Hola MaHigh-School - August 2021

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Hola

MaHighSchool Volume 10, Issue 8, August 2021

n o i t i ed y r rsa u b s ng i i t r s p u s Aug ... and

d a e d S A r F e S b N m : e t n i p Just ow 3 Se n e n i l


LATEST AMENDED 2021 SCHOOL CALENDAR

January 2021 S

3 10 17 24

M

4 11 18 25

T

5 12 19 26

W

6 13 20 27

T

7 14 21 28

February 2021 F

S

1

2

8 15 22 29

9 16 23 30

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

1

2

3

4

5

6

7 14 21 28

8 15 22

9 16 23

10 17 24

11 18 25

12 19 26

13 20 27

S

M

T

31 April 2021 S

4 11 18 25

M

5 12 19 26

T

6 13 20 27

W

7 14 21 28

T

May 2021

1

2

3

8 15 22 29

9 16 23 30

10 17 24

4 11 18 25

M

5 12 19 26

T

6 13 20 27

W

7 14 21 28

2 9 16 23

3 10 17 24

30

31

3 10 17 24

M

4 11 18 25

T

5 12 19 26

S

S

M

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

8 15 22 29

F

S

T

W

T

F

S

1

2

3

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8 15 22 29

9 16 23 30

10 17 24 31

8 15 22 29

9 16 23 30

10 17 24 31

11 18 25

12 19 26

13 20 27

14 21 28

F

S

S

M

W

6 13 20 27

F

August 2021 T

October 2021 S

T

1

July 2021 S

W

T

7 14 21 28

November 2021 1

2

8 15 22 29

9 16 23 30

7 14 21 28

T

W

T

F

S

1

2

3

4

5

6

8 15 22 29

9 16 23 30

10 17 24

11 18 25

12 19 26

13 20 27

31 Duration

No. of weeks

(25 January) (01) 15 February – 23 April

(13)(12)10

(65

03 May – 09 July

10

50

26 July – 01 October

10

50

11 October

10

48 (

(43)(42)40

(21

Total

– 15 (15) December

No.


March 2021 S

M

T

W

T

F

1

2

3

4

5

6

7 14 21 28

8 15 22 29

9 16 23 30

10 17 24 31

11 18 25

12 19 26

13 20 27

S

M

T

F

S

June 2021

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

W

T

1

2

3

4

5

8 15 22 29

9 16 23 30

10 17 24

11 18 25

12 19 26

September 2021 S

5 12 19 26

M

6 13 20 27

T

7 14 21 28

W

T

F

S

1

2

3

4

8 15 22 29

9 16 23 30

10 17 24

11 18 25

December 2021 S

M

T

W

1

2

3

4

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

8 15 22 29

9 16 23 30

10 17 24 31

11 18 25

. of days

5)(60)50

(48)

13)(208)198

T

F

Weekends

S

S

Days for administration School days Public holidays School holidays Public and School Holidays 2021 01 January

New Year’s Day

21 March

Human Rights Day

22 March

Public holiday

02 April

Good Friday

05 April

Family Day

27 April

Freedom Day

01 May

Workers’ Day

16 June

Youth Day

09 August

National Women’s Day

24 September

Heritage Day

16 December

Day of Reconciliation

25 December

Christmas Day

26 December

Day of Goodwill

27 December

Public holiday

No. of public holidays

Actual no. of school days

3

(62)(57)47

1

49

2

48

00

(48)48

6

(207)(202)192


e t n o C e l b Ta of

Editor’s Letter

06

Contributors

10

Holler at us

11

Bursaries and funding

12

Poem of the month

13

Funding: how does it work

14

Bursaries: An experience

16

What to do? industry view

22

Who is Sivuka?

24

TVET support systems

26


ent

August 2021

NSFAS and TVETs

28

Funding music? Yes/No

30

UN climate report: doom?

36

The one: Get inspired

42

Olympics: what did we see?

46

Paralympics: Lest we forget

50

It is movie-time Is law science?

52 54

Month of September

58

We need writers

60

Next issue

62


Sybil Otterstrom Editor and CEO


September - which also means spring, finally! this was a hard one to get through. September is also last chance for a lot of bursaries. We have provided some good advise and provided some links for you to explore. The message is really: it is complicated. NSFAS is the biggie! no doubt there and they have extended their deadline to 3 September. The questions is: What about funding for TVETs? Is NSFAS there? Read on - we have the answers. We also have an article from a new content provider: Sivukayouth. This is very hot stuff, so look it up. And of course the fun stuff - that I love. Good Read!

Sybil


Tshwane South Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Do you youhave havea aGrade Grade 9 certificate or higher? Have decided Do 9 certificate orEducation higher? Have you you decided College operating under the Department of Higher and which career path to follow? Training thepath fourthto largest TVET College in terms of enrolwhichbecame career follow? ments in 2018. Over and above that thethe College managed to attainVocational - NC (V) and Well choose National Certificate Well don’t don’tlook lookany anyfurther further choose the National Certificate Vocational - NC(V) the fifth rank in the 2019 T119 national results. The College was also start studying for your career path? and start studying for your career path.for the fields of Meselected as one of the Centres of Specialisation chanical Fitter, and Fitting and Turning, Electrician, Boilermaking and What is National Certificate Vocational NC(V)? Millwright 2017. What isinNational Certificate Vocational (NCV)?

TheNational NationalCertificate Certificate Vocational NC(V) is aand new and modern qualification The Vocational (NCV) is a new modern qualification offered

Employing ±470 staff TVET members, theTVET College aims to2007. equip students offered at Tshwane South College since offered at Tshwane South College since January It isJanuary offered at2007. LevelsIt2,is3 and 4 with the skills required by the job market and has Alumni that work of National Framework are equivalent to Grades 10, 11 and at the Levels 2, 3Qualifications and 4 of the Nationalwhich Qualifications Framework which are for renowned Engineering companies like WBHO, to name but a few.

12. It is regarded as one of quality andas high knowledge pro- skills, equivalent to Grades 10,the 11high andskills, 12. Ithigh is regarded one of the high grammes that provides experience of the workplace environment and is intended toof high quality and high knowledge programmes that provides experience Under the auspices of Department of Higher Education Training, the directly respond to the priority. This qualification will also provide you an opportunithe workplace environment and is intended to 9directly College targets learners who have completed their Grade to 11 forrespond to the priority. ty to be admitted higher studies is subject appropriate NC (V) courses as wellatas learners who haveyou completed their Gradetoto 12be This qualification will alsoeducation provide an that opportunity admitted subject at higher combination. for NATED/Report 191 programmes. education studies that is subject to appropriate subject combination.

