Roma Numismatics Auction XI

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ROMA NUMISMATICS LIMITED

Auction XI 7 April 2016 Roma Numismatics Limited 20 Fitzroy Square Fitzrovia London W1T 6EJ United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0)20 7121 6518 www.romanumismatics.com email: info@romanumismatics.com

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Auction XI

7 APRIL

10:00

Greek Coins

14:00 Roman, Migration Period, Byzantine and World Coins

Location The Electra Room The Cavendish Hotel London 81 Jermyn Street London SW1Y 6JF United Kingdom

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Viewing At the office of Roma Numismatics: 20 Fitzroy Square Fitzrovia London W1T 6EJ United Kingdom From February 29th - April 6th Monday – Friday, 09:30 – 17:30

lots will not be available for viewing during the sale

Lot pickup will be available from 10:00am on Friday 8th April

Roma Numismatics Limited Richard Beale – Director Alexander Morley-Smith Leslee Arlington Garfield Simon Parkin

Special Thanks to Italo Vecchi Deniz Grotjohann Rob & Jackie UNUS PRO OMNIBUS, OMNES PRO UNO

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ABSENTEE BIDDING If you are unable to attend the auction in person, you may submit an absentee bid that will be executed on your behalf by Roma Numismatics. Roma Numismatics will attempt to obtain the lot for you at the lowest possible price, and will not purchase the lot for you at a price higher than the maximum you specify. This service is free and confidential. Absentee bids must be sent and received in good time. To place absentee bids please submit your list of lots, together with your maximum bids, either by email, fax, or post using the form provided, or online at www.RomaNumismatics.com. You may also participate live online during the sale at www. the-saleroom.com.

email or postal bids The customer is responsible for submitting these in good time and confirming that the bids have been received. Please note we no longer accept bids by fax.

Telephone bids Bids may be placed by telephone as the auction is in progress, but are accepted only at the discretion of Roma Numismatics and at the risk of the customer. Roma Numismatics will not be held responsible for any failure to execute bids by telephone during the auction resulting from technical issues, miscommunication or any other reason. Any client wishing to bid by telephone should inform Roma Numismatics no later than 72 hours before the auction, and should have a prepared list of all the lots they wish to bid on.

Internet Bidding

BID ONLINE PRIOR TO THE AUCTION, SEE BIDS UPDATED IN REAL-TIME ON THE ROMA SITE. Internet bids may be submitted prior to the auction at www.RomaNumismatics.com - these bids will be automatically executed on the website. These bids will then be carried over into the live auction and executed by the auctioneer on the day. BID ONLINE DURING THE AUCTION, HEAR THE AUCTION LIVE ON YOUR COMPUTER. Real-time bids may be placed at www.the-saleroom.com on the day of the sale. These bids will be executed live on the floor. A 3% surcharge will apply to lots won through www.the-saleroom.com. This charge is made through the-saleroom. com and is not connected with Roma Numismatics. Roma Numismatics is not responsible for any missed lots or bids due to network speed or down-time. It is advisable to register as early as possible for this service, since all internet bidders must be manually approved by the auctioneer.

Successful Bids Successful bidders will be notified and invoiced within a few days of the auction. Prices realised will be published around the same time.

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ROMA NUMISMATICS AUCTION XI MAIL BID FORM First Name:

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Conditions of Sale The following terms and conditions will apply to this auction:

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All estimates are in POUNDS STERLING. The opening bids will be 80% of the estimate unless there are existing higher bids. There will be a 17.5% Buyer’s Fee added to the hammer price. II. VAT at 20% (applicable to customers within the UK and EU) is due on the Buyer’s Fee only, not the hammer price. III. The auctioneer guarantees the absolute authenticity of any and all coins sold. There is no expiration to this guarantee. Any coins subsequently found to be not authentic will be exchanged for a full refund of the purchase price. IV. Absentee bids must be submitted and received by 20:00 on the day before the auction at the latest. It is the bidder’s responsibility to ensure that bids have been received by Roma Numismatics. V. All grades and descriptions are the opinion of the cataloguer. Conditions of all lots are as per the photographs displayed on the Roma Numismatics website; condition reports are available upon request. It is not possible to note all marks or defects, and thus customers are encouraged to carefully examine in person all lots that they are interested in bidding on. Bids, once placed, are final and will not be rescinded. If, however, the description is found to be incorrect, the item is returnable within 21 days after the sale. No other returns will be accepted except on the grounds of non-authenticity. All prospective bidders who exercise the opportunity to examine lots in hand shall assume all responsibility for any damage they cause in so doing. The auctioneer shall have sole discretion in determining the value of the damage caused, which shall be promptly paid by the prospective bidder. VI. The auctioneer will have absolute discretion to accept or decline any bid, withdraw lots from sale at any time until such point as the purchaser takes physical possession, re-open any lot, even after the hammer has fallen, in which a bidding error has occurred, and to determine in the event of a dispute, the final winner of a lot or to rescind the sale and put the lot up for sale again. VII. For the protection of mail or absentee bidders, no ‘unlimited’ or ‘buy’ bids will be accepted. When identical bids are received for the same lot, preference will be given to the bid received first. A mail bid will take preference over a floor bid. VIII. Some lots may carry a reserve. The auctioneer reserves the right not to sell an item below the confidential price, or will repurchase the item on behalf of the consignor or for the account of Roma Numismatics Ltd. If a reserve exists the auctioneer reserves the right to bid on any lot on behalf of the consignor up to the amount of the reserve against any floor or mail bidders. The auctioneer also reserves the right to bid on any lot on behalf of Roma Numismatics Ltd. IX. Title remains with the owner until such time as the customer has paid in full. X. Invoices are due immediately upon receipt. Roma Numismatics Ltd. reserves the right to charge interest on unpaid invoices at the rate of 2% per calendar month, except where prior agreement has been made with regards to payment arrangements. XI. A 3.5% surcharge will be applied to payments made via PayPal or credit/debit card. A £10 surcharge will be applied to payments made by bank transfer from outside of the UK. The customer is responsible for paying all bank charges and shipping and insurance costs. XII. A 3% surcharge will be applied to lots won through www.the-saleroom.com. Roma Numismatics is not responsible for any missed lots or bids due to network speed or down-time. XIII. By making a bid the customer agrees to the above terms and conditions and accepts to be bound by them. These conditions shall take effect and be construed in accordance with the provisions of English Law. US COIN IMPORT RESTRICTIONS Any coins in this sale that fall under US import restrictions but may still be legally imported into the US are accompanied by documentation proving that they were outside of the source country prior to the effective date, or are accompanied by a valid export certificate issued by the country of origin. Any coins subject to US import restrictions that may not lawfully be imported into the United States of America will be clearly indicated as such with the note: ‘not suitable for US market’. Roma Numismatics will make every effort to ensure that US import restrictions affect our clients as little as possible, and will carry out all necessary importations and procedures as required on behalf of the client.

PAYMENT METHODS Invoices to be settled in POUNDS STERLING immediately upon receipt unless previously agreed otherwise. Bank Transfer: Barclays Bank, 22 The Borough, Farnham, GU9 7NH, UK | Account Name: Roma Numismatics IBAN: GB81 BARC 2031 0663 0101 39 | BIC: BARC GB22 | SORT CODE: 20-31-06 | ACC #: 63010139 Cheque (GBP only): Please make payable to Roma Numismatics Limited PayPal (add 3.5%): sales@romanumismatics.com Credit/Debit Card (add 3.5%): contact us directly on +44 (0)20 7121 6518

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The Collection of a Nobel Laureate

Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Roma Numismatics is proud to present the collection of Dr. Murray Gell-Mann. It is a rare honor indeed to be afforded the opportunity to offer for sale the coins belonging to a Nobel Laureate, and we feel privileged to assist in their sale on behalf of this individual whose work has so advanced humanity’s knowledge and understanding of the fundamental parts of the universe. Presented within this catalogue are 183 coins from the Gell-Mann collection. They are all noted as “from the Murray Gell-Mann Collection”. A further selection from Dr. Gell-Mann’s collection will appear in our next electronic auction, E-Sale 26, which will close on April 30 from 13:00 GMT. Richard Beale Director, Roma Numismatics Ltd

Murray Gell-Mann is Founder, Life-time Trustee and Distinguished Fellow of the Santa Fe Institute as well as the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology, where he joined the faculty in 1955. In 1969 he received the Nobel Prize in physics for his work on the theory of elementary particles. He is the author of The Quark and the Jaguar, published in 1994, in which his ideas on simplicity, complexity, regularity, and randomness are presented to a general readership. Among his contributions to physics was the “eightfold way” scheme that brought order out of the chaos created by the discovery of some 100 kinds of particles in collisions involving atomic nuclei. He subsequently found that all of those particles, including the neutron and proton, are composed of fundamental building blocks that he named “quarks,” with very unusual properties. That idea has since been fully confirmed by experiment. The quarks are permanently confined by forces coming from the exchange of “gluons.” He and others later constructed the quantum field theory of quarks and gluons, called “quantum chromodynamics,” which seems to account for all the nuclear particles and their strong interactions. Professor Gell-Mann was a director of the J.D. and C.T. MacArthur Foundation from 1979 to 2002 and was a board member of the Wildlife Conservation Society from 1994 to 2006. From 1974 to 1988, he was a Citizen Regent of the Smithsonian Institution. He belongs to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the Council on Foreign Relations; he is also a Foreign Member of the Royal Society of London. He was on the U.S. President’s Science Advisory Committee from 1969 to 1972 and the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology from 1994 to 2001. In 1988 he was listed on the United Nations Environmental Program’s Roll of Honor for Environmental Achievement (The Global 500). He also shared the 1989 Ettore Majorana “Science for Peace” prize. Professor Gell-Mann received the Helmholtz Medal of the Berlin Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities in 2014. His interests extend to historical linguistics, archeology, natural history, the psychology of creative thinking, and other subjects connected with biological and cultural evolution and with learning. Much of his recent research at the Santa Fe Institute has focused on the theory of complex adaptive systems, which brings many of those topics together. Currently he is spearheading the Evolution of Human Languages Program at the Santa Fe Institute. He is also concerned with how knowledge and understanding are to be extracted from the welter of “information” that can now be transmitted and stored as a result of the digital revolution. Dr. Gell-Mann began collecting coins as a child. One of his early purchases was the Pine Tree shilling included in this sale. As a boy, GellMann lived across the street from the Netherlands Coin Company, a shop specializing in American colonial coinage. He bought that coin after reading Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Whole History of Grandfather’s Chair - True Stories from New England History 1620-1808, in which one the chapters was entitled “The Pine -Tree Shillings,” a tale revolving around Mintmaster John Hull. He was also interested in Greek coins from Sicily and southern Italy, in particular because they displayed the place-names of the cities where they were struck; preferring the ‘purer’ archaic forms of Greek characters accompanied by the symbols/badges connected with the cities (e.g. man-headed bull for Gela), he tended to purchase pre-Classical pieces. His acquisitions of the Dark Age and medieval coinage reflect his specific interest in historical rulers and events of those periods. As written and approved by Dr. Murray Gell-Mann

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COINS OF THE CELTS BRITANNIA Extremely Rare North Thames Gold Stater

1. Britannia, Eastern North Thames AV Stater. Circa 60-20 BC. ‘SS’ type. Two reversed ‘S’ motifs in field, banding beneath / Annulate horse right; wing motif above, wheel below, sun before, dispersed symbols in field. ABC 2237; VA 1509-1; S. 34; Spink 15049, lot 238 (sold £9,000). 5.58g, 18mm. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

2,000

Superb Example of an Extremely Rare Type

2. Britannia, Catuvellauni and Trinovantes AV Stater. Cunobelin. Camulodunum (Colchester), circa AD 8-41. Grain ear, CA-MV across / Horse jumping to right, branch above, CVNO below. Rudd, ABC 2795 (this coin); BMC 1828; VA 2025. 5.49g, 17mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, and very well preserved for the type.

2,000

3. Britannia, Corieltauvi AV Stater. Circa 40-10 BC. Wreath motif with brick-like leaves facing inwards / Lunate Celtic horse right, pellet ornament above, sun below. ABC 1719; VA 800-; BMC 184-91. 5.99g, 17mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

300

GAUL

4. Northern Gaul, Ambiani AV Stater. Gallic War Uniface Type. Circa 58-55 BC. Plain obverse / M-shaped Celtic horse right, pellets and crescents around, ‘coffee bean’ behind. D&T 237; De la Tour -; Van Arsdell 50; ABC 16 (Gallic imports). 5.49g, 17mm. Extremely Fine. Toned. From the M.M. Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group 66, 19 May 2004, lot 4; Found in West Sussex.

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500


EASTERN EUROPE

5. Celts in Eastern Europe AR Tetradrachm. Zigzag type, 2nd century BC. Stylized head of Zeus left / Stylized horse and rider left, zigzag pattern and annulet above, circle in square before. Pink 460; Dessewffy 235; BMCC S132. 12.16g, 24mm, 3h. Well struck and centred on a pleasing flan of good metal. Very Rare - only one example on CoinArchives.

2,750

6. Celts in Eastern Europe AR Tetradrachm. Imitation of Philip II of Macedon, 2nd century BC. Celticized head of Zeus right / Horseman riding right, showing only his torso, raising hand; pseudo-legend above, Λ before, Π below raised foreleg, triskeles below. Lanz 724; OTA 434; BMCC I 123; KMW 1350. 12.76g, 23mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine.

100

Interesting Celtic Imitation of Seleukos I Drachm

7. Celts in Eastern Europe AR Drachm. Imitation of Seleukos I Nikator of Syria, 3rd century BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; BAΣIΛEΩΣ below, ΣEΛEYKOY to right, anchor in left field, Π under throne. For prototype, cf. SC 111. 4.23g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Lightly toned.

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75


COINS OF THE GREEKS CAMPANIA

8. Campania, Neapolis AR Didrachm. Circa 300-275 BC. Diademed head of Parthenope right, wearing pendant earring and pearl necklace; behind neck, Artemis standing facing, holding two torches; ΑΡΤΕΜΙ below truncation / Man-headed bull, head facing, walking to right, crowned by Nike flying above to right; ΝΕΑΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ below. HN Italy 579; Sambon 460; SNG ANS 340; SNG France 778. 7.42g, 22mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

750

Ex Gorny & Mosch 199, 10 October 2011, lot 17.

9. Campania, Nuceria Alfaterna AR Didrachm. Circa 250-225 BC. Head of Apollo Karneios left with horn of Ammon, Oscan legend ‘nukrinum alafaternum’ around / Dioskouros standing facing, head turned to left, beside his horse, holding the reins and a thyrsos. HN Italy 608; SNG ANS 560; SNG Copenhagen 566; SNG München 388; Sambon 1008. 7.15g, 19mm, 10h. Very Fine. Rare.

750

LUCANIA

10. Lucania, Herakleia AR Stater. Time of Pyrrhos of Epeiros, circa 281-278 BC. Phila-, magistrate. Head of Athena facing slightly right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with Skylla throwing a stone; monogram to left, [E to right] / |-HPAKΛEIΩN, Herakles standing facing, holding club in right hand and bow and arrow in left, lion skin draped over left arm; to left, Nike flying right, crowning him with wreath; HA to lower left, ΦIΛΩ to outer right. Van Keuren 94; HN Italy 1392; SNG ANS 80; SNG Lloyd 278; Basel 1112. 7.77g, 22mm, 12h. Very Fine.

500

Very Rare Stater of Laos

11. Lucania, Laos AR Stater. Circa 480-460 BC. Man headed bull left, head reverted; ΛAΣ (retrograde) above / Man headed bull right; ΛAΣ (retrograde) above. Sternberg, “Die Silberprägung von Laos ca. 510-440 v. Chr.,” Proceedings of the 8th International Numismatic Congress, 9 (V8/ R8); SNG ANS 135 (same dies); Weber 728 (same dies); HN Italy 2275. 7.95g, 17mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex Tony Hardy Collection, Classical Numismatic Group 67, 22 September 2004, lot 122.

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2,000


12. Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 540-510 BC. Ear of barley with seven grains on each side; ME-TA across field / Incuse ear of barley with seven grains on each side. HN Italy 1577; Noe 97 (these dies); SNG ANS 203 (these dies); SNG Lloyd -; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG Ashmolean 650 (these dies); Basel -; Gulbenkian -. 8.17g, 26mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive old tone.

5,000

Ex Sotheby’s, 30 March 1995, lot 877.

13. Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 540-510 BC. Ear of barley with eight grains on each side; MET upwards to right / Incuse ear of barley with eight grains on each side. HN Italy 1479; Noe 117. 8.07g, 28mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Beautiful iridescent toning.

1,500

Ex Heritage 3019, 26 April 2012, lot 23011.

14. Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 530-500 BC. Ear of barley with eight grains on each side; META upwards to right / Incuse ear of barley with eight grains on each side. HN Italy 1479; Noe 129; SNG ANS 209. 8.02g, 28mm, 12h. Very Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

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500


Ex Antikenmuseum Basel & Sammlung Ludwig

15.

Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 400-340 BC. Head of Demeter right, wearing pendant earring and necklace / Ear of barley with leaf to right, upon which ΞΩ; META to left. Antikenmuseum Basel 145 (this coin); Noe-Johnston 507; HN Italy 1538. 7.89g, 22mm, 10h. Extremely Fine; die break on rev. Beautiful old cabinet tone.

10,000

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 64, 17 May 2012, lot 632; Ex Antikenmuseum Basel & Sammlung Ludwig, Numismatica Ars Classica 13, 8 October 1998, lot 145; Exhibited at the Antikenmuseum Basel und Sammlung Ludwig in Basel in 1988. Metapontion was among the first cities of Magna Graecia to issue coinage, and indeed long preceded its later rival Tarentum in this respect. The choice of the barley ear as the civic emblem is unusual in that the other cities of Magna Graecia all struck coinage displaying types relating to their foundation myths or principal cults. Metapontion’s choice may well reflect a significant economic reliance on its major export, a hypothesis supported by the preponderance of Demeter portraits on its later coinage, a convention seemingly broken only in exceptional circumstances, such as the occasional Hygeia issue that was probably elicited by concern over pestilence, flooding or drought. The city’s reliance on its agricultural exports made it particularly vulnerable to the increasing barbarian attacks in the fourth century that eventually caused Tarentum to request the assistance of the Epeirote king Alexander in driving the aggressive Lucani and other tribes back into the interior. It was this period of strife that caused the only significant variation in the coinage of Metapontion - the new demands placed on the city by the war against the Lucani and its support for Alexander of Epeiros’ campaign are undoubtedly the cause of the sudden rise in output of the mint, as well as the hasty overstriking of Pegasi. It was at this time that militaristic types were introduced, engraved in double relief, depicting the helmeted portraits of the city’s founder Leukippos, along with the deities Zeus, Athena ‘Tharragoras’, Apollo and Herakles - a fitting series of coinage for a Hellenic city threated by barbaric aggressors. Indeed it is not coincidental that the contemporary issues at Tarentum similarly allude to war, depicting Taras armed, the horseman armed, and sometimes accompanied by Nike. It is also probable that the appearance of the same signatures, notably KAL and API, represent a coordination of defence efforts at a federal level, rather than an artist’s signature as is often suggested. It has been often suggested that the head of Demeter on this coin draws heavily for inspiration on the Arethusa portraits by Euainetos on the dekadrachms of Syracuse. Indeed, with the only exception being that Euainetos’ Arethusa wears a wreath of reeds, the images are so similar that this influence seems certain – the hair, in particular, is virtually identical in style. Returning Italian Greek mercenaries would have brought these coins home with them, and evidently they had a strong influence on the local die engravers.

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16. Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 350 BC. Head of Demeter right, wearing drop earring, hair bound up with diadem / Ear of barley with leaf to left, MET to right. HN Italy 1528; SNG ANS 377; Noe 501. 7.90g, 23mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

500

Ex Gorny & Mosch 200, 10 October 2011, lot 1065; Ex Münzhandlung Ritter List 66, 2004, 124.

17. Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 330-290 BC. Head of Demeter left, wearing grain wreath; Δ[EΞ] (retrograde) below chin / Ear of barley with leaf to left, lighted altar on tip of leaf; META and YΛ to right. Johnston C10.4; SNG ANS 503; HN Italy 1593. 7.52g, 21mm, 10h. Good Very Fine. Lightly toned and lustrous.

200

18. Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 330-290 BC. Head of Demeter facing slightly right, wearng grain wreath / Ear of barley with leaf to right; bukranion above leaf, AΘA below. Johnston Class C, 2.2 (same dies); HN Italy 1584; SNG ANS 463-4; SNG Fitzwilliam 503; SNG München 992; Dewing 388 (all from the same dies). 7.74g, 19mm, 1h. Very Fine.

1,000

19. Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 290-280 BC. Head of Demeter left, wearing grain wreath / Ear of barley with leaf to right, cockerel standing left on leaf; META in left field. SNG ANS 513; Johnston Class D, 2.2; HN Italy 1613 (same dies). 7.76g, 22mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

500

Ex Fritz Rudolf Künker Auction 111, 18 March 2006, lot 6044.

20. Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 290-280 BC. Head of Demeter right wearing grain wreath, triple-drop earring and necklace; ΔI to left / Ear of barley with seven grains and leaf to right, META and ant to left, cornucopiae surmounted by two ears of barley to right, ΦI below leaf. HN Italy 1577; SNG ANS 516; Johnston Class D: 4.8 (same dies). 7.54g, 21mm, 2h. Good Very Fine.

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300


21. Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 280 BC. Head of Demeter left, wearing grain wreath; Δ behind / Ear of barley, distaff to right, META to left. Johnston D1.1 (these dies); HN Italy 1612. 8.00g, 21mm, 11h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

Ex Gorny & Mosch 133, 11 October 2004, lot 28.

Ex NAC 4, 1991 and Leu 2, 1972

22. Lucania, Poseidonia AR Drachm. Circa 530-500 BC. Poseidon advancing right, chlamys draped over shoulders, preparing to throw trident held aloft in left hand, right hand extended; ΠOM to left / Incuse of obverse, except legend in relief. HN Italy 1108; SNG ANS 624; SNG Copenhagen 1274; SNG München 1051. 3.71g, 20mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Old cabinet tone.

5,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 4, 27 February 1991, lot 16; Ex Leu 2, 25 April 1972 , lot 41.

Beautiful Stater of Sybaris

23. Lucania, Sybaris AR Stater. Circa 550-510 BC. Bull standing to left, head reverted; VM in exergue / Incuse bull standing right, head reverted. HN Italy 1729; SNG ANS 828-44. 7.83g, 27mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Iridescent toning, rough edge. From the M.M. Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group E-Auction 312, 9 October 2013, lot 43. Lot includes old collection holder marked “June 1937, Paul S. Szego, $12.00”.

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1,500


Ex Aufhäuser 4, 1987

24. Lucania, Sybaris AR Stater. Circa 550-510 BC. Bull standing to left, head reverted; VM above / Incuse bull standing right, head reverted. SNG ANS 819-820; SNG Copenhagen 1390; HN Italy 1729; Gorini 3. 8.25g, 27mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Bold iridescent toning.

1,500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex Aufhäuser 4, 7 October 1987, lot 14.

Second Known Stater of Sybaris III

25. Lucania, Sybaris AR Stater. Circa 453-448 BC. Bull standing to left on ground line / Bull standing to right on ground line, MVBA (retrograde) above. The Golden Horn Collection, 2063 (same dies, sold for $11,000); otherwise unpublished; cf. HN Italy 1747. 8.16g, 18mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Of the highest rarity - the second known specimen.

3,000

A similar specimen cited in HN Italy (1747) has the obverse type of a bull walking to right. The obverse depiction of the bull standing to left was unpublished and thought to be unique at the time of the publication and sale of the Golden Horn Collection in January 2009. This extremely rare coin can be attributed to the short-lived third foundation of Sybaris (Sybaris III), an attempt to re-establish the city, sponsored by Poseidonia, after Kroton had already twice destroyed it. After the destruction of Sybaris I by Kroton in 510 BC, though many survivors fled to the Sybarite colonies of Laos and Skidros, some appear to have remained on the site which passed into Krotoniate dependency, as indicated by incuse coins bearing the joint ethnics of both Kroton and Sybaris and confirmed by a report that the Krotoniates appointed a governor at Sybaris. Sybaris II appears to have succumbed like its predecessor to an attack by the Krotoniates in 467 BC, in which conflict they appealed to the Syracusan tyrant Hieron for assistance, though none was forthcoming. In 453 BC, a full fifty-eight years after the catastrophe of 510, Sybaris was refounded again with the apparent blessing and sponsorship of Poseidonia. That city is recorded as having acted as a guarantor in a treaty between Sybaris and the Serdaioi, and indeed the coins of Sybaris III are closely modelled on the contemporary issues of Poseidonia (see Rutter, ‘Sybaris: Legend and Reality’ 1970, p. 173), suggesting that city had a significant interest in the endeavour. The refounded city advanced swiftly in wealth on account of the fertility of its lands, and after only five years again aroused the jealousy or fear of Kroton, who once more brought war against Sybaris, and drove away the inhabitants.

26. Lucania, Thourioi AR Distater. Circa 400-350 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with Skylla; IΔ behind neck guard / Bull charging right, ΘOYPIΩN above; fish to right in exergue. HN Italy 1805; Noe, Thurian F28; SNG Lloyd 486; Pozzi 229; Jameson 359 (all from these dies). 15.65g, 27mm, 12h. Very Fine. Pleasantly toned; of fine style.

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2,000


27. Lucania, Thourioi AR Distater. Circa 350-300 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with Skylla hurling rock / ΘOYPIΩN, bull charging right, cornucopiae and H-ΓA in exergue. HN Italy 1858; Noe, Thurian N14. 15.51g, 28mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Struck on a very broad flan.

2,500

28. Lucania, Thourioi AR Distater. Circa 350 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with Skylla; B behind / Bull charging right, ΘOYPIΩN and APH in two lines above; fish in exergue. Noe N8. 15.16g, 29mm, 8h. Good Very Fine.

1,000

Attractive Drachm of Velia

29. Lucania, Velia AR Drachm. Circa 535-465 BC. Forepart of lion right, devouring prey / Incuse square. SNG Copenhagen 1521; HN Italy 1259; SNG ANS 1202-1210. 3.72g, 12mm. Good Very Fine. Toned and attractive. Rare.

1,250

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

30. Lucania, Velia AR Stater. Circa 340-334 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right, bowl decorated with griffin, at sides, dolphins swimming downwards; behind neck-guard, Θ / Lion advancing to right, Θ between its legs; ΥΕΛΗΤΩΝ in exergue. Jameson 391 (same dies); SNG ANS 1301 (same dies); Williams 269; HN Italy 1284. 7.62g, 23mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 6, 11 March 1993, lot 44.

10

3,000


31. Lucania, Velia AR Stater. Circa 334-300 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing Phrygian helmet decorated with centauress, monogram behind / Lion left, tearing prey, Λ above, monogram below; YEΛHTΩN in exergue. Williams 327; BMC 74; HN Italy 1294. 7.69g, 22mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Minor flaw on reverse.

750

Ex DNW 13, 25 September 2012, lot 3005.

32. Lucania, Velia AR Stater. Circa 305-290 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing winged, laureate and crested Attic helmet / Lion standing right, Φ-Ι above, bunch of grapes between; ΥΕΛΗΤΩΝ in exergue. Williams, Velia 496 (these dies); HN Italy 1311. 7.50g, 21mm, 12h. Very Fine. Attractively toned.

500

Ex Münzen & Medaillen 25, 18 October 2007, lot 2105.

33. Lucania, Velia AR Stater. Period VII, signed by Philistion. Circa 305-290 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with winged Nike in quadriga on bowl, Pegasos on neck guard, ΦΙΛΙΣΤΙΩΝΟΣ on crest holder; Θ behind, E before / Lion crouching left holding sword in mouth and right paw, the Dioskouroi above between Φ-I; YEΛHTΩN in exergue. Williams 410; SNG Lockett 559. 7.51g, 22mm, 7h. Good Very Fine; attractively toned. Very Rare. Ex Noble Numismatics 96, 5 April 2011, lot 4954.

11

500


Haeberlin’s Long Lost Velia Hemidrachm

34. Lucania, Velia AR Hemidrachm. Circa 305-290 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet bound with olive-wreath / Lion crouching left, holding sword in jaws and right paw; below, I; [ΥΕ]ΛHΤ IΩ[Ν] in exergue. Haeberlin, ZfN 1908, p. 231 (Volsinii); Giesecke, Italia Numismatica p. 21-22 (Volsinii); HN Italy 2677 (uncertain issue). 2.76g, 15mm, 8h. Toned, Good Very Fine. Unique.

5,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex Walther Giesecke Collection. When this long lost unique coin from the Walther Giesecke collection was first published by Ernst Haeberlin in 1908, it was attributed on the suggestion of Heinrich Dressel (then Director of the Königliche Museen zu Berlin) as part of the gold Volsinii series (Vecchi, Etruscan Coins, pp. 367-8), based on a misreading of the legend below the exergual line and misinterpretation of the I below the lion as an Etruscan value mark. This erroneous conclusion was followed by Giesecke in his masterful publication, Italia Numismatica, Leipzig 1928, and this incorrect identification was perpetuated by Italo Vecchi in a preliminary study on Etruscan coins, SNR 26, 1988 p. 61, with the caveat ‘as the coin is not available the recorded weight could not checked.’ In 2001 Historia Nummorum Italy (no. 2677), without the benefit of actually seeing the coin, correctly rejected the Volsinian identification, placing it under ‘Uncertain Issues’ (pp. 198-9) and tentatively suggested that the issue may belong to Velia based on the similarity of the reverse type to the Philistion group of didrachms (Williams 406-8; HN Italy 1303-4). The welcomed reappearance of the coin in this interesting American collection after nearly 100 years confirms the suspected attribution of HN Italy, with a slightly blundered, but clear legend: … ΛNΤ IΩ ... (sic).

35. Lucania, Velia AR Stater. Circa 280 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing Attic helmet decorated with griffin, A before, monogram behind / Lion attacking stag; YEΛHTΩN behind. Williams 561; HN Italy 1318. 7.52g, 25mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,500

Ex Meister & Sonntag 12, 17 November 2011, lot 23.

CALABRIA Very Rare Early Tarentine Nomos

36. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 510–500 BC. Taras astride dolphin to right with right hand outstretched, scallop shell below, TAPAΣ (retrograde) behind; all within heavy border with dot-and-reel motif / Same type as obverse, reversed and incuse. Fischer-Bossert 16; Vlasto 68. 7.99g, 24mm, 11h. Very Fine. Very Rare. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

12

2,000


Ex Sotheby’s 1996 and Ciani 1950

37.

Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 500-490 BC. Taras astride dolphin to right, holding octopus in his right hand and phiale in his extended left; rope and pellet border around / Hippocamp swimming to right, scallop shell below, TAPAΣ above; incuse radiating border around. Fischer-Bossert 33b (same dies); HN Italy 827; Vlasto 127. 8.07g, 20mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful old cabinet tone. Rare, and among the finest known examples.

7,500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex Sotheby’s, 7 March 1996, lot 27; Ex Hess-Leu 28, 5-6 May 1965, lot 11; Ex Ciani, February 1950. Tarentum, the only Spartan colony ever to be established, was founded in 706 BC by the Partheniae - Spartan children born to unmarried women as a product of Spartan desperation to ensure the survival and continuation of their demographic during the bloody Messenian wars, who were later disowned and expelled by the state - and Perioeci (subjects, but not citizens of Sparta), under the leadership of the Parthenian Phalanthos. According to legend, Phalanthos consulted the oracle at Delphi, and was told that he should found his new city ‘where rain fell from a clear sky’. After much searching, and despairing of finding a suitable location for a city, Phalanthos was consoled by his wife Aethra who laid his head in her lap, and as her tears splashed upon his forehead he understood the oracle’s words for his wife’s name itself meant ‘clear sky’, and thus he determined to make the nearby harbour the site of their new home, which they named after Taras, the son of Poseidon and the nymph Satyrion. In the time this coinage was produced Tarentum was a monarchy, as it had been since its foundation. Though we have little information concerning the early governance of Tarentum, the monarchy was probably modelled on the one ruling over Sparta. According to Herodotus (iii, 136) a certain king Aristophilides ruled over the city in this period. Since the arrival of the Greeks in the region in the late 8th century BC, a long-running series of skirmishes appears to have taken place between the Tarentines and the indigenous Iapygian tribes (Messapians, Daunians and the Peucetii) who controlled the interior of the Apulian peninsula. Tarentine expansion was therefore limited to the coast because of the resistance of these populations, a situation reflected in their coinage types which are predominantly marine in character. In c.490 BC the Messapians moved against the Tarentines with a composite force of around 8,000 men including shield infantry, skirmishers, and their skilled cavalry. The Tarentines meanwhile fielded 4,000 citizen hoplites and 1,000 light infantry in support, as well as a combination of light and sword-wielding cavalry. Outside the walls of their city the Tarentines withstood the initial skirmishing and the Messapian charge; despite the superiority of the Messapian cavalry and being greatly outnumbered on foot, the Tarentines appear to have represented their Spartan heritage well in this battle, and were able to claim victory and a temporary respite from the Iapygian attacks. After this defeat the Iapygians would not challenge Taras again for nearly twenty years, but in 473 when they would again come against the Tarentines, they would come in overwhelming numbers.

13


38. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 333-330 BC. Nude youth on horse pacing to right, wreath in outstretched right hand to crown the horse, Nike flying right crowning rider; ΣIM below horse / Taras astride dolphin to left, holding wreath and trident, TAPAΣ in right field, I-HP below; waves beneath. SNG Copenhagen 823 (these dies); Fischer-Bossert 785; HN Italy 886. 7.80g, 22mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. Lightly toned.

1,000

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 59, 4 April 2011, lot 486.

39. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 320-315 BC. Nude youth on horse pacing to right, wreath in outstretched right hand to crown the horse; ΣΑ to left, mask of Pan below / Taras astride dolphin to left, holding kantharos; ΦΙ below, TAPAΣ behind. Vlasto 661 (these dies); HN Italy 945. 7.81g, 23mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

500

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 59, 4 April 2011, lot 488.

40. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 315-300 BC. Nude warrior on horse prancing to right, holding reins, shield and two spears in left hand and striking with spear in right; ΣΑ below / Taras astride dolphin to left, holding trident and kantharos, TAPAΣ behind; AP ligate in upper left field, small dolphin in lower right. Vlasto 605 (these dies); SNG Fitzwilliam 278 (these dies); Fischer-Bossert 852; HN Italy 937. 7.91g, 24mm, 9h. Good Extremely Fine. An aesthetically highly pleasing coin, struck on a huge flan.

3,000

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 84, 20 May 2015, lot 557; Ex private Swiss collection.

41. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 272-240 BC. Aristokles, magistrate. Nude warrior on horseback right, holding round shield, two lances and a spear, ΔΙ behind; ΑΡΙΣΤΟΚΛΗΣ in two lines below / Taras astride dolphin to left, holding kantharos and trident; head of nymph to left behind, TAPAΣ below. Vlasto 878; HN Italy 1033. 6.41g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Unusually well detailed faces.

14

750


42. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 240-228 BC. Youth on horse leaping right, ΖΩΠΥΡΙΩΝ below; below forelegs, ΣΩ above bukranion / TAPAΣ below, Taras astride dolphin to left, holding hippocamp in extended right hand, trident against left arm; monogram and mask of Silenos right. Vlasto 941 (same obverse die); Evans IX B, 1; HN Italy 1054. 6.49g, 20mm, 3h. Near Mint State. Very Rare. A very unusual obverse type with the rider’s head thrown back and facing the viewer of the coin.

1,000

43. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 280-272 BC. Nude youth on horseback right, crowning himself; IΩ to left, IΑΛΟ and Ionic capital below / Taras astride dolphin to left, holding bunch of grapes and distaff; TAPAΣ below, ANΘ to right. Vlasto 803; HN Italy 1014. 6.89g, 21mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

400

44. Calabria, Tarentum AR Drachm. Circa 302-280 BC. Zor..., magistrate. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet ornamented with Skylla hurling a stone / TAP, owl with folded wings standing right, head facing; in right field, ZOP downwards and olive branch. Vlasto 1047ff; SNG ANS 1303ff; HN Italy 975. 3.24g, 18mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. A well struck and detailed example with attractive lustre.

300

45. Calabria, Tarentum AR Drachm. Circa 281-272 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing crested helmet ornamented with Skylla; EY below bust truncation / TAPANTINΩN, owl standing facing with open wings; ΣΩ upwards to right. SNG Delepierre 250; Vlasto -, cf. 1077; HN Italy 1018. 3.28g, 16mm, 9h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive style, lightly toned and lustrous.

500

2x 46. Calabria, Tarentum AR Diobol. Circa 280-228 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right, helmet decorated with laurel wreath / Herakles strangling the Nemean lion. Vlasto 1341; SNG ANS 1429 (both same dies); cf. HN Italy 1061. 1.20g, 12mm, 9h. Very Fine. Toned. From the M.M. Collection; Ex Gorny & Mosch 224, 13 October 2014, lot 24; Purchased from Grabow, Berlin, August 1957.

15

200


BRUTTIUM

47. Bruttium, Kaulonia AR Stater. Circa 525-500 BC. Apollo advancing right, holding branch; small daimon running right on Apollo’s left arm; to right, stag standing right, head reverted / Incuse of obverse, but branch instead of daimon and three letter ethnic in relief. Noe, Caulonia, Group B, 31 (same dies); HN Italy 2036. 7.58g, 30mm, 12h. Very Fine. Edge chips. Old collection tone.

1,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

48. Bruttium, Kaulonia AR Stater. Circa 450-445 BC. Apollo, naked, advancing right, holding a branch in uplifted right hand, small daimon running right on outstretched left arm; stag on tablet in right field, looking backwards; KAVΛ to left / Stag standing right; branch in right field; KAVΛ in retrograde above. HN Italy 2046; SNG ANS 180 (these dies); SNG Fitzwilliam 731 (these dies); Noe, Caulonia 93. 8.31g, 21mm, 10h. Good Very Fine. Attractive old tone.

750

Ex Rockefeller University / Dr. Alfred E. Mirsky Collection, Gemini V, 9 January 2011, lot 62.

Beautiful Kroton Incuse Stater

49. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 530-500 BC. Tripod, legs terminating in lion’s feet, serpents rising from bowl; QPO to left / Incuse tripod, legs terminating in lion’s feet, with ornaments on and serpents rising from the bowl in relief. HN Italy 2075; SNG ANS 227-234; Gorini 3. 7.58g, 31mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Beautifully toned. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; This coin must certainly have a pre-2000 provenance, however this cataloguer has been unable to find it.

16

5,000


50. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 480-430 BC. Tripod, heron standing to right; QPO to left / Incuse tripod. SNG ANS 273; SNG Copenhagen 1754; HN Italy 2102. 8.00g, 21mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Pleasing old tone.

500

Ex Gorny & Mosch 207, 15 October 2012, lot 43.

51. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 370 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, KPOTΩNIATAΣ around / Infant Herakles kneeling right, head turned left, strangling two serpents. SNG ANS 384-386; SNG Lockett 631; SNG Lloyd 618; Jameson 433; Dewing 513; cf. HN Italy 2157. 7.59g, 20mm, 10h. Very Fine. Small and unobtrusive punch on reverse.

1,500

From the Mark Christenson Collection; Ex Hirsch 289, 2 May 2013, lot 88; Ex New York Sale VII, 15 January 2004, lot 10; Ex New York Sale IV, 17 January 2002, lot 39. On the night that Herakles was to be born, Hera, knowing of her husband Zeus’ adultery with the mortal Alkmene, persuaded Zeus to swear an oath that the child born that night to a member of the House of Perseus would be High King. Hera did this knowing that while Herakles was to be born a descendant of Perseus, so too was Eurystheos, son of Sthenelos. Once the oath was sworn, Hera hurried to Alkmene’s dwelling and slowed the birth of Herakles by forcing Ilithyia, goddess of childbirth, to sit cross-legged with her clothing tied in knots, thereby causing Herakles to be trapped in the womb. Meanwhile, Hera caused Eurystheos to be born prematurely, making him High King in place of Herakles. She would have permanently delayed Herakles’ birth had she not been foiled by Galanthis, Alkmene’s servant, who lied to Ilithyia, saying that Alkmene had already delivered the baby. Upon hearing this, she jumped in surprise, untying the knots and thus allowing Alkmene to give birth to Herakles. Having failed to prevent his birth, Hera sent two serpents to kill the baby Herakles as he lay in his cot. While his twin brother Iphikles screamed in terror, Herakles throttled the snakes, one in each hand, and was found by his nurse playing with their limp bodies as if they were toys.

52. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 350-300 BC. Eagle standing right, wings displayed and head raised / Tripod, legs terminating in lion’s feet; bay leaf to left, QPO to right. Attianese, Kroton 106; HN Italy 2148; SNG ANS 344-5 (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen 1784. 7.82g, 20mm, 8h. Good Very Fine. Pleasant old cabinet tone. From the M.M. Collection; Ex Gorny & Mosch 225, 14 October 2014, lot 1090; Ex Kricheldorf 27, 1958, lot 121.

450

53. Bruttium, Kroton AR Drachm. Circa 300-250 BC. Male head right, wearing taenia / Owl standing left; QPO above, grain ear to left. Attianese 151; SNG ANS 421; HN Italy 2195. 3.19g, 15mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned. Ex Mark Christenson Collection.

17

750


54. Bruttium, Rhegion AR Drachm. Circa 494-480 BC. Lion’s head facing / Head of calf to left, RECINON (retrograde) around. Robinson 3; HN Italy 2470; SNG Copenhagen 1923; SNG ANS 622. 5.67g, 17mm, 7h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

1,250

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex SKA 57, 1 March 1992, lot 9.

55. Bruttium, Rhegion AR Tetradrachm. Circa 435-425 BC. Facing lion’s head; dotted border / RECINOS (retrograde), Apollo Iocastos enthroned left, holding long staff; laurel wreath around. Herzfelder 52 (same dies); HN Italy 2491; SNG Copenhagen -, cf. 1929; SNG ANS 640. 17.05g, 27mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. Obv. of particularly fine style. Old cabinet tone.

5,000

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 9, 16-17 April 1996, lot 118. The lion on the obverse of Rhegion’s coinage is the sacred animal of Apollo, patron god of colonisation. The seated figure on the reverse has no distinctive attributes that aid identification, however current interpretations attribute him as being Iocastos, son of Aiolos, and who was king over much of the toe of Italy. That he died from the effects of a snake-bite we learn from Heraklides, a pupil of Plato: “Rhegion was founded by Chalkidians who had left Euripas on account of a pestilence; they were aided by Messenians, who settled down first near the grave of Iocastos, one of the sons of Aiolos, whom they say died from the bite of a snake.” The fact that his brothers Pheraimon and Agathurnos were commemorated on coins of Messana and Tyndaris renders it likely that Iocastos should likewise be made the subject of a type.

NUMIDIA AND MAURETANIA

56. Kingdom of Numidia, Juba I AR Denarius. Circa 60-46 BC. Diademed and draped bust right, with sceptre over shoulder; REX IVBA before / Octastyle temple, Punic inscription around. MAA 29; SNG Copenhagen 523. 3.94g, 18mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

150

From the Eucharius Collection.

57. Kingdom of Mauretania, Juba II AR Denarius. Caesarea, 17/18 AD. REX IVBA, head of Juba II in the guise of Hercules, wearing lion skin headdress; club behind / Capricorn to right with globe, cornucopiae and rudder; RXXXXII below. SNG Copenhagen 587; Mazard 211. 2.88g, 17mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 84, 20 May 2015, lot 762.

18

1,000


CARTHAGE

58. North Africa, Carthage EL Stater. Circa 350-310 BC. Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace / Horse standing right on single ground line, on which two pellets. Jenkins & Lewis, Group IV D, 328-329. 7.49g, 19mm, 12h. Very Fine.

1,000

59. North Africa, Carthage EL Stater. Circa 350-310 BC. Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace / Horse standing right on single ground line, on which two pellets. Jenkins & Lewis, Group IV D, 328-329. 7.53g, 18mm, 12h. Very Fine.

1,000

60. North Africa, Carthage EL Stater. Circa 310-290 BC. Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace, pellet before / Horse standing right on single ground line, on which two pellets. Jenkins & Lewis, Group V, 259-279. 7.42g, 19mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Lustrous. Minor die break to obv.

1,250

61. North Africa, Carthage EL Stater. Circa 310-290 BC. Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace, pellet before / Horse standing right; three pellets in exergue. Jenkins & Lewis group V, 293/295; MAA 12. 7.46g, 18mm, 12h. Very Fine.

1,000

62. North Africa, Carthage EL Stater. Circa 310-270 BC. Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace / Horse standing right on single ground line. Jenkins & Lewis, Group VI, 317ff. 7.45g, 19mm, 12h. Very Fine. Flan crack.

19

1,000


63. North Africa, Carthage EL Stater. Circa 310-270 BC. Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace / Horse standing right on single ground line. Jenkins & Lewis, Group VI, 317ff. 7.34g, 19mm, 11h. Very Fine.

1,000

SICILY Extremely Rare Trionkion of Panormos

4x 64. Sicily, Panormos AR Tetras (Trionkion). Circa 400 BC. Horned head of bearded Pan right / Π-A-N and three pellets around. G. Manganaro, JNG 34, 1984, 29 and pl. 5, 68. 0.20g. 7mm, 4h. Mint State. Extremely Rare, and preserved in excellent condition.

2,000

65. Sicily, Entella AR Tetradrachm. Circa 345-315 BC. Head of Arethusa right, wearing wreath of grain ears, triple-pendant earring, and necklace; four dolphins around / Horse prancing right; palm tree in background. Jenkins, Punic 132 (O44/R119); SNG Copenhagen 965. 17.13g, 26mm, 1h. About Extremely Fine.

3,000

Fine Style Siculo-Punic Tetradrachm

66. Sicily, Siculo-Punic AR Tetradrachm. ‘People of the Camp’ mint, circa 320-315 BC. Head of Tanit left, wearing grain wreath, triple-pendant earring and pearl necklace; four dolphins around / Horse’s head left, palm tree behind; Punic legend ‘MMHNT’ below. Jenkins, Punic Sicily, pl. 11, 171 (these dies). 17.17g, 27mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine. Attractively toned. Ex Gorny & Mosch 185, 8 March 2010, lot 57.

20

3,000


67. Sicily, Entella AR Tetradrachm. 317-310 BC. Head of Tanit left, wearing grain wreath, triple-drop earring and pearl necklace / Horse’s head, palm tree behind; Phoenician ‘M’ below. Jenkins 237. 16.83g, 28mm, 8h. Extremely Fine.

2,000

68. Sicily, Siculo-Punic AR Tetradrachm. Circa 310-300 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Horse’s head left, palm tree with date clusters behind; ‘MHSBM’ (Paymaster, or Quaestor) in Punic characters below. Jenkins, Punic Sicily IV 289; SNG Oxford 2164. 17.15g, 22mm, 10h. Good Very Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone.

500

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Gorny & Mosch 232, 5 October 2015, lot 89.

69. Sicily, Entella AR Tetradrachm. Circa 300-289 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Horse’s head left; astragalos to left, palm tree to right; Punic ‘MHSBM’ below. Jenkins, Punic 367-9 var. (O115/R- [unlisted rev. die]); Gorny and Mosch 114, lot 37 (same dies). 16.93g, 24mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned. Struck in good style on a very broad flan for the issue.

2,500

2x 70. Sicily, Abakainon AR Litra. Circa 430-420 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Sow standing right; acorn to lower right. SNG ANS 898; SNG München 2. 0.65g, 10mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine.

200

Abakainon was a city of the native Siculi, and it does not appear to have ever received a Greek colony, though it did adopt the customs and influences of Greek civilization and art. Its territory originally included the site of Tyndaris, which was separated from it by the Syracusan tyrant Dionysios when he founded that city in 396 BC. In that time, Abakainon appears to have been a settlement of some considerable size, but it was quickly eclipsed by Tyndaris and declined in size and prosperity. The boar and acorn must refer to the great oak forests that still cover the neighbouring mountains. Such forests would have provided pasture to large herds of swine, which it is logical to assume was one of the main sources of Abakainon’s wealth.

21


71. Sicily, Akragas AR Didrachm. Circa 520-500 BC. Sea eagle standing left, wings folded, AKPACANTOΣ around / Crab. SNG Lockett 687; SNG ANS 913; Jenkins, The Coinage of Gela, AMUGS II (1970), pl. 37, 2 (all same dies). 8.75g, 25mm, 4h. Good Very Fine. Fine Archaic style and pleasing old collection tone.

750

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

72. Sicily, Akragas AR Didrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Eagle with folded wings standing right, AKRA around / Crab, male head below, flanked by A-Σ, all within shallow circular incuse. Jenkins group III, pl. 37, 18; SNG ANS 959. 8.37g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

2,000

73. Sicily, Akragas AR Didrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Eagle standing left, AK-RA around / Crab within shallow incuse circle. SNG ANS 950-3; Jenkins, Gela, Group IV. 8.74g, 21mm, 10h. Very Fine. Old cabinet tone.

750

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

74. Sicily, Akragas AR Tetradrachm. Circa 460-446 BC. Sea eagle standing left on Ionic capital, AKRACANTOΣ around / Crab; spiral floral ornament below; all within shallow incuse circle. SNG ANS 982 var.; Lee Group II; SNG Lockett 696. 17.23g, 24mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine. Attractively toned. Rare. Ex Tkalec Auction, 17 May 2010, lot 3.

22

2,500


Interesting One-Mina Bronze Weight

Please note this image not to scale - see dimensions below

75. Sicily, Akragas (?) Æ weight with suspension loop. 66.39mm x 65.11mm x 66.56mm x 49.75 mm; 466g. Unusual and important for possessing a countermark and engraved Greek legends. 2,500 Side 1 bears a circular 16mm countermark, depicting a crab seen from above. The style of the crab is similar to countermarks stamped on Akragantine hemilitrai, dated to the early 4th century BC (the time of Dionysios I, tyrant at Syracuse). Side 2 bears a Greek inscription in two rows: ΑΝΤΑΛΛΙΔΟΣ / ΝΜΕΟΝΙΟΣΟ. There are also traces of an obscure previous inscription, partially overlapped by the above letters. Side 3 bears a Greek inscription AΓΤΑΛΛΙΔΙΣ in one row, without evident traces of previous letters. The base displays a further Greek inscription, separated in two branches: ΚΙΚO / ΝΟ (Σ ?) This bronze weight seems to correspond to the standard Attic Solonian mina of 457.80 grams, i.e. to 105 Attic drachms (see Land & Crosby 1964, p.3-4; Milne 1945), then rounded to 100 drachms, with a difference of only 1.8%. Usually specimens of Attic mina weight have a square or rectangular form and a weight range from about 426 to 477 g, with a weight range of about 450-460 g (mean = 450.2 g; median = 453.4 g). The above looped specimen is therefore within the normal range observed for a mina weight of the Solonian system. The application of a countermark on bronze (or lead) Attic weights is attested, as on some specimens found in the Athenian agora. The use of a crab countermark, already seen on Akragas hemilitrai, seems to point to an Akragantine context. From a private English collection formed before 1939.

23


76. Sicily, Gela AR Didrachm. Circa 490-480 BC. Nude horseman galloping to right, brandishing spear held high / Forepart of man-headed bull with long beard to right, CΕΛΑ above. Jenkins, Gela group I, 11. 8.34g, 21mm, 12h. Some areas of corrosion, otherwise Extremely Fine.

2,000

77. Sicily, Gela AR Didrachm. Circa 490-475 BC. Nude horseman wearing helmet, galloping to right and brandishing spear held high / Forepart of man-headed bull with long beard to right, CELA around. Jenkins 59; SNG München 258. 8.51g, 21mm, 1h. Extremely Fine.

2,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex A. Tkalec, 16 November 1987, lot 41.

78. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga to right, Ionic column behind, grain ear in exergue / Forepart of man-headed bull right, CEΛAΣ above. Jenkins, Gela 211 (O56/R112); SNG ANS O47/R46. 17.56g, 29mm, 3h. Very Fine.

1,500

79. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 420-415 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron in left hand and reins in both, driving slow quadriga right; above, Nike flying right, crowning horses with open wreath held in both hands / Forepart of man-headed bull right; ΓEΛAΣ above. Jenkins, Gela, group VIII, 468.29 (O90/R180) = Weber 1324 (this coin); SNG ANS 90; SNG Lloyd 971; BMC 50; McClean 2258 (all from the same dies). 17.33g, 26mm, 8h. Good Very Fine. From the J.T.B. Collection; Ex Hirsch 275, 22 September 2011, lot 3187; Ex Numismatik Lanz 24, 25 April 1983, lot 65.

24

2,500


Superb Classical Style

80.

Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 420-415 BC. Charioteer, holding reins and kentron, driving slow quadriga to left; above, Nike flying left to crown the horses / Forepart of the river-god Gelas to right, ΓEΛAΣ above. Jenkins 473; SNG ANS 93 (same dies); Kraay/Hirmer 162; SNG Fitzwilliam 1000 (same dies); Jenkins 473. 17.45g, 24mm, 9h. Good Extremely Fine; obv. from the usual worn die.

15,000

From the Angelo S. Collection; Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 64, 17 May 2012, lot 682; Ex Nomos FPL 3, 2010, no. 11. The city of Gela was jointly founded by colonists from Crete and Lindos, Rhodes, 45 years after the foundation of Syracuse, around 688 BC. The city took its name from the nearby river, which itself was given the appellation Gela on account of the icy coldness of its waters, the word gela meaning ‘ice’ in the languages of the Opici and Siculi, as it does in Latin. Virgil applies the epithet immanis to Gela, which some believe is in reference to the river, others the city. The latter is more correct, and is an allusion to the horned, man-headed bull depicted on their coinage which is a personification of the river Gela itself. This image of the river-god is derived from that of Acheloüs, the ‘father of all rivers’. Those who apply the epithet to the river make it signify ‘cruel’ or ‘monstrous’, and consider this a reference to the number of perilous whirlpools in its waters, whence Ovid remarks ‘Et te vorticibus non adeunde Gela’ (Fasti, 4, 470) - ‘And you, Gela, whose whirlpools must not be approached’. This coin dates from the high period of die engraving at Gela. Though the prosperity of the city was severely diminished when Gelon removed a large part of its inhabitants to Syracuse, many inhabitants subsequently returned and the city regained a part of its power, until the Carthaginian destruction of Gela’s colony Akragas in 406 forced the citizens to turn to Dionysios I of Syracuse for help. The latter delayed, and Gela was left to defend itself, wherein the inhabitants made a valiant defence with even the women toiling to repair the battered walls at night. At last Dionysios arrived to lift the siege, but following an initial defeat, he resolved to abandon the city and under cover of night he removed his army and the population of the city to Syracuse. The city thus fell to the Carthaginians and was thoroughly sacked, the spoils including a famous statue of Apollo which was carried away to Tyre.

25


81. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 420-415 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow quadriga right; above, Nike flying left, crowning charioteer with wreath / Forepart of man-headed bull right, ΓEΛAΣ above. Jenkins 478; SNG ANS 96 (these dies). 17.16g, 28mm, 7h. Worn obverse die, but otherwise Very Fine.

1,000

82. Sicily, Gela Æ Trias. Circa 420-405 BC. Bull standing right, head lowered; ••• (mark of value) in exergue / Head of young river god right, hair flowing; barley grain behind. Jenkins, Gela 506 and 520; CNS 17; SNG ANS -. 3.51g, 15mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

450

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Eckenheimer Collection, Roma Numismatics Auction IX, 22 March 2015, lot 76.

83. Sicily, Himera AR Drachm. Circa 530-483/2 BC. Cockerel standing left / Hen standing right in linear square border within incuse square. SNG ANS 152; HGC 2, 423. 5.46g, 19mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

The Finest of Four Known

4x 84. Sicily, Himera AR Trias. Circa 409-390 BC. Head of nymph three-quarters facing / Four pellets within wreath. Gemini VII, 116; The New York Sale XIV, 80; otherwise unpublished in the standard references, but cf. SNG Lloyd 1035-1037 (hemilitrai). 0.23g, 8mm. Extremely Fine; by far the finest of four known examples.

26

500


Emergency Coinage of Kamarina

2x 85. Sicily, Kamarina AV Diobol. Emergency issue, circa 406/5 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with winged hippocamp / KA surrounded by olive sprig with two berries. Westermark & Jenkins 206; HGC 2, 518; SNG ANS 1209; Rizzo VII, 17; Weber 1248. 1.06g, 10mm, 5h. About Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

2,500

This coin, like the contemporary issues at Gela, Stiela, Akragas and Syracuse (see lot 114), was struck to finance a defence against the great Carthaginian expedition which was at that time ravaging the Greek cities of Sicily. Akragas had been sacked and razed in 406, Gela in 405. Having suffered a defeat against the Carthaginian army at Gela, the Syracusan tyrant Dionysios chose not to offer battle again, but rather to evacuate the population. Retreating to Kamarina, it appears that Dionysios immediately ordered the complete evacuation of the city, and so Kamarina in its turn was also left to the advancing Carthaginians. The people fled toward Syracuse, chased by the fear of the Carthaginians, though not by the Carthaginians themselves; the rumour among the Greeks was that Dionysios had betrayed their cause and made a deal with the enemy to cement his power over Syracuse. With this issue, the high period of coinage at Kamarina came to an abrupt end.

86. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull kneeling to right on ground line, floral design in exergue / Nike, wearing long chiton, advancing left, holding tainia in her outstretched right hand, wreath in left; H to left, KATANAION around. SNG ANS 1236; Randazzo pl. 4, 75 (same dies). 17.32g, 29mm, 4h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

4,000

From a private American Collection.

87. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull standing to right on ground line, Nike above flying to right holding wreath / Nike, wearing long chiton, advancing left, holding taenia in her outstretched right hand, vine in left; H to left, KATANAION around. SNG ANS -; Jameson 533 (same dies); Randazzo pl. 4, O73/R72; Rizzo pl. IX, 8 (same dies). 17.06g, 29mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

88. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull swimming to right; branch above, fish below / Nike, wearing long chiton, advancing left, holding tainia in her outstretched right hand; KATANE around. Randazzo 55. 16.97g, 26mm, 3h. Very Fine.

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750


2x 89. Sicily, Katane AR Litra. Circa 461-450 BC. Head of Silenos left / Winged thunderbolt, two shields flanking; KATANE around. Boehringer 2 var.; SNG Tübingen 590 var.; Pecunem 9, 39 (same obverse die). 0.85g, 12mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

90. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 425 BC. Charioteer driving slow quadriga to right, Nike flying above to right,crowning horses with wreath in outstretched arms / Laureate head of Apollo facing right, KATANAION; around. Rizzo pl. XI, 4. SNG ANS 1249 (same dies). 16.77g, 27mm, 1h. Near Very Fine. Rare.

1,000

91. Sicily, Kephaloidion AR Hemidrachm. Circa 307-305 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress; EK ΚΕΦΑΛΟΙΔΙON around / Bull butting left on tablet; monogram AK and ΗΡΑΚΛΕΙΩΤΑΝ above. Campana, Kephaloidion 1; Jenkins, Coinages, p. 97, 1 = CNS I p. 245 (Herakleia) = Basel 345 = Numismatica Ars Classica 13, lot 345. 1.93g, 16mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare, one of only very few examples.

1,500

From a private German collection. Once in the territory of Himera, the Sikeliote city of Kephaloidion fell into Carthaginian possession after the destruction of Himera, from where the ‘Rash Melkarth’ or ‘Promontory of Herakles’ coins appear to have been issued. The city was recovered in 393 BC by Dionysios of Syracuse, and he settled here a group of Italian mercenaries who called themselves the Herakleotai. The series of coins produced by these mercenaries is extremely rare, such that very few examples of each denomination survive - of the drachms there are believed to be only two surviving specimens, and this uncertain denomination is of similar scarcity. It is described by the ANS as a triobol, and as a hemidrachm by Jameson, though the present specimen is heavier than both of those, being slightly greater than hemidrachm weight. The great rarity of this series means that this coin represents a near singular opportunity for collectors to acquire a coin of this Hellenised city in a denomination any greater than a litra.

92. Sicily, Leontini AR Obol. Circa 476-466 BC. Facing lion’s scalp / Barley grain, ΛEON around. Boehringer, Münzgeschichte 19; SNG ANS 214 (litra). 0.49g, 10mm,12h. Extremely Fine.

200

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

93. Sicily, Leontinoi AR Didrachm. Circa 470 BC. Nude rider on horseback right / Lion’s head left, ΛEONTINO (retrograde) and four grains of barley around. SNG Fitzwilliam 1033-4 (same dies); SNG ANS 209 (same obv. die). 7.87g, 21mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Pleasing tone with golden highlights. Very Rare. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

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1,500


Ex Vinchon 1985

94. Sicily, Zankle-Messana AR Chalkidian Drachm. Circa 520-493 BC. Dolphin swimming left within sickle shaped harbour of Zankle, DANKLE above / Scallop shell within incuse pattern. HGC 2, 766; SNG Lloyd 1076; Basel 359; Boston MFA 285; SNG ANS 298-303; Kraay-Hirmer 49. 5.78g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Lovely metal; beautifully toned.

7,500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex M. Jean Vinchon, 13 April 1985, lot 98. The circumstances and time of the foundation of Zankle are uncertain, due to conflicting accounts from the historical sources. According to Thucydides, the place was originally settled by the Chalkidian colony of Kyme (Cumae), first as a trading outpost, then as a polis in its own right at a later date, when greater numbers of Chalkidian and other Euboian settlers arrived. According to Ps.-Skymnos 283-86 (possibly drawing on Ephor fr. 137A; cf. Strabo 6.2.2-3) however, Zankle was founded by Naxos as a sub-colony at around the same time as Katane and Leontinoi, i.e. circa 735-730 BC. This date seems to be supported by archaeological evidence, and by the Zanklaian participation in the foundation of Rhegion. Situated near the narrowest point of the straights south of Cape Pelorus on a low coastal plateau facing a natural, sickle-shaped harbour from which the city took its name (ζάγκλον – scythe), the settlement of Zankle lay along the inner harbour and upon the sickle-shaped peninsula that enclosed the harbour. The city appears to have been prosperous until around 488/7 BC, when the Zanklaian forces were laying siege to a native Sikel town, and their undefended city was captured by Samian exiles.

2x 95. Sicily, Zankle-Messana AR Diobol. Samian occupation, circa 493-488 BC. Facing lion’s scalp / Prow of a Samaina (Samian galley) left, Corinthian helmet before. SNG ANS 309. 1.14g, 10mm, 3h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

750

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group 64, 24 September 2003, lot 53. In 493 BC emigrants from Samos along with some Milesians and other Ionians were invited to Sicily by Skythes, the ruler of Zankle, to assist with the founding of a new city. When the Ionian settlers were already in Italian waters, Skythes marched out with the forces of Zankle to besiege a nearby city of the native Sikels, presumably in aid of the enterprise. However at this point the Samians, who had now reached Lokroi, were persuaded by Anaxilas the tyrant of Rhegion to take advantage of the absence of the Zanklaians, and that rather than endure the hardships of founding a new colony they should take over Zankle itself while its men were away. The Samians agreed and did so; by the time Skythes had hurried back to his city he found the walls held against him. The Samians, having thus taken for themselves a new city, elected to strike coins on the Euboic standard bearing the types of the lion’s scalp used at Samos and a Samian galley, though without an ethnic – presumably because they were a mixed body of Samians, Milesians and others, and thus had not yet determined a collective identity.

29


96. Sicily, Messana AR Tetradrachm. 478-476 BC. Seated charioteer, holding reins with both hands, driving mule biga right; bay leaf in exergue / Hare springing to right, MESSENION around. Caltabiano Serie IIB, 75 (D41/R38); Bement 405; Hunterian 3; Randazzo 105. 17.00g, 28mm, 2h. Good Extremely Fine. Lightly toned.

1,000

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Gorny & Mosch 224, 13 October 2014, lot 62.

97. Sicily, Messana AR Tetradrachm. 478-476 BC. Seated charioteer, holding reins with both hands, driving mule biga right; bay leaf in exergue / Hare springing to right, MESSENION around. SNG ANS 315-319. Caltabiano 98 (D53/R51); SNG Lloyd 1084; Randazzo 109 (same rev. die); Basel 361. 17.35g, 27mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex Triton X, 9 January 2007, lot 77.

98. Sicily, Messana AR Tetradrachm. Circa 478-476 BC. Seated charioteer, holding reins with both hands, driving mule biga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath, bay leaf in exergue / Hare springing to right, MESSANION around. SNG ANS -; Caltabiano 352 (same dies). 17.38g, 26mm, 9h. Struck from worn obverse die, otherwise Very Fine.

500

99. Sicily, The Mamertinoi Æ Quadruple. Messana, circa 288-278 BC. Laureate head of youthful Ares right, helmet with apex behind, APEOΣ before / Bull charging to left; MAMERTINΩN around. Särström 17-42; CNS I p. 91, 1; SNG ANS 399. 19.26g, 28mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, with a sound, untouched patina.

30

750


100

101

100. Sicily, Morgantina Æ Hemidrachm. Circa 339/8-317 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with serpents; behind neck guard, owl standing right, head facing; MOPΓANTINΩN before / Lion standing right, devouring stag’s head; Γ above, coiled serpent below. Erim & Jaunzems issue 6, 4; Castrizio series I, 2; CNS 2; SNG Morcom 640; SNG ANS -; SNG Lloyd -; Rizzo pl. LX, 7; Basel 375; SNG Delepierre 3054. 17.24g, 21mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Very well preserved for the type. 750 101. Sicily, Segesta AR Didrachm. Circa 480-410 BC. Hound standing left / Head of the nymph Segesta right, swastika behind, everything in linear circle within shallow incuse circle. SNG Fitzwilliam 1125 (same dies); SNG ANS -. 8.21g, 23mm, 4h. Near Very Fine. Old collection tone with blue iridescent flashes. Rare. 300 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Ex Metropolitan Museum & Ward Collection

102. Sicily, Segesta AR Didrachm. Circa 480-410 BC. Hound standing left, head lowered, on double exergual line / ΣECEΣTAII-B, Archaic head of the nymph Segesta right, wearing circular earring and necklace. BMC 2; Weber 1502. 8.44g, 21mm, 5h. About Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

5,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 6, 11 March 1993, lot 78; Ex Metropolitan Museum of Art: The John Ward Collection, Sotheby & Co., 4 April 1973, lot 181.

103. Sicily, Selinos AR Didrachm. Circa 540-515 BC. Selinon leaf; pellet to upper left and right, pellets flanking stem and taking form of eyes of facing panther head design at bottom of leaf / Incuse square divided into eight sections with Maltese cross form. Arnold-Biucchi Group I, 5; Selinus Hoard 30; HGC 2, 1210; SNG ANS 666; SNG Lloyd –; SNG München –; Basel –; Dewing –. 8.99g, 27mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

104. Sicily, Solous Æ22. Circa 400-350 BC. Male head left, wearing Attic helmet, Punic letter below / Horse galloping right, caduceus behind. CNS I, 9; SNG ANS -; SNG Copenhagen-; BMC -. 7.82g, 22mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine, and among the finest known. Small area of bronze disease on rev. removed and restored. Extremely Rare.

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1,000


A Numismatic Gem

105.

Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer -, (V140/R208). 17.45g, 25mm, 2h. Mint State; exceptional metal quality and preservation for a Syracusan tetradrachm of this period. Superb lustre with vivid iridescence. Extremely Rare; this die pairing not recorded by Boehringer. 10,000 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; This coin must certainly have a pre-2000 provenance, however this cataloguer has been unable to find it. This coin displays not only an incredibly sharp strike from fresh dies in the centre of a large planchet, but also a wonderfully deep cabinet tone with gold iridescence on the obverse and vivid green flashes radiating out from the portrait on the reverse. This has yielded a coin with gem-like qualities; it is without a doubt one of the most beautiful Deinomenid tetradrachms to have come to market in many years. Following the Battle of Himera in 480 BC, Syracuse had been unchallenged in Sicily. The reign of Hieron therefore was characterised by a period of great expansion in the power and prestige of Syracuse, and the effective carte blanche to do as he pleased; he removed the inhabitants of Naxos and Katane to Leontinoi, peopled Katane (which he renamed Aetna) with Dorians, concluded an alliance with Akragas, and espoused the cause of the Lokrians against Anaxilas, tyrant of Rhegion. Around the time when this coin must have been struck, Hieron achieved his most important military victory at the Battle of Cumae (474 BC). Responding to a call for aid from Aristodemos, the tyrant of Cumae, to counter an Etruscan invasion, Hieron sent a fleet of triremes to assist the Cumaeans, whose combined navies met and defeated the Etruscan forces in the Bay of Naples. This defeat caused the Etruscans to lose much of their influence in Italy; they lost control of the seas and their territories were eventually absorbed piecemeal by the Romans, Samnites and Gauls. The Syracusans dedicated a captured Etruscan helmet at the great panhellenic sanctuary at Olympia, a piece of armour found in the German excavations there. Perhaps remembering this bitter defeat and hoping to avenge their ancestors, the Etruscans would later readily join the ill-fated Athenian expedition against Syracuse in 415 BC.

32


106. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRAKOΣION and four dolphins around. Boehringer - (unlisted dies); cf. Randazzo 475 (same obv. die). 17.34g, 24mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Both dies were unknown to Boehringer when he published his die study, and the obv. die only came to light in the Randazzo Hoard in 1980.

1,250

107. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 314 (O152/R220); Randazzo 482 (same dies); SNG ANS -. 17.36g, 24mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

750

108. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer - (V158/R-); Randazzo 494, 496 (same obverse die). 17.29g, 25mm, 2h. Very Fine. Very Rare. This reverse die apparently unpublished.

750

2x 109. Sicily, Syracuse AR Litra. Circa 475-470 BC. Diademed head of Arethusa right / Four-spoked wheel. Cf. Boehringer 362-373: HGC 2, 1371. 0.65g, 9mm. Extremely Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

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200


110. Sicily, Syracuse AR Litra. Second Democracy, circa 466-460 BC. Head of Arethusa right, wearing pearl tainia, SVRA before / Octopus. Boehringer Series XIII, 449-467; SNG ANS 142. 0.60g, 13mm, 4h. Very Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

111. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Second Democracy. Circa 450 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow quadriga right; Nike flying above right, ketos below / Head of Arethusa right, wearing pendant earring and pearl necklace; SURAKOSION and four dolphins around. Boehringer 506 (V267/R362). 16.62g, 25mm, 10h. Good Very Fine. Old cabinet tone. Scarce.

1,250

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Struck From Dies of Wonderful Style

112. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Second Democracy, circa 450-440 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; Nike above, flying to right, crowning horses, ketos in exergue / Head of Arethusa right, wearing headband, pendant earring, and pearl necklace with pendant; ΣΥRAΚΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 554; SNG ANS 180 (same obverse die); Rizzo plate 37, 13 (same obverse die). 17.35g, 26mm, 2h. Extremely Fine; very difficult to find in this grade. Struck from dies of wonderful style on sound metal. Rare. Privately purchased from Numismatica Ars Classica, 13 January 2011.

34

7,500


35


36


Victory Over the Athenians in 413 BC

113.

Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Second Democracy, circa 415-406 BC. Dies signed by Euth(edemos?) on obverse and Phrygillos on reverse. Nude Eros driving galloping quadriga to right, holding reins in both hands; above, Nike flying to left, crowning him with wreath; in exergue, Skylla swimming to right, holding trident over shoulder, flanked by EYΘ and fish to right and leaping dolphin to left / Grain-wreathed head of the nymph Arethusa to left, wearing looped earring and necklace; ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΟΝ and four swimming dolphins around, ΦPYΓIΛΛΟΣ in two lines below. Tudeer 47; SNG ANS 274; Kraay-Hirmer 107; Rizzo pl. XLII, 12; Jameson 801; de Luynes 1169 (all from same dies). 16.56g, 26mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. A highly desirable type in exceptional condition of preservation.

40,000

This spectacular coin is part of a brief series of coins engraved at Syracuse, Akragas and a mint believed to be Kamarina as Syracuse and her allies basked in the glory of their brilliant and total victory in the autumn of 413 BC over the Athenian expeditionary force commanded by Nikias, Demosthenes and Eurymedon. Despite the traditionally broad dating assigned to this issue (415-405) we may deduce the date of its production on the basis of several considerations: namely, the unusual attributes of this series, the availability of metal, and the requirement for coinage. This issue, Tudeer 46 (which shares the same obverse die) and Tudeer 51 share one highly unusual feature: Nike carries not the usual palm branch, but an aphlaston; a hemilitron attributed to Kamarina struck in the same period also displays an aphlaston as the sole reverse type. The extraordinary use of such a symbol at this time can only refer to the great naval victories won in late August and early September of 413. In the former engagement, Eurymedon was killed and many of the Athenian ships were pushed on to the shore where Syracusan-allied land forces commanded by the Spartan general Gylippos was waiting for them. With the Syracusans now blockading the harbour the Athenians on 9 September readied themselves for one last battle, but the cramped conditions in the harbour prevented them from manoeuvring and eventually forced them back onto the shore again. Abandoning their ships, they retreated to their camp leaving the Syracusans to burn or tow away what little remained of their once great fleet. This hypothesis is further reinforced by the presence of Skylla in the exergue, playfully chasing a fish with her trident over her shoulder, while a dolphin follows in her wake. This too is a symbol unique to this single Syracusan die, but not to the period: Akragas at this time also issues a famous and unprecedented type (Kraay-Hirmer 175) bearing Skylla and the Akragantine crab in great detail upon the reverse, while two majestic eagles stand proudly on the obverse, tearing at a dead hare. It has already been remarked elsewhere that that type most likely commemorates the defeat of the Athenian force (see U. Westermark, Skylla on the Coins of Akragas, DN pp. 215-223). The unusual depiction of Arethusa wreathed with grain on both this issue and Tudeer 46 may also be explained by the lifting of the blockade of the city and the threat of starvation being dispelled as food was able to be once again freely imported. The spoils from the annihilated Athenian army would have provided ample metal on which to strike this celebratory issue (the Athenian reinforcements in 414 alone brought 300 talents – nearly 8 metric tonnes of silver). Indeed, though the coins are now extremely rare, the issue must have been vast judging by the highly worn die states we see on the surviving specimens. By 406/5 however, silver was in sufficiently short supply that Akragas, Kamarina and even Syracuse resorted to emergency gold issues. Excepting the great victory of 413 there appear to be no other occasions between 415 and 405 that would warrant the striking of so special a coinage and in such numbers. During the Carthaginian invasion of 410-409 neither Syracuse nor Akragas directly engaged the invaders, and even after the destruction of Selinos and Himera, their reactions were mild. Syracuse chose to quietly build up its fleet, while Akragas slowly expanded its army. Neither city had cause therefore in this period to expend sums as great as those which would have been required following the siege of Syracuse – soldiers, mercenaries and allies never require payment as great as when they have just concluded a successful war.

37


The Great Carthaginian Invasion of Sicily

2x

114. Sicily, Syracuse AV Dilitron. Emergency issue of the Second Democracy, winter 406/5 BC. Obverse die signed by ‘IM...’. Head of Athena left, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with serpent, palmette and elaborate spiral tendrils, [ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ before, IM below truncation of neck] / Aegis with gorgoneion at centre. Boehringer, Essays Thompson, pl. 38, 12 = Hess Leu Sale (27 March 1956), lot 210 (same obverse die); Manhattan Sale I, 28 (same dies). 1.76g, 10mm, 7h. Near Mint State. Extremely Rare; one of very few known specimens - only one other on CoinArchives.

7,500

The year 406 marked a desperate time for the Greeks in Sicily. A great Carthaginian invasion of Sicily had commenced in the Spring to punish the Greeks for having raided the Punic territories of Motya and Panormos. 60,000 soldiers under Hannibal Mago in 1,000 transports along with 120 triremes sailed for Sicily, where despite a plague that ravaged the ranks of the Carthaginian army and felled its commander, they successfully besieged and sacked Akragas, the wealthiest of all the cities of Sicily. After razing the city to the ground, the Carthaginians under their new commander Himilco marched east to Gela. Despite a spirited defence of the city by the defenders and the arrival of a relief force of 34,000 men and 50 triremes under Dionysios of Syracuse, the city fell after a poorly coordinated and unsuccessful attack launched by the Greeks. As Dionysios retreated from Gela first to Kamarina and then back to Syracuse, both of these now indefensible cities were sacked and levelled by Himilco’s forces. It was against this backdrop of a desperate fight for survival that many emergency coinages were issued in Sicily. Gold was scarce in the Greek world and tended to be used only for emergency coinages, as in that famous instance when Athens in the last decade of the fifth century resorted to melting the gold from the statues of Nike on the Akropolis when cut off from their silver mines at Laurion. Gela, Akragas, Kamarina and Syracuse all issued emergency gold coinage in 406/5 BC, without doubt to pay the mercenaries they had hired in their doomed resistance to Himilco. The master engraver ‘IM...’ responsible for this coin is also known to have engraved Syracusan tetradrachms around this period (see Tudeer 67).

115. Sicily, Syracuse AR Dekadrachm. Dionysios I, struck circa 405-400 BC. Unsigned dies in the style of Euainetos. Charioteer, holding kentron in extended right hand and reins in left, driving fast quadriga left; above, Nike flying right, crowning charioteer with wreath held in her extended hands; below heavy exergual line, [military harness, shield], greaves, cuirass, and crested Attic helmet, all connected by a horizontal spear; [AΘΛA below] / Head of Arethusa left, wearing wreath of grain ears, triple-pendant earring, and pearl necklace; ΣYPAKOΣIΩN above, [pellet below chin], four dolphins swimming around. Gallatin dies R.XXII/J.IV; SNG ANS –; Dewing –; Bement 517 (same dies); Hirsch 594 (same dies); HGC 2, 1299. 40.96g, 35mm, 5h. Very Fine. Old collection tone with iridescent highlights. Surfaces somewhat rough. From the M.M. Collection; Ex Daniel Koppersmith Collection, Classical Numismatic Group E-Auction 311, 25 September 2013, lot 446; Ex Rockefeller University / Dr. Alfred E. Mirsky Collection, Gemini VII, 9 January 2011, lot 174; Ex A.C. Ionides Collection, Christie’s, 4 March 1953.

38

6,000


Unsigned Dies of the Highest Calibre

116. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Time of Dionysios I, circa 405-400 BC. Charioteer, holding reins and kentron, driving galloping quadriga to left, detached chariot wheel beneath the back hooves of the horses; above, Nike flying to right, holding wreath, grain ear below double exergual lines / Head of Arethusa to left, wearing sakkos, double earring, and necklace; ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ and four swimming dolphins around. Tudeer 69 (O25/R47); Gulbenkian 288 (same dies); AMB 471 (same dies); Rizzo, pl. 47, 17 (same dies); Boston MFA 415 (same dies). 17.32g, 25mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

25,000

From the Angelo S. Collection; Ex Dr. Patrick Tan Collection, Gemini VII, 9 January 2011, lot 164; Ex A. Tkalec, 24 October 2003, lot 39. Sicily in the mid-5th Century BC was riven by continual warfare between cities vying for pre-eminence and power over their neighbours, and such warfare required vast amounts of money to finance, money which the cities of Sicily had in abundance thanks to their favourable position on the Mediterranean trade routes. This constant state of war stood in contrast to a climate of state-patronized cultural experimentation and development. Great artists, sculptors and die cutters were hired to imbue their employers’ cities with elegance and grandeur; the need for ready coin to pay mercenaries naturally leant itself to the die cutter’s advantage. The tetradrachms provided the ideal medium on which to explore, refine and hone their art, and while the first masters such as the ‘Maestro della foglia’, and the unknown master who signed his work ‘A’ (see lot 106) remained anonymous on their coinage, their students proudly signed their works with their signatures, and thus are passed on to us the names of Exakestidas, Kimon, Euainetos and others. Yet while the signed dies are often among the most coveted by collectors, many of the finest dies were left unsigned – as was the case with the present piece, which though lacking a signature is nonetheless an excellent example of the very best numismatic art of the period.

117. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Time of Dionysios I, circa 405-400 BC. Charioteer, holding reins and kentron, driving galloping quadriga to left; Nike flying to right above, holding wreath; grain ear below double exergual line / Head of Arethusa to left, wearing sakkos ornamented with stars, triple pendant earring, and necklace; [ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ] and four dolphins around. Tudeer 83 (V30/R56); Dewing 850. 17.37g, 24mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Ex Roma Numismatics Auction II, 2 October 2011, lot 112; Ex Dr. Busso Peus Nachf. 380, 3 November 2004, lot 253; Ex KPM 44, 1993, lot 24.

39

3,000


118. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Dionysios I, struck circa 405-400 BC. Reverse die signed by Eukleidas. Charioteer driving fast quadriga left; above, Nike flying right, crowning charioteer; in exergue, dolphin left / Head of Arethusa left; below neck, tablet inscribed EYKΛEI; four dolphins around. Tudeer 88 (V33/R60); HGC 2, –; SNG ANS 295; SNG Lloyd 1403; BMC 194; de Luynes 1183 (all from the same dies). 16.89g, 24mm, 7h. Very Fine. Toned with iridescent highlights. A few marks.

3,000

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Daniel Koppersmith Collection, Classical Numismatic Group 94, 18 September 2013, lot 123; Ex Rockefeller University / Dr. Alfred E. Mirsky Collection, Gemini VII, 9 January 2011, lot 167.

119. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Hemilitron. Time of Dionysios I, circa 405-400 BC. Head of Arethusa left, barley ear to right / Wheel of four spokes, ΣY-PA in upper quarters, dolphins in lower. CNS II, p. 49, 21; SNG ANS 404ff. 3.53g, 16mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Pleasing green patina.

300

Ex Roma Numismatics IV, 30 September 2012, lot 97.

120. Sicily, Syracuse AR Stater. Time of Timoleon and the Third Democracy, circa 344-338 BC. Pegasos flying left / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet, ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around. Pegasi 2; SNG ANS 496-507. 8.61g, 20mm, 2h. Extremely Fine.

500

Very Rare Gold Hemidrachm

2x 121. Sicily, Syracuse AV Hemidrachm - 30 Litrai. Time of Timoleon and the Third Democracy, circa 344-335 BC. ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios right; thunderbolt behind / Pegasos flying right; ΣΩ below. S. Garrafo, “Zeus Eleutherios - Zeus Olympius” in Annali 23-24 (1977), pl. 1, 9 (same dies); SNG Lloyd 1439. 2.12g, 12mm, 6h. About Good Very Fine. Lustre around the devices. Very Rare - the right facing type is seldom seen compared to the left facing.

40

1,500


122. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Dilitron. Time of Timoleon and the Third Democracy, circa 339/8-334 BC. Laureate head of Zeus to left, ΖΕΥΣ ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΙΟΣ around / Free horse prancing to left, ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ around. SNG ANS 533-541; SNG Lloyd 1456-1457. 18.35g, 28mm, 8h. Good Very Fine. Fine style obverse.

2,000

From the Angelo S. Collection; Ex Freeman & Sear 16, 5 June 2009, lot 27.

123. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Agathokles, circa 310-305 BC. Wreathed head of Arethusa left, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace; ΝΙ beneath neck truncation, three dolphins around / Fast quadriga driven to left by charioteer, holding reins in left hand and kentron in outstretched right; triskeles above, ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ and ΑΙ ligate in exergue. SNG Fitzwilliam 1328 (this obverse die); SNG ANS 633 (this reverse die); Ierardi 13. 16.89g, 24mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

3,000

Ex M. L. Collection, Numismatica Ars Classica 82, 20 May 2015, lot 64; Privately purchased in 1990.

124. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Agathokles, circa 310-305 BC. Wreathed head of Arethusa left, wearing triple-pendent earring and necklace, three dolphins around; NI below neck / Charioteer driving quadriga left; triskeles above; ΣYPAKOΣIΩN and monogram in exergue. HGC 2 1348; SNG ANS 638. 17.06g, 27mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

2,000

Ex Comptoir General Financier 47, 19 March 2011, lot 38.

2x 125. Sicily, Syracuse AV Stater. Agathokles, circa 306-289 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin, singlependant earring and necklace / AΓAΘOKΛEOΣ BAΣIΛEOΣ, winged thunderbolt, monogram below. BMC 416; SNG Copenhagen -. 5.70g, 17mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Some minor scratches. Rare symbol.

4,000

This piece is from a short-lived issue known from six obverse and seven reverse dies with numerous interlinkings, which suggest a specific occasion for its striking. Three alternatives proposed are the assumption of the royal title by Agathokles in 304 BC, the marriage of his daughter to Pyrrhos of Epeiros in 297, or renewed preparations for war against Carthage - the last of which seems the most plausible; indeed we see here a type familiar to Greek mercenaries that at once recalls the gold staters of Alexander the Great, and the silver staters of Alexander of Epeiros.

41


3x 126. Sicily, Syracuse AV 40 Litrai. Circa 305-289 BC. Head of Apollo left, wearing laurel wreath / Charioteer, holding kentron in right hand, reins in left, driving galloping biga right; triskeles below horses, monogram in exergue. Jameson 859 var. (Q in exergue); Bérend, l’or pl. 9, 11; BAR Issue 30; SNG ANS 706 var. (Q in exergue); SNG Lloyd 1474 var. (T in exergue); Gulbenkian 337; cf. Triton VII, January 2004, lot 110. 2.83g, 12mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

3,000

127. Sicily, Syracuse AR 10 Litrai. Hieronymos, circa 215-214 BC. Diademed head of Hieronymos left; K (retrograde) behind / BAΣIΛEOΣ IEPΩNYMOY, winged thunderbolt; KI above. Holloway 41 (O21/R33); SNG ANS 1029 (these dies). 8.44g, 23mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine.

2,000

Ex Classical Numismatic Group 76, 12 September 2007, lot 181. Hieronymos ascended to the throne of Syracuse at a time of crisis. A Roman Consular army of eight legions and allied troops had been annihilated at Cannae only the year before, and Roman power had been dealt a considerable shock. The repercussions of that defeat had been profoundly felt in Sicily; the former king Hieron II had remained steadfast in his loyalty and support to Rome though a significant party in the city favoured abandoning the Roman alliance and joining the cause of Carthage, despite their traditional enmity to that people. The young Hieronymos, who had already shown signs of weakness and depravity of character, allowed himself to be influenced by his pro-Carthaginian uncles into breaking the alliance with Rome.

ILLYRIA

128. Illyria, Dyrrhachion AR Stater. Circa 350-300 BC. Pegasos flying to left / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; club behind, dolphin above, ΔYP before. Cf. Pegasi 29/1 - 30 var. (no obv. symbol). 8.84g, 21mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

300

EPEIROS

129. Epeiros, Ambrakia AR Stater. 360-338 BC. Pegasos flying right, A below / Helmeted head of Athena right; crab behind. Pegasi 41; BMC pl. XXVIII, 4. 8.57g, 21mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Ex Goldberg 59, 30 May 2010, lot 2114.

42

500


Very Rare Tetradrachm of Pyrrhos of Epeiros

130. Kingdom of Epeiros, Pyrrhos AR Tetradrachm. Lokroi Epizephyrioi, 297-272 BC. Head of Zeus of Dodona left, wearing oak wreath; A below / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠYPPOY, Dione seated left, holding staff in right hand and lifting her veil with her left. Boston 944 (same dies); Kraay-Hirmer pl. 150, 472; Babelon, ANS Centennial Publication 1958, pl. VII, 3 (same obverse die); SNG Lockett 1650 (same obverse die); AMB 211. 16.36g, 28mm, 8h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

7,500

Pyrrhos’ limited but highly artistic coinage advertises not his reign or that of his forebears, but rather he uses the coins to promote the cults of the two principal deities of Epeiros, Zeus of Dodona and his consort Dione. As remarked by Jenkins, “it is at once apparent that in one important respect Pyrrhos’ practice is closely akin to that of the Macedonian kings of this time, in that nowhere does his portrait appear. Much as we may regret this, the splendid and exuberant types of Pyrrhos’ Lokrian coins go far to compensate for it. The tetradrachm has for the obverse the head of Dodonean Zeus, whose sanctuary lay in Pyrrhos’ homeland; this head, crowned with oak leaves and with restless flowing hair and beard, makes a strong contrast with the restrained and classical head of the same god minted for Alexander of Epeiros at Tarentum, and even with the more concentrated style of Antigonos Doson’s Poseidon, but the Pyrrhos coin is masterly in its different way. Its exciting and dynamic quality is well matched by the calm majesty of the reverse type, Dione seated on a high-backed throne and swathed in the complex drapery so typical of Hellenistic sculpture.... The impressive style of these coins is quite different from anything we might have expected at an Italian mint at this time, and it may well be that the artist responsible was not a local one, but may have come from mainland Greece or Macedonia.” (G.K. Jenkins, Ancient Greek Coins [New York: Putnam, 1972], pp. 247-8.)

AKARNANIA

131. Akarnania, Anaktorion AR Stater. 320-280 BC. Pegasos flying left; AN monogram below / Helmeted head of Athena left; AN monogram and omphalos to right. Pegasi 36; BCD Akarnania 105. 8.48g, 21mm, 4h. About Extremely Fine.

500

From the J.T.B. Collection.

AITOLIA

132. Aitolia, Aitolian League AR Stater. Circa 250-225 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Aitolos standing left, right foot on rock, partially draped with chlamys and with kausia hanging behind his back, holding spear in his right hand and with sword under his left arm; Δ to left, AITΩΛΩΝ to right. Scheu 13; BMC 10; McClean 5402. 10.56g, 25mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Ex Münzen & Medaillen 23, 18 October 2007, lot 444.

43

2,500


THESSALY Ex de Nanteuil and Hazlitt Collections

133. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 400-380 BC. Facing head of the nymph Larissa, turned slightly to the right, wearing ampyx, drop earrings, and a necklace with a central pendant / ΛΑΡΙΣΑΙ, horse with straight legs feeding to right. BCD II, 214 (this coin); De Nanteuil 845 (this coin); Lorber -; Traité IV, 719 = pl. CCXCIX, 7 (this coin). 5.93g, 19mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine. Very attractively toned.

1,000

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Northern European Collection, Nomos 8, 22 October 2013, lot 126; Ex BCD Collection, Triton XV, 3 January 2012, lot 214; Ex L. de Nanteuil Collection, Bank Leu 42, 12 May 1987, lot 209; Ex W. C. Hazlitt Collection, Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, 5 July 1909, lot 118.

2x 134. Thessaly, Larissa AR Obol. Circa 479-460 BC. Head of the nymph Larissa left / Sandal of Jason left; ΛAR above, Z below; all within incuse square. BCD Thessaly II 349.2 (same rev. die). 0.95 g, 10mm, 7h. Good Very Fine.

500

From the J.T.B. Collection; Ex BCD Collection, Classical Numismatic Group 96, 14 May 2014, lot 139.

Excellent Early Larissan Stater

135. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 475-425 BC. Thessalos advancing right, with petasos over his shoulders and chlamys tied at his neck, holding a band around the forehead of a bull rushing to right, lotus flower below / Horse prancing left, Λ-Α; below, R-I above, all within incuse square. Herrmann group III B, pl. I, 22 (same obverse die); cf. Triton XIII (5 January 2010) 1127 (same dies). 5.85g, 22mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

3,000

Ex BCD Collection, Triton XV, 3 January 2012, lot 152. The obverse of this coin depicts the taurokathapsia, a contest in which the athlete passes a band around the bull’s head and pulls it tight in an attempt to bring the animal under control. This would no doubt have been not only a feat of great strength, but also of dexterity and agility to avoid being trampled or gored by the bull. This particular coin is overstruck on an early sandal-type drachm. The reuse of the earlier coinage in this manner explains why they are so rare today.

44


136. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 460-420 BC. Thessalos advancing right, with petasos over his shoulders and chlamys tied at his neck, holding a band around the forehead of a bull rushing to right / Bridled horse with loose rein prancing right, ΛΑ above, ΡΙΣ retrograde below, all within incuse square. SNG Copenhagen 99 (same dies); cf. Nomos 4, 1122 and R. Ratto, 4 April 1927, 998 (both from the same dies). 6.07g, 20mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Beautiful old tone.

1,500

Ex Vinchon, 13 November 1986, lot 155.

137. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 410-405 BC. Head of the nymph Larissa left, hair bound in sphendone / Horse galloping right, reins trailing; ΛΑΡIΣΑ-ΙΑ around. Lorber, Thessalian 64; Herrmann group IV, pl. IV, 12; BCD Thessaly 1134 var. (arrangement of ethnic); SNG Copenhagen -. 6.15g, 18mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

500

138. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 400-380 BC. Head of the nymph Larissa facing, turned slightly to left, wearing ampyx and necklace; on either side, dolphin swimming downward / Horse standing to right, trailing rein on the exergual line and preparing to lie down, [bukranion on haunch]; ΛI below horse’s belly, [ΛΑΡΙΣΑΙ below]. C. Lorber, Facing Head Drachms of Larissa in FS Westermark Head Type 10; Triton XV, BCD Thessaly, 2012, 203 (same dies). 6.33g, 18mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. An obverse die of wonderful style.

1,250

139. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 400-380 BC. Head of the nymph Larissa facing, turned slightly to right, neckline in the form of an open V with central pellet / Horse grazing right on solid exergual line, ΛΑΡΙ above. Lorber, Early, 71.2 (these dies). 5.89g, 20mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

45

750


Superb Style

140. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 375-350 BC. Head of the nymph Larissa facing, turned slightly to left, wearing pendant earring and plain necklace / Horse crouching left and preparing to lie down on solid ground line; ΛΑΡΙ above, ΣΑΙΩΝ in exergue. Cf. Gorny & Mosch 165, 17 March 2008, 1237 (same dies). 6.16g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Superb style.

1,500

141. Thessaly, Larissa AR Diobol. Circa 344-337 BC. Head of nymph Larissa facing three-quarters left, wearing ampyx, earring and necklace / Horse standing right, preparing to lie down; ΛΑΡΙΣ above, ΑΙΩΝ below. Hermann pl. V, 17; SNG Copenhagen 132. 2.34g, 15mm, 11h. Extremely Fine.

500

142. Thessaly, Oitaioi AR Hemidrachm. Circa 360-344 BC. Lion’s head left, spear in its jaws / OITA downward to right, IΩN downward to left, Herakles standing facing, holding club in both hands. Valassiadis 3; BCD Thessaly II 489 (sold for $5500). 2.97g, 14mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

From the J.T.B. Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group e290, 7 November 2012, lot 56.

143. Thessaly, Perrhaiboi AR Hemidrachm. Circa 450-400 BC. Hero to right, with chlamys draped over his shoulders, holding with both his hands a band passing around the head of a bull’s forepart leaping to right / Forepart of bridled horse to right; Π above, E to right, all within incuse square. SNG Fitzwilliam 2429 (same dies); BCD Thessaly pt. 2, 542 (this coin). 2.96g, 17mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Rare. Ex BCD Collection, Triton XV, 3 January 2012, lot 542.

46

750


Last Remnant of an Exterminated People

144.

Islands off Thessaly, Skyros AR Stater. Circa 480 BC. Two goats back to back on either side of fig leaf, heads reverted / Stellate floral pattern within square incuse. J.M. Balcer, SNR 57 (1978), p. 96, 6, pl. 25 (same dies). 8.07g, 27mm. Very Fine. Extremely Rare, Balcer cites only 2 examples: ANS, New York (Skyros hoard. IGCH 31) and Athens, Numismatic Museum.

7,500

This didrachm and other silver coins of the same type are all very rare and were often overstruck on Attic-weight coins of Akanthos. Since one such coin was found on Skyros (Balcer, no. 46) and six others were in the possession of an inhabitant of the island, it would appear that they were struck on Skyros prior to the arrival of Kimon, c. 475 BC. See J.N. Svoronos, JIAN 3 (1900), pp. 39-46 and Balcer, pp. 69-101. In the early fifth century an expedition was mounted to the island of Skyros under the command of the Athenian general Kimon, ostensibly under the auspices of the Delian League. The conquest of the island is mentioned by Thucydides (1.98), but Plutarch’s version in his Life of Kimon is much more detailed (Life of Kimon, 8). According to Plutarch the island was inhabited by non-Greek Dolopians whose constant plundering of ships, including those which were trading with them, eventually resulted in a request for Athenian intervention, addressed directly to Kimon, whose expedition ‘cleared the sea of pirates’. To complete this heroic effort, Kimon also fulfilled the edict of the Delphic oracle by ‘discovering’ the bones of the Athenian hero Theseus on the island – who, it was said, had been murdered by the jealous and fearful king Lycomedes – and returning them to Athens. Plutarch relates that he identified as the remains of Theseus “a coffin of a great corpse with a bronze spear-head by its side and a sword.” Thucydides, who was to some extent a contemporary of Kimon, and whose account precedes that of Plutarch by over four centuries, is much less elaborate in his description of the invasion, and simply tells us that the Athenians enslaved the local population and established a colony of Athenian citizens there. De Souza (Piracy in the GraecoRoman World, Cambridge University Press, 1999) points out that Plutarch’s account is the only one to mention piracy (Diorodus and Pausanias also cover the invasion of Skyros), and it is unconvincing, and appears very much like an attempt to justify Athenian aggression. Dawe (Scandal at Skyros: The Delian League, Plutarch and the Maligning of the Dolopians, Studia Antiqua 6.1, 2008) arrives at the same conclusion, and contends that the real purpose of the expedition was to decrease Persian influence by removing a Medizing people from the Aegean, to expand the influence of Athens, and to add to his own political capital by returning the bones of the Athenian hero Theseus. Modern historians have tended to take Plutarch’s account at face value, and not question either his facts or motives, or why his version should differ markedly from those of Thucydides, Diodorus or Pausanias. Given no further evidence of piracy other than Plutarch’s word for it nearly half a millennium after the event, it seems probable that rather than being the product of a pirate gang, this coin represents one of the last remnants of a people exterminated by Athenian imperialism; a people who in the days of myth had supposedly sheltered the young Achilles at the request of his mother Thetis.

47


145. Thessaly, Trikka AR Hemidrachm. Circa 440-400 BC. The hero Thessalos, bearded, nude but for chlamys and petasos, holding band around the head of forepart of a bull right / Forepart of bridled horse right, TPIKKAIΩИ around. BCD Thessaly II 782/781.2 (for obv./rev. dies). 2.77g, 17mm, 9h. Good Very Fine.

250

146. Thessaly, Thessalian League AR Hemidrachm. Circa 470-460 BC. Forepart of horse right / ΘΕ-ΤΑ, wheat grain upwards, all in incuse square. BCD Thessaly II, 9 (this coin). 2.91g, 15mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

Ex BCD Collection, Triton XV, 3 January 2012, lot 9.

147. Thessaly, Thessalian League AR Stater. Philippos and Themistogenes, magistrates, circa 75-25 BC. Head of Zeus to right, wearing oak wreath / Athena Itonia striding right, hurling spear with her right hand and holding shield in her left; ΘΕΣΣΑ-ΛΩΝ across fields, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ above, ΘΕΜΙΣΤΟΓΕΝHΣ below. SNG Copenhagen 296 var. 6.01g, 22mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

Ex Nomos 5, 25 October 2011, lot 154; Ex European private collection, acquired in the 1980s.

LOKRIS Ex Kato Klitoria Hoard, 1980

2x 148. Lokris, Lokris Opuntii AR Obol. Circa 375-350 BC. Amphora with two ivy leaves hanging from handles / Stellate pattern. BCD Lokris 460.7 = Warren, Kato (Kraay-Mørkholm Essays), p. 292, 5 and pl. LXVII, 5 (this coin). 0.96g, 12mm. Good Very Fine. Toned. From the M.M. Collection; Ex Daniel Koppersmith Collection, Classical Numismatic Group 94, 18 September 2013, lot 335; Ex Classical Numismatic Group E-Auction 280, 6 June 2012, lot 27; Ex BCD Collection, Numismatica Ars Classica, 8 October 2010, lot 460 (part); Ex Kato Klitoria Hoard, 1980.

48

250


Ex Viscount Wimbourne and Leu 1981

149.

Lokris, Lokris Opuntii AR Stater. Circa 369 BC. Head of Demeter left, wearing barley-wreath, pearl necklace and elaborate ‘boat’ earring with crescent and five pendants / Ajax the Lokrian, nude but for crested Corinthian helmet, advancing right on rocky ground, holding short sword and round shield decorated on its interior with griffin, transverse spear behind hero’s legs; OΠΟΝTΙΩΝ to left. SNG Berry 570 (same dies); Gulbenkian 495–496 (same obverse die); SNG Lockett 1693 (same obverse die). 12.14g, 24mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Beautifully toned.

5,000

Ex Roma Numismatics Auction II, 2 October 2011, lot 178; Ex Peter Guber Collection, Manhattan Sale II, 4 January 2011, lot 50; Ex Freeman & Sear Fixed Price List 9, Spring 2004, 29; Ex Viscount Wimbourne Collection, Leu 81, 16 May 2001, lot 198; Ex Sotheby’s, 4 April 1991, lot 52; Ex Leu 28, 5 May 1981, lot 102. This exceptional portrait, with its right-facing orientation and elaborate earring, has been proposed to be the inaugural type of the Lokrian series. It is in any case certainly one of the most beautiful, and the reverse too is of an exceptionally fine style. Ajax of Lokris (or Ajax ‘the Lesser’), who is depicted on the reverse of this attractive type, led a fleet of forty ships from Lokris Opuntii against Troy in the Greeks’ great war on that city. At Troy’s fall, he was alleged by Odysseus to have violated a sanctuary of Athena by ravishing Cassandra, who had sought refuge there. He thus brought down the wrath of Athena upon himself and his countrymen: Ajax himself was wrecked and killed in a storm as he made his way home from the war, and the rest of the Opuntians reached home only with great difficulty. Nevertheless, they annually honoured their former leader by launching a ship fitted with black sails and laden with gifts, which they then set alight, and whenever the Lokrian army drew up for battle, one place was always left open for Ajax, whose spirit they believed would stand and fight with them.

49


2X 150. Lokris, Lokris Opuntii AR Hemidrachm. Circa 300 BC. Head of Demeter right, wearing wreath of grain ears / Ajax advancing to right, between his legs, monogram VPO, to right, trophy; ΛOKΡΩN upwards to left. BCD 103; Corpus group 13, 368g; SNG Copenhagen 60. 2.68g, 15mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Lightly toned.

450

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Gorny & Mosch 232, 5 October 2015, lot 174.

ELIS

151. Elis, Olympia AR Stater. ‘Zeus’ mint, 93rd Olympiad, 408 BC. Eagle’s head left; poplar leaf below / Winged thunderbolt within olive wreath, F-A across fields. Seltman, Temple Series XVII, 160; BCD Olympia 77. 11.85g, 22mm, 9h. Good Fine.

750

LAKONIA Rare Spartan Hemidrachm

2X 152. Lakonia, Lakedaimon (Sparta) AR Hemidrachm. Circa 125-75 BC. Laureate head of Herakles right / Amphora between Λ-A above the pilei of the Dioskouroi, PKA monogram in lower right field; all within olive wreath. Grunauer group VIII, series 4; SNG Copenhagen 557; BCD Collection 853ff. 2.40g, 15mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Obv. struck in high relief. Rare.

1,000

CORINTHIA

153. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-345 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet; E and race torch behind. Ravel 995; Pegasi 372; BCD Corinth 95; SNG Copenhagen -. 8.59g, 21mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. From the J.T.B. Collection.

50

500


154. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-345 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left; behind, N and Ares standing right, holding shield and spear. Pegasi 376; Ravel 1056; BCD Corinth 121; SNG Copenhagen 121. 8.64g, 23mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. From the J.T.B. Collection.

500

155. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 345-307 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena right; aryballos and N behind. Pegasi 378; Ravel 1058. 8.41g, 19mm, 12h. About Good Very Fine. From the J.T.B Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group e113, 11 May 2005, lot 19.

200

156. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 345-307 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena right; bukranion and N behind. Pegasi 382; Ravel 1064. 8.61g, 22mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned with golden iridescent highlights.

750

157. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-300 BC. Pegasos flying to left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left; behind, N and triskeles of crescents within circle. Ravel 1065; Pegasi 383; BCD Corinth 126 (same rev. die); SNG Copenhagen -. 8.62g, 21mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. From the J.T.B. Collection; Ex Collection C.P.A., Classical Numismatic Group 78, 14 May 2008, lot 673.

750

158. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-300 BC. Pegasos flying left; Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left; round shield behind. Pegasi 405/2; BCD Corinth 117; SNG Copenhagen –. 8.46g, 21mm, 3h. Very Fine. Beautifully toned. From the J.T.B. Collection.

51

500


159. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-300 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left; Γ below chin; behind, dove flying left within wreath. Ravel 1029; Pegasi 419; BCD Corinth 110 = SNG Lockett 2094 (this coin); SNG Copenhagen –. 8.30g, 22mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Attractive old collection tone. From the M.M. Collection; Ex Daniel Koppersmith Collection, Classical Numismatic Group 94, 18 September 2013, lot 374; Ex BCD Collection, Numismatik Lanz Auction 105, 26 November 2001, lot 110; Ex Richard Cyril Lockett Collection, Glendining, 27 May 1959, lot 1818 (part of); Ex Charles Austin Hersh Collection, Naville–Ars Classica XVI, 3 July 1933, lot 1259.

500

160. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 345-307 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left; ΔΙ and pine cone behind. Pegasi 444; Ravel 1070. 8.46g, 22mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Lightly toned.

250

SIKYONIA

161. Sikyonia, Sikyon AR Stater. Circa 431-400 BC. Chimaera standing left, raising forepaw; ΣE below / Dove flying left within wreath with ties to right. Cf. BCD Peloponnesos 198; cf. CNG 91, 19 September 2012, lot 199. 12.24g, 23mm, 6h. Very Fine.

500

2X 162. Sikyonia, Sikyon AR Hemidrachm. Circa 330-280 BC. Chimaera standing left, raising forepaw; ΣI below / Dove flying left; NO behind. BMC 118. 2.81g, 16mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful old tone. Ex Dove Collection, privately purchased from Tradart.

52

500


ATTICA

163. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 490-482 BC. Archaic head of Athena right wearing crested helmet decorated with chevron and dot pattern / Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig behind, ΑΘΕ before. Cf. Svoronos Pl. 5; cf. Asyut pl. XVIII. 16.93g, 22mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

5,000

164. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 490-482 BC. Archaic head of Athena right wearing crested helmet decorated with chevron and dot pattern / Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig behind, ΑΘΕ before. Cf. Svoronos Pl. 5; cf. Asyut pl. XVIII. 17.31g, 22mm, 8h. Good Very Fine. Lightly toned.

5,000

165. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 460-455 BC. Head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet ornamented with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, wearing round earring with central boss / AΘE, owl standing three-quarters right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind; all within incuse square. Starr Group IV, cf. Starr 125. 17.17g, 25mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

4,000

A beautiful example of this rare transitional style, which feature the finest style owls of the entire Athenian tetradrachm series. Here the emblematic bird is rendered with a remarkable degree of realism and proportionality, and lies within the typically deep incuse square that characterizes the issue: evidence of the great care and attention to detail with which these coins were struck.

166. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-430 BC. Head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet ornamented with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, wearing round earring with central boss / AΘE, owl standing three-quarters right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; Dewing 1591-8; SNG Copenhagen 31. 17.21g, 24mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful old cabinet tone with subtle iridescent tones. Near full crest.

53

5,000


167. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-430 BC. Head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet ornamented with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, wearing round earring with central boss / AΘE, owl standing three-quarters right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; Dewing 1591-8; SNG Copenhagen 31. 17.20g, 24mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine.

2,500

From the J.T.B. Collection.

168. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-430 BC. Head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet ornamented with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, wearing round earring with central boss / AΘE, owl standing three-quarters right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; Dewing 1591-8; SNG Copenhagen 31. 17.15g, 24mm, 1h. Good Very Fine, near full crest.

1,000

169. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-430 BC. Head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet ornamented with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, wearing round earring with central boss / AΘE, owl standing three-quarters right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; Dewing 1591-8; SNG Copenhagen 31. 17.25g, 25mm, 4h. Extremely Fine.

1,500

Ex Nomos FPL 2, 2009, no. 53.

170. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-430 BC. Head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet ornamented with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, wearing round earring with central boss / AΘE, owl standing three-quarters right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; Dewing 1591-8; SNG Copenhagen 31. 17.18g, 25mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine.

54

750


Sulla Conquers Athens

171. Attica, Athens AR New Style Tetradrachm. Athens or mint moving with Sulla, circa 86-84 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet, bowl decorated with griffin / Owl standing facing on amphora on which A, monogram to either side; all within wreath. Dewing 1653; Kraay-Hirmer pl. 120, 366; Thompson, New Style 1304a (same obverse die). 16.55g, 28mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Magnificent old cabinet tone. Very Rare.

2,500

From the Angelo S. Collection; Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 64, 17 May 2012, lot 812; Ex Prof. Dr. Hagen Tronnier Collection, Künker 94, 27 September 2004, lot 865; Ex Schulten & Co, October 1978, lot 21. In the First Mithradatic War the Roman forces under Sulla first directed their attention to the city of Athens, which was then ruled by the tyrant Aristion, a puppet of Mithradates. Upon his arrival, Sulla threw up earthworks encompassing not only the city but also the port of Piraeos. Despite several attempts by Archelaos, the Mithradatic commander in Asia, to raise the siege, Athens remained firmly blockaded. During the year or so of siege, Sulla stripped shrines and Sibyls alike of wealth to fund his war effort. From these and other sources of precious metal Sulla appears to have chosen to strike a currency that would be familiar and acceptable to the surrounding regions. The monogram series seem to have been the first issue, for which Thompson suggested a starting date of 86 BC, after Sulla captured Athens. Another series displaying a trophy are regarded as the second issue, and presumably were struck shortly before Sulla left Athens to return to Rome. It has been suggested however that Sulla would have also struck coins of Athenian type during the period of the siege itself, a sensible notion that would seem to make the trophy series fitting for a post-siege issue.

172. Islands off Attica, Aegina AR Stater. Circa 480-457 BC. Sea turtle with line of pellets down the back of its shell / Incuse punch. Milbank Pl. I, 15. SNG Copenhagen 507. 12.32g, 20mm. Extremely Fine. Well centred and lightly toned.

2,500

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Höher Collection, Nomos 9, 21 October 2014, lot 128.

BOIOTIA

173. Boiotia, Thebes AR Stater. Circa 425-400 BC. Boiotian shield / Amphora; Θ-Ε across lower field; all within incuse square. BCD Boiotia 386-7. 12.10g, 21mm, 4h. Very Fine.

55

250


174. Boiotia, Thebes AR Stater. Circa 368-364 BC. Klion-, magistrate. Boiotian shield / Amphora; KΛI-ΩN across field; all within incuse concave circle. BCD Boiotia 532; Hepworth 70. 12.20g, 22mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine.

250

CYCLADES

175. Cyclades, Paros AR Stater. Early 2nd century BC. Teisen, magistrate. Head of female right, hair bound in tainia / Goat standing right; TEIΣHN ΠAPI in two lines above. Tully Di2.A, 1b (O1/R1 - this coin); HGC 6, 661; SNG Berry 881 (same dies); SNG Fitzwilliam 4018 (same dies). 7.53g, 21mm, 12h. Very Fine, small chip at edge on obverse. Rare. From the J.T.B. Collection; Ex Hess-Divo 317, 27 October 2010, lot 206; Ex Künker 158, 28 September 2009, lot 238; Ex Harlan J Berk BBS 165, 28 July 2009, no. 187; Ex Harlan J Berk BBS 48, 22 April 1987, no. 116.

2,000

MACEDON

176. Macedon, Akanthos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 500-480 BC. Lion to left, biting into the hindquarter of a bull crouching right; floral ornament in exergue / Quadripartite incuse square of swastika pattern. Desneux 2 (D2/R2); cf. AMNG III 1; SNG ANS 1-2. 17.24g, 25mm. Good Very Fine. Pleasantly toned.

2,500

From the J.T.B. Collection; Ex W.B. and R.E. Montgomery Collection, Triton XI, 8 January 2008, lot 103.

177. Macedon, Akanthos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Lion to right, biting into the hindquarter of a bull crouching left; pellet-in-circle above, floral ornament in exergue / Quadripartite incuse square. Desneux 48–68 var. (unlisted rev. dies); AMNG III/2, 4; SNG ANS 10. 16.99g, 27mm. Good Very Fine; minor edge chip. From the J.T.B. Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group 94, 18 September 2013, lot 192; Ex Numismatik Lanz 149, 24 June 2010, lot 97.

56

3,500


Fine Style Chalkidian League Tetradrachm

178.

Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetradrachm. Olynthos, circa 364-348 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / XAΛKIΔEΩN around kithara with six strings. Robinson & Clement 96 (A63/P83). SNG ANS 502 = SNG Berry 24 (same dies). 14.21g, 25mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. A portrait of fine style, centrally struck in high relief on a large sized flan.

7,500

From the Angelo S. Collection; Ex Roma Numismatics II, 2 October 2011, lot 218; Ex Gorny & Mosch 155, March 2007, lot 61; Ex Triton VIII, 11 January 2005, lot 117. The growing influence and expansionist aims of the Chalkidian League led by Olynthos had in 382 BC led to calls from Amyntas of Macedon, as well as Akanthos and Apollonia (who anticipated imminent conquest by the League), for Spartan intervention to check the League’s power. Sparta, keen to reassert its presence in northern Greece, consented and a force of 10,000 was mobilised and dispatched against the League. After several years of protracted but indecisive warfare, Olynthos agreed to dissolve the Chalkidian League, though this dissolution appears to have been little more than a token formality, since in the following year the League appears among the members of the Athenian naval confederacy, and twenty years later Demosthenes reported the power of the League as being much greater than before the Spartan expedition. Olynthos itself is at this time spoken of as a city of the first rank, and the Chalkidian League then comprised thirty-two cities. Olynthus was allied with Macedon when Philip II and Athens went to war in 356 after Philip’s capture of the Athenian colonies of Pydna and Potidea. Around this time Philip also allowed himself to be drawn into the Sacred War on behalf of the Thessalians; since Athens was also a combatant in the Sacred War, the war between Athens and Macedon became inextricably linked with the progress of the Sacred War. Alarmed by Philip’s aggressive policies and further invasions of neighbouring territories, Olynthos concluded an alliance with Athens in 352. The city made three embassies to Athens, the occasions of Demosthenes’s three Olynthiac Orations. On the third, the Athenians sent soldiers from among its citizens to garrison the city and reinforce its defences. In response Philip attacked the Chalkidian League in 349, and by 348, he had completely destroyed the League, razing Olynthos to the ground in the process.

57


Unique and Unpublished Quarter Stater

179. Macedon, Chalkidian League AV Quarter Stater. Olynthos, circa 350-348 BC. Dikaios, magistrate. Laureate head of Apollo right / Kithara, XAΛKIΔEΩN around; EΠI ΔΙΚΑΙΟΥ below. Apparently unique and unpublished; for epimeletes Dikaios, cf. Robinson-Clement, Excavations at Olynthos IX 1938, pl. 17, 138-9; for Eudoridas cf. pl. 17, group W, A IV - 137. 2.15g, 11mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

3,000

The epimeletes Dikaios’ coins are previously only recorded in silver, though these have obverse die links with the silver staters of Eudoridas, whose gold staters are well attested, though very rare.

180. Kingdom of Macedon, Archelaos AR Stater. Aigai, circa 413-400/399 BC. Head of Apollo right, wearing tainia / Horse standing right, trailing rein, ΑΡΧΕΛΑΟ around; all within incuse square. Westermark, Staters, Group II, Series 2 (O66/R82); SNG ANS 66–7; SNG Lockett 1391. 16.72g, 23mm, 2h. Extremely Fine.

2,000

Ex Gorny & Mosch 129, 8 March 2004, lot 87.

181. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 355-348 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / The king, wearing kausia and chlamys, raising his right hand in salute and riding a horse walking to the left; ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ around; trident head to left below. Le Rider 85, pl. 26 (this rev. die). 14.42g, 25mm, 7h. Good Very Fine. Excellent style and beautifully toned.

2,500

Ex Rockefeller University / Dr. Alfred E. Mirsky Collection.

Ex Münzen und Medaillen XIX, 1959

182. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AV Twelfth Stater. Pella, struck 345/2-340/36 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / ΦIΛIΠΠOY, thunderbolt; facing lion head below. Le Rider 14c (D10/R10 – this coin); SNG ANS 209–15; SNG Copenhagen 542 (same dies). 0.71g, 8mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. Some deposits. From the M.M. Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group 94, 18 September 2013, lot 218; Ex Münzen und Medaillen XIX, 6 June 1959, lot 390.

58

800


Superb Lifetime Tetradrachm of Philip II

183.

Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Lifetime issue. Pella, circa 342/1-337/6 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Young male rider, nude and holding a palm branch, on horse pacing to right, thunderbolt below. Le Rider pl. 9, 199 (D116/R163); SNG ANS 379. 14.49g, 25mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine. Rare.

15,000

From the Angelo S. Collection; Ex Prospero Collection, New York Sale XXVII, 4 January 2012, lot 296; Privately purchased from A.H. Baldwin & Sons Ltd, 11 May 1985. The presence of Zeus’s head on the obverse of Philip’s coinage was a novelty in Macedonian coinage, and its sudden appearance is closely connected with both types of Philip’s tetradrachms - both the more mature, cloaked rider, and the younger, nude rider holding a victor’s palm - as well as his other denominations. While in his extensive work Le Rider identifies the mature horseman found on Philip’s coinage as the king himself, he makes no attempt to explain the young rider holding the palm branch as seen on this example. Caltabiano however proposes that the use of the heads of Zeus and Apollo on Philip’s coinage, as well as the older and younger horsemen, suggest an important father-son relationship: that of Philip and his heir Alexander. Isokrates proposed that Zeus here represents ‘the conceit of a royal power’ whose right to rule comes directly from Zeus, and whose continuity is assured by the hereditary principle. This interpretation is reinforced by the heroon that Philip built in the Sanctuary of Zeus at Olympia after his victory at Chaeroneia, in which were contained the statues of Philip and Olympias, his parents Amyntas and Eurydice, and his son Alexander. The latter, whose chryselephantine image stood in an eminent position, had played a glorious and distinguished role in the battle, breaking and routing the Greek right flank with his cavalry. Thus, if we are to see in the cloaked older rider the figure of Philip himself, we must see in the younger rider a representation of his son Alexander. For a more detailed treatment of this subject, see Caltabiano, Ancient Macedonia, Sixth International Symposium, vol. 1, pp 197-205.

59


184. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 342-328 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, bee below, aphlaston to right. Le Rider 486-494; SNG ANS 560-5. 14.43g, 25mm, 8h. Good Very Fine.

500

Alexander’s First Coinage at Pella

185. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Pella, 336/5-329/8 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, wreath below. Le Rider 384 var. (D200/R– [unlisted rev. die]); SNG ANS 415. 13.97g, 23mm, 4h. Good Very Fine. Some die rust, and slightly granular surfaces.

1,000

A posthumous issue, this coin is from Alexander’s first issue of silver coinage at Pella.

186. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 336-326 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, bee below, janiform-head vase to right. SNG ANS 510-20. 14.41g, 26mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

750

187. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AV Stater. Teos, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Charioteer driving biga to right, ΣΩ monogram under horses’ forelegs, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ and spearhead in exergue. SNG ANS 323; cf. Thompson, Studia Naster, 17 (same obverse die, but no spearhead). 8.58g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

60

1,500


188. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, wreath below horse, Λ in right field. Le Rider pl. 45, 22. 14.33g, 24mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine.

750

Ex A. Tkalec, 27 October 2011, lot 59.

189. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, thunderbolt over I below, dolphin before. Le Rider pl. 48, 4; SNG ANS 812. 14.38g, 26mm, 10h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautiful style, and attractively toned.

2,000

190. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, grain ear below, Π below horse’s foreleg. Le Rider pl. 46, 3; Troxell, Studies, group 8, 314; SNG ANS 667-72. 13.34g, 25mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,000

191. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, dolphin below, Π with pellet to right. Le Rider pl. 46, 19, SNG ANS 751. 14.27g, 24mm, 9h. Good Extremely Fine.

61

1,000


192

193

192. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, dolphin below, Π with pellet to right. Le Rider pl. 46, 19, SNG ANS 751. 14.45g, 24mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. 500 193. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head right of Zeus / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, kausia beneath horse, A to right. Le Rider pl. 44, 32 var. (no pellet). 14.37g, 27mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare. 500

194

195

194. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, monogram below, ivy-leaf to right. Le Rider pl. 44, 7. 14.43g, 24mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare. 500 195. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, crescent below, Π to right. Le Rider pl. 45, 11-2; SNG ANS 638-42. 14.24g, 25mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine. Vivid toning around the devices and struck on a broad flan. 500

196

197

196. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, crescent below, Π to right. Le Rider pl. 45, 11-2; SNG ANS 638-42. 14.34g, 24mm, 10h. Good Very Fine. 500 197. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, crescent below, Π to right. Le Rider pl. 45, 11-2; SNG ANS 638-42. 14.29g, 24mm, 10h. Good Very Fine. 500

198

199

198. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback to right, holding palm; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, wreath below, E to right. Le Rider pl. 45, 25. 14.33g, 24mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. 300 199. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 336-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, janiform-head vase in left field; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 6. 17.20g, 26mm, 9h. Very Fine.

62

250


200

201

200. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-320 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, cornucopiae in left field; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to left, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 104. 17.25g, 25mm, 3h. Very Fine.

300

201. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 320-317 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, Phrygian helmet in left field; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to left, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 112. 17.27g, 26mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. 350

202

203

202. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-320 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; monogram in left field, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to left, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 120. 17.22g, 27mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

350

203. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-320 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; monogram in left field, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to left, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 121. 17.39g, 24mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

350

204

205

204. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 320-317 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding sceptre; laurel branch before, BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ around, Π below throne. Price 124. 17.16g, 26mm, 9h. Very Fine. 300 205. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 320-317 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; laurel branch before, Π below throne, BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ around. Price 124. 17.25g, 27mm, 5h. About Extremely Fine. 350

206. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 316-315 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; aplustre in left field, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, Π• below throne. Price 129. 17.25g, 25mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine.

63

750


207

208

207. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 317-305 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; aphlaston in left field, Π with pellet below throne, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right. Price 129. 17.30g, 24mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. 500 208. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 320-317 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, wreath in left field, Π with pellet below throne; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 132. 17.25g, 26mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. 500

209. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 320-317 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, dolphin in left field; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, Π• below throne. Price 134 var. (direction of dolphin). 17.21g, 26mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

750

210. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 320-317 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, dolphin in left field; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, Π• below throne. Price 134 var. (direction of dolphin). 17.34g, 26mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

211

500

212

211. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 320-317 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, dolphin in left field; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, Π• below throne. Price 134 var. (direction of dolphin). 17.15g, 25mm, 2h. About Extremely Fine.

350

212. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 320-317 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, dolphin in left field; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, Π• below throne. Price 134 var. (direction of dolphin). 17.28g, 25mm, 11h. About Extremely Fine.

64

500


High Grade and Fine Style Alexander Distater

213.

Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Distater. Amphipolis, circa 325-323 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing to left, holding wreath in outstretched right hand and stylis over left shoulder; thunderbolt to left, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 163; Müller 1; NGSA 7, 173 = HD Rauch 89, 1080 (same dies); for the date, see Troxell, p. 128. 17.13g, 24mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Of beautiful style, and exceptionally well preserved for the issue.

25,000

Alexander’s stunning conquest of the Persian Achaemenid Empire delivered into his hands a vast wealth of proportions so incredible that it was scarcely believable. At the time of the death of Alexander’s father Philip II in 336 BC the Macedonian state was indebted to the sum of five hundred talents of silver. Yet less than five years later Alexander was the wealthiest man on the face of the earth and the Macedonian kingdom spanned some three thousand miles at its greatest length. The treasuries of Susa, Babylon and Persepolis rendered a treasure estimated at some one hundred and eighty thousand talents. A significant quantity of the captured gold was sent back to Amphipolis where a part was used for the striking of the Alexandrine distaters, the heaviest gold coins the world had yet known. Valued at forty silver drachms, this new denomination meant that Alexander’s discharged veteran soldiers could be paid out their one talent in 120 distaters. In practice, the relatively low output of gold distaters compared with the staters seems to suggest that perhaps they fulfilled a more ceremonial than practical role.

65


214. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Amphipolis, circa 330-320 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, thunderbolt in left field; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ to right. Price 164; Müller 2. 8.51g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Lustrous around the devices, a few scattered marks.

2,000

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Edward Metcalf and Buddy Ebsen Collections, Superior Galleries, 7-10 June 1987, lot 4042.

215. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Amphipolis, circa 325-319 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, kantharos in left field; AΛEΞANΔPOY to right. Price 168. 8.59g, 18mm, 2h. Very Fine.

1,250

216. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Amphipolis, circa 320-320 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, Boiotian shield to left; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ to right. Price 176. 8.60g, 18mm, 12h. Very Fine.

1,500

217. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Amphipolis, circa 330-320 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, downward trident in left field, Λ and pellet below left wing; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ to right. Price 179; Müller 112. 8.62g, 18mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Brilliant mint lustre.

1,500

218. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Pella, circa 325-315 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, bee in left field; AΛEΞANΔPOY to right. Price 201. 8.62g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

66

1,500


219. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 323-318/7 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left holding sceptre, rose surmounted by bee to right in left field; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 206; Moore 23-43; SNG Alpha Bank –; SNG München 343; SNG Saroglos 259. 17.24g, 26mm, 7h. Mint State.

1,250

220. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 325-315 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, thunderbolt in left field; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 232; SNG Copenhagen 711. 17.14g, 27mm, 10h. Extremely Fine.

221

500

222

221. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 317-314 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding sceptre; Boeotian shield in left field, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 248. 17.00g, 28mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine. Pleasant old tone. 750 222. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 315-310 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; Boeotian shield in left field, serpent left below throne, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 249; SNG Copenhagen 728; Muller 754. 17.29g, 25mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. 500

223. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 315-310 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; Boiotian shield in left field, serpent below throne, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 249; SNG Copenhagen 728; Muller 754. 17.21g, 28mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine.

67

500


Uncommonly Fine Style

224. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Uncertain mint in Greece or Macedon, circa 310-275 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; aphlaston in left field, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 861 and pl. XLI, 861a (same obv. die); SNG München -; SNG Alpha Bank -. 17.07g, 27mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone. Very Rare.

3,000

From the Angelo S. Collection; Ex Peus 380, 3 November 2004, lot 427.

225. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Uncertain mint in Greece or Macedon, circa 310-275 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated to left holding eagle and sceptre; aphlaston to left, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right. Price 861; Müller 281. 16.95g, 27mm, 12h. Unobtrusive die break on obv., otherwise Near Extremely Fine. In good style, lightly toned and lustrous.

300

226. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Lampsakos, circa 328-323 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, conjoined foreparts of two horses in left field, monogram below left wing; AΛEΞANΔPOY to right. Price 1358; Müller 394. 8.55g, 18mm, 4h. Extremely Fine.

227

1,500

228

227. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Lampsakos, circa 328-323 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, conjoined foreparts of two horses in left field, monogram below left wing; AΛEΞANΔPOY to right. Price 1358; Müller 394. 8.53g, 17mm, 7h. Very Fine. 1,250 228. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Lampsakos, circa 328-323 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, conjoined foreparts of two horses in left field, monogram below left wing; AΛEΞANΔPOY to right. Price 1358; Müller 394. 8.55g, 18mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine. 1,500

68


229. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Drachm. Lampsakos, circa 310-301 BC. Struck under Antigonos I Monophthalmos. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, mouse right. Price 1427; Müller 654; SNG Copenhagen 981. 4.26g, 17mm, 3h. Good Very Fine.

100

Superb, Sculptural Zeus

230. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Lampsakos, circa 280-275 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding sceptre, K below throne; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, monogram and forepart of Pegasos to left. Price 1448. 17.25g, 31mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Uncommonly beautiful style. Very Rare.

2,000

231. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Miletos, circa 323-319 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, double headed axe below right wing, monogram in left field; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 2115. 8.58g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

232

1,500

233

232. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Drachm. Chios, circa 290-275 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding eagle and sceptre; AΛEΞANΔPOY to right, M within vine wreath in left field, bunch of grapes below. Price 2324. 4.13g, 19mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. 300 233. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ Æ20. Uncertain Western Asia Minor mint, circa 323-310 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / BAΣIΛEΩΣ between club and bow in bowcase, race torch below. Price 2800. 6.08g, 20mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. 150

69


234. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Arados, circa 328-320 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent; Σ behind / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; AP monogram in lower left field, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ to left. Price 3315. 8.58g, 18mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine.

235

2,500

236

235. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Arados, circa 328-320 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, Λ in left field, AP monogram below throne; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ in exergue. Price 3320. 17.19g, 27mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 400 236. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Arados, circa 324-320 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; kerykeion in left field, AP monogram below throne; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ below, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 3332; Duyrat group IV, series 11, 703 (D171/R311); SNG Alpha Bank 675; SNG Saroglos 579-81. 17.21g, 29mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. 500

237. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Arados, circa 324-320 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; kerykeion in left field, AP monogram below throne; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ below, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 3332; Duyrat group IV, series 11, 703 (D171/R311); SNG Alpha Bank 675; SNG Saroglos 579-81. 17.22g, 27mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Light deposit on rev. near kerykeion.

1,250

238. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Babylon, circa 317-311 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, XA ligate to left, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price –, cf. 3724; Müller 825. 8.55g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. A fine style obverse.

70

2,000


239. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip III AR Drachm. Uncertain mint, 323-317 BC. Head of Herakles right in lion-skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left holding sceptre; ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ to right, jug in left field, ball under throne. Price -; Münzen & Medaillen Auction 30, 28 May 2009, lot 221 (same rev. die). 4.29g, 17mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Of beautiful style, pleasantly toned with golden highlights. Possibly only the second known example.

500

240. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip III AV Stater. Abydos, circa 323-317 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, monogram above serpent in right field; ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ to right. Price P31. 8.52g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

2,000

241. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip III AV Stater. Sardes, 323-317 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, TI in left field, rose below left wing; ΦIΛIΠΠOY to right. Price P90. 8.55g, 20mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

1,500

242. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip III AV Stater. Babylon, circa 323-317 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, M in left field, ΛΥ below left wing; ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ to left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ to right. Price P180; Müller P97. 8.59g, 19mm, 4h. Extremely Fine.

2,000

243. Kingdom of Macedon, Demetrios I Poliorketes AR Tetradrachm. Salamis, circa 300-295 BC. Nike, blowing a trumpet and holding a stylis, alighting to left on a left-facing galley prow / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ, Poseidon, nude but for wreath of reeds and a chlamys wrapped around his left arm, striding left, hurling trident from his upraised right hand; monogram of AYN to left, Σ to right. Unpublished in the Standard References, including Newell. 16.73g, 31mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Well struck and centred; fine style and very well preserved for the type. Unpublished and possibly unique.

71

3,000


Third Known Tetradrachm of Ptolemy Keraunos

244. Kingdom of Macedon, Ptolemy Keraunos AR Tetradrachm. In the name and types of Lysimachos of Thrace. Lysimacheia, 281-280 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; BAΣIΛEΩΣ to right, ΛYΣIMAXOY being crowned by Nike to left, to inner left, head of lion left above elephant standing left; ΘE monogram on throne. W. Hollstein. “Münzen des Ptolemaios Keraunos” in SNR 74 (1995), p.14, fig. 1 [= Pozzi collection 1169] (same dies); Boutin, Collection Pozzi, 2627; cf. Hollstein p. 14, fig. 2 [= ex Leu sale 42, 1987, 163] (same obverse die). 16.93g, 32mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare - the third known example.

2,500

Now known from three silver tetradrachms and two gold staters, this extremely rare and short-lived issue has been convincingly argued by W. Hollstein to have been struck under Ptolemy Keraunos, the eldest son of Ptolemy I of Egypt and the assassin of Seleukos I. Forced to leave Egypt after his younger half-brother was first named heir apparent and then ascended the throne in 282 as Ptolemy II, Keraunos travelled to the court of Lysimachos where his half-sister Arsinoe was queen and his sister Lysandra resided, married to Lysimachos’ son Agathokles. After Agathokles was executed for treason - an accusation encouraged by Arsinoe in order to position her own sons by Lysimachos to inherit the kingdom - Keraunos and Lysandra travelled east to court aid from Seleukos, prompting the expedition that began shortly afterwards and ended with the death of Lysimachos at the Battle of Korupedion in 281. Keraunos moved quickly to secure his own position and assassinated Seleukos. Though known as a personal symbol of Seleukos, the elephant on this issue is thought to refer to the war elephants supplied by Keraunos to his ally Pyrrhos of Epeiros for his Italian expedition, while the use of the types of Lysimachos is a clear indication that his intent was to portray himself as the successor of his former protector. That this type was struck for such a brief period is due to the death of Keraunos in battle against the invading Celts, as the collapse of Lysimachos’ kingdom opened the way for their southern migration.

245. Kingdom of Macedon, Antigonos III Doson AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis (?), struck circa 227-225 BC. Head of Poseidon right, wearing wreath of marine plants / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIΓONOY, Apollo, testing bow in extended right hand, seated left on prow left; monogram below. EHC 436; Touratsoglou 52–3; SNG Saroglos 933. 16.97g, 33mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine. Well detailed and lightly toned.

72

1,500


246. Kingdom of Macedon, Antigonos III Doson AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis (?), struck circa 227-225 BC. Head of Poseidon right, wearing wreath of marine plants / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIΓONOY, Apollo, testing bow in extended right hand, seated left on prow left; monogram and HP monogram below. SNG Alpha Bank 1048. 16.90g, 33mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine. Well detailed and lightly toned. Scarce monogram combination.

750

247. Kingdom of Macedon, Antigonos III Doson AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis (?), struck circa 227-225 BC. Head of Poseidon right, wearing wreath of marine plants / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIΓONOY, Apollo, testing bow in extended right hand, seated left on prow left; monogram below. EHC 436; Touratsoglou 52–3; SNG Saroglos 933. 16.65g, 31mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine. Lightly toned.

750

248. Kingdom of Macedon, Antigonos III Doson AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis (?), struck circa 227-225 BC. Head of Poseidon right, wearing wreath of marine plants / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIΓONOY, Apollo, testing bow in extended right hand, seated left on prow left; [monogram below]. EHC 436; Touratsoglou 52–3; SNG Saroglos 933. 17.07g, 31mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Lightly toned.

500

249. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip V Æ17. Uncertain Macedonian Mint, circa 221-179 BC. Head of Perseus right, wearing winged Phrygian helmet / Harpa, BA above, Φ below, oak-wreath around. Mamroth 28; SNG Alpha Bank 1129. 3.31g, 17mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Dark patina. Very Rare.

73

500


250. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip V AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 202-200 BC. Head of the hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet surmounted by griffin’s head; harpa in background; all in the centre of a Macedonian shield / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦIΛIΠΠOY, club; all within oak wreath tying to right, ΠA monogram to right. Unpublished in the standard references, including A. Mamroth. “Die Silbermünzen des Königs Perseus” in ZfN 38 (1928), pp. 277-303. 16.62g, 31mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Unpublished in the standard references.

2,000

251. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip V AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 202-200 BC. Head of the hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet surmounted by griffin’s head; harpa in background; all in the centre of a Macedonian shield / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦIΛIΠΠOY, club; all within oak wreath tying to right. SNG München 1125; SNG Fitzwilliam 2343; Weber 2251; Du Chastel 210. 17.13g, 31mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

1,000

252. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip V AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 202-200 BC. Head of the hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet surmounted by griffin’s head; harpa in background; all in the centre of a Macedonian shield / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦIΛIΠΠOY, club; all within oak wreath tying to right, ΠA monogram to right. Unpublished in the standard references, including A. Mamroth. “Die Silbermünzen des Königs Perseus” in ZfN 38 (1928),pp. 277-303. 16.14g, 30mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Unpublished in the standard references.

74

1,000


253. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip V AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 202-200 BC. Head of the hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet surmounted by griffin’s head; harpa in background; all in the centre of a Macedonian shield / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦIΛIΠΠOY, club; all within oak wreath tying to right, TE monogram to right. Unpublished in the standard references, including A. Mamroth. “Die Silbermünzen des Königs Perseus” in ZfN 38 (1928),pp. 277-303. 16.97g, 32mm, 4h. Very Fine. Unpublished in the standard references.

1,000

254. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip V AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 202-200 BC. Head of the hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet surmounted by griffin’s head; harpa in background; all in the centre of a Macedonian shield / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦIΛIΠΠOY, club; all within oak wreath tying to right, ΠA monogram to right. Unpublished in the standard references, including A. Mamroth. “Die Silbermünzen des Königs Perseus” in ZfN 38 (1928),pp. 277-303. 15.85g, 30mm, 12h. Very Fine. Unpublished in the standard references.

500

255. Kingdom of Macedon, Time of Philip V - Perseus AR Tetrobol. Pella or Amphipolis, circa 187-168 BC. Macedonian shield with MA-KE and club on boss / Macedonian helmet, two monograms to left, monogram and thunderbolt to right. SNG Ashmolean 3278 var.; SNG Copenhagen 1282 var.; SNG Alpha Bank -. 2.17g, 15mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

300

256. Kingdom of Macedon, Perseus AR Tetradrachm. Pella or Amphipolis, circa 173-171 BC. Ay-, magistrate. Diademed head right / ΠEPΣEΩΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle standing right, wings spread, on thunderbolt; mintmaster’s monogram to right, control marks above (MA monogram) and between legs (Φ); all within oak wreath, plough below. Mamroth, Perseus 18b; SNG München 1198. 15.34g, 31mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. From the J.T.B. Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group 76, 12 September 2007, lot 317.

75

1,500


257. Macedon under Roman rule, First Meris AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 167-149 BC. Diademed and draped bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver at shoulder; all within tondo of Macedonian shield / ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝΩΝ ΠΡΩΤΗΣ, horizontal club, monograms above and below, all within oak wreath tied at left; thunderbolt in outer left field. SNG Copenhagen 1313 (this obverse die). 17.13g, 32mm, 8h. Good Extremely Fine. A splendid example of the type; beautifully centred and struck.

1,000

THRACO-MACEDONIAN REGION

258. Thraco-Macedonian Region, Derrones AR Dodekadrachm. Circa 480-465 BC. Male driver, holding goad in right hand, reins in left, driving ox cart to right on ornate ground line; above, crested Corinthian helmet right / Clockwise triskeles with central dot, palmette to left. AMNG III 56.5 var.; SNG ANS 930/931; Rosen 120-121 var. 37.81g, 34mm, 10h. Good Very Fine.

2,000

From the Mark Christenson Collection.

259. Thraco-Macedonian Region, Siris AR Stater. Circa 525-480 BC. Satyr, nude and ithyphallic, standing right, grasping hand of nymph fleeing right; three pellets in field / Rough incuse square. Peykov A0010. 9.91g, 20mm. Good Very Fine. Lightly toned. From the M.M. Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group E-Auction 312, 9 October 2013, lot 57.

76

1,000


THRACE

260. Thrace, Ainos AR Tetradrachm. Antiadas, magistrate. Circa 453-450 BC. Head of Hermes right, wearing petasos on which AINI / Goat walking right within linear frame, outside which Pan stands right holding lagobolon, raising left arm, ΑΝΤΙΑΔΑΣ around; all within incuse square. Jameson 1050; May, Ainos 85 (A55/P68). 16.04g, 24mm, 3h. Extremely Fine.

3,000

261. Thrace, Ainos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 412-409 BC. Head of Hermes right, wearing petasos / Goat walking right, kerykeion before, AIN above; all within incuse square. May 255c; Kraay-Hirmer 422; Locker-Lampson 131; SNG Lockett 1157. 16.50g, 25mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

7,500

Ex Roma Numismatics V, 23 March 2013, lot 292. Beautiful late classical style. This portrait is one of the last profile heads to appear on the coinage of Ainos, and its severe features make it one of the most striking of the entire series.

Ex Consul Weber Collection, Hirsch 1908

262. Thrace, Ainos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 374/3-372/1 BC. Head of Hermes facing slightly left, wearing petasos / Goat standing right; AINION above, laurel wreath to right; all within incuse square. May, Ainos 404a (A244/P286) = AMNG II 328.11 (this coin); SNG Copenhagen –; McClean 3932 = Rhousopoulos 536. 15.58g, 21mm, 12h. Very Fine, dark find patina.

3,500

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Daniel Koppersmith Collection, Classical Numismatic Group Auction 94, 18 September 2013, lot 145; Ex Numismatik Lanz Auction 151, 30 June 2011, lot 12; Ex Consul Eduard Friedrich Weber Collection, J. Hirsch Auction XXI, 16 November 1908, lot 870.

263. Thrace, Abdera AR Tetradrachm. Circa 365-345 BC. Griffin crouching left, ΑΒΔΗ-ΡΙΤΕΩΝ above and below / Laureate head of Apollo to right, ΕΠΙ ΕΥΡΗΣΙΠΠΟΥ around. Dewing 1264; May 541. 10.04g, 24mm, 3h. About Extremely Fine. From the Mark Christenson Collection; Ex Hirsch 279-280, 8 February 2012, lot 4176; Ex Gorny & Mosch 186, 8 March 2010, lot 1173.

77

1,000


Unique and of Significant Numismatic Interest

264.

Thrace, Abdera AV Quarter Stater. Epimeletes Polyphantos, circa 336-311 BC. ΑΒΔΗ-ΡΙΤΕΩΝ, griffin crouching left / Laureate head of Apollo left, ΕΠΙ ΠΟΛ-ΥΦΑΝΤΟΥ around. Unique and unpublished; for the same epimeletes, cf. J.M.F. May, The Coinage of Abdera (540-345 BC), edited by C.M. Kraay and G.K. Jenkins, Issue IX, London 1966, Group CXXXVII 547-8; M. Price, ‘Thrace, 1980’, in Coin Hoards VII, 1985, pp. 42-3, 50, fig. 5, 15 [= Triton sale 2, 1998, 347 (6.40g) = Leschorn II, p. 766]. 2.10g, 12mm, 12h. Very Fine. Unique and of significant numismatic interest.

7,500

Ex Roma Numismatics IX, 22 March 2015, lot 244 (failed to reach owner’s reserve, since lowered). The above mentioned Thrace 1980 hoard found wrapped in a sheet of lead near Abdera is of very considerable numismatic significance. The presence in this uncirculated hoard of posthumous Philip II types issued under Philip III together with the second known Abderan gold stater indicates that May’s period IX, dated to c. 375-360, should be considerably lowered. Another hoard from Kasamovo in Bulgaria, found in 1894 (IGCH 741), but not noted by May, Kraay and Jenkins, in which the epimeletai (overseers or supervisors, commonly called magistrates by modern numismatists) from periods V, VIII and IX are present together with coins of the Thracian Chersonesos on a similar weight standard, also argue for the down dating of these three periods. The metrology of the later Abderan coinage is complex in the extreme, to the point that the only gold piece known at the time (signed by the epimeletes ΙΚΕΣΙΟΥ, weighing 6.42 and now in Oxford) is defined as a stater on p. 39, but as a half-stater on pp. 265, 267, 269 and on p. 274, catalogue no. 462. The discovery of the Abdera 1980 hoard gold stater signed by Polyphantos confirms a local Thracian weight standard of about 6.4 grams, exactly the double of two extant ‘half-staters’ of nearby Maroneia with an average weight of 3.2 grams (cf, Schönert-Geiss, Maroneia, 597, 1-2). The above newly discovered gold 1/4 Stater is logically based on the ‘Attic’ gold standard, which was presumably intended to circulate with the gold 1/4 staters in the name of Philip of the same weight, dated to c. 336328 BC (cf, Le Rider 47-82 and SNG ANS 281-227).

78


265. Thrace, Apollonia Pontika AR Drachm. Late 5th-4th centuries BC. Facing gorgoneion / Upright anchor; A and crayfish flanking; all within circular incuse. SNG BM Black Sea 160-1; SNG Copenhagen 457. 3.21g, 16mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

250

From the J.T.B Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group e269, 30 November 2011, lot 10.

266. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Stater. 500-480 BC. Naked satyr carrying off struggling nymph right / Quadripartite incuse square. SNG Copenhagen 1010-1011. 8.70g, 20mm. Good Very Fine. Attractive archaic style.

750

267. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Stater. 490-480 BC. Naked satyr carrying off struggling nymph right / Quadripartite incuse square. SNG Copenhagen 1010-1011. 8.42g, 21mm. Good Very Fine - Near Extremely Fine.

750

268. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Drachm. Circa 411-340 BC. Bearded head of Dionysos left, wearing wreath of ivy with berries / Herakles kneeling to right, wearing lion skin and drawing bow; ΘΑΣΙΟΝ behind, head of Pan to right; all within linear square in shallow square incuse. BMC 45; SNG Copenhagen 1024. 3.78g, 16mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. Old collection tone. Rare.

275

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Gorny & Mosch 224, 13 October 2014, lot 107; Ex Grabow 9, January 1958, lot 1136.

269. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 305-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, monogram above club in left field and monogram in exergue. Hirsch 269, 23 September 2010, lot 2347; Müller -. 17.05g, 30mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Lightly toned.

79

750


270. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 288/7-282/1 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, monogram in left field and in exergue. Thompson 211; Müller 544. 17.12g, 32mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Of good style.

1,000

271. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lysimacheia, circa 305-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, lion head and monogram in inner field, K in exergue. Müller 47; Thompson -. 16.85g, 30mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

500

272. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lysimacheia, circa 305-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, lion head right and monogram in left field, monogram in exergue. Müller -; cf. Stack’s 181, 7 November 2013, lot 20022 for same obv. die. 17.14g, 31mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Lightly toned and lustrous.

750

273. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lysimacheia, 297-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, lion head above KO to inner left, monogram on throne. Thompson –; Müller 46; Pozzi 1168. 16.85g, 32mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. From the J.T.B. Collection.

80

1,500


274. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lampsakos, circa 297-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, herm to outer left, monogram to inner left. Thompson 50; Müller 91; SNG France 2553-4. 16.87g, 32mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine. Struck on a very broad flan; very fine style.

3,000

From the Angelo S. Collection; Ex Roma Numismatics II, 2 October 2011, lot 259.

275. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lampsakos, circa 297-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, torch to inner left, star on throne. Thompson 43; Müller 381; SNG France 2538-9. 17.07g, 29mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful, vivid iridescent tones.

2,000

276. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lampsakos, circa 297-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, torch in inner left field, crescent below throne. Thompson 171; SNG Ashmolean 3724. 16.86g, 28mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare variant with crescent below seat of throne rather than in exergue.

500

277. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lampsakos, circa 297-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, monogram in inner left field, crescent in exergue. Thompson 49; SNG Copenhagen 1097. 17.22g, 30mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

81

750


278. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Pergamon, circa 305-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, monograms in left field and in exergue. Cf. Triton VI, 14 January 2003, lot 234 (but no thyrsus); Müller -. 17.04g, 31mm,12h. Extremely Fine. Excellent style.

1,500

279. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Pergamon, circa 305-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, pentagram above M in inner left field, crescent to outer left. Cf. CNG 94, 18 September 2013, lot 181 (same obv die.); Müller 92 (no crescent). 17.20g, 30mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,000

280. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Uncertain mint, circa 305-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, monogram in inner left field and in exergue. Müller 477; Thompson -. 17.11g, 31mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,000

281. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Uncertain mint, circa 3rd century BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, monogram ΔΙ below arm, owl and monogram in exergue. Unpublished in the standard references, for monograms cf. Thompson 6 and 8 (Lysimachia) and 213 (Amphipolis). 16.83g, 28mm, 4h. Extremely Fine.

82

1,000


282. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Drachm. Kolophon, circa 301-297 BC. In the types of Alexander III ‘the Great’. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, torch below forepart of lion left; pentagram below throne. Thompson 126; Müller 20; Price L26. 4.31g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Lightly toned.

175

Ex Roma Numismatics E-Sale 12, 1 November 2014, lot 900.

283. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Sestos, circa 297/6-282/1 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, flower to inner left. Thompson 29; Müller 331. 17.02g, 27mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,000

284. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Sestos, circa 297/6-282/1 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, labrys (?) to inner left. Cf. Müller 94; CNG E-363, 11 November 2015, lot 32 (same obv. die). 16.93g, 28mm, 2h. Good Very Fine.

500

285. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria Troas, circa 297-282 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, horse’s head in inner left field, star on throne. Thompson 149. 17.05g, 27mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

83

1,000


286. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Magnesia, 297-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, spear behind; BAΣIΛEΩΣ to right, ΛYΣIMAXOY crowned by Nike to left, monogram in wreath to outer left, Σ to inner left, ornament on throne. Thompson 102; Müller 302. 17.02g, 28mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Beautifully lustrous metal.

1,500

287. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Kyzikos, after 281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, transverse spear in background; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, monogram in left field. Thompson -; Meydancikkale 2713; Mektepini 163; Müller 528. 17.13g, 29mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Well centred and struck, on sound lustrous metal.

3,000

CIMMERIAN BOSPOROS

288. Cimmerian Bosporos, Pantikapaion Æ26. Circa 340-325 BC. Wreathed head of Pan left / Bow and arrow, ΠANTI below. MacDonald 59; Anokhin 1022; HGC 7, 106. 13.81g, 26mm, 8h. Extremely well struck and centred on a flan of sound metal. Wonderful preservation of detail. Pleasing dark brown matt patina. Fleur de Coin.

150

289. Cimmerian Bosporos, Pantikapaion Æ24. Circa 340-325 BC. Wreathed head of Pan left / Bow and arrow, ΠANTI below. MacDonald 59; Anokhin 1022; HGC 7, 106. 11.75g, 24mm, 3h. Well struck and finely detailed. Good Extremely Fine.

84

150


CRETE

Herakles and the Hydra

290. Crete, Phaistos AR Stater. Mid-Late 4th century BC. Herakles standing in fighting attitude to right, wearing Nemean lion skin, seizing with his left hand one of the heads of the Lernean Hydra, and with his right hand preparing to strike with club; by right foot, crab on exergual line / ΦΑΙΣΤΙΩ, Bull butting to right on wavy exergual line. Cf. Svoronos 66, pl. 24, 22. 11.47g, 28mm, 7h. Good Very Fine - Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

10,000

The obverse of this coin depicts the second of Herakles’ Twelve Labours set by Eurystheos, the agent of Hera. He was tasked with slaying the ancient serpent-like monster that resided in the lake of Lerna in the Argolid, which guarded an underwater entrance to the underworld. Upon cutting off each of the Hydra’s heads however, Herakles found that two more would grow back in its place, an expression of the hopelessness of such a struggle for any but the hero. Realizing that he could not defeat the Hydra in this way, Herakles called on his nephew Iolaos for help. Iolaos then came upon the idea (possibly inspired by Athena) of using a firebrand to cauterize the stumps after each decapitation. When Hera saw that Herakles was gaining the upper hand she sent a large crab to distract the hero, but Herakles crushed it underfoot. He cut off the last and strongest of the Hydra’s heads with a golden sword given to him by Athena, and so completed his task. Hera, upset that Herakles had slain the beast she raised to kill him, placed it in the vault of the heavens as the constellation Hydra, and she turned the crab into the constellation Cancer. The encounter with the Lernean Hydra is not only well attested in epic, but is also the subject of some of the earliest securely identifiable Herakles scenes in Greek art. On two Boiotian fibulae of c. 750-700 BC (BM 3025, Philadelphia 75-35-1), the hydra is attacked by Herakles, at whose feet is the crab sent by Hera. This particular form of the scene would later be replicated on the coins of Phaistos (cf. Svoronos 60, pl. XXIV, 20), even including the crab.

291. Crete, Phaistos AR Stater. Mid-Late 4th century BC. Herakles standing in fighting attitude to left, wearing Nemean lion skin, seizing with his left hand one of the heads of the Lernean Hydra, and with his right hand preparing to strike with club; between legs, crab on exergual line / ΦΑΙΣΤΙΩΝ, Bull butting to right on wavy exergual line. Cf. for obverse Svoronos 61, pl. 24, 21; cf. Le Rider 61, pl. 23, 24 (bull butting left). 11.89g, 27mm, 11h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

7,500

It has been repeatedly suggested that the later designs of Phaistos copy a now lost masterpiece of sculpture or painting, perhaps even a statue group by the great sculptor Lysippos (see Lehmann, ‘Statues on Coins’, New York 1946; see also Lacroix, ‘Les Reproductions de Statues sur les Monnaies Grecques’, Liege 1949; see also Lattimore, ‘Lysippian Sculpture on Greek Coins’, California Studies in Classical Antiquity Vol. 5 1972). Lattimore makes a plausible and convincing argument for the Herakles-Hydra confrontation as depicted here being copied from a sculpture; in particular he notes that a sculptural prototype is strongly suggested by ‘a feature that is rare, possibly unique, in Greek numismatic design: the group of combatants is shown from both sides, not in mirror reversal, but as two profile views of a three-dimensional group’ (cf. Svoronos pl. XXIV, 17 and 22, and Wroth pl. XV, 6). Lattimore notes two discrepancies: that the head of the lion skin is sometimes depicted whether we are shown the front or back view of Herakles, and the lion’s paw always passes behind the body of Herakles, but he explains these as a minor and illustrative artistic licence on the part of the die engraver, and a practical necessity to avoid overlapping planes, respectively.

85


292. Crete, Phaistos AR Stater. Mid-Late 4th century BC. ΦΑΙΣΤΙOΝ, Herakles standing in fighting attitude to left, wearing Nemean lion skin, with his right hand preparing to strike the Lernean Hydra with club; by right foot, M on exergual line / Bull butting to right. Le Rider 54, pl. 23, 13 (same dies). 11.88g, 26mm, 10h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

5,000

293. Crete, Phalasarna AR Stater. Circa 300 BC. Head of Britomartis to right, her hair tightly bound / Trident head. Le Rider pl. X, 12-13 (same dies); SNG Lockett 2596; Svoronos 2, pl. XXV, 5 (same dies). 11.25g, 26mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

3,000

Britomartis was the Minoan goddess of mountains and hunting, who was later assimilated into classical Greek mythology through her equation to Artemis. She was worshipped as an aspect of Potnia, the Cretan Mother of Mountains, who in Minoan art appears as a demonic gorgon, accompanied by double-axes of power, and gripping divine serpents. Her name Britomartis, which means ‘sweet maid’, appears to have been an apotropaic euphemism to allay the dangerous, terrifying side to the goddess.

TROAS

294. Troas, Skepsis AR Drachm. 4th century BC. Rhyton in the form of forepart of Pegasos right / Palm tree; crab and AK monogram flanking; within linear square surrounded by ΣKHΨIΩN; all in shallow incuse square. Kagan, Hellenistic, dies a1/p1, pl. 3, 4 (same dies); SNG Ashmolean –; SNG Copenhagen 472 (same dies); BMC 8 (same dies). 3.53g, 15mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Well detailed and attractive. Very Rare.

250

AEOLIS

3x 3x 295. Aeolis, Kyme AR Hemiobol. Circa 450-400 BC. Head of eagle left; K to left / Quadripartite incuse square. SNG Ashmolean –; SNG von Aulock 1623 var. (K retrograde); SNG Copenhagen 31. 0.45g, 8mm. Good Very Fine. From the J.T.B. Collection.

86

200


IONIA Apparently the Fourth Known Specimen

3x 296. Ionia, uncertain mint EL Hekte. Milesian standard. Circa 500-550 BC. Head of roaring lion to right / Incuse square with two diagonal dividers. SNG Kayhan -; Weidauer -; Vismara, Elektron -; Rosen -; cf. Gorny & Mosch 159, 181 and Lanz 148, 48 (sold $14,000). 2.35g, 10mm. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, perhaps the fourth known example.

3,500

Sixth Recorded Example

3x 297. Ionia, uncertain mint EL 1/12 Stater. Circa 5th Century BC. Siren standing right, holding tympanon (tambourine) / Bukranion with fillets hanging from each horn. Rosen 369. 1.00g, 7mm, 10h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare, only the sixth recorded specimen.

2,500

From the Doliones Collection. This type, which is known from just six examples including the current piece, was encountered for the first time in only 1957 when a specimen appeared for sale at the Hess-Leu auction in Lucerne on April 16 of that year. That piece, lot 271, now resides in Oxford. Two further examples were sold by Münzen & Medaillen, one on 6 October 1987 (lot 131), which was the Rosen specimen, and another on 22 March 2002 (lot 72). Jeffrey Spier wrote (Numismatic Chronicle 1988, p.221) that the first of these examples was ‘gold rather than electrum’, though it is clearly not. The fourth specimen was sold at The New York Sale 25 on 5 January 2011 (lot 97), whilst the fifth was sold in Roma Numismatics Auction III, 31 March 2012 (lot 197). The mythical Sirens are best known to us from two ancient epics: the ‘Argonautica’ by Apollonios, in which Jason and the Argonauts have to travel past them on their quest for the Golden Fleece, and Homer’s ‘Odyssey’, where they are portrayed as a pair of dangerous creatures that lure passing sailors to their deaths with their sweet music (Odyssey XII, 40). They are supposed to have inhabited an island with a particularly rocky shoreline onto which sailors would be drawn by their desire to hear the Sirens sing, leading to shipwreck. Speaking to Odysseus and warning him of the dangers he would encounter further into his journey, Queen Circe describes the Sirens as sitting in a meadow, with around them “a great heap of bones of mouldering men” (XII, 45). Although later depicted as women with wings, feathery tails and scaly bird-like feet, and eventually as mermaids, whose bodies were as seductive as their voices, depictions of the Sirens in early Greek art were as they appear on this coin, combining the body of a bird with the head of a woman, as can be seen on the ‘Siren Vase’, now in the British Museum, decorated in c. 480-470 BC and roughly contemporaneous with this coin.

Stunning Facing Apollo

2x 298. Ionia, Miletos AR Drachm. 2nd-1st century BC. Laureate head of Apollo facing, slightly right / Lion standing left, head reverted; in left upper field, MI monogram over ME monogram; in right upper field, sun-burst; in exergue, [M]ENANΔΡ[ΟΣ]. Unpublished in the standard references, for magistrates’ name cf. P. Kinns, ‘The Coinage of Miletos’, in NC 1986 p. 255 note 59; for type cf. Deppert-Lippitz 633-4. 5.35g, 20mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Of the highest rarity.

87

5,000


2x

2x

299 300 299. Ionia, Ephesos EL 1/24 Stater. Phanes, circa 625-600 BC. Forepart of stag left, head reverted; three pellets before / Incuse punch with raised lines within. Cf. Fritz Rudolf Künker Auction 326, 7 October 2013, lot 583 (same dies). 0.56g, 6mm. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare with type left. 300 300. Ionia, Phokaia EL 1/24 Stater. Circa 560-545 BC. Head of a griffin with open jaws to left; behind head, seal swimming upwards / Quadripartite incuse square. BMC 15; Bodenstedt 12. 0.64g, 6mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare. 500

2x 301. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 560-545 BC. Head of a griffin with open jaws to left; behind head, seal swimming upwards / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 12. 2.57g, 10mm. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare. 2x

500

2x

302 303 302. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 560-545 BC. Head of roaring lion left; to right, small seal upwards / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 13. 2.60g, 10mm. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 1,000 303. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 560-545 BC. Head of roaring lion left; to right, small seal upwards / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 13 (a/α); Roma III, 204 (same dies). 2.53g, 10mm. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare. 1,000

Possibly Only the Fifth Known

3x 304. Ionia, Phokaia EL 1/24 Stater. Circa 560-545 BC. Head of roaring lion left; to right, small seal upwards / Incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 13; Boston MFA 1904; SNG von Aulock –. 0.64g, 7mm. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare; only two examples recorded by Bodenstedt, both in public collections, and just two specimens in CoinArchives.

500

2x 2x 305. Ionia, Phokaia EL 1/24 Stater. Circa 560-545 BC. Head of ram left; below, small seal left / Incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 20; SNG von Aulock 7939; Boston MFA 1897 = Warren 1679. 0.66g, 7mm. Good Very Fine.

250

2x 306. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 560-545 BC. Head of griffin to left with protruding tongue; behind, small seal upward / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 22.1; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA –; BMC –; Jameson 1510; Weber 6072 = Bement 1470. 2.60g, 10mm. Near Mint State. Very Rare.

88

2,000


An Aethiopian at Phokaia

307. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 560-545 BC. Head of African left, seal downward behind / Quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 24; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC -; SNG von Aulock -; Boston MFA -. 2.56g, 10mm. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

5,000

Though Aethiopians - the Greek name for all Africans characterised by dark skin and short hair - feature regularly in Greek art, their depiction on coins is by contrast very infrequent. We know that the Greeks were well acquainted with black Africans, since they appear often in Greek literature as mythical or semi-mythical characters and warriors; it appears that they were known in the Greek world as early as the Minoan period, where they were employed by Minoan commanders as auxiliary troops. Indeed, if we may believe Quintus of Smyrna, the Greeks encountered black Africans in the army of Memnon at Troy. Black African contingents also formed a part of Xerxes’ army and according to some scholars fought at Marathon (see Frazer, J. G., 1913: Pausanias’ Description of Greece, II. Macmillan, London, p 434; and Graindor, P., 1908: Les Vases au Nègre. Musée Belge, p 29). Of the surviving art objects representing black Africans, many appear to be the work of artists who modelled from life. These depictions invariably display an astonishing degree of individuality, vitality, and energy, presenting scenes and designs that appealed to the craftsmen; one might surmise that the exotic appearance of such individuals presented the artist with a challenge to represent the distinctive features of blacks, whose aesthetic qualities are readily conveyed in pieces such as the present hekte. The closest parallels we find in the numismatic record for this portrait can be seen in the silver staters of an uncertain (possibly Karian) mint that have appeared in 2008 (Gemini IV, 195) and 2009 (NAC 52, 177) that bear an incuse head of a negroid man, and a small issue of silver fractions on Lesbos that also show a male head, this time in relief. Both however are highly stylised, and may not necessarily represent the features of a particular individual.

Second Known

2x

2x

308. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Forepart of lion to left; [above, seal to right] / Quadripartite incuse square. Triton XII, 2009, lot 300; otherwise unpublished. 2.56g, 10mm. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare - the second recorded example, and the better of the two.

89

2,000


2x 2x 309. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Three seals swimming clockwise around central pellet / Incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 29; SNG von Aulock -; Boston MFA 1895 = Warren 1666; Traité II 2090. 2.59g, 10mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

1,500

From the J.T.B. Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group 94, 18 September 2013, lot 528; Ex Numismatik Lanz 149, 24 June 2010, lot 196.

Very Rare and Attractive Hekte

2x

2x

310. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Female head left, wearing helmet or close fitting cap; seal to right / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 31; BMC Ionia -; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock 7943; SNG Kayhan 518. Near Mint State. Very Rare, Bodenstedt cites only four specimens. 2x

2,000

2x

312 311 311. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 480 BC. Forepart of man-headed bull left, collar with row of pearls; behind, seal swimming upward / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 35. 2.52g, 10mm. Near Mint State. Very Rare. A pleasing example of this type. 1,000 312. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 480 BC. Forepart of man-headed bull left, collar with row of pearls; behind, seal swimming upward / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 35. 2.58g, 10mm. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

750

Exceptional Griffin Hekte of Phokaia

2x

2x

313. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Forepart of griffin left, with curled wing; behind, seal downward / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 39; BMC 12; Boston MFA Supp. 174. Near Mint State. Very Rare. Bodenstedt records only 3 examples; 5 on CoinArchives, all in very poor condition. 2x

2x

314

315

2,000

314. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Forepart of griffin left; to right, seal downward / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 42; Boston MFA –; SNG von Aulock –. 2.57g, 9mm. Good Very Fine. Very Rare - Bodenstedt knew of only the Berlin specimen. 500 315. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Heads of two confronted boars; small seal to left above / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 45. 2.60g, 11mm. Very Fine; worn die. Very Rare. 300

90


2x

2x

2x

316

317

318

316. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Helmeted male head to left, with frontal eye and tendril ornament on bowl of helmet; below, seal swimming to left / Rough quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 50. 2.57g, 10mm. Mint State. Very Rare. 1,000 317. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 478-387 BC. Forepart of bull to left; above, small seal to right / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 58; SNG von Aulock 7949; SNG Lockett 2543 = Pozzi 2504. 2.53g, 10mm. Good Very Fine; scrape on obv. Rare. 500 318. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 478-387 BC. Ram standing right, scratching nose with right hind hoof; below, small seal to left / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 59; SNG von Aulock -; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC -; Boston MFA 1901. 2.53g, 10mm. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare; only three examples are noted by Bodenstedt, all in public collections (Boston, Karlsruhe, and s’Gravenhage). 1,000 A most charming pastoral motif, finely rendered in high relief.

One of Only Ten Known

2x 319. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 478-450 BC. Facing bearded head of Silenos, wearing ivy wreath; to left, small seal upward / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 67 (dies a/α); Gemini VI, lot 187 (same die and punch); Kastner 4, lot 125 (same die and punch). 2.55g, 10mm. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, apparently only the tenth known.

1,000

2x 320. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 478-387 BC. Head of young male left, wearing Silenos mask on top of his head; behind, seal swimming downward to left / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 70; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA –; BMC 43. 2.53g, 10mm. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, only three specimens cited by Bodenstedt, with a further five recorded in CoinArchives.

750

Beautiful and Extremely Rare Zeus Hekte

2x

2x

321. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 450-400 BC. Laureate head of Zeus left / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt -; cf. 76; Boston 1916; Traité 2124, pl. 158, 41; Roma III, 209 (£4,000). 2.55g, 11mm. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

1,500

2x 322. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 477-388 BC. Head of Aktaion left, with unruly hair and stag’s antler; [small seal behind] / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 77; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC 42; SNG von Aulock -; Boston MFA -. 2.54g, 10mm. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, only three specimens recorded by Bodenstedt, and just four on CoinArchives.

1,500

The obverse subject is variously referred to as either Pan or simply a young male, but the clear stag antler on his head clearly identifies him as the unfortunate hunter.

91


Second and Finest Known Specimen

2x 323. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 478-387 BC. Head of young Herakles left, with profile eye, wearing lion skin; [small seal not visible] / Quadripartite incuse square. Cf. Bodenstedt 80 (older Herakles with beard); Triton XIX, 229; otherwise unpublished. 2.54g, 10mm. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare - the second and finest known specimen.

1,000

2x 324. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 478-437 BC. Bearded head of Zeus Ammon wearing ram’s horn to left; behind, seal swimming downwards to left / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 81; Boston MFA -; BMC -; Leu 13, 1975, 239; J. Hirsch 25, 1909, 2186. 2.55g, 11mm. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare. Apparently only the fifth example known.

750

2 Examples Recorded by Bodenstedt

2x 325. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 387-326 BC. Laureate head of youthful Pan left, small horn at forehead; seal behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 85; SNG von Aulock -; Boston MFA -; Triton XI, lot 243; CNG 94, lot 542. 2.54g, 10mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare; only two examples recorded by Bodenstedt.

1,000

2x 326. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 478-387 BC. Helmeted head of Athena left; below, small seal left / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 91; SNG von Aulock 2131–2; Boston MFA 1914 and 1927–8. 2.57g, 10mm. Extremely Fine.

750

Fourth and Finest Known

2x 327. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 478-387 BC. Head of female left, wearing stephane ornamented with palmettes; below, small seal left / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 95; Roma Numismatics e-23, 155; Triton XIX, 231; otherwise unpublished. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, only one noted by Bodenstedt; just two in CoinArchives. Apparently the fourth known specimen, and certainly the finest. 1,000

Extremely Rare - Apparently the Third Known

2x 328. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 387-326 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with seal / Quadripartite incuse square. CNG 93, lot 391; Triton XVIII, lot 627; otherwise unpublished (but cf. Bodenstedt 111 for a similar type with serpent on helmet and seal below). 2.56g, 11mm. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, apparently only the third known.

92

1,000


329. Ionia, Smyrna AR Tetradrachm. Circa 155-145 BC. Head of Tyche right, wearing turreted crown / ΣΜΥΡ-ΝΑΙΩΝ over monogram, all within laurel wreath. Milne, Autonomous 141; Milne, Silver obv. die A; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC 4 (same obv. die). 16.37g, 35mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Exceptionally sharp reverse with none of the usual flatness.

2,000

From the J.T.B. Collection; Ex Roma Numismatics VIII, 28 September 2014, lot 598.

330. Ionia, Teos AR Stater. Circa 470/65-449 BC. Griffin with curled wings seated right, forepaw raised; owl to right / Quadripartite incuse square. Balcer Group LI, 100 (A100/P132); BMC Ionia -; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock -; SNG Kayhan -; Pozzi 2518 (same dies). 12.07g, 22mm. Extremely Fine. Finer than the four specimens cited by Balcer.

1,250

From the J.T.B. Collection; Ex Triton VIII, 11 January 2005, lot 429.

LESBOS

2x 331. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Forepart of bull to right / Incuse head of lion to left, rectangular punch to right. Bodenstedt 5; HGC 6, 929; SNG von Aulock 7720; SNG Lockett 2751. 2.51g, 10mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare; only three examples on CoinArchives. 2x

2x

750

2x

332 333 334 332. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Forepart of winged lion left / Incuse head of cockerel left; small rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 9.1; HGC 6, 933; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA –; BMC 25; Jameson 1472; Weber –. 2.55g, 10mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Well centred. Rare. From the M.M. Collection; Ex Triton XVIII, 6 January 2015, lot 592.

1,500

333. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Forepart of winged lion left / Incuse head of cockerel left; small rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt9.1; HGC 6, 933; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA –; BMC 25; Jameson 1472; Weber –. 2.60g, 11mm, 12h. Near Mint State.

1,000

334. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Forepart of winged lion left / Incuse head of cockerel left; small rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 9.1; HGC 6, 933; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA –; BMC 25; Jameson 1472; Weber -. 2.56g, 10mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

750

2x 2x 335. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Forepart of winged boar right / Incuse head of lion left; rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 10; HGC 6, 935; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA 1678; BMC –. 2.55g, 10mm, 6h. Mint State.

93

750


All images on this page are 2x enlargements.

336 337 336. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Head of roaring lion right / Incuse head of calf right; rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 13; SNG Copenhagen 301. 2.57g, 10mm, 12h. Near Mint State. 1,000 337. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Head of roaring lion right / Incuse head of calf right; rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 13; SNG Copenhagen 301. 2.58g, 10mm, 3h. Near Mint State. 750

339 338 338. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Head of roaring lion right / Incuse head of calf right; rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 13; SNG Copenhagen 301. 2.58g, 10mm, 11h. Near Mint State. 750 339. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Head of roaring lion right / Incuse head of calf right; rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 13; SNG Copenhagen 301. 2.59g, 10mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. 300

340. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Forepart of winged boar right / Incuse head of roaring lion to right, rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 15; HGC 6, 940. 2.54g, 11mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

2,500

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Roma Numismatics Auction IX, 22 March 2015, lot 298.

341. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Gorgoneion facing, surrounded by snakes and with a protruding tongue / Bearded head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress; neck truncation formed by two rows of small squares, four above and six below; behind head, rectangle with irregular field; all incuse. Bodenstedt 19.1 (c/Îł); BMC 14 (same dies); SNG von Aulock 1691. 2.53g, 9mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Well struck and centred.

2,500

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Nomos 9, 21 October 2014, lot 141; Ex Gemini VI, 10 January 2010, 141.

342

343

344

342. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Facing gorgoneion with protruding tongue / Incuse head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress; rectangular punch behind neck. Bodenstedt 19.1; HGC 6, 944; SNG von Aulock 1691; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC 14. 2.57g, 10mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 1,000 343. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Facing gorgoneion with protruding tongue / Incuse head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress; rectangular punch behind neck. Bodenstedt 19.1; HGC 6, 944; SNG von Aulock 1691; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC 14. 2.54g, 11mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. 500 344. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Facing gorgoneion with protruding tongue / Incuse head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress; rectangular punch behind neck. Bodenstedt 19.1; HGC 6, 944; SNG von Aulock 1691; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC 14. 2.56g, 11mm, 6h. Very Fine. 300

94


2x

2x

2x

345 346 347 345. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 478-455 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Head of bull right within slight incuse circle. Bodenstedt 29; HGC 6, 956. 2.52g, 10mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine. 500 346. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 478-455 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Incuse lion’s head facing in incuse. Bodenstedt 30; HGC 6, 957. 2.54g, 11mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 750 347. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 478-455 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Confronted bulls’ heads within incuse square. Bodenstedt 35; HGC 6, 961; SNG von Aulock 1695: Boston MFA 1683; BMC 36. 2.52g, 10mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

500

Exceptional Facing Silenos

348. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 478-455 BC. Bearded head of Silenos facing slightly right / Incuse head of roaring lion left. Bodenstedt 36; HGC 6, 962; Gulbenkian 704; SNG von Aulock 7725; Leu 86, 399. 2.54g, 11mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, Bodenstedt records only five specimens, and only two examples are present on CoinArchives.

5,000

The much inferior Leu specimen sold for CHF 5,200 in 2003. More recently, similar Bodenstedt 34 types struck from the same obverse die have sold for $10,000 in 2009 (Triton XII, 283; very poor die state), and $16,000 in 2013 (CNG 94, 489). The present example can easily be said to be the finest example of this obverse die strike present on CoinArchives. Silenos, the rustic god of winemaking and drunkenness, is conspicuous for being commonly featured on the coinage of Mytilene in a variety of forms and types. That this is the case should immediately suggest to us that wine making was an important aspect of Mytilene’s economic activities, and when consulting the ancient sources we find that this was indeed the case. The island of Lesbos has a long history of wine making dating back to at least the 7th century BC when it was mentioned in the works of Homer. Warmly spoken of in the 4th century BC, Lesbian wines achieve fulsome praise from Archestratos, the ‘Daedalos of tasty dishes’, who rated it above Thasian and Phoenician, without even a mention (in the surviving fragments) of Chian, the other first-class wine of the period. Euboulos implies that tax breaks for Lesbian wines at Athens increased its popularity and availability, and refers to it as “old, dripping with nectar”. During this time the island competed with the wines of Chios for the lucrative Greek markets, and the popularity of Lesbian wine is well attested as continuing into Roman times where it was highly valued along with other Aegean wines of Chios, Thasos and Kos. “I can name and praise the wines produced in other cities and their names I do not forget. But none of them is compared to the wine of Lesbos.” Athenaeus, Deipnosophistae, A, 52d

95


2x

349. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 455-428/7 BC. Head of an aged satyr facing right, wearing a taenia / Two confronted heads of rams, palmette above, all within incuse square. Bodenstedt 37. 2.51g, 10mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 300

Only Four Noted by Bodenstedt 2x

350. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Head of Silenos facing slightly left / Head of lion right in linear square within shallow incuse circle. Bodenstedt 38; HGC 6, 964; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA 1686; BMC –. 2.53g, 10mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare; only four noted by Bodenstedt, just three in CoinArchives. 1,000 2x

2x

2x

352 351 353 351. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Bare male head right / Head of calf right in linear square. Bodenstedt 39; HGC 6, 965; SNG von Aulock 1696; Boston MFA 1698; BMC 34. 2.54g, 10mm, 10h. Near Extremely Fine. Lightly toned. Rare. 800 From the M.M. Collection; Ex Triton XIX, 5 January 2016, lot 184. 352. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Forepart of boar right / Head of lion right within linear square. Bodenstedt 41; Traité pl. CLIX, 30; Boston MFA 1684; BMC Lesbos p. 159, 31; SNG Copenhagen 309; SNG von Aulock 1694. 2.54g, 10mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Rare. 500 353. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Forepart of boar right / Head of lion right within linear square. Bodenstedt 41; Traité pl. CLIX, 30; Boston MFA 1684; BMC Lesbos p. 159, 31; SNG Copenhagen 309; SNG von Aulock 1694. 2.52g, 10mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Rare. 300

Reverse Inspired by the Athenian Dekadrachms 2x

2x

354 355 354. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Forepart of goat right, head reverted / Owl standing facing, wings spread, within incuse square. Bodenstedt 42; HGC 6, 968; SNG von Aulock 1693; SNG Lockett 2757 = Pozzi 2320; Boston MFA 1682; BMC 29–30; Weber 5606. 2.51g, 11mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. 500 The reverse design of this coin is thought to have been copied from the Athenian dekadrachms, coins famous and impressive even in their own day. 355. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Forepart of goat right, head reverted / Owl standing facing, wings spread, within incuse square. Bodenstedt 42; HGC 6, 968; SNG von Aulock 1693; SNG Lockett 2757 = Pozzi 2320; Boston MFA 1682; BMC 29–30; Weber 5606. 2.57g, 11mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine. 500

2x 2x 356. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Bearded head of Priapos right, wearing tainia / Head of female (nymph Chione or Dione?) right, hair in sphendone, within shallow incuse square. Bodenstedt 43; HGC 6, 969; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA –; BMC 47–8; de Luynes 2556. 2.55g, 10mm, 12h. Near Mint State. Extremely Rare, only four examples noted by Bodenstedt. 1,000

96


2x

2x

358 357 357. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Diademed female head facing slightly right / Bull’s head left; M above; all within incuse square. Bodenstedt 44; HGC 6, 970; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA –; BMC 49–50. 2.51g, 10mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. Rare. 1,250 358. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Diademed female head facing slightly right / Confronted boars’ heads within incuse square. Bodenstedt 45; HGC 6, 971; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA 1692; BMC 51. 2.55g, 10mm, 4h. Near Mint State. Rare, and in exceptional state of conservation. 1,000

Only Two Examples on CoinArchives

2x 2x 359. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Bearded head of Silenos right / Head of wolf (or lion) facing within incuse square. Bodenstedt 47; HGC 6, 973. 2.51g, 10mm. Near Mint State. Extremely Rare; only two examples on CoinArchives.

1,500

Second Known Example

2x 2x 360. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Head of Persephone to right / Lyre of four strings. Bodenstedt -; Boston MFA -; CNG 57, 477; otherwise unpublished. 2.55g, 11mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare - the second known example. 2x

1,000

2x

361 362 361. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Head of Persephone right, hair in bunch behind / Head of roaring lion to right within incuse square. Bodenstedt 49; Boston MFA -; SNG Copenhagen -. 2.59g, 10mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

750

362. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Laureate head of Dionysos right / Confronted bulls’ heads; palmette above. Bodenstedt 50; BMC Troas 38; Gulbenkian 882; SNG Fitzwilliam 4345; de Luynes 2553 (all from the same dies). 2.52g, 10mm, 9h. Near Mint State. Extremely Rare; six examples cited by Bodenstedt, four of which are in museums; one example on CoinArchives. 750 2x

2x

2x

363

364

365

363. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Head of Apollo right, wearing laurel wreath / Bearded head of Silenos right within incuse square. Bodenstedt 51; HGC 6, 977; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA –; BMC –; SNG Copenhagen 307. 2.56g, 10mm. Near Mint State. Very Rare; only nine noted by Bodenstedt, seven in CoinArchives. 750 364. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-427 BC. Diademed head of youthful river-god right, small horn over forehead / Bearded head of old rivergod to right in archaic style, wearing wreath of reeds. Bodenstedt 52; HGC 6, 978. 2.57g, 12mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 750 365. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-428 BC. Head of Aktaion right / Facing gorgoneion within incuse square. Bodenstedt 54; Boston MFA 1701. 2.60g, 11mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. 500

97


Ancient Visual Paradox

2x

366.

Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-427 BC. Head of Athena wearing crested Corinthian helmet to right / Two confronted female heads, their faces overlapping; all within incuse square. Bodenstedt 55; HGC 6, 981; Boston MFA 1693; de Luynes 2555. 2.53g, 11mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare (Bodenstedt lists only 8 examples), and among the finest known.

5,000

This coin seems like a perfectly ordinary hekte when the obverse is first viewed; it is only when the coin is flipped to reveal its highly unusual reverse does the importance and novelty of the type become apparent. Employing a simple but effective form of optical illusion, the reverse appears to show the same female portrait both to the left and to the right. The design is deliberately intended to confound the eye and engage the viewer’s attention in attempting to resolve both portraits independently of the other, which is of course impossible, thus presenting the viewer with a visual paradox. The image works by confusing the brain’s figure-ground perceptual grouping process by giving it contradictory cues, thus preventing it from assigning definitive edges to the observed shapes. As a result, the human visual system will settle on one of the portraits, facing either left or right, and alternate between them. The importance of this type, both in terms of numismatic art and in the wider context of Greek art in general, cannot be understated. It is a thoroughly novel, and never to be repeated experiment in paradoxical illusion on the coinage of a Greek city-state. The Greeks were certainly familiar with the concept of a visual paradox - Plato describes the ourobouros ‘taildevouring snake’ as the first living thing; a self-eating, circular being: the universe as an immortal, mythologically constructed entity. They were also aware of the power of illusions - Greek architects would apply a technique known as entasis in the construction of their temple columns. Columns formed with straight sides would appear to the observer to have an attenuated appearance, and their outlines would seem concave rather than straight. Therefore a slight convex curve would be built into the shaft of the column, resulting in a swelling in the middle parts, in order to correct this disagreeable trick of the eye. Why then, when they were clearly aware of the power of illusion and paradox, did Greek artists not employ such techniques? The answer most likely lies in the cultural shift away from the static representational art of the archaic period driven by new realistic and idealistic paradigms; artists now sought to demonstrate their skill through attempting to attain aesthetic perfection based on both observational study, and occasionally improvement of nature through idealisation of the subject’s features. Thus non-practical forms of optical illusion were most likely dismissed as curious, but unlikely to earn an artist everlasting fame. It was therefore left to relatively modern artists such as Oscar Reutersvärd, who created the Penrose Stairs (also dubbed the impossible staircase), and psychologists such as Edgar Rubin, who developed the familiar Rubin’s vase (sometimes known as the Rubin face or the figure–ground vase), to explore the visual and psychological implications of these images which trick the brain. The significance of this coin therefore is that it pre-dates the work of both of the aforementioned celebrated ‘illusionists’ by well over two millennia, and demonstrates an appreciation and understanding of optical illusions as an art form, not just a necessary practical expedience.

98


2x

2x

2x

367 369 368 367. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 377-326 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Head of calf to right within incuse square. Bodenstedt 56; Traité II 2 pl. 159, 40; SNG von Aulock 7727. 2.58g, 10mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. 750 368. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 377-326 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Head of calf to right within incuse square. Bodenstedt 56; Traité II 2 pl. 159, 40; SNG von Aulock 7727. 2.57g, 10mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. 500 369. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 377-326 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Head of calf to right within incuse square. Bodenstedt 56; Traité II 2 pl. 159, 40; SNG von Aulock 7727. 2.55g, 10mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 300

Only 5 Noted by Bodenstedt

2x 2x 370. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-427 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Rock partridge walking to right, linear frame around; all within incuse square. Bodenstedt 58; Traité II 2199; SNG von Aulock 1699. 2.54g, 11mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare; only five examples noted by Bodenstedt, and just four on CoinArchives. 2x

1,000

2x

371 372 371. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-427 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Goat head to right within square linear frame. Bodenstedt 59; HGC 6, 985; SNG von Aulock 1698; Boston MFA –; BMC –. 2.52g, 10mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare; only six other examples on CoinArchives. 750 372. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 412-378 BC. Head of Io with cow’s ears facing slightly to right / Forepart of bull to right. Bodenstedt 61; Traité II, 2168, pl. 160, 2. 2.54g, 11mm, 9h. Extremely Fine; very well preserved for the type. Extremely Rare; Bodenstedt records four examples, and CoinArchives only a further five. 500

2x 2x 373. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 412-378 BC. Forepart of winged lion left / Sphinx seated right in linear square within incuse square. Bodenstedt Em. 63; HGC 6, 989; SNG von Aulock 1704; Boston MFA 1694–6; Gulbenkian 877; Jameson 1173; Weber 5608. 2.59g, 11mm, 10mm. Extremely Fine. Beautiful style. 1,250

Inspired by ‘Parthenon Group’ Amphipolis Tetradrachms

2x 2x 374. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 357-326 BC. Laureate head of youthful Apollo three-quarters facing / Head of an Amazon to right wearing ornamented helmet with cheek guards up. Bodenstedt 64.3; Traité II, pl. 160, 38; BMC 94, pl. 34, 8. 2.59g, 10mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

The obverse of this beautiful coin was inspired by the remarkable and widely praised ‘Parthenon Group’ tetradrachms of Amphipolis issued during that city’s short-lived war with Philip II of Macedon (see Kurt Regling, ZfN 33 (1922), p. 48, Anm. 2 and p. 60). It is a direct stylistic copy of this brief issue, which has been described as ‘the most beautiful of all the facing-head tetradrachms of Amphipolis and one of the prettiest of all ancient Greek coins’.

99


2x

2x

375 376 375. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 412-378 BC. Bearded head of Ares right, wearing crested helmet decorated with griffin / Head of Amazon right, wearing ornate helmet, in linear border within incuse square. Bodenstedt 65; HGC 6, 991; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA 1711; BMC 95–7; Gulbenkian 888; Pozzi 2330. 2.58g, 12mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine. 500 376. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 412-378 BC. Bearded head of Ares right, wearing crested helmet decorated with griffin / Head of Amazon right, wearing ornate helmet, in linear border within incuse square. Bodenstedt 65; HGC 6, 991; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA 1711; BMC 95–7; Gulbenkian 888; Pozzi 2330. 2.55g, 10mm, 2h. Very Fine. 300

2x

2x

377. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 412-378 BC. Bearded head of Ares right, wearing crested helmet decorated with griffin / Head of Artemis to right, hair tied up in a bunch. Bodenstedt 65h. 2.58g, 11mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare; only 2 examples on CoinArchives.

750

2x

2x

378. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 412-378 BC. Head of Ares right, wearing crested helmet decorated with a griffin on bowl / Facing Corinthian helmet, linear frame around; all within incuse square. Bodenstedt 66 = SNG von Aulock 1728 = Jameson 2245; BMC -; SNG Copenhagen -; Boston MFA -. 2.56g, 10mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, only three noted by Bodenstedt and just two in CoinArchives.

2x

750

2x

379. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 412-378 BC. Head of Artemis-Kybele right, hair in sakkos / Head of Telchine left, hair in sakkos, lamp at forehead; all in linear square within shallow incuse square. Bodenstedt 68; HGC 5, 994; Boston MFA 1696; Triton XI, lot 228. 2.53g, 10mm, 10h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, only 6 examples known to Bodenstedt.

2x

2x

380

381

1,000

380. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 412-378 BC. Head of Artemis-Kybele right, hair in sakkos / Head of Telchine left, hair in sakkos, lamp at forehead; all in linear square within shallow incuse square. Bodenstedt 68; HGC 5, 994; Boston MFA 1696; Triton XI, lot 228. 2.52g, 10mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, only 6 examples known to Bodenstedt. 750 381. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 412-378 BC. Head of Artemis-Kybele right, hair in sakkos / Head of Telchine left, hair in sakkos, lamp at forehead; all in linear square within shallow incuse square. Bodenstedt 68; HGC 5, 994; Boston MFA 1696; Triton XI, lot 228. 2.54g, 10mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare. 500

100


2x 382. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 360-340 BC. Head of Athena to right, wearing crested Attic helmet / Facing lion-scalp facing, square linear frame around; all within incuse square. Bodenstedt 72; SNG von Aulock 1705. 2.59g, 10mm, 12. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

2x

500

2x

383. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 412-378 BC. Wreathed and bearded head of Dionysos right, of archaizing style / Head of Kalathiskos-dance performer in linear square within incuse square. Bodenstedt 76 (dies a/α); SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock 7729 (same dies); BMC 59 (same dies). 2.56g, 15mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

2x

1,000

2x

384. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 377-326 BC. Head of Hermes right, wearing petasos / Lion standing right in linear square within shallow incuse square. Bodenstedt Em. 83; SNG von Aulock 1724; Boston MFA 1740; BMC 68; Dewing 2240; Gulbenkian 709; Weber 5618. 2.52g, 10mm, 9h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,250

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Triton XVIII, 6 January 2015, lot 598.

2x

2x

385. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Head of Dionysos right, wearing ivy-wreath / Mask of Silenos facing in thin square frame. Bodenstedt 90; Traité II 2, col. 2200, pl. 161, 1; BMC 77; SNG Copenhagen 324. 2.56g, 11mm, 1h. Fleur De Coin.

1,250

MYSIA

2x 386. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hemihekte. Circa 600-550 BC. Tunny fish head to left, tunny fish body below / Quadripartite incuse square. Hurter & Liewald 12,2. 1.36g, 8mm. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

750

2x 387. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hemihekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Head of lion left; tunny to right / Quadripartite incuse square. Cf. von Fritze I 39 (unlisted denomination); cf. SNG France 178–80 (larger denominations); cf. Boston MFA 1414–5 (same); Rosen 433; Gemini X, lot 72. 1.31g, 8mm. Extremely Fine. Extremely rare denomination, only two in CoinArchives.

101

350


3x 388. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hemihekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Sow standing to left on tunny left / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 45; cf. SNG von Aulock 7275 (stater); Boston MFA -. 1.34g, 8mm. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely rare denomination - no other examples on CoinArchives.

500

2x 389. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Sow standing to left on tunny fish / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 45; SNG France 184; cf. SNG von Aulock 7275 (stater); Boston MFA -. 2.66g, 10mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare; the finest of very few examples on CoinArchives.

1,500

2x 390. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Forepart of ram left; behind, tunny upward / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 46; cf. Boston MFA 1420 (stater); SNG von Aulock 1175 = Jameson 2166; SNG France –. 2.67g, 11mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

2x 391. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Forepart of ram left; behind, tunny upward / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 46; cf. Boston MFA 1420 (stater); SNG von Aulock 1175 = Jameson 2166; SNG France –. 2.66g, 10mm. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

750

392. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Ram kneeling left, head reverted; tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 47; SNG France -; BMC 48. 16.04g, 20mm. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

2,000

393. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Heads of lion and ram, conjoined, back-to-back; tunny fish to left below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 54; cf. SNG France 190 (hekte); Boston MFA 1422 = Warren 1543. 16.03g, 19mm. Very Fine. Very Rare, only four other examples have been offered at auction in the past fifteen years.

102

5,000


Extremely Rare Chimaera Stater

394. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Chimaera to left, tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 55; BMFA -; SNG France -. 16.09g, 22mm. Near Mint State. Extremely Rare.

25,000

The feared Chimaera was a monster of which a brief description in Homer’s Iliad is the earliest surviving literary reference. He depicts it as “a thing of immortal make, not human, lion-fronted and snake behind, a goat in the middle, and snorting out the breath of the terrible flame of bright fire”. It was the offspring of Typhon (last son of Gaia, fathered by Tartarus, and most fearsome of all the monsters of Greek mythology) and Echidna (a half-woman, half-snake, who with her mate Typhon was the origin of many monsters) and a sibling of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. According to Greek myth, the Chimaera lived in Lycia, ravaging the land. It was eventually slain by Corinth’s most famous son Bellerophon, with the help of Pegasos, at the command of King Iobates of Lycia. Since the Chimaera was impervious to Bellerophon’s attacks even when mounted on Pegasos, an inventive weapon was required – thus, mounting a block of lead on the end of his spear, Bellerophon lodged the lead in the Chimaera’s mouth so that when it breathed fire the lead melted and blocked its airway, suffocating it. The Chimaera first appears at an early stage in the repertory of the proto-Corinthian pottery-painters, providing some of the earliest identifiable mythological scenes that may be recognized in Greek art. The Corinthian type has been fixed, after some early hesitation, in the 670s BC. In Etruria too, the Chimaera appears in the Orientalizing period of the seventh cenury BC that precedes Etruscan Archaic art, where it found considerable popularity both as a myth and as a motif. The Chimaera appears in Etruscan wall-paintings of the fourth century BC, was one of the principal types employed on the coinage of Populonia, and is the subject of one of the most important surviving Etruscan bronze statues (see Chimera of Arezzo). It is well known that Kyzikos frequently took inspiration for its coin types from the art of other Greek city-states’ coins and wares, however the present type does not quite conform to the Chimaera seen on either the coinage of Populonia or Sikyon. The former’s coins were not widely distributed and on those of the latter the goat always (and the serpent tail usually) faces front. On this occasion therefore it is probable that this depiction copies the design of a vase or other vessel which found its way to Kyzikos - see for example Louvre A478 for a c.560-550 Attic black figure cup with a similarly formatted chimaera.

2x 395. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Head of Perseus left, wearing winged cap; tunny fish behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 65; SNG France -; SNG von Aulock 1186; Boston MFA -; Rosen -. 2.69g, 11mm. Very Fine.

500

On the present coin we see Perseus, the child of Zeus and the mortal Danaë, the daughter of the king of Argos, who though he had no mythical connection to Kyzikos, is most likely chosen as the type in recognition of his divine status and widespread worship among the Hellenes. He wears here the Ἄϊδος κυνέην - the so-called Helm of Hades which rendered its user invisible to other supernatural entities, given to him by Athena to help him evade the gorgons Sthenno and Euryale after he had slain and decapitated their sister Medusa.

103


2x 396. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Bearded archaic male head to left, tunny fish to left below / Quadripartite incuse square. Cf. Von Fritze 66 (stater); SNG BN -; BMFA -; Hurter & Liewald -. Rosen 447 (same dies). 2.66g, 11mm. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

500

2x 397. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing crested helmet, tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 67; SNG France -. 2.76g, 11mm. Near Extremely Fine.

750

3x 398. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hemihekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Helmeted head of Athena left on tunny left / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 67; SNG France 195; cf. Boston MFA 1447 (hekte). 1.35g, 9mm. Very Fine.

500

2x 399. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Nude Herakles kneeling to right, holding club and bow; below, tunny fish to right / Incuse square with mill-sail pattern. Von Fritze 69; Boston 1482; Ward Coll. 601; H. Troxell, The Norman Davis Collection, ANS 1969, #195 (this coin). 2.66g, 12mm. Very Fine.

700

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Gemini VII, 9 January 2011, lot 464; Ex Norman Davis Collection.

3x 400. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hemihekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Winged siren standing left, holding tunny fish / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 74, pl. II, 29; SNG France 203 (hekte). 1.33g, 8mm. Good Very Fine. Extremely rare denomination.

500

3x 401. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hemihekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Bearded head of Poseidon to left, wearing a helmet in the form of the head of a sea monster; [below, tunny fish to right] / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze -; Hurter-Liewald (SNR 2002), 17b; SNG von Aulock 7291 (hekte). 1.42g, 4mm. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

104

750


The Flower Girl of Kyzikos

402. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Half-length bust of a winged female deity to left, wearing kekryphalos headdress, round earring and long-sleeved chiton, in her right hand holding a tunny fish by the tail, and raising a flower to her chin; bust truncation indicated by dotted line between parallel lines / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 75; SNG France 205; Boston MFA 1448 = Warren 1519. 16.20g, 23mm. Very Fine. Very Rare.

7,500

The winged figure on this coin of Kyzikos is most frequently simply described as a ‘winged female’, though on occasion numismatists have ventured to suggest that the depiction is that of a harpy, one of the mythical ‘snatchers’ who were sent by the gods to torment Phineos, the blind seer-king of Thrace, for his transgressions. Though in the Homeric poems the harpies are nothing more than the personifications of storm winds, Hesiod (c. 750-650 BC) described them as the daughters of Thaumas by the Oceanid Electra; fair-haired and winged maidens, who surpassed the winds and birds in the rapidity of their flight. Archaic pottery depicts them thus, in a manner that closely resembles the winged figures on the coins of Kaunos in Karia - see in particular Wagner Museum L164 – black figure clay vase. It was only later tradition that portrayed the harpies as hideous half-woman, half-bird creatures - a development resulting from a confusion of harpies with sirens. By the time of Aeschylus (c. 525-455 BC), this transformation was largely complete, though the harpy’s ‘beautiful’ image is still occasionally seen as late as 480 BC - see the J. Paul Getty Museum hydria/kalpis by Kleophrades, on which the harpies are rendered as young winged girls. The identification of the winged figure on this stater as a harpy is therefore possible, though other identifications are equally plausible. Iris, goddess of the rainbow, was depicted as a winged woman with a herald’s staff, as likewise was Nike, though the latter usually carried a wreath or palm. However, none of these beings was associated with flowers, which above all were an attribute of Aphrodite and Kore-Persephone. Only one parallel for the present type exists in surviving Greek art: the 5th century BC funerary stele now known as ‘The Exaltation of the Flower’, held in the Louvre. Carved in a similarly severe archaic style, the stele depicts two female figures holding up flowers; the left figure in a pose very similar to that shown on this coin. Those figures have been identified either as unknown mortals, or as Demeter and her daughter Persephone - the view favoured by its discoverer Léon Heuzey. The wings on our figure clearly identify her as a goddess though, and the flower is most likely the key to understanding her identity. Kore-Persephone, daughter of Demeter, therefore seems to be a logical choice: she was gathering flowers when Hades came to abduct her, and her return to earth each year was heralded by the blossoming of the meadows. Her overwhelming prominence on the later coinage of Kyzikos further strengthens the case for her depiction here.

2x

2x

403. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Upper body of winged female deity to left, holding tunny fish in right hand, raising a flower to her face with left hand / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 75, pl. II, 30; SNG von Aulock 7280; SNG France 206. 2.68g, 11mm. Extremely Fine. Rare.

1,000

404. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-450 BC. Head of Athena to left, wearing crested Attic helmet, base of crest decorated with zig-zag and pellet pattern; below, tunny fish to left / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 76; Greenwell 25; SNG France –; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA 1446; Dewing –; Gillet 1053 = Kunstfreund 3 = Jameson 2171 = Weber 4971; Gulbenkian 609 (all from the same obv. die). 16.06g, 21mm. Very Fine. Very Rare.

105

5,000


A Superb Archaic Head of Silenos

405. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Head of Silenos facing; two tunny fish upward to either side / Quadripartite incuse square. CNG 75, 23 May 2007, lot 336; cf. Von Fritze 77 (fractions); SNG France -; Hurter & Liewald I, 77. 15.99g, 23mm. About Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, the sixth and finest known. A superb archaic head of Silenos.

30,000

Of the other five examples, one was sold by CNG in 2007, and two were noted by Hurter & Liewald as being in the von Aulock Collection (but unpublished) and the Velkov Collection (Vinchon, 24 Nov. 94), lot 61 = CH II, p. 7, 2. Two others were sold by Roma Numismatics: Auction V, 2013, lot 364; Auction X, 2015, lot 483. This spectacular coin features a bold facing portrait of Silenos engraved in excellent archaic style. The teacher and faithful companion of the wine-god Dionysos, Silenos was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysos, and was said in Orphic hymns to be the young god’s tutor. Originally a folkloric man of the forest with the ears of a horse (and sometimes also the tail and legs of a horse), Silenos was often depicted with thick lips and a squat nose as, is the case here, fat, and most often bald – though our Silenos may consider himself fortunate in that he sports a full head of hair. Unusual consideration has been given to symmetry in the composition of this type; though symmetrical designs occur as in the case of two eagles perched on an omphalos (v. Fritze 220) or the double bodied sphinx (v. Fritze 138) to name but two, this is one of a tiny minority of designs that incorporates two tunny fish for balance. Interestingly, it has been suggested that the head of Silenos on this coin very possibly served as the model for a silver issue of the slightly later Lykian dynast Teththiveibi (see BMC 88 and SNG Berry 1164). One of the principal myths concerning Silenos has him lost and wandering in Phrygia, rescued by peasants and taken to the Phrygian King Midas, who treated him kindly. In return for Midas’ hospitality Silenos regaled him with tales and Midas, enchanted by Silenos’ fictions, entertained him for five days and nights. When the god Dionysos found his wayward friend, he offered Midas a reward for his kindness towards Silenos, a blessing which the avaricious Midas squandered by choosing the power of turning everything he touched into gold. How fitting then that we should see in this beautiful coin a faint reflection of that classic myth of the drunken but sage Silenos looking out at us across the millennia through this window of golden metal.

2x

406. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hemihekte. Circa 550-500 BC. Facing head of Silenos; two tunny fish at left and right / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 77; SNG France 208; SNG von Aulock 7269; Rosen Coll. 455 (all hektes). 1.39g, 9mm. Near Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

106

200


Second Known Example of Apollo Delphinios

407.

Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-450 BC. Winged figure to right, consisting of man’s body with dolphin’s head, holding tunny fish in left hand, right hand raised behind head. Von Fritze -, cf. 79 (hemihekte); BMC -; von Aulock -; Franke-Hirmer 599 = Hurter-Liewald II, 79. 16.11g, 20mm. Of the highest rarity, only the second specimen known and the only one in private hands.

25,000

The type of this coin is at first glance completely perplexing - there are no part man, part dolphin hybrid monsters known in Greek mythology. To better understand the type we must therefore consider other possibilities. The prevalence of winged beings in Kyzikene coinage is a reflection of archaic mythological convention that assigned wings to most divine or sacred entities as an immediately visible and understandable symbol of their nature, and in the case of gods, of their power to move at will across great distances. The presence of wings on this figure therefore indicates a divine identity. Several gods are associated with dolphins, notably Poseidon, Aphrodite and even Dionysos. The latter on one occasion was travelling in disguise among a group of Tyrrhenian pirates, who thinking him only a man, decided to sell him into slavery; Dionysos transformed them into dolphins as they dove into the sea to escape his wrath, charging them for evermore with rescuing sailors in distress. While it could be argued therefore that the image on this coin represents a sailor in mid-transformation, this does not satisfactorily explain why it should be accorded a divine aspect, nor why an obscure myth should be chosen to feature on the coinage of Kyzikos. Instead we should turn to the Homeric Hymns of Apollo, which relate that having been born on the island of Delos in the Cyclades, the god grew to manhood in just four days, and from there set out into the world, looking for a place to make his home, until he arrived at last at Mount Parnassos and the site of Pytho. Finding it occupied already by the oracle of Gaia and guarded by a serpent known as Python, the offspring of Gaia, Apollo slew the monster with an arrow and claimed the site for his own. Yet, despite being the son of Zeus, Apollo had nonetheless committed murder and to cleanse the blood-guilt he was required to serve king Admetos of Pherai in Thessaly for nine years. This he did, and when he returned to Pytho he came in the form of a dolphin bringing with him priests from Crete. The site became known as Delphi, from the Greek word for dolphin: ‘delphis’. It is most likely that we are expected to see in this coin’s winged dolphin-headed man a representation of Apollo Delphinios: Apollo of Delphi; Apollo the dolphin. This identification is further supported by some myths which name the eponymous founder of Kyzikos’ father as being none other than the god Apollo; Aristides (Orat. Cyzic., 1, p.114) goes so far as to speak of the god himself as the founder of the city.

107


Second Known Specimen

2x 2x 408. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Forepart of horse left; tunny diagonally downward to right / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze -; Hurter & Liewald, SNR 81 (2002), p. 33, no. 40 & pl. 3, 40a. 2.64g, 11mm. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare - Apparently the Second Known Specimen.

300

2x 2x 409. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Forepart of galley with wolf’s head prow left, beneath, tunny fish left / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 80 (staters); Hurter-Liewald, SNR 83 (2004), p. 33, 80, pl. 6. 2.68g, 11mm. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

500

410. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Dog standing left, fore-paw raised; tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 93, pl. III, 12; Boston 1469; SNG von Aulock 1192; SNG France 230. 16.12g, 20mm. Good Very Fine.

3x

5,000

3x

411. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hemihekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Dog crouching to left, tail raised; tunny fish left below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 93; BMFA 1471. 1.33g, 8mm. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

750

412. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Forepart of winged lioness to left; tunny fish behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 96; SNG France 237; Boston MFA -. 16.07g, 19mm. Near Extremely Fine.

108

7,500


413. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Forepart of winged lioness left; tunny fish behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 96; SNG France 237; Boston –. 16.28g, 21mm. Extremely Fine. Rare.

5,000

414. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Nude youth kneeling left, holding tunny fish / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 112, pl. III, 31; Boston 1487; SNG France 253. 15.91g, 20mm. Very Fine.

5,000

415. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Nude youth kneeling left, holding tunny fish / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 112, pl. III, 31; Boston 1487; SNG France 253. 16.28g, 19mm. Very Fine. Rare.

4,000

3x 3x 416. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hemihekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Nude youth kneeling left, holding tunny by its tail / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 112; SNG von Aulock 1202; cf. SNG France 253 (stater). 1.33g, 8mm. Good Extremely Fine.

500

417. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Satyr in kneeling-running stance to left, holding in his extended right hand a tunny fish by the tail / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 122; Boston 1461; SNG France -. 16.03g, 19mm. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare; although around six or so hektes of this series have been offered at auction over the last fifteen years, there has been only one stater of this type (Roma VIII, 2014, lot 627).

109

7,500


Second and Finest Known Specimen

418. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Three-quarter facing head of Apollo, turned slightly to right / Quadripartite incuse square. Cf. Von Fritze 132 (stater); cf. SNG France 283 (stater); CNG e140, 44 (hekte); otherwise apparently unpublished for this denomination. 2.68g, 11mm. Extremely Fine. The second (and finest) known example.

7,500

Beautiful and Extremely Rare Kabeiros Hekte

2x 419. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 450-350 BC. Head of Kabeiros left, wearing laureate pilos / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 139 (stater); SNG France -; MFA Boston -. 2.68g, 10mm. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare; only one other example on CoinArchives (in very poor condition).

3,000

420. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. 400-350 BC. Apollo, clad in himation, seated sideways on swan flying left, holding laurel branch in right hand; tunny to left below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 150 & pl. IV, 38; Babelon pl. 175, 16; BMC 104 & pl. VIII, 13 (same obv. die). 16.04g, 16mm. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare - only one example on CoinArchives.

110

7,500


Odysseus Sacrifices to Attract the Souls of the Dead

421. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 450-400 BC. Male figure (Odysseus?), wearing a pilos and a chlamys, kneeling to left, in the act of sacrificing a ram; tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Greenwell 71, pl. III, 22; Von Fritze 156, pl. V, 4. 16.07g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare. By quality far superior to the Prospero specimen, which realised $40,000 on a $20,000 estimate.

15,000

The identity of the figure on the obverse of this coin has been widely debated. It has been suggested that it could be Phrixos, in the act of sacrificing the ram with the golden fleece. However, on the basis of the pilos, Odysseus, shown sacrificing the animal provided by Circe before his descent into Hades, has also been suggested.

Third Known Example

2x 2x 422. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 400-360 BC. Bearded and laureate head of Zeus three-quarters facing; tunny fish to right below / Quadripartite incuse square. Leu 57, 1993, 100; cf. von Fritze 182 (stater); cf. Hurter & Liewald, SNR 83, 2004, p. 34, 182 (hemihekte). 2.64g, 11mm. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, apparently only the third known example.

3,000

423. Mysia, Kyzikos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 390-340 BC. Wreathed head of Kore Soteira left, hair in sphendone covered with veil, two grain ears in hair; ΣΩTEIPA above / Head of lion left, mouth open with tongue protruding, tunny fish below; KYZI around, bunch of grapes behind. Pixodarus -; Von Fritze II 23; SNG France -; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock -; Traité pl. CLXXVIII, 17. 15.07g, 25mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

111

5,000


424. Mysia, Lampsakos AR Drachm. Circa 500-470 BC. Diademed Janiform female head / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet, within incuse square. SNG France 1124; SNG von Aulock 1291 var. (caduceus behind head of Athena). 4.60g, 20mm, 10h. Good Very Fine - Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

200

Attractive Lampsakene Stater

425. Mysia, Lampsakos EL Stater. Circa 480-450 BC. Forepart of Pegasos with curved wings to left, vine with bunches of grapes around / Quadripartite incuse square. A. Baldwin, Period I, pl. I, 11; BMC 9; Traité pl. 8, 2. 15.22g, 20mm. Good Extremely Fine.

12,000

Lampsakos was founded in around 654/3 BC by Phokaian colonists, and in the sixth century became a dependency of Lydia; when the Lampsakenes had captured Miltiades, the Athenian tyrant of the Chersonesos, they were forced by Kroisos to set him free. After the fall of the Lydian kingdom in 547, the city then fell under the dominion of Persia. Lampsakos joined the Ionian cities in revolt in 499, but was conquered by Daurises in 498 or 497, and thereafter remained under Persian control until it was given by Artaxerxes to the exiled Athenian general Themistokles as part of the governorship of the Magnesian district. Themistokles’ district also included the cities of Myos, and Magnesia itself, who along with Lampsakos paid him revenue of 50 talents per year, for ‘meat’, ‘bread’ and ‘wine’ respectively. At an uncertain date after the death of Themistokles in 459, Lampsakos joined the Delian League, and is recorded in the tribute lists from 453/2, paying a phoros of fifteen talents. The dating of this issue has long proven to be difficult, with earlier scholars having attributed it to as far back as 525-500, though this has been shown to be unlikely, not least on account of the style being of a more dynamic and baroque nature than the rather static designs of the Archaic period. At the time Baldwin published her study of the electrum coinage of Lampsakos in 1914, she knew of just fourteen varieties encompassing approximately forty specimens of all of Lampsakene electrum. As for coins from the first period under which this coin falls, she knew of just thirteen specimens. Of course while additional specimens have appeared over the past century, this coin is still a rarity. The style is much more refined than the earliest issues of the period, and while it is tempting to perceive the Pegasos motif as one symbolising freedom, and thus try to place this as a product of the Ionian revolt, the general modern consensus is that the issue should belong to the period of 480-450. This being the case, it should reasonably be viewed within the context of Themistokles’ control of the city – under his control, Lampsakos was required to pay tribute, for which purpose a substantial issue of coinage was necessary. The subsequent issue has the same types and is also of a highly refined engraving style, but shows the letter Ξ below the winged horse of the obverse, thus tying it to the Athenian Coinage Decree and the banning of the use of non-Athenian silver soon after 450 BC.

112


Bold Portrait of Seleukos I

426.

Kingdom of Pergamon, Philetairos I AR Tetradrachm. Circa 270-265 BC. Diademed head of the deified Seleukos I to right / Athena, helmeted and wearing long robes, seated to left on low throne with lion’s feet, resting her left elbow on support in the form of a sphinx, holding a transverse downward pointing spear in her left hand and resting her right on the edge of a round shield adorned with a gorgoneion standing before her; above, ivy leaf; to right, bow. BMC 28; De Hirsch 1459; Kraay/Hirmer 736; Newell 14, XVI-36a (same dies); SNG Lockett 2718 (same dies); SNG von Aulock 7451 (same dies). 17.03g, 28mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

15,000

Philetairos began his career serving under Antigonos Monophthalmos, but after the Battle of Ipsos in 301 BC where Antigonos was killed, he shifted his allegiance to Lysimachos, who entrusted him with command of the fortress of Pergamon, and a treasury of nine thousand talents of silver (234 metric tonnes). Philetairos served Lysimachos until 282 BC, when perhaps because of conflicts involving the court intrigues of Arsinoe, Lysimachos’ third wife, Philetairos deserted Lysimachos, offering himself and the important fortress of Pergamon, along with its treasury to Seleukos, who subsequently defeated and killed Lysimachos at the Battle of Korupedion in 281 BC. Seleukos himself was murdered by Ptolemy Keraunos, a brother of Arsinoe, a few months later at Lysimacheia. After the death of Seleukos, though he and Pergamon remained nominally under Seleukid dominion, Philetairos had considerable autonomy and with the help of his considerable wealth was able to increase his power and influence beyond Pergamon. His first coinage was struck under the reign of Antiochos I, the son of Seleukos, and though it proclaims his loyalty to Seleukos, the presence of his name upon the reverse must have inevitably raised suspicions about his ambitions. Nevertheless, Philetairos never went so far as to proclaim himself king, and remained loyal to the Seleukids until his death in 263. Having no children of his own, Philetairos passed the rule of Pergamon to his nephew Eumenes, who almost immediately revolted against Antiochos, defeating the Seleukid king near Sardes in 261. Eumenes was thus able to free Pergamon, and greatly increased the territory under his control. In his new possessions, he established garrison posts in the north at the foot of Mount Ida called Philetaireia after his adoptive father, and in the east, north-east of Thyatira near the sources of the river Lykos, called Attaleia after his grandfather, and he extended his control south of the river Caïcus to the Gulf of Kyme as well. Demonstrating his independence, he began to strike coins as his predecessor had done, only now the obverse portrait was that of his uncle and adoptive father Philetairos.

113


427. Kingdom of Pergamon, Philetairos I AR Tetradrachm. Circa 284-263 BC. Diademed head of Seleukos I right / Athena enthroned left, holding shield and spear; ivy leaf before, ΦIΛETAIPOY and bow behind. SC 309.5a; SNG France 1599 (same obv. die); Newell 14. 17.12g, 30mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

3,000

428. Kingdom of Pergamon, Eumenes I AR Tetradrachm. Circa 263-241 BC. Laureate head of Philetairos right / Athena seated left, left elbow resting on shield, crowning ΦIΛETAIΡOY with wreath held in her extended right hand, spear diagonally in background, ivy leaf in outer left field, A in inner left field, bow in right field. Westermark group IVa (Attalos I); SNG France 1612. 16.96g, 30mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. High relief, pleasing metal and tone.

3,000

The second of the Attalid rulers of Pergamon, Eumenes had been adopted by his childless uncle Philetairos. In the reign of his predecessor Pergamon had been a largely autonomous but apparently loyal client state of the Seleukid empire, and as such Philetairos’ coins bore the head of Seleukos I on the obverse. Upon his succession Eumenes, perhaps with the encouragement of Ptolemy II, who was at war with the Seleukids, revolted and defeated Antiochos I near the Lydian capital of Sardes in 261 BC. In so doing he obtained independence for Pergamon and greatly increased the territory under his dominion. Eumenes honoured his forebears by establishing garrison posts in the north near the foot of Mount Ida which he called Philetaireia after his uncle and adoptive father, and an eastern region, north-east of Thyateira near the sources of the river Lykos, he called Attaleia after his grandfather. Eumenes struck coins bearing now the portrait not of the founder of the Seleukid dynasty, but that of his own - Philetairos. Though possessing all the powers of one, Eumenes never assumed the title of BAΣIΛEΩΣ - king. He did however imitate other Hellenistic rulers, for example by instituting a festival in his own honour at Pergamon - the Eumeneia.

429. Kingdom of Pergamon, Eumenes I AR Tetradrachm. Circa 263-241 BC. Laureate head of Philetairos right / Athena seated left, resting elbow on small sphinx, holding shield and transverse spear; monogram on throne, ivy leaf to inner left, ΦIΛETAIΡOY and bow to right. SNG France 1606–9. 16.60g, 28mm, 12h. Very Fine.

114

750


115


LYDIA 430.

431.

116


Two Stunning Kroisos Staters

430. Kingdom of Lydia, Kroisos AV Stater. Heavy series, prototype issue. Sardes, circa 564/53-550/39 BC. Confronted foreparts of lion, with sun on forehead, and bull / Two incuse squares. Berk 1; Konuk & Lorber fig. 25 = CH VIII, pl. I, Hoard 7, no. 40 = Triton XV, lot 1243 (same die and punches; realized $150,000); Athena Fund I 58; McClean 8635; NAIM-BAN 6; Ward 723 (same die and punches); Triton XVIII, lot 656 (realized $130,000); Triton XIX, lot 243. 10.82g, 18mm. Near Mint State. Very Rare. The heaviest example recorded on CoinArchives, and easily the best preserved.

50,000

Kroisos is credited with issuing the first true gold coins with a standardised purity for general circulation. The series began on a ‘heavy’ standard, with gold and silver staters of equal weight, around 10.6-10.7 grams, which was later reduced to about 8.17 grams for the gold. Studies have shown that coins of both standards circulated together, but that the heavy standard was only used for a relatively short time compared to the light standard, which continued to be used into the Persian period. This type has been identified as the prototype issue of the entire Kroiseid series on the basis of certain stylistic considerations which set it apart from later issues, having been first noted and analysed by Paolo Naster (“Une série aberrante de Créséides” in BSFN 19 (1964), pp. 364–5, reprinted in P. Naster, Scripta Nummaria: Contributions à la méthodologie numismatique [Louvian-la-Neuve, 1983], pp. 76–7). Martin Price also concluded that the type belongs between the preceding electrum issues and the later gold issues of ‘standard’ style. The cataloguer of the Triton XIX example succinctly noted “the archaic character of the type is most evident in the bull, where the fine waves of hair on the later coinage is here represented as a series of pelleted lines emanating from a solid arc that forms the animal’s neckline. At the same time, antecedents of the style of the lion can be seen in the earlier electum coinage, particularly the hemihektai of Wiedauer’s Group XVI. The most significant feature linking this issue to the electrum, though, is the appearance of the small pellet or protuberance on the head of the lion. This feature, usually featuring rays emanating from it, is canonical on all the earlier electrum coinage from the time of Ardys until the early part of Kroisos’ reign. It is a feature that is totally lacking on the bimetallic coinage of the ‘realistic’ and, later, ‘stylized’ character. A final unusual feature particular to this issue is the depiction of the arms of the lion and bull, which are shown bent nearly 90 degrees at their mid-point, rather than in a straight line from shoulder to paw and hoof.” It has been further suggested that the exceptional rarity of the type today can be explained by the issue being a short-lived trial run, prior to the style being reconsidered and standardised for the successive issues. All of the coins of Kroisos feature without variation his heraldic badge, the confronted heads of a lion and a bull, both ancient symbols of power. The badge itself doubtless stems from the ubiquitous and persistent theme of the lion-bull combat scene which can be traced back to the figurate art of the third millennium, where geometrical motifs are replaced by narrative symbolic representations. The earliest known lion-bull combat scene depiction occurs on a ewer found at Uruk dated to the latter part of the Protoliterate period, circa 3300 BC. That ewer has a relief depiction of a lion attacking a bull from behind (see Henri Frankfort, Art and Architecture of the Ancient Orient, 1963). The scene became widely distributed by 500 BC, featuring prominently in the Achaemenid Empire, and in particular at the palace of Darius in Persepolis, where it occurs no fewer than twenty seven times, including on the main staircase leading the the imperial complex. Various attempts have been made to explain the meaning of the lion attack motif, often centred on possible astrological or cosmological significances, or associations with particular deities. One interpretation that has gained traction in recent years is that the motif is apotropaic in nature, serving to ward off evil in a similar function to the gorgoneion, which like the lion attack motif is very prevalent in ancient Greek coinage, though there is little evidence to support such a notion. G. E. Markoe (‘The Lion Attack in Archaic Greek Art’, Classical Antiquity Vol. 8, 1, 1989) convincingly suggests that a more likely explanation may be found in the examination of archaic Greek epic poetry, particularly in Homeric literature, wherein a lion attacking cattle or sheep is repeatedly employed as a simile for the aggression and valour of combatant heroes. In notable passages, Agamemnon’s victorious advance against the Trojans in the Iliad (11.113ff and 129) and Hektor’s successful pursuit of the Achaeans (15.630ff) are both likened to a lion triumphing over its hapless prey. In both of these cases the allusion is completed by the defeated being compared to fleeing prey animals. In all, there are twenty five examples present in the Iliad of heroic warriors being compared to leonine aggressors, with the victims variously compared to boars, sheep, goats, bulls or deer. The repetition of this literary device is clearly demonstrative of how deeply rooted the imagery was in the Greek (and perhaps more generally human) consciousness. Of further and great significance is the involvement of the gods as the primary instigators of heroic leonine aggression in almost every case, and as it is made clear that the lion itself is an animal that is divinely directed to its prey (11.480, by a daimon), so then is the lion attack a metaphor for divinely inspired heroic triumph. Indeed, divinely inspired heroic triumph was exactly what Kroisos expected when, encouraged by a prediction by the Delphic Oracle that if he attacked Persia he would destroy a great empire, Kroisos made his preparations for war with Cyrus the Great. The war resulted in defeat for Kroisos; his numerically superior army was smashed, and the capital Sardes was captured along with Kroisos and his family, who were immolated on the orders of Cyrus. Lydia became a satrapy of the Persian Empire, though it continued to mint coins in the traditional types, and indeed the legendary wealth of Kroisos was used by Cyrus to form the basis of a new Persian gold standard currency.

431. Kingdom of Lydia, Kroisos AV Stater. Heavy series. Sardes, circa 564/53-550/39 BC. Confronted foreparts of lion and bull / Two incuse squares. Berk 2; Le Rider, Naissance, pl. V, 2; Traité I 396; BMC 30; Boston MFA 2068–9; Gulbenkian 756. 10.75g, 18mm. Extremely Fine; lustrous, handsome metal. Very Rare.

117

40,000


432. Kingdom of Lydia, Kroisos AR Stater (Double Siglos). Sardes, circa 550-546 BC. Confronted foreparts of lion right and bull left / Two square punches of unequal size. Berk 20; Traité I 407; SNG Kayhan 1018; Carradice (1987) 2. 10.51g, 20mm. Very Fine.

750

433 434 433. Kingdom of Lydia, Kroisos AR Third Stater. Sardes, circa 550-520 BC. Confronted foreparts of lion right and bull left / Two incuse squares of unequal size. Carradice 9; Berk 24; Rosen 666. 3.40g, 13mm. Good Very Fine. Toned. From the M.M. Collection; Ex Gorny & Mosch 216, 15 October 2013, lot 2575.

250

434. Kingdom of Lydia, Kroisos AR Third Stater. Sardes, circa 550-520 BC. Confronted foreparts of lion right and bull left / Two incuse squares of unequal size. Carradice 9; Berk 24; Rosen 666. 3.50g, 13mm. Good Very Fine.

200

435. Kingdom of Lydia, Kroisos AR Siglos. Sardes, circa 545-520 BC. Confronted foreparts of lion and bull / Two incuse square punches of unequal size. SNG Copenhagen 456; SNG von Aulock 2877-79; SNG Kayhan 1025; Rosen Coll. 663. 5.33g, 15mm. Near Extremely Fine. Attractive style.

1,000

436. Kingdom of Lydia, Kroisos AR Siglos. Sardes, circa 545-520 BC. Confronted foreparts of lion and bull / Two incuse square punches of unequal size. SNG Copenhagen 456; SNG von Aulock 2877-79; SNG Kayhan 1025; Rosen Coll. 663. 5.30g, 11mm. Good Extremely Fine. Lustrous.

KARIA

1,000

2x 2x 437. Asia Minor, uncertain mint AR Obol. 5th-early 4th centuries BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Lion standing left, Y H(?) above. CNG eAuction 347, 263; otherwise unpublished in the standard references. 0.79g, 0.9g, 4h. Near Extremely Fine. Apparently the second known example.

200

The cataloguer of the CNG example noted the similarity in style to the Cypriot issues of Evagoras I and his successors; the presence on this example of a partial legend does not yet help to clarify the identity of the issuing example.

438. Karia, Achaemenid Period AR Tetradrachm. Circa 341-334 BC. Persian king or hero in kneeling-running stance right, drawing bow / Satrap on horseback right, thrusting spear; to left, bearded male head right. Konuk, Influences, Group 5 var. (head of Herakles); SNG Copenhagen (Persian Empire) 290-291 var. (same); Traité II 121 var. (same); CNG 72, 14 June 2006, 801. 14.66g, 23mm, 11h. About Very Fine. Very Rare, and unpublished in the standard references with this symbol.

1,250

Struck in the last years before Alexander’s invasion of the Persian empire, the archer-horseman tetradrachms of Achaemenid Karia are one of the rarest and most enigmatic Persian coinages struck in Asia Minor. We are unfortunately aware neither of where nor why they were produced - no inscription is present to facilitate identification of the issuing authority, with only various symbols and letters present as control marks. These control marks allowed Konuk to discern two distinct series: those with subsidiary symbols, and those without. Analysis of the Pixodarus Hoard has allowed the coinage to be dated from the decade beginning circa 350 BC. Additionally, since that hoard contained only the earlier, nonsymbol, type, Meadows concluded that the date of deposit of the hoard (341 BC) should be seen as the earliest possible start of the second series, to which this coin belongs.

118


Exceptional Pixodaros Stater

439.

Satraps of Karia, Pixodaros AR Stater. Halikarnassos, circa 341/0-336/5 BC. Head of Apollo facing slightly right, wearing laurel wreath, drapery around neck / Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding double-axe (labrys) and lotustipped sceptre; ΠIΞOΔAPOY to right. Konuk, Identities 30; Babelon, Perses 414–21; Traité II 111; SNG von Aulock 2375–6; SNG Kayhan 891–2; SNG Copenhagen 597; Roma Numismatics III, 293 (same obverse die). 6.94g, 20mm, 11h. Near Mint State. Of exceptionally fine style; struck from the same obverse die as Roma III, lot 293 (hammered at for £10,000 on an estimate of £7,500), but struck from a reverse die in superior condition to that of the aforementioned.

5,000

Privately purchased from Maison Platt, September 1980. From 395 to 334 BC, the rulers of Karia were members of the family of Hekatomnos of Mylasa, whose sons Maussolos, Idrieos and Pixodaros all succeeded him in their turn. Pixodaros as the youngest, was the last member of the family to rule Karia, and but for the indignant interference of Philip II of Macedon, would have given the hand of his daughter in marriage to Alexander III. This stunning didrachm, though from dies the product of which are not themselves excessively rare, is here found to be in a condition far surpassing the majority of those of its brothers that have survived to the present day. The coins struck from these dies are of a rare, sculptural quality that is matched by only one other set of dies for the didrachm issues, and one set of tetradrachm dies. The others are, much in common with the coins of his siblings, of a style that is often weak-featured and insipid. Here however, we are presented with a portrait bearing a bold chin, proud cheekbones and strong nose; all of this is cunningly rendered in carefully wrought relief.

119


440. Satraps of Karia, Pixodaros AR Stater. Halikarnassos, circa 341/0-336/5 BC. Head of Apollo facing slightly right, wearing laurel wreath, drapery around neck / Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding double-axe (labrys) and lotus-tipped sceptre; ΠIΞΩΔAPOY to right. Pixodaros 28; SNG von Aulock 2376; SNG München 15. 7.00g, 21mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautiful iridescent toning.

2,500

Ex Künker 193, 26 September 2011, lot 248.

441. Karia, Knidos AR Hemidrachm. Circa 380-360 BC. Phileanas, magistrate. Head and leg of lion right / Head of Aphrodite right, hair bound in sphendone; ΦIΛEANAΣ before. SNG Copenhagen 260 var. (magistrate); SNG Keckman 170 var. (magistrate). 1.81g, 13mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

300

442. Islands off Karia, Kos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 285-258 BC. Xanthippos, magistrate. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Crab; XANΘIΠΠOΣ and bow in bow-case below. Requier 62; SNG Copenhagen -; Boston MFA Supp. 195. 14.95g, 27mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

2,500

RHODOS

443

444

443. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Circa 340-316 BC. Chian standard. Head of Helios facing slightly right / POΔION, rose with bud to right; to left, grape bunch and Δ; all within incuse square. Ashton 97; cf. SNG Keckman 433. 6.79g, 20mm, 12h. Very Fine. Rare. 300 444. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Circa 305-275 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / POΔION, rose with bud to right; to left, jug above EY. Ashton 160; Ashton, Colossus, Series 2; SNG Keckman 461; SNG Copenhagen 730. 6.74g, 21mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 300

445

446

445. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Circa 305-275 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / POΔION, rose with buds to either side; A to inner left, trident to inner right. Ashton 163; Ashton, Colossus, Series 2; SNG Keckman 475; HGC 6, 1435. 6.72g, 21mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 500 446. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Circa 305-275 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / POΔION, rose with buds to either side; trident to inner right, A-M across lower fields. BMC -; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG Keckman 475 (var.) 6.74g, 21mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 300

447. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Circa 305-275 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / POΔION, rose with bud to right; to left, bee above NI. Ashton 164; Ashton, Colossus, Series 2; SNG Keckman -; HGC 6, 1435; BMC 37. 6.78g, 20mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Die break across obv. 300

120


448. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Aristonomos, magistrate. Circa 275-250 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; APIΣTONOMOΣ above; to left, prow right. Ashton 180; SNG Keckman 487; HGC 6, 1439. 6.73g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

750

449 450 449. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Aristonomos, magistrate. Circa 275-250 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; APIΣTONOMOΣ above; to left, prow right. Ashton 180; SNG Keckman 487; HGC 6, 1439. 6.75g, 19mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

450. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Aristonomos, magistrate. Circa 275-250 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; APIΣTONOMOΣ above; to left, prow right. Ashton 180; SNG Keckman 487; HGC 6, 1439. 6.76g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

750

451 452 451. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Antipatros, magistrate. Circa 275-250 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; [ANTI] ΠATP[OΣ] above, dolphin to left. Ashton 185; SNG Keckman -. 6.75g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 300 452. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Herasikles, magistrate. Circa 275-250 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; EPAΣIKΛHΣ above, Phrygian cap to left. Ashton 187; SNG Keckman -; SNG von Aulock 2806; SNG Copenhagen 738. 6.75g, 19mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

500

453 454 453. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Herasikles, magistrate. Circa 275-250 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; EPAΣIKΛHΣ above, Phrygian cap to left. Ashton 187; SNG Keckman -; SNG von Aulock 2806; SNG Copenhagen 738. 6.76g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

500

454. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Aristobios, magistrate. Circa 275-250 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; [APIΣT]OBI[OΣ] above, wreath to left. Ashton 191; SNG Keckman 494. 6.77g, 20mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

300

455

456

455. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Aristobios, magistrate. Circa 275-250 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; [APIΣT]OBI[OΣ] above, wreath to left. Ashton 191; SNG Keckman 494. 6.81g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

500

456. Rhodos, Rhodes AR Didrachm. Mnasimachos, magistrate. Circa 250-229 BC. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly to right / Rose with single bud to right, MNAΣIMAXOΣ above, P-O flanking stem, Athena Nikephoros standing left. BMC 143; SNG Copenhagen 765; Ashton 208; SNG Keckman 537. 6.73g, 20mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Vibrant golden iridescent tone. 1,250

LYKIA

457. Lykia, Oinoanda AR Stater. Early Second Century BC. Laureate head of Zeus right; B and lotus-tipped sceptre behind / Eagle standing right on thunderbolt; before, round shield over sword; OINO-ANΔЄ Ѡ-N in exergue. Ashton, “The coinage of Oinoanda,” NC 2005, 4 (A3/P3) (this coin). 7.79g, 20mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare. From the Mark Christenson Collection; Ex Gemini IV, 8 January 2008, lot 205.

121

500


PAMPHYLIA Ex H. von Aulock Collection

458.

Pamphylia, Aspendos AR Stater. Circa 380/75-330/25 BC. Two wrestlers beginning to grapple with each other; between them, ΔΡ / ΕΣ]ΤFΕΔΙΙ[ΥΣ], slinger striding right, preparing to launch sling-bolt; to right, triskeles to left above an uncertain symbol, perhaps a greave; all within rectangular frame of pearls. SNG Copenhagen 220 (same dies); SNG von Aulock 4550 (this coin). 10.96g, 23mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine. Well struck in high relief, lightly toned with some iridescent highlights. An exceptional example of this series.

6,000

From the M.M. Collection; Ex B. in B. Collection, Nomos 8, 22 October 2013, lot 198; Ex Bank Leu Auction 48, 10 May 1989, lot 248; Ex H. von Aulock Collection. Coins depicting a pair of wrestlers were first issued by Aspendos beginning circa 400 BC, and continued to be struck until they were replaced by Alexander’s ‘universal’ currency in the 320s. These wrestler coins replaced the earlier types, which had generally featured a militaristic obverse depicting a hoplite warrior or cavalryman, with a triskeles or boar upon the reverse. The wrestler coins may seemingly be divided into two broad groups: the first, clearly minted earlier, shows a great deal of variation in the posture of the wrestlers; the second shows the wrestlers always in the same stances. This second group was in all probability inaugurated by an issue (von Aulock 4568) bearing the inscription MENETΥΣ EΛΥΨA, which Hill (NC 1920, pp. 115-116 ) interprets as the names of the two wrestlers: Menetos and Elypsa. The obvious conclusion is that the wrestlers depicted represent a commemorative statue group erected at Aspendos, with the first group of coins struck after the event commemorated, but before it was set in stone, and the second group with its unchanging stances being struck after the completion of the statue group. The reason for such a work is uncertain however. It is possible that one of Apendos’ citizens was victorious at the Olympic games, since such victories are believed to have inspired coin types on more than one occasion (at Messana and on Philipp II of Macedon’s coinage). It is also known however that games were instituted at Aspendos in 402 BC, and that they represented a revival of an earlier festival. In any case, the prominence of this type, which endured on their coins for over a century, suggests it was of particular significance to the city, and the importance of this coinage in the region was such that the city of Selge in Pisidia issued a series of its own staters in the 4th century that clearly imitated Aspendos’ coinage.

122


459. Pamphylia, Aspendos AR Stater. Circa 330-250 BC. Two wrestlers grappling; ΠO between / Slinger in throwing stance right; EΣTFEΔIIYE to left; to right, forepart of horse above helmet. BMC -; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG France -; SNG Lockett 3020. 10.37g, 25mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

CILICIA

2x

2x

460

461

460. Cilicia, uncertain mint AR Obol. 4th century BC. Head of Herakles facing slightly left, wearing lion skin headdress / Head of Aphrodite left, wearing triple pendant earring, necklace, and turreted stephane decorated with palmette between two circles. Göktürk –; SNG France –; SNG Levante 242. 0.66g, 10mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

200

461. Cilicia, uncertain mint AR Obol. 4th century BC. Crowned and bearded head right (of Persian Great King?) / Forepart of Pegasos right. Göktürk –; Troxell & Kagan –; SNG France 482–4; SNG Levante 232. 0.83g, 11mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare. 200

2x 2x 462. Cilicia, Satraps AR Obol. Datames, Satrap of Cilicia and Cappadocia. Tarsos, circa 380 BC. Head of female facing slightly left, drapery around neck / Draped bust of female (Aphrodite?) right, wearing tainia, hoop earring, and pearl necklace. Casabonne Series 1; Göktürk –; SNG France 310–1; SNG Levante 217–8. 0.63g, 10mm, 1h. Extremely Fine.

463

200

464

463. Cilicia, Satraps AR Stater. Pharnabazos, satrap of Hellespontine Phrygia. Tarsos, circa 380-374/3 BC. Head of Arethusa facing slightly left / Helmeted and bearded male head right. SNG France 247; SNG von Aulock 5922. 10.65g, 22mm, 12h. Very Fine. 750 In the wake of a protracted war against Sparta, Persian power was weakened, causing Egypt to revolt and declare its independence from Persian rule. An initial force sent to crush the upstart Egyptians was defeated by Greek mercenaries hired by the Egyptian Pharaoh. Pharnabazos was then appointed commander of the second campaign to reconquer Egypt, and caused these coins to be struck in order to pay the Greek mercenaries he hired to counter those of the Egyptians. 464. Cilicia, Satraps AR Stater. Pharnabazos, satrap of Hellespontine Phrygia. Tarsos, circa 380-373 BC. Baaltars seated left, holding lotus tipped sceptre; astragalos below throne / Bearded male head (Ares?) left, wearing crested Attic helmet. Casabonne Series 4; Moysey Issue 2; SNG France 251; SNG Levante 72. 10.85g, 23mm, 3h. About Extremely Fine. 750

465

466

465. Cilicia, Satraps AR Stater. Mazaios, satrap of Cilicia and Cappadocia. Tarsos, circa 361-334 BC. Baaltars seated left, holding eagle, ear of corn and bunch of grapes in right hand, lotus-headed sceptre in left, Aramaic legend ‘BLTRZ’ = Baaltars, to right, Aramaic letters on left and below seat / Lion attacking a bull to left, Aramaic legend above ‘MZDI’ = Mazaios; monogram below. SNG Levante 106 (these dies). 10.83g, 25mm, 9h. Good Extremely Fine. Bold reverse. 1,000 466. Cilicia, Satraps AR Stater. Mazaios, satrap of Cilicia and Cappadocia. Tarsos, circa 361-334 BC. Baaltars seated left, holding eagle, ear of corn and bunch of grapes in right hand, lotus-headed sceptre in left, Aramaic legend ‘BLTRZ’ = Baaltars, to right, Aramaic letters on left and below seat / Lion attacking a bull to left, Aramaic legend above ‘MZDI’ = Mazaios. SNG France 2, 335; SNG Levante 100ff. 10.94g, 23mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. 1,000

123


124


Probably the Finest Known

467.

Cilicia, Mallos AR Stater. Circa 440-390 BC. Winged male deity (Kronos?) advancing right, holding solar disk with both hands / Swan standing left, MAP above, fish downwards to left; all within pelleted square border within incuse square. Casabonne Group 4; SNG France -; SNG von Aulock -; cf. BMC 12, pl. xvi, 8 (dotted incuse square, but grain kernel in place of fish); cf. Traité II 1399 = SNG Paris 378 (no square incuse or border, and ankh behind swan); SNG Levante -; Gemini IV, 209; otherwise apparently unpublished. 11.18g, 22mm, 1h. Near Mint State. Extremely Rare, perhaps the second known example. Beautiful early style, and in exceptional condition for this early series; very possibly the finest known example.

15,000

Mallos (archaically known as Marlotas) issued a rich coinage between the early fifth century and 333 BC, when it came under Macedonian hegemony, featuring Greek deities including Herakles, Aphrodite, Athena, Hermes, Dionysos and Demeter, as well as securely identifiable oriental deities such as Baal and Ahuramazda. The solar deity present on the obverse of this coin is sometimes identified as Kronos (a Semitic god more properly known as ‘El’, and distinct from the Greek Titan and father of the Olympian gods, but with whom he was syncretised by Greeks). This seems eminently logical, since the spiral - which Robert Graves called a ‘spiral of immortality’ (The White Goddess, 1948), a symbol of power most likely appropriated from the Red Crown of Lower Egypt - and solar disc attributes do not belong to any Olympian deity, but to one of near-Eastern origin. It has moreover been suggested that Mallos was originally of Phoenician foundation (see IACP, 1009) on the basis of its original ethnik, a suggestion supported by the presence of other Semitic deities portrayed on the city’s coinage, as well as the use of Aramaic legends. Curiously, the attribute of the solar disc is one with few parallels in the archaeological record. In a similar pose, a male solar deity is carrying a sun disc on a 6th century orientalising archaic Greek scarab from Cyprus, and an alabastron from the Isis tomb at Vulci, Etruria (suggested locations for its manufacture are Cyprus and Phoenicia) depicts a female carrying a winged sun disc. Possibly related also are Phoenician terracotta figurines from Punic sites holding a disc in front of them. In all cases a Semitic origin is apparent, further strengthening the likelihood that the deity of this coin should be the Semitic solar god Kronos.

125


3x

3x

468. Cilicia, Mallos AR Obol. Circa 440-390 BC. Bearded janiform head / Head (of Bellerophon?) left, wearing cap; MAP before; all in dotted square within incuse square. Cf. CNG 90, 23 May 2012, lot 642 (sold for $1,100). 0.59g, 8mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Slightly granular surfaces, lightly toned, of good style. Extremely Rare.

200

PHRYGIA

469. Phrygia, Kibyra AR Drachm. Circa 166-84 BC. Young male head right, wearing crested helmet / Helmeted and cuirassed horseman galloping right, wielding spear and shield; M and ΚΙΒΥΡΤΩΝ below. SNG von Aulock 3709; SNG Copenhagen 267. 2.89g, 17mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Struck in fine style and remarkably well preserved. One of the finest known. Very Rare.

500

Ex Giessener Münzhandlung 46, 30 October 1989, lot 303.

PONTUS Latest known stater of Mithradates VI, struck during the Third Mithradatic War

470. Kingdom of Pontos. Mithradates VI Eupator AV Stater. Struck in Parion, Bithyno-Pontic year CΚΣ, month A (= October 72 BC). Diademed head right / Stag grazing left; BAΣIΛEΩΣ above, MIΘPAΔATOY / EYΠATOPOΣ in two lines below; to left, star-in-crescent; CKΣ (year) above ΠAP (= Parion) monogram to right, A (month) in exergue; all within Dionysiac wreath of ivy and fruit. Unpublished in the standard references cf. for date: de Callataÿ 1997, p. 49. 8.35g, 19mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Unique and unpublished, a coin of great numismatic importance. The same year and monogram were previously known from just one tetradrachm (as recorded in Recueil Général).

5,000

The dating of this coin makes this the latest stater of Mithradates VI of which we are currently aware after the unique example dated two years earlier in October 74 BC (see Roma Numismatics Auction VII, lot 758). This unique piece was struck at Parion during the winter of 72/1 BC after the first engagements of the Third Mithradatic War (73-63 BC). Battered by the Roman armies under the consuls Lucullus and Cotta, who were sent by the Senate to quell the Pontic uprising, Mithradates used the break in hostilities to hastily rebuild his army. This issue then, would have been struck to pay mercenary troops to bolster his forces. This war, sparked when Nikomedes IV of Bithynia died without heirs in 75 and left his kingdom to Rome, would result in great devastation being wrought on Pontos, betrayal on the part of Mithradates son, Machares, who allied himself with Rome, and rebellion by another son, Pharnakes (see lot 765) who assumed control of the army and forced his father to commit suicide.

126


Stunning Last Issue of Mithradates VI

471. Kingdom of Pontos, Mithradates VI Eupator AR Tetradrachm. 67/66 BC. Diademed head right / Pegasos on ground line to left, preparing to lie down, BAΣΙΛEΩΣ above, MIΘPAΔATOY EYΠATOPOΣ below; star within crescent to left, monogram to right, date (year 231) below. De Callataÿ D77/R1a; Paris, BN, Pont 50 = Waddington 131; Burgan, 30 June 1984, 309. 16.44g, 32mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare - De Callataÿ recorded only two specimens. The examples presented here bring the known corpus up to just eight surviving coins.

5,000

Ex Roma Numismatics VII, 22 March 2014, lot 759 (sold for £12,000 but not paid for). The latest known tetradrachms struck by Mithradates date from the year 231 BE (67/66 BC), of which De Callataÿ found only three extant examples from two reverse dies. Struck at the height of the Third Mithradatic War, Mithradates had succeeded in regaining control of his kingdom of Pontos after a resounding victory at the Battle of Zela, in which the Romans suffered near catastrophic casualties and were routed, leaving 7000 dead on the field including 24 tribunes and 150 centurions. Despite this victory, Mithradates had only bought himself brief respite, as Pompey’s campaign against the Mediterranean pirates was brought to a close and he proceeded to take command of the war against Mithradates, reorganising the Roman forces and drawing on reinforcements from Cilicia, such that a force of some six legions was brought under his command. Pompey opened peace negotiations with Mithradates, naming his terms as a formal submission to Pompey’s authority and the surrender of a large number of Roman deserters who were now fighting on the Pontic side. Mithradates refused his terms, and forced onto the defensive, he made preparations to receive Pompey’s assault.

ARMENIA

472. Kingdom of Armenia, Tigranes II AR Tetradrachm. Antioch, 70-69 BC. Diademed and draped bust right, wearing tiara decorated with star between two eagles / BAΣILEΩΣ TIΓPANOY, Tyche of Antioch seated right on rock, holding palm; at her feet, river-god Orontes swimming right; monogram in inner right field, monogram on rock; all within wreath. Depeyrot, Armenia 29; Bedoukian 20. 15.87g, 26mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine.

2,000

From the J.T.B. Collection; Ex Gorny & Mosch 200, 10 October 2011, lot 2017.

PHOENICIA

473. Phoenicia, Arados AR Drachm. Circa 174-110 BC. Bee with straight wings, seen from above, monograms to left and right / Stag standing right in front of palm tree, APAΔIΩN to right. BMC 150-151. 4.16g, 19mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

127

500


128


Exceptional Sidon Dishekel

474.

Phoenicia, Sidon AR Dishekel. `Abd`aštart (Straton) I, dated regnal year 13 = 353/2 BC. War galley under way to left over zig-zag waves, III- (date) above, eight-rayed star over deck near stern / King of Persia and driver in chariot drawn by two horses left; behind, King of Sidon standing left, in Egyptian dress, holding cultic sceptre and votive vase; ‘B (in Phoenician) above. E&E-S Group IV.2.1.m, 1339 (D31/R33); Betlyon 23; Rouvier –; HGC 10, 242; DCA 849. 25.55g, 27mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. Exceptionally well detailed for the type.

15,000

Ex Elsen Liste 231, 2005, no. 104. The dishekels of Sidon are not particularly rare. They are however nearly uniformly poorly struck, or heavily worn, or both. This coin satisfies the conditions of being both comparatively very well struck on both obverse and reverse, and has evidently seen very limited circulation indeed, evidenced by the preservation of fine detail on both sides. It is therefore an extreme rarity within the series on account of its superlative condition and level of detail, unmatched by any of the examples present on CoinArchives, and far superior to the Millennia Collection example which sold for US$30,000 in 2014. This coin dates to the final year of the reign of Abdashtart I (or Straton, as he was known to the Greeks). One of his first acts as king was to reduce the weight of the dishekel by approximately 12%, while increasing its silver content from 72 to 99 per cent, primarily to safeguard confidence in the Sidonian currency which had in his father’s reign become increasingly debased. A complex figure, caught between East and West, Abdashtart was required to honour Sidon’s allegiance to the Persian Great King on the one hand, yet found himself personally drawn towards Greek culture on the other. Yet, despite increasing discontent amongst the Sidonians at Persian overlordship of Phoenicia, Abdashtart initially displayed the outward appearance of being a loyal servant of Artaxerxes II. Early on in his reign, Abdashtart was able to obtain a guarantee of safe passage for an Athenian embassy to Artaxerxes, for which favour the Athenians honoured him with a decree set in marble on the Acropolis, next to the Parthenon. Importantly, this decree granted favourable trading rights and exemptions from taxation in Athens to the Sidonians. Thanks to this decree he obtained for himself an image as a philhellene, an image he promoted further through lavish patronage of Greek artists and musicians he invited to his court from the cities of Ionia and the Peloponnese. Following the redating of the reigns of the Sidonian kings by J. Elayi (An Updated Chronology of the Reigns of Phoenician Kings during the Persian Period), it is now understood that Abdashtart was responsible for leading the Sidonian revolt against Persian overlordship that occurred in 356 BC, and which was swiftly suppressed the following year. Though he was not deposed, he was forced to surrender unconditionally and all of Phoenicia was placed under the supervision of the Persian agent Mazaios, who was made satrap of Transeuphrates. Abdashtart’s final years between 355 and 352 appear to have been difficult, and according to ancient sources it is likely he suffered a sudden and violent death.

129


CYPRUS Beautiful Evagoras I Stater

475. Cyprus, Salamis AR Stater. Evagoras I, circa 411-374 BC. Bearded head of Herakles right, wearing lion-skin headdress, ‘Evagoro’ in Cypriot script to right / Ram recumbent right, barley grain above, ‘Basileus’ in Cypriot and EV around; A to right. BMC 55 variant (rev. legend); SNG Copenhagen 47; Tziambazis 113. 24mm, 1h. Good Very Fine; very good metal and uncommonly well preserved for the type.

10,000

From an English collection; Privately purchased from A. H. Baldwin & Sons, 11 February 2006.

SAMARIA

3x

3x

476. Samaria, uncertain mint AR Obol. Circa 375-333 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Lion’s head facing. Meshorer & Qedar 162; HGC 10, -. 0.66g, 9mm, 9h. Very Fine. Toned. Very Rare.

100

KYRENAIKA

2x

2x

477. Kyrenaika, Euhesperides AR Drachm. Circa 470-44 BC. Silphium plant with leaves / Head of Zeus Ammon to right within circle of dots; all within incuse square cornered by E-[Y]-E-Σ (retrograde). SNG Copenhagen 1003 (these dies); BMC p. 110, 3 (these dies). 3.26g, 14mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare. Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 29, 11 May 2005, lot 243; Ex Münzen & Medaillen 88, 17 May 1999, lot 323.

130

6,000


Exceptional Kyrene Didrachm

478.

Kyrenaika, Kyrene AR Didrachm. Koinon issue, circa 250 BC. Diademed head of Zeus Ammon to right / Silphium plant with four leaves, ibex horn in upper left field; KOI-NON across fields. BMC 1; SNG Copenhagen 1275. 7.81g, 21mm, 12h. Good Very Fine - exceptional for the issue. Fine style. Iridescent toning.

5,000

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 84, 20 May 2015, lot 757. Kyrene was founded in 631 BC by Dorian settlers from Thera and their leader Battos, as instructed by the Delphic oracle. Around a hundred years later as the city grew in prosperity to rival even Carthage, Kyrene began issuing silver coins of archaic style on small, thick modules. Virtually all of the coins of Kyrene display the badge of the city and the principal source of its wealth - the silphium plant. It was described as having a thick root, a stalk like fennel, large alternating leaves with leaflets like celery, spherical clusters of small yellow flowers at the top and broad leaf-like, heart-shaped fruit called phyllon. The plant was valued in ancient times because of its many uses as a food source, seasoning for food, and, most importantly, as a medication. Perfumes were made from the flowers, the stalk was used for food or fodder while the juice and root were used to make a variety of medical potions. Aside from its uses in Greco-Roman cooking (as in recipes by Apicius), the many medical applications of the plant included use to treat cough, sore throat, fever, indigestion, aches and pains, warts, and it has even been speculated that the plant may also have functioned as a contraceptive, based partly on testimony from Pliny. The plant only grew along a narrow coastal area, about 125 by 35 miles. Much of the speculation about the cause of its extinction rests on a sudden demand for animals that grazed on the plant, for some supposed effect on the quality of the meat. Overgrazing combined with over harvesting and climate change led to its extinction. Pliny reported that the last known stalk of silphium found in Kyrenaika was given to the Emperor Nero as a curiosity. The city never recovered from the extinction of its principal export, and economic decline combined with a series of devastating earthquakes led to the abandonment of the city in the 4th Century AD.

131


EGYPT Ex Leu 28, 1981, and Demanhur Hoard, 1905

479. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy I, as satrap, AR Tetradrachm. Memphis, circa 323 BC. In the name and types of Alexander III. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, drapery about legs and waist, holding sceptre and eagle; AΛEΞANΔPOY to left, rose before, moneyer’s signature ΔI-O beneath. Price 3971. 17.24g, 25mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful style.

5,000

Ex Leu 28, 5 May 1981, lot 213; From the Demanhur Hoard of 1905. Alexander tetradrachms marked with the rose symbol and the letters ΔIO have long been admired as one of the most beautiful issues of his coinage. They were struck in Egypt, probably not long after Alexander’s death on 10 June 323 BC. Without Alexander’s leadership, and with no clear or legitimate heir to the vast empire he had created, Alexander’s generals fought amongst themselves and fractured the empire, dividing it into satrapies which they nominally managed on behalf of Alexander’s successor, his feeble-minded half-brother Philip Arrhidaeos. Ptolemy took Egypt, recognising its great potential. He initially retained Cleomenes, the caretaker Alexander had left in place in Egypt, as his deputy, though subsequently removed him on account of his many excesses and mismanagements, and appropriated the 8,000 talents Cleomenes had accumulated in his treasury. A part of this treasure was turned into new coin, like the present piece, and used to fund Ptolemy’s military ambitions.

480. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy I, as satrap, AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria, circa 309-305 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant skin headdress / Athena Alkidemos advancing right; AΛEΞANΔPOY to left, Corinthian helmet, monogram, and eagle standing on thunderbolt to right. Svoronos 162; SNG Copenhagen 29. 15.69g, 26mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

1,500

481. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria, circa 303 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant skin headdress / Athena Alkidemos advancing right; AΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to left, Corinthian helmet, monogram, and eagle standing on thunderbolt to right. Svoronos 165; Zervos Issue 27, obv. die 392; Jenkins, Early, Group e; SNG Copenhagen -; Weber 8227 (same obv. die). 15.57g, 30mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

1,500

From the J.T.B. Collection.

ARABIA

482. South Arabia, Qataban AR Tetradrachm. Uncertain ruler, circa 350-320 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet / ΑΘE, Owl standing right., head facing; behind, crescent and olive spray; in right field, royal Qatabanian monogram composed of South Arabian letter hl. Huth 344; van Alfen in CCK, pl. 20, 41. 16.62g, 24mm, 10h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

132

2,000


PERSIA Fleur De Coin

483.

Achaemenid Kings of Persia AV Daric. Time of Darios I to Xerxes II, circa 485-420 BC. Persian Great King or hero in kneeling-running stance to right, holding spear and bow; quiver over shoulder / Rectangular incuse punch. Carradice Type IIIb A/B. 8.41g, 15mm. Fleur De Coin. Easily the equal of, and in fact possibly superior to the specimen that sold for a record US$24,000 at Heritage in January 2016. 7,500 The ancient Greeks themselves believed that the term ‘dareikos’ was derived from the name of Darius the Great, an assessment that many modern scholars agree with. Others however have generally supposed that the Greek term can be traced back to old Persian ‘dari’ (“golden”) and that it was first associated with the name of Darius only in later folk etymology. Both suppositions may be equally valid. While the Persians had not traditionally used coinage, Cyrus the Great had introduced it to the Persian empire with the conquest of the Lydian Kingdom in 546 BC. The Lydian coinage series featuring a confronted lion and bull type was continued at first, but under the reign of the third Great King, Darios I, the Lydian gold stater was converted into a type bearing the stylised image of the Persian ruler or a hero, a type which would last with little modification until the conquest of Persia by Alexander in the 330s BC. One of the principal motivating factors behind this institution of an official Persian currency was the requirement to pay Greek mercenaries, who were accustomed to receiving payment in coinage, or for official use as bribes and subsidies. Indeed, nothing demonstrates the power of the gold daric more succinctly than when Sparta was waging an increasingly successful war led by Agesilaos II against Persia in Asia Minor (398-395 BC). Unable to defeat the Spartan army, the satrap Pharnabazos sent an Asiatic Greek by the name of Timocrates of Rhodes to distribute ten thousand gold darics in the major cities of mainland Greece and thus incite them to war against Sparta. Athens, Thebes, Corinth and Argos quickly entered into conflict with Sparta, precipitating a messenger to be sent to Agesilaos ordering him to return to Greece. The recall was a bitter disappointment to Agesilaos, who wryly observed that “but for ten thousand ‘archers’, he would have vanquished all Asia”.

133


484. Achaemenid Kings of Persia AV Daric. Time of Darius I to Xerxes II, circa 485-420 BC. Persian Great King, wearing kidaris and kandys, in kneeling-running attitude on exergual line to right, holding strung bow, and apple-tipped spear over right shoulder with point downwards, quiver at left shoulder / Rectangular incuse punch. Carradice Type IIIb A/B (pl. XIII, 27); BMC pl. XXIV, 25. 8.31g, 17mm. Mint State.

5,000

485. Achaemenid Kings of Persia AV Daric. Time of Darius I to Xerxes II, circa 485-420 BC. Persian Great King, wearing kidaris and kandys, in kneeling-running attitude on exergual line to right, holding strung bow, and apple-tipped spear over right shoulder with point downwards, quiver at left shoulder / Rectangular incuse punch. Carradice Type IIIb A/B (pl. XIII, 27); BMC pl. XXIV, 25. 8.32g, 16mm. Mint State.

5,000

486. Achaemenid Kings of Persia AV Daric. Time of Darius I to Xerxes II, circa 485-420 BC. Persian Great King, wearing kidaris and kandys, in kneeling-running attitude on exergual line to right, holding strung bow, and apple-tipped spear over right shoulder with point downwards, quiver at left shoulder / Rectangular incuse punch. Carradice Type IIIb A/B (pl. XIII, 27); BMC pl. XXIV, 25. 8.30g, 15mm. Mint State.

4,000

487. Achaemenid Kings of Persia AV Daric. Time of Darius I to Xerxes II, circa 485-420 BC. Persian Great King, wearing kidaris and kandys, in kneeling-running attitude on exergual line to right, holding strung bow, and apple-tipped spear over right shoulder with point downwards, quiver at left shoulder / Rectangular incuse punch. Carradice Type IIIb A/B (pl. XIII, 27); BMC pl. XXIV, 25. 8.29g, 14mm. Mint State.

3,000

488. Achaemenid Kings of Persia AV Daric. Time of Darius I to Xerxes II, circa 485-420 BC. Persian Great King, wearing kidaris and kandys, in kneeling-running attitude on exergual line to right, holding strung bow, and apple-tipped spear over right shoulder with point downwards, quiver at left shoulder / Rectangular incuse punch. Carradice Type IIIb A/B (pl. XIII, 27); BMC pl. XXIV, 25. 8.37g, 14mm. Good Extremely Fine.

2,000

489. Achaemenid Kings of Persia AV Daric. Time of Darius I to Xerxes II, circa 485-420 BC. Persian Great King, wearing kidaris and kandys, in kneeling-running attitude on exergual line to right, holding strung bow, and apple-tipped spear over right shoulder with point downwards, quiver at left shoulder / Rectangular incuse punch. Carradice Type IIIb A/B (pl. XIII, 27); BMC pl. XXIV, 25. 8.34g, 16mm. Extremely Fine.

134

1,000


KYRRHESTIKE Unique and of Considerable Historical Interest

490. Kyrrhestike, Bambyke-Manbog AR Didrachm. Circa 342-331 BC. Bearded Persian king seated left, wearing crenelated crown, holding upright lotus-flower or cup in right hand and raised left arm, before incense altar, above which, crescent; in right field, Aramaic legend: ‘atar’ateh / Biga advancing left, carrying driver holding reins and bearded and crowned Persian king with raised right hand; above biga, yod. 8.16g, 23mm, 6h. Unpublished in the standard references, for obverse type cf. Myriandros in Cilicia, obol, SNG Levante 183-4; for reverse type cf. H. Seyrig. “Le monnayage de Hieropolis de Syrie à l’epoque d’Alexandre” in RN 1971, pp. 11-21 and HGC 9, 1342, which is ultimately derived from Sidonian chariot types. Unique and of considerable historical interest. Very Fine, with golden highlights. Test cut to obverse.

2,000

Bambyke-Manbog was a temple state ruled by priests who recognised the authority of the Great Kings of Aštart (Hellenised as Astarte). Astarte’s most common symbol was the crescent moon, while the lotus-flower has long been associated with fertility and the cup of eternal life.

SYRIA

491. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Seleukos I Nikator AV Stater. Babylon, circa 311-308 BC. In the name and types of Alexander. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet ornamented with griffin / Nike standing left, holding stylis and wreath, BAΣIΛEΩΣ to left, AΛEΞANΔPOY, to right; MHP monogram in wreath at feet to left. Price 3749; Müller 732. 8.57g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Brilliant mint lustre.

2,000

492. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Seleukos I Nikator AV Stater. Babylon, circa 311-305 BC. In the name and types of Alexander. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin / Nike alighting left, holding wreath and stylis; BAΣIΛEΩΣ to left, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right, H at outer left, monogram within wreath in left field. Price -, cf. 3749 (MI instead of H). 8.54g, 17mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Rare, this variety not listed by Price. Fine style obverse.

3,000

Privately purchased from Spink, 30 June 1965.

493. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Seleukos I Nikator AR Tetradrachm. Struck in the name and types of Alexander. Babylon, circa 311-305 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding eagle and sceptre; in left field, MI above bee; monogram in wreath below throne. SC 82.2b; Price 3754; HGC 9, 10f; SNG München 795; Armenak 141. 16.79g, 25mm, 11h. Toned, Good Very Fine.

135

300


494. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Seleukos I Nikator AV Stater. Babylon, circa 311-300 BC. In the name and types of Alexander. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; H below left wing, monogram in wreath below right wing; BAΣIΛEΩΣ to left, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right. Price 3707. 8.57g, 17mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,500

495. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Seleukos I Nikator AR Tetradrachm. Susa, circa 300-294 BC. Head of Seleukos I right, wearing helmet covered with panther skin and adorned with bull’s ears and horns, panther skin tied around neck / Nike standing right, wearing peplos, crowning trophy of Macedonian arms set on sapling tree, from which branch sprouts near base; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ around, E-ΔI in fields. SC 173.11; ESM 413; Hoover 20 var. (different monograms). 17.10g, 27mm, 1h. About Extremely Fine.

5,000

496. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Demetrios I Soter AR Tetradrachm. Antioch, 152/151 BC. Diademed bust right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ, Tyche seated left on throne supported by Nike, two monograms to left; date ΑΞΡ (= 161) in exergue. SC 1641.6a; Newell, SMA 121. 17.03g, 29mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine. Lustrous metal.

1,000

497. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Kleopatra Thea and Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Ake-Ptolemais, circa 125-121 BC. Jugate heads right of Kleopatra Thea, draped and wearing diadem and stephane, and Antiochos VIII wearing diadem / ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ KΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ ΘΕΑΣ KAI ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANTIOXOY, Zeus seated left, holding Nike and sceptre; ΣY monogram to outer left. SC 2271.1; HGC 9, 1182g; DCA 252. 16.61g, 30mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

136

500


498

499

498. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Antioch, circa 121-113 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above, IE over A in left field, P to right; all within laurel wreath border. SC 2298.1; SMA 376. 16.50g, 31mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 200 499. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Antioch, circa 121-113 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above, IE over A in left field, P to right; all within laurel wreath border. SC 2298.2; SMA 369. 16.56g, 31mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. 200

500

501

500. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Antioch, circa 121-113 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above, IE over A in left field, P to right and on wreath tie; all within laurel wreath border. SC 2298.3; SMA 375. 16.61g, 29mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. 200 501. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Antioch, circa 121-113 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above, IE over AI in left field, A to right and k on wreath tie; all within laurel wreath border. SC 2298.4; SMA 371. 16.49g, 29mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 200

502

503

502. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Ake-Ptolemais, circa 121-113 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, M in field; all within laurel wreath border. SC 2335.2. 16.54g, 32mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Pleasantly toned. 500 Ex Rockefeller University / Dr. Alfred E. Mirsky Collection. 503. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Ake-Ptolemais, circa 121-113 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above, M in field; all within laurel wreath border. SC 2335.2. 16.47g, 31mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 200

504

505

504. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Ake-Ptolemais, circa 121-113 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above, M in field; all within laurel wreath border. SC 2335.2. 16.91g, 29mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. 200 505. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Ake-Ptolemais, circa 121-113 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above, M in field; all within laurel wreath border. SC 2335.2. 16.58g, 31mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 200

137


506

507

506. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Ake-Ptolemais, circa 121-113 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above, monogram in field; all within wreath. SC 2336.2. 16.43g, 30mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 200 507. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Damascus, dated SE 195 = 118/7 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above, two monograms to outer left; EQP (date) in exergue; all within wreath. SC 2323.1; LSM 97. 16.47g, 30mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 200

508

509

508. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Damascus, dated SE 196 = 117/6 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above, two monograms to outer left; CQP (date) in exergue; all within wreath. SC 2323.3; HGC 9, 1197f; DCA 266. 16.25g, 30mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 200 509. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Sidon, dated SE 197 = 116/5 BC. Diademed head right / Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ in two lines to right, ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ to left, ΣΙΔΩ ΙΕΡΑ monogram in three lines in outer left field, second monogram below, IQP (date) in exergue; all within wreath. SC 2330.2. 16.68g, 30mm, 12h. Very Fine. 300

FDC Tetradrachm of Antiochos X

510. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos X Eusebes Philopator AR Tetradrachm. Antioch on the Orontes, First Reign, struck 94 BC. Diademed head right / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOV EVΣEBOVΣ ΦIΛOΠATPOΣ, Zeus Nikephoros seated left, holding sceptre; monogram [above A] to outer left, monogram below throne; all within wreath. SC 2429.1c; HGC 9, 1287 corr. (without sideburn). 15.88g, 38mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. Lightly toned and lustrous.

1,000

ELYMAIS

511

512

511. Kings of Elymais, Kamnaskires III, with Anzaze, AR Tetradrachm. Circa 82-75 BC. Conjoined busts left of Kamnaskires and Queen Anzaze; monogram above anchor symbol behind; countermark: Nike standing left / Zeus seated left, holding sceptre and Nike, who crowns him, MAKEΔΩN before; IΛCIΛEΩC KΛMNΛIKIPOY KΛI IΛIIΛIICHC ANZAZH (BAΣIΛEΩΣ KAMNΣKIROY KAI BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ ANZAZHΣ) around, date in exergue. BMC 245/1; Alram 454. 16.51g, 27mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, struck on sound metal and exceptionally well preserved and detailed for the issue. Very Rare. 1,500 512. Kings of Elymais, Kamnaskires V AR Tetradrachm. Seleucia on the Hedyphon, Year 267 = 46/5 BC. Diademed and draped bust left, with pointed beard; star and anchor behind / Diademed and draped male bust with short beard left, legend around, date in exergue. Van’t Haaff p. 75, subtype 1-4. 14.28g, 28mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 750

138


BAKTRIA The Iconic ‘Heroic’ Portrait of Eukratides

513.

Greco-Baktrian Kingdom, Eukratides I ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Circa 171-145 BC. Diademed and draped heroic bust left, holding spear, wearing helmet adorned with bull’s horn and ear / The Dioskouroi on horseback right, each holding spear and palm; BAΣIΛEΩΣ MEΓAΛOY EYKPATIΔOY around, monogram to lower right. Bopearachchi 8B; SNG ANS 485; Mitchiner 179a. 16.99g, 34mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine. A superb example of this iconic type.

7,500

This remarkable tetradrachm of Eukratides I represents a pinnacle of Hellenistic numismatic portraiture. Depicting him in an unprecedented way as a helmeted warrior with a nude and muscular back, diadem ties flowing down it, and in a posture of preparing to strike with a spear or javelin. This image succeeds marvellously in evoking the romantic spirit of the by-gone golden age of Greek glory as embodied by heroes such as Leonidas and Epaminondas, who as tradition dictated, would fight in the front rank alongside their soldiers to lead and inspire by example. Such a posture was well known in Greek art and sculpture, being not only the typical stance of the Greek hoplite warrior, but also of the gods Zeus, Poseidon and Athena, most famously preserved in the form of the Artemision Bronze statue now in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens. Eukratides’ stance is also reminiscent of the coins of Demetrios Poliorketes and Diodotos I, who both issued tetradrachms featuring a naked Poseidon and Zeus, respectively, wielding their weapons in a similar overarm stance; there however, the whole bodies were shown. Eukratides’ use of this classic form to depict himself was an innovation that clearly made a lasting impression - the portrait type would be copied by successive Greek kings in India, and would later be adopted by several Roman emperors from the time of Septimius Severus onwards, as the role of the emperor became increasingly militarized in nature.

139


140


Beautiful Eukratides I Stater

514.

Greco-Baktrian Kingdom, Eukratides I ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Circa 170-145 BC. Diademed and draped bust right, wearing crested helmet adorned with bull’s horn and ear; all within pelleted border / BAΣIΛEΩΣ MEΓAΛΟΥ above, EYKPATIΔOY below, the Dioskouroi on rearing horses right, holding palm fronds and spears; monogram in lower right field. Al. N. Oikonomedes, ‘The Gold Coinage of the Indo-Greek King Eukratides I (171-155 B.C.),’ North American Journal of Numismatics 7.6 (1968), Group B; F.L. Holt, ‘Eukratides of Baktria,’ Coins, Cults, History and Inscriptions III: Studies in Honor of Al. N. Oikonomedes, pp. 72-76; Bopearachchi 5 var. (unlisted monogram); cf. Bopearachchi 7A (drachm); cf. SNG ANS 463 (monogram); MIG Type 176 var. (unlisted monogram); HGC 12, 129; Triton XVIII, lot 837 (same obv. die); Triton XIV, lot 428 (same obv. die); Triton VIII, 645 (same dies); Triton I, lot 618 (same dies); Tkalec (29 February 2000), lot 199 (same obv. die). 8.50g, 20mm, 12h. Near Mint State; lustrous.

50,000

The close die links (only one obverse die and two reverse dies) suggest that this issue was very limited and struck for a special occasion, no doubt at the same time as the fabulous 20 stater medallion weighing 169.2g now in the Bibliothèque Nationale in France, which is the largest gold coin to have been struck in antiquity. The occasion that merited such grand celebration was undoubtedly the victory over Demetrios of India and the conquest of the western parts of the Indo-Greek kingdom: ‘Eukratides led many wars with great courage, and, while weakened by them, was put under siege by Demetrios, king of the Indians. He made numerous sorties, and managed to vanquish 60,000 enemies with 300 soldiers, and thus liberated after four months, he put India under his rule’ (Justin XLI, 6). Eukratides was one of the last but most important Greco-Baktrian kings, responsible for the overthrow of the Euthydemid dynasty and for waging numerous campaigns against the Indo-Greek kings, temporarily holding territory as far east as the Indus. By the range, quantity and quality of his coinage, which included the above mentioned medallion, we can surmise that his was a reign of considerable significance and prestige. Eukratides was murdered on his way home from India, apparently by his son, who hated his father so much that he ‘ran with his chariot over the blood of his father, and ordered the corpse to be left without a sepulture’ (Justin XLI,6). The subsequent civil war between rival members of the dynasty, combined with external pressures from the Indo-Greeks, Sogdians and Parthians led to the ultimate collapse of the Greco-Baktrian Kingdom a mere fifteen years later, when it was conquered by the Parthians under Mithradates.

141


515. Greco-Baktrian Kingdom, Eukratides I ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Circa 170-145 BC. Helmeted bust of Eukratides right / The Dioskouroi on horses prancing right, each holding spear and palm; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΜΕΓΑΛΟΥ above, ΕΥΚΡΑΤΙΔΟΥ below, monogram in lower right field. Bopearachchi 6X; SNG ANS 472. 17.01g, 33mm, 6h. Mint State.

1,250

ROMAN PROVINCIAL COINS Caesonia, Fourth Wife of Caligula

516. Caligula and Caesonia Æ27 of Carthago Nova, Hispania. Circa AD 37. C CAESAR AVG GERMANIC IMP P M TR P COS, laureate head of Caligula right / CN ATEL FLAC CN POM FLAC II VIR QVINC SAL AVG, laureate head of Caesonia as Salus to right; SAL-AVG across fields. SNG Copenhagen 503; RPC 185. 10.64g, 27mm, 3h. Good Very Fine.

300

The reverse portrait has been traditionally identified, following Cohen, as Caesonia - the fourth and last wife of Caligula. This identification is disputed however by other numismatists who identify the portrait as either Antonia or simply Salus (without being an imperial personage in the guise of).

517. Nero BI Tetradrachm of Antioch, Syria. AD 63. ΝΕΡΩΝ ΚΑΙΣΑΡ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΟΣ, laureate bust right, wearing aegis / ΕΤΟΥΣ ΒΙΡ.Ι, eagle standing right on thunderbolt, wings spread, palm to right. Prieur 89; RPC 4189. 15.10g, 25mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Pleasing iridescent toning.

1,500

Ex Sierra Collection; Ex Ponterio 117, 18 January 2002, lot 326.

518. Galba AR Tetradrachm of Antioch, Syria. AD 68-9. AYTOKPATWP CEPOYIOC ΓAΛBAC CEBACTOC, bare head right / Eagle standing facing on opposed laurel branches, head left, wreath in beak, palm in left field; ETOYC B in exergue. Prieur 99; RPC 4197. 15.03g, 27mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

500

519. Domitian, as Caesar, Æ21 of Antioch, Syria. AD 69-81. CAESAR DOMIT COS II, laureate head left / SC within laurel wreath. BMC 253; Wruck 112. 6.36g, 21mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Desert Patina. Rare.

142

100


Antinous Eros, the New Dionysus

520. Antinous Æ34 ‘Medallion’ of Tarsus, Cilicia. Circa AD 134. ΑΝΤΙΝΟΟC ΗΡΩC, bare head of Antinous to left, star and uraeus above / AΔPIANHC TAPCOV MHTPOΠOΛEΩC NEΩ IAKXΩ, Dionysiac cista, ornamented with garlands and with its lid closed, on low base flanked by two thyrsoi and with a third behind, all linked by ribbons. SNG France 1422; Waddington -; Blum -. 22.37g, 34mm, 10h. About Very Fine. Of the highest rarity, apparently only the second known example; double the weight of the BN specimen, and the heaviest of all those recorded.

7,500

The Cult of Melikertes

521. Marcus Aurelius Æ28 of Corinth, Corinthia. AD 161-180. M AVR ANTONINVS AVG, laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder / CLI COR, Melikertes-Palaimon lying on the back of a dolphin swimming right; pine-tree behind. BCD Corinth -; BMC 611 var.; SNG Copenhagen -; Edwards -; F. Imhoof-Blumer and P. Gardner, A Numismatic Commentary on Pausanias, JHS London 1885-7, pp. 10-11, pl. B, I-II. 13.87g, 27mm, 10h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, and one of the best preserved of all Corinthian imperial bronzes.

2,000

Pausanias travelling to Corinth in the 2nd century AD observed: ‘In the Corinthian territory is also the place called Cromyon from Cromus the son of Poseidon. Here they say that Phaea was bred; overcoming this sow was one of the traditional achievements of Theseus. Farther on the pine still grew by the shore at the time of my visit, and there was an altar of Melikertes. At this place, they say, the boy was brought ashore by a dolphin; Sisyphus found him lying and gave him burial on the Isthmus, establishing the Isthmian games in his honour’. - Pausanias, Description of Greece 2.1.3, with an English Translation by W.H.S. Jones and H.A. Ormerod, London 1918.

143


522. Septimius Severus AR Tetradrachm of Laodicea ad Mare, Syria. AD 207-208. AYT KAI CEOYHPOC CE, laureate, draped bust right / ΔHMAPX EΞ VPATOCΓ, eagle standing, head left, holding beak in wreath, star between legs. Prieur 1140. 13.80g, 28mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

523

500

524

523. Julia Domna AR Tridrachm of Seleucia ad Calycadnum, Cilicia. AD 193-211. ΙΟΥΛΙΑ ΔΟΜΝΑ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΗ, draped bust right / ΣΕΛΕΥΚΕΩΝ ΤΩΝ ΠΡΟΣ ΤΩ ΚΑΛΥΚΑΔΝΩ, Tyche standing to left wearing Polos, holding cornucopiae, hand on rudder; C−Ε across field. SNG von Aulock 5828; SNG Levante 740; BMC 28 var. 7.32g, 25mm, 7h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 200 524. Julia Domna AR Drachm of Tarsus, Cilicia. AD 193-217. ΙΟYΛΙΑ ΔΟΜΝΑ CΕΒΑCΤ, draped bust right / ΤΑΡCΟY ΜΗΤΡΟ Α Μ Κ, Nike walking left, holding wreath and palm. SNG Levante 1030; SNG France -; BMC Lycaonia -; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock -; Prieur 783. 3.54g, 21mm, 7h. Minor flan crack, otherwise Good Very Fine. Lightly toned. Very Rare. 300

525. Caracalla Æ32 of Amasia, Pontus. AD 209. AV KAI M AVR ANTWNINOC, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right / AΔP CEV ANT AMACIAC MHT NEΠP, Tyche standing left, holding rudder & cornucopiae. BMC 28. 12.98g, 32mm, 6h. Very Fine.

200

526. Diadumenian, as Caesar, AR Drachm of Tarsus, Cilicia. AD 217-218. M OΠ ANTOΩNINOC KAIC, bareheaded and draped bust right / TAPCOV MHTPOΠ, Nike walking left, holding wreath and palm. SNG France 1556 corr. (obv. legend); BMC Lycaonia -; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock -. 4.84g, 21mm, 6h. Minor flan crack, otherwise Good Very Fine. Lightly toned. Extremely Rare.

750

527. Severus Alexander Æ34 of Amasia, Pontus. Dated CY 234=AD 231-232. AVT K CEOVHPOC AΛEΞANΔPOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / AΔ CEY AΛEΞ AMACIAC MH, eagle with wings spread standing atop altar; above, Helios in facing quadriga; tree to left of altar, ЄT CΛΔ (date) flanking eagle. SNG von Aulock 43 SNG Copenhagen 118. 22.56g, 34mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. An attractive, fine style portrait.

144

120


A Lost Statue Group of Aphrodite and Mars

528. Maximinus I Æ37 ‘Medallion’ of Tralleis, Lydia. AD 235-238. Aur. Faidreios, magistrate. AYT K Γ IOYL OYH MAXIMEINOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / EΠI ΓP AYP ΦAIΔPEIOY A TPAΛΛIANΩN, statue group of diademed Venus standing right wearing stola and palla with arms around Mars, nude but for crested helmet, standing facing, holding shield; cuirass on low column on right field ground line. F. Imhoof, Lydische Statdmünzen, Winterthur 1897, pp. 178-9, 38, pl. 7, 16. 23.63g, 37mm, 5h. About Extremely Fine. Dark green patina. Of the highest rarity; the only other known specimen is the one recorded by Imhoof in his collection.

5,000

Under the Antonines there was an increased interest in depicting both aristocratic and freed men and women in mythical guise. The models for such statuary groups in the round and in the relief undoubtedly belonged to courtly circles. Even though no extant groups or coins explicitly portray an emperor or empress as Mars and Venus, such examples certainly existed. We know from Cassius Dio (81-96) that Marcus Aurelius and Faustina minor were celebrated as Mars and Venus and that she was commonly represented as Venus. Hadrian and other emperors also commonly appeared in statues in the guise of Mars. Three Roman statue groups have survived of a man and woman depicted as Mars and Venus in which portrait heads were placed on bodies based on the 5th century BC Greek so called ‘Ares Borghese’ type with attributed to the sculptor Alkamenes, now in the Louvre (MA 866; LIMC II, Ares 23). He stands in a counter-pose (contrapposto), with his right leg advanced in front and his weight resting on the left leg. In his right hand he carries a shield or lance and on his head he wears a high crested helmet. The woman also stands in counter-pose to the male figure which ultimately derives from a 4th century BC Greek so called ‘Aphrodite of Capua’ type now in the Museo Nazionale Archeologico, Naples (LIMC II, Aphrodite 627), an earlier version of the celebrated Aphrodite of Milos type now in the Louvre (LIMC II, Aphrodite 645), and close to the Venus of Arles attributed to Praxiteles, also now in the Louvre (LIMC II, Aphrodite 526). The statue probably represented the goddess admiring her reflection in the reflective surface of Ares’ shield, a motif known on coins from Corinth. (cf. Corinth, Plautilla BMC 664-6), with most of its weight on one foot so that its shoulders and arms twist around from the hips and legs, giving the figure a dynamic and tender appearance. The earliest extant of these three groups was found on the Isola Sacra in Ostia and now in the Museo Capitolino, Rome (LIMC II, Ares/Mars 348). The woman is represented according to the Capuan Aphrodite type: she turns toward her husband and puts her left arm around his shoulders, unlike the Venus of Capua, she is clothed in a stola and palla. The man is nude, wears a helmet and short pallium and stands in the Ares Borghese counterpose. The woman’s diademed head is coiffure with its series of overlapping locks and bun at the back of the head, is comparable to that of Faustina II on coins and portraits in the round of about AD 147. The carving of the hair style and face of the man resembles the portraits of a young Marcus Aurelius in about AD 145. This group must date from AD 145-150. The second group, formerly from the Borghese Collection and now in the Louvre (LIMC II, Ares/Mars 350) depicts the woman, probably Sabina, represented in the style of the Capuan Venus, except that she is also clothed in a stola and palla. The man is heroically nude, save for helmet and balteus with parazonium, and stands in the Ares Borghese counter-pose with a portrait that has often been identified as Hadrian during the principate of Antoninus Pius and can be dated to about AD 150-160. The third and latest group was found in the so-called Basilica at Ostia, now in the Museo Nazionale, Rome (LIMC II, Ares/Mars 347) also represents a man and woman in the style of the Venus of Capua and Ares Borghese statuary group, but now the woman is partially nude and the man is again completely heroically nude but for helmet and balteus with parazonium. The carving style of this group suggests an unknown Roman and his wife in the time of Marcus Aurelian and Faustina II to Commodus and Crispina, circa AD 175-180. Although there is no consensus amongst scholars as to the identification of these three groups as celebrating imperial personages or high status wealthy members of Roman society emulating the conceit of mythological portraiture popular among the imperial circle, there are three other lesser works with very similar representations of the general Mars/Venus group theme: the ‘Concordia group’ high relief sarcophagus panel in Palazzo Mattei, Rome (LIMC II, Ares/Mars 351); a mint of Rome medallion of Faustina II (Gnecchi II, p. 39, 10, pl. 67, 8) and a rare mint of Rome As of Faustina II (RIC III, 1680; BMC IV, 999-1001).

145


529. Gordian III Æ23 of Seleucia ad Calycadnum, Cilicia. AD 238-244. ΑΝΤΩΝΙΟΣ ΓΟΡΔΙΑΝΟΣ ΣΕΒΑΣ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / ΣΕΛΕΥΚΕΩΝ ΤΩ ΠΡΟ ΠΟ [...], Europa, with veil billowing over her head, seated facing on bull charging to right, dolphin swimming right on waves below. SNG Levante -; SNG France -; SNG von Aulock 5843. 6.26g, 23mm, 12h. Fine patina, Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

300

530. Gordian III AR Tetradrachm of Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria. AD 238-240. AYTOK K M ANT ΓOPΔIANOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind / ΔHMARX EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing facing, head left, with wings displayed, holding wreath in beak; SC in exergue. Prieur 282. 11.50g, 28mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

400

531. Gordian III AR Tetradrachm of Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria. AD 238-240. AYTOK K M ANT ΓOPΔIANOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind / ΔHMARX EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing facing, head left, with wings displayed, holding wreath in beak; SC in exergue. Prieur 282. 13.38g, 29mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

400

532. Philip II AR Tetradrachm of Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria. AD 244-249. AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind / ΔHMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠATOΔ, eagle standing left holding wreath in beak; ANTIOXIA SC in in two lines in exergue. Prieur 473. 13.76g, 28mm, 2h. Good Extremely Fine.

146

200


COINS OF THE ROMAN REPUBLIC

533. Central Italy, uncertain mint Æ Currency Bar. Circa 6th-4th centuries BC. ‘Ramo secco’ pattern on each side. ICC pp. 26-7, 3; Garrucci pp. 5-8, pls. 7-11; Haeberlin pp.10-19, pls. 6-8; ERC III pp. 207- 212; CMRR p. 4, 2; Craddock, P.T. and Meeks, N. ‘Italian currency bars’, in Italian Iron Age Artefacts, J. Swaddling (ed.), London 1986, pp. 127-130; D. Neri. ‘Aspetti premonetali e monetali nell’Emilia centrale, aes signatum e moneta greca da Castelfranco Emilia’, in QAER 1, Bologna 1998; E. Pellegrini and R. Macellari, I lingotti con il segno ramo secco, considerazioni su alcuni aspetti socio-economici nell’area etrusco-italica durante il periodo tardo arcaico, Biblioteca di ‘Studi Etruschi’ 38, Pisa-Roma 2002. 1865.00g, 148 x 74 x 30mm. One of the finest known examples. Extremely Rare.

15,000

Ex Artemide 28, 10 April 2010, lot 1121; Published in The Collector’s International Magazine 12, Turin 1956, p. 59. From about the 6th century flat cast copper currency bars or ingots with a high ferruginous content appear, often bearing a cross-section design called by Italian numismatists ‘ramo secco’ (dry branch or twig). They appear in hoards throughout Italy and Sicily, with a concentration of finds in Etruria and the Padana, often together with aes rude lumps. They do not equate to a set weight standard and are usually found broken into subdivisions. Before denominated round coins were introduced in the early third century, all bronze transactions had to be weighed, and not counted, by dispensatoris (dispensers or cashiers). This manner of exchange necessitated the use of a balance and has left a rich legacy to the Latin language, e.g., expensa, inpendia, dependere, stipendia, aerarium, aestimare. Most striking of all was the formula per aes et libram (with bronze and balance), which was used to designate the formal ceremony of emancipatory contracts. All these terms lasted well beyond the introduction of struck coinage and have passed into modern languages. The Latin term aes signatum (signed or marked bronze) was used by Pliny (HN 33.13.43) for the cast currency bars supposedly issued by king Servius Tullius. These bars were frequently converted to aes rude. The term was misused by 19th and 20th century numismatists and has been avoided in this catalogue.

147


534. Cast Æ As. Rome, circa 235 BC. Diademed head of Apollo right; behind, bunch of grapes / Same type left. RRC 26/5 (acorn); ICC 54 (acorn); HN Italy 310 (acorn); Haeberlin p. 81, 1-7 pl. 33, 1-6 (Vine-leaf). 250.20g, 48mm, 12h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

15,000

Ex Artemide XXX, 9 October 2010, lot 116. The style of this rare issue is quite different from the common Apollo/Apollo series RCC 18/1, which led Haeberlin (pp. 80-81) to hypothesize that it was a provincial issue of Latium or Campania. Two find spots have been noted: Lake Nemi in Lazio and Nicotera in Calabria.

535. Cast Æ As. Rome, circa 235 BC. Head of Roma right, wearing Phrygian helmet with pinnate crest; behind, club / Same type left. RRC 27/5; ICC 58; HN Italy 318; Haeberlin p. 71, 1-22 pl. 28, 21-24. 258.80g, 46mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

4,500

Ex Artemide XXVIII, 10 April 2010, lot 1133.

536. Umbria, Ariminum Æ Biunx. Circa 264-241 BC. Head of Gaul right, wearing torque / Dolphin right; below, ŸŸ. HN Italy 5; ICC 232; Haeberlin p. 216, 1-31, pl. 77, 9-12. 67.30g, 29mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

4,000

Ex Artemide XXVIII, 10 April 2010, lot 1033. Ancient Ariminum (modern Rimini) was a city of the Ager Gallicus situated on the coast of the Adriatic close to the mouth of the rivers Ariminus (now Marecchia) and Apusa (Ausa) and about 15 km south of the Rubicon. Ariminum was at first of Umbrian and Gallic foundation (Strabo Geography 5.1.11) and became a Latin colony in 268 BC. In the 3rd century Ariminum, together with Arretium, was an important strategic stronghold in the line of defence of the Roman Republic against the Gauls of the Padana plain and Italy.

148


537. Picenum, Hatria Æ As. Circa 275-225 BC. Head of Selinus facing; in right field, H / Sleeping dog curled right; below, [H]-AT. HN Italy 11; ICC 236; cf. Haeberlin pp. 203-6, 1-67 and pl. 74, 7. 401.80g, 66mm, 12h. Very Fine, unusually good for this issue.

15,000

Ex Gorny & Mosch 169, 13 October 2008, lot 195; Ancient Hatria (modern Adri) was a city of the Ager Praetutianus, situated 20 km from the Adriatic Sea, between the rivers Vomanus (Vomano) and Matrinus (La Piomba). According to Livy (Periochae 11), ‘Hadria’ was a Latin colony from 290 BC and counted among the cities which offered aid to the Romans against Hannibal in 209 (Livy 27.10.7).

Pedigreed to 1895

538. Latium, Praeneste (?) Æ As. Circa 275-225 BC. Lion’s head facing, spear between jaws / Horse’s head left. HN Italy 249; ICC 254; Haeberlin p. 152, 16 = Sir Hermann Weber Collection, Forrer 1922, 224 (this coin). 247.34g, 68mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

8,000

Ex E. H. Bunbury Collection, Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, 10-14 June 1895, lot 210. Tentative identification of this remarkable issue to Praeneste (modern Palestrina) by most numismatists is based on find evidence provided by Garrucci (p. 22, 1) and Haeberlin (p. 151, 11). Praeneste was a very early Latin settlement 40 km south-east of Rome on Monte Ginestro, a strategic site facing the Alban hills, to which tradition gives various founders in the mythical period (Virgil. Aeneid 7,678). It became an ally of Rome after the battle of Lake Regillus in 499 BC, but opposed Rome in the Latin War and was eventually subdued by Cincinnatus in 388. Famous for its opulent Etruscan type tombs of the 7th century BC, the immense temple of Fortuna Primagenia and oracular sortes Praenstinae.

149


539. Northern Apulia, Luceria Æ Nummus. Circa 225-217 BC. Head of Apollo left; in left field, – . / Cock standing left. HN Italy 669; ICC 336; Haeberlin p. 1-36 pls. 64, 6-10 and pl. 65, 1. 209.40g, 49mm, 3h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

6,000

Ex Artemide XXVIII, 10 April 2010, lot 1008. Luceria was a settlement of the Daunii of considerable strategic importance about 20 km north-northwest of Foggia, which according to legend, like Arpi and Canosa, it dates to Diomedes, who carried the Palladium from Troy to the site (Strabo 6.264; Pliny 2.102). During the Second Samnite War it was an ally of Rome, to whom it gave aid following the disaster of the Caudine Forks in 321 BC. It became a Latin colony in 314 remained a steadfast supporter of Rome and during the Second Punic War became the winter quarters of the Roman army (Livy 22.9). The monetary unit at Luceria, (as at Teate and Venusia) was the nummus (CMRR, pp. 14-15). During the Second Punic War Rome produced coins at Luceria as an auxiliary mint (cf. RRC 43/1-2).

The Eucharius Collection of Roman Republican Silver Coins Formed, we are told, mostly in the 1950s and 60s, the Eucharius Collection comprises over 400 silver coins of the Roman Republic, including numerous rarities. Presented in this catalogue are 127 of the highest quality specimens; the remainder of the collection has been consigned to our E-Sales. Unfortunately the collector responsible for amassing this group is no longer with us, and the present owner wishes it to remain anonymous, so this beautiful collection has been named for the day on which it was consigned: December 8th, the feast day of Saint Eucharius.

540. Anonymous AR Didrachm. Rome, circa 265-242 BC. Head of Roma right, wearing Phrygian helmet, cornucopiae behind / ROMANO, Victory standing right, attaching wreath to long palm, YY in right field. Crawford 22/1; RSC 7. 6.55g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine.

500

From the Eucharius Collection.

541. Anonymous AR Didrachm. Rome, 234-231 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Horse prancing left, ROMA above. Crawford 26/1; RSC 37. 6.63g, 20mm, 12h. Very Fine.

2x

750

2x

542. Anonymous Æ Semilitra. Rome, circa 234-231 BC. Head of Roma right wearing Phrygian helmet / Dog standing right, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 26/4; RBW 51; HN Italy 309. 1.90g, 12mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

150

300


543. Anonymous AR Didrachm. Rome, circa 225-214 BC. Laureate head of Janus / Jupiter, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, in quadriga to right, driven by Victory; ROMA incuse on tablet below. Crawford 28/3; RSC 23. 6.74g, 24mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. Attractive old toning.

1,000

544. Anonymous AR Didrachm. Rome, circa 225-214 BC. Laureate head of Janus / Jupiter, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, in quadriga to right, driven by Victory; ROMA incuse on tablet below. Crawford 28/3; RSC 23. 6.61g, 24mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

750

545. Anonymous AR Didrachm. Rome, circa 225-214 BC. Laureate head of Janus / Jupiter, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, in quadriga to right, driven by Victory; ROMA incuse on tablet below. Crawford 28/3; RSC 23. 6.70g, 23mm, 6h. Toned. Extremely Fine.

750

Ex Classical Numismatic Group XXXII, 7 December 1994, lot 33; Ex Moreira Sale, Pt. 1, 31 May-1 June 1988, lot 1654.

546. Anonymous AR Quinarius. Apulia, circa 211-210 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, V behind / The Dioscuri on horseback to right, MT ligate below horse on right, ROMA in linear frame below. Crawford 103/2a; RSC 33h; King 27. 2.32g, 17mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. Scarce.

300

547. Bird and TOD series AR FourĂŠe Denarius. Rome, 189-180 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; X behind / Luna in biga right; bird and TOD below; ROMA in exergue. Crawford 141/1; RSC 35. 3.66g, 18mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Attractive old cabinet toning. From the Eucharius Collection.

151

150


548. C. Scribonius AR Denarius. Rome, 154 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; X behind / The Dioscuri, each holding spear, on horseback right; two stars above, C•SCR below. Crawford 201/1; RSC Scribonia 1. 3.86g, 18mm, 9h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautifully toned.

750

From the Eucharius Collection.

549. P. Cornelius Sulla AR Denarius. Rome, 151 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind / Victory in biga right, holding whip; P•SVLA (ligate) below, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 205/1; RSC Cornelia 1. 3.90g, 18mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine. Attractively toned and well centred.

150

From the Eucharius Collection.

550. Pinarius Natta AR Denarius. Rome, 149 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; X (mark of value) to left / Victory driving galloping biga right, holding reins and whip; NATTA (ligate) below; ROMA in linear frame below. Crawford 208/1; RSC Pinaria 1. 3.59g, 18mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine.

200

From the Eucharius Collection.

551. M. Atilius Saranus AR Denarius. Rome, 148 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, SARAN ligate behind, X below chin / The Dioscuri on horseback to right; M•ATILI below horses, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 214/1c; RSC Atilia 8. 3.87g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

500

552. Q. Marcius Libo AR Denarius. Rome, 148 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X below chin, LIBO behind / The Dioscuri on horseback to right, Q•MARC below horses, ROMA in linear frame below. Crawford 215/1; RSC Marcia 1. 3.88g, 21mm, 5h. Fleur De Coin. Struck on a broad flan and with a beautiful golden tone. Ex Roma Numismatics Auction III, 31 March 2012, lot 371.

152

1,500


553. C. Curiatius Trigeminus AR Denarius. Rome, 142 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; [TRIGE upwards behind], X (mark of value) below chin / Juno, holding reins and sceptre, driving galloping quadriga right, while being crowned by Victory flying right above; C•CVR below horses, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 223/1; RSC Curiatia 1. 3.75g, 19mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Lightly toned and lustrous.

150

From the Eucharius Collection.

554. Ti. Veturius AR Denarius. Rome, 137 BC. Helmeted and draped bust of Mars right; behind, denomination mark X and TI•VET (ligate) downwards / Two soldiers face each other, one bearded and without armour, one bearded and in armour; each holds a spear in left hand and with sword in right hand touches pig held by figure kneeling between them; above, ROMA. Crawford 234/1; RSC Veturia 1. 3.91g, 20mm, 7h. Near Mint State.

500

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 84, 20 May 2015, lot 777.

555. Ti. Veturius AR Denarius. Rome, 137 BC. Helmeted and draped bust of Mars right; behind, denomination mark X and TI•VET (ligate) downwards / Two soldiers face each other, one bearded and without armour, one bearded and in armour; each holds a spear in left hand and with sword in right hand touches pig held by figure kneeling between them; above, ROMA. Crawford 234/1; RSC Veturia 1. 3.91g, 20mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

250

556. Ti. Veturius AR Denarius. Rome, 137 BC. Helmeted and draped bust of Mars right; behind, denomination mark X and TI•VET (ligate) downwards / Two soldiers face each other, one bearded and without armour, one bearded and in armour; each holds a spear in left hand and with sword in right hand touches pig held by figure kneeling between them; above, ROMA. Crawford 234/1; RSC Veturia 1. 3.91g, 19mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Lustrous metal.

200

From the Eucharius Collection.

557. M. Baebius Q. f. Tampilus AR Denarius. Rome, 137 BC. Helmeted head of Roma left; [TAM]PIL behind, mark of value below chin / Apollo driving galloping quadriga right, holding branch, bow and arrow; ROMA below, M•BAEBI•Q•F in exergue. Crawford 236/1a; RSC Baebia 12. 3.97g, 18mm, 10h. Near Mint State. Lightly toned with golden highlights.

153

200


154


558. Cn. Lucretius Trio AR Denarius. Rome, 136 BC. Helmeted bust of Roma right; X before; TRIO behind / The Dioscuri riding right, each holding a couched lance, stars above; CN•LVCR below; ROMA in exergue. Crawford 237/1; RSC Lucretia 1. 3.93g, 18mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

250

From the Eucharius Collection.

559. C. Servilius M. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 136 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, wreath and XVI monogram behind, ROMA below / The Dioscuri galloping apart, with spears reverted; C SERVEILI M F in exergue. Crawford 239/1; RSC Servilia 1. 3.90g, 21mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine.

300

Ex Classical Numismatic Group 35, 20 September 1995, lot 493.

560. C. Aburius Geminus AR Denarius. Rome, 134 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, GEM behind, XVI monogram below chin / Mars in quadriga right; C•ABVRI below horses, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 244/1; RSC Aburia 1. 3.87g, 19mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractively toned; lustrous.

300

561. M. Marcius Mn. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 134 BC. Helmeted bust of Roma right; modius behind; XVI monogram below chin / Victory driving galloping biga right, holding whip in right hand and reins in left; M MARC ROMA divided by two stalks of grain below. Crawford 245/1; RSC Marcia 8. 3.91g, 20mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Bold iridescent tones.

750

562. P. Calpurnius AR Denarius. Rome, 133 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; XVI monogram behind / Goddess, crowned by Victory, in prancing biga right; below horses, P•CALP; ROMA in exergue. Crawford 247/1; RSC Calpurnia 2. 3.91g, 21mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

155

300


563. P. Maenius Antiaticus M. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 132 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, XVI monogram behind / Victory driving quadriga right, P•MAE ANT (ligate) below; ROMA in exergue. Crawford 249/1; RSC Maenia 7. 3.97g, 20mm, 8h. Extremely Fine.

250

From the Eucharius Collection.

564. M. Acilius M. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 130 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, M•ACILIVS•M•F• around within two dotted lines / Hercules, holding trophy and club, in slow quadriga right; ROMA in exergue. Crawford 255/1; RSC Acilia 4. 3.92g, 20mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful iridescent toning.

250

565. L. Caecilius Metellus Diadematus AR Denarius. Rome, 128 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; mark of value behind / Pax driving galloping biga right, holding olive branch, sceptre, and reins; below, elephant’s head right, wearing bell, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 262/1; RSC Caecilia 38. 3.86g, 18mm, 2h. Extremely Fine.

200

From the Eucharius Collection.

566. C. Servilius Vatia AR Denarius. Rome, 127 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; behind, lituus; before, star; below, ROMA / Battle on horseback between two warriors, the shield of horseman on right inscribed M; C•SERVEIL in exergue. Crawford 264/1; RSC Servilia 6. 3.97g, 18mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

156

300


567. Man. Acilius Balbus AR Denarius. Rome, 125 BC. Helmeted head of Roma left, BALBVS downwards to left, mark of value below chin, ROMA below; all within laurel wreath / Jupiter, holding thunderbolt in right hand and spear in left, standing in quadriga driven right by Victory, holding reins in left hand and whip in right; round Macedonian shield below; MN•ACILI in exergue. Crawford 271/1; RSC Acilia 1. 3.87g, 18mm, 9h. Good Very Fine.

150

From the Eucharius Collection.

568. M. Cipius AR Denarius. Rome, 115-114 BC. Helmeted bust of Roma right; M•CIPI•M•F before; X behind / Victory driving biga right, holding palm branch; rudder below; ROMA in exergue. Crawford 289/1; RSC Cipia 1. 3.95g, 18mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Old cabinet toning.

500

This moneyer has been identified with a certain Cipius who gave rise to the proverb ‘Non omnibus dormio’, and who was called “the snorer” because he pretended to be asleep in order to facilitate his wife’s acts of adultery.

569. M. Cipius AR Denarius. Rome, 115-114 BC. Helmeted bust of Roma right; M•CIPI•M•F before; X behind / Victory driving biga right, holding palm branch; rudder below; [ROMA] in exergue. Crawford 289/1; RSC Cipia 1. 3.96g, 18mm, 4h. Good Very Fine.

150

From the Eucharius Collection.

570. Mn. Aemilius Lepidus AR Denarius. Rome, 114-113 BC. Diademed and draped bust of Roma right, mark of value behind, ROM before / MN•AEMILIO•, equestrian statue standing right on triumphal arch, L-E-P in between columns. Crawford 291/1; RSC Aemilia 7. 3.92g, 18mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

157

200


571. L. Manlius Torquatus AR Denarius. Rome, 113-112 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, ROMA behind, X below chin, torque as border / Horseman charging left, L•TORQVA below, Q above, [EX S C] in exergue. Crawford 295/1; RSC Manlia 25. 3.86g, 18mm, 8h. Near Extremely Fine.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

572. Ti. Quinctius AR Denarius. Rome, 112-111 BC. Laureate and bearded bust of Hercules left, seen from behind, wearing lion skin across shoulders, club over right shoulder / Two horses galloping to left with desultor on the nearer horse, •G behind, rat to right below, TI - Q across; in exergue, D•S•S incuse on tablet. Crawford 297/1a; RSC Quinctia 6. 3.86g, 18mm, 5h. About Good Very Fine.

250

From the Eucharius Collection.

573. Appius Claudius Pulcher, T. Manlius Mancinus and Q. Urbinus AR Denarius. Rome, 111-110 BC. Helmeted bust of Roma right; quadrangular device behind / Victory in triga right, one horse looking back; T•MANL•AP•CL•Q•VR in exergue. Crawford 299/1a; RSC Claudia 2. 3.93g, 19mm, 4h. Extremely Fine.

200

From the Eucharius Collection.

574. C. Claudius Pulcher AR Denarius. Rome, 110-109 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right / Victory in biga right, C•PVLCHER in exergue. Crawford 300/1; RSC Claudia 1. 3.93g, 18mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

100

575. P. Porcius Laeca AR Denarius. Rome, circa 110-109. Helmeted head of Roma right; ROMA above, P•LAECA behind, X below chin / Figure in military dress left, with right hand raised; figure in toga to left, attendant with rods to right; PROVOCO in exergue. Crawford 301/1; RSC Porcia 4. 3.85g, 18mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

158

400


576. M. Herennius AR Denarius. Rome, 108 BC. Head of Pietas right, wearing diadem, PIETAS behind, D before / Amphinomus, walking right, carrying his father Nisos; M•HERENNI behind. Crawford 308/1a; RSC Herennia 1. 3.86g, 18mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

250

577. A. Manlius Q. f. Sergianus AR Denarius. Rome, 118-107 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, SER behind, ROMA before / Sol in facing quadriga rising from the waves of the sea, X and crescent above, XVI monograms in both fields, A•MANLI•Q•F below. Crawford 309/1; RSC Manlia 1. 3.88g, 21mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

500

From the Eucharius Collection. This bold and innovative reverse design uses the device of Helios in quadriga as an allusion to the East to recall the memory of the moneyer’s ancestor Cn. Manlius Vulso who led a victorious campaign against the Galatians in Asia Minor, concluded a treaty with Antiochos III of the Seleucid Empire, and returned to Rome laden with treasure. Manlius’ campaign was apparently widely regarded in the Senate as a wanton expedition for the gaining of plunder, and Florus reports that his request for a triumph was rejected, though Livy, who is greatly critical of Manlius’ actions, nonetheless describes a triumphal procession in elaborate detail, including its captives, wagon loads of booty and even the celebratory songs of the soldiery.

Two Very Rare and Well Preserved Sisena Denarii

578. Cn. Cornelius L. f. Sisena AR Denarius. Rome, 118-107 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, SISENA behind, ROMA before, [X below chin] / Jupiter in quadriga right, holding sceptre and reins and hurling thunderbolt, star on either side, head of Sol and crescent above, anguipede giant holding thunderbolt below, CN•CORNEL•L•F in exergue. Crawford 310/1; RSC Cornelia 17. 3.75g, 22mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine, minor scuff on reverse, but exceptional for type. Very Rare.

1,500

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 84, 20 May 2015, lot 783.

579. Cn. Cornelius L. f. Sisena AR Denarius. Rome, 118-107 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, SISENA behind, ROMA before, X below chin / Jupiter in quadriga right, holding sceptre and reins and hurling thunderbolt, star on either side, head of Sol and crescent above, anguipede giant holding thunderbolt below, CN•CORNEL•L•F in exergue. Crawford 310/1; RSC Cornelia 17. 3.89g, 20mm, 7h. Good Very Fine. Well struck on a broad flan, lightly toned. Very Rare, and extremely well preserved for the type. From the Eucharius Collection.

159

1,000


580. L. Memmius Galeria AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 106 BC. Laureate bust of Saturn left; O• before; ROMA and harpa behind / Venus driving biga right; Cupid flying above with laurel wreath; L•MEMMI.GAL in two lines in exergue. Crawford 313/1b; RSC Memmia 2. 3.95g, 20mm, 10h. Extremely Fine.

200

From the Eucharius Collection.

581. L. Thorius Balbus AR Denarius. Rome, 105 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; I•S•M•R. behind / Bull charging right, I above, L•THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue. Crawford 316/1; RSC Thoria 1. 3.86g, 19mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Lightly toned with golden highlights.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

Rare and Very Well Preserved

582. L. Appuleius Saturninus AR Denarius. Rome, 104 BC. Helmeted head of Roma left, H behind / Helmeted head of Roma left, L•SAT partially ligate behind. Crawford 317/1; RSC Appuleia 2. 3.91g, 18mm, 8h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare and in very high grade for the type.

500

583. C. Coelius Caldus AR Denarius. Rome, 104 BC. Helmeted head of Roma left / Victory driving galloping biga left, holding reins; CALD below, three pellets and P in exergue. Crawford 318/1b; RSC Coelia 3. 3.91g, 18mm, 11h. Extremely Fine.

200

From the Eucharius Collection.

584. C. Fabius C. f. Hadrianus AR Denarius. Rome, 102 BC. Turreted and veiled head of Cybele right, wearing single-drop earring and pearl necklace; EX•A•PV upwards to left / Victory driving galloping biga right, holding reins in left hand and goad in right; • over F below horses, and stork standing right; C•FABI•C•F in exergue. Crawford 322/1b; RSC Fabia 14. 4.06g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

160

300


An Exceptional Example

585. P. Cornelius Lentulus M.f. AR Denarius. Rome, 100 BC. Bust of Hercules right, seen from behind, holding club, shield in left field, K below pellet in right field, ROMA below / Roma standing facing, holding spear and wearing triple-crested helmet, Genius of the Roman People right crowning her and holding cornucopiae, K below pellet in left field, LENT•MAR•F in exergue, all within laurel-wreath. Crawford 329/1b; RSC Cornelia 25a. 3.78g, 19mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Exceptional condition for the type. Lightly toned.

1,500

586. L. Pomponius Molo AR Denarius. Rome, 97 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, L•POMPON•MOLO around / Numa Pompilius standing right, holding lituus behind lighted altar to which victimarius leads goat for sacrifice, [NVMA•POMPIL] below. Crawford 334/1; RSC Pomponia 6. 3.88g, 16mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Attractive old tone, some tiny corrosion spots.

250

From the Eucharius Collection.

587. C. Malleolus AR Fourrée Denarius. Rome, circa 96 BC. Helmeted head of Mars right; hammer above, star below chin / Naked warrior standing left, holding spear and placing right foot on cuirass; in field to left, trophy and on right, tablet inscribed P, C•MAL below. Crawford 335/3g; RSC Policia 7. 3.37g, 20mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine.

200

From the Eucharius Collection.

588. A. Albinus Sp. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 96 BC. Bust of Diana right, bow and quiver at shoulder, ROMA below / Three soldiers on horseback galloping left, each holding spear and one holding standard, fallen warrior before; A•ALBINVS•S•F in exergue. Crawford 335/9; RSC Postumia 4. 3.80g, 19mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

100

589. C. Allius Bala AR Denarius. Rome, 92 BC. Diademed female head right; BALA behind, C below chin / Diana in biga of stags to right, with quiver over shoulder and holding sceptre and reins in left hand and torch in right, scorpion below horses, C•ALLI in exergue; all within laurel wreath. Crawford 336/1c; RSC Allia 4. 3.98g, 17mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Some corrosion spots. From the Eucharius Collection.

161

250


590. D. Junius L. f. Silanus Æ As. Rome, 91 BC. Laureate head of Janus, mark of value above / Prow right, D•SILANVS•L•F above. Crawford 337/5; Sear 738. 13.46g, 29mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Dark green patina.

500

Privately purchased from Freeman & Sear in January 2006.

591. D. Junius L. f. Silanus AR Denarius. Rome, 91 BC. Diademed bust of Salus right, SALVS below, C before, all within torque / Victory in biga right; ROMA beneath; D•SILANVS•L•F in exergue. Crawford 337/2c; RSC Junia 18a. 3.84g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Pleasant old tone. Rare.

300

Ex Sternberg XXXII, 28-29 October 1996, lot 228.

592. D. Junius L. f. Silanus AR Denarius. Rome, 91 BC. Diademed head of Salus right, SALVS below, P below chin; all within ornamental torque / Victory in biga right, holding palm branch, ear below horses; D•SILANVS•L•F in exergue. Crawford 337/2f; RSC Junia 17. 3.96g, 18mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine.

250

From the Eucharius Collection.

593. L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi AR Denarius. Rome, 90 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right; H below chin / Horseman riding right, holding palm frond and reins; symbol above, L•PISO FRVGI and ROMA below. Crawford 340/1; RSC Calpurnia 12. 3.91g, 18mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Very attractive toning with golden highlights.

250

594. L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi AR Denarius. Rome, 90 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right; anchor behind, T before / L•PISO FRVGI below horseman galloping right, holding palm, staff below, P above. Crawford 340/1; RSC Calpurnia 8ff. 4.15g, 20mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin. Attractive iridescent tones on lustrous metal.

162

250


595. L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi AR Denarius. Rome, 90 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, XII behind / Naked horseman galloping right, holding palm frond, VI above, L•PISO•FRVGI and ROMA monogram below. Crawford 340/1; RSC Calpurnia 12. 3.96g, 20mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Attractive old tone.

200

596. Q. Titius AR Denarius. Rome, 90 BC. Bearded head of Mutinus Titinus right, wearing winged diadem, lock of hair falling down neck / Pegasus springing right on tablet inscribed Q•TITI. Crawford 341/1; RSC Titia 1. 4.09g, 18mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Well centred and struck. Lightly toned.

275

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Triton XVII, 7 January 2014, lot 522.

597. Q. Titius AR Denarius. Rome, 90 BC. Head of Liber right, wearing ivy-wreath / Q•TITI on a tablet from which springs Pegasus. Crawford 341/2; RSC Titia 2. 3.91g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Lightly toned and lustrous, with bold blue and violet highlights on the reverse. From the Eucharius Collection.

150

598. Q. Titius AR Quinarius. Rome, 90 BC. Draped and winged bust of Victory right / Pegasus right, Q•TITI below. Crawford 341/3; RSC Titia 3; King 44. 2.00g, 14mm, 1h. Very Fine.

100

From the Eucharius Collection.

599. C. Vibius C. f. Pansa AR Denarius. Rome, 90 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right; control mark below chin, PANSA behind / Ceres advancing right, holding lit torch in each hand; to lower right, pig advancing right; C•VIBIVS•C•F downwards to left; all within border of dots. Crawford 342/3b; RSC Vibia 6. 3.71g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Toned, some light iridescence. From the Eucharius Collection.

163

300


600. C. Vibius C. f. Pansa AR Denarius. Rome, 90 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, A below chin, PANSA behind / Minerva driving galloping quadriga right, holding trophy, reins and spear; C•VIBIVS•C•F in exergue. Crawford 342/5b; RSC Vibia 1. 4.02g, 20mm, 12h. About Extremely Fine.

300

Ex Hirsch 255, 14 February 2008, lot 1695.

Superbly Well Detailed Pansa Denarius

601. C. Vibius C. f. Pansa AR Denarius. Rome, 90 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right; control mark below chin, PANSA behind / Minerva driving galloping quadriga left, holding trophy, reins, and spear; C•VIBIVS•C•F in exergue. Crawford 342/4b; RSC Vibia 3. 4.09g, 18mm, 9h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive cabinet tone with iridescent highlights, and superbly well detailed - note the complete and well-rendered face of Minerva on the reverse. 250 From the Eucharius Collection.

Very Rare Pansa Denarius

602. C. Vibius C. f. Pansa AR Denarius. Rome, 90 BC. Mask of bearded Silenos right; control mark below, PANSA behind / Mask of bearded Pan right; control mark before, C•VIBIVS•C•F below. Crawford 342/1; RSC Vibia 8. 3.88g, 20mm, 6h. Very Fine. Light cabinet tone with golden highlights. Very Rare. Unusually complete for this issue, with nearly full legends. From the Eucharius Collection.

200

603. C. Vibius C. f. Pansa AR Denarius. Rome, 90 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right; X below chin, PANSA behind / Minerva driving galloping quadriga right, holding trophy, reins and spear; C•VIBIVS•C•F in exergue. Crawford 342/5b; RSC Vibia 1. 4.04g, 20mm, 5h. Near Mint State. Lightly toned. From the Eucharius Collection.

164

150


604. C. Vibius C. f. Pansa AR Denarius. Rome, 90 BC. Minerva driving galloping quadriga left, holding trophy, reins and spear; [PA]NSA in exergue / Minerva driving galloping quadriga right, holding trophy, reins and spear; C•VIBIVS•C•F in exergue. Crawford 342/6a; RSC Vibia 5. 4.05g, 19mm, 5h. Very Fine. Deep grey tone, areas of flat striking. Rare.

150

From the Eucharius Collection.

605. The Social War, Marsic Confederation AR Denarius. Aesernia, circa 89 BC. Laureate head of Italia left; behind, ‘Viteliu’ (= Italia) in Oscan characters / Soldier in helmet and cloak, standing facing, head right, holding reversed spear; left foot placed on a Roman standard; by his side, recumbent bull; in exergue, II. Unpublished variant, cf. Campana 136 (I in exergue); cf. HN Italy 407. 3.77g, 19mm, 5h. Very Fine.

1,500

606. The Social War, Marsic Confederation AR Denarius. Corfinium, 89 BC. Laureate head of Italia right, wearing pearl necklace; ITALIA behind, X (mark of value) below chin / Italia, seated left on shields, holding sceptre in right hand and sword in left, being crowned with wreath by Victory who stands behind; retrograde B(?) in exergue. Campana 105 (same obverse die); HN Italy 412a. 3.60g, 20mm, 8h. Near Very Fine. Cleaning marks to rev. Very Rare.

750

607. The Social War, Marsic Confederation AR Denarius. Bovianum(?), 89 BC. Laureate head of Italia left, VITELIV = ITALIA in Oscan script / Soldier standing facing, head right, foot on uncertain object, holding inverted spear and sword, recumbent bull to right facing; retrograde B in exergue. Campana 122 (same dies); HN Italy 407. 3.93g, 20mm, 3h. Near Very Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

300

608. L. Titurius L. f. Sabinus AR Denarius. Rome, 89 BC. Bearded head of King Tatius right, SABIN downwards behind / Victory in biga right, bearing wreath, L•TITVRI below; fish in exergue. Crawford 344/3; RSC Tituria 6. 4.09g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

165

150


609. Cn. Lentulus Clodianus AR Denarius. Rome, 88 BC. Helmeted bust of Mars right, seen from behind / Victory in biga right, holding wreath and reins, CN•LENTVL in exergue. Crawford 345/1; RSC Cornelia 50. 3.83g, 21mm, 2h. Extremely Fine.

200

Ex Triton VI, 14 January 2003, lot 663.

610. Cn. Lentulus Clodianus AR Quinarius. Rome, 88 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right / Victory standing right, crowning trophy, CN•LENT in exergue. Crawford 345/2; RSC Cornelia 51; King 47. 1.85g, 16mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

150

From the Eucharius Collection.

611. C. Marcius Censorinus AR Denarius. Rome, 88 BC. Jugate heads right of Numa Pompilius, bearded, and Ancus Marcius, beardless / Desultor, wearing conical cap and holding whip; below horses, pair of facing birds and in exergue, C•CENSO. Crawford 346/1d; RSC Marcia 18. 3.76g, 18mm, 7h. Near Mint State.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

Rare Censorinus Denarius

612. C. Censorinus AR Denarius. Rome, 88 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Horse galloping right, CX above, C•CENSORI below; serpent entwined staff in exergue. Crawford 346/2b; RSC Marcia 19. 4.08g, 18mm, 7h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

250

From the Eucharius Collection.

613. L. Rubrius Dossenus AR Denarius. Rome, 87 BC. Helmeted bust of Minerva right, wearing aegis; DOS behind / Triumphal chariot with side panel decorated with eagle on thunderbolt; above, Victory in chariot right; L•RVBRI in exergue. Crawford 348/3; RSC Rubria 3. 3.50g, 18mm, 8h. Mint State. From the Eucharius Collection.

166

300


614. L. Rubrius Dossenus AR Quinarius. Rome, 87 BC. Laureate head of Neptune right, trident over shoulder; DOS[SEN] behind / Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm frond; to right, garlanded altar with snake coiled round top; L•RVBRI to left. Crawford 348/4; RSC Rubria 4; King 48. 2.03g, 15mm, 8h. Very Fine.

100

From the Eucharius Collection.

615. Gargilius, Ogulnius, and Vergilius AR Denarius. Rome, 86 BC. Head of Apollo right, wearing oak-wreath; thunderbolt below / Jupiter driving quadriga right, wielding thunderbolt; OGVL (ligate) below, GAR•VE (ligate) in exergue. Crawford 350A/1c; RSC Ogulnia 1. 3.76g, 19mm, 10h. Very Fine. Rare.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

616. Vergilius, Gargilius, and Ogulnius AR Denarius. Rome, 86 BC. Head of Apollo right, wearing oak wreath; thunderbolt below / Jupiter, hurling thunderbolt, driving quadriga right; control letter (Q?) above, VER below, GAR•OGVL (ligate) in exergue. Crawford 350A/1e; RSC Vergilia 1. 3.92g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine. Rare.

150

From the Eucharius Collection.

617. L. Julius Bursio AR Denarius. Rome, 85 BC. Male head right with attributes of Apollo, Mercury and Neptune, control mark behind / Victory in quadriga right, EX•A•P in exergue. Crawford 352/1b; RSC Julia 6. 3.96g, 18mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Faint Φ graffito under tone on obv. Very Rare, six examples on CoinArchives.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

618. Mn. Fonteius C. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 85 BC. Laureate head of Veiovis (or Apollo) right; MN•FONTEI behind, C•F before / Infant winged Genius (or Cupid) seated on goat standing right; pilei of the Dioscuri on either side, thyrsus with fillet in exergue; all within laurel wreath. Crawford 353/1d; RSC Fonteia 11. 3.87g, 18mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

167

150


619. C. Norbanus AR Denarius. Rome, 83 BC. Head of Venus right, wearing stephane, earring, and necklace; below, C•NORBANVS; behind, VII / Prow-stem, fasces with axe, caduceus and corn ear. Crawford 357/1a; RSC Norbana 1. 3.92g, 19mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Well centred and struck on a large flan.

400

From the Eucharius Collection.

620. C. Norbanus AR Denarius. Rome, 83 BC. Diademed bust of Venus right; CLXXIIII behind; C•NORBANVS below / Corn ear, fasces and caduceus. Crawford 357/1b; RSC Norbana 2. 3.94g, 20mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine. Pleasant golden toning.

300

621. C. Mamilius Limetanus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 82 BC. Bust of Mercury right, draped and wearing winged petasos, caduceus and M behind / Ulysses standing right, holding staff in left hand and extending right hand to Argus, C•MAMIL LIMETAN around. Crawford 362/1; RSC Mamilia 6. 4.11g, 21mm, 8h. Good Very Fine.

400

622. L. Censorinus AR Denarius. Rome, 82 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Marsyas standing left, holding wineskin over shoulder; to right, column surmounted by statue of Minerva (?) standing left; L•CENSOR downwards to left. Crawford 363/1d; RSC Marcia 24. 3.60g, 17mm, 3h. Mint State.

500

From the Eucharius Collection.

623. Q. Antonius Balbus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 83-82 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right; S•C behind neck / Victory driving quadriga right, holding reins, wreath, and palm frond; E below; Q•ANTO•BALB PR in two lines in exergue. Crawford 364/1d; RSC Antonia 1. 3.83g, 19mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

168

200


624. C. Valerius Flaccus AR Denarius. Massalia, 82 BC. Draped and winged bust of Victory right; P behind head / Legionary eagle between two standards inscribed H (Hastati) and P (Principes); C•VAL•FLA (ligate) upwards to left, IMPERAT upwards to right, EX• S•C below. Crawford 365/1b; RSC Valeria 12b. 3.97g, 17mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned with hints of iridescence.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

625. C. Valerius Flaccus AR Denarius. Massalia, 82 BC. Draped and winged bust of Victory right; tripod behind head / Legionary eagle between two standards inscribed H (Hastati) and P (Principes); C•VAL•FLA (ligate) upwards to left, IMPERAT upwards to right, EX• S•C below. Crawford 365/1a; RSC Valeria 12. 3.66g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Pleasing iridescent toning.

300

626. C. Annius T. f. T. n. and L. Fabius Hispaniensis AR Denarius. North Italy and Spain, 82-81 BC. C•ANNI•T•F•T•N•PRO•COS•EX•S•C•, diademed and draped female bust right; control-letter N below / Victory driving quadriga right, holding reins and palm-branch; above, Q; L•FABI•L•F•HISP in exergue. Crawford 366/2a; RSC Annia 3. 3.86g, 20mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

200

From the Eucharius Collection.

627. L. Manlius and L. Cornelius Sulla AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Sulla, 82 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, L•MANLI before, PRO•Q. behind / Sulla in quadriga right, L•SVLLA•IM in exergue. Crawford 367/5; RSC Manlia 4. 3.96g, 18mm, 10h. Extremely Fine.

750

From the Eucharius Collection.

628. L. Cornelius Sulla Felix, as Dictator, AR Denarius. Italy, 81 BC. Diademed head of Venus right, wearing single-pendant earring and necklace / Filleted double cornucopiae; Q below. Crawford 375/2; RSC Cornelia 33. 3.66g, 19mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

Ex SKA 3, 19 April 1985, lot 357. While Sulla’s enemy Marius claimed Apollo as his divine patron, Sulla himself invoked the goddess Venus, and consequently she appears on the obverse of his coinage. The double cornucopiae is an attribute of Fortuna and may allude to Sulla’s cognomen, Felix, but it likely also suggests that this issue was intended to defray the expenses of some special largesse of grain - the inhabitants of Rome must have badly needed some such assistance after the recent struggle.

169


629. L. Cornelius Sulla Felix, as Dictator, AR Denarius. Italy, 81 BC. Diademed head of Venus right, wearing single-pendant earring and necklace / Filleted double cornucopiae; Q below. Crawford 375/2; RSC Cornelia 33. 4.23g, 21mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

500

630. L. Volteius L. f. Strabo AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 81 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right; L behind / Europa seated on bull charging left, holding veil which billows overhead; thunderbolt behind, vine leaf below; L•VLO•L•F•STRAB in exergue. Crawford 377/1; RSC Volteia 6. 3.87g, 19mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

750

From the Eucharius Collection.

631. L. Procilius AR Denarius. Rome, 80 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right, S•C behind / Juno Sospita advancing right, hurling spear and holding shield decorated with thunderbolt; L•PROCILI•F downwards to left, serpent to right. Crawford 379/1; RSC Procilia 1. 3.95g, 18mm, 2h. Good Very Fine.

200

From the Eucharius Collection.

632. C. Naevius Balbus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Diademed bust of Venus right; S•C behind / Victory in triga right, holding reins in both hands; C•NAE•BALB in exergue. Crawford 382/1a; RSC Naevia 6b. 4.04g, 18mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine.

150

From the Eucharius Collection.

633. Ti. Claudius Ti. f. Ap. n. Nero AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Diademed and draped bust of Diana right, with bow and quiver over shoulder; S•C before / Victory driving galloping biga right, holding reins, palm frond and wreath; control mark below; TI•CLAVD•TI•F in exergue. Crawford 383/1; RSC Claudia 6. 3.66g, 18mm, 8h. Good Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

170

250


634. L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; butterfly behind / Griffin leaping right, bee below; L• PAPI in exergue. Crawford 384/1 (symbols 15); RSC Papia 1. 3.94g, 19mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

500

From the Eucharius Collection.

635. M. Volteius M. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 75 BC. Laureate, helmeted, and draped bust of Attis right; helmet behind / Cybele driving biga of lions to right; ΠΓ above, M•VOLTEI•M•F in exergue. Crawford 385/4; RSC Volteia 4. 4.14g, 18mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Attractive golden tone.

200

From the Eucharius Collection.

636. M. Volteius M. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 75 BC. Laureate and bearded head of Jupiter right / Tetrastyle Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, winged thunderbolt in pediment; M•VOLTEI•M•F in exergue. Crawford 385/1; RSC Volteia 1. 4.17g, 18mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine. Light VI graffito on obv.

200

From the Eucharius Collection.

637. L. Lucretius Trio AR Denarius. Rome, 74 BC. Laureate head of Neptune right, trident at shoulder and control number above / Infant Genius riding dolphin right; L•LVCRETI TRIO in two lines below. Crawford 390/2; RSC Lucretia 3. 3.81g, 19mm, 8h. About Extremely Fine.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

638. L. Lucretius Trio AR Denarius. Rome, 74 BC. Radiate head of Sol right / Crescent moon surrounded by seven stars, TRIO above, L•LVCRETI below. Crawford 390/1; RSC Lucretia 2. 3.97g, 19mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

171

300


639. L. Farsuleius Mensor AR Denarius. Rome, 75 BC. Diademed and draped bust of Libertas right; MENSOR before, S•C and pileus behind / Roma in biga assisting togate figure to mount into the chariot; control numeral below horses; L•FARSVLEI in exergue. Crawford 392/1a; RSC Farsuleia 1. 3.92g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

750

640. Cn. Lentulus AR Denarius. Spanish(?) mint, 76-75 BC. Diademed and draped bust of Genius Populi Romani right; sceptre over shoulder; G•P•R above / Sceptre with wreath, globe and rudder; EX to left, S•C to right, LENT•CVR (monogram) •FL in exergue. Crawford 393/1a; RSC Cornelia 54. 3.92g, 17mm, 9h. Good Extremely Fine, attractively toned.

250

From the Eucharius Collection.

641. C. Postumius AR Denarius. Rome, 74 BC. Draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder / Hound running right, spear below, C•POSTVMI and TA monogram in exergue. Crawford 394/1a; RSC Postumia 9. 4.03g, 18mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

642. L. Plaetorius L. f. Cestianus AR Denarius. Rome, 74 BC. Draped and diademed bust of Juno Moneta right; MONETA behind; S•C below chin / Victorious boxer running right, holding caestus and palm-branch over shoulder; L•PLAETORI behind; L•F•Q•S•C before. Crawford 396/1a; RSC Plaetoria 2. 3.77g, 19mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. A very attractive example of the type. Rare.

750

From the Eucharius Collection.

643. Q. Fufius Kalenus and Mucius Cordus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 70 BC. Jugate heads right of Honos, laureate, and Virtus, wearing crested helmet; KALENI below; HO behind; VIRT before / Italia standing right, holding cornucopiae, and Roma standing left, foot on globe and holding sceptre, clasping hands; winged caduceus and ITAL behind Italia, RO behind Roma, CORDI in exergue. Crawford 403/1; RSC Fufia 1. 3.93g, 20mm, 4h. Near Mint State. From the Eucharius Collection.

172

500


644. T. Vettius Sabinus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 70 BC. Bareheaded and bearded head of King Tatius right; SABINVS behind, S•C before, TA monogram (for Tatius) below chin / Togate figure, holding reins and magistrate’s sceptre, driving biga left; IVDEX above, stalk of grain to right, T•VETTIVS in exergue. Crawford 404/1; RSC Vettia 2. 4.00g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Toned and lustrous.

500

645. T. Vettius Sabinus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 70 BC. Bareheaded and bearded head of King Tatius right; SABINVS behind, S•C before, TA monogram (for Tatius) below chin / Togate figure, holding reins and magistrate’s sceptre, driving biga left; IVDEX above, stalk of grain to right, T•VETTIVS in exergue. Crawford 404/1; RSC Vettia 2. 3.95g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Pleasantly toned.

250

From the Eucharius Collection.

646. M. Plaetorius M. f. Cestianus AR Denarius. Rome, 69 BC. Draped bust of Fortuna right, wheel as symbol behind / Half-length bust of Sors facing, head slightly right; tablet inscribed SORS below, M•PLAETORI CEST•S•C around. Crawford 405/2 (table XXXIX); RSC Plaetoria 10. 3.49g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Some areas of flat striking. Rare.

750

From the Eucharius Collection.

647. M. Plaetorius M. f. Cestianus AR Denarius. Rome, 69 BC. Draped bust of Fortuna right, pedum as symbol behind / Half-length bust of Sors facing, head slightly right; tablet inscribed SORS below, M•PLAETORI CEST•S•C around. Crawford 405/2 (table XXXIX); RSC Plaetoria 10. 4.11g, 18mm, 8h. Near Extremely Fine. Very well centred and preserved, with good detail on reverse, including the facial area which is usually worn. Attractively toned. Rare. 750

648. Q. Pomponius Musa AR Denarius. Rome, 66 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, scroll behind / Clio left, holding scroll in right hand and resting left elbow on column; Q•POMPONI downwards to right, MVSA downwards to left. Crawford 410/3; RSC Pomponia 11. 4.27g, 19mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone.

173

750


649. Q. Pomponius Musa AR Denarius. Rome, 66 BC. Laureate bust of Apollo right; two crossed flutes behind / Euterpe, the Muse of Lyric Poetry, standing right, supporting chin with arm resting on column to right, and holding two tibiae (a form of flute); Q•POMPONI behind; MVSA before. Crawford 410/5; RSC Pomponia 13. 3.97g, 18mm, 3h. Good Very Fine.

500

From the Eucharius Collection.

650. Q. Pomponius Musa AR Denarius. Rome, 66 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, scroll behind / Clio left, holding scroll in right hand and resting left elbow on column; Q•POMPONI downwards to right, MVSA downwards to left. Crawford 410/3; RSC Pomponia 11. 3.99g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

500

From the Eucharius Collection.

651. Q. Pomponius Musa AR Denarius. Rome, 66 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right; lyre key (plectrum) behind / Calliope, Muse of Epic Poetry, standing right, plying lyre held on low column; Q•POMPONI downwards to left, MVSA downwards to right. Crawford 410/2b; RSC Pomponia 10. 3.96g, 17mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

652. L. Manlius Torquatus AR Denarius. Rome, 65 BC. Ivy-wreathed head of Sybil right, [SIBYLLA] below neck truncation / L•TORQVAT III•VIR, tripod on which stands amphora flanked by two stars; all within torque. Crawford 411/1b; RSC Manlia 12. 3.93g, 16mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

500

From the Eucharius Collection.

653. L. Furius Brocchus AR Denarius. Rome, 63 BC. III VIR BROCCHI, bust of Ceres right, between wheat-ear and barley corn / L•FVRI CN•F, curule chair between fasces. Crawford 414/1; RSC Furia 23. 3.86g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful iridescent toning.

174

250


Very Rare Aemilius Lepidus Denarius

654. L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus and L. Scribonius Libo AR Denarius. Rome, 62 BC. Veiled and diademed bust of Concordia right; PAVLLVS•LEPIDVS CONCORD around / Puteal Scribonianum, garlanded, ornamented with lyres, tongs at base; PVTEAL•SCRIBON around, LIBO in exergue. Crawford 417/1b; RSC 11a. 3.84g, 20mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful old tone.

300

655. M. Piso M. f. Frugi AR Denarius. Rome, 61 BC. Terminal bust of Mercury right; star behind; wreath in left field; calyx in right field / M•PISO•M•F FRVGI, in two lines above secespita and patera; all within wreath. Crawford 418/2b; RSC Calpurnia 23. 4.04g, 18mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

750

From the Eucharius Collection.

656. M. Aemilius Lepidus AR Denarius. Rome, 61 BC. Turreted head of Alexandria right, ALEX[ANDREA] below / Lepidus standing left, crowning Ptolemy V, who stands facing holding sceptre; PONF•MAX•TVTOR•REG around, M•LEPIDVS in exergue. Crawford 419/2; RSC Aemilia 23. 4.00g, 19mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Attractively toned. Rare.

750

From the Eucharius Collection.

657. M. Aemilius Lepidus AR Denarius. Rome, 61 BC. Laureate and diademed female bust right / Horseman right, carrying trophy over shoulder, M•LEPIDVS in exergue. Crawford 419/1b; RSC Aemilia 22. 3.71g, 18mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. Lightly toned. Rare.

500

658. M. Aemilius Lepidus AR Denarius. Rome, 61 BC. Laureate and diademed female bust right / Horseman right, carrying trophy over shoulder; AN•XV•PR•H•O•C•S• around; M•LEPIDVS in exergue. Crawford 419/1b; RSC Aemilia 22. 3.74g, 18mm, 7h. Good Very Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

175

300


659. P. Plautius Hypsaeus AR Denarius. Rome, 60 BC. Draped bust of Leuconoë right, pearled band in hair, wearing earring and necklace, dolphin swimming downward to left; P•YPSAE•S•C to right / Jupiter, holding reins in right hand, throwing thunderbolt in left, driving quadriga left; CEPIT upwards behind, C•YPSAE•COS PRIV in two lines in exergue. Crawford 420/2a; RSC Plautia 12. 3.81g, 20mm, 8h. Near Extremely Fine. Well centred and struck on a large flan.

400

From the Eucharius Collection.

660. P. Plautius Hypsaeus AR Denarius. Rome, 60 BC. Draped bust of Leuconoë right, pearled band in hair, wearing earring and necklace, dolphin swimming downward to left; P•YPSAE•S•C to right / Jupiter, holding reins in right hand, throwing thunderbolt in left, driving quadriga left; CEPIT upwards behind, C•YPSAE•COS PRIV in two lines in exergue. Crawford 420/2a; RSC Plautia 12. 3.75g, 18mm, 2h.3.75g, 18mm, 2h. Good Extremely Fine. Slightly off-centre, but lustrous and far more beautiful in hand.

400

661. P. Plautius Hypsaeus AR Denarius. Rome, 60 BC. Head of Neptune right, wreathed in seaweed, trident behind; P•YPSAE•S•C• before / Jupiter, holding reins in right hand, throwing thunderbolt in left, driving quadriga left; CEPIT upwards behind, C•YPSAE•COS PRIV in two lines in exergue. Crawford 420/1a; RSC Plautia 11. 3.92g, 18mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Banker’s mark on obv. From the Eucharius Collection.

250

662. M. Nonius Sufenas AR Denarius. Rome, 59 BC. Bearded head of Saturn right; harpa and baetyl behind, SVFENAS before / Roma seated left on cuirass and shields, holding sceptre and sword, crowned by Victory standing left, holding palm frond; PR•L•V•P•F around, SEX•NONI in exergue. Crawford 421/1; RSC Nonia 1. 3.86g, 18mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. Attractive old toning.

150

From the Eucharius Collection.

663. M. Aemilius Scaurus and P. Plautius Hypsaeus AR Denarius. Rome, 58 BC. M•SCAVR AED•CVR, kneeling figure right (King Aretas of Nabataea), holding olive branch and reins of camel beside him; EX on left; S•C on right; REX•ARETAS in exergue / P•HVPSAE AED•CVR, Jupiter in quadriga left, holding reins in left hand and hurling thunderbolt with right; scorpion below horses; CAPTV on right; C•HVPSAE•COS PREIVE in exergue. Crawford 422/1b; RSC Aemilia 8 and Plautia 8. 3.92g, 18mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

176

150


664. M. Aemilius Scaurus and P. Plautius Hypsaeus AR Denarius. Rome, 58 BC. M•SCAVR AED•CVR, kneeling figure right (King Aretas of Nabataea), holding olive branch and reins of camel beside him; EX on left; S•C on right; REX ARETAS in exergue / P•HVPSAE AED•CVR, Jupiter in quadriga left, holding reins in left hand and hurling thunderbolt with right; scorpion below horses; CAPTV on right; C•HVPSAE•COS PREIVE in exergue. Crawford 422/1b; RSC Aemilia 8 and Plautia 8. 4.10g, 20mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Attractively toned.

100

665. C. Servilius C. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 57 BC. FLORA•PRIMVS, head of Flora right, wearing flower-wreath, lituus behind / Two soldiers standing confronted, each holding a shield and upright short sword, C•F in lower right field; C•SERVEIL in exergue. Crawford 423/1; RSC Servilia 15. 4.08g, 19mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine.

250

From the Eucharius Collection.

666. C. Considius Nonianus AR Denarius. Rome, 57 BC. Laureate and diademed bust of Venus right; [C•CONSIDI•N]ONIANI downwards behind, S•C before / Temple on summit of rocky mountain surrounded by wall with towers on each side and gate in centre; ERVC above gate. Crawford 424/1; RSC Considia 1a. 3.95g, 19mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

250

From the Eucharius Collection.

667. L. Marcius Philippus AR Denarius. Rome, 56 BC. Head of Ancus Marcius right, wearing diadem, lituus behind, ANCVS below / Aqueduct on which stands equestrian statue, flower at horse’s feet, PHILIPPVS to left, AQVA MAR ligate within arches of aqueduct. Crawford 425/1; RSC Marcia 28. 3.91g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone. Well centred and struck on a very large flan.

500

From the Eucharius Collection.

668. Faustus Cornelius Sulla AR Denarius. Rome, 56 BC. Bust of Hercules right, wearing lion skin headdress; S•C and monogram behind / Globe surrounded by four wreaths; aplustre below left, corn below right. Crawford 426/4a; RSC Cornelia 61. 3.60g, 20mm, 10h. Very Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone.

177

300


669. Faustus Cornelius Sulla AR Denarius. Rome, 56 BC. Draped bust of Diana right, wearing diadem with crescent; lituus behind, FAVSTVS before / Sulla seated left on raised seat, FELIX behind; before him, Bocchus, king of Mauretania, kneels, offering an olive branch, behind, Jugurtha, king of Numidia, also kneeling, his hands tied behind him. Crawford 426/1; RSC Cornelia 59. 3.78g, 18mm, 9h. Mint State, some areas of flat striking.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

670. Faustus Cornelius Sulla AR Denarius. Rome, 56 BC. Laureate, diademed and draped bust of Venus right; behind, sceptre above which S•C / Three trophies; to left and right, jug and lituus; in exergue, monogram. Crawford 426/3; RSC Cornelia 63. 3.78g, 21mm, 6h. Very Fine. Attractive old tone.

250

From the Eucharius Collection.

671. Faustus Cornelius Sulla AR Denarius. Rome, 56 BC. Diademed bust of young Hercules right wearing lion’s skin, FEELIX (sic) behind / Diana driving galloping biga right, holding reins and lituus; FAVSTVS below, crescent and two stars above, two stars below. Crawford 426/2; RSC Cornelia 63. 3.70g, 18mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine, some areas of flatness. From the Eucharius Collection.

200

672. P. Fonteius P. f. Capito AR Denarius. Rome, 55 BC. P•FONTEIVS•CAPITO•III•VIR•CONCORDIA, diademed, veiled and draped head of Concordia right / Villa Publica on the Campus Martius, T•DIDI on left, VIL•PVB on right, IMP below. Crawford 429/2a; Fonteia 18 and Didia 1. 4.20g, 18mm, 10h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

From the Eucharius Collection.

673. P. Fonteius P. f. Capito AR Denarius. Rome, 55 BC. P•FONTEIVS•CAPITO•III•VIR, helmeted and draped bust of Mars right; trophy behind / [MN•FONT•TR•MIL], warrior on horseback galloping right, thrusting spear downwards at kneeling enemy in Gallic helmet, who holds sword and shield; to lower left, another enemy warrior, kneeling right; Gallic helmet and shield to lower right. Crawford 429/1; RSC Fonteia 17. 4.05g, 17mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine; minor marks and deposits.

178

150


674. P. Licinius Crassus AR Denarius. Rome, 55 BC. Diademed, laureate and draped bust of Venus right, S•C behind / Female figure leading horse left with right hand, and holding spear in left; at her feet, cuirass and shield; P•CRASSVS•M•F around. Crawford 430/1; RSC Licinia 18. 3.77g, 19mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

675. A. Plautius AR Denarius. Rome, 55 BC. Turreted head of Cybele right; A•PLAVTIVS downwards to right, AED•CVR•S•C downwards to left / Bacchius Judaeus (Aristobulus II, High Priest and King of Judaea) kneeling right, holding reins and offering up olive branch, camel standing to right behind; IVDAEVS upwards before, BACCHIVS in exergue. Crawford 431/1; RSC Plautia 13. 3.97g, 17mm, 4h. Good Very Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

200

676. Q. Servilius Caepio (M. Junius) Brutus AR Denarius. Rome, 54 BC. Bare head of L. Junius Brutus right; BRVTVS downwards to left / Bare head of C. Servilius Ahala right; AHALA downwards to left. Crawford 433/2; RSC Junia 30. 3.63g, 18mm, 9h. Good Very Fine.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

677. Q. Pompeius Rufus AR Denarius. Rome, 54 BC. Q•POMPEI•Q•F RVFVS above, curule chair flanked by arrow and laurel-branch; COS on raised tablet below / SVLLA•COS above, curule chair flanked by lituus and a wreath; Q•POMPEI•RVF on raised tablet below. Crawford 434/2; RSC Pompeia 5. 3.56g, 17mm, 4h. Extremely Fine.

200

From the Eucharius Collection.

678. C. Coelius Caldus AR Denarius. Rome, 51 BC. Bare head of the consul Caius Coelius Caldus right, tablet inscribed L•D (Libero | Damno) behind; C•COEL•CALDVS downwards before, COS below / Radiate head of Sol right; oblong shield ornamented with thunderbolt behind, circular Macedonian shield before and CALDVS•III•VIR to right. Crawford 437/1a; RSC Coelia 4. 3.89g, 21mm, 5h. About Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

179

300


679. Servius Sulpicius AR Denarius. Rome, 51 BC. Laureate male head right, SER behind, SVLP before / Naval trophy, naked and bound captive on right, draped figure looking on to left. Crawford 438/1; RSC Sulpicia 8. 3.86g, 19mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

750

The reverse type may celebrate the achievements of P. Sulpicius Galba Maximus who was proconsul in Greece during the war against Philip of Macedon in 209-8 BC. He was responsible for leading the Roman fleet into the Aegean sea and capturing Aegina; hence the naval trophy would refer to the destruction of the enemy fleet, and the prisoner to those captured during the battle. Cf. Livy XXVII, 5-6.

680. Q. Sicinius AR Denarius. Rome, 49 BC. Diademed head of Fortuna right, P•R behind, FORT before / Palm-branch and caduceus crossed, laurel wreath above, III VIR across fields, Q•SICINIVS below. Crawford 440/1; RSC Sicinia 5. 3.89g, 18mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Pleasant blue tone on reverse.

400

681. Q. Sicinius and C. Coponius AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Pompey, 49 BC. Diademed head of Apollo right, XVI monogram below, III•VIR behind, Q•SICINIVS before / Club of Hercules surmounted by lion’s skin between arrow and bow, PR•S•C on left, C•COPONIVS on right. Crawford 444/1b; RSC Sicinia 2. 3.92g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive iridescent toning.

400

Ex Künker 143, 6-7 October 2008, lot 422.

682. L. Cornelius Lentulus and C. Claudius Marcellus AR Denarius. Apollonia, 49 BC. Head of Apollo right; L•LENT•C•MARC•COS• around / Jupiter standing right, eagle in left hand over garlanded altar, thunderbolt in right; star and Q in left field. Crawford 445/2; RSC Cornelia 65. 3.85g, 17mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

From the Eucharius Collection.

683. L. Cornelius Lentulus and C. Claudius Marcellus AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Pompey, 49 BC. Facing head of Medusa in centre of triskeles with grain ear between each leg / Jupiter standing facing, holding thunderbolt in right hand and eagle in left; LENT MAR upwards to left, COS upwards to right, (NT and MAR ligate). Crawford 445/1b; RSC Cornelia 64a. 4.00g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

180

300


684. L. Hostilius Saserna AR Denarius. Rome, 48 BC. Bare head of Gallia right, wearing long, dishevelled hair; carnyx behind / Artemis (Diana) standing facing, laureate, wearing long hair falling down her shoulders and long flowing robes, holding spear in left hand and stag by its antlers in her right; L•HOSTILIVS SASERNA around. Crawford 448/3; RSC Hostilia 4. 3.93g, 19mm, 8h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,000

Ex Triton XVI, 8 January 2013, lot 810; Ex A. Tkalec, 29 February 2008, lot 227.

685. L. Hostilius Saserna AR Denarius. Rome, 48 BC. Head of Gallic captive right; Gallic shield behind / Two warriors in galloping biga right: one driving, holding whip and reins, and the other, facing backward, holding shield and brandishing spear; L•HOSTILIVS above, SASERN below. Crawford 448/2a; RSC Hostilia 2. 3.67g, 20mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

1,000

686. L. Hostilius Saserna AR Denarius. Rome, 48 BC. Female head right wearing oak wreath / Victory walking right, holding trophy over left shoulder, and caduceus in right hand; L•HOSTILIVS SASERNA around. Crawford 448/1a; RSC Hostilia 5. 3.99g, 19mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Beautifully toned.

400

687. C. Vibius C. f. C. n. Pansa Caetronianus AR Denarius. Rome, 48 BC. Mask of Pan right; PANS[A] below / Jupiter Axurus seated left, holding patera and sceptre, IOVIS AXVR upwards to left, [C•V]IBIVS•C•F•C•N downwards to right. Crawford 449/1b; RSC Vibia 18. 4.10g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

181

200


688. Albinus Bruti f. AR Denarius. Rome, 48 BC. Helmeted head of young Mars right / Two carnyces (Gallic trumpets) in saltire; oval shield above; round shield below; ALBINVS downwards to right, BRVTI•F upwards to left. Crawford 450/1a; RSC Postumia 11. 3.65g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

689. Albinus Bruti f. AR Denarius. Rome, 48 BC. Bare head of the consul Aulus Postumius Albinus right; A•POSTVMIVS•COS around / ALBINV BRVTI•F in two lines within wreath of grain ears. Crawford 450/3b; RSC Postumia 14. 3.66g, 18mm, 10h. About Extremely Fine.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

690. C. Pansa and Albinus Bruti f. AR Denarius. Rome, 48 BC. Mask of bearded Pan right; C•PANSA below / Two clasped right hands, holding vertical winged caduceus; ALBINVS•BRVTI•F below. Crawford 451/1; RSC Vibia 22. 3.64g, 19mm, 6h. Very Fine. Bankers marks on obv.

100

From the Eucharius Collection.

691. L. Plautius Plancus AR Denarius. Rome, 47 BC. Head of Medusa, facing, with coiled snake on either side, L•PLAVTIVS below / Victory facing, holding palm and leading four horses, PLANCVS below. Crawford 453/1c; RSC Plautia 14. 3.54g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

2,000

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 7, 1 March 1994, lot 639.

692. L. Plautius Plancus AR Denarius. Rome, 47 BC. Head of Medusa, facing, with coiled snake on either side, L•PLAVTIVS below / Victory facing, holding palm and leading four horses, PLANCVS below. Crawford 453/1a; RSC Plautia 11. 4.11g, 20mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful style and well preserved for the issue. From the Eucharius Collection.

182

750


693. L. Plautius Plancus AR Denarius. Rome, 47 BC. Head of Medusa, facing, with coiled snake on either side; L•PLAVTIVS below / Victory facing, holding palm and leading four horses, PLANCVS below. Crawford 453/1a; RSC Plautia 11. 4.04g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

250

694. Mn. Cordius Rufus AR Denarius. Rome, 46 BC. Corinthian helmet with crest on which an owl stands; RVFVS to left / The aegis of Minerva with head of Medusa in the centre; MN•CORDIVS around. Crawford 463/2; RSC Cordia 4. 3.91g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, exceptionally well struck for this issue. Pleasing iridescent tones.

400

From the Eucharius Collection.

695. Mn. Cordius Rufus AR Denarius. Rome, 46 BC. Diademed head of Venus right, [RVFVS]•S•C behind / Cupid on dolphin to right; MN•CORDIVS below. Crawford 463/3; RSC Cordia 3. 3.88g, 19mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Some areas of flat striking.

200

From the Eucharius Collection.

696. T. Carisius AR Denarius. Rome, 46 BC. Head of Juno Moneta right; MONETA behind / Implements for coining money: anvil die with garlanded punch die above; tongs and hammer on either side; T•CARISIVS above; all within laurel wreath. Crawford 464/2; RSC Carisia 1a. 3.66g, 19mm, 3h. Extremely Fine.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

697. T. Carisius AR Denarius. Rome, 46 BC. Head of Sibyl Herophile right, hair elaborately decorated with jewels and enclosed in a sling and tied with bands / Sphinx seated right, T•CARISIVS to right, III•VIR in exergue. Crawford 464/1; RSC Carisia 11a. 3.88g, 19mm, 2h. Very Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

183

200


698. L. Papius Celsus AR Denarius. Rome, 45 BC. Laureate head of Triumphus right with trophy over shoulder; TRIVMPVS below / Wolf to right, placing stick on fire, an eagle to left fanning the flames; CELSVS•III•VIR above, [L•PAPIVS] in exergue. Crawford 472/2; RSC Papia 3. 4.03g, 17mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Attractive old tone.

300

From the Eucharius Collection; Ex Münzen & Medaillen Basel, 2 December 1957, lot 259.

699. Lollius Palikanus AR Denarius. Rome, 45 BC. Diademed head of Libertas, LIBERTATIS behind / Subsellium standing on rostrum, PALIKANVS above. Crawford 473/1; RSC Lollia 2. 4.03g, 20mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Pleasantly toned. Banker’s mark on obv.

250

From the Eucharius Collection.

700. L. Valerius Acisculus AR Denarius. Rome, 45 BC. ACISCVLVS, diademed head of Apollo Soranus right, acisculus behind, star above / Valeria Luperca riding a heifer right, holding a veil above; L•VALERIVS in exergue. Crawford 474/1a; RSC Valeria 17. 3.99g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

400

701. Petillius Capitolinus AR Denarius. Rome, 43 BC. Eagle, with wings spread, standing facing, head right, on thunderbolt; PETILLIVS CAPITOLINVS around / Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus: richly decorated hexastyle temple with three garlands hanging between columns; the pediment ornamented with armed figures; in the tympanum is a seated figure of Jupiter between two other figures. Crawford 487/2a; RSC Petillia 2. 3.91g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Scarce.

400

702. Petillius Capitolinus AR Denarius. Rome, 43 BC. Eagle, with wings spread, standing facing, head right, on thunderbolt; PETILLIVS CAPITOLINVS around / Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus: richly decorated hexastyle temple with three garlands hanging between columns; the pediment ornamented with armed figures; in the tympanum is a seated figure of Jupiter between two other figures. Crawford 487/2a; RSC Petillia 2. 4.11g, 19mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

184

300


703. P. Clodius M. f. Turrinus AR Denarius. Rome, 42 BC. Radiate head of Sol right; quiver to left / Crescent moon surrounded by semicircle of five stars; P•CLODIVS•M•F in two lines below. Crawford 494/21; RSC Claudia 17. 3.81g, 18mm, 6h. Near Mint State.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

704. P. Clodius M. f. Turrinus AR Denarius. Rome, 42 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right; lyre behind / Diana standing facing, head right, with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding lighted torch in each hand; P•CLODIVS M•F• across fields. Crawford 494/23; RSC Claudia 15. 3.82g, 18mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

705. P. Clodius M. f. Turrinus AR Denarius. Rome, 42 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right; lyre behind / Diana standing facing, head right, with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding lighted torch in each hand; P•CLODIVS M•F• across fields. Crawford 494/23; RSC Claudia 15. 3.92g, 21mm, 1h. Near Mint State.

250

706. L. Livineius Regulus AR Denarius. Rome, 42 BC. Bare head right / Gladiatorial scene: in foreground, lion charging right toward a combatant who spears it; in background on left, a wounded bear sits right; on right, another gladiator, holding sword and shield, defends himself against a tiger charging left; L•REGVLVS in exergue. Crawford 494/30; RSC Livineia 12. 4.08g, 17mm, 2h. Good Extremely Fine. A fantastically well preserved reverse. Very Rare. From the Eucharius Collection.

185

1,000


707. C. Vibius Varus AR Denarius. Rome, 42 BC. Laureate and bearded head of Hercules right / Minerva standing right, holding spear and Victory; shield set on ground before; VARVS to left, C•VIBIVS to right. Crawford 494/37; RSC Vibia 23. 3.87g, 18mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

708. C. Vibius Varus AR Denarius. Rome, 42 BC. Bust of Minerva right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet and aegis / Hercules standing facing, holding club in right hand and with lion’s skin over left arm; C•VIBIVS downwards to right, VARVS downwards to left. Crawford 494/38; RSC Vibia 26. 4.07g, 20mm, 1h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

250

709. Marcus Arrius Secundus AR Denarius. Rome, 41 BC. Young, bare, male head (Octavian? or Quintus Arrius?) right, wearing slight beard; M•ARRIVS upwards behind, SECVNDVS downwards before / Hasta pura (vertical spear) between wreath on left and rectangular phalera (military decoration) on right. Crawford 513/2; RSC Arria 2. 3.61g, 19mm, 1h. Near Very Fine. Very Rare.

750

From the Eucharius Collection.

710. Cn. Domitius L. f. Ahenobarbus AR Denarius. Uncertain mint along the Adriatic or Ionian Sea, 41-40 BC. Bare head right; AHENOBAR upwards to right / Prow right surmounted by a military trophy; CN•DOMITIVS•IMP around. Crawford 519/2; RSC Domitia 21. 4.07g, 22mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Minor flan flaws on obv.

186

500


Coins of The Imperators

711. Pompey Magnus AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Pompey, 49 BC. Diademed terminal bust of Jupiter right, VARRO•PRO•Q / Sceptre between dolphin and eagle, MAGN•PRO COS in two lines in exergue. Crawford 447/1a; RSC 3. 3.83g, 19mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Lightly toned. Rare.

2,000

712. Pompey Magnus and M. Poblicius AR Denarius. Spanish mint, 46-45 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; M•POBLICI•LEG•PRO PR around / Hispania standing right, with shield slung on back, holding two spears in left hand and presenting long palm branch to soldier standing left on prow of ship; CN•MAGNVS•IMP around. Crawford 469/1c; RSC 1. 3.96g, 21mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

750

From the Eucharius Collection.

713. Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius Scipio AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Scipio in Africa, 47- Spring 46 BC. Eppius, legate. Small head of Africa right, wearing elephant skin headdress; grain ear to right; plough below; SCIPIO•IMP upwards to left, Q•METELL downwards to right / Hercules standing facing, right hand on hip, leaning on club draped with lion skin and set on rock; LEG•F•C upwards to left, EPPIVS downwards to right. Crawford 461/1; RSC Caecilia 50. 3.95g, 19mm, 9h. Good Extremely Fine. Exceptional for the issue.

500

From the Eucharius Collection.

714. Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius Scipio and P. Licinius Crassus Junianus AR Denarius. Utica, 47- Spring 46 BC. Head of Jupiter right, beard and hair in ringlets; below, eagle’s head left above and sceptre; SCIP•IMP upwards to left, METEL•PIVS downwards to right / Cornucopiae, supporting scales, set on curule chair, itself set on ground line; grain ear to left, head of cetus to right; LEG•PRO•PR upwards to left, CRASS•IVN downwards to right. Crawford 460/2; RSC Caecilia 49. 3.60g, 17mm, 8h. About Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare. From the Eucharius Collection.

187

1,000


188


A Spectacular Denarius Depicting ‘Genius Terrae Africae’

715.

Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius Scipio AR Denarius. Utica, 47/46 BC. P. Licinius Crassus Junianus, legatus pro praetore. Q•METEL•PIVS on right, SCIPIO•IMP on left, lion-headed figure of Genius of Africa (Sekhmet or leontocephalic Tanit?) standing facing, holding symbol of Tanit; above, G•T•A / Victory standing left, holding winged caduceus and small round shield; P•CRASSVS•IVN on right, LEG•PRO•P•R on left. Crawford 460/4; RSC Caecilia 51. 3.88g, 20mm, 8h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare - the rarest of Scipio’s denarii, and exceptionally complete and well preserved for the issue. Arguably the best example on CoinArchives.

5,000

From the Eucharius Collection. This coin is traditionally described as depicting the Genius Terrae Africae, or Sekhmet holding an ankh, however this remarkable statue is not Egyptian - the coin is struck in Africa and therefore an ankh symbol makes no sense in a Punic Carthaginian context. Actually, the symbol is quite obviously that of Tanit who was commonly represented by a simple linear female abstract. The identity of the figure must therefore also be called into question in light of statues recovered from Carthage and Tunis which some academics take to represent the Carthaginian deity herself in leontocephalic form. Either way, the coinage of Scipio shows a dramatic break with Republican tradition. No local or city goddess had previously been portrayed on the obverse of Roman coinage other than Roma herself, and certainly never a foreign one! In this case it was made all the more objectionable by either being or holding the symbol of Tanit - a god whose people had slain hundreds of thousands of Roman soldiers and nearly vanquished Rome entirely. Nor indeed was there any precedent for the depiction of a Genius other than the Genius Populi Romani. In no way does Scipio use his coinage to champion the cause of the Republic; though it might have been designed to curry favour with the populace of their last remaining territory, the effect is that it nonetheless appears utterly in the style of an Eastern ruler. Caesar must not have been able to believe his luck, as nothing could better demonstrate to the rank and file the justness of their cause than the thoroughly un-Roman depths to which Scipio had lowered himself. Needless to say then, Scipio’s coinage stands in stark contrast to the traditional republican types of his colleague Cato, whose types replicated those of his ancestor, another M. Porcius Cato, moneyer of 89 BC. Perhaps we should not be surprised. Classical scholar John H. Collins summed up the character and reputation of Metellus Scipio thusly: “From all that can be learned of this Scipio, he was as personally despicable and as politically reactionary as they come: a defender of C. Verres (In Ver. II. 4. 79–81), a debauchee of singular repulsiveness (Valerius Maximus, 9.1.8), an incompetent and bull-headed commander (Plutarch, Cato Min. 58), an undisciplined tyrant in the possession of authority (Bell. Afr. 44–46), an extortioner of the provinces (BC 3.31–33), a proscription-thirsty bankrupt (Att. 9.11), a worthy great grandson des hochmütigen, plebejerfeindlichen Junkers (Münzer, RE 4.1502) who had led the lynching of Tiberius Gracchus, and a most unworthy father of the gentle Cornelia. Only in the ‘Imperator se bene habet’ with which he met death is there any trace of the nobler character of his great forebears (Seneca Rhet., Suas. 7.8).

189


716. Q. Metellus Pius Scipio AR Denarius. African mint, 47-46 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right, in archaic style with beard and hair in ringlets; Q•METEL PIVS around / Elephant standing to right, SCIPIO above, IMP below. Crawford 459/1; RSC Caecilia 47. 4.12g, 17mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

After L. Caecilius Metellus’ victory over Hasdrubal at Panormus and the capture of one of the Carthaginians’ elephants, that beast became as a heraldic symbol to the gens Caecilia. It is ironic then that displayed on this coin it should be so reminiscent of Caesar’s own earlier issue bearing an elephant on the reverse.

717. Q. Metellus Pius Scipio AR Denarius. African mint, 47-46 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right, in archaic style with beard and hair in ringlets; Q•METEL PIVS around / Elephant standing to right, SCIPIO above, IMP below. Crawford 459/1; RSC Caecilia 47. 4.02g, 19mm, 2h. Good Very Fine.

500

718. Q. Metellus Pius Scipio AR Denarius. African mint, 47-46 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right, in archaic style with beard and hair in ringlets; Q•METEL PIVS around / Elephant standing to right, SCIPIO above, IMP below. Crawford 459/1; RSC Caecilia 47. 3.74g, 17mm, 10h. Near Extremely Fine. Light punch on obv.

300

From the Eucharius Collection.

719. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 49-48 BC. Elephant advancing right, trampling on serpent; CAESAR in exergue / Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, securis (surmounted by wolf’s head), and apex. Crawford 443/1; RSC 49. 3.95g, 20mm, 2h. Mint State. A perfectly struck and centred example.

1,000

From the Eucharius Collection.

720. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Travelling military mint, 48-47 BC. Female head right, wearing oak wreath and diadem; LII behind / Trophy of Gallic arms; axe surmounted by an animal’s head to right; CAESAR below. Crawford 452/2; RSC 18. 4.07g, 19mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive old tone. From the Eucharius Collection.

190

750


721. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. African mint, 47-46 BC. Diademed head of Venus right / Aeneas advancing left, carrying palladium in right hand and Anchises on left shoulder; CAESAR to right. Crawford 458/1; RSC 12. 3.83g, 17mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Attractive old tone.

400

From the Eucharius Collection.

722. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Uncertain mint, 46 BC. Head of Ceres right, wearing grain ear wreath; COS•TERT downwards behind, DICT•ITER upwards before / Emblems of the augurate and pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, capis, and lituus; [D to right], AVGVR above, PONT•MAX below. Crawford 467/1a; RSC 4a. 3.83g, 17mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

500

From the Eucharius Collection.

Very Rare Julius Caesar Quinarius

723. Julius Caesar AV Quinarius. Rome, 45 BC. M. Munatius Plancus, moneyer. Draped bust of Victory right; C•CAES upwards behind, DIC•TER downwards before / Jug; L•PLANC upwards to left, PRAEF•VRB downwards to right. Crawford 475/2; Bahrfeldt 22.9; RBW 1665. 3.87g, 16mm, 9h. Very Fine. Flan somewhat rough at edges, scattered contact marks. Very Rare.

5,000

724. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Rome, January-February 44 BC. Lifetime issue. M. Mettius, moneyer. CAESAR•IMP, wreathed head of Caesar right; lituus and simpulum behind / M•METTIVS, Venus Victrix standing left, holding Victory in outstretched right hand and transverse sceptre in left, resting her left elbow on shield set on celestial globe; I to left. Crawford 480/3; RSC 34. 3.89g, 19mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. From the Eucharius Collection.

191

1,000


Caesar’s Final Lifetime Issue

725. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Rome, February-March 44 BC. Lifetime issue. P. Sepullius Macer, moneyer. Wreathed and veiled head right; CAESAR downward to right, DICT•PERPETVO upward to left / Venus Victrix standing left, holding Victory and sceptre, to right at feet, shield set on ground; P•SEPVLLIVS downward to right, MACER downward to left. Crawford 480/13; RSC 39. 3.68g, 18mm, 3h. Near Very Fine.

250

726. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Rome, April 44 BC. C. Cossutius Maridianus, moneyer. CAESAR PARENS•PATRIAE, laureate and veiled head right; apex behind, lituus before / C•COSSVTIVS and MARIDIANVS arranged in form of cross; A A A F F in angles. Crawford 480/19; RSC 8. 3.99g, 19mm. About Extremely Fine. Some flatness.

1,000

From the Eucharius Collection.

727. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Rome, April 44 BC. C. Cossutius Maridianus, moneyer. CAESAR PARENS•PATRIAE, laureate and veiled head right; apex behind, lituus before / C•COSSVTIVS and MARIDIANVS arranged in form of cross; A A A F F in angles. Crawford 480/19; RSC 8. 3.69g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Light cabinet tone.

500

From the Eucharius Collection.

728. M. Junius Brutus AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Brutus and Cassius in Western Asia Minor or Northern Greece, 43-42 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right; COSTA LEG around / Trophy of arms; IMP BRVTVS around. Crawford 506/2; RSC 4. 3.90g, 19mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine; old cabinet tone. Rare.

192

750


729. M. Junius Brutus AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Brutus and Cassius in Western Asia Minor or Northern Greece, 43-42 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right; COSTA LEG around / Trophy of arms; IMP BRVTVS around. Crawford 506/2; RSC 4. 3.68g, 18mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

500

From the Eucharius Collection.

730. M. Junius Brutus with P. Servilius Casca Longus AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with the army (western Asia Minor or northern Greece), summer-autumn 42 BC. CASCA LONGVS, laureate bust of Neptune right, trident below / BRVTVS IMP, Victory in long tunic walking to right, palm branch over left shoulder and breaking diadem with both hands, broken sceptre on ground. Crawford 507/2; RSC 3. 3.81g, 18mm, 11h. Extremely Fine.

3,000

731. M. Junius Brutus with P. Servilius Casca Longus AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with the army (western Asia Minor or northern Greece), summer-autumn 42 BC. CASCA LONGVS, laureate bust of Neptune right, trident below / BRVTVS IMP, Victory in long tunic walking to right, palm branch over left shoulder and breaking diadem with both hands, broken sceptre on ground. Crawford 507/2; RSC 3. 3.70g, 18mm, 12h. About Extremely Fine.

2,000

732. M. Junius Brutus AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Brutus in Asia Minor, 42 BC. Veiled and draped bust of Libertas right; L•SESTI•PRO•Q around; P in left field / Tripod between sacrificial axe and simpulum, all within beaded border; Q•CAEPIO•BRVTVS•PRO•COS around. Crawford 502/2; RSC 11. 3.84g, 17mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

193

1,000


733. C. Cassius Longinus and P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Brutus (Smyrna?), 43-42 BC. C•CASSI IMP, tripod with cauldron, decorated with two laurel-branches / LENTVLVS SPINT, jug and lituus. Crawford 500/1; RSC 7. 3.83g, 20mm, 6h. Mint State; struck on sound and lustrous metal. Lightly toned.

1,500

734. C. Cassius Longinus AR Denarius. Military mint, probably at Smyrna, Spring 42 BC. P. Lentulus Spinther, legate. Diademed head of Libertas right; LEIBERTAS before, C•CASSI•IMP behind / Capis and lituus; LENTVLVS SPINT in two lines below. Crawford 500/3; RSC 4. 3.77g, 19mm, 7h. Good Very Fine.

500

735. C. Cassius Longinus AR Denarius. Military mint, probably at Smyrna, Spring 42 BC. P. Lentulus Spinther, legate. Veiled, diademed, and draped bust of Libertas right; LEIBERTAS before, C•CASSI•IMP behind / Capis and lituus; LENTVLVS SPINT in two lines below. Crawford 500/5; RSC 6. 3.75g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone.

1,000

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Archer M. Huntington Collection, ANS 1001.1.22837, Triton XVII, 7 January 2014, lot 587.

Extremely Rare L. Staius Murcus Denarius

736. L. Staius Murcus AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Murcus, 42-41 BC. Head of Neptune right, with trident over shoulder / Male figure on right, holding sword in left hand and right hand raising kneeling female figure on left, between them, trophy with sword and shield, MVRCVS IMP in exergue. Crawford 510/1; RSC Statia 1. 3.58g, 19mm, 12h. Good Fine. Extremely Rare.

1,500

From the Eucharius Collection. Like many commanders of the Imperatorial age, not a great deal is known about the career of L. Staius Murcus. Appian relates that he served under Caesar in Gaul and Africa, and was present at the Senate House on the Ides of March and whilst he did not participate in Caesar’s murder, he approved of the deed. Following Caesar’s assassination, the Senate sent Murcus to Syria as proconsul to besiege Q. Caecilius Bassus alongside Cassius. Murcus was posted to blockade the fleet of Cleopatra as she came to the aid of Marc Antony and Octavian. Domitius Ahenobarbus was sent to assist him in this, and the two formed a highly successful partnership, which resulted in dominance over the seas between Greece and Italy. This partnership was not to last long however, and as a rift formed between the two, Murcus joined forces with Sextus Pompey. Murcus’ stubbornness and refusal to cooperate with Pompey’s plans led to a growing suspicion on behalf of the latter, who soon had Murcus assassinated.

194


Very Rare Quintus Labienus AR Denarius

737.

Quintus Labienus AR Denarius. Uncertain mint in Syria or south-eastern Asia Minor, early 40 BC. Bare head right; Q•LABIENVS•PARTHICVS•IMP around / Horse standing to right on ground line, wearing saddle with quiver attached and bridle. Crawford 524/2; Hersh 15; RSC 2. 3.33g, 18mm, 5h. Areas of old corrosion at edges, otherwise Extremely Fine. A bold and attractive portrait of Q. Labienus. Very Rare. 12,500 It should perhaps not come as a surprise that Quintus Labienus, the son of Titus Labienus who was an important general to Caesar during the Gaul Campaign and then broke ties with him to form an alliance with Pompey, also became a traitor during his lifetime. After the assassination of Caesar, the younger Labienus joined Cassius and Brutus who sent him as an ambassador to Parthia to request support from King Orodes II. This mission proved to be unsuccessful and thus contributed to Cassius and Brutus being defeated in the battle of Philippi by Octavian and Antony in 42 BC. It is at this point that some may call Labienus a coward, and some an opportunist. He knew if he returned home he would face punishment, and the chances of advancement for himself would all but disappear. However, if he stayed with the Parthians he could perhaps have the opportunity to fulfil his military ambitions. Labienus therefore decided to stay and convince Orodes to invade Syria on the pretence that several areas under Antony and Octavian were not well protected. In 40 BC he jointly commanded forces with Orodes’ son Pacorus II that invaded areas of Syria and Asia Minor. Labienus and Pacorus were able to achieve much success and overtook Apameia, Antioch, and Cilicia. His success was short lived though, as in 39 BC he was defeated, captured and executed in an attack orchestrated by Antony and Octavian and carried out by Publius Ventidius. It is around the time of his military victories that he began striking coinage to pay the many soldiers he was acquiring through his conquests. This coin in particular strikes a balance between Roman and Parthian characteristics. The obverse depicts a very serious, yet commanding portrait in Roman style, but with a legend naming him PARTHICVS. The reverse depicts a horse with a bridled saddle and quiver, making reference to the infamous Parthian soldiers who were known for their accuracy and efficiency as horse archers. After Labienus was killed most of his coinage was melted down, making surviving examples very rare indeed.

195


738. Marc Antony and Octavian AR Denarius. M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetore. Military mint moving with Antony (Ephesus?), 41 BC. Bare head of Antony right; M•ANT•IMP•AVG•III•R•P•C•M•BARBAT•Q•P around / Bare head of Octavian right, with slight beard; CAESAR•IMP•PONT•III•VIR•R•P•C• around. Crawford 517/2; RSC 8a. 3.88g, 19mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Toned, some deposits.

1,500

From the M.M. Collection; Ex Archer M. Huntington Collection, ANS 1001.1.22509, Triton XVII, 7 January 2014, lot 595.

739. Marc Antony and Octavian AR Denarius. M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetore. Military mint moving with Antony (Ephesus?), 41 BC. Bare head of Antony right; M•ANT•IMP•AVG•III•R•P•C•M•BARBAT•Q•P around / Bare head of Octavian right, with slight beard; CAESAR•IMP•PONT•III•VIR•R•P•C• around. Crawford 517/2; RSC 8a. 3.91g, 20mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

1,500

740. Marc Antony and Octavian AR Denarius. M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetore. Military mint moving with Antony (Ephesus?), 41 BC. Bare head of Antony right; M•ANT•IMP•AVG•III•R•P•C•M•BARBAT•Q•P around / Bare head of Octavian right, with slight beard; CAESAR•IMP•PONT•III•VIR•R•P•C• around. Crawford 517/2; RSC 8a. 3.69g, 19mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,250

741. Marc Antony and Octavian AR Denarius. M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetore. Military mint moving with Antony (Ephesus?), 41 BC. Bare head of Antony right; M•ANT•IMP•AVG•III•R•P•C•M•BARBAT•Q•P around / Bare head of Octavian right, with slight beard; CAESAR•IMP•PONT•III•VIR•R•P•C• around. Crawford 517/2; RSC 8a. 3.60g, 21mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

400

742. Marc Antony and Octavia AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm. Ephesus, 39 BC. M•ANTONIVS•IMP•COS•DESIG•ITERET•TERT, head of Antony right, wearing ivy wreath, lituus below; all within wreath of ivy and flowers / Head of Octavia atop cista mystica, flanked by snakes; III•VIR downwards to left, R•P•C upwards to right. RPC I 2201; RSC 2. 10.65g, 27mm, 12h. About Very Fine.

196

500


743

744

743. Marc Antony AR Denarius. Athens, 38-37 BC. III•VIR•R•P•C•COS•DESIG•ITER•ET•TERT, radiate bust of Sol right / M•ANTONIVS•M•F•M•N• AVGVR•IMP•TER, Antony standing right, dressed as priest, veiled, wearing toga and holding a lituus. Crawford 533/2; RSC 13a. 3.97g, 20mm, 9h. Very Fine. Somewhat worn and with a bankers mark on obverse chin, but still a highly attractive example of this sought after type, displaying magnificent iridescent hues around the devices. 300 744. Marc Antony AR Denarius. Patrae(?), 32-31 BC. Galley to right; ANT•AVG above, III•VIR•R•P•C below / LEG•XVIII•LYBICAE, legionary aquila between two standards. Crawford 544/11; RSC 53. 3.52g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 500 Ex Classical Numismatic Group 67, 22 September 2004, lot 1241.

745. Octavian, with Julius Caesar, Æ Dupondius. Vienna, Gaul, 36 BC. Bare heads of Julius Caesar and Octavian, back to back; •IMP• above, CAESAR below, DIVI IVL downwards to left, DIVI F upwards to right / Prow of quinquereme with elaborate superstructure and mast right; CIV above. RPC 517; SNG Copenhagen 703-4. 18.06g, 31mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Exceptional for this issue. Rare.

750

Ex Richard Prideaux Collection. The reverse of this piece could refer to one of several naval actions in 36 BC, but the most likely event to which it alludes is the action on September 3rd, when Agrippa defeated Sextus Pompey in a major naval engagement off Naulochus.

Roman Imperial Coins

746. Augustus AR Denarius. P. Carisius, moneyer. Emerita, Spain, 25-23 BC. IMP CAESAR AVGVST, bare head of Augustus right / P CARISIVS LEG PRO PR, helmet between dagger and bipennis. RIC 7a; BMC 281; RSC 405. 3.80g, 19mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

1,250

747. Augustus AR Denarius. Spanish mint (Colonia Caesaraugusta?), 19-18 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS, head left, wearing oak wreath / Eight-rayed comet with tail upwards, DIVVS IVLIVS across fields. RIC I 37b; RSC 97; BMCRE 326-7 = BMCRR Gaul 138-9; BN 1298-304. 3.64g, 21mm, 4h. Near Extremely Fine. Privately purchased from Tradart.

197

1,500


748. Augustus AR Denarius. Spanish mint (Colonia Patricia?), struck 19-18 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS, bare head right / OB CIVIS SERVATOS in three lines within oak wreath with wreath ties drawn upward. RIC I 77a; RSC 208. 3.87g, 19mm, 8h. Near Extremely Fine. Beautiful old tone.

500

749. Augustus AR Denarius. Lugdunum, 15-13 BC. AVGVSTVS DIVI F, bare head right / Bull butting right, IMP X in exergue. RIC 167a; RSC 137; BMC 451. 3.76g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

750

750. Augustus AR Denarius. Lugdunum, 7-6 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE, laureate head right / AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT, Gaius and Lucius Caesars standing facing, each togate and resting hand on shield, spear behind each shield, simpulum and lituus above, C L CAESARES in exergue. RIC 207; RSC 43c. 3.76g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive portrait style.

750

751. Augustus AR Denarius. P. Petronius Turpilianus, moneyer. Rome, 19/18 BC. TVRPILIANVS III VIR FERON, draped bust of Feronia right, wearing stephane, above which is a row of berries, and pearl necklace / CAESAR AVGVSTVS SIGN RECE, bare-headed Parthian kneeling right, extending in right hand a standard, to which is attached a vexillum marked X, and holding out left hand. RIC 288; RSC 484; BMC 14; BN 127-37. 3.90g, 19mm, 11h. Extremely Fine.

750

752. Augustus AR Denarius. P. Petronius Turpilianus, moneyer. Rome, 19/18 BC. TVRPILIANVS III VIR FERON, draped bust of Feronia right, wearing stephane, above which is a row of berries, and pearl necklace / CAESAR AVGVSTVS SIGN RECE, bare-headed Parthian kneeling right, extending in right hand a standard, to which is attached a vexillum marked X, and holding out left hand. RIC 288; RSC 484; BMC 14; BN 127-37. 3.91g, 21mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Lightly toned.

198

750


753. Augustus AR Denarius. P. Petronius Turpilianus, moneyer. Rome, 19-18 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS, bare head right / P • PETRON • TVRPILIAN • III • VIR, Pegasus walking right. RIC 297; RSC 491; BMCRE 23-6 = BMCRR Rome 4536-9; BN 147-52. 4.00g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

1,500

From the Archer M. Huntington Collection, ANS 1001.1.10547.

754. Augustus AR Denarius. Rome, 19 BC. Q. Rustius, moneyer. Q • RVSTIVS FORTVNÆ, Jugate, draped busts right of Fortuna Victrix, wearing round helmet, holding patera in right hand, and Fortuna Felix, wearing stephane; both busts rest on bar terminating at each end in a ram’s head; ANTIAT in exergue / CAESARI AVGVSTO, ornamented rectangular altar inscribed FOR • RE set on base; EX S C in exergue. RIC 322; RSC 513; BMCRE 2-4 = BMCRR Rome 4580-2; BN 221-8. 3.92g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. A sharply struck and very beautifully toned specimen.

1,250

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 84, 20 May 2015, lot 880.

755. Augustus AR Denarius. Rome, 19 BC. Q. Rustius, moneyer. Q • RVSTIVS FORTVNÆ, Jugate, draped busts right of Fortuna Victrix, wearing round helmet, holding patera in right hand, and Fortuna Felix, wearing stephane; both busts rest on bar terminating at each end in a ram’s head; ANTIAT in exergue / CAESARI AVGVSTO, ornamented rectangular altar inscribed FOR • RE set on base; EX S C in exergue. RIC 322; RSC 513; BMCRE 2-4 = BMCRR Rome 4580-2; BN 221-8. 3.79g, 19mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine. Pleasant old tone with hints of iridescent blue. Well preserved for the type.

750

Ex Archer M. Huntington Collection, ANS 1001.1.22517.

756. Augustus AR Denarius. P. Licinius Stolo, moneyer. Rome, 17 BC. AVGVSTVS TR POT, bare head of Augustus right / Apex between two studded ancilia; P STOLO above; III VIR below. RIC 343; RSC 438; BMC 74; CBN 296. 3.65g, 18mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

1,250

757. Augustus AR Denarius. Rome, 12 BC. L. Caninius Gallus, moneyer. AVGVSTVS, bare head right / L•CANINIVS GALLVS•III•VIR, German, wearing long hair and beard, naked but for a cloak over shoulders, kneeling right on right knee, in attitude of submission, offering up vexillum in right hand, left hand extended below left knee. RIC 416; RSC 383; BMCRE 127-30 = BMCRR Rome 4678-81; BN 560-4. 3.82g, 20mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

199

500


Rare Antonia Aureus

758. Antonia AV Aureus. Rome, AD 41-45. ANTONIA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Antonia as Ceres right, wearing wreath of corn ears / SACERDOS DIVI AVGVSTI, two long torches lighted and linked by ribbon. RIC Claudius 67; Calic贸 319. 7.63g, 19mm, 2h. Near Very Fine. Rare.

5,000

759. Tiberius AV Aureus. Lugdunum (Lyon), AD 18-35. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right on throne with ornate chair legs, holding branch and sceptre, feet on footstool; single line below. RIC 29; Lyon 149; Calic贸 305a; BMCRE 46-7; BN 22-7; Biaggi 169. 7.78g, 19mm, 1h. Near Mint State.

8,500

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 64, 17 May 2012, lot 1083.

760. Tiberius AV Aureus. Lugdunum (Lyon), AD 36-37. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right on throne with plain legs, holding branch and sceptre; double exergual line. RIC 25; C. 15; BMC 30; Calic贸 305d. 7.78g, 21mm, 4h. Good Very Fine.

3,000

761. Nero Claudius Drusus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 41-54. NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP, laureate head left / DE GERMANIS on architrave of triumphal arch surmounted by equestrian statue to left between two trophies. RIC I 72 (Claudius); von Kaenel Type 14 (unlisted dies); RSC 4; BMCRE 102. 3.48g, 18mm, 4h. Good Very Fine, flan crack. Rare.

200

1,500


762. Nero AV Aureus. Rome, AD 60-61. NERO CAESAR AVG IMP, bare head right / PONTIF MAX TR P VII COS IIII P P around oak wreath enclosing EX S C. RIC 21; BMC 23; CBN 28; Vagi 684; Calicó 427. 7.75g, 19mm, 2h. Good Very Fine; edge knock at 1 o’clock rev.

5,000

Rare and Well Preserved Nero Aureus

763. Nero AV Aureus. Rome, AD 64-65. NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / AVGVSTVS AVGVSTA, Nero, radiate and togate, holding long sceptre and patera, standing to left beside empress Poppaea, veiled and draped, holding patera and cornucopiae. C. 42; BMC 52; RIC 44; CBN 200; Calicó 201. 7.33g, 19mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine. Rare, and in excellent condition for the type which is seldom found in anything other than very worn state.

10,000

764. Nero AV Aureus. Rome, AD 64-65. NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head of Nero right / IVPPITER CVSTOS, Jupiter seated left on throne, holding thunderbolt and sceptre. RIC 52; Calicó 412a. 7.29g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine, attractive style. Lustre around the devices.

2,500

765. Nero AV Aureus. Rome, AD 65-66. NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / Salus seated left on throne, holding patera and resting arm at side; SALVS in exergue. RIC 59; Calicó 443; Biaggi 242-245. 7.30g, 19mm, 6h. Near Very Fine.

1,500

766. Nero Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 65. NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head right / Roma, helmeted and in military dress, seated left on cuirass, holding Victory in right hand and with left hand resting on parazonium, various shields around and behind, S-C across fields, ROMA in exergue. RIC 273 var. (no aegis); BMC 173. 27.77g, 36mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 2,500

201


767. Nero Æ Sestertius. Lugdunum (Lyon), AD 66. IMP NERO • CAESAR • AVG • PONT • MAX • TR • POT • P • P, laureate head left; globe at point of bust / Triumphal arch surmounted by emperor in facing quadriga accompanied by Pax and Victory, flanked by two soldiers; statue of Mars in side niche. RIC 500; WCN 452; Lyon 191. 26.88g, 35mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine, some corrosion spots. 2,000

Unpublished Vindex Denarius

768. Civil War, Vindex AR Denarius. Uncertain mint in Gaul, AD 68. DIVVS AVG, laureate head of the deified Augustus to right / SPQR within corona civica, circular jewel in bezel at apex. Martin -; Nicolas -; BMC -; C. -; RIC -, cf. 104; Roma Numismatics VII, 22 March 2014, lot 1010 (same dies). 3.29g, 16mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Unpublished in the standard references and of the highest rarity.

2,000

Kraay noted the unusual presence of SPQR within a wreath on these coins of Vindex. He states: ‘It will have been noticed that the earlier formula of SPQR has replaced the Neronian EX SC. In strict Augustan usage SPQR never accompanied the corona, but always the clipeus virtutis of the inscription on which it formed the opening words. However, the choice of SPQR was probably deliberate and represented something more than the mere blurring of Augustan distinction. That broad basis of public and Senatorial support which the principate had had in the days of Augustus was to be restored to it.’

769. Civil War, Vindex AR Denarius. Uncertain mint in Gaul, AD 68. AVGVSTVS DIVI F, bare head of youthful Augustus (Octavian) to left / OB CIVES SERVAT in three lines within corona civica with circular jewel in bezel at apex. Nicolas A17RH (same dies); Hess-Leu 1962, 442; BMC 52. 3.29g, 15mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, the fifth known specimen.

2,000

The coins of the ill-fated revolt of Vindex in AD 68 are notoriously rare and difficult to obtain. Until relatively recently they had largely been ignored by scholars, though in the 1970s Peter-Hugo Martin, Colin Kraay and Etienne-Paul Nicolas all published studies on this obscure series. The coins themselves are extremely rare, with many types being known from only very few examples, or unique specimens. Despite the revolt being brief, a matter of just a few months, the coinage is exceptionally diverse. This is due in great part certainly to the large number of men Vindex was able to call to his standards - by his account, over 100,000 though more probably about 20,000 as reported by Plutarch - and the need to pay them. Vindex was a descendent of a family of chieftains granted Roman citizenship during the time of Julius Caesar and who were admitted to the Senate by Claudius. On account of this it is tempting to view his revolt as a campaign for Gallic independence. The numismatic evidence, however, suggests the contrary and demonstrates that rather than having an anti-Roman agenda, Vindex was specifically anti-Neronian and anti-tyrannical. His coinage employs consistently Augustan propaganda, recalling the great Pax inaugurated by Augustus following his defeat of Marc Antony. Augustus’ self-styled persona as the protector of the liberty of the Roman people is an obvious choice to champion on the coinage of Vindex as he led a revolt against the tyranny of Nero.

770. Civil War, Vindex AR Denarius. Uncertain mint in Gaul, AD 68. SALVS GENERIS HVMANI, Victory standing to left on globe, holding palm branch and wreath / SPQR within corona civica with circular jewel in bezel at apex. Nicolas 77TRE (same rev. die); RIC 72; Martin 77. 3.27g, 17mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

202

1,500


771. Civil War, Vindex AR Denarius. Uncertain mint in Gaul, AD 68. SALVS GENERIS HVMANI, Victory standing to left on globe, holding palm branch and wreath / S•P•Q•R within corona civica with circular jewel in bezel at apex. Nicolas 77; RIC 72; Martin 77. 3.37g, 18mm, 8h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

1,000

Superb Civil War Denarius of Vindex

772. Civil War, Vindex AR Denarius. Uncertain mint in Gaul, AD 68. S•P•Q•R• within corona civica, circular jewel in bezel at apex / SALVS GENERIS HVMANIS, Victory standing to right on globe, bearing wreath in outstretched right hand and palm branch over left shoulder. Martin 78; RIC 73a; C. 421; Nicolas 70, pl. III, 70NIG. 3.99g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare – one of as few as a dozen examples.

5,000

Interestingly, this issue reverses the normal convention of placing Victory on the obverse, who is instead relegated to the reverse of the coin, and replaced by the corona civica.

773. Civil War, Vindex AR Denarius. Uncertain mint in Gaul, AD 68. SALVS GENERIS HVMANI, Victory standing to right on globe, holding palm branch and wreath / SPQR within corona civica with circular jewel in bezel at apex. Martin 78; RIC 73a; C. 421; Nicolas 70, pl. III, 70NIG (same dies). 3.59g, 16mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare – one of as few as a dozen examples.

2,000

774. Civil War, Vindex AR Denarius. Uncertain mint in Gaul, AD 68. AVGVSTVS CAESAR, laureate head of Augustus to right / DIVVS IVLIVS, comet of eight rays with tail upward. Nicolas A8; BMC p.301, 49-50; RIC 92; Martin A10; Classical Numismatic Group 90, 23 May 2012, 1479 (same dies). 2.81g, 16mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

750

775. Civil War, Vindex AR Denarius. Uncertain mint in Gaul, AD 68. CAESAR AVGVSTVS, bare head of the deified Augustus to right / SPQR within corona civica with circular jewel in bezel at apex. Nicolas A22BR (same dies); BMC 55; RIC 106; Martin 29. 3.90g, 17mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare. The fourth known example.

203

2,000


Bold Portrait

776. Galba AR Denarius. Rome, July AD 68-January 69. IMP SER GALBA AVG, laureate head right / DIVA AVGVSTA, Livia, draped, standing left, holding patera and vertical sceptre. RIC 150; RSC 52a. 3.30g, 18mm, 6h. Fleur de Coin. Struck on sound, lustrous metal. Very Rare.

2,500

777. Galba Æ Sestertius. Rome, July AD 68-January 69. IMP SER GALBA AVG TR P, laureate and draped bust right / Victory alighting to right, holding wreath in outstretched right hand and palm over left shoulder. RIC -, cf. 251-252; BMC -; Stacks Bowers & Ponterio 1743, 12 January 2013, 6082 (same obverse die). 27.65g, 36mm, 5h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

778

1,500

779

778. Otho AR Denarius. Rome, 15 January-8 March AD 69. IMP M OTHO CAESΛR AVG TR P, bare head right / SECVRITAS P R, Securitas, draped, standing left, holding wreath in right hand and cradling sceptre in left. RIC 8; RSC 17; BMC 17-18; BN 10. 3.55g, 20mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Flip strike. 1,000 779. Otho AR Denarius. Rome, 15 January-8 March AD 69. IMP M OTHO CAESΛR AVG TR P, bare head right / SECVRITAS P R, Securitas, draped, standing left, holding wreath in right hand and cradling sceptre in left. RIC 8. 3.38g, 17mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Pleasant old cabinet tone. Rare. 750

780. Vitellius AR Denarius. Lugdunum (Lyon), March-July AD 69. A VITELLIVS IMP GERMAN, laureate head right, globe at point of neck / IO MAX CAPITOLINVS, Jupiter Maximus Capitolinus seated left within distyle temple, holding thunderbolt and sceptre. RIC 56; Lyon 6; RSC 39. 3.28g, 18mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and in excellent condition for the issue.

2,000

Ex Helios 6, 9 March 2011, lot 136; Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 46, 2 April 2008, lot 523.

781. Vitellius AR Denarius. Rome, AD 69. A VITELLIVS GERMAN IMP TR P, laureate bust right / CONCORDIA P R, Concordia seated left with patera and cornucopiae. RIC 73; BMC 7; RSC 20. 3.54g, 18mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

204

1,000


The Temple of Vesta

782. Vespasian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 73. IMP CAES VESP AVG CEN, laureate head right / VESTA, domed tetrastyle Temple of Vesta, containing statue of Vesta holding [patera] and sceptre; temple flanked by two further statues. RIC 515; Calicó 690a (same obv. die). 7.12g, 20mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine - Near Mint State. Well struck on sound, lustrous metal. Rare.

20,000

The original Temple of Vesta is believed to have been built by Numa Pompilius along with the original Regia and House of the Vestal Virgins, though the site had already been the centre of the cult’s activity since the 7th century. The temple was the storehouse for the legal wills and documents of Roman Senators and relics such as the Palladium. Popular superstition held that the sacred fire of Vesta contained within was closely tied to the fortunes of the city, and its extinction was viewed as a portent of disaster. One of the earliest structures located in the Roman Forum, it was destroyed by fire and rebuilt several times. The present depiction is that of Nero’s restoration after the Great Fire of AD 64. The appearance of the temple as a type on the coinage of Vespasian is likely linked to the seriousness with which he took the role of Pontifex Maximus, head of Roman religion, a position which he assumed in 71 and which was followed by an explosion in types related to religion on the coinage. It is also appropriate that the founding emperor of the Flavian Dynasty should use the temple sacred to the goddess of hearth, home and family in Roman religion on his coinage. It is perhaps a little ironic however, that while commemorating the temple built by Nero to replace that lost in the Great Fire, Vespasian had recently begun work building the Flavian Amphitheatre, or Colosseum. This lasting monument to the Flavian Dynasty stands over part of the large central area of Rome that Nero appropriated after the fire to build the lavish and extravagant Domus Aurea palace within, and was a symbolic act for Vespasian to be returning part of the city of Rome to her people.

783. Vespasian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 77-78. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head left / Vespasian standing left, holding spear and parazonium, crowned by Victory standing left, holding wreath and palm; COS VIII in exergue. RIC II 936; Calicó 625; BMCRE 205; BN 183; Biaggi 318. 7.06g, 19mm, 6h. About Very Fine.

205

1,500


784. Titus, as Caesar, Æ Sestertius. Struck under Vespasian, Rome, AD 72. T CAES VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS II, laureate head right / PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, holding branch and cornucopiae; S - C across fields. RIC II (1) 609 = II (2) 423; C 150. 27.11g, 33mm, 6h. Attractive glossy green patina, Good Very Fine.

1,250

785. Titus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 79-80. IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head right / TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, throne with back in form of a diadem. RIC 24a; RSC 313; BMC 58. 3.44g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine.

200

786. Titus AR Denarius. Rome, struck 1 January - 30 June AD 80. IMP T CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head left / TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, tripod with fillets; dolphin to right above. RIC 130; cf. RSC 323 (for type); Kölner Münzkabinett 82, lot 121. 3.21g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine, with a deep tone. Very Rare with this obverse legend.

300

Ex CNG Auction 99, 13 May 2015, lot 610.

787. Domitian, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 76-77. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right / COS IIII, legend across fields, cornucopiae with ribbons hanging down each side. RIC 918; Calicó 817. 7.00g, 20mm, 6h. Near Very Fine, scrape on reverse edge.

1,000

788. Domitian, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 79. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, laureate head right / PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, two clasped hands holding aquila set on prow. RIC 246 (Vespasian); BMC 267; C. 392; Calicó 916. 7.05g, 19mm, 6h. Very Fine.

1,500

789. Domitian, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, January - June AD 79. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, laureate head right / PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, clasped hands before legionary eagle, set on prow. RIC 1081; RSC 393; BMC 269. 3.29g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

206

500


Scarce Domitian Sestertius

790. Domitian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 85. IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI, laureate bust right, wearing aegis / Emperor on horseback to right, holding shield and spearing recoiling enemy below horse; S C in exergue. RIC 280; BMC 300a; BN 317. 27.36g, 36mm. Very Fine. Scarce type; attractive portrait.

1,500

791. Domitian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 87. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, laureate head right / IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, with spear in left hand and shield in right, owl at feet to right. RIC 507; RSC 218. 3.43g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

200

792. Domitian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 92-94. DOMITIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / GERMANICVS COS XVI, Germania, bare-chested but wearing drapery from the waist, seated to right in attitude of mourning upon Germanic hexagonal shield, a bent spear below her. RIC 747; BMC 211; Calicó 854. 6.98g, 19mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

5,000

793. Domitian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 96. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV, laureate head right / IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P, Minerva standing left with thunderbolt and spear, shield at her left side. RIC 789; RSC 291. 3.12g, 18mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

207

200


794. Julia Titi AR Denarius. Rome, AD 80-81. IVLIA AVGVSTA TITI AVGVSTI F, draped bust right / VENVS AVGVST, Venus standing right, seen from behind, half nude with drapery hanging low beneath her posterior, holding sceptre in her left hand and helmet in her right and leaning with her left elbow on a column to her left. RIC 388 (Titus); RSC 14. 3.45g, 19mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare. Attractively Toned, with a beautiful reverse.

2,500

Despite the nobility and quality of her father Titus, Julia was no model of womanly virtue. Although a married woman, she and her uncle Domitian carried on an affair that gained public notoriety and was thoroughly condemned by contemporary Roman writers.

795

796

795. Nerva AR Denarius. Rome, AD 96. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS II P P, laureate head right / AEQVITAS AVGVST, Aequitas standing left, holding scales in right hand and cornucopiae in left. RIC 1; RSC 3. 3.44g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 200 796. Nerva AR Denarius. Rome, AD 96. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS II P P, laureate head right / CONCORDIA EXERCITVVM, clasped hands, holding aquila resting on prow. RIC 3; RSC 25. 3.72g, 19mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. 500

797. Trajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 112-113. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI PP, laureate bust right / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, personification of via Traiana reclining left on rocks with wheel and branch; VIA TRAIANA in exergue. Woytek 398; RIC 266; RSC 648. 3.40g, 19mm, 7h. About Extremely Fine. An interesting historical reverse; attractively toned.

150

Built by Trajan at his own expense and commemorated with an arch at its beginning in Beneventum, as well as on his coinage, the Via Traiana was a quicker route for travellers from Rome to Brundisium on the coast. At 205 miles, despite being two miles longer than the Via Appia, the Via Traiana was a much less arduous and therefore faster option than the original Republican road because it traversed a significantly flatter route to the north. Strabo, in his Geography (6.3.7), indicates that the route of the Via Traiana, even though in his day little more than a mule track, saved the traveller a whole day’s journeying.

798. Trajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 112-113. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, equestrian statue of Trajan (equus Traiani of Traian’s forum) depicting the emperor on horseback left carrying spear and Victory. Woytek 394; RIC 291; RSC 497a; BMC 445. 3.31g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Scarce.

250

Although several reverse variants show Trajan on horseback, those dating to his sixth consulship in AD 112 are likely to depict the equestrian statue of the Emperor that once stood in his forum in Rome, which was dedicated in this year. The monument itself was likely modelled on that of Domitian that stood in the Forum Romanum, and may well have influenced the design of the surviving statue of Marcus Aurelius that can be seen in the Capitoline Museums.

208


Trajan Conquers Armenia, Parthia and Mesopotamia

799. Trajan AV Aureus. Rome, AD 116. IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIM AVG GER DAC PARTHICO, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / REGNA ADSIGNATA, Trajan seated to left on platform with two attendants standing behind him; before platform, three kings standing right. RIC 367; Woytek 564f; BMC 613; Calicó 524. 7.26g, 19mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

15,000

This historically significant type proclaims Trajan’s assignment of rulers to the freshly conquered kingdoms of Armenia, Parthia and Mesopotamia following his victories in the East. In his campaign of AD 114-116 Trajan expanded the territories of the empire to what was then the greatest extent of Rome’s borders; her dominion now stretched from the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean to the waters of the Caspian Sea and the Persian Gulf. Trajan had his statue set up on the shore of the latter, and sent the Senate a laurelled letter declaring the war to be at a close but bemoaning that he was too old to go on any further and repeat the conquests of Alexander the Great, to whose conquests this expedition was widely compared. The admiration and respect in which Trajan held the Macedonian king was evidenced by his determination to return to Babylon where he intended to offer sacrifice to Alexander in the house where he had died in 323 BC. The successes referenced on this coin were to be short-lived however, as shortly after his death revolts erupted in Armenia, Mesopotamia, Cyprus and Cyrene, as well as in North West Africa and along the Northern borders of Europe, prompting his successor Hadrian to abandon much of the newly gained territory in favour of a smaller but more defensible empire.

Beautiful Trajan Denarius Featuring Sol

800. Trajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 116-117. IMP CAES NER TRAIAN OPTIM AVG GERM DAC, laureate and draped bust right / PARTHICO P M TR P COS VI P P S P Q R, Sol, radiate and draped, right. Woytek 573; RIC 326; BMC 642. 3.30g, 19mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Scarce, in superb condition for the type.

209

500


801

802

801. Trajan Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 100. IMP CAES NERVA TRAIAN AVG GERM P M, laureate head right with aegis on left shoulder / TR POT COS III P P, Pax seated left on throne, feet on footstool, holding olive branch in outstretched right hand and cradling long sceptre in left arm; S C in exergue. Woytek 76; RIC 413. 23.55g, 34mm, 6h. About Good Very Fine. Attractive even light brown patina. 750 802. Trajan Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 109-10. IMP CAES NERVA TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P P COS V P P, laureate bust right with slight drapery on left shoulder / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Spes walking left holding flower, S-C across fields. Woytek 338; RIC 519. 27.99g, 34mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Pleasant toning around the devices. 500

803. Trajan Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 109-10. IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P P COS V P P, laureate bust right with slight drapery on left shoulder / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Dacia seated left on shield and arms in attitude of mourning, trophy before her, SC in exergue. Woytek 326; RIC 564. 26.89g, 34mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

804

500

805

804. Trajan Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 114-117. IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIM AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate draped bust right / SENATVS POPVLVSQVE ROMANVS, Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and cornucopiae, S-C across fields. Woytek 534; RIC 672. 30.42g, 34mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 750 805. Trajan Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 116-117. IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC PARTHICO P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate and draped bust right / PROVIDENTIA AVGVSTI SPQR, Providentia standing left, resting elbow on column and pointing to globe at her feet, S-C across fields. Woytek 591; RIC 663. 25.03g, 35mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Pleasant dark tone. 500

806. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS III, the Genius of the Roman People standing to left, holding patera and cornucopiae; GEN P R across fields. RIC 123; BMC 273; C. 796; Calicó 1267. 6.64g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

210

5,000


211


212


The Cult of Sol

807.

Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, with drapery on left shoulder / COS III, Sol in prancing quadriga to left, holding whip and wearing chlamys. RIC 168; BMC 378; C –; Calicó 1209; Biaggi 583. 7.30g, 20mm, 7h. Mint State. Rare.

30,000

While it is very likely that the Romans, like many other cultures, had a reverence for the sun from the earliest of times, the ‘official’ cult of the sun-god, Sol Indiges, did not have a very high profile initially. According to Roman sources, the worship of Sol was introduced by Titus Tatius. A shrine to Sol stood on the banks of the Numicius, near many important shrines of early Latin religion. In Rome itself Sol had an ‘old’ temple in the Circus Maximus according to Tacitus, and this temple remained important in the first three centuries AD. Sol also had an old shrine on the Quirinal Hill where an annual sacrifice was offered on August 9. Romans were therefore well acquainted with the concept of a sun god, though his appearance on coinage was infrequent; it would require an Eastern revival of the cult to bring it to prominence. It is known that by AD 158 the cult of Sol Invictus was established at Rome, as evidenced by a votive military inscription (see Campbell, 1994, The Roman army, 31 BC–AD 337: a sourcebook, p. 43 and Halsberghe 1972, p. 45.), however Rome’s first contact with the Syrian cult that would come to worship the sun under this name probably occurred sometime during the reign of Hadrian, whose Eastern connections led to an intensification of relations with the eastern provinces of the empire. Hadrian had accompanied Trajan on all his campaigns in Dacia and the East, and had been appointed legate of Syria, and remained there to guard the Roman frontiers as Trajan, now seriously ill, returned to Rome. Now the de facto supreme commander of the Eastern Roman army, Hadrian’s position as a potential claimant to the throne became unchallengeable. Even after his accession, Hadrian would remain in the East, consolidating the frontiers of the empire and assisting in the restoration of Egypt, Cyprus, Cyrene and Judaea. Sol does of course appear on the coinage of Trajan (see lot 800) where the type is used as a deliberate and obvious reference to his campaign of conquest in the East. Sol also appears early on in the coinage of Hadrian’s reign (see RIC 16), personifying the East more explicitly still with the inscription ORIENS below the portrait, doubtless representing not only a continuation of Trajan’s legacy but also an indirect reference to the emperor himself who, like the sun, had risen to power in the east. This second major issue of a Sol type appears to have coincided with the anticipation of the emperor’s imminent arrival from his tour of the Eastern provinces, heralding his return in a manner reminiscent of his earlier coinage.

213


808. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, circa AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right / VICTORIA AVG, Victory standing left, holding palm in left hand and eagle, which bears wreath in beak, in outstretched hand right. RIC 284; Calicó 1397; C. 1459. 7.27g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

7,500

This reverse type most likely makes reference to Hadrian’s victory over Simon Bar Kochba in Judaea during the last Romano-Jewish war.

809. Hadrian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 118. IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, drapery over left shoulder / PONT MAX TR P COS II, Fortuna seated left holding cornucopiae and rudder, FORT RED SC in exergue. RIC 551a; Cohen 756; BMC 1130. 3.89g, 33mm, 6h. Good Fine - Near Very Fine.

300

810. Sabina AV Aureus. Rome, AD 128-136. SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P, diademed and draped bust right wearing stephane / CONCORDIA AVG, Concordia seated left, holding a patera and resting her left arm on a small statue of Spes. RIC 398 note; BMC 894; Calicó 1429 (these dies); C. 11 var. 7.36g, 19mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Light reddish tone. Rare.

7,500

811. Aelius, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 137. L AELIVS CAESAR, bare head right / TR POT COS II, Concordia seated left, holding patera, resting left elbow on cornucopiae set on base, CONCORD in exergue. RIC 436; RSC 1. 3.45g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine. Beautiful toning; a strong portrait. 200

812. Aelius, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 137. L AELIVS CAESAR, bare head right / TR POT COS II, Pietas standing right, before altar, right hand raised, left hand holding box of incense, PIE-TAS across fields. RIC 439; RSC 36; BMC 989. 3.42g, 19mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. 1,000

214


813. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 151-152. IMP CAES T AEL HADR ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, bare head right / TR POT XV COS IIII, Pius standing facing, head left, holding globe. RIC 213; Calicรณ 1663a. 7.31g, 19mm, 6h. Minor marks, otherwise Near Extremely Fine.

2,000

Unknown to Cohen and RIC

814. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 158-159. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, bareheaded bust to right, drapery on left shoulder / TEMPL DIVI AVG REST, octastyle temple of Divus Augustus, seated cult-statues of Augustus and Livia within, surmounted by a quadriga and statues on the corners and by the steps; COS IIII in exergue. Calicรณ 1625 (Same obv. die); RIC -; C. -. 7.16g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine, edge scrape on obv. Very Rare. There are no examples of this variety in CoinArchives, and it was unknown to RIC and Cohen.

2,000

815. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 159-160. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXIII, bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed bust right / PIETATI AVG COS IIII, Pietas standing facing, head left, holding globe in extended right hand and child in her left arm; a child standing to either side. RIC III 302; Calicรณ 1601a; Biaggi 750; BMCRE 983. 7.23g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Rare.

4,000

816. Antoninus Pius ร Sestertius. Rome, AD 144. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head right / DES IIII, Salus seated left, holding rudder and feeding snake rising from altar; SC in exergue. C. 748 var.; RIC 751. 25.58g, 30mm, 12h. About Extremely Fine.

1,500

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 59, 4 April 2011, lot 1993.

817. Diva Faustina Senior AV Aureus. Rome, AD 150. DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust of Faustina to right, her hair bound with pearls and piled up on top of her head / AVGVSTA, Ceres standing to left, holding two torches. Beckmann df 36 / CB 29; RIC 357a; Biaggi 808; BMC 403; Calicรณ 1758. 7.06g, 20mm, 1h. Very Fine.

215

2,000


818. Diva Faustina Senior AV Aureus. Rome, AD 150. DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust of Faustina to right, her hair bound with pearls and piled up on top of her head / AVGVSTA, Ceres standing to left, holding two torches. Beckmann df 30 / CB 5; RIC 357a; Biaggi 808; BMC 403; Calicó 1758; Strack 471. 7.31g, 20mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

7,500

819. Marcus Aurelius, as Caesar, Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 152-153. AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG PII FIL, bare head right / TR POT VII COS II, Minerva standing left, holding Victory on globe and resting hand on shield, spear leaning against arm; S-C across fields. RIC 1308; C. 653. 26.94g, 34mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. Beautiful surfaces.

1,000

820. Marcus Aurelius, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 157-158. AVRELIVS CAES ANTON AVG P II F, bare head right / TR POT XII COS II, Apollo standing left, holding patera and lyre. RIC 474a; Calicó 1966. 6.83g, 18mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Highly lustrous surfaces.

5,000

821. Marcus Aurelius, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 159-160. AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG P II F, bare headed and draped bust right / TR POT XIIII COS II, Mars advancing right, carrying spear and trophy. RIC 481b; Calicó 1973. 7.24g, 19mm, 6h. Very Fine.

216

2,000


822. Marcus Aurelius AV Aureus. Rome, March-December AD 161. IMP CAES M AVREL ANTONINVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PROV DEOR TR XV COS III, Providentia standing left, holding globe and cornucopiae. RIC 20; Calicó 1904; BMC 14. 7.27g, 20mm, 11h. About Good Very Fine. Very Rare, only two other examples on CoinArchives, both in lower grade.

5,000

823. Lucius Verus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 161. IMP CAES L AVREL VERVS AVG, bare head right / CONCORDIAE AVGVSTOR TR P, Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, both togate, standing facing each other, clasping hands; COS II in exergue. RIC 450; BMC 31; Calicó 2111. 7.33g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

5,000

824. Divus Lucius Verus AR Denarius. Struck under Marcus Aurelius. Rome, AD 169. DIVVS VERVS, bare head right / CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right, head left. RIC 596a; RSC 55. 3.37g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Scarce.

500

825. Commodus Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 185-186. M COMMODVS ANTON AVG PIVS BRIT, laureate and draped bust right / P M TR P X IMP VII COS IIII P P, Victory seated right on shields, inscribing shield set on knee, S-C across fields, VICT BRIT in exergue. RIC 452 var. (draped bust); BMC 560 var. (draped bust). 24.13g, 31mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. A very well preserved example of the type. Very Rare.

1,500

Cassius Dio relates in his Historiae Romanae (LXXII.viii.1-6) that in the last months of Marcus Aurelius’ life there was a serious incursion by the northern tribes into the province of Britannia; the wall was overrun and possibly even the governor himself was lost in battle. The wall in question is likely to have been the Hadrianic frontier, the Antonine wall having been already abandoned. Ulpius Marcellus was therefore dispatched to Britain and by AD 184 had secured a victory against the tribes. This type was struck in commemoration of that victory.

217


826. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 207. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / RESTITVTOR VRBIS, Roma seated left on shield, holding palladium and sceptre. RIC 288; Calic贸 2529; BMC 358; Hill 840. 7.19g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Lustrous metal. Rare. 15,000 Septimius Severus was credited with restoring stability to the Roman Empire after the turbulent reign of Commodus and the civil wars that erupted in the wake of his murder, and by the time this coin was struck he had enlarged the empire in the East and strengthened the southern borders through the expansion of the Limes Tripolitanus, a frontier zone of defensive forts in north Africa. The improved security of the empire enabled Severus to undertake restorative works in Rome itself, the theme of this reverse type. Roma, personification of Rome, is portrayed here as a direct reference to Severus having restored peace and prosperity to the city.

827. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 210. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / P M TR P XVIII COS III P P, Victory advancing right, head left, carrying trophy and leading captive by hand. RIC 237; C. 544; BMC 23; Calic贸 2517; Hill 1107. 7.14g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine - struck on a broad flan; lustrous. Very Rare.

218

10,000


828. Divus Septimius Severus AR Denarius. Struck under Caracalla, Rome, AD 211. DIVO SEVERO PIO, bare head right / CONSECRATIO, eagle standing facing on globe, with open wings and head left. RIC 191c (Caracalla); BMC 21 (Caracalla); Hill 1232; RSC 84. 2.38g, 18mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Light toning, underlying lustre. Scarce.

200

This Coin Illustrated in Calicó

829. Caracalla AV Aureus. Rome, AD 204. ANTON P AVG PON TR P VII, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA PARTHICA MAXIMA, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm. RIC 79; Calicó 2844 corr. (this coin); Hill 680. 7.42g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

10,000

Septimius Severus’ Parthian campaign was concluded in 198 with the capture of the Parthian capital of Ctesiphon. On this occasion Septimius was acclaimed imperator for the eleventh time, and he received the title Parthicus Maximus. His successful campaign was celebrated on coinage over the next few years, and an arch was erected in Rome in commemoration of the event in 203. In the wake of his great triumph, Septimius elevated Caracalla, who had campaigned with him in the east, to co-augustus. That the coinage of Caracalla shared in the celebration of his father’s Parthian victory is attested to by the reverse of this aureus. We find Caracalla bearing the title given to his father, Parthicus Maximus, along with a figure of Victory. As Caracalla neither gained the military victory as Emperor or as a military leader, this aureus demonstrates that victory was also an abstract quality associated with emperorship. The willingness of Septimius Severus to share his victory names with his sons reflects his desire to create a strong and lasting dynasty.

219


830. Caracalla AR Denarius. Rome, AD 206-210. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / LAETITIA TEMPORVM, the spina of the Circus Maximus decorated as a ship facing left, with the turning posts at its prow and stern, a sail mounted on the central obelisk, and the spina’s other monuments visible in between; around the ship, four quadrigas racing left; below, seven animals: an ostrich at left and bear at right; between them a lion and a lioness chasing a wild ass and a panther attacking a bison. RIC 157; BMC 508; Hill 793; RSC 118. 2.65g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

750

831. Caracalla AR Denarius. Rome, AD 208. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / PONTIF TR P XI COS III, Caracalla on horseback right, holding spear, PROF in exergue. RIC 107; RSC 510; BMC 572; Hill 963. 3.31g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful light tone with golden highlights.

250

832. Caracalla AR Antoninianus. Rome, AD 217. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind / VICT PARTHICA, Victory seated right on cuirass, inscribing VO XX in two lines on shield which she props on her left knee and holds with her left hand; shield behind and helmet below. RIC IV 314 note; BMCRE 89; RSC 656b. 4.83g, 24mm, 7h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

300

This coin was struck in anticipation of a Roman victory over the Parthians that was to coincide with the beginning of Caracalla’s twentieth year as Augustus. Caracalla had taken the opportunity of a divided Parthian kingdom, invading their lands in early AD 216. Meeting initial success and pushing the Parthians back deeper into their territory, the emperor decided to consolidate his gains and winter in Edessa. A decisive victory however eluded the emperor, as in the spring of AD 217, while on a trip to Carrhae, Caracalla was assassinated by a member of his bodyguard.

833. Diadumenian, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 217-18. M OPEL ANT DIADVMENIAN CAES, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right / PRINC IVVENTVTIS, Diadumenian standing facing, head right, holding standard and sceptre, two more standards to right. RIC 102; RSC 3. 3.11g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine, and struck on a large flan. Scarce.

220

300



Extremely Rare Medallion

834.

Severus Alexander and Julia Mamaea Æ Bimetallic Medallion. Rome, special emission of AD 228-230. IMP SEVERVS ALEXANDER AVG IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Alexander facing draped bust of Mamaea, wearing stephane; MATER AVG below / FELICITAS TEMPORVM, Severus Alexander, draped, holding globe and mappa, seated left on curule chair and being crowned by Victory; Felicitas standing right, facing female standing left, in front. Gnecchi II, p. 84, 2. For an analogous issue of smaller module see the following references: Gnecchi III, pp. 44-5, 16 and pl. 153, 4-5; BMC, Roman Medallions p. 41, 1 pl. 40; BMC VI, 540; Toynbee cf. p. 147 note 5 and pl. 27, 2 (gold); RIC IV.II, 661. 42.27g, 37mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Some very minor corrosion and encrustation, but otherwise pleasing patina. Of excellent style, obv. well struck in extremely high relief. 7,500 Robert Carson attributed this type to the special issues of 228 (RIC IV pp. 69-70), but the engraving style and composition is similar to the securely VOT X dated medallions of AD 230, cf. Gnecchi III, p. 45, no. 20. Roman bimetallic medallions were donative by nature on behalf of the emperor or the senate and commemorated events, presentation pieces and diplomatic presents. From Antonine times they were produced in two metals, a central portion of soft copper and an outer rim of harder bronze which provided a large area for striking complex designs with oversized dies engraved by master die cutters. The present piece is an example of the work of just such a master die cutter, being of pleasing style and composition. Repeatedly criticised for being under the sway of women whist emperor, Severus Alexander was raised to the purple after his cousin Elagabalus was killed by his guards and his remains desecrated by being thown into the Tiber. Elagabalus had ruled in Rome for a scandalous four years, and after the excesses of his predecessor the peace time reign of Alexander was properous and settled. The reverse type used on this medallion marks just that, with FELICITAS TEMPORVM (Prosperity of the Times) marking a ‘Golden Age’ mentality that the young emperor and his mother were keen to promote. However, the peace was not to last as the Sasanian Persian army rose in the east under Ardashir I, giving cause for Alexander to lead the Roman army against them. Although some successes were achieved and the Sasanids checked for a time, it was during his Germanic campaigns in 235 that the peace built by Alexander and Mamaea finally broke completely when the emperor was murdered by his own troops, leading to nearly fifty years of civil wars, foreign invasion, and collapse of the monetary system.

222


Very Rare Aureus of Severus Alexander

835.

Severus Alexander AV Aureus. Rome, AD 231. IMP SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate bust right, slight drapery over far shoulder / VICTORIA AVG, Victory standing left, holding wreath and palm. RIC 211b; Calic贸 3138; BMC 699. 6.12g, 20mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. Very Rare, the only example on CoinArchives.

9,500

Ex Jesus Vico 134, 28 February 2013, lot 399. In the second period of the reign of Severus Alexander, AD 228-231, the general character of his coinage remains unchanged. The same deities and personifications recur regularly, but at the end of the period we find Profectio, Virtus and Victoria types, which mark the preliminary stages of the campaign against Artaxerxes of Persia. In AD 227, Artaxerxes had invaded Parthia and overthrown King Artabanus V, proclaiming himself the restorer of the Achaemenids under the title of King of Kings. Having consolidated his position in Media and Persia, he proceeded to overrun Mesopotamia and threaten the provinces of Syria and Cappadocia. News of the impending danger reached Rome in AD 230, and in the following year Alexander and his mother set out for Antioch. Whilst the campaign appears to have brought little credit to the Roman army and still less to the Emperor as a military commander, the desires of Artaxerxes were temporarily arrested and Alexander celebrated a triumph in September AD 232. The Victory type we find on the reverse of this coin, as in several other cases, may have been anticipatory rather than commemorative, although it was likely issued in connection with the campaign in the East.

223


836. Orbiana AR Denarius. Rome, AD 225-227. SALL BARBIA ORBIANA AVG, diademed and draped bust right / CONCORDIA AVGG, Concordia seated left on throne, holding patera and double cornucopiae. RIC 319; RSC 1; BMC 287. 2.97g, 19mm, 6h. Very Fine. Scarce. A bold and attractive portrait.

200

837. Orbiana Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 225-227. SALL BARBIA ORBIANA AVG, diademed and draped bust right / CONCORDIA AVGVSTORVM, Severus Alexander standing right, togate, holding scroll and clasping hands with Orbiana standing left. RIC 657. 19.30g, 31mm, 11h. Very Fine. Rare.

500

838. Maximus, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 236-237. IVL VERVS MAXIMVS CAES, bareheaded and draped bust right / PIETAS AVG, emblems of the pontificate: lituus, secespita, guttus, simpulum, and aspergillum. RIC IV 2; RSC 3; BMCRE 201-203 (Maximinus). 3.10g, 20mm, 7h. Good Very Fine.

300

839. Gordian I Africanus AR Denarius. Rome, March-April AD 238. IMP M ANT GORDIANVS AFR AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind / P M TR P COS P P, Gordian standing facing, head left, holding branch in right hand and short sceptre in left. RIC 2; RSC 2. 2.94g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Hint of copper deposit on reverse; lustrous and bright metal. Rare.

1,250

840. Gordian I Africanus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 238. IMP M ANT GORDIANVS AFR AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind / SECVRITAS AVGG, Securitas seated left, holding sceptre in right hand. RIC IV 5; BMCRE 11; RSC 10. 3.38g, 21mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Expressive portrait, lightly toned.

224

1,500


841. Gordian II AR Denarius. Rome, AD 238. IMP M ANT GORDIANVS AFR AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGG, Victory advancing left, holding wreath in extended right hand, cradling palm frond with left arm. RIC 2; BMCRE 28; RSC 12. 3.05g, 19mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

2,000

842. Balbinus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 238. IMP CD CAEL BALBINVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS II PP, Emperor, togate, standing left, holding branch and parazonium. RIC 5; RSC 20. 2.61g, 20mm, 1h. About Extremely Fine.

843

500

844

843. Balbinus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 238. IMP C D CAEL BALBINVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PROVIDENTIA DEORVM, Providentia standing left, holding a wand in lowered right hand over a globe at feet to left, and cornucopiae in left hand. RIC 7; RSC 23. 2.74g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 500 844. Pupienus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 238. IMP C M CLOD PVPIENVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PAX PVBLICA, Pax seated left holding branch and sceptre. RIC 4; RSC 22. 3.38g, 20mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Lightly toned. A well-detailed portrait. 500

845

846

845. Pupienus AR Antoninianus. Rome, AD 238. IMP CAES M CLOD PVPIENVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / AMOR MVTVVS AVGG, clasped hands. RIC 9b; RSC 1; BMC 77. 4.85g, 23mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. 300 846. Gordian III, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 238. M ANT GORDIANVS CAES, bare-headed and draped bust right / PIETAS AVGG, jug between lituus and knife on left, simpulum and sprinkler on right. RIC 1; RSC 182. 2.52g, 21mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

300

847. Gordian III AV Aureus. Rome, late AD 240-early AD 243. IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / VIRTVTI AVGVSTI, the ‘Farnese’ Hercules standing facing, head right, resting right hand on hip and placing left on club set on rock; lion skin beside club. RIC 108; Calicó 3242; Biaggi 1373-4. 5.27g, 21mm, 6h. Very Fine.

225

1,500


Beautiful and Pedigreed Tranquillina

848.

Tranquillina AR Denarius. Rome, AD 241-244. SABINIA TRANQVILLINA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane / CONCORDIA AVGG, Concordia seated left on throne, holding patera in right hand and cradling double cornucopiae in left arm. RIC IV 252; RSC 1a; Hunter 1. 3.12g, 20m, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Boldly struck, and certainly one of the finest surviving examples. Very Rare. From an old European collection; Ex Münzen & Medaillen 28, 19 June 1964, lot 448.

10,000

In contrast to the prodigious output of the standard silver antoninianus for her husband Gordian III, the corresponding imperial issues for Tranquillina are exceedingly scarce to a puzzling extent, more especially as her provincial issues are comparatively great in number. Changing from the denarius, which had been struck for him in 240, to the antoninianus as the standard issue renders denarii of both Gordian and Tranquillina a rare denomination probably only struck on special occasions. However, this does not explain the scarcity of Tranquillina’s imperial coinage in general. The daughter of Gaius Furius Sabinius Aquila Timesitheus, commander of the Praetorian Guard, Tranquillina was married to the young boy-Emperor in 241 who, at only 13 when he had been raised to the purple, was soon to be held in sway by his new father in law, de facto ruler of the Empire. That this situation prevailed has been suggested by David Vagi to explain the scarcity of Tranquillina’s coinage, and might also go some way to give reason to the vast output of coinage for Gordian: Timesitheus might be controlling the Emperor, but it may have been more favourable not to promote this to the population of Rome in the traditional propagandist form of the coinage, instead opting to use all issues to reinforce that Gordian was in fact Emperor. That Tranquillina’s provincial issues continued in a more standard pattern simply shows that outside of Rome the relationship between the Emperor and the Commander of the Praetorian Guard mattered less. In any event, Timesitheus remained in his position until his death in uncertain circumstances two years later while on campaign in the east, while Gordian remained married to Tranquillina for the rest of his life also, though there were no new issues of coinage for the Empress and after her husband’s death in 244 she disappears from the historical record.

226


Rare and Beautiful Aureus set in Ancient Bezel

849. Otacilia Severa AV Aureus. Rome, AD 245-247, in a gold pendant with an openwork border of leaf-pattern with a ribbed suspension loop. M•OTACIL SEVERA AVG, draped bust of Otacilia right, wearing stephane, hair in six tight waves with turned up plait / CONCORDIA AVGG, Concordia seated left, holding patera and double cornucopiae. R. Bland, ‘The gold coinage of Philip I and family’, in RN 171, 2014, pp. 93-149, 30 (OS10/O3); RIC Philip I 125; Calicó 3264. For a similar openwork gold setting with loop see: F.H. Marshall, Catalogue of the Jewellery, Greek, Etruscan and Roman, in the Department of Antiquities, British Museum, London 1969, pl. 68, 2937 (Philip I). 25.17g (including mount and chain), 28mm (coin in mount), 1h (coin). Extremely Fine. Rare.

20,000

850. Otacilia Severa Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 244-249. MARCIA OTACIL SEVERA AVG, diademed and draped bust right / PIETAS AVGVSTAE, Pietas standing facing, head left, raising right hand and holding box of perfume in left, S-C across fields. RIC 208. 19.95g, 31mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

500

851. Trajan Decius AE Sestertius. Rome, AD 249. IMP CAES C MESS TRAI Q DECIO AVG, laureate, draped bust right / GENIVS EXERCITVS ILLYRICIANI, Genius, wearing polos on head, standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae, with standard to right. RIC 105d. 16.29g, 29mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

227

300


852. Postumus Æ Sestertius. Cologne, AD 261. IMP C POSTVMVS PIVS F AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS II P P, emperor in military attire standing left, holding globe and spear, S-C across fields. RIC 109; Bastien 58 (same dies); C. 256; De Witte 208; Elmer 208. 18.46g, 31mm, 6h. Pleasing patina, Good Very Fine. Rare obv. legend variant with PIVS.

300

Expressive Portrait of Postumus

853. Postumus Ӕ Double Sestertius. Lugdunum, AD 261. IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing facing, head left, holding two standards. RIC 123; Bastien 77e. 17.29g, 33mm, 5h. Attractive green patina, Near Extremely Fine. Wonderfully expressive portrait of Postumus.

750

854. Diocletian AV Aureus. Nicomedia, AD 284. DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right / IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing to left, naked but for cloak, holding thunderbolt and sceptre; SMN in exergue. RIC 5a; Calicó 4494; C. 251; Depeyrot 2/4; Lukanc Nicomedia 2. 5.34g, 18mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

228

8,000


Unique and Important Diocletian Gilded Medallion

855.

Diocletian Gilded Æ Medallion. Rome, AD 287. IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust left / VICTORIA AVGG, two victories holding shield. Unpublished in the standard references. 14.22g, 27mm, 1h. Good Very Fine; much of the original gold plating remaining. Unique.

5,000

Ex A. Tkalec, 8 September 2008, lot 380. Struck in AD 287, this coin commemorates the co-consulship of Diocletian and Maximian. The joint consulship was essentially a required formality, since Maximian had been elevated from the rank of Caesar to that of Augustus the year before by Diocletian in order to assist in better governing the empire and responding to military threats (and in particular to deal with the rebel Carausius on an equal footing, Carausius having proclaimed himself Augustus when he caused the secession of Britain and northern Gaul). However it was also necessary as a public display of unity between the two Augusti, which is also borne out on the coins issued in their names at this time. Despite having been elevated to Caesar in 285, no coinage was struck for Maximian until he had been made co-Augustus in 286. Thereafter the imperial mints struck parallel issues for both emperors. The consulships of Diocletian and Maximian were marked on issues of aurei (rare heavy aurei are attested for both colleagues from the Antioch mint, which are considered ceremonial in nature and perhaps part of a donative) and bronze medallions, which no doubt followed the usual pattern of presentation pieces produced as gifts for court officials, or visiting dignitaries. The obverse of this coin portrays Diocletian in his consular regalia: mantled, and holding a sceptre topped with the Roman imperial eagle. The victory alluded to on the reverse of the coin probably represents the achievements in 285/6 of his right hand man Maximian in mounting successful raids on the Burgundian and Alemanni tribes of the Moselle-Vosges region, the Heruli, and the Chaibones, all of whom he defeated and whose lands he laid waste. Maximian struck deep into their territories, defeating their armies in battle and reducing them through famine and disease. By the winter of 287 he had cleared the Rhine lands of Germanic tribesben, leading his panegyrist to declare “All that I see beyond the Rhine is Roman.”

229


856

857

856. Diocletian AR Argenteus. Rome, AD 294. DIOCLETIANVS AVG, laureate bust right / VICTORIA SARMAT, four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with six turrets. RIC 31a. 3.77g, 19mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. Very Rare. 750 857. Diocletian AR Argenteus. Nicomedia, AD 295. DIOCLETIANVS AVG, laureate bust right / VICTORIAE SARMATICAE, four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with six turrets; SMNΓ in exergue. RIC 19a. 3.43g, 19mm, 1h. Fleur De Coin. Very Rare. 750

858

859

858. Diocletian AR Argenteus. Rome, circa AD 295-297. DIOCLETIANVS AVG, laureate bust right / VIRTVS MILITVM, four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with six turrets, dot in archway, B in exergue. RIC 40a. 3.88g, 20mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Scarce. 500 859. Maximianus AR Argenteus. Ticinum, AD 294. MAXIMIANVS AVG, laureate bust right / VIRTVS MILITVM, four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with six turrets, dot in archway. RIC 27b. 2.77g, 19mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

861

860

860. Maximianus AR Argenteus. Siscia, AD 294. MAXIMIANVS AVG, laureate bust right / VIRTVS MILITVM, four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with eight turrets. RIC 32b; RSC 625f. 3.09g, 19mm. Good Extremely Fine. 500 861. Galerius, as Caesar, AR Argenteus. Siscia, AD 294-295. MAXIMIANVS CAESAR, laureate bust right / VIRTVS MILITVM, four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with eight turrets. RIC 44b. 3.70g, 18mm, 5h. Near Mint State. Very Rare.

750

862. Galerius, as Caesar, AR Argenteus. Heraclea, AD 295. MAXIMIANVS CAESAR, laureate bust right / VIRTVS MILITVM, four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with six turrets, dot in archway; HΔ in exergue. RIC 8; RSC 220e. 3.58g, 18mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

230

750


Extremely Rare Severus II Argenteus

863. Severus II, as Caesar, AR Argenteus. Serdica, AD 305-306. SEVERVS NOB C, laureate bust right / VIRTVS MILITVM, three-turreted camp-gate with no doors, pellet in doorway, •SM•SDB• in exergue. RIC -; Gautier 24 var. (officina); RSC -; Cf. NAC 62, 6 October 2011, lot 2089 (same obv. die). 3.47g, 20mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. Of the Highest Rarity.

6,250

Most likely struck to mark the commencement of the Second Tetrarchy in AD 305, this extremely rare coin is one of only a handful known, a few having come to light in a hoard about a decade ago. Struck using the same obverse die as several known specimens, the reverse die of this issue is new, having the inclusion of a pellet in the doorway of the camp gate. The scarcity of these types might be explained by the short period of time during which Severus held the position of Caesar before being elevated by Galerius after the death of Constantius I in summer 306 - in a matter of months he was raised from the senior ranks of the army to Augustus in the West. However, his time as Augustus came to an abrupt end when he was tasked with the suppression of the revolt of Maxentius in Rome: he marched on the city at the head of an army previously commanded by Maximian, father of Maxentius, to whom his soldiers deserted. Severus fled to Ravenna where, in 307, he was persuaded by Maxentius to surrender. Despite Maximian’s assurances that he would be treated with respect, Severus was nonetheless displayed as a captive and later imprisoned at Tres Tabernae. When Galerius invaded Italy to suppress Maxentius and Maximian himself, Maxentius ordered Severus’ death. He was executed (or forced to commit suicide) on 16 September 307.

Unusually Well Preserved Martinian

864. Martinian Æ Nummus. Nicomedia, AD 324. D N M MARTINIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on globe in right hand and eagle-tipped sceptre in left, captive on ground to right, X-IIΓ above, eagle to left holding wreath in beak; SMNΓ in exergue. RIC 45; C.3. 2.64g, 20mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, and very well preserved for the issue.

3,000

865. Martinian Æ Nummus. Nicomedia, AD 324. D N M MARTINIANO P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on globe in right hand and eagle-tipped sceptre in left, captive on ground to right, X-IIΓ above, eagle to left holding wreath in beak; SMNB in exergue. RIC 46. 3.08g, 19mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

231

1,500


Very Rare Alexandrian Siliqua of Constans

866. Constans AR Siliqua. Alexandria, 9 September AD 337-spring 340. Pearl-diademed head right / CONSTANS AVG in two lines within wreath; ALE in exergue. RIC 3; RSC 2a. 3.29g, 21mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare; only three examples on CoinArchives.

500

867. Constans AV Solidus. Thessalonica, AD 337-340. FL IVL CONSTANS P F AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VIRTVS EXERCITVM, the emperor in military attire, standing left and holding trophy and shield, two captives at his feet; TES in exergue. RIC 34; Depeyrot 4/7. 4.46g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

2,000

868. Constans AV Solidus. Decennnalia issue. Aquileia, struck AD 347. CONSTANS AVGVSTVS, laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; all within border consisting of wreath with large central jewel / VICTORIAE DD NN AVGG, two Victories standing facing each other, holding between them wreath inscribed VOT X MVLT XX in four lines; SMAQ in exergue; all within border consisting of wreath with large central jewel. RIC VIII 45; Depeyrot 5/1; Paolucci 377 (same dies as illustration); DOC –; Biaggi –. 4.45g, 22mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Sharply struck and lustrous. Very Rare.

3,000

Ex Stack’s Bowers and Ponterio 174, 11 January 2013, lot 5508.

869. Constantius II AV Solidus. Nicomedia, AD 340-351. FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / GLORIA REIPVBLICAE, shield inscribed with VOT XX MVLT XXX in four lines supported by Roma enthroned left, wearing helmet and holding spear, and Constantinopolis enthroned right, wearing mural crown, foot on prow and holding sceptre; SMNT in exergue. RIC 33; Depeyrot 3/4. 4.43g, 22mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautiful, lustrous metal. Rare.

3,000

870. Constantius II AV Solidus. Antioch, AD 347-355. FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / GLORIA REIPVBLICAE, Roma, seated facing on left, and Constantinopolis, seated left on right, supporting round shield inscribed VOT XX MVLT XXX; SMANΔ in exergue. RIC 83. 4.50g, 21mm, 11h. About Extremely Fine.

232

1,500


871. Constantius II AV Solidus. Antioch, AD 347-355. FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / GLORIA REIPVBLICAE, Roma, seated facing on left, and Constantinopolis, seated left on right, supporting round shield inscribed VOT XX MVLT XXX; SMANΓ in exergue. RIC 84. 4.46g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Flan a little wavy. Well detailed and centred. Rare.

1,500

872. Constantius Gallus, as Caesar, AV Solidus. Antioch, 15 March AD 351– late 354. D N CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right / GLORIA REIPVBLICAE, Roma, seated facing on left, and Constantinopolis, seated left on right, supporting round shield inscribed VOTIS V; SMANI• in exergue. RIC 90; Depeyrot 7/4. 4.38g, 21mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Some cleaning marks. Very Rare.

4,000

873. Valentinian I AV Solidus. Arelate, AD 364-367. D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / RESTIVTOR REIPVBLICAE, emperor standing left, head right, holding labarum and Victory on globe; KONSTAN in exergue. RIC 1b. 4.45g, 21mm, 12h. Near Mint State. Beautiful, lustrous fields.

3,000

Mint State Solidus of Valentinian I

874. Valentinian I AV Solidus. Treveri, AD 367-375. D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped bust right / VICTORIA AVGG, Valens and Valentinian facing, jointly holding globe; Victory above, wings spread; palm branch below; TROBS in exergue. RIC 17b. 4.43g, 21mm, 1h. Mint State.

3,000

875. Valentinian I AV Solidus. Treveri, AD 367-375. D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGG, Valens and Valentinian seated facing, together holding a globe, Victory above them, palm branch set between them on ground; TR•OB• in exergue. RIC 17a. 4.47g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

233

1,000


876. Valens AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 367. D N VALENS P F AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / RESTITVTOR REIPVBLICAE, emperor standing left, head right, holding labarum and victory on globe; CONS in exergue. RIC 25(b); Depeyrot 21/2. 4.43g, 22mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Superb portrait, well framed within a full border. Lustrous metal.

3,000

877. Valens AV Solidus. Treveri, AD 367-375. D N VALENS P F AVG, pearl-diademed and draped bust right / RESTITVTOR REIPVBLICAE, emperor standing left, head right, holding labarum and Victory on globe; SMTR in exergue. RIC 14b. 4.38g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous surfaces.

2,500

Beautiful Gratian Miliarense

878. Gratian AR Miliarense. Treveri, AD 367-375. D N GRATIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VIRTVS EXERCITVS, Gratian standing facing, head left, holding signum in right hand, placing left hand on shield set on ground; TRPS• in exergue. RIC IX 26e; RSC 52†b. 4.51g, 25mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive old tone.

4,000

Ex Mark Poncin Collection; Ex Triton X, 9 January 2007, lot 803; Ex Lanz 120, 18 May 2004, lot 594; Ex Auctiones 23, 17 June 1993, lot 622.

Ex Lanz 1984

879. Gratian AV Solidus. Thessalonica, AD 379. D N GRATIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGG, Gratian and Valentinian seated facing, holding globe between them; above, Victory facing with spread wings; below, a palm branch; TESOB in exergue. RIC 34(a); Depeyrot 34/1. 4.38g, 21mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous metal. Ex Lanz 28, 7 May 1984, lot 817.

234

2.500


880. Valentinian II AV Solidus. Trier, AD 375-392. D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGG, two nimbate emperors enthroned facing, holding globe between them, Victory above, palm below; T-R across fields, COM in exergue. RIC 90a; Depeyrot 53/1. 4.49g, 22mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin.

4,000

881. Theodosius I AV Solidus. Mediolanum, circa AD 383-385. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGG, Gratian and Theodosius, nimbate, in consular robes, seated facing on throne with their legs draped; the figure to right holds mappa, together they hold globe between them; above globe, facing half figure of Victory with wings spread; below globe, palm branch; COM in exergue RIC 5f; Depeyrot 1/3. 4.17g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

750

882. Theodosius I AV Solidus. Aquileia, 25 August AD 383 - AD 387. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGG, Theodosius and Gratian, nimbate and draped, seated facing, holding globe between them; above and behind them is a Victory with open wings, below and between a palm branch; A-Q across fields, COM in exergue. RIC 40b; Depeyrot 21/2; Paolucci 777. 4.50g, 21mm, 7h. Scrape across hair of portrait and flan edge at 5 o’clock (obv.), otherwise Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

2,500

883. Magnus Maximus AR Siliqua. Treveri, AD 383-388. D N MAG MAXIMVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VIRTVS ROMANORVM, Roma enthroned facing, head left, holding globe and spear, TRPS in exergue. RIC 84b; RSC 20a. 1.86g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful iridescent tones.

200

Unlisted Officina for Very Rare Issue

884. Arcadius AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 388-392. D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / CONCORDIA AVGGG H, Constantinopolis seated facing, head right, on throne ornamented with lion heads, foot on prow, holding sceptre in right hand and globe in left, CONOB in exergue. RIC IX 45e; Depeyrot 34/2. 4.43g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare; RIC does not list officina H for this issue.

235

750


885. Arcadius AV Solidus. Mediolanum, AD 395-402. D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, Arcadius standing right, holding labarum and crowning Victory on globe, with foot on captive to lower right; M-D across fields; COMOB in exergue. RIC IX 35b = RIC X 1205; Depeyrot 16/1. 4.41g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

500

886. Arcadius AV Solidus. Ravenna, AD 402-408. D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, Arcadius standing right, with left foot on captive, holding labarum in right hand and Victory on globe in left; R窶天 across fields; COMOB in exergue. RIC X 1286; Ranieri 2-3; Depeyrot 7/2. 4.47g, 21mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

887. Honorius AV Solidus. Mediolanum, AD 394-395. D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, Honorius standing right, holding Victory on globe in his left hand and labarum with his right, his left foot on bound captive to right; M-D across fields; COMOB in exergue. Depeyrot 16/2; RIC IX 35c; cf. RIC X 1206a. 4.40g, 21mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

500

888. Honorius AV Solidus. Mediolanum, AD 394-395. D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, Honorius standing right, holding Victory on globe in his left hand and labarum with his right, his left foot on bound captive to right; M-D across fields; COMOB in exergue. Depeyrot 16/2; RIC IX 35c; cf. RIC X 1206a. 4.50g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

500

889. Honorius AV Solidus. Rome, AD 404-416. D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, Honorius standing right, foot on captive, holding labarum and Victory on globe; R-M across fields; COMOB in exergue. RIC X 1252; Depeyrot 34/2. 4.48g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

236

500


Johannes, Usurper

890. Johannes AV Solidus. Ravenna, AD 423-425. D N IOHANNES P F AVG, rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, Johannes standing right, holding standard in right hand and Victory on globe in left, trampling on captive to right; R-V across fields; COMOB in exergue. RIC 1901; Ulrich-Bansa 2; Ranieri 51–2; Depeyrot 12/1; Biaggi 2344. 4.49g, 21mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

6,500

Matthews (Western Aristocracies and Imperial Court AD 364-425, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990) writes that “the events of Johannes’ reign are as shadowy as its origins”, and then provides a list of the ruler’s known actions in a single paragraph. What is known of Johannes is that on the death of Honorius on 15 August 423, he was a high ranking official, a “primicerius notariorum”, and therefore occupied a position of great influence as head of the palace bureaucracy in Ravenna. An ‘interregum’ of several months followed Honorius’ death during which the eastern Emperor Theodosius II hesitated in announcing the death of his uncle, and was therefore technically the ruler of the entire Empire. On 20 November the situation dramatically changed when Honorius’ patrcian Castinus proclaimed Johannes emperor of the West. Although Procopius of Caesarea praised him as “both gentle and well-endowed with sagacity and thoroughly capable of valorous deeds”, his control over the empire was insecure from the very beginning. In Gaul, his praetorian prefect was slain at Arelate in an uprising of the soldiery there. Meanwhile Bonifacius, Comes of the Diocese of Africa, held back the grain fleet destined for Rome. More importantly, Theodosius refused to countenance this usurpation and decided to support the claim to the western throne of his young cousin, Valentinian, son of the late Emperor Constantius III and the Empress Galla Placidia. Therefore towards the end of 424 a large army was despatched from the East to forcibly remove Johannes from power and install Valentinian III in his place. Despite Johannes’ apparently fragile position however, the Eastern empire’s campaign to depose him was not straightforward. The historian Adrian Goldsworthy writes that “it took a hard-fought campaign by strong elements of the East Roman army and navy, in addition to a fair dose of betrayal,” to defeat Johannes.

891. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 408-420. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, helmeted, three-quarter facing bust, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / CONCORDIA AVGG S, Constantinopolis seated facing, holding sceptre and Victory on globe, resting her foot on a prow; star in left field, CONOB in exergue. RIC 202; Depeyrot 73/2. 4.47g, 21mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. Struck on a broad flan of lustrous metal. Minor edge mark to obv.

237

750


892. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 408-420. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, helmeted, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust right, holding spear pointing forward and shield with a horseman and enemy motif / GLORIA REIPVBLICAE, Roma and Constantinopolis enthroned facing, heads turned towards one another, holding sceptres and supporting between them a shield inscribed VOT XV MVL XX; prow beneath right foot of Constantinopolis, star in left field, CONOB in exergue. RIC 207; Depeyrot 61/1. 4.49g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

893. Theodosius II AR Miliarense. Constantinople, AD 408-423. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left / GLORIA ROMANORVM, Theodosius, nimbate, standing facing, head left, raising hand and holding globe, star to left; CON in exergue. RIC 370; RSC 20a. 4.31g, 24mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. Lightly toned and lustrous.

2,500

894. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 424/5-430. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / GLORIA ORVIS TERRAR Z, emperor standing facing, holding labarum and globus cruciger; star in left field, CONOB in exergue. RIC X 232; Depeyrot 77/1. 4.46g, 22mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

1,000

895. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 426-429. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / SALVS REIPVBLICAE H, Theodosius II and Valentinian III seated facing on double throne, each nimbate and wearing consular robes, holding mappa in right hand, cruciform sceptre in left; star above, CONOB in exergue. RIC 237; Depeyrot 79/1. 4.50g, 21mm, 5h. Near Mint State.

1,000

896. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Thessalonica, AD 430-440. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / VOT XXX MVLT XXXX Γ, Constantinopolis enthroned left with shield behind, holding globus cruciger and sceptre, foot on prow; star in right field; CONOB in exergue. RIC X 257. 4.49g, 21mm, 7h. Light ‘X’ grafitto on obv., otherwise Near Mint State.

238

650


The Wedding of Valentinian III and Licinia Eudoxia

897.

Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, October AD 437. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear and shield with horseman motif / FELICITER NUBTIIS, Theodosius standing facing, crowned and nimbate, his hands resting on the shoulders of his son-in-law Valentinian III to left, and his daughter Licinia Eudoxia to right, both crowned and nimbate, who hold hands before Theodosius; CONOB in exergue. RIC 267; MIRB 8. 4.34g, 22mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. At least the equal of, if not better than, the example sold at A. Tkalec in January 2000 for CHF 31,000. Of the highest rarity. 10,000 This coin was struck in Constantinople to commemorate the marriage between the daughter of Theodosius II, Licinia Eudoxia, to the Western Emperor Valentinian III on 29 October 437. As first cousins the marriage represented an attempt to maintain the stability of imperial succession by re-unifying both halves of the Theodosian family and consolidate dynastic power over both halves of the empire. The marriage of the eighteen-year old Valentinian to the fifteen-year old Eudoxia is depicted on this reverse with the senior emperor Theodosius II between the newlyweds, indicating the ultimate source of Valentinian’s power. Indeed, Valentinian had been placed on the throne at the age of six by Theodosius himself, following a period of instability over succession. Whilst the long reigns of Valentinian III and Theodosius II were indicative of periods of relative stability in both the East and West, the Western Empire would merely survive two decades after Valentinian’s death in 454. Though the Theodosian Dynasty would end in the East with the death of Marcian in 457, the Eastern Empire itself would survive another millennium.

239


FDC Solidus of Theodosius II

898. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 441-450. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / IMP XXXXII COS XVII•P•P•, Constantinopolis enthroned left with shield behind, holding globus cruciger and sceptre; foot on prow, star in left field, COMOB in exergue. RIC 313; Depeyrot 84/1. 4.45g, 21mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin.

899

650

900

899. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 441-450. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / IMP XXXXII COS XV•II•P•P (sic), Constantinopolis enthroned left with shield behind, holding globus cruciger and sceptre; foot on prow, star in left field, COIIOB in exergue. RIC 319 var. (placements of punctuation); Gorny & Mosch 233, 2754 corr. (same reverse die); Depeyrot 84/1. 4.40g, 21mm, 6h. Mint State. 650 900. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 441-450. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / IMP XXXXII COS XV•II•P•P (sic), Constantinopolis enthroned left with shield behind, holding globus cruciger and sceptre; foot on prow, star in left field, COIIOB in exergue. RIC 319 var. (placements of punctuation); Gorny & Mosch 233, 2754 corr. (same reverse die); Depeyrot 84/1. 4.38g, 21mm, 6h. Mint State. 650

901

902

901. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 441-450. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / IMP XXXXII COS XV•II•P•P (sic), Constantinopolis enthroned left with shield behind, holding globus cruciger and sceptre; foot on prow, star in left field, COIIOB in exergue. RIC 319 var. (placements of punctuation); Gorny & Mosch 233, 2754 corr. (same reverse die); Depeyrot 84/1. 4.45g, 21mm, 6h. Mint State. 650 902. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 441-450. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / IMP XXXXII COS XV•II•P•P (sic), Constantinopolis enthroned left with shield behind, holding globus cruciger and sceptre; foot on prow, star in left field, COIIOB in exergue. RIC 319 var. (placements of punctuation); Gorny & Mosch 233, 2754 corr. (same reverse die); Depeyrot 84/1. 4.39g, 21mm, 6h. Mint State. 650

903. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 441-450. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / IMP XXXXII COS XVII P P, Constantinopolis enthroned left with shield behind, holding globus cruciger and sceptre; foot on prow, star in left field; CONOB in exergue. RIC X 323; Depeyrot 84/1. 4.47g, 21mm, 6h. Mint State.

240

650


904

905

904. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 441-450. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / IMP XXXXII COS XVII P P, Constantinopolis enthroned left with shield behind, holding globus cruciger and sceptre; foot on prow, star in left field; CONOB in exergue. RIC X 323; Depeyrot 84/1. 4.49g, 21mm, 6h. Near Mint State. 650 905. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 441-450. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / IMP XXXXII COS XVII P P, Constantinopolis enthroned left with shield behind, holding globus cruciger and sceptre; foot on prow, star in left fieldas above. RIC X 323; Depeyrot 84/1. 4.50g, 21mm, 7h. Near Mint State. 650

906. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 441-450. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman / IMP XXXXII COS XVII P P, Constantinopolis enthroned left with shield behind, holding globus cruciger and sceptre; foot on prow, star in left field as above. RIC X 323; Depeyrot 84/1. 4.47g, 21mm, 6h. Near Mint State.

650

Ex NFA, ‘Julius Caesar and His Legacy’ at Caesar’s Palace, Las Vegas, 1991

907. Galla Placidia AV Solidus. Uncertain Asian mint, struck under Theodosius II, AD 443. GALLA PLACIDIA AVG, pearl-diademed and draped bust right, wearing single-drop earring and pearl necklace, crowned by manus Dei above / IMP • XXXXII • COS XVII • P • P •, Constantinopolis, draped and wearing plumed helmet, enthroned left, left foot set on prow, holding globus cruciger in extended right hand and sceptre in left; shield set on ground to right; star to left; COMOB in exergue. RIC X 305; Depeyrot 84/6 (Constantinople mint); Biaggi –; DOCLR 834 var. (different number of •’s); G. Giacosa, Women of the Caesars (Milan, 1977), pl. lxv (this coin). 4.46g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, some minor scratches. Extremely Rare late issue. Ex Triton XVIII, 6 January 2015, lot 1269; Ex Julius Caesar and His Legacy, Numismatic Fine Arts, 13 May 1991, lot 146; Ex Numismatic Fine Arts XXII, 1 June 1989, lot 163.

7,500

From the NFA sale catalogue, which was not distributed to anyone in the coin trade, but held as a ‘secret’ auction at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas: “The empress Galla Placidia had a most extraordinary career spanning the first half of the turbulent fifth century. Born about 388, she was the daughter of Theodosius the Great by his second wife Galla, and half-sister of Arcadius and Honorius. Taken prisoner by Alaric during the sack of Rome by the Visigoths in 410, she was eventually married to his successor, Ataulf. Following Ataulf’s death she was ransomed to the Romans for 600,000 measures of grain, and in 417 married the general Constantius by whom she had a son, the future emperor Valentinian III, and a daughter, Honoria. She acted as regent for the first twelve years of her son’s reign (425-437), but then gradually faded into the background as the political influence of the general Aetius increased. Her final years were devoted to the erection of sacred buildings in Ravenna, and her tomb, which contained also the remains of Honorius and Constantius III, is still to be seen in the city. Coins honouring Galla Placidia were struck both in the western empire, under her son Valentinian III, and in the East by her nephew Theodosius II. She may already have held the rank of Augusta under Honorius, but if not she certainly received it in 424 when Valentinian was created Caesar. This attractive solidus, issued from an uncertain Asian mint, may be closely dated by Theodosius II’s titles which appear on the reverse. His forty-second imperatorial acclamation, corresponding to the years of his reign, covers the period 10 January 443 to 10 January 444, whilst the celebration of his eighteenth and final consulship on 1 January 444 indicates that the issue to which the present coin belongs had ceased before the end of the year 443. After the reign of Theodosius II the seated figure of Constantinopolis disappeared from the gold coinage of the eastern empire, not to be seen again until the reign of Justin II more than a century later.”

241


908. Valentinian III AV Solidus. Mediolanum, AD 430-435. D N PLA VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, emperor standing facing, holding long cross and Victory on globe, foot on man-headed serpent; M-D across fields; COMOB in exergue. RIC 2025; Depeyrot 20/2. 4.44g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

650

Very Rare Consular Solidus of Valentinian III

909. Valentinian III AV Solidus. Consular issue. Rome, AD 435. D N PLA VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, rosette diademed bust left, wearing consular robes, and holding mappa and cruciform sceptre / VOT X MVLT XX, Valentinian seated facing on throne, holding mappa and cruciform sceptre; R-M across fields; COMOB in exergue. RIC 2034; Depeyrot 42/1. 4.41g, 21mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

4,000

910. Valentinian III AV Solidus. Ravenna, AD 430-445. D N PLA VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, emperor standing facing, holding long cross and Victory on globe, foot on man-headed serpent; R窶天 across fields; COMOB in exergue. RIC 2010; Depeyrot 17/1. 4.52g, 21mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine.

650

911. Valentinian III AV Solidus. Ravenna, AD 440-455. D N PLA VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, emperor standing facing, holding long cross and Victory on globe, foot on man-headed serpent; R-M across fields; COMOB in exergue. RIC 2014; LRC 849; Depeyrot 46/1. 4.41g, 21mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

650

912. Valentinian III AV Solidus. Ravenna, AD 440-455. D N PLA VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, emperor standing facing, holding long cross and Victory on globe, foot on man-headed serpent; R-M across fields; COMOB in exergue. RIC 2014; LRC 849; Depeyrot 46/1. 4.48g, 23mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

242

650


Avitus, Emperor for Fifteen Months

913.

Avitus AV Solidus. Arelate, July AD 455-October AD 456. D N AVITVS PERP F AVG, rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Avitus right / VICTORIA AVGGG, emperor in military attire standing right, holding long cross in right hand and Victory on globe in left, resting left foot on recumbent captive, A-R across fields; COMOB in exergue. RIC 2401; Lacam 2; Depeyrot 24/1. 4.43g, 22mm, 7h. Some areas of flat striking, otherwise Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

25,000

This coin reflects the origins of the reign of Avitus, as it was struck at the newly opened mint of Arelate, where he was first proclaimed Emperor with the backing of the new Visigothic King, Theodoric II. Avitus had been sent to the Visogothic court as an Imperial envoy by Petronius Maximus, who hoped to confirm to the new king and his people the condition of “foederati” of the Empire and gain support for his own newly established regime. The need for Visogothic support was particularly pressing: news had reached Rome that the Vandal army of Genseric had set sail for Italy. The proclamation of Avitus however, was prompted by news of the death of the emperor and of the sacking of Rome by the invading Vandal army of Genseric in June 455. Whilst Avitus was proclaimed emperor in July, he remained in Gaul for the next three months in order to consolidate support, before finally reaching Rome with his Gallic army in September. It would soon become apparent however, that the Gallic foundations on which the new emperor’s power and legitimacy relied upon were met with much resentment amongst the Roman populace. This problem was exacerbated by the emperor’s decision to offer many key offices of public administration, which were usually occupied by Romans, to Gallic-Roman aristocracy, and the behaviour of the Gallic troops in the city. Such growing popular discontent pressured the emperor into disbanding the Visigoth imperial guard, leaving him vulnerable. Avitus appointed Ricimer, a Roman general of Germanic origin, to lead his armies against the Vandals, which yielded a significant naval victory early in 456. The emperor’s subsequent decision to appoint Ricimer as commander of the Western Empire’s army however, would prove to be less fruitful. Ricimer plotted with his colleague Majorian to convince the Roman Senate to authorise a military expedition against Avitus at the Imperial capital of Ravenna. In October 456, Avitus was besieged and captured at Ravenna, forced to assume the bishopric of Piacenza, and finally executed. Ricimer would effectively rule the remaining territories of the Western Roman Empire from this point until his death in 472, exercising political control through a series of puppet emperors.

243


FDC Solidus of Leo I

914. Leo I AV Solidus. Constantinople, circa AD 465-466. D N LEO PERPET AVG, helmeted, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust three quarters facing, holding spear over right shoulder and shield, decorated with horseman motif, on left arm / VICTORIA AVGGG B, Victory standing left, holding long jewelled cross; star in right field; CONOB in exergue. RIC 605 ; MIRB 3b; LRC 527; Depeyrot 93/1. 4.48g, 20mm, 5h. Fleur De Coin.

1,000

915. Julius Nepos AV Tremissis. Mediolanum, AD 474-475. D N IVL NEPOS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / Cross within wreath; COMOB in exergue. RIC 3220; Lacam 78. 1.45g, 12mm, 6h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

750

COINS OF THE MIGRATION PERIOD

916

917

916. Vandals, AR Siliqua in the name of Honorius. Africa, circa AD 440-490. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius right / [VRBS] ROMA, Roma seated left on cuirass, holding Victory on globe and inverted spear; RVPS in exergue. RIC X 3801; MEC 1-3; BMC 6-9 (Gaiseric). 1.65, 15mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 200 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 917. Vandals, AR Siliqua in the name of Honorius. Africa, circa AD 440-490. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius right / VRBS [ROMA], Roma seated left on cuirass, holding Victory on globe and inverted spear; RVPS in exergue. RIC X 3801; MEC 1-3; BMC 6-9 (Gaiseric). 1.52, 15mm, 8h. Very Fine. 150 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

918 919 918. Vandals, AR Siliqua in the name of Honorius. Africa, circa AD 440-490. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius right / VRBS ROMA, Roma seated left on cuirass, holding Victory on globe and inverted spear; RVPS in exergue. RIC X 3801; MEC 1-3; BMC 6-9 (Gaiseric). 1.74, 15mm, 1h. Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 919. Vandals, AR Half-siliqua in the name of Honorius. Africa, circa AD 440-490. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius right / VICTORIA AVGG, Victory standing left, holding wreath and palm-branch; [RV] in exergue. RIC X 3802; MEC 4-5. 0.62, 10mm, 1h. Nearly as struck. Extremely Rare. 200 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

920. Vandals, AR Half-siliqua in the name of Honorius. Africa, circa AD 440-490. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius right / VICTORIA AVGG, Victory standing left, holding wreath and palm-branch; [RV] in exergue. RIC X 3802; MEC 4-5. 0.73, 12mm, 2h. Very Fine.

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

244

150


Extremely Rare Siliqua of Gaiseric

921. Vandals, Gaiseric AR Siliqua in the name of Honorius. Carthage, year 4 (= AD 443-444). HONORIVS PVSAGT, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius right / ANNO IIII, Carthage standing facing, each hand outstretched holding ears of corn; in right field, K; in exergue, star between two palm-branches. RIC X 3803; MEC p. 20; MIB 1 (Huneric, AD 481/2); BMC 1-2 (Hunaric). 1.44g, 14mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare. 2,000 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group 79, 17 September 2008, lot 1316.

Very Rare 100 Denarii of Gunthamund

922. Vandals, Gunthamund AR 100 Denarii. Carthage, AD 484-496. DN REX GVNTHAMVND, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / D•N over C within wreath. MEC 6-7; MIB 2. 2.10g, 18mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and exceptional for the type. 750 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

923. Vandals, Gunthamund AR 50 Denarii. Carthage, AD 484-496. DN RX GVNTHA, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / D•N within wreath. MEC 8-10; MIB 3. 0.99g, 14mm, 4h. Good Very Fine. 200 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Very Rare 25 Denarii of Gunthamund

924. Vandals, Gunthamund AR 25 Denarii. Carthage, AD 484-496. DN RX GVNTHA, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / D•N over XXV within wreath. MEC 11-12; MIB 4. 0.43g, 10mm, 3h. Very Fine. Very Rare. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

250

925 926 925. Vandals, Gunthamund Æ Nummus. Carthage, AD 484-496. DN REX GVN, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / Christogram to left. Cf. MIB 15 (Christogram to right); M. Ladich, Monete vandale, Casino 2013,12. 0.67g, 11mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare variety. 200 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 926. Vandals, Thrasamund AR 50 Denarii. Carthage, AD 496-523. DN RG TRASAMVS, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust / DN within wreath. MEC 16; MIB 7. 1.09g, 13mm, 2h. right Good Very Fine. 200 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

245


927

928

927. Vandals, Thrasamund AR 50 Denarii. Carthage, AD 496-523. DN RG THRASAMVDS, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / D•N within wreath. MEC 15; MIB 5b. 0.78g, 13mm, 3h. Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 928. Vandals, Thrasamund AR 25 Denarii. Carthage, AD 496-523. DN RG TRASAMVS, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / D•N over XXV within wreath. MEC 16; MIB 7. 0.56g, 10mm,10h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 250 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

929

930

929. Vandals, Thrasamund AR 50 Denarii. Carthage, AD 496-523. DN RG THRASAMVDS, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / D•N over L within wreath. MEC 18; MIB 6a. 1.19g, 13mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Very high quality metal for the issue. 250 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 930. Vandals, Hilderic AR 50 Denarii. Carthage, AD523-530. DN HILDIRIX REX, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / FELIX KARTG, Carthage standing facing, each hand outstretched holding ears of corn. MEC 21-22; MIB 8. 1.15g, 15mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Very good for the type. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

931

500

932

931. Vandals, Gelimer AR 50 Denarii. Carthage, AD 530-534. DN REX GELIMIR, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / D•N over L within wreath. MEC 26; MIB 12. 1.26g, 16mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection

250

932. Vandals, Gelimer AR 50 Denarii. Carthage, AD 530-534. DN REX GELIMIR, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / D•N over L within wreath. MEC 26; MIB 12. 1.29g, 15mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

250

Second Recorded Example

2x 933. Vandals, Gelimer AR 12 Denarii. Carthage, AD 530-534. …. ΛVS, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / XII within wreath. Cf. Ladich p. 45, 3 [= Leu-Numismatica Ars Classica 26 May 1993, 348]. 0.28g, 10mm, 3h. Very Fine. Scratches on rev. rim. Extremely Rare - second recorded example. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

246

250


934. Vandals, Æ 42 Nummi. Carthage, circa AD 480-533. Carthage standing facing, each hand outstretched holding ears of corn / NXLII within wreath. MEC 34-8; MIB 17 (Hilderic). 10.90g, 27mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

200

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

935 936 935. Vandals, Æ 21 Nummi. Carthage, circa AD 480-533. Carthage standing facing, each hand outstretched holding ears of corn / NXXI within wreath. MEC 41; MIB 18 (Hilderic). 8.75g, 21mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. 200 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 936. Vandals, Æ 12 Nummi. Carthage, circa AD 480-533. Carthage standing facing, each hand outstretched holding ears of corn / NXII within wreath. MEC 42; MIB 19 (Hilderic). 5.31g, 19mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Rare, and in exceptional condition for the issue. 750 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

937

938

937. Vandals, Æ 42 Nummi. Carthage, circa AD 480-533. KARTHAGO, soldier facing, holding spear / Horse’s head over XLII. MEC 43-4; MIB 22 (Gelimer). 11.95g, 26mm, 12h. Very Fine. 200 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 938. Vandals, Æ 21 Nummi. Carthage, circa AD 480-533. KARTHAGO, soldier facing, holding spear / Horse’s head over XXI. MEC 45-50; MIB 23 (Gelimer). 7.84g, 21mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. 200 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

940 939 939. Vandals, Æ 12 Nummi. Carthage, circa AD 480-533. KARTHAGO, soldier facing, holding spear / Horse’s head over XII. MEC 48-50; MIB 20 (Hilderic). 5.84g, 20mm, 11h. Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 940. Vandals, Æ 12 Nummi. Carthage, circa AD 480-533. KARTHAGO, soldier facing, holding spear / Horse’s head over XII. MEC 48-50; MIB 20 (Hilderic). 5.44g, 18mm, 4h. Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

941. Vandals, Æ 4 Nummi. Carthage, circa AD 480-533. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left / N over IIII. MEC 51-6; MIB 20 (Hilderic). 1.08g, 11mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

247

200


942. Ostrogoths, Odovacar AV Tremissis. In the name of Zeno. Rome, AD 476-491. D N ZENO PERP AVC, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / Cross within wreath; in exergue, COMOB. RIC 3660; Lacam pl. 45, 140. 1.46g, 13mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

943. Ostrogoths, Æ 42 Nummi. Early to mid 6th century. Numerals XLII cut into obverse of a Rome mint As of Galba with Libertas Publica reverse (RIC 328). MEC 69; cf. MIB pl. 42, 14. 9.48g, 28mm, 12h. Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Very Rare Solidus of Theoderic

944. Ostrogoths, Theoderic AV Solidus. In the name of Anastasius I. Rome, AD 491-518. D N ANASTASIVS P F AVC, diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield with horseman motif on arm / VICTORIA AVCCC Θ, Victory standing left, holding long voided cross; in left field, RM monogram; in right field, star; in exergue, COMOB in exergue. Metlich 6; MIB 7. 4.37g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Some faint scratches. Very Rare.

1,500

945. Ostrogoths, Theoderic AV Solidus. In the name of Anastasius I. Ravenna, AD 491-518. D N ANASTASIVS P F AVG, helmeted, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust three quarters facing, with spear and shield decorated with horseman and enemy motif / VICTORIA AVGGG A, Victory standing left, holding long cross, star in right field, COMOB in exergue. MIB, pl. 36, 9. 4.43g, 20mm, 6h. Mint State. Rare.

946

750

947

946. Ostrogoths, Theoderic AR Half-siliqua. In the name of Anastasius I. Ravenna, AD 493-518. D N ANASTASIVS P P AVC, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust right / Star within wreath. Metlich 43a; MIBE V77; MEC 117 (Rome). 1.27g, 12mm. Very Fine. Very Rare. 250 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 947. Ostrogoths, Theoderic AR Quarter-siliqua. In the name of Anastasius I. Ravenna, AD 493-518. D N ANASTASIVS P P AVC, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust right / INVICTA ROMA, monogram. Metlich 44a; MEC 120 (Milan). 0.79g, 11mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 250 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

248


948. Ostrogoths, Theoderic AR Quarter-siliqua. In the name of Justin I. Ravenna, AD 518-526. DN IVSTINVS AVC, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust right / Monogram within wreath, cross above. Metlich 55; MEC 121 (Rome). 0.68g, 12mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

200

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

949

950

949. Municipal coinage of Rome Æ 40 Nummi. Rome, AD 493-518. INVICTA ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma right / XL, eagle left, looking right; E in exergue. Metlich 76; MEC 102-6. 11.93g, 24mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Uncommonly well centred, struck and preserved for the type.

500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 950. Municipal coinage of Rome Æ 40 Nummi. Rome, AD 493-518. INVICTA ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma right / XL, eagle left, looking right; Δ in exergue. Metlich 76; MEC 101. 8.17g, 24mm, 6h. Very Fine.

150

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

951. Ostrogoths, Theoderic Æ 10 Nummi. Rome, AD 493-518. Crowned bust of Ravenna right / Cross over Ravenna monogram within wreath. Metlich 78b; MEC 50 (Ravenna). 2.77g, 15mm, 6h. Very Fine.

150

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

952. Ostrogoths, Athalaric or his immediate successors AV Solidus. In the name of Justinian I. Ravenna, circa AD 530-539. D N IVSTINIANVS P Γ AVC, diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust of Justinian I facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield with horseman motif on arm / VICTORIA AVCCC A, Victory standing left, holding long voided cross, star to left, COMOB in exergue. Metlich 36a; MEC 122 (Rome). 4.36g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

953. Ostrogoths, Athalaric or his immediate successors AV Solidus. In the name of Justinian I. Ravenna, circa AD 530-539. D N IVSTINIANVS P Γ AVC, diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust of Justinian I facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield with horseman motif on arm / VICTORIA AVCCC A, Victory standing left, holding long voided cross, star to left, COMOB in exergue. Metlich 36a; MEC 122 (Rome). 4.45g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

249

500


954. Ostrogoths, Athalaric or his immediate successors AV Tremissis. In the name of Justinian I. Ravenna, circa AD 530-539. D N IVSTINIANVS P Γ AVC, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIΛ ΛVGVSTORVM, Victory advancing right, looking backwards, holding wreath and globus cruciger, star in right field, COMOB in exergue. Metlich 37; MEC124 (Rome). 1.48g, 15mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

955. Ostrogoths, Athalaric AR Quarter-siliqua. In the name of Justinian I. Ravenna, AD 526-534. D N IVSTINIANVS AVC, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / DN ΛTHAL-ΛRICVS RIX within wreath. Metlich 59; MEC 127-30.0.69g, 11mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

200

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

956. Municipal coinage of Rome Æ 40 Nummi. Rome, AD 526-534. INVICTA ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma right / XL, Lupa left suckling Romulus and Remus; V in exergue. Metlich 82a; cf. MEC 93-6. 14.21g, 25mm, 12h. Fine - Very Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Final Coinage of the Romans

957. Municipal coinage of Rome Æ 20 Nummi. AD 526-534. INVICTA ROMA, draped bust of Roma to right, wearing crested helmet, pendant earring and necklace / She-wolf standing to left, head turned back to watch the two infants Romulus and Remus suckling; two stars flanking Chi-Rho above, mark of value XX below. Hahn, MEC 99, MIB 71c (Theoderic); Kraus 29; Metlich 84b. 6.64g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and one of the very finest surviving coins from the reign of Athalaric. An exceptional example of the type, struck from dies of what may almost be described as fine. 3,000 Although Rome in 526-534 was under Ostrogothic rule, the governance of the city and Italy in general as established by Theoderic was a civilised and relatively enlightened one. Theoderic had sought to revive Roman culture and self-government, and while he was at once king of the Goths, he was also the successor (though without any imperial titles) of the West Roman Emperors. These two nations, differing in religion, manners and language, lived in parallel and side by side with each other, without the one greatly influencing the other, and each was ruled according to its own laws. After his death in 526 his grandson Athalaric ascended the throne, with his mother Amalsuntha as Queen and regent. Although the most noticeable of the bronze coins used in Italy under the Ostrogoths are the countermarked asses and other earlier types (see lot 943), in fact these did not make up the bulk of the copper coinage in circulation at that time. Under Odovacar and the Ostrogoths the Roman Senate enjoyed a brief Indian summer of power; amongst its activities was a revival of the ancient Senatorial privilege of minting in bronze, which after a very brief issue in the name of Zeno, then consisted of types purely Roman in character, making no reference to either imperial or royal authority. This revived Senatorial coinage features the helmeted bust of Roma along with the ironic obverse inscription INVICTA ROMA, and recalls the ancient silver coins of the Republic. The reverse types, when they are not a Roman eagle (see lots 949-950) refer to the mythical founding of Rome, with Romulus and Remus being suckled by the she-wolf (as on the present example), or a fig tree representing the ficus ruminalis beneath which the scene supposedly took place. This Senatorial coinage came to an end in 535/6 when it was briefly replaced by the portrait coins of Theodahad (see lot 961). In 537, after the occupation of Rome by the forces of Belisarius, this was in turn replaced by a regular ‘Byzantine’ imperial coinage in the name of Justinian. When Rome again fell under Ostrogothic control and the mint was reopened in 549, the coinage issued there was purely royal and Ostrogothic in character (see lot 965). This series may therefore be rightfully described as the final issue of coinage struck by the ancient Romans in their own name.

250


958. Municipal coinage of Rome Æ 20 Nummi. Rome, AD 526-534. INVICTA ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma right / XX, tree between two eagles. Metlich 83a; MEC 110-11. 9.66g, 23mm, 12h. Fine - Very Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

959. Municipal coinage of Rome Æ 10 Nummi. Rome, AD 526-534. INVICTA ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma right / D N ATHALARICVS, king standing right, holding spear; in field, S-C and X. Metlich 85a; MEC 132. 2.36g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine.

150

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

960. Ostrogoths, Theodahad AR Quarter-siliqua. In the name of Justinian I. Ravenna, AD 534-536. D N IVSTINIANVS P G AVC, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / D N THEADAHATHVS REX within wreath. Metlich 62; MEC 139-40. 0.62g, 10mm, 6h. Very Fine.

200

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Rare 40 Nummi of Theodahad

961. Ostrogoths, Theodahad Æ 40 Nummi. Rome, AD 534-536. D N THEODAHADVS REX, mantled bust right, wearing ornate ‘Spangenhelm’, large pectoral cross and ‘Ostrogothic’ garment / VICTORIA PINCIPVN, Victory standing right on prow of galley, holding wreath and palm; S-C across fields. Metlich pl. A, B1-M2; MEC143. 10.41g, 25nn, 7h. Good Very Fine. Dark patina. Rare.

600

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

962. Ostrogoths, Witigis Æ 10 Nummi. Ravenna, AD 536-540. INVICTA ROMA, helmeted head of Roma right / D N WITICES REX within wreath. Metlich 92; MEC 15. 3.50g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine.

150

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

963. Ostrogoths, Baduila AR Half-siliqua. In the name of Anastasius. Ticinum, AD 549/550-552. D N ANASTASIVS RF AVC, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / D N BADVILA REX within wreath. Metlich 70; MEC 153-5. 1.30g, 14mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

251

250


964. Ostrogoths, Baduila AR Quarter-siliqua. Ticinum, AD 549/550-552. … NVII C, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / D N BADVILA REX within wreath. CF. Metlich 70; MEC 156. 0.41g, 11mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

250

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

965. Ostrogoths, Baduila Æ 10 Nummi. Rome, AD 549/550-552. D N BADVILA REX, frontal bust of king wearing ‘Ostrogothic’ garment and helmet / FLOREA[S SEMPER], Baduila standing right, holding spear and shield. Metlich 98b; MEC 162. 6.88g, 18mm, 7h. Very Fine.

200

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

966. Visigoths, Gaul AV Solidus. Unknown king, circa AD 439-55. Struck in the name of Valentinian III. D N PLA VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, rosettediademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, Valentinian standing facing, holding long cross and Victory on globe, foot placed on man-headed coiled serpent; R-M across field, COMOB in exergue. Cf. RIC X 2014; cf. Depeyrot 46/1; cf. MEC 1, 166 (R-V). 4.49g, 21mm, 6h. Near Mint State, minor nick on rev.

650

967. Uncertain Germanic tribe AV Solidus. Struck in the name of Theodosius II, circa AD 402-450. D H THEOOOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and shield; diadem ribbons to left / Constantinopolis enthroned left, foot on prow, holding globus cruciger and sceptre; shield at her side, star in left field, no points in legend; COHOB. Cf. RIC X 321; cf. Depeyrot 84/1; cf. CNG 72, 2266. 4.49g, 20mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine.

650

Very Rare Solidus of Alaric II (?)

968. Visigoths, Alaric II(?) AV Solidus. In the name of Libius Severus. Gaul, circa AD 461-507. D N HBIVS SEVERVS P P AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, emperor standing facing, right foot on man-headed serpent, holding long cross and Victory; in field, R-A; COMOB in exergue. RIC X, 3755 (Rome); Lacam p. 50, 10; Reinhart 1938, 72; MEC 175. 4.31g, 21mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. It has been suggested that R-A across the reverse field of this solidus gallicus may refer to the Visigothic king Alaric II (Rex Alericus), who succeeded his father Euric as king of Toulouse from AD 485. For commentary see MEC p. 46.

252

1,000


Very Rare Tremissis

2x 969. Visigoths, AV Tremissis in the name of Libius Severus. Gaul, circa AD 461-507. D N HBIVS SEVERVS P P AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, Victory standing left, holding long cross, star in upper field; COMOB in exergue. RIC X, 3761-3; MEC p. 46. 1.43g, 15mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex Marc Poncin Collection, Classical Numismatic Group 72, 14 June 2006, lot 2234.

970

971

970. Visigoths, Thierry I(?) AV Tremissis. In the name of Anastasius. Narbonne, circa AD 491-507. CN ANASTASIVS PP AVC, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA + AVCVSTOR .T., Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch; CONOB in exergue. Tomasini A3, 68. 1.27g, 12mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 250 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. The .T. in the reverse may refer to the Frankish king Thierry I (AD 511-534) - see note to MEC 187. 971. Visigoths, Thierry I(?) AV Tremissis. In the name of Justin I. Narbonne or Arles, circa AD 518-527. DN IVSTINVS AVC, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA + AVCVSTOR .T., Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch; CONOB in exergue. Tomasini JI 2, 187; cf. MEC 187. 1.46g, 15mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 250 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. The .T. in the reverse may refer to the Frankish king Thierry I (AD 511-534) - see note to MEC 187.

972 973 972. Visigoths, AV Tremissis in the name of Justin I. Narbonne, circa AD 525-527. D N IVSTINVS P P AVC, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right with cross on chest / VICTORIA + AVCVSTORVA, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm; CONOB in exergue. Tomasini JI 3, 211. 1.42g, 15mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 250 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 973. Visigoths, AV Tremissis in the name of Justinian I. Barcelona, circa AD 527-580. CVAITI INAVIC, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right with cross on chest / VICTI VTOIAYC, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch; CONO in exergue. Tomasini JAN 2, 247-63; MEC 194-202. 1.44g, 16mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 500 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

974

975

974. Visigoths, AV Tremissis in the name of Justinian I. Barcelona, circa AD 527-580. CNIVTTIII NVSPAVC, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right with cross on chest / VICTI AVCVSPVI, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch; CINO in exergue. Tomasini JAN 2, 247-63; MEC CF. 194-202. 1.46g, 16mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 500 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 975. Visigoths, AV Tremissis in the name of Justin II. Sevilla, circa AD 565-580. CNIVSTI NVSPAVC, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right with cross on chest / VICTO AAVSTOI, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch; ONO in exergue. Tomasini JII 2, 411-326; CF. MEC 203-6. 1.46g, 16mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 500 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

253


Very Rare ‘Curru’ Tremissis

976. Visigoths, ‘Curru’ AV Tremissis. Toledo, circa AD 565-580. CVRRVI + CVRRVI (retrograde), diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right with cross on chest / VVRR IN.IVRRV, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch; ONO in exergue. Tomasini C 3, 568-92; cf. MEC 207. 1.24g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. It is hard to explain the legend currui (Latin dative for a ‘wagon’) and similar legends on the Tomasini group C tremisses. It does not look like a personal name, but does belong to the final group just before the introduction of the regal series of similar style in Toledo in about 580 in the name of Leovigild, cf. MEC 209.

Very Rare Leovigild Tremissis

977. Visigoths, Leovigild AV Tremissis. Toledo, AD 585-586. + LEOVIGILVS REX, draped bust facing / + TOLETO IVSTVS, draped bust facing. CNV 41a; MEC 212; Miles 29. 1.49g, 17mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

978. Visigoths, Reccared I AV Tremissis. Mérida, circa AD 586-601. + RECCEREDVS REX, bust facing / + EMERITA PIVS, cuirassed bust facing. CNV 106; Miles 94a.1.31g, 12mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

500

Second Recorded Example

979. Visigoths, Recceswinth AV Tremissis. Sevilla, circa AD 653-672. +RECESNTS REX, diademed bust right / + ISPALIS around SPLA monogram. MEC 258 [= CNV 446; Miles 366] (same dies). 1.48g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare - the second recorded example.

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

254

5,000


Unique and Important Egica and Wittiza Tremissis

980. Visigoths, Egica and Wittiza AV Tremissis. Laure, Gallaecia, AD 694-702. + NNDNECICAP+RECS, confronted busts of Egica and Wittiza with a cross-sceptre between / + VVITTIZAR+RECE, cross monogram of L-A-V-R with E on cross-bar, the whole surrounded by four pellets. Cf. CNV 575 (no pellets) and CNV 580.31 (this coin, monogram misread); Miles –; MEC I, –. 1.37g, 20mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Unique, and highly interesting.

15,000

Egica was anointed in 687 and immediately adopted a policy of consolidation of his family’s grip on the kingdom, necessary after the discovery of several plots to depose him. His reign represented one of the most turbulent eras of the Visigothic monarchy, characterised by struggles between noble factions, famine, plagues and further persecutions of Jews. As early as 694 Egica raised Wittiza, his son by his consort Cilixo (daughter of his predecessor), to the kingship as co-ruler even though he was still a minor, and gave him control of Gallaecia in the north-eastern portion of the peninsula. It was at this point that a new Visigothic coin type was introduced with the confronted profile busts of the kings either side of a crosssceptre. The site of Laure in Gallaecia has been identified with Laubis, a parish in the Diocese of Braga in modern Portugal, see CNV p. 192.

981. Visigoths, Egica and Wittiza AV Tremissis. Sevilla, AD 695-702. + I.Δ.IMNE GICARX, long cross potent between facing busts / + INPINHE VVITTIZRX, monogram ISPALIS, three pellets above. Cf. CNV 566.19-22; Miles 480. 1.25g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

Extremely Rare Wittiza Tremissis

982. Visigoths, Wittiza AV Tremissis. Emerita, AD 700-710. +IN•HMVVITTIZΛI+, crowned bust of Wittiza right / +EMERITAPIVS, cross potent on three steps, flanked by four pellets on either side. Cf. CNV 617 (two pellets); otherwise unpublished. 1.10g, 20mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

255

7,500


Very Rare Gundomar II Tremissis

2x 983. Burgundians, Gundomar II AV Tremissis. In the name of Justin I. Burgundy, AD 524-532. D N IVSTINVS P P AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch; in left field, star; in right field, MAR monogram. Tomasini JI 5, 1227-31; MEC 341. 1.27g, 12mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

984. Merovingians, AV Tremissis. In the name of Anastasius. Circa AD 500-580. D N ANASTASIVS P P AVG, diademed and draped bust right with spiky hair / VICTORIA AVGVSTOA VII, Victory standing facing, holding wreath and globus cruciger; ONO in exergue. Unpublished in the standard references. 1.47g, 16mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Unpublished in the standard references.

250

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

985

986

985. Merovingians, Pseudo-imperial AV Tremissis. Imitating Justin I-Justin II. Gaul, circa AD 518-580. NEII IIAWIO, diademed and draped bust right with spiky hair, cross on breast / Garbled legends, disjointed figure of Victory with prominent wings advancing right, holding cross. Unpublished in the standard references, for type cf. Tomasini 651-660, pl. 35 and Belfort IV, 5341-54. 1.35g, 14mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 500 986. Merovingians, Pseudo-imperial AV Tremissis. Imitating Justin I-Justin II. Gaul, circa AD 518-580. Garbled legend, diademed and draped bust right with spiky hair / … AV… O…, crude figure of Victory advancing right, holding cross, NO in exergue. Unpublished in the standard references, for type, see Belfort IV, 5376 and Prou p. 6, 23. 1.29g, 15mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 500

987

988

987. Merovingians, Pseudo-imperial AV Tremissis. Imitating Justin I-Justin II. Gaul, circa AD 518-580. IIVSTV crescent TINVS, pearl-diademed and draped bust right / CTSCVIAATVAIA, crude figure of Victory facing, holding cross and wreath, wavy line in exergue. Cf. Belfort 325 (Arventum); MEC 371. 1.39g, 15mm, 6h. Very Fine. 500 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 988. Merovingians, Castrum Fuscium (Foix) AV Tremissis. Circa AD 560-585. CASSTRO FVS, diademed and draped bust right, with spiky hair / + REDEMTVS MON, cross potent on globe, C–Γ over V – II in lower field. Cf. Depeyrot IV, p. 42, 3, pl. 17. 1.31g, 12mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 1,000

989. Merovingians, Nebernium (Nevers) AV Tremissis. Circa AD 518-580. NEBERNO IVSTI, diademed and draped bust right / …IAAVCOC, crude figure of Victory facing, holding cross and wreath; ONO in exergue. Unpublished in the standard references, for the city’s identification cf. Belfort 3183 and Depeyrot III, pp.85-6; MEC 371. 1.31g, 15mm, 5h. Very Fine. Unpublished in the standard references. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

256

500


Extremely Rare Arvernus Tremissis

2x 990. Merovingians, King Theodebert II of Austrasia AV Tremissis. Arvernus (Clermont-Ferrand), AD 595-612. THIOD. BIRTI, pearl-diademed and draped bust right / MANILEOB…, MONI (retrograde) around large AR. Depeyrot III, p. 142, 8, pl. 57; Belfort 345.1.28g, 10mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

2,500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Rare Beaumont Tremissis

2x 991. Merovingians, Beaumont (Vienne) AV Tremissis. Circa AD 600-640. AVDIERNVS M, diademed and draped bust right, wavy line in front / + BELLO + MONTE within double wreathed border within which cross potent on two steps, pellet below. Cf. Depeyrot III, p. 121, 6, pl. 48, 6; Belfort 825; Prou 1681. 1.14g, 13mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

1,000

992. Lombards, Pseudo-imperial AV Tremissis in the name of Justinian I. Lombardy, circa AD 568-690. D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AV, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory facing, holding wreath and globus cruciger; CONOB in exergue. MEC 298; BMC Vand., 123.1.40g, 15mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

250

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

993. Lombards, Pseudo-imperial AV Tremissis. Tuscany, circa AD 620-700. VAV VHW, diademed bust right, two annulets on chest; B before face / VIIOIIOIIV, III around long cross potent. Cf. MEC 313-7; Oddy 1972, 353-9. 1.34g, 12mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

BYZANTINE COINS

994

995

994. Justin I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 518-527. D N IVSTINVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG A, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. Sear 56; DOC 2; MIBE 3. 4.49g, 20mm, 7h. Mint State. Struck on a large flan; brilliant mint lustre. 500 995. Justin I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 518-527. D N IVSTINVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG Γ, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. Sear 56; DOC 2; MIBE 3. 4.49g, 20mm, 7h. Mint State. Brilliant mint lustre. 500

257


996

997

996. Justin I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 518-527. D N IVSTINVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG Γ, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. Sear 56; DOC 2; MIBE 3. 4.45g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Brilliant mint lustre. 500 997. Justin I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 518-527. D N IVSTINVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG B, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. Sear 56; DOC 2; MIBE 3. 4.45g, 20mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Well centred. 500

998

999

998. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 527-538. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG B, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIBE 5; Sear 137. 4.44g, 21mm, 5h. Mint State. Brilliant mint lustre. 500 999. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 527-538. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG Θ, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIBE 5; Sear 137.4.48g, 22mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Mint lustre. 500

1000

1001

1000. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 527-538. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG I, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIBE 5; Sear 137. 4.49g, 22mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Mint lustre. 500 1001. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 527-538. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG (uncertain officina), angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. DOC 3a; MIBE 5; Sear 137. 4.43g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Mint lustre. 500

1002

1003

1002. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 527-538. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG Z, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. DOC 3z; MIBE 5; Sear 137. 4.41g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Brilliant mint lustre. 500 1003. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 527-538. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG B, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIBE 5; Sear 137. 4.44g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Mint lustre. 500

258


1004. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 527-538. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG I, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIBE 5; Sear 137. 4.45g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Mint lustre.

1005

500

1006

1005. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 527-538. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG B, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIBE 5; Sear 137. 4.45g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Mint lustre. 500 1006. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 527-538. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG S, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. DOC 3s; MIBE 5; Sear 137. 4.47g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Mint lustre.

500

FDC Solidus of Justinian

1007. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 527-538. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear across right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG A, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIBE 5; Sear 137. 4.50g, 21mm, 7h. Fleur De Coin. Brilliant mint lustre.

500

1008. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 527-538. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear acros right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG A, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIBE 5; Sear 137. 4.46g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Mint lustre.

500

1009. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 542-565. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, globus cruciger in right hand / VICTORIA AVGGG E, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. DOC 7; MIBE 22; Sear 138. 4.42g, 21mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Well centred on a large flan; brilliant mint lustre.

259

500


1010. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 542-565. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, globus cruciger in right hand / VICTORIA AVGGG Δ, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. DOC 8c; MIBE 6; Sear 139. 4.42g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine; minor scuff on obv. Mint Lustre.

500

1011. Justinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 542-565. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, shield with horseman device on left shoulder, globus cruciger in right hand / VICTORIA AVGGG H, angel standing facing holding long cross in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. DOC 8; MIBE 6; Sear 139. 4.44g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Wonderful lustre.

500

1012. Justinian I Æ 10 Nummi. Uncertain Italian mint, circa 540-565. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / Large X within wreath. MIBE 244; BMC Vand., p. 65, 41-5. 2.93g, 17mm. Very Fine. Rare.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

2x 1013. Justinian I AR Half Siliqua. Ravenna, AD 552-565. D N IVSTINIANVS P P, diademed bust right, wearing robe / Large staurogram set on globe; stars flanking; all within wreath. DOC 339; MIBE 78; Ranieri 361; Sear 320. 0.69g, 12mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

500

2x 1014. Justin II AR Half Siliqua. Ravenna, AD 565-578. D N IVSTINVS P P AV, diademed and draped bust right / Cross surmounted by staurogram set on globe; stars flanking; all within wreath. DOC 215; MIBE 41; Ranieri 425; Sear 412. 0.74g, 12mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

750

1015. Tiberius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 578-582. DM TIB CONSTANT P P AVI, crowned and cuirassed bust facing holding globus cruciger and shield / VICTORIA AVGG Θ, cross potent on four steps, CONOB in exergue. DOC 4; MIBE 4; Sear 422. 4.44g, 21mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin.

260

750


The Revolt of the Heraclii

1016.

Revolt of the Heraclii AV Solidus. Alexandria or Cyprus, Dated fixed IY 11 (summer AD 608). DN ЄRACLIO CONSVLI BA, facing busts of Heraclius and the Exarch Heraclius, each wearing slight beard and consular robes; cross between / VICTORIA CONSAB IA, cross potent set upon four steps; CONOB in exergue. DOC 11; MIBE 3; Sear 719; Berk 112. 4.46g, 20mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Insignificant scratch on rev., tiny edge bump. Very Rare.

10,000

Having been appointed Exarch of Africa by the Emperor Maurice Tiberius, Heraclius the Elder was venerated at Carthage where he had established ties with the local elite and enjoyed a safe and strong position. His son and namesake Heraclius the Younger married into the local African elite, his first wife Eudocia being the daughter of a local landowner. Although not as wealthy an area of the Empire as Egypt, Africa was able to stand alone in self sufficiency whilst also being a provider of grain and revenues to Constantinople, a position that further strengthened the Heraclii’s position for the events of AD 608. Maurice was murdered by disaffected soldiers after they had rebelled against him and proclaimed their fellow soldier Phocas to be Emperor in 602, the culmination of a long struggle with the finances of the Empire, for which he had imposed high taxes and intended to introduce reforms to reduce expenditure on the maintenance of the army. The change of regime at first being welcomed due to the lowering of taxes, Phocas’ methods of ensuring loyalty and keeping control of the government by killing thousands of dissenters (a claim we ought to take with caution as no contemporary histories remain), coupled with the disintegrating stability of the Eastern provinces where the Sasanian Persian king Khosrau II was preparing an invasion, led to increasing hostility towards him. In opposition to the tyranny of Phocas, Heraclius the elder and the younger were proclaimed Consuls, perhaps by the Senate at Carthage (a body which had no power to do so), and began issuing coinage depicting themselves in consular robes only as we see on this very rare solidus, as they did not hold the imperial title at that time. Gaining support from Egypt, Syria, Cyrus and Sicily, Heraclius the Younger sailed to Constantinople, arriving in October 610, and the revolt culminatepd in a coup where he was crowned and saw to the execution of his predecessor, establishing a dynasty which would last a century, ending with the execution of Justinian II in 711.

261


1017. Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 616-25. ddNN hЄRCOSNЧ ЄT HAEOMS RΛNPEA (sic), crowned busts of Heraclius on left and Heraclius Constantine on right, each wearing chlamys and cross on diadem, cross above / VICTORIA AVG VI, cross potent on three steps; CONOB in exergue. DOC 13 var.; MIB 11 var.; Sear 738 var. 4.48g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Interesting blundered obverse legend - apparently the die cutter entrusted with this task was illiterate.

500

Ex Gorny and Mosch 141, 10 October 2005, lot 380.

1018

1019

1018. Heraclius, Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas AV Solidus. Constantinople, year 9 = AD 635/6. Heraclonas, Heraclius, and Heraclius Constantine standing facing, each holding globus cruciger and wearing crown / VICTORIA AVGY H, Cross potent set on three steps; monogram to left and Θ to right, CONOB in exergue. MIB 40; Sear 759. 4.44g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Faint scratches on rev. 200 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1019. Heraclius, Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 610-641. Heraclonas, Heraclius, and Heraclius Constantine standing facing, each holding globus cruciger and wearing crown / VICTORIA AVGU and officina letter, cross potent on three steps; PTh monogram in left field; I in right field; CONOB in exergue. Sear 761. 4.43g, 20mm, 5h. Near Mint State. Brilliant mint lustre.

1020

250

1021

1020. Heraclius, Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 610-641. Heraclius, crowned, with long moustache and long beard in centre, Heraclonas, of almost equal height, crowned, on left, and Heraclius Constantine, of equal height, crowned, unbearded, on right, all wearing chlamys and holding cross on globe / VICTORIA AVGU B; cross potent on three steps; PTh monogram in left field; A in right field; CONOB in exergue. DOC 39; MIB 45; Sear 764. 4.47g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. 300 1021. Heraclius, Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 610-641. Heraclius, crowned, with long moustache and long beard in centre, Heraclonas, of almost equal height, crowned, on left, and Heraclius Constantine, of equal height, crowned, unbearded, on right, all wearing chlamys and holding cross on globe / VICTORIA AVGU, cross potent on three steps; PTh monogram in left field; CONOB in exergue. Sear 769; DOC 43; MIB 50. 4.36g, 19mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Brilliant mint lustre. 250

1023

1022

1022. Heraclius, Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 610-641. Heraclius, crowned, with long moustache and long beard in centre, Heraclonas, of almost equal height, crowned, on left, and Heraclius Constantine, of equal height, crowned, unbearded, on right, all wearing chlamys and holding cross on globe / VICTORIA AVGU B, cross potent on three steps; PTh monogram in left field, E in right field; CONOB in exergue. DOC 44a; MIB 53 (Heraclonas); Sear 770. 4.43g, 21mm, 7h. Mint State; brilliant lustre. 300 1023. Constans II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 641 or later. dN CONSTANTINUS PP AV, bust facing with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, holding cross on globe / VICTORIA AVGU and officina letter, cross potent on three steps; CONOB+ in exergue. DOC 17; Sear 954. 4.43g, 20mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Brilliant mint lustre. 250

262


1024. Constans II AR Hexagram. Constantinople, AD 654-659. Crowned facing busts of Constans and Constantine IV; cross in field above / Cross on globe on three steps; B to right. DOC 55; Sear 996. 6.33g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

750

1025. Constantine IV AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 668-685. CONSTANYS PP, three-quarter facing bust, wearing plumed helmet and cuirass, holding spear and shield with horseman device / VICTORA A AVςu H, cross potent on three steps, CONOB in exergue. Sear 1157; MIB 10; DOC 12. 4.39g, 18mm, 6h. Near Mint State. A well-detailed portrait of fine style.

1,500

2x 1026. Leo III the Isaurian, with Constantine V AV Tremissis. Syracuse, AD 735-741. D LЄON P A, crowned facing bust of Leo, wearing chlamys pinned at right shoulder, holding globus cruciger in right hand and akakia in left / D N CONSTANTIN, crowned facing bust of Constantine, beardless, wearing chlamys pinned at right shoulder, holding Cross potent in right hand and akakia in left. Sear 1528A; DOC 51. 1.21g, 17mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 250

1027. Theophilus AV Solidus. Syracuse, AD 830/1-842. ΘЄOFILOS, crowned bust facing, wearing loros and holding cross potent in right hand / ΘЄOFILOS, crowned bust facing, wearing chlamys and holding globus cruciger in right hand. DOC 24; Sear 1670. 3.83g, 15mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

500

1028. Theophilus AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 831-842. ΘЄOFILOS bASILЄ Θ, crowned facing bust of Theophilus, holding patriarchal cross and akakia / MIXAHL S COnSTnhTIN, crowned facing busts of Michael III and Constantine; cross above. DOC 3; Sear 1653. 4.39g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

250

1029 1030 1029. Theophilus AV Semissis. Syracuse, AD 835-842. ΘЄOFILOS, crowned facing bust, wearing chlamys, holding globus cruciger / ΘЄOFILOS, crowned facing bust, wearing loros, holding globus cruciger. DOC 26c; Anastasi 560; Sear 1674. 1.80g, 14mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

300

1030. Theophilus AV Semissis. Syracuse, AD 835-842. ΘЄOFILOS, crowned facing bust, wearing chlamys, holding globus cruciger / ΘЄOFILOS, crowned facing bust, wearing loros, holding globus cruciger. DOC 26c; Anastasi 560; Sear 1674. 1.77g, 12mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

263


1031

1032

1031. Theophilus AV Semissis. Syracuse, AD 835-842. ΘЄOFILOS, crowned facing bust, wearing chlamys, holding globus cruciger / ΘЄOFILOS, crowned facing bust, wearing loros, holding globus cruciger. DOC 26c; Anastasi 560; Sear 1674. 1.65g, 11mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

1032. Theophilus AV Semissis. Syracuse, AD 835-842. ΘЄOFILOS, crowned facing bust, wearing chlamys, holding globus cruciger / ΘЄOFILOS, crowned facing bust, wearing loros, holding globus cruciger. DOC 26c; Anastasi 560; Sear 1674. 1.78g, 11mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

300

Very Rare Solidus of Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus

1033. Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus AV Solidus. Constantinople, Sole Reign, January-April AD 945. Nimbate facing bust of Christ, raising hand in benediction and holding Gospels / Half-length facing bust of Constantine VII, with long beard, wearing crown with pendilia and ornate jewelled loros, holding patriarchal globus cruciger. DOC III 13a.1; BN 11; Sear 1747. 4.32g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

750

1034. Nicephorus II AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 963-969. Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus crown and holding book of Gospels / Half-length facing busts of the Virgin, wearing stola and maphorium, and Nicephorus, wearing crown and loros, holding patriarchal cross between them; M-O either side of the Virgin. DOC 4; Sear 1778. 4.42g, 21mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

400

1035. Nicephorus II AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 963-969. Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus crown and holding book of Gospels / Half-length facing busts of the Virgin, wearing stola and maphorium, and Nicephorus, wearing crown and loros, holding patriarchal cross between them; M-O either side of the Virgin. DOC 4; Sear 1778. 4.40g, 21mm, 6h. Mint State.

750

1036. John I Tzimisces AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinopolis, AD 969-976. Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus crown and holding book of Gospels / Half-length facing busts of John, wearing crown and loros, holding patriarchal cross, and the Virgin Mary; manus Dei above John, MΘ above the Virgin. DOC III 3; Sear 1785. 4.37g, 22mm, 6h. Nearly Mint State.

264

500


Extremely Rare Histamenon Nomisma of John I Tzimisces

1037. John I Tzimisces AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 969-976. Facing bust of Christ, nimbate, raising hand in benediction, holding Gospels / Half-length facing busts of John, wearing crown and loros, holding globe surmounted by trefoil, and the Virgin Mary; manus Dei above John, MΘ to right of the Virgin. DOC III 1a; Sear 1787. 4.40g, 21mm, 6h. Nearly Mint State. Extremely Rare - no examples on CoinArchives.

1,000

1038. Romanus III AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1028-1034. +IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTINM, Christ enthroned facing, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction and holding book of Gospels in left / ΘCЄ bOHΘ RWMANW, the Virgin, nimbate on right, and Romanus, bearded to left, both standing facing; the Virgin wears pallium and maphorium, and with her right hand crowns the emperor, who wears saccos and loros, and holds globus cruciger in left hand; MΘ between their heads. DOC 1; Sear 1819. 4.35g, 25mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

500

1039. Romanus III AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1028-1034. +IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTINM, Christ enthroned facing, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction and holding book of Gospels in left / ΘCЄ bOHΘ RWMANW, the Virgin, nimbate on right, and Romanus, bearded to left, both standing facing; the Virgin wears pallium and maphorium, and with her right hand crowns the emperor, who wears saccos and loros, and holds globus cruciger in left hand; MΘ between their heads. DOC 1; Sear 1819. 4.34g, 23mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

500

1040. Romanus III AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1028-1034. +IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTINM, Christ enthroned facing, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction and holding book of Gospels in left / ΘCЄ bOHΘ RWMANW, the Virgin, nimbate on right, and Romanus, bearded to left, both standing facing; the Virgin wears pallium and maphorium, and with her right hand crowns the emperor, who wears saccos and loros, and holds globus cruciger in left hand; MΘ between their heads. DOC 1; Sear 1819. 4.35g, 23mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

265

300


1041. Romanus III AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1028-1034. +IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTINM, Christ enthroned facing, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels / ΘCЄ bOHΘ RWMANW, the Virgin on right, and Romanus, bearded to left, both standing facing; the Virgin wears pallium and maphorium, and with her right hand crowns the emperor, who wears saccos and loros, and holds globus cruciger in left hand; MΘ between their heads. DOC 1a; Sear 1820. 4.44g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare variant showing the Virgin without nimbus.

750

Rare and Unusual Theodora Histamenon Nomisma

1042. Theodora, Second Reign, AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, 11 January AD 1055 - 21 August 1056. + IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTINM, Christ standing facing on footstool, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, holding Gospels in both hands, surrounded by double border / + θЄOΔωPA AVΓOVCTA, Theodora, to left, wearing crown, saccos and loros, and the Virgin, on right, nimbate and clad in pallium and maphorium, with M and Θ either side of Her shoulders, both standing facing, holding between them labarum, surrounded by double border. Sear 1837; DOC 1. 4.38g, 24mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Lustrous. Unusually scyphate.

1,500

1043. Constantine X AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1059-1067. +IhS IXS REX REGNANTINM, Christ, nimbate, seated facing on straight-backed throne, raising hand in benediction, holding Gospels / + KѠN RACΛ O ΔOVKAC, Isaac standing facing, wearing crown and loros, holding labarum with pellet on shaft, and globus cruciger. DOC 1; Sear 1847. 4.46g, 27mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

1044. Constantine X AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1059-1067. + IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTINM, Christ seated facing on throne with curved arms / + KѠN RACΛ O ΔOVKAC, the Virgin, nimbate, crowning the Emperor; M between their heads and Θ in upper right field. Sear 1848; DOC 2. 4.40g, 27mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. 300

266


ISLAMIC

MEDIEVAL AND MODERN COINS Extremely Rare Umayyad Arab-Byzantine Tremissis

3x 1045. Arab-Byzantine, Umayyad Caliphate AV Tremissis. North Africa, circa AH 80-85 (AD 700-704). NOM…ET TEVS (i.e. DEUS TUUS DeUS ET AliUS NON Est), crowned facing busts in the style of Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine, but with crosses on crowns transformed into tripartite ornament / ...VObSOVIC ... (i.e. IN NOMINE TUO Deus), transformed cross on two steps, pellet below. AGC I, 12; Walker, Arab-Byzantine, 1512, G.3; Album 117; Wilks 145. 1.37g, 9mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

6,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1046

1047

1048

1046. Umayyad, temp. ‘Abd al-Malik AV Dinar. No mint name (Damascus), AH 89. Walker 189; Album 136; Wilks 167. 4.25g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

250

1047. Umayyad, temp Hisham AV Dinar. No mint name (Damascus), AH 122. Walker 242; Wilks 216; Album 136. 4.27g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Faint scratches. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

150

1048. Abbasid, al-Mahdi AV Dinar. No mint name, AH 167; Album 214; Wilks 378. 4.25g, 20mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

150

CRUSADERS

1050 1049 1049. Crusaders, Antioch, Bohémond III AR Denier. Minority, AD 1149-1163. + BOANVNDIIS, young male head right / + ANTIOCHIA, cross pattée; annulet in first quarter. Metcalf, Crusades 348-9; CCS p. 205, 26. 0.57g, 16mm, 8h. Good Very Fine. 50 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1050. Crusaders, Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem, temp. of Baldwin III AV Bezant. Before the battle of the Horns of Hattim in AD 1187. Imitating a dinar of the Fatimid caliph al-Amir. Legends blundered. Metcalf, Crusades, 135; CCS p. 116, 4. 3.94g, 22mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. 250 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1052

1051

1051. Crusaders, County of Tripoli, Bohémond VII AR Gros. AD 1275-1287. + SЄPTIMVS : BOЄMVNDVS : COMЄS, cross pattée within tressure of twelve arcs; triple pellet stops / + CIVITAS : TRIPOLIS : SVRIЄ, triple-towered castle façade; towers and walls crenelated; all within tressure of twelve arcs; triple pellet stops. Metcalf, Crusades 497-8; CCS p. 175, 26. 4.17g, 25mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Weakly struck. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1052. Crusaders, Despotate of Epirus, Philip of Taranto BI Denier Tournois. AD 1323-1335. Lepanto. + (lis) PhS · P TAR · DЄSP :, cross pattée / · NЄPΛNTI CIVIS ’, chateau tournois. CCS p. 397, 111a. 0.70g, 20mm, 12h. Very Fine. 50 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

267


268


269


BELGIUM

Sharply Struck and Well Preserved

1053. Belgium, Flanders. Louis II de Mâle (1346-84) AV Franc à cheval (Gouden Rijder). Ghent, c.1361-64. LVDOVIC´oDEI GRΛ:COMЄS Ƶ DnS:FLΛNDRIЄ, armoured knight on horseback galloping left brandishing a sword / +XPC:VIИCIT:XPC:REGИΛT:XPC IИPERΛT, cross fleurée in quadrilobe with leaves at angles and trefoils in spandrels. Delmonte 458; Schneider 142; Friedberg 156. 3.83g, 30mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. Sharply struck and very well preserved.

2,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1054. Belgium, Flanders. Louis II de Mâle (1346-84) AV Franc à pied (Flandres d’or). Ghent, c.1361-64. L-VDOVIC´o DЄI G’ o COM Ƶo|DnS:FLANDRI Є, count bearing sword standing on a Gothic dais with a shield and helmet to either side, his mantle with ermines, FLΛnDRЄS in exergue / + BЄИЄDICTVS:QVI:VЄИIT:IИ:ИOMIИЄ:DOMIИI, cross fleurée with lion rampant in centre and F-L-Λ-D in angles, all within a quadrilobe with trefoils in the spandrels. Delmonte 464; Schneider 147, Friedberg 161. 4.17g, 31mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1055. Belgium, Flanders. Louis II de Mâle (1346-84) AV Chaise d’or au lion. Ghent, c.1369-84. + LVDOVICVS:DЄIx xGRΛx COM’xƵ:DnS:FLΛnD’, count seated facing on Gothic throne, a sword in his right hand and a shield with a lion supported by his left; all within a tressure of arches with trefoils in the spandrels / +XPC:VIИCIT:XPC:RЄGИΛT:XPC:IИPЄRΛT, cross fleurée in quadrilobe with leaves on cusps and rosettes in spandrels. Delmonte 466; Schneider 148, Friedberg 163. 4.48g, 30mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1056. Belgium, Hainault. Jean d’Avesnes (1280-1304) AR Esterling. Head facing / Long cross. Mayhew p. 42, 34. 1.32g, 20mm, 12h. Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

270

100


BOHEMIA

1057. Bohemia. Bretislaus I (1037-1055) AR Denar. BRACISLΛVSV DVX, standing figure holding banner / SC S WENCEZLΛVA (Z retrograde), standing figure facing, holding cross-tipped sceptre; long cross in right field. Cach 317. 0.92g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Toned. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1058

100

1059

1058. Bohemia. Bratislav I (1034-1055) AR Denar. Prague, after c.1050. BRACIZLAVS DVX, bust facing between pellets / SCS WENCEZLAVS, bust right, holding cross in right hand. Cach 322. 0.91g, 15mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Toned. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1059. Bohemia. Wenceslaus II (1278-1305) AR Pragergroschen. Crown inside double circles of legend / Crowned rampant lion left. Saurma 390/166; Kopicki 10013. 3.66g, 28mm, 7h. Good Very Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

FRANCE

100

Charlemagne, Rex Francorum

1060. France, Carolingians. Charlemagne (768-814), King of the Franks, AR Denier. Uncertain mint, circa AD 771-794. CAROLVS in two lines, bead border around / RF for (Rex Francorum - King of the Franks), bead border around. MEC 730-731. 1.03g, 16mm, 1h. Toned, Good Very Fine.

3,000

1061. France, Aquitaine. Guillaume IX and X (1086-1126, 1126-1137) BI Denier. +GVILILMO, four crosses / +BVRGDEGELALA around cross. Duplessy 1020. 0.83, 17mm, 8h. Very Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1062

1063

1062. France, Bretagne. Jean V (1399-1442) AR Blanc aux neuf mouchetures. Rennes, 1399-1436+IOANNES BRITON DVX, nine ermine / +SITROME DRI BERENDICTV, cross. Duplessy 184. 3.17g, 26mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1063. France, Lorraine. René II (1473-1508) AR Sol de guerre. Nantes. Crowned ducal coat-of-arms / Sword. De Saulcy XII, 12; Roberts 9434. 1.20g, 20mm, 11h. Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

271


1064

1065

1064. France, Provence. Anonymous AR Denier. c.1186-1243?. +REX ARAGONE, crowned head left / POVINCIA, long cross. Duplessy 1611. 0.79g, 18mm, 8h. Good Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1065. France, Provence. Raymond VI (1194-1222) or Raymond VII (1222-1249) AR Denier. +DVX MARCHIO PV, star and crescent / R COMES PALATII, cross pattée surrounded by pellets. Duplessy 1606. 0.74g, 17mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

100

1066. France. Philippe III le Hardi (1270-1285) or Philippe IV le Bel (1285–1314) AR Gros tournois à l’O rond. c.1280-1290. + PHILIPPVS REX + BHDICTV : SIT : HOmЄ : DHI : nRI : DЄI : IhV. XPI around small cross pattée / + TVRONVS CIVIS, châtel tornouis within border of twelve lis. Duplessy 202 and 213. 4.08g, 25mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1067. France. Jean II le Bon (1350-1364) AV Mouton d’or. 17 January 1355. + AGn’ DЄI QVI TOLL’ PCCA mVDI mISЄRЄRЄ nOB’, Agnus Dei standing left, head upturned right, wearing nimbus crown and cradling banner on long cross fleurée; IOh’ RЄX below; pellet-in-annulet stops / + XP’C VIИCIT XP’C RЄGИAT XP’C IMPЄRAT, cross fleurée with star in angled quadrilobe at centre and lis in each quarter; all within double linear angled quadrilobe; lis in spandrels; double quadrilobe stops. Duplessy 291; Friedberg 280. 4.71g., 31mm, h. Good Extremely Fine. 1,500 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Exceptionally Well Struck and Preserved

1068. France. Charles VI (1380-1422) or Charles VII (1422-1461) AV Écu d’or à la couronne. Uncertain mint. + KAROLVS:DЄI: GRACIA:FRAnCORVM:RЄX, crowned arms of France / +XPC*VIHCIT*XPC * RЄGHAT * XPC * IHPЄRAT*XPC*IMPERAT, star in the centre; all within a quadrilobe with lis at points and crowns in spandrels. Pellet near M of FRANCORVM, cf. Duplessy 369 A and 453; Friedberg 291 and 306. 4.06g, 27mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Exceptionally well struck and preserved. 1,000 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group Auction 45, 18 March 1998, lot 2558.

272


GERMANY

1069

1070

1069. Germany, Bavaria. Rudolf I and Ludwig IV (1274-1317) AR Pfennig. RL, Panther-like animal left / Shield. Struck with his brother, Ludwig. Wittelsbach 63, Beierlein 41. 0.61g, 16mm, 6h. Very Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

100

1070. Germany, Braunschweig. Heinrichder Löwe (1142-1195) AR Brakteat. Lion at bay to right. Bohnhoff 356; Hannover, KM 432-44. 0.46g, 23mm. Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1071. Germany, Donauwörth. Philipp von Schwaben (1198–1208) AR Brakteat. Head of king facing, imperial eagle facing right. Gebhart 16. Weissenburg 7. Cahn-Wüthr. 321. 0.76g, 25mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

250

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Very Rare Ulrich von Reinstein Brakteat

1072. Germany, Halberstadt Bishopric. Ulrich von Reinstein (1149-1160) AR Brakteat. + STEPHANVS + OWDALRICVS EPC, bishop with crook kneeling before St Stephan holding book. Berger 1268; Besser/ Brämer/Bürger 14.08: Nau, Die Zeit der Staufer, 189.2; Bonhoff 456.0.83g, 32mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

1,500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1073

1074

1073. Germany, Regensburg Bishopric. Heinrich II as Count (995-995) AR Denar. +HINIRICVNS DV around small cross, three pellets and an annulet in angles / SIII H IIVNA around temple, upon which, WAO. CF. Hahn, Moneta Radasponensis, p. 82, 21-221,56 g. 1.56g, 20mm, 8h. Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1074. Germany, Überlingen. AR Brakteat. c.1180-1190. Crowned lion right. Bohnhoff 1855; Cahn 134; Lebek 14d. 0.35g, 19mm. Extremely Fine. Rare. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

273

100


GREAT BRITAIN

Very Rare ‘Pada’ Thrymsa

2x

2x

1075. Great Britain. Anglo-Saxon, ‘Pada’ Pale AV Thrymsa. Kent, c.675-680. Pearl-diademed and draped bust right / NOVI PADA (in Runic letters) ANVSPFΛVC, cross over saltire, arms terminating in annulets, pellet in centre. Sutherland 1948, 82 pl. 4, 28; Metcalf 82-3; North 31; S 770. 1.15g, 12mm. Very Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Rare and Superbly Struck Sceatta

2x 1076. Great Britain. Anglo-Saxon, AR Sceatta. East Midlands, c.725-735/45. Diademed head right / Bird standing left; pellets around. Metcalf series Q, type IE, 383; North 133; S 808A. 0.78g, 12mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare. Superbly struck on sound metal. The last example of this type to appear in auction was in 2007, and sold for $1,700 (Triton X, lot 1308). 1,000 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1077. Great Britain. Kings of Northumbria, Eanred (c. 810-841) Æ Styca. York c.837-841. +EANRED REX, cross / +MONNE, cross. Pirie 574; North 186; S 862. 1.25g, 12mm, 3h. Extremely Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1078. Great Britain. Kings of Mercia, Burgred (852-874) AR Penny. Bust right / MON/+BERHEA/ETA between lunettes. North 423; S 938. 1.25g, 20mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Minor part of rim missing.

250

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1079 1080 1079. Great Britain. Eadgar (959-975) AR Penny. ‘York’ 959-c.972/3. Small cross, M in field / FRETHI CES MOT between rosettes. North 744; S 1130. 1.18g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Part of flan missing. 200 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1080. Great Britain. Aethelred II (978-1016) AR Penny. London, c.985-991. Diademed bust right / +ÆDEERED MO LVNDO, hand of providence between alpha and omega. North 766; S 1144. 1.58g, 20mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

274

400


Exceptional Penny of Aethelred II

1081. Great Britain. Aethelred II (978-1016) AR Penny. Winchester, circa AD 997-1003. Moneyer Beorhtnoth. Bare-headed bust left / + BУRHTNOÐ M•ΩO PIN, long cross, voided with pellet in centre, each limb terminating in three crescents. SCBI 7 (Copenhagen), 1372; Hild. 4169; BMC 375; North 774; SCBC 1151. 1.72g, 20mm, 10h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,500

1082. Great Britain. Cnut (1016-1035) AR Penny. Southwark, c.1029-1035/6. Bust with sceptre left / +EGELRIC ON SV, short cross. North 790; S 1159. 0.84g, 18mm, 10h. Very Fine. 150 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1083. Great Britain. Edward the Confessor (1042-1066) AR Penny. York, c.1046-1048. Bust with sceptre left / +IOLANA ON EOFERW, voided short cross, over it a quadrilateral ornament with three pellets at each angle. North 817; S 1174. 1.07g, 19mm, 2h. Extremely Fine.

200

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1084. Great Britain. Edward the Confessor (1042-1066) AR Penny. London, c.1046-1048. King enthroned facing / +EMVND ON LVNDE, voided short cross with martin in each angle. North 827; S 1181. 1.07g, 19mm, 2h. Extremely Fine.

200

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1085. Great Britain. Edward the Confessor (1042-1066) AR Penny. Lewes, c.1059-1062. Bust with sceptre right / +LIOFPEP ON LEPE, hammer cross. North 828; S 1182. 1.33g, 19mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

275

200


1086

1087

1086. Great Britain. Edward the Confessor (1042-1066) AR Penny. Wallingford, c.1062-1065. Bust facing / +BVREPNE ON PALL, small cross. North 830; S 1183. 1.08g, 16mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 200 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1087. Great Britain. Henry III (1216-1272) AR Penny. Canterbury, c.1216-1217. Bearded head facing / +HENRI ON CANT, short cross. North 976/1; S 1355. 1.37g, 20mm, 12h. Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1088

1089

1088. Great Britain. John (1199-1216) in the name of Henry II, AR Penny. London, c.1204-1209. Bearded head facing / +WALTER ON LV, short cross. North 968/4; S1350. 1.54g, 19mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1089. Great Britain. Henry III (1216-1272) AR Penny. Canterbury, c.1251-1272. Bearded head facing / IOHAN ON CANT, long cross. North 991/2; S 1367A. 1.43g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1090. Great Britain. Henry III (1216-1272) AR Penny. Canterbury, c.1251-1272. Bearded head facing / NICOLE ON CANT, long cross. North 992/2; S 1368. 1.43g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1091. Great Britain. Edward II (1307-13027) AR Penny. London, c.1320-1333. Head facing / CIVITAS LONDON, long cross. Withers class 15; North 1066; S 1462. 1.34g, 19mm, 6h. Very Fine.

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

276

100


Exceptionally Sharp and Well Preserved

1092.

Great Britain. Edward III (1327-1377) AV Noble. London, pre-treaty period, c.1351-1352. King standing in ship, holding sword and shield / Ornate cross with lis at ends and E in centre, crowns and lions in quarters; one quarter with additional tiny lis in field. Schneider 17; North 1144; S 1486; Friedberg 89. 7.77g, 34mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Well struck; exceptionally sharp and well preserved for the type.

5,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group Auction 66, 19 May 2004, lot 1985; Ex Davissons 14, 14 November 2000, lot 6. The Noble was the first English gold coin produced in quantity, having been preceded by the Gold penny and the Florin earlier in the reigns of King Henry III and King Edward III, which saw little circulation. The value of the coin was six shillings and eight pence (written 6/8), which was equivalent to eighty pence or one-third of a pound sterling. The weight was changed from issue to issue to maintain this value until 1464 when the value was increased. Edward deliberately aggravated the French by naming himself not only King of England and Ireland, but also of France - adding “Rex Francie” to the royal titles. This claim would continue for centuries until the time of George III, but was famously interrupted in the 1360s when the title was altered, during and after the Treaty of Brétigni, appearing as Latin versions of Duke of Aquitaine for the treaty period, and finally both titles appeared for what has come to be known as the Post-Treaty period. Edward is depicted here in war panoply standing within an English warship, which is widely believed to have originated to commemorate the English naval victory at Sluys in 1340, a total victory over the French navy which was utterly annihilated, leaving some 16,000-18,000 dead, at a cost of just two English ships and a small number of men. This denomination became long lived and was a key ingredient for the success of the wool trade with Flanders, and was widely copied by other monarchs on the Continent.

277


1093. Great Britain. Henry VI (First reign, 1422-1426) AV Half-noble. Annulet issue. London, c.1422-1430. King, crowned, standing facing in ship holding sword and shield / Floriate cross extending from a central panel containing a letter h. Schneider 291; North 1417; S 1805; Friedberg 113. 3.47g, 26mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,250

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1094. Great Britain. Henry VI (First reign, 1422-1461) AR Groat. Calais, mm: rosettes and mascules c.1430-1431. Bust facing / Long cross. North 1446; S 1859. 3.77g, 26mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1095. Great Britain. Edward IV (Second reign, 1471-1483) AV Angel. London mm: heraldic cinquefoil, c.1480-1483. Archangel Michael slaying the Dragon / Ship bearing shield and cross. Schneider 467-8; North 1626; S 2091; Friedberg 139. 5.08g, 28mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

1,500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1096. Great Britain. Henry VIII (1509-1547) AR Groat. London, im: rose, c.1526-1544. Crowned and draped bust right / Coat of arms over long cross fourchĂŠe. North 1797; S 2337E. 2.66g, 25mm, 8h. Very Fine.

150

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1097. Great Britain. Henry VIII (1509-1547) AR Groat. London, im: lis, c.1544-1547. Facing crowned, bearded bust / Coat of arms over long cross fourchĂŠe. North 1844; S 2370. 2.53g, 25mm, 6h. Very Fine. Attractive, realistic portraiture. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

278

300


ANGLO-GALLIC Edward the Black Prince

1098.

Anglo-Gallic. Edward the Black Prince, prince of Aquitaine (1362-1372) AV Leopard d’or. Aquitaine, c.1357-1360. + ЄD : PmO : GnS : [AnGLI]Є : P’nCPS : AQVITNIЄ, crowned leopard passant left, raising right forepaw, within tressure of 10 arches, quatrefoils on points and within spandrels; double quatrefoil stops / + XPC : VInCЄT : XPC RЄGnAT : XPC : IMPЄRAT, floriate cross within quatrefoil, leopards passant in angles. Withers & Ford 150; Schneider –; Elias 140; S 8121; Friedberg p. 212, 4. 3.47g, 29mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Sharply struck and in exceptional condition for the type. Rare.

5,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. An exceptional military commander, Edward ‘the Black Prince’ was the eldest son of King Edward III, on whose behalf he campaigned in France from the age of 15. Scoring decisive military victories over the French at Crécy in 1346 and Poitiers in 1356, the Black Prince twice crippled the French army for a decade each time. Struck at the height of the Black Prince’s popularity, the leopard d’or is an example of his use of iconography to bolster the English position in Aquitaine, as it appears to deliberately supersede the French mouton d’or – the Paschal Lamb on the obverse and the fleur de lys on the reverse are all replaced by English leopards. This coin was one of the last issues of leopards struck in the period 1357-1361, and the entire series was probably recalled in 1361, when Edward III renounced his title of King of France in exchange for ratification of his possession of Aquitaine in the Treaty of Brétigny. The captured French King John II had to pay three million gold crowns for his ransom, and would be released after he paid one million; he was also required to provide numerous hostages, including two of his sons. While the hostages were held, John returned to France to try and raise funds to pay the ransom. In 1362 John’s son Louis of Anjou escaped captivity. John thus felt honour-bound to return to captivity in England, where he died in 1364. In 1362, the Black Prince was invested as Prince of Aquitaine. He and his wife Joan of Kent moved to Bordeaux, the capital of the principality, where they spent the next nine years, and had two sons. The elder son, named Edward after his father and grandfather, died at the age of six. Around the time of the birth of their younger son, Richard (who would become King Richard II), the Black Prince was lured into a war on behalf of King Peter of Castile. The ensuing Battle of Náera in 1367 was one of the Black Prince’s greatest victories. While the English longbow again demonstrated its devastating power, driving off the opposing cavalry, unlike in other battles of the Hundred Years’ War however, at Nájera it was the English who assaulted the French lines, with the English vanguard pinning the French formation while their mounted knights flanked and routed the enemy lines. Yet it was this campaign that shattered the Prince’s health, and he died some nine years later after a long-lasting illness contracted in Spain, becoming the first Prince of Wales not to become king, and thus robbing England of a capable and greatly respected heir.

279


1099. Anglo-Gallic. Henry VI of England (1422-1453) AV Salut d’or. Rouen, 1423. (leopard mm) hЄnRICVS : DЄI : GRΛ : FRΛCORV : Ƶ : ΛGLIЄ : RЄX, the Virgin Mary standing behind the arms of France facing the Archangel Gabriel standing behind the quartered arms of France and England, handing her a scroll bearing AVЄ beneath the light of God / Crown mm XPC’ * VIИCIT * XPC’ * RЄGHΛT * XPC’ * IMPЄRΛT, Latin cross above “h” within tressure of arches, a lis and leopard to either side. Withers & Ford 386D; Elias 270a; Schneider 110; S 8164; Friedberg p. 214, 18. 3.48g, 28mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

1,500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Sold with old ticket marked ‘Seaby 23.XI.46”.

HUNGARY

1100

1101

1100. Hungary. Wenzel (1301-1305) AR Dinar. King enthroned facing / Facing male face surrounded by leaves. Huszár 436. 0.50g, 11mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

100

1101. Hungary. Sigismund (1387-1437) AV Gulden or Ducat. Kaschau, c.1387-1401. +SIGISMVNDI D G R VNGARIE, quartered arms in shield / St Ladislas standing facing, around S LADISL AVS REX, mm. two lis. Huszár 572; Pohl Tabelle D1-6 R118-9; Friedberg 9. Slightly uneven flan, otherwise very fine. 3.56g, 20mm, 1h. Near Mint State. 300 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group Auction 64, 24 September 2003, lot 1489.

IRELAND

Unpublished in the Standard References

1102. Ireland. Hiberno-Norse in the name of Aethelred II of England AR Penny. Dublin, c.995-1020. +ÆDELRED REX ANGLOX, draped head left, pellet behind / +LEOFPOL DIMNL OPIN, double long cross. Unpublished in the standard references, for type cf. W. O’Sullivan, The Earliest Irish Coinage, 1962, 8; BMC 21-43; S 6016. 1.71g, 19mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Well toned. Unpublished in the standard references.

2,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1103. Ireland. Hiberno-Norse in the name of Aethelred II of England AR Penny. Dublin, c.1035-1060. +INITIIEILIILND, draped head left, four pellets on neck / +IIID III:II I+III LDI, double long cross, S, pellet and hand in angles. O’Sullivan 20 (same dies); S 6133. 0.90g, 17mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Well toned. Rare. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

280

500


1104

1105

1104. Ireland. John as lord of Ireland (1177-1199), AR Half-penny. Dublin, c. 1190-1198. +IOHANNES DO, facing diademed head / +TOMAS…VVE, voided cross potent. SCBI 10, Belfast, 231-74; S 6205. 0.71g, 14mm, 6h. Very Fine. 250 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1105. Ireland. King John (1199-1216) AR Penny. Dublin, c.1207-1211. IOҺA NNЄS RЄ X, crowned facing bust, holding cruciform sceptre; rosette to right; all within triangle / + ROBЄ + RD ON + DIVЄ, pinwheel (sun) within crescent moon; three stars around; all within triangle; three crosses pattée around legend. SCBI 10, Belfast, 343-76; S 6228. 1.46g, 19mm, 10h. Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1106

1107

1106. Ireland. Henry III (1216-1272) AR Penny. Dublin, c. 1251-1254. Һ(ЄNR)I CVS R ЄX III, crowned facing bust, holding sceptre; cinquefoil to right; all within triangle / RIC (AR)D O(N D) IVЄ, voided long cross, with trefoil in each angle. SCBI 10, Belfast 438-64; S 6236. 1.41g, 18mm, 4h. Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1107. Ireland. Edward I, as king of England and lord of Ireland (1272-1307) AR Penny. Dublin, c.1279-1302. EDW’ R’ ANGL’ D NS hyB’, crowned and draped bust facing in triangle; three pellets on breast, pellet before EDW, wedge-tailed R / CIVI TAS DVBL INIE, long cross; three pellets in quarters. SCBI 10, Belfast 470-481; S 6247. 1.35g, 19mm, 10h. Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Extremely Rare Edward IV Groat

1108. Ireland. Edward IV (1461-1483) AR Groat. Dublin, c.1460-1463. Large crown within tressure of nine arches, each arch ending in triple pellets / CIVI TΛS DVBL InIЄ (double saltire stops) large cross pattée; triple pellets in quarters; central annulet in second and third quarters. S 6272. 2.44g, 23mm, 8h. Very Fine, some clipping. Extremely Rare.

1,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1109

1110

1109. Ireland. Henry VII (1485-1509) AR Groat. Dublin, c.1485-1487. [RЄX] ΛnGL IЄ FRΛ nC[IЄ], coat of arms over long cross with triple pellet ends / [DOmI] nVS hУBЄ RnIЄ, three crowns over long cross with triple pellet ends. S 6415. 1.92g, 22mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Of exceptional quality and visual appeal.

500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1110. Ireland. Elizabeth I (1558-1603) BI Groat. Dublin, c.1558. ELIZA[B]ETA D’·G’·ANG’·FRA’·Z·HI, crowned and mantled bust left / POSVI:DEVM:ADIVTOREM:MEVM ·, crowned harp; crowned E R to left and right. S 6504. 3.04g, 25mm, 3h. Very Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

281

200


282


ITALY Unique Siege of Ancona Gold Issue

1111.

Italy. The Roman Republic (1798-1799), Siege of Ancona AV ‘Scudo Romano’. Ancona, 1799. PIVS SEXTVS PONT M A VI, oval coat of arms of the Braschi in a rich cornice decorated with cornucopiae and shell, surmounted by a radiant papal tiara and crossed keys / AVXILIVM DE SANCTO 1780, veiled personification of Holy Church, with radiant head, seated to front on clouds, holding keys of St Peter in right hand and extending left to a small domed temple; in left inner field, mint mark A; below, small coat of arms of Mons. Giuseppe Vai. Plain edge. M. Dubbini & G. Mancinelli, Storia delle monete di Ancona, Ancona 2009, 7.4 and p. 206, first paragraph (this coin); M. Traina, Gli assedi e le loro monete (491-1861), Bologna 1976, ‘Ancona, asseddio austro-russo-turco del 1799’, pp. 55-75, 3. For related obsidional silver issues of Ancona cf. Muntoni IV, p. 212, 20 pl. 218; Serafini III, 855; Pagani p. 262 note; Berman 3001 (Pius VI); Gigante 2005, p. 373, 1; KM 10. 37.20g, 41mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin. Unique and of great numismatic interest.

25,000

The allied siege and naval blockade of Ancona from 18 March - 13 November 1799 was effected by a squadron of 8 Russian and Turkish ships, and on land, by an army of troops from Austria, Russia and Turkey. This was the occasion for the remarkable obsidional issue by Ancona of silver coins utilising dies previously used for silver scudi and half scudi from the Rome mint in the name of Pius VI, as well as local copper 2 and 1 Baiocchi pieces. According to the Abbot Antonio Leoni, in Ancona Ilustrata opera dell’Abbate Antonio Leoni anconitano colle risposte ai sigg. Peruzzi, Pignetti etc, e il compendio delle memorie storiche d’Ancona, Ancona 1832 (Archivio comunale di Ancona fasc. 2920, p. 100), the new mint was housed in a confiscated collegiate church and entrusted on 3 Fiorile (11 April) to the chief mint master of the new Roman Republic, Luigi Severi. The emergency mint was operational by the end of Germile (about 19 April), and with the seizure of church property and forced contributions from wealthy private citizens, including the Jewish community, it began to strike coins in bronze, silver and gold. Leoni op. cit., p. 376, expressly states that gold was struck: (‘Zecca: ove fu battuta la moneta d rame, e di bronzo, da’ argento, e d’ oro: esendo zecchiere il signor Luigi romano. Le monete d’oro, e d’ argento (piasre e doppie) furono coniate simile alle pontifice, e di eguale purezza.’). The bronze coinage was struck from the bell metal recovered from the local churches, the ‘voluntary’ silver was debased and struck from modified Pius VI dies with a small mint mark ‘A’ added to the field of the reverse die. However, none of the gold coinage has survived except for the above specimen which according to Dubbini and Mancinelli, p. 206: ‘Probabilmente si tratta di un omaggio fatto durante l’assedio a qualche personaggio di rilievo’ (‘it is probably a donative made during the siege for a very important person’). The ancient Doric city of Ancona was founded by Syracusan exiles (Strabo v.4.3.2 [241]) in the early fourth century BC on an elbow-shaped promontory (Ἀγκών), which gave the town its name, situated on an excellent natural harbour. Under the Roman Empire the city became a municipium and base for the fleet; Trajan improved the port, where he built nearby a splendid triumphal arch celebrating the Dacian victory. Under Byzantium, Ancona became the first city of the Maritime Pentapolis, governed by Ravenna, but with considerable autonomy. The seat of a Carolingian march, it eventually became a semi-independent maritime republic under papal patronage, rich in commerce with Constantinople. After the fall of Constantinople in 1453, Ancona’s fortunes waned. The Medici pope Clement VII seized the city in 1532, bringing it under direct papal rule. In February 1797 Ancona was occupied by the French and on 19 November became the revolutionary Anconine Republic (Repubblica Anconitana) and part of Napoleon’s newly proclaimed First Roman Republic (Repubblica Romana). Ancona soon became target for the anti-French alliance and became the subject of a well documented siege. The long and obstinate defence of the besieged obtained for the defenders, as it always should do, the most honourable of terms; and General Monnier and his troops were highly complimented for their bravery by the Austrian General Frœlich. Ancona became once again a papal state (1799-1808), part of the Italian Kingdom of Napoleon (1808-1814), yet again a papal state (1814-1848), a part of the second revolutionary Roman Republic (1848-1849), and finally again a papal state (1849-1860), before its entry in the Kingdom of Italy in 29 September 1860.

283


1112. Italy, Aquileia. Raimondo della Torre, Patriach (1273-1298) AR Denaro. c.1287-81. RAIMV NDV PA, enthroned patriarch facing / AQV ILE GENSIS, arms of the patriarch, two keys and two towers in angles of long cross. Bernardi 31; Biaggi 153. 1.10g, 22mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1113. Italy, Firenze. AV Fiorino d’oro. c.1252-1303. +FLOR ENTIA, ornate lily of Florence / S IOИA NNES B, St. John the Baptist standing facing, wearing cloak, holding cross sceptre and raising right hand; in upper left, mm; bell. MIR 4/22 pl.2, 16; Bernocchi II, 167/9; Friedberg 275. 3.52g, 20mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

300

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1114

1115

1114. Italy, Firenze. AR Fiorino da 12 denari or Soldo. c.1260-1279. +FLOR ENTIA, ornate lily of Florence / +IOИANNES B, bust of St John the Baptist facing. MIR 36; CNI8/9; Bernocchi II, pl. 34, 23/25. 1.80g, 19mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. Toned. Rare variety. 200 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1115. Italy, Firenze. Francesco di Nerio Ardighelli AR Grosso da 5 csoldi 6 denari. 1390/1. DET TIBI FLORErE XPS FLORENNTIA VERE, lily / SANTVS IOIIΛHNES BATISTA, St John the Baptist seated facing, coat of arms and latter in circle in upper left field. MIR 57/1; Bernocch II, 1935/8. 2.65g, 25mm, 2h. Very Fine. Very Rare. 250 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Very Rare Nicola Guarco Genovino

1116. Italy, Genova. Nicola Guarco, Doge VIII (1378-1383) AV Genovino. +DVX IANVENSIVM: OTAVVS: O, castle within tressure of arches / +CONRADV’ REX ROMANORVM, cross within tressure of arches. MIR 45; CNI 1/14; Friedberg 360. 3.40g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare. Very well centred, struck and preserved.

1,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Very Rare Quattrino of Federico II Gonzaga

1117. Italy, Mantova. Federico II Gonzaga (1519–1540) Æ Quattrino. VIRILIVS MΛRO, laureate head of Virgil left / EPO above flower. CNI IV 18-9 var. (obv. legend); Rossi, Gonzaga 43; Bignotti 2 (Federico I). 1.89g, 16mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. Ex Owen Parsons Collection, Baldwