includes smooth mud flats, salt flats and unbroken ice. police stations, emergency shelters and emergency operations centers, etc. Exposure B – shall apply where surface roughness B prevails in the windward direction for a distance of at least 2,600 feet or twenty times the height. For buildings whose mean roof height is less than or equal to 30 feet, the upwind distance may be reduced to 1,500 feet.

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Exposure C – shall apply for all cases where Exposure B or D does not apply. Exposure D – shall apply where surface roughness D prevails in the upwind direction for a distance of greater than 5,000 feet. Exposure D shall also apply where the ground surface roughness immediately upward of the site is B or C and the site is within a distance of 600 feet or 20 times the building height, whichever is greater, from an Exposure D condition.

Online Tools ATC Hazards by Location https://hazards.atcouncil.org NRCA Roof Wind Designer www.roofwinddesigner.com

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FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020


the information needed to make the proper decision for your entries. You can also save your jobs on the site for future use. Many thanks to NRCA. Once this is done, you will be able to generate a great report. It will give you the size of the zones (shown as “a”) and the appropriate pressures. Make sure to use the Vasd – allowable stress design (ASD) portion of the report. Print the report for your files. The information you now have will allow you to match the required pressures to your roof system attachment for the appropriate roof zones. You can get this from the FBC’s Product Approval or Miami-Dade Notice of Acceptance (NOA). Or, request the attachment requirements from the manufacturer for the appropriate base area (Zone 1) pressure. This information should show that the system was tested up to a specific pressure and the attachment needed. As long as the resistance to pressure meets or exceeds the required pressure you are good to go. In most cases you can extrapolate (increase accordingly) the amount of attachment for the zones with higher pressure. I know this is complex stuff. Believe me, I know! This is the world we live in. So, ASCE 7-16 doesn’t really change everything: we will still use adhesives and fasteners, just more of them in different places. If you are a roofing contractor who wants to install code-compliant roof systems, an understanding of ASCE 7-16 is critical. I hope this information helps. The approach described is not by any means the only way to get there, but it is a way that I think we can work with and learn to understand.

FRM

Mike Silvers, CPRC is owner of Silvers Systems Inc. and is consulting with FRSA as Director of Technical Services. Mike is an FRSA Past President, Life Member, and Campanella Award recipient and brings over 40 years of industry knowledge and experience to FRSA’s team.

Submit Your Premier Roofing Projects from 2020

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27


The Capital City Roofing & Sheet Metal Association Wins Community Service S.T.A.R. Award FRSA Staff The Spotlight Trophy for the Advancement of Roofing is an awards program designed by FRSA to recognize members' unique and outstanding projects. A panel evaluates the entries for inclusion and outstanding performance in each category. This year, there were 48 submissions for placement in one of four categories: Low Slope, Steep Slope, Community Service and Craftsmanship. Judging criteria is based on aesthetics, special circumstances, unique project design, complexity of project, workmanship, teamwork, testimonials and creative problem solving. The judges use before, in-progress and completed pictures and videos to assist in the process. The Capital City Roofing & Sheet Metal Association (CRSA) won First Place in the Community Service category for their Wallwood Scout Reservation reroof project in Quincy, Fla. On May 10, 2019, members of the Capital City Roofing & Sheet Metal Association began tear-off and reroofing operations at the Wallwood Scout Reservation. Volunteers included contractor members, suppliers, distributors, general contractors and many others from the Tallahassee construction community.

28

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020

Volunteers completed tear-off and dry-in that weekend, with final punchout, finish and detail-work concluded the following weekend. Various Tallahassee and North Florida roofing contractors donated their time, talents, crews, tools, trailers, equipment and knowledge to come together to completely reroof three separate buildings at the Scout’s Quincy location. CRSA’s contractor members first sent out demolition and tear-off teams who made quick work of the existing (and rapidly deteriorating) shingle system. The cooperation between the volunteers and the logistical accomplishments of the various crews was a magnificent sight. Roofing professionals may serve as competitors in the business world, yet during this volunteer operation, the coordination, team-mentality and joint collaboration was clear to see. The facility’s three buildings slated for reroof included an administrative building, the camp’s medical building and the mess hall and covered 14,000 square feet of space. Tear-off began simultaneously on each of the three buildings. Two contractors were tasked with tear-off on the


administrative and medical buildings, while others divided up the tear-off on the mess hall. Once roofers removed all compromised shingles and underlayment, other volunteers from ground crews came in to shovel the debris into donated dumpsters and trailers. Equally admirable was the support provided by CRSA non-contractor members. Those who could not roof, cooked and cleaned. Members made rounds throughout the mornings providing water and breakfast to workers as they continued tear-off and began dry-in. They also manned the grill each workday to serve lunch to all those who donated their time and resources to the project. Once tear-off and dry-in crews moved out, metal roofers sprang into action. The crews once again divided the three buildings among the many volunteer companies and installed standing seam panels. The mess hall presented its share of unique field fabrication issues. Specifically, it was equipped with a large stainless-steel vent hood and exhaust stack for the kitchen ovens, ventilation stacks for the refrigeration unit and a stone facade chimney. The chimney was faced with cobble stones, which left an uneven and varying vertical surface for flashing. Because of the difficult nature of the flashing around the chimney, CRSA called in one of their veterans to flash and seal the area with expert precision.

Once the dust settled on the final day of construction, CRSA’s members and volunteers left Wallwood Scout Reservation with three new standing-seam metal roofs. In total, manufacturer and distributor members donated over $17,000 worth of metal for the Scouts. CRSA estimated the total labor and materials for the project exceeded $60,000 in donations. This project could not have been accomplished without the kindness, dedication and selflessness of those who volunteered their time, resources and energy to their community. CRSA remains truly grateful to all those who helped. The team from CRSA consisted of: ■ Contractor – CRSA Members ■ Estimator – Farley Maxwell ■ Superintendent – Ralph Davis ■ Foreman – Farley Maxwell ■ Manufacturer – Sheffield Metals International ■ Distributor – Gulfeagle Supply ■ Project MVP – Farley Maxwell Congratulations to the team from CRSA on winning the Community Service Award!

FRM

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29


Roof Assemblies – Significant Changes to Roofing Requirements in the 7th Edition (2020) Florida Building Code Overview

The 7th Edition (2020) Florida Building Code includes several key changes to the requirements for roof assemblies. Many changes strengthen the code to improve the resistance of wind and water infiltration damage. Several of the changes apply to both new construction and roof replacement. The information in this article provides a summary of the following key changes: ■ Changes to roofing underlayment (sealed roof deck) ■ Changes to wind loads on roofs (ASCE 7-16) ■ Roof mitigation

FEMA Hurricane Michael in Florida, Recovery Advisory 2, Best Practices for Minimizing Wind and Water Infiltration Damage provides guidance on creating a Sealed Roof Deck and additional recommendations for reducing wind and water infiltration damage to new and existing residential buildings

Best Practices for Minimizing Wind and Water Infiltration Damage HURRICANE MICHAEL IN FLORIDA

Recovery Advisory 2, June 2019

Purpose and Intended Audience This Recovery Advisory presents important recommendations to reduce wind and water infiltration damage to new and existing residential buildings. The recommendations discussed are from existing Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Building Science resources, including recovery advisories published after Hurricane Irma, and also include new recommendations and best practices based on observations made by the Mitigation Assessment Team (MAT) after Hurricane Michael struck in 2018 (Figure 1 shows an example of observed damage). This advisory describes specific issues observed in newer residential buildings after Hurricane Michael. The buildings observed were built after the adoption of the first edition of the Florida Building Code (FBC) (March 2002). The advisory provides key points for consideration during rebuilding and mitigation activities. The references cited in the advisory contain additional best practices and guidance for issues commonly observed after storm events. The primary audience includes building owners, operators, and managers; design professionals; building officials; contractors; and municipal building and planning officials.

Figure 1: House with typical envelope damage (siding, soffit, and fascia cover) observed on newer buildings after Hurricane Michael (Panama City area)

The State of Florida requires product approval for the building envelope components addressed in this Recovery Advisory. For more information on Florida product approval, see Hurricane Irma in Florida Recovery Advisory 2, Soffit Installation in Florida (in FEMA P-2023, 2018).

Key Issues "

"

Widespread wind damage to envelope components (roof coverings, wall coverings, roof ventilation components, and windows and doors) resulted in extensive and costly water intrusion damage from wind-driven rain. Water intrusion occurred where there was roof covering damage, loss of roof ventilation components (i.e., ridge vents and soffits), damage to exterior wall coverings, and around windows and door openings. Water infiltration can saturate attic insulation, allow water seepage into exterior and interior wall systems, damage interior finishes and furnishings, and lead to algae and mold growth.

■ Roof diaphragms resisting wind loads in high-wind regions

(https://www.fema.gov/media-library/resources-documents/ collections/24f)

■ Soffits

Option #1 – A self-adhering polymer-modified bitumen underlayment complying with ASTM D1970 applied over the entire roof.

■ Cable- and raceway-type wiring methods on roofs

"

"

Wind and water infiltration damage can lead to extensive operational impacts and loss of (or degraded) building usage over extended periods of time, until adequate repairs are made. There is a lot of existing guidance that can be used to reduce wind damage and water infiltration for residential buildings, which can make it difficult for users to find the best guidance.

Best Practices for Minimizing Wind and Water Infiltration Damage

FL-RA2 / JUNE 2019

Page 1 of 13

Underlayment (Sealed Roof Deck)

The requirements for the type and installation of underlayment in the 7th Edition (2020) Florida Building Code, Building (FBCB) and the Florida Building Code, Residential (FBCR) have been strengthened. The new underlayment requirements are consistent with those recommended by the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety (IBHS) to create a sealed roof deck (SRD). When the primary roof covering is lost due to a wind event such as a hurricane, water infiltration can cause extensive damage to interior finishes, furnishings and other contents and can lead to ceiling collapse when insulation is saturated. Also, where power is lost or a building cannot otherwise be quickly dried out, mold growth is common. Research by IBHS demonstrates that a sealed roof deck can significantly reduce the amount of water infiltration when the primary roof covering is lost. The key differences from the 6th Edition (2017) FBCB and FBCR are: ■ where felt underlayment is used, it must be 30# or equivalent (ASTM D 226 Type II, ASTM D4869 Types III or IV) ■ installation techniques such as number of plies, lapping and fastener spacing have been strengthened There are essentially three options for creating a sealed roof deck that vary a bit depending on the type of roof covering. A summary of the three options follows: 30

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020

Sealed Roof Deck Option #1 *3-3/4-inch AAMA 711 flashing tape is also permitted. **Synthetic underlayment meeting the performance requirements specified is also permitted. Option #2 – A minimum 4-inch wide strip of selfadhering polymer-modified bitumen complying with ASTM D1970 or a minimum 3-3/4-inch wide strip of self-adhering flexible flashing tape complying with AAMA 711 applied over all joints in the roof decking. A felt underlayment complying with ASTM D226 Type II, ASTM D4869 Type III or IV or ASTM D6757 or a synthetic underlayment meeting the performance


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requirements specified, is required to be applied over the strips/tape over the entire roof (see Table 1507.1.1.1 of the FBCB or Table R905.1.1.1 of the FBCR for fastener type and spacing).

A new exception to Section 1507.1.1.1 in the FBCB permits an existing self-adhered membrane to remain on the roof provided that, if required, renailing of the roof deck in accordance with Section 706.7.1 of the FBCEB can be confirmed or verified. An approved underlayment for the applicable roof coverings is required to be applied over the existing self-adhered membrane.

BASF Wind Loads – Impacts from ASCE 7-16 Fact Sheet The BASF Wind Loads – Impacts from ASCE 7-16 Fact Sheet provides an overview of the significant changes to wind loads in ASCE 7-16 and the 7th Edition (2020) FBC. The BASF Wind Loads – Impacts from ASCE 7-16 Fact Sheet can be downloaded at www.floridabuilding.org. Sealed Roof Deck Option #2 *Synthetic underlayment meeting the performance requirements specified is also permitted. Option #3 – Two layers of felt underlayment complying to ASTM D226 Type II or ASTM D4869 Type III or IV, or two layers of a synthetic underlayment meeting the performance requirements specified, lapped and fastened as specified.

Wind Loads on Roofs (ASCE 7-16)

Roof component and cladding loads for buildings with mean roof heights of 60 feet or less have been revised significantly from ASCE 7-10. The changes mostly result in significant increases in design wind pressures on roofs compared to ASCE 7-10. Due to changes to roof wind loads, the FRSA-TRI Florida High Wind Concrete and Clay Roof Tile Installation Manual, Sixth Edition has been updated to comply with ASCE 7-16. Additionally, the prescriptive fastening requirements for wood structural panel roof sheathing in Section R803.2 of the FBCR have been updated to comply with ASCE 7-16. Two new tables have been added. Table R803.2.2 specifies the minimum sheathing thickness for framing spaced 24 inches on center based on exposure category and wind speed. An excerpt of Table R803.2.2 is shown below. Excerpt of Table R803.2.2 7th Edition (2020) FBCR Minimum Roof Sheathing Thickness (excerpt)

Sealed Roof Deck Option #3 For asphalt, metal, mineral surfaced, slate and slate-type roof coverings, Options 1, 2 or 3 are permitted. For concrete and clay roof tile, underlayment is required to be in accordance with the FRSA-TRI Florida High Wind Concrete and Clay Roof Tile Installation Manual, Sixth Edition. For wood shakes and shingles, Options 2 and 3 are permitted. It’s worth noting that these requirements do not apply to the High Velocity Hurricane Zones (HVHZ). For additional details, see Section 1507.1.1 of the 7th Edition (2020) FBCB and Section R905.1.1 of the 7th Edition (2020) FBCR. 32

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020

Rafter/Truss Spacing 24 in. o.c. Min Sheathing Thickness, inches (Panel Span Rating) Exposure B Min Sheathing Thickness, inches (Panel Span Rating) Exposure C Min Sheathing Thickness, inches (Panel Span Rating) Exposure D

Wind Speed 140 mph

150 mph

160 mph

7/16

15/32

19/32

(24/16)

(32/16)

(40/20)

19/32

19/32

19/32

(40/20)

(40/20)

(40/20)

19/32

19/32

19/32

(40/20)

(40/20)

(40/20)


While ring shank nails are still required, the nail size depends on the sheathing thickness. Where the sheathing thickness is 15/32 inches or less, roof sheathing is required to be fastened with ASTM F1667 RSRS-01 (2-3/8” × 0.113”) nails. Where the sheathing thickness is greater than 15/32 inches, roof sheathing is required to be fastened with ASTM F1667 RSRS03 (2-1/2” × 0.131”) nails or ASTM F1667 RSRS-04 (3” × 0.120”) nails. The RSRS designation indicates the fastener is a ring shank roof sheathing nail. Table R803.2.3.1 specifies the maximum fastener spacing based on framing specific gravity, exposure category and wind speed. An excerpt of Table R803.2.3.1 is shown below. Table R803.2.3.1 Roof Sheathing Attachment (excerpt) Roof Sheathing Attachment Rafter/Truss Spacing 24 in. o.c.

Wind Speed (mph) 140 E

150 F

160

E

F

E

F

Exposure B Rafter/Truss SG = 0.42

6

6

6

6

4

4

Rafter/Truss SG = 0.49

6

6

6

6

6

6

Exposure C Rafter/Truss SG = 0.42

4

4

4

4

4

4

Rafter/Truss SG = 0.49

6

6

6

6

6

6

Exposure D Rafter/Truss SG = 0.42

4

4

4

4

3

3

Rafter/Truss SG = 0.49

6

6

4

4

4

4

Section 706.7 — 7th Edition (2020) FBCEB 706.7 Mitigation. When a roof covering on an existing structure with a sawn lumber, wood plank, or wood structural panel roof deck is removed and replaced, the following procedures shall be permitted to be performed by the roofing contractor: (a) Roof-decking attachment shall be as required by Section 706.7.1. (b) A secondary water barrier shall be provided as required by Section 706.7.2. Exception: Structures permitted subject to the Florida Building Code are not required to comply with this section. ■ Adding supplement ring shank fasteners to attach the roof decking where the existing deck has insufficient fasteners such as staples or 6d nails or where the spacing of fasteners is lacking. ■ Applying a secondary water barrier (similar to the sealed roof deck that will now be required outside the HVHZ). ■ Install roof to wall connections in some circumstances. The 7th Edition (2020) FBCEB has expanded the required mitigation techniques to apply to all buildings with wood roof decks, not just site-built single-family buildings. Buildings such as apartments, office buildings and modular buildings with wood roof decks will now be required to comply with mitigation provisions of 706.6 and 706.7 of the FBCEB. In the 6th Edition (2017) FBCEB, where roofing

Roof Mitigation (FBCEB and FBCR)

The Florida Building Code, Existing Building (FBCEB) has historically required a certain level of mitigation on roof assemblies when existing roofs are removed and replaced. This is primarily because the best time to perform mitigation on roof assemblies is when the roof covering is removed. Sections 706.7 and 706.8 in the FBCEB (Sections R908.7 and R908.8 in the FBCR) required that where roof covering is removed and replaced on a site-built single-family dwelling permitted prior to the implementation of the FBC, the following mitigation measures needed to be completed: www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

33


installed using fasteners specified by the manufacturer and wind pressure is 30 psf or less, soffit panels sh shall be fastened at both ends to a supporting component imum of 7/16 inch in thickness and shall be such as a nailing strip, fascia or subfascia component in framing or nailing strips with 2 1/2 × 0.113 accordance with Figure R704.2.1. Where the unsupported spaced not more than 6 inches on center at pan span of soffit panels is greater than 12 inches, intermediate 12 inches on center at intermediate supports nailing strips shall be provided in accordance with Figure design wind pressure is greater than 30 psf, ha R704.2.2 unless a depict larger span is permitted in accordance the appropriate installationfitofpanels vinylshall soffit panelsin accordance wi be installed with the manufacturer’s product approval specification. Section 707.3.2 — 7th Edition (2020) FBCEB facturer’s product approval specification and l have been added. These new figures limit the span Vinyl soffit panels shall be installed in accordance with use. vinyl soffitspecification panels toand 12liminches (unless the Product the manufacturer’s of product approval 707.3.2 Roof diaphragms resisting wind loads Wood structural panel soffit covers shall be installed in accor- andR704.2.4 Approval specifies otherwise) illustrateWood thatstructural vinyl panel soffit pa in high-wind regions. Where the structuralitations roof of use. Fascia alternative. dance with the manufacturer’s product approval soffit panels have to be fastened at both ends of the mitted to be installed in accordance with Tabl deck is removed from more than 30 percent of specification and limitations of use.

the structural diaphragm or section of a building located where the ultimate design wind speed, Vult, is greater than 115 mph, as defined in Section 1609 (the HVHZ shall comply with Section 1620) of the Florida Building Code, Building, roof diaphragms, connections of the roof diaphragm to roof framing members, and roof-to-wall connections shall be evaluated for the wind loads specified in the Florida Building Code, Building, including wind uplift. If the diaphragms and connections in their current condition are not capable of resisting at least 75 percent of those wind loads, they shall be replaced or strengthened in accordance with the loads specified in the Florida Building Code, Building.

panel – at the fascia and at the wall. Additionally, a new prescriptive table for wood structural panel soffit has been added that specifies the minimum wood structural panel thickness, fastener size and fastener spacing to meet the tabulated design wind pressure. Figure R704.2.1 – Typical Single-Span Vinyl Soffit Panel Support

FASCIA COVER INSTALLED IN ACCORDANCE WITH FASCIA MANUFACTURER’S PRODUCT APROVAL SPECIFICATION AND LIMITATIONS OF USE.

MIN. 1X2 NAILING STRIP

Exception: This section does not apply to buildings permitted subject to the Florida Building Code.

ATTACH SOFFIT TO FASCIA OR TO NAILING STRIP (NOT SHOWN)

FRAMING

ATTACH SOFFIT TO NAILING STRIP VINYL SOFFIT

J-CHANNEL

materials are removed from more than 50 percent UNSUPPORTED SPAN LIMITED PER SECTION 704.2.1 of the roof diaphragm, Section 707.3.2 WALL required an COVERING evaluation of the roof diaphragm, its connection to roof framing and roof-to-wall connections. Where they were not capable of resisting 75 percent of current wind loads, they were required to be replaced Figure R704.2.1 – Typical Vinyl Soffit FIGUREMulti-Span R704.2.1 TYPICAL SINGLE-SPAN VINYL SOFFIT PANEL SUPPORT or strengthened. The applicability of this section has Panel Support been reduced significantly in the 7th Edition (2020). The evaluation and potential strengthening required FLORIDA BUILDING CODE — RESIDENTIAL, 7th EDITION (2020) RAFTER Copyright © 2020 ICC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Accessed by Michael Silvers (silvers@floridaroof.com), (-) Order Number #100928143 on Aug 17, 2020 01:43 PM (PDT) p now only applies where the structural deck is removed No further reproduction, no further reproductions by any third party, or distribution authorized. Single user only, copying and networking prohibited. ANY UNAUTHORIZ DISTRIBUTION IS A VIOLATION OF THE FEDERAL COPYRIGHT ACT AND THE LICENSE AGREEMENT, AND SUBJECT TO CIVIL AND CRIMINAL PENALTIES FASCIA COVER INSTALLED IN from more than 30 percent of the structural roof ACCORDANCE WITH FASCIA MANUFACTURER’S PRODUCT APPROVAL diaphragm. SPECIFICATIONS AND LIMITATIONS OF USE .

MIN. 1x2 NAILING STRIPS

Soffits (FBCR)

Field investigations in the aftermath of hurricanes have identified widespread failure of soffits on buildings built to FBC specifications. Problems with soffits have been observed as far back as the 2004 hurricane season (hurricanes Charley, Frances, Jeanne and Ivan). When soffits fail, wind-driven rain can enter the attic area of a building unimpeded, resulting in significant water intrusion damage. Design wind loads for soffits were added to the 2007 FBCB and FBCR. The FEMA Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Michael Mitigation Assessment Team (MAT) reports noted that many soffit failures were due to poor installation. To improve soffit installation, the 7th Edition (2020) FBCR contains a new section specifically addressing design wind loads and installation details for soffits. Prescriptive details have been added for various soffit materials including vinyl, fiber-cement, hardboard and wood structural panel soffit. Two new figures that clearly 34

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020

ATTACH SOFFIT TO FASCIA OR TO NAILING STRIP (NOT SHOWN)

VINYL SOFFIT ATTACH SOFFIT TO NAILING STRIP

FRAMING

J-CHANNEL UNSUPPORTED SPAN LIMITED PER SECTION 704.2.1

FIGURE R704.2.2 Cable- and Raceway-Type Wiring TYPICAL MULTI-SPAN VINYL SOFFIT PANEL Methods SUPPORT on Roofs

When reroofing, the presence of cable- and raceway wiring systems embedded within a roof assembly or installed under and close to metal roof decking can present a particular hazard in the event of accidental Continued on page 41


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Focus on Your Financial Strategy Kevin M. Smith, CLU, ChFC, President, KMS Wealth Management, Inc.

The U.S. election has been one of the most important in our lifetimes. Emotions are high and there is no shortage of opinions on how this will impact the future. What should you make of this for your financial strategy? Here’s what to do: focus on the future and remember your long-term goals. Let’s turn to what you can control and specific actions you can take. You’ve built a diversified long-term financial strategy and there are things you can prioritize before year-end to help maximize your tax benefits and investments now. Any changes you make are based on your specific goals and the market conditions, not on sentiment about who is elected.

Four Money Moves You Should Prioritize Now The end of the year is a busy time for most people. Unfortunately, it is usually also the last opportunity to make financial moves that will count towards the current year. If you’ve been slow to tackle your financial to-do list this year, consider completing your checklist before the end of the year. No matter how eager you are to say goodbye to 2020, it doesn’t mean you should leave money on the table. Get started on your year-end financial checklist with four money moves you should prioritize now.

Put Extra Savings to Work

Often, investors realize they’re holding too much cash, but they’re just not sure what else to do with the money. If you’re a high earner, you may notice your paycheck increased over the year as you exceed the Social Security taxable wage base, $137,700 in 2020. If you’re keeping too much cash in the bank (earning next to nothing), here are seven ways to put extra cash to work for you: ■ Invest excess cash using a brokerage account ■ Max out contributions to a 401(k), 403(b), or IRA (see 2020 limits). Turned 50 this year or will by December 31? You’re eligible for an additional $6,500 catch-up contribution to a 401(k), 403(b) or $1,000 to an IRA. ■ Fully fund your emergency cash account ■ Pay the tax on a Roth IRA conversion ■ Refinance your mortgage, especially given historically low interest rates ■ Pay off (or down) student loans or high-cost debt ■ Own a business or have a side job? Consider reducing your taxable income while saving for 36

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020

retirement with a SEP IRA or Solo 401(k)

Review Your Benefit Elections and 2021 Contributions for Open Enrollment

Most companies allow workers to adjust their health insurance and other benefit elections at the end of the year. Don’t skip it! This is your chance to take advantage of tax-saving opportunities and employer-paid benefits or save money by opting out of coverage you’re not using. ■ Health insurance coverage – Are the 2021 insurance premiums increasing dramatically on your policy? You may want to run the numbers to see if another provider your company offers could provide cost savings. If you’re on a high-deductible health plan with a health savings account (HSA), does that still work for your situation? ■ Life insurance – If you have a voluntary term life insurance policy through work, you may want to consider whether getting a private policy would cost less. The general rule of thumb is that an annual renewable term policy will cost more in a few years’ time. So, if you need coverage beyond that, contact your insurance professional to get quotes. While you won’t want to cancel your life insurance before having another policy in force, consider getting a jump for next year. ■ Flexible spending accounts – Are you utilizing a health care or dependent care flexible spending account? Pre-tax contributions can save hundreds depending on your tax rate. Also, check your current balance and find out whether your plan allows rollovers for any unused money; some plans are use-it-or-lose-it. ■ Pre-tax benefits – Not going back to work for the foreseeable future? Consider cancelling any transportation benefits (even if they’re pre-tax), parking, etc. The IRS recently announced 2021 contribution limits, so keep this in mind when making your selections.


Look at Your 401(k) - Both Old and New

Investors sometimes take "set it and forget it" too literally. As part of your year-end financial checklist, give your 401(k) some needed attention. Although there aren’t any changes to the 401(k) contribution limit in 2021, you should check your current investment choices, allocations and scheduled contributions. ■

will be reportable to you for tax purposes even if you sell the day after the ex-date.

Rebalancing Your Accounts

Portfolio rebalancing is the process of buying and selling part of your investments to get back to your original investment mix. Without rebalancing, you may be taking on more risk than necessary. Over time, the Are you missing the match? Maxing out your value of your investments changes as different asset 401(k) too early in the year could mean leaving emclasses outperform on a relative basis. This impacts ployer matching dollars on the table. Depending on the composition of your portfolio. your situation and asset mix, you may also want to To correct it, consider portfolio rebalancing at a consider using an after-tax Roth 401(k) option. predetermined interval. When you rebalance, you How are you invested? Is your account aligned sell overweight positions, reinvesting the proceeds with the investment mix you picked? You may in underweight funds to restore the intended asset need to rebalance your 401(k) – more on that allocation. below. Or perhaps your account has grown significantly and a target-date fund is no longer your Selling a Concentrated Stock Position, best option. If your plan offers a brokerage winLikely in Employer Stock dow, you might be able to expand your offerings. For investors looking to diversify out of a concentrated stock position, most typically employer stock, the end Do something with old retirement plans. After of the year presents an opportunity to spread taxable you leave your job, it’s easy to forget about an old 401(k) or 403(b). Retirement plans often limit your gains over two tax years in a matter of days or weeks. Particularly when the stock is also your employer, investment options and make it harder to know where you stand financially. Consider rolling an old wild swings in the stock price can decimate on-paper wealth. 401(k) over to an IRA or weigh the pros and cons If you own stock that has outperformed, you may of a Roth IRA conversion. be hesitant to sell due to FOMO (fear of missing out). Review beneficiary designations. Make sure your But if taking profits allows you to achieve or further elections are current and consider naming continyour goals, why not take the opportunity? After all, gent beneficiaries. that’s what really matters.

Diversify or Reallocate Your Investments in a Tax-Efficient Way

The end of the year presents an opportunity for taxloss harvesting in taxable accounts. In all accounts, rebalancing and diversifying a concentrated position are opportunities. It’s usually best to consider these moves together, which is why it’s an important part of a year-end financial checklist.

Tax-Loss Harvesting

Tax-loss harvesting is the process of selling an investment that has lost value in your portfolio to realize losses for tax purposes. Losses can offset taxable capital gains and potentially even reduce ordinary income by up to $3,000 in the current year. Remaining losses can be carried forward as a deduction in future years. Before putting this tax strategy into action, consider whether the savings are worth the risks of potentially being unaligned with your target asset allocation. If you own actively managed mutual funds in a taxable account, be aware of dividend and capital gains distributions at year-end. If the fund hasn’t issued distributions yet, consider selling before the ex-date. When you own the fund on the ex-date, capital gains

Getting Help Tackling Your Year-End Financial Checklist

Finding time to accomplish financial tasks or keep up with regular maintenance can be hard for busy professionals. Whether you truly need a financial advisor or accountant will depend on your situation. For individuals who would benefit from working with an advisor, delaying the decision may mean missing opportunities or making expensive mistakes. Just as the benefits of making good financial moves can compound over time (through investment returns or growing your savings), the negative effects of making the wrong financial choices can plague you for years.

FRM

Kevin Smith is President of KMS Wealth Management, Inc. and has partnered with FRSA to offer members a retirement option through TAG Retirement Program. More information about this program can be found on FRSA’s website, www.floridaroof.com, under the Member’s Login section. If you have additional questions, please contact Kevin directly at 407-923-8724 or by email at kevin@kmswm.com or visit his website at www.kmswm.com.

www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

37


COTNEY CONSULTING GROUP John Kenney

Construction’s Data-Driven Future Over the past few years, I have had conversations with hundreds of people in our industry at all levels, from C-level Execs to the field teams onsite. I consistently hear that we need better collaboration but, at the same time, all are afraid of transparency to create a common ground for collaboration. So, we continue to support our current way of working instead of taking a step back and seeing that nobody wins the way we currently operate. The key is to question and challenge how we go to business everyday, from our strategy, to process to implementation. Data undoubtedly is a crucial ingredient, but it has to be the correct data. The dataset has to be pertinent to the task you desire to improve. It also has to be clean, timely, accurate, unbiased and perhaps most importantly, it has to be trustworthy. That means that if you want to achieve a real datadriven company, it’s vital to ensure you are making the right steps to get the correct data. A data-driven construction or roofing company culture has to exhibit the following elements.

Vigoriuos Data Collection

A data-driven firm must start with the right system processes and digital analytical tools to collect quality data. It must be:

Accessibility tools need

■ be easy to use ■ be centrally organized and ■ provide a snapshot of your decision-making process

Data Entry and Workflow Automation

To have good output, you must have good input. To eliminate mistakes and errors that will compromise your data’s trustworthiness, you have to automate your data entry process and workflows. Companies that are already using data effectively do not depend on manual data entry processes that waste time and put your projects at risk. They only use digital tools for functions to create and manage the operational process in real-time.

Standardization of Technology and Data

You must also start thinking of data beyond just the numbers. Certainly, crunched facts and figures are great, but today’s construction data also comes in from visual information like photos and videos of your project’s progression. If you do not include those in your overall evaluation process, you will not get an accurate picture of your operational process.

It is common for owners, contractors and subcontractors to use different systems to exchange information on projects. The result is not a smooth and well-run project and, inevitably, profits fade from mistakes caused by non-uniform information being passed throughout the project. Even more alarming is the lack of standardization in a business between its divisions and departments. Whether on a project or in your company, incompatible systems and processes work against success. This is where standardization comes in: to get the highest quality and most reliable data. You want everyone to achieve the same goals and use the same metrics, tools and technology.

Information Accessibility

Advanced Analysis

■ Accurate – without errors and mistakes ■ Real-time – continuously updated from the data source ■ Trustworthy – usable as a decision-making means

Accessibility is one of the most significant components of any data-driven decision process. It needs to be accessible by everyone who needs it and when they need it from anywhere. No matter how good your data process is, if you can’t access it, it becomes useless. Your data must also be structured so that it is easy to understand and make decisions. Proper training of your team to read and analyze the data will also be needed to become engrained in your company culture. 38

to:

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020

Data arrives before cleaning and formatting in raw data views, leading to a misleading look. Advanced analytics will help you go beyond the raw data so you can make innovative and forward-thinking decisions. Data increases in usefulness and competitive advantage as it increases in analytical abundance. If you want to be competitive, you will need to include all data sources and formats, not just some. See the chart on the next page.


Effective Risk Management and Decision Making

If you cannot confidently say that your data is being used to guide your decisions and to support your team to bring projects in on or under budget, you have a problem. Without useful data, you are not likely to go from a defensive position to a proactive one. Then you can address risks before they become an unsurmountable challenge to your company.

Strive for Continuous Improvement

The collection of your data and analysis is an ongoing process and requires constant improvement. A data-driven company should never consider themselves at their ultimate peak of data conscientiousness, even if you have a competitive market advantage. Great companies always know they can do more to improve their processes, efficiency and overall profits. Today is the day to begin your transformation into the future of data-driven analytics. Whether you consider yourself among the more advanced technologically driven companies or know if you have a lot of work left to do, there is no time like the present to establish better systems and methods for using and managing your data. Don’t let your competitors get the upper hand on you; instead, take your company’s data seriously and make excellent use of it.

Source: McKinsey & Company

John Kenney has over 45 years of experience in the roofing industry. John started his career by working as a roofing apprentice at a family business in the Northeast and grew to operate multiple Top 100 Roofing Contractor businesses. If you would like any further information on this or another subject, you can contact John at jkenney@cotneyconsulting.com

FRM

Roof Warranties, continued from page 16

definition “limited,” there is a vast array of offerings and, many times, misunderstanding of what is actually being provided by the issuer. When discussing warranties and guarantees, understanding exactly what is being offered by researching the key provisions can position you to provide clarity to a property owner or roofing system specifier. This clarity will help avoid problems in the future and also help you be recognized as a valuable resource for information regarding roofing systems and their installation.

FRM

Helene Hardy Pierce is Vice President of Technical Services, Codes and Industry Relations at GAF in Parsippany, NJ.

Host Your Next Meeting or Seminar in Orlando FRSA’s New Training Center and Conference Room are Now Open FRSA can take care of catering and other details so you can focus on your event. Contact John Hellein for rates / schedule 800-767-3772 ext. 123 | john@floridaroof.com

www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

39


Roofing Apprenticeship Program via Online Learning Clay Thomas, Project Manager, Advanced Roofing, Inc., Instructor, ABCI Roofing Apprenticeship Program When we promised the roofing apprentices that they would learn new skills in the program, Zoom was not on the list. Of the 24 year three apprentices, only a handful had been exposed to the Zoom application and meetings. Now, they're all proud of their skills and look forward to the weekly online training sessions.

40

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020

Through a community effort with Career Source and Associated Builders and Contractors Institute (ABCI), laptop computers were secured for students in need. Year one of the program focuses on an introduction to roofing industry materials and methods. Year two focuses on roof systems and their construction,


while year three training gets product specific and finishes off with a module on Leadership and Project Management. Industry support for the program continues to be phenomenal. Unique times call for unique solutions. The Orlando and Fort Lauderdale year three groups are now combined and the format has been transitioned to primarily online learning, to adopt to COVID-19 restrictions. Trent Begley and Michael Snyder of SOPREMA provided a great overview of modified bitumen history, material composition and installation techniques. Dave Scott and Wally Brown of GAF conducted an online training session. Michael Scardina, Metal Division Manager at Advanced Roofing Inc. supported the gutter and downspout module with his extensive knowledge of metal fabrication and installation. Mike Silvers, CPRC, FRSA

Technical Director, continues to provide powerful industry insight and extensive code knowledge to help apprentices understand why we do what we do. In the coming months, PolySchool will be conducting a torch-applied modified bitumen lab and Gulf Coast Supply and Manufacturing will be conducting metal panel installation training. Sunbelt Equipment rentals will be certifying apprentices on boom lifts, scissor lifts and lulls. The group will also be installing gutter and downspouts as a charity project. Soft skills development is also a feature of the program. The goal of the ABCI Roofing Apprentice program is to expose the participants to all aspects of the roofing industry and prepare them to achieve to their full potential. The apprentices attend 450 hours of classroom and hands on labs as well as log 6,000 hours of on-the-job training during the course of the program. The ABCI Roofing Apprentice program is open to all contractors in a spirit of creating a qualified workforce for the entire industry.

FRM

Interested in learning more about the ABCI Roofing Apprenticeship Program? Visit FRSA’s website, www.floridaroof.com/roofing-apprenticeship-program and learn how you can invest in your employees’, your company’s and the industry’s future. More information available on the next page.

FBC 2020 Changes, continued from page 34

these challenges thanks to a grant from the Florida Department of Community Affairs, Building a Safer Florida, Inc. and its affiliated organizations. For more information, visit www.buildingasaferflorida.org. DISCLAIMER – This piece is intended to give the reader only general factual information current at the time of publication. This piece is not a substitute for professional advice and should not be used for guidance or decisions related to a specific design or FRM construction project. This piece is not intended to reflect the opinion of any of the entities, agencies or This document was provided by Building a Safer organizations identified in the materials. Any opinion Florida (BASF). Florida’s contractors, architects, engiis that of the individual author and should not be relied neers and trades professionals share a common goal of building a better Florida through use of hurricane-re- upon. lated mitigation techniques and energy-efficiency standards. Construction professionals can meet damage to metal electrical conduit during reroofing operations. To provide additional protection against accidental damage, the code now requires metal electrical conduit to be encased in concrete or supported above the roof covering when installed on roofs. Additionally, where metal electrical conduit is installed under corrugated metal sheet roof decking, it has to be located not less than 1.5 inches from the lowest surface of the roof decking.

www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

41


Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc.

Institute

How Many Roofers HOW HOW HOW MANY MANY MANY ROOFERS ROOFERS ROOFERS Are Coming ARE ARE ARE COMING COMING COMINGThrough THROUGH THROUGH THROUGH YOUR YOUR YOURDoors? DOORS? DOORS? DOORS? Your

               artral al l rirdridaidaa r t t ooo CCeCen en  n   FFl Fl l  

Classes held in Orlando, FL $880 per student per year

aidaa h h h d d i i t t t r r r SSoSouou u  F  Fl oFlolo    

Classes held in Fort Lauderdale, FL $880 per student per year

sststt ddadaa WWeWee  F FloFlorloirri i    

Classes held in Tampa, FL (HCC) $1,000 per student per year

INVEST INVEST INVESTIN YOUR IN YOUR IN YOURCOMPANY'S COMPANY'S COMPANY'SFUTURE FUTURE FUTURE- - - Booth Booth Booth#227 #227 #227

Roofing Apprentices Wanted! ROOFING ROOFING ROOFINGAPPRENTICES APPRENTICES APPRENTICESWANTED WANTED WANTED!!!

42

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020


CENTRAL FLORIDA ORLANDO

WEST FLORIDA TAMPA (HCC)

NEW CYCLE START

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Three year accredited Department of Educaton program

Three year accredited Department of Educaton program

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Tuition: $880 per student per year

ABC Members $500 per student per year

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For more information about the

NEW CYCLE START

FLORIDA ROOFING APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM

Three year accredited Department of Educaton program Tuition: $880 per student per year

Contact Kevin Kornahrens kevin@advancedroofing.com or 954-522-6868

Invest in Your Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Future... Florida Roofing Apprenticeship 3855 N. Econlockhatchee Trl. | Orlando, FL 32817 407-671-3772 ext. 123 | john@floridaroof.com


New Hire Checklist and Company Handbook Lisa Pate, FRSA Executive Director Last month we focused on Onboarding procedures for new hires and are following that up with more human resource information we hope you’ll find valuable. We asked Seay Management Consultants to create a Human Resources Checklist that helps ensure you implement "best practices" in terms of policies, procedures, manuals and documents to hire and retain employees and motivate them to excel. The following are recommended areas of focus as we move into a new year.

Review Application and New Hire Packet Ensure your hiring procedures are compliant with applicable regulations.

■ All applicants must fill out an application form and sign it. Incorrect information provided on the application form can be immediate grounds for termination. ■ Remove request for a social security number on the application form. ■ Some states and localities have restricted employers from inquiring about a candidate’s compensation history. ■ “Ban the Box” regulations in several states and municipal areas prohibit having questions on the application pertaining to criminal backgrounds or records. ■ Keep background check authorization documents separate from the application form. ■ Include a job description in your new hire packet for signature and acknowledgement of expected job duties. ■ Written authorization for any deductions should be contained in the new hire packet. Remember, employers are not permitted to deduct from an employee’s pay without advanced written authorization, in compliance with FLSA regulations.

Submit New Hire Reports

Regularly submit your New Hire Reports to the state employment agency database.

Job Descriptions

We recommend ensuring that you have detailed job descriptions for every position, in compliance with ADA, EEOC and Generally Accepted Principles of Human Resources Management. In addition to helping to manage employees, job descriptions are often 44

FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020

a first line of defense in the event of an EEOC or DOL investigation.

Organize I-9 Forms

Review your I-9 forms for completion and keep them in a file for all employees hired after November 6, 1986. Currently, employers should be utilizing the I-9 form with an expiration date of October 31, 2022 for new hires. ■ Examine and record documents under Columns A or B and C. ■ Make copies of the verification documents and attach them to the I-9 form. ■ File the I-9 forms in a separate location, not with the regular employee file. In July 2020, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed E-Verify into law, which requires public employers, contractors and subcontractors to use E-Verify and requires private employers to use E-Verify or to use the I-9 form and maintain copies of the documents used to complete the I-9 for three years.

Update Employment Labor Posters

Check that you have all currently required employment posters, placed in prominent locations. Federal regulations require six posters; the various state or municipal agencies require about five more. Government contractors have additional special posters which must be displayed according to federal requirements.

Audit Employee Files

Make sure your employee files are complete and that they include all the documents you need (such as the application form, disciplinary notices, commendations, performance appraisals, etc.) but none of the documents that are problematic (drug test records, private and personal documents). Some employee documents are necessary for recordkeeping and reporting and are perfectly proper, but are of a personal, private or medical nature or have an EEO component. Keep these documents in a confidential employee file, separate from the regular employee file.

Documentation

Make sure all of your human resources decisions and actions are fully and comprehensively documented and that you have developed and implemented a system of Progressive Discipline and that all of your


supervisors and managers have been fully trained.

Update Your Employee Handbook

This is your fundamental employment document because it describes how you will handle work issues that arise with your employees. To meet that goal, it should be comprehensive and detailed. Some recommended policies are: ■ EEO policy – This policy should include all protected categories under federal, state and local employment regulations. The policy should be reviewed annually to ensure all categories are listed. ■ Emergency Closing – Inclement weather and natural disasters can have an impact on regular business operations. Employers should have a stated plan of action to communicate with employees during these occurrences. ■ Cell Phones and Digital Technology – Address talking or texting at work, photography and safety issues involved while driving on employer business. ■ Email/Internet Use at Work – Train employees on how to compose emails, which internet sites should be avoided and inform them that, since the email system is the property of the employer, all emails are subject to being retrieved. ■ Discussing Wages – Employers should not have policies prohibiting employees from discussing wages, benefits and working conditions.

Time Records

The Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor is targeting the question of “working time,” which regulations define laboriously as whenever an employee is “suffered or permitted to work.” If an employee is working, the employer is responsible for paying for this time even if it was not authorized and even if the employer didn’t know about it. This could include travel time, meal periods, time before and after regular work hours, working from home and other time. Employers should have a clear policy on the use of smart phones and other devices at home and during other non-scheduled work hours to conduct company related business. Make sure employees are recording all of their work time accurately and that you know when employees are working.

Exempt/Non-Exempt Classification

Effective January 1, 2020, the Department of Labor implemented updated salary thresholds for exempt employees. The guaranteed salary level for an employee to be considered exempt from overtime is $684 per week (formerly $455) not subject to deduction. Employers may apply a portion of certain bonuses and commissions toward this total.

■ Review the status of your exempt employees to make sure they meet the current Department of Labor requirements. ■ Review the current salary levels of your exempt employees to determine if they are under or close to the $684 per week salary level. These employees will need to either: (a) keep an accurate record of all hours worked and be paid overtime (b) be held to under 40 hours per week or (c) have their salaries raised to the new guaranteed salary level of $684 per week ($35,568 annually). ■ Review and restructure pay plans for exempt employees paid by a salary plus commission pay plan. Pay plans must guarantee that these employees receive at least $684 per week. There are provisions regarding catch-up payments in a 52-week period.

Implement a Drug Free Workplace Program

This policy can help to resolve potential drug issues at work and lower your workers’ compensation premium. Employers have the right to prohibit employees from coming to work under the influence of drugs or alcohol and from bringing illegal drugs into the workplace. Even if marijuana is “legal” in your state, the employee still is not allowed to use it at work or report to work under the influence. Employers should check applicable state and local regulations due to evolving changes of screening requirements of applicants and employees pertaining to marijuana.

Prevent Sexual Harassment

Conduct sexual harassment awareness training annually for all managers and employees, to build a wall of protection around your company. Several states and municipalities have instituted required annual prevention training. We recommend that every employer should have a policy, published in the employee handbook, which prohibits sexual harassment at work and outlines a procedure for reporting allegations of sexual harassment. Employees who utilize the complaint procedure outlined in the policy should not be retaliated against or have their employment adversely affected by making such a complaint. A policy prohibiting management from engaging in a social, dating or romantic relationship with non-management employees is recommended.

Prevent Bullying in the Workplace

Bullying can be physical, emotional and relational and often occurs online and through social media. To prevent, eliminate or reduce bullying at work, we recommend that you develop a strong anti-bullying policy www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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and ensure you have a confidential and anonymous way for employees to report abuses.

2. continue the health insurance on the same basis as before the leave

Address Social Networking

3. upon return from leave, reinstate the employee in the same position he/she left, or an equivalent one.

Employers should develop a policy on the use of social networking at work, taking into consideration sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, etc. ■ Employers should prohibit or restrict access to social networking sites during working time and employers should be aware that some material that employees post may be considered a protected concerted activity, even if it is critical of management. ■ Supervisors and managers should be required to stay off the personal social media pages or sites of their employees. We strongly recommend management not “friend” employees on social media and to “unfriend” them if it has already occurred. ■ On the basis of NLRB regulations, employers should refrain from instructing employees about what they can and cannot post on Facebook or other social networking sites.

National Labor Relations Board

This agency covers both union and non-union employees and enforces the “Unfair Labor Practices” requirements. Under the provision of “protected concerted activity” two or more employees may discuss their wages, benefits or working conditions. As employers, we cannot counsel, discipline or dismiss them for engaging in this activity.

Unemployment

In an effort to reduce claims and benefits, keep the following in mind: ■ If you dismiss an employee within the 90-day probationary period, whatever benefits may be awarded should not be charged to your account. ■ Former employees should not be eligible for benefits if they are dismissed for misconduct or if they leave with “no good cause attributable to the employer.” ■ Employees who are dismissed for performance reasons will almost always be awarded benefits.

Understand the Different Types of Leave

Determine if your organization is covered by the federal Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) regulations. In most cases, an employer is covered if they have 50 or more employees within 75 miles of each other. Generally, an employee is eligible for FMLA if he or she has been employed for a year and has worked at least 1,250 hours within that year. FMLA requires the employer to: 1. provide 12 weeks of unpaid leave

Workers’ compensation leave is, by definition, a qualifying event for the Family and Medical Leave. If we do not place the employee concurrently on FMLA, the individual has this option on reserve to use at any time. If your organization is not covered by FMLA, then you should apply a regular Leave of Absence policy, which is usually not as restrictive on employers as FMLA. The key point to remember is that we must place the employee on some kind of leave – either FMLA, if you are covered and the employee is eligible, or Regular Leave of Absence. Employers should also review any applicable state and local leave regulations in areas such as Family Leave, Paid Sick Leave, Domestic Violence Leave and Parental/School Leave.

VETS 4212 Reports

In compliance with the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act (VEVRAA) all VETS 4212 reports are due on September 30th of each year. Employers must complete this if they have 100 employees or if they have 50 employees and an Affirmative Action Plan.

Conduct Management Training

Consider conducting several management training sessions this year on important subjects like: ■ How to counsel and dismiss employees ■ How to conduct performance appraisal ■ Sexual harassment training ■ Diversity in the workplace.

Schedule an HR Management Compliance Audit Review

This will help you reduce or eliminate any potential liability or exposure and provide you with the comfort and assurance that you are in compliance with all of the employment regulations that cover you as an employer. A Human Resources Management Compliance Audit Review checks to see that you have best practices in place to hire and retain good employees.

FRM

Seay Management Consultants, Inc. is a Human Resources Management Consulting firm that has been in operation since 1966, headquartered in Orlando, Fla. FRSA members have complimentary access to a human resource professional in partnership with Seay Management Consultants. This resource is available to provide answers to your HR, personnel management Continued on next page

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FLORIDA ROOFING | December 2020


Giving Back

FRSA Members Giving Back to the Community

Cotney Construction Law is launching a Giving Back campaign in December and will kick off the program on RoofersCoffeeShop.com. They will be donating their advertising and promotion budget promoting industry foundations and ask the industry to Give Back to the FRSA Educational Foundation or three other foundations as part of their year-end giving program. Cotney is matching donations evenly to all four foundations up to $2,500. As part of this generous December promotion, the RoofersCoffeeShop.com is focusing their December 17 Coffee Conversations on a discussion about the

importance of roofing industry foundations. You can listen to the live discussion, which begins at 9 am ET, where people across the country can ask questions and show support for roofing industry foundations. Visit www.rooferscoffeeshop.com for more information. Not able to join the December 17 Coffee Conversations but would like to support the FRSA Educational Foundation? Visit www.floridaroof.com and select “Support the Educational Foundation” in the center of the homepage. FRM

New Hires, continued from previous page

and employment-related questions. Many types of employment questions arise in daily business operations: topics such as payroll, leave of absence, discrimination, discipline, workers’ compensation and disabilities. Sometimes a simple question can turn into

a complicated or costly concern if it is not handled properly. When you have a question and need an accurate and concise answer, contact Seay Management by email at admin@seay.us or call 888-245-6272.

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

www.floridaroof.com | FLORIDA ROOFING

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OFERS F OV E R

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Profile for Florida Roofing Magazine

December 2020  

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