Duration of the qualification: The College offers Report 191 programmes N1 to N6 in Mechanical, Duration of the qualification: Civil and Electrical Engineering, N4 to N6 Management Assistant, FiNCV isManagement aisthree yearyear qualification offered at 2, 3inand Each4.level takes a full NC(V) a three qualification offered Levels 2, 4. 3 and Each level takes nancial and Hospitality Studies. NCLevels (V)atL2-L4 Electrical year of study. A student is issued with a certificate on the successful completion of a full year Construction, of study. A Engineering student isand issued with a certificate Infrastructure Related Design, Informa- on the successful each level of of study. tion Technology, Tourism, Officeof Administration, Civil Construction and completion each level study. Hospitality. Learnerships are also offered at the College. At TSC TVET we offer the following NC(V) programmes: At TSC TVET we offer the following NC (V) programmes:

Tshwane South TVET Currently comprises of the following Campuses: Atteridgeville, Centurion, •• Finance, Finance, Economicsand andAccounting Accounting Economics Odi and Pretoria West.

•• Office Office Administration Administration • Information Technology Computer Scienceskills of its Hospitality students The College’s campus in Centurion isand famed for the Science culinary • Information Technology and Computer •• Civil Civil Engineering Building Construction and for having the best machinery for practical engineering training workshops. Atteridgeville Engineering & &Building Construction •• Electrical Electrical Infrastructure Construction Campus is known for its Civil Engineering. Pretoria Infrastructure Construction West is offering Engineering for both Report 191 and Engineering NC (V) andand hasand been identified as an Engineering Report 191 and for Engineering and IT •• Engineering Related Design Related Design courses. The Odi campus, in Mabopane, is acclaimed for its NC (V) Tourism Programme. •• Hospitality Hospitality •• Tourism Tourism

Want to be part of the fourth industrial revolution let TSC TVET assist you to achieve the future! LIL\17619086


COURSES OFFERED AT TSHWANE SOUTH TVET COLLEGE NATIONAL CERTIFICATE VOCATIONAL *L2 - L4 : • • • • • • • •

Tourism Hospitality Information Technology & Computer Science Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering & Related Design Office Administration Finance Economics & Accounting

PRE LEARNING PROGRAMME • PLP – Pre Learning Programme (NEW)

REPORT 191: GENERAL STUDIES *N4 - N6 : • Intro Business Studies N4 • Intro Catering services N4 • Management Assistant • Financial Management • Hospitality Studies

REPORT 191: NATURAL SCIENCE (ENGENEERING STUDIES)

*N4 - N6 :

• Electrical, Mechanical & Civil Engineering

SKILLS PROGRAMME • • • •

Clothing Production Artisan Training Gandhi – Mandela Centre of Specialisation for Artisan Skills (NEW) Centre of Specialisation for tting & turning (NEW)

LEARNERSHIP • Early Childhood Development • Community House Building • Building and Civil Construction CAMPUS CONTACT DETAILS:

General Enquiries: 012 401 5000 Atteridgeville: 012 373 1200 Centurion: 012 660 8500/1 Pretoria West: 012 380 5000 Odi: 012 725 1800

Tshwane South TVET College has been selected as one of the Centres of Specialisation for the elds of Mechanical Fitter and Fitter & Turning.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT : www.tsc.edu.za

FOLLOW US: @OfficialTshwaneSouthCollege/ @tsc_tvet @tsc_tvet


Meet our contributors Masiziba Hadebe is doing her Master’s Agricultural Economics at the University of the Free State (UFS). She is driven to make a change and is a passionate volunteer for community projects. She loves reading and writing about science, agriculture and anything in between. She believes you can wear a smile whatever the weather! I am Marcia Ramodike from Limpopo Tzaneen at lenyenye. I am an author when not studying. I am passionate about writing and i live to give hope and wish to change the world. I love reading and in most of my time i write. My favourite book is ‘Her Mothers Hope by Francine Rivers. My name is Molatelo Kate Kgatla, I’m 24 years old. I was born and raised in Lenyenye. I’m a grade 2 teacher at Vunza Teddy Bear Learning Academy, an author of a book titled her jouney as a young mother. I became a mother at 17. It influenced me to write about my personal journey to try and help someone that could be going through the same. I love writing and I love my 7 year old daughter and life. Lesly Malose Mahapa is a singer/writer/poet. He started writing at the age of 14 and has since been on a journey to pursue his music and writing career. Lesly is currently working with an indie group ‘MozSouth’ based in Ivory park, Midrand. Lesly is also a brand ambassador for a local clothing line “Boi Boi apparel”


HOLLER AT US MaHigh-School The stuff we need to mention:

Website www.romele.co.za

Editor & Publisher Sybil Otterstrom sybil@romele.co.za Advertising sales Next level Management services cc 011 614 5046 076 360 1792 sybil@next-level.co.za Publishing Romele Publications cc 32 Eleanor street Troyeville 2094 011 614 5046/076 360 1792

facebook.com/ holamahigh

Enquiries Romele Publications cc 32 Eleanor Street Troyeville 2094 Production and Art Direction Ivan Otterstrom ivan@romele.co.za

Twitter.com/ high_hola


One thing is to identify the career and identifying the institution, another thing all together is how to get through it. This is where funding comes in. Of course there are several options, but let us face it: the majority will depend on bursaries and other funding options. NSFAS is a major player, but there are also other options out there. Experience is good to listen to. That is why we have asked our writers to also look at how easy (or difficult) it is to obtain a bursary. We have an industry view of funding. This is a major organisation which is providing us with content: Sivuka Youth. There are several services they can provide, which might be of interest. TVETs offer courses which are eligible for funding. Look out! it is not all courses which NSFAS can fund. We have found the courses which are funded, and also the amounts, etc. As NSFAS is the government funding, it is worth looking at this first. In essence: It is not so easy, but it is possible!

JUST IN: New NSFAS deadline: 3 September



Funding education – how does it work Welcome to the confusing world of bursaries, scholarships and funding of education in general. TVET funding TVETs are an important part of SA now. It is an international trend to ensure that our workforce in all aspects is well-skilled and that it can be documented. Gone are the days of the low-grade ‘apprentice’. However, that puts pressure on the TVETs (whether government or private institutions) to also ensure that an education can be funded. The big ‘funder’ is of course NSFAS. NSFAS does support and fund certain TVET educations but only government TVETs. Please do read the article from Northlink College. It will give you a feel for what can be achieved. On the TVET front it is not all lost. There are bursaries available also for private institutions. However, it takes an effort to dig them out. University funding NSFAS funding and private bursaries are available. However, it is again something that requires an effort to figure out. In general terms: university studies are funded. However, there are also rules applicable to this.


General advise: Start NOW and stick to deadlines. Explore options and research it. The better researched and the better the focus, the better the result (typically at least). We have provided a few links which might help: This is surely the crucial one. Ensure this is first step in the research.

This is the list of TVETs where NSFAS funding is available.

Another interesting link

And of course Fundi

But also look at our new contributor: Sivuka

Good Luck!


Acquiring a bursary? Is it easy or difficult: My perspective. Studying is very expensive. This is well known and not everyone gets through varsity without some help. In fact, university costs are estimated to rise to R107, 600 by 2025 and as much as R165, 600 by 2030. That is a lot, so a bursary might come in handy! Bursaries, however, are no longer just a financial support program, but have expanded into holistic student support in order to ensure your student success. Therefore, one can no longer only look into bursaries for financial support, but for a community in which you can grow emotionally as well. So how do you acquire one? Firstly, seek them. As they say: “Seek and you shall find”. Be always on the lookout. Ask your teachers if they know of any bursaries for what you want to study. Do this from Grade 10 and Grade 11 because some bursaries recruit earlier and want students to be ready. So be on the lookout, set those google alerts. So that you can have options. Secondly, once you have identified the bursaries, look out for the requirements. What kind of student do they want and even more importantly, where (which institution) do they want you. Paying attention to the requirements will make the application easier for you and the potential


funders. Some bursaries want you to have applied at certain higher institutions while others want your family to be in a certain income bracket, while some are interested purely in merit. After you have identified the requirements, do what is needed. Do they want you to submit online? Always try to practically do what they need you to do. Also remember to always align your documents with what they want. If they want all documents in PDF, do that and submit all the documents in the format they require. Take note of the closing date and submission method. When the closing date is stipulated, please follow it as it is. Do not attempt to submit after the closing date because the application will not be rendered successful. If they say via email/link, at least you know you can submit on the day, however, should they want post or courier, please remember to complete your applications way ahead of time in order for the documents to arrive on time. Bursaries are available to you, grab the opportunity and there might be some luck if you prepare. As they say “Luck is when opportunity meets preparation”.

Masiziba Hadebe




PROGRAMMES OFFERED DHET TVET College Bursary Scheme (Terms and Conditions apply)

STUDY FULL TIME OR PART TIME

BUSINESS SCHOOL - N4-N6 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (BENONI, BRAKPAN, SPRINGS) - N4-N6 MARKETING MANAGEMENT (BENONI, BRAKPAN, SPRINGS) - N4-N6 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (BENONI) - N4-N6 MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT (BENONI, BRAKPAN)

SCHOOL OF CREATIVE & SOCIAL SERVICES (N4-N6 FULL TIME) - N4-N6 TOURISM (SPRINGS ONLY) - N4-N6 HOSPITALITY (SPRINGS ONLY)

Tel: (011) 730 6600 | Fax: (011) 736 9909 | info@eec.edu.za | www.eec.edu.za @EkurhuleniEast

@EECTVETCOLLEGE

@EKURHULENIEASTTVETCOLLEGE


higher education & training Department: Higher Education and Training REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

STUDENT JOURNEY

SCH OO L

F O

Innovation is seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought EERING GIN EN

DAVEYTON CAMPUS

EKURHULENI EAST TVET COLLEGE produced first innovative young man G who developed a cell phone. OL OF ENGINE HO ER SC IN

The cell phone model demo IPRINO is named a�er his first nickname PRINO which is shortened from his first name ENGINEERING STUDIES Prince. With the rapid growth in Computer Technology in South Africa and the world and a shi� towards the fourth Trimester 2 registration starts: 2020 Industrial Revolu�on Prince20is April keeping up with the Classes commence: May 2020of an inven�on of a technology as he has an 11 idea in mind health detec�on applica�on for the IPRINO that will Trimester 3 registration be starts: 17 August 2020 able to scan the body temperature and Classes commence: September detect if there07are any health2020 problems and recommends a healing plan for the disorder, BUSINESS SCHOOL he quoted. SCHOOL OF CREATIVE & SOCIAL SCIENCES

When it comes to innova�on and crea�vity Prince Sebetha a former student of Ekurhuleni East Tvet College sets a KWA-THEMA CAMPUS good example. His journey with the College started back in 2016 when he SC enrolled in one of our campuses (Daveyton Campus) for Engineering and Related Design (fi�ng and Turning).

“My dream is22toJune see the IPRINO cell Semester 2 registration starts: 2020 phone manufactured sold in South Classes commence: 13 July and 2020

SCHOOL ESS SIN U B

ENGINEERIN G OF N1 OL HO

BENONI CAMPUS “ In the year 2019, Ekurhuleni East Tvet College Placement office changed my life completely and made my dream come true when I got an opportunity to go for a Mechatronics engineering internship in Luzhou CAMPUS VocationalBRAKPAN and Technical College based in China”, said Sebetha.

Africa and in other African countries, as it

will be the first cell phone designed by a black DOCUMENTS REQUIRED South African young man from a small

N3

ESS SCHOOL SIN BU

SPRINGS CAMPUS

O SCHO L | SCH OO L

F O

S CE VI

BU

SS NE SI

With the knowledge he got from the Mechatronics internship he designed a cell phone model demo and he named it IPRINO.

REGISTRATION DATES...

1. Student ID certified copy (x3) disadvantaged and unrecognized village”, Prince 2. Parent(s) / Guardian ID concluded. certified copy (x3) Sebetha 3. Proof of address (x3) i.e The student's home address and not a box number. If a student comes from KZN, Limpopo, Soshanguve, etc the address must be from he/she comes from. Proof of address could be: 3.1 Certified Letter from the Local Municipality bearing the Municipality logo 3.2 Municipality bills receipt certified 3.3 Any retail shops certified statement such as Edgars as an example but not a bank statement 3.4 A letter from the traditional leader if coming from a village. The letter must bear the signature of the traditional leader and a stamp from the tradition leader. 4. Certified proof of income of parent(s) /Guardian (x1) 5. Student's bank statement (x1) 6. Lease agreement (x1) signed by both the student and the property owner 7. Certified Parent(s) Death Certificates (x1) 8. Certified student's results (x3) NB: ALL DOCUMENTS MUST BEAR A CERTIFICATION STAMP NOT OLDER THAN 3 MONTHS TO APPLY ONLINE:

https://eecapp.eec.edu.za/pls/prodi03/gen.gw1pkg.gw1startup?x_processcode=ITS_OAP

TEL: (011) 730 6600, WEBSITE: www.eec.edu.za, EMAIL: info@eec.edu.za

IVE & SOCI EAT AL CR SE R


What you need to know about bursaries and funding By Ashalia Maharajh, Founder and Director of Sivuka Consulting It’s getting closer to the end of the year and, if you’re in Matric, you’ve probably started planning your next move. While some might decide to take a gap year, others are already looking forward to furthering their education and applying at various institutions and universities to give them the boost they need to enter the working world, but tertiary education can be very expensive. How to secure a bursary? There are so many ways that you can study or work after high school. Organisations in South Africa are incentivised to run learnership, internship programmes and sponsor bursaries, so these are abundantly available. Depending on the sector you are interested in, you can work on the skills needed to get selected for these while you are at school and apply for them. These are powerful opportunities where you get paid a stipend amount, are given an accredited qualification, and gain invaluable workplace experience. Learnership: Usually a 12-month programme where you are taught skills within an Accredited Qualification and gain workplace experience. You will need to show that you are willing to work hard at completing the qualification and have your matric certificate to qual-


ify. Look out for these whilst you are still at school and be sure to search for Learnerships in your career path. Bursary: A sponsorship of your studies, usually post-matric based on high academic performance in school. You gain the opportunity to have your fees paid for and potentially vacation work at the company that is sponsoring in your chosen career field. A great way to apply for sponsorship is contacting the companies directly and asking if they are sponsoring university students. Being proactive here is key! You got a bursary – now what? If you are lucky enough to get a bursary, you have to be clear on what is expected of you and work towards meeting those expectations. Knowing this will give you an opportunity to continue studying and give your career a jumpstart. That’s why learning very important skills on how to make the most of opportunities is critical to success beyond the bursary. About Sivuka Youth At Sivuka Youth, our programmes empower our youth to find their voice, discover their purpose and take up space in this world. We can help you master your true self and coach you as you prepare for the start of your next journey. Just keep in mind that it won’t always be easy, however there will always be opportunities to help you get closer to your dreams. Want to know more: https://www.sivukayouth.com/


Who is Sivuka? Sivuka is an accredited skills provider, specialising in self-mastery-based training, employment skills development, recruitment, and career coaching for young South Africans. In doing so, Sivuka is determined to not only close the graduate skills gap but encourage young people to find their voice, discover their purpose, and use their talents to make a real difference in the world. “As a proudly South African company, we are incredibly passionate about the amount of talent and tenacity our youth have, and we are doing everything in our power to unleash this talent in the best way possible,” explains Ashalia Maharajh, Founder and Director of Sivuka Youth. “We bring graduates, unemployed individuals, and organisations together to liberate and transform youth development across South Africa. Another key differentiator? Sivuka focuses on self-mastery, personal effectiveness, and emotional intelligence (EQ/EI) in its youth training courses. Sivuka believes that self-mastery is a critical driver for young people, profoundly impacting their career trajectories and how they will lead and transform the country in the future. Research backs this up: here and here. In just 3 years Sivuka Youth have individually coached over 1000 young people, facilitated 10 Corporate Youth Work Readiness Programmes for corporates in the country which consisted of about 220 young delegates.


Also, Sivuka is currently developing an online Business Professional Learnership that can be done online. Sivuka’s work also includes work implemented for local and global organisations, having consulted and designed learning strategies for 5 global organisations. Sivuka has successfully assessed and recruited 58 Learners and Interns for organisations. Lastly, Sivuka Youth’s database spans over 20 000 strong talented youth, that have been through a free personality test and received a free CV. So far, Sivuka has partnered with more than 20 companies to place 58 young people in jobs, as well as developed 3 training and change management programmes that have helped employees excel in the workplace. Sivuka’s core aim is to deliver an end-to-end youth solution for organisations. The ability to train interns, mentors, and managers to become better coaches using unique training techniques has resulted in Sivuka receiving a 97% average training evaluation across all programmes. Sivuka’s goal is to match more businesses with talented young people and empower these young people with the skills they need to succeed and grow South Africa. Learn more about all that Sivuka has to offer South Africa’s youth: https://www. sivukayouth.com/


Leaving school and getting to ‘real life’ can be hard. Tertiary education is different and it does pose different problems. We have asked Thozamile Mvumvu from Northlink TVET to describe what they are doing to support the students.

Northlink College student support services

Northlink college’s intense academic programmes are designed to provide a challenging, yet rewarding, student life experience, for both new and returning students. Students are the heart of the College and they must be sustained holistically to ensure that they excel academically, mentally and psychologically physically. The college provides necessary support services to students, through a range of student-oriented programmes, rendered by various departments such as Student Support Services (SSS), Work Integrated Learning (WIL), Professional nurse services (Wellness), Financial support (Bursary), Sport, Arts and Culture and support from their Student Representative Council. Services offered by these departments are all intended to help students holistically thus ensuring they achieve their educational goals, and enhance their college experiences. All registered students have access and can benefit from these services. SSS promotes academic success, career development, social-emotional and physical wellbeing as part of their strategy.


Holistically this is how students are prioritised at Northlink: • Academic Support - career guidance • Health and Wellness - professional counselling services (online and in-person) • Inclusive Education – to include special needs students into the system • Sport, Arts and Culture – cultural events create awareness, nurtures talents, allow for interaction and inclusiveness between peers • Financial Assistance – provide information on bursaries • Student Governance and Leadership – assist with the development of skills, as well as guidance and support from peers • Opening Learning Centres – provides access to research, computers, WiFi, photocopying, printing, etc. • Work Integrated Learning (WIL) - support and advice for on job readiness and placement

Thozamile Thomas Mvumvu


NSFAS and TVETs What is funded and where? The big question is always: Does NSFAS fund education not at universities? It is correct that NSFAS is by far the biggest and most regulated of the bursary options. And the answer is YES. TVET courses are funded, but not all courses at TVETs. This is important as TVETs may offer a variety of courses, so look out. The information below is from www. careersportal.co.za/news/how-nsfasworks-for-tvet-college-students Which TVET programmes does NSFAS fund? • Engineering Studies National Certificate -Vocational NQF levels 2-4 Report 191 N1-N6 • Engineering and Related Design; Electrical Infrastructure; Civil Engineering Construction; Information Technology & Computer Science • Business & Utility Studies National Certificate – Vocational NQF levels 2-4 Report 191 N1-N6 • Management; Marketing; Finance; Office Administration; Economics & Accounting; Education & Development; Hospitality; Tourism; Safety in Society and Transport & Logistics • Pre-Learning Programme (PLP) funding through NSFAS


What is included in the NSFAS bursary? • Registration fees • Tuition fees • Personal Care Allowance of R2900 per year • Transport Allowance of R7000 per year • Accommodation Allowance; Accommodation in an urban area R24,000 per annum Accommodation in an peri-urban area R18,900 per annum Accommodation in an rural area R15,750 per annum If we look at the amounts, it does enable a student to focus on studying without the absolute need for a job in parallel. That is one of the major risks: we all like to have that extra and a ‘little’ job can take away from studying. Be aware! And the other big question: Does NSFAS fund education at private colleges? The answer is NO. NSFAS is focused on public TVETs. The list of public TVETs was published in the last issue of Hola MaHigh-School. Here is the link anyway. https://issuu.com/romele/docs/hola_mahigh-school_-_july_2021

About NSFAS The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) is the government student bursary and loan scheme that receives its funding budget from, and reports to the Department of Higher Education and Training. The scheme was established in terms of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme Act 56 of 1999. We provide financial assistance in the form of bursaries and loans to eligible students at public universities and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges in South Africa. We administer such bursaries and loans, and recover the loans from students once they have graduated and are employed. NSFAS also raises funds in order to increase the funding pool for student bursaries and loans.


How can music be funded in South Africa? Firstly, how many times have you heard about South African musicians dying broke? is it because they’re using their money recklessly or is it because our government does not really fund and focus on arts and music in general? I have been doing a bit of research before starting to write this article. I have tried to find agencies or companies that actually fund musicians (besides the government agencies) and I only found one: BASA. It seems to me that the only work that they have been doing is to find artists that are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. I stand to be corrected though. The sad part about this is that they only cover a smaller number of musicians in South Africa out of the thousands and thousands that we have. It makes me wonder: what about the rest of us? And mind you most of the beneficiaries are musicians who are already discovered and are in the limelight.


What do we say about the ones that are starting up? I think the government needs to change its policies when it comes to this funding music and art. I looked at countries like the United States, UK and Australia. They literally have the government and taxpayers helping musicians who are still starting up, finding them and making sure that music becomes their primary income. I believe this is the way to go. If only there were platforms that were put in place to help up and coming artists to produce music and art, things would be so much better. In South Africa, in order for you to be able to live off music, you have to have a job that can also provide some sort of an income for you. Your income is not promised and things are worse now since the pandemic. Gigs are getting cancelled and more and more artists are struggling a lot more than ever. It is sad, but in my opinion music in South Africa is a hobby more than a career because the opportunities to succeed depend on funding and support – and that is not fortcoming. Music and art in all its forms are part of us all and we should not neglect it in the face of covid hardships.

Lezy de Yong


New Exhibitions

We added two new exhibitions to our collection on the floor. The 4IR and Mirror Maze exhibitions

4IR Exhibition The 4IR exhibition currently hosts the Humanoids (two small ones and the big one called Pepper), Virtual reality Station, Augmented Reality and the interactive displays integrated with of a number of TV screens. This concept is through the touch screen located at the entrance to the center. Interactive display section has been created where visitors are encouraged to use traditional touch screens to immerse themselves in games and content around Science Technology Engineering and Arts and Mathematics (STEAM).

Children are provided with the opportunity to play games to train their analytical ability, improve their ability to solve puzzles and chal-


lenges. They are also challenged to explore more traditional content style, such as exploration of subjects including how Artificial Intelligence works, Machine Learning, how data transfers over networks etc. Science Exploration While traditional science teaching has complex challenges around logistics, safety and costs. VR has none of these limitations. Experiments are done as often as needed with no physical costs of materials or safety concerns. Students can learn about physics and chemistry, life science etc. in a safe environment. Within VR learning occurs without any distract but with full immersion. Learning and understanding mathematics becomes easier and more fun inside of VR due to the nature of games and how they are designed. This is designed to make learning and exploration real fun especially for little ones. Wide learning opportunities exist through this exhibition, children have many prospects to learn on, e.g. google earth exploration experience. With Google Earth VR, children can travel to almost any place in the world. They can fly all over the world and explore any city, any monument and landmark anywhere in the world.The exhibition has two different types of humanoids the small one (called Sanbot Max and the Bigger one called Pepper). The Sanbot Max robot was designed to be implemented into numerous kinds of business scenarios, providing customers and staff members with intelligent and efficient services. Pepper is a semi-humanoid robot, which means that a human has to control it. It is designed with the ability to read emotions. Pepper recognizes faces and basic human emotion.


Drones and Mirror Maze Drones Pilots at the Clubhouse Did you know that the Clubhouse has three certified drone pilots? They also have 10 DJI Tell drones that they will used for their drone course. They are currently putting together content for the said course. In addition, the Clubhouse offers programmes such as Teach Fundamentals of drones, real-life applications of drones: namely surveillance using object identification and tracking to videography for commercials and other media use. This includes python programming that covers drone automation.


Mirror Maze Exhibit A mirror is an object that reflects an image. Light that bounces off a mirror will show an image of whatever is in front of it, when focused through the lens of the eye or a camera. Mirrors reverse the direction of the image in an equal yet opposite angle from which the light shines upon it. This allows the viewer to see themselves or objects behind them, or even objects that are at an angle from them but out of their field of view, such as around a corner. Natural mirrors prehistoric times, water, but people turing mirrors out rials for thousands metals, and glass. metals like silver often used due to applied as a thin cause of its natuhard surface.

have existed since such as the surface of have been manufacof a variety of mateof years, like stone, In modern mirrors, or aluminum are their high reflectivity, coating on glass berally smooth and very

A maze is a path or collection of paths, typically from an entrance to a goal. The word is used to refer both to branching tour puzzles through which the solver must find a route, and to simpler non-branching patterns that lead unambiguously through a convoluted layout to a goal. The pathways and walls in a maze are typically fixed, but puzzles in which the walls and paths can change during the game are also categorised as mazes or tour puzzles Mirror Maze The mirror maze itself is a pattern, combining several characteristics of geometric patterns: repetition, symmetry and tessellation using repeated equilateral triangles. These triangles fit together without any gaps or overlaps, creating a tessellation. Mirrored surfaces all around reflect the pattern so that it repeats and appears infinite.


The New Climate report: is it doom? The latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Report was released indicating our status on climate change and it is making some lengthy and terrifying statements. However, is it doom and gloom? Let us explore. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the United Nations body for assessing the science related to climate change. As always, human activities are the center of climate change. The report highlights the human activity aspect in depth. To illustrate, the report found that the observed increases in well-mixed greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations since around 1750 are unequivocally caused by human activities. Land and ocean have taken up about 56% per year of CO2 emissions from human activities over the past six decades. In addition, cities contribute to the human-induced warming locally, and further urbanization together with more frequent hot extremes will increase the severity of heatwaves (very high confidence In coastal cities), the combination of more frequent extreme sea level events (due to


sea level rise and storm surge) and extreme rainfall/river flow events will make flooding more probable. In other words, the report is informing us that heatwaves, floods and other usually abnormal natural disasters may be a norm. That is terrifying, and unfortunately this has been due to the increase in human activities that continue plugging GHG’s into our planet’s atmosphere. In addition, this could make some of the places on this planet completely inhabitable and not even visitable. So can we remedy such a situation? Besides halting all human activities (a situation we saw during the hard lockdowns of the pandemic where the economy was practically in ICU), there are ways we can act on climate change. According to the report, if global net negative CO2 emissions were to be achieved and be sustained, the global CO2-induced surface temperature increase would be gradually reversed but other climate changes would continue in their current direction for decades to millennia (high confidence). In other words, the world must ensure that the production activities that are responsible for producing CO2 must reduce the CO2 produced to a quantity that can be recycled by the atmosphere. Reaching this net zero is possible through using clean technology or burying any remaining releases using carbon capture and storage or planting more trees in order to absorb these emissions. For instance, if we were to limit the use of fossil fuels such as oil, carbon and natural gas and replacing them with renewable and cleaner sources of energy, all while increasing energy efficiency it can prove beneficial because then sources of emissions are reduced.


This report, in its lengthy aspect, could not even cover up the effects of climate change on the world with its current disparities and that on its own is terrifying. However, as climate change is a process that has been studied and continues to be studied, countries and individuals must take the report’s findings into consideration for the betterment of people (both present and future generations) and the planet. In addition, since climate change is not a process that occurred in a short period of time, we cannot remedy the situation in a blink of an eye and action must taken now. A glimmer of hope According to BBC article by by Victoria Gill, Science correspondent, BBC News, the ban on CFC gasses in 1987 averted climate a catastrophe. The ban was a part of the Montreal protocol on climate. If the ban had not been perature might have 2,5 degrees and the UV light hitting us all dramatically.

in place, the air tembeen increased by amount of harmful would have increased

Something actually works!

Masiziba Hadebe


HOW TO CHOOSE YOUR CAREER Knowing yourself and your capabilities

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The Eastern Ca pe Department of Education enco urages learners to choose suitable career path, by collecting inform ation that will he lp them pursue their career / field of study.

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Hola MaHi We just created our whatsapp group! Why not join? The group name is Hola MaHigh-School and you can chuck me a whatsapp on 076 503 1282 and you will get added pronto.


igh-School What will you receive? We will have the monthly digizine in your hands via the link to Issuu. That is a quick way of making sure you can enjoy it in your own time. ` Info and more info We promise not to burden you with too much info, but if and when something great is happening (an article perhaps?) we will push it out to you. Can I post as well? Limited for now, but please feel free to whatsapp me on my office cell: 076 503 1282. If it is relevant, we wil ensure it gets out there.


August is women’s month here in South Africa and I am honored and privileged to be covering this talented lady of fashion. Tshegofatso More is a 22 year old fashion designer, singer and model from Soweto. After completing her matric Tshegofatso found herself caught between studying law or business. This was a difficult choice for her as she was fond of both. As she was contemtwo a friend of hers ion design since she her own clothes and advice and then en05 fashion institution

plating between these advised her to try fashwas good at making sketching. She took the rolled herself at studio in Johannesburg.

When asked about the challenges she faced as a fashion design student she said “It is not only about sketching and sewing as people think. There is a whole lot more to it, things that I did not know about. There is a lot of numbers involved, so you have to know your math. Not only math, but driving your own business requires business knowledge and acumen. The curriculum also involves more than 20 plus modules and practicals that you have to go through in order for you to pass and get your diploma. Her designs are both classy with a touch of vintage and elegance and she is currently working on her spring/summer collection. Since she has no


sponsorship or funding, she had to get a job in order for her to sponsor herself. The lack of funding in the fashion industry is a challenge, but despite that her future goals are to own her own fashion factory that can employ over 100 people. When asked why, she said “I am passionate about people and I want to create employment and not just obtain wealth for myself”. Her advice to young people out there who wish to be in the same field as hers is to do your verifications. Check if the institution is registered, check the NQF levels and also study hard. As Tshegofatso says: “You will be grateful when it’s done right and most importantly do what you love and enjoy it to the fullest”. @Tshegofatso_More on social media

Lezy de Yong


What is NSFAS?

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) is a government entity under the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET)

What does NSFAS do? Supports access to and success in, higher education and training for students from poor and working-class families who would otherwise not be able to afford the cost of studies at a public university or Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college. • Provides financial aid to eligible students who are studying or plan to study at any of the 50 TVET colleges or the 26 public universities in South Africa • Identifies students who qualify for the bursary • Provides bursaries to students

Who qualifies for NSFAS funding? • All South African citizens • All SASSA grant recipients • Applicants whose combined household income is not more than R350 000 per annum • Persons with disabilities with a combined household income of not more than R600 000 per annum • Students who started studying at a university before 2018 and whose household income is not more than R122 000 per annum


What does the NSFAS bursary cover?

• Registration • Tuition • Book allowance • Accommodation allowance • Transport allowance • Food allowance • Personal care allowance

Does the NSFAS bursary offer any additional support for students with disabilities? Yes, NSFAS further supports funded students with disabilities through an additional allowance that covers: • Medical assessments • Assistive devices • Human support to cover for the cost of a caregiver, guide dog, scribe or tutor.

How, where and when can one apply for NSFAS? The 2021 application season will be communicated through media, social media and the NSFAS website www.nsfas.org.za. Applications are submitted online through the NSFAS website: www.nsfas.org.za

To apply for NSFAS funding students must have a registered myNSFAS account. If you plan to study in 2021 and require support from NSFAS, you may open your myNSFAS account now to keep updated with the latest funding information.

Connect with us using the following channels: National Student Financial Aid Scheme

myNSFAS

myNSFAS

NSFAS Connect: www.nsfas.org.za and log into your myNSFAS account NSFAS Connect gives you access to quick facts and frequently asked questions. Applicants and students can also submit and track a query for further assistance.


International things to write about are by nature complex. However, we found something interesting in terms of the Olympics. This is inspired by the article from BBC here. It is written by Dan Roan, the BBC sports editor. So, yes. The Olympics did come off. Moved from 2020 to this year. Despite a lot of protests and upheavals and sweltering heat waves which knocked a lot of the people. Covid was of course a concern, but it is amazing to see that the ‘bubble’ held up. There were a total of 438 cases among the athletes, officials, media, etc. That means a lot! The bubble held up. But what happened as well? We had Biles who spoke about mental health, several others spoke up about pressure and frustrations, climate change and so on. Team SA did get three medals in total. Whether that is impressive or not can be debated. But let us now look at the human beings. What if the event had been cancelled? The money ($12 bn) could have


been spent on a lot of other things, but that would mean tragedy for the athletes. What about the athletes who trained for this one shot at being an Olympian? If there would have been no event, their commitments and sacrifices would have amounted to nothing. The joy and pride of representing even more than ones own country would have gone unnoticed. Where would our swimming heroes have been? Look at the absolute joy of Tatjana and her family? They deserve it. And what about Bianca? Sure, these were the ones who brought medals home, but the commitment and sacrifice were shared by all the team members. We had high and lows, but we had people who wanted to perform and were proud of it. Whether the Olympics could have been different or not should pale in comparison to the human element: the athletes from all over the world came together to compete and uplift us all with a great show. And that is what we should all remember


Is there a future for the Olympics? The Olympics attract a lot of praise and also a lot of criticism. Are we watching the last ones? Or can the Olympics revive itself? Does it even need to? There is an interesting article here that looks at the changes we may expect. The first thing we need to acknowledge is that the ‘audience’ will be very different. In the years to come (and the article looks at 20 year from now), we see that ‘tech’ will be the dominant factor. The attention span of any good GenZ is some 8 seconds. TV is not important, the stream services are. That means that the audience may select when and what they want to watch. It poses a different challenge altogether. What sports are ‘user friendly’? Is the typical ones still able to catch and audience? Maybe Javelin is not as exciting as surfing?


If the Olympics are to be relevant to the new audience, we probably need to re-look at what goes on. Tokyo introduced a lot of new things (rock climbing, surfing, skateboarding etc). all of these new sports may have the ripple effect that the next Olympics will be very different. IOC themselves are looking at the New Norm. it can also be to axe even more of the traditional sports and appealing to what is going on outside the boardrooms. The multi-billion stadia may not be a feature in the future. We may have got used to stream services and watch what we want from home (when we want it, and in what format we want it). The few stadia will then have to provide so much more in terms of video and sound. The audience will decide angles, speed, augmented reality options, and more. The human element will be more important. It will be the athlete more than the team or the country. The personal story will be the deciding factor. And the big: eSport. Wiki: “Esports is a form of competition using video games. Esports often takes the form of organized, multiplayer video game competitions, particularly between professional players, individually or as teams. IOC is discussing whether to introduce eSport in the future. The new norm is already here!


Lest we forget! This is so important. The Paralympics started 24 August 2021. As everything else, it was postponed from 2020. But…it is here. The athletes competing deserve just as much accolades and respect and admiration as others. Their sacrifices and their determination are the same. That the Paralympics are different is a fact, but it does not detract from it. It just makes it more challenging in many ways. Let us honour our heroes – and honour everyone who partakes. These are role models and worth our admiration.

Let us just look at a few things here: The Paralympics 2021 has also changed.


There will be 539 events in 22 sports with athletes from 162 countries (committees) – this is a total of 4,400 athletes! It is a major thing all by itself and attracts viewers. The classical events have been updated: Wiki: “Cycling events will be split into road and track disciplines. Team events of goalball, sitting volleyball, and wheelchair basketball continue, wheelchair rugby continues to be a mixed event, while 5-a-side-football will only be open to male competitors” “New sports suggested included amputee football, badminton, power hockey, powerchair football, and taekwondo. New disciplines were also proposed in existing events, including visually impaired match racing and one-person multi-hull in sailing, and 3x3 basketball in intellectually disabled (ID)” “The IPC officially announced that badminton and taekwondo had been added to the Paralympic programme for 2020, which will replace 7-a-side football and sailing” So, the Paralympics also develop. And are we there?

Yes, we have a total of 34 athletes in seven sports: Men’s track and field and Women’s track and field, cycling, equestrian, swimming, table tennis, wheelchair tennis and archery.

We have the opportunity to win a few medals. Let this be an inspiration to all.


It’s mov All courtesy of NuMetro Well, lockdowns and all – Nobody knows when we can go to the ‘flicks’ again. But at least we can look forward to the following Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings Shang-Chi must confront the past he thought he left behind when he is drawn into the web of the mysterious Ten Rings organisation. PS: There is a reason I love Marvel Studios. Screening: 3 September 2021


vie time! - look them up and see!

No time to die Bond has left active service and is enjoying a tranquil life in Jamaica. His peace is short-lived when his old friend Felix Leiter from the CIA turns up asking for help. The mission to rescue a kidnapped scientist turns out to be far more treacherous than expected, leading Bond onto the trail of a mysterious villain armed with dangerous new technology. Screening 1 October 2021


Is Law Science? This is a tricky question! And it is one that has had me wondering. Is law science? Law is taught at universities. That is where we (also) find science things – like space and medicine and other discoveries. But does it make law into science? Law is the interpretation of laws, isn’t it? Or maybe … The ancients had four faculties: Arts, Medicine, Theology and Law. That did put law into a special category all by itself. Some universities have law as a separate faculty. Some has law baked into Social Sciences, others into humanities. Maybe it is a vocation? I found this article. It is written by MC Roos, BCom LLB (PU for CHE), LLM (RAU), MPhil (NWU). Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, Potchefstroom Campus of the North-West University. It is high-level stuff, but let me try to get to the core of this question. So what is law? “In the current standard work


prescribed for most first-year students in Introduction to Law, “law” is defined as the body of rules or regulations that facilitate and regulate human interaction, order society, create certainty and are applied, interpreted and enforced by state institutions” It becomes even more complex when we consider who creates ‘law texts’. Obviously, Parliament creates laws (via the law office) as the courts creates ‘law texts’ (judgments and precedents). But that is not really innovations. “South African courts accept a distinction between legal practice and legal science without attempting any definitions of legal science or law as science. The highest courts in the country, the Constitutional Court and Supreme Court of Appeal, have never been requested to or deemed it necessary to address the issue”, So that is not where we can go for definitions. It can be claimed that law is science insofar as it involves abstraction. Meaning really going forward. That is probably undeniable, but is it a bit too ‘scientific’? “In 1990 Venter et al describe science as having three characteristics or “components” that are constantly and dynamically interacting: abstraction, systemisation and reflection. These three human capabilities are employed to explain reality in a “rational” manner”


The law - as science Let us see what our institutions have to say: “The National Research Foundation (NRF) is the principal public institution for funding and promoting scientific endeavours in South Africa. In section 1 of the National Research Foundation Act research, science and technology are defined as follows: “research” is the generation, preservation, augmentation and improvement of knowledge by means of scientific investigations and methods in the field of science and technology; “science” includes any system of knowledge attained by verifiable means and the organised body of knowledge humans have gained by research; “technology” includes indigenous technology, and means knowledge accumulated through research or observation, and the practical application thereof. The Human Sciences Research Council Act defines human sciences as: ... the investigation of human life and society through systematic, rational and verifiable methods that recognise the validity of both objective and subjective data” With this in hand, we might be able to include ‘law’ as ‘science’.


“On its official website the Human Sciences Research Council states that it “conducts research that generates critical and independent knowledge relative to all aspects of human and social development” and lists a number of research areas, but none of these directly include law.” “It can be accepted without any fear of contradiction that law is a system of knowledge and that it forms part of the organised body of knowledge humans have gained, but the question is whether this was achieved by means of “verifiable means” or through “generation, preservation, augmentation and improvement of knowledge by means of scientific investigations and methods in the field of science and technology”. What we end up with is an activity-based definition. When a law student is engaging in re-interpreting cases and deduce new innovative interpretations, the person is acting. The process of acting is then creating new knowledge… and that in all definitions is science. Therefore, lawyers may be practicing science, depending on the actions they are involved in. Ipso facto. Case closed!


September is spring. However, I stumbled across something absolute off the chart. Something really left-field. Thanks Wiki! It is (of course) something rather British. I doubt this could be somewhere else. The Abbots Bromley Horn Dance is an English folk dance dating back to the Middle Ages. The dance takes place each year in Abbots Bromley, a village in Staffordshire, England. The modern version of the dance involves reindeer antlers, a hobby horse, Maid Marian, and a Fool. There are no recorded references to the horn dance prior to Robert Plot’s Natural History of Staffordshire, written in 1686. A carbon analysis discovered that the antlers used in the dance date to the 11th century. According to some, the use of antlers suggests an Anglo-Saxon origin along with other native Anglo-Saxon traditions that have survived into modern times in various forms. It has been speculated, for example, that the dance originated in the pagan period and was connected with the ruling dynasty of Mercia, based some 15 miles away at Tamworth.


Such an ancient origin for the dance has been doubted by some folklorists, who point out that while the reindeer antlers date to the 11th century, reindeer were long since extinct in England and Wales (and probably Scotland), The antlers must have been imported from Scandinavia at some point between the 11th and 17th centuries. The Horn Dance takes place on Wakes Monday, the day following Wakes Sunday, which is the first Sunday after 4 September.

There are 12 dancers. Six carry the horns and they are accompanied by a musician playing an accordion, Maid Marian (a man in a dress), the Hobby-horse, the Fool (or Jester), a youngster with a bow and arrow, and another youngster with a triangle. The dance itself is simple, since the antlers themselves have some weight to them and are large and bulky.

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We need writers! Hola MaHigh-School is YOUR magazine. That is why we would love to see students writing for students about student life and everything of importance to a student in any grade10-12 across the country. What is required? That is easy: You have to be in grade 10-12 somewhere Impeccable in your preferred language-and that might not be English. We try to be more than just English. Passionate about your topic of choice - no dull articles here. Do you get anything out of it? Well, not money, sorrry. BUT if we publish your articles you will have: Your bio in a commercial magazine A photo of yourself You can put it all on your CV you can use us as a reference


Is it important? YES it is. Look what Rofhiwa said: My name is Rofhiwa and I love to write. I have used my skills to express my thoughts on international dealings of the world which have been published in Hola MaHigh-School. It has paid off, not only is my work printed for young people in the country to read, but it also contributed to me gettng a bursary from CNBC-Africa to do my post-graduate studies. Would be a lot harder to get by if I didn’t have a platform like Hola MaHigh-School.

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Next Issue Spring - finally - but that also comes with exams. We will provide you with some tips and good ideas for the coming exams. However, it is nearly impossible to predict in what format exams will be. The importance of exams is also a matter of concern. To what extent will it all be the finals marks? However, we still have time for fun: music, movies and conspiracies (if I can find one). Good read!

Sybil


Coronavirus

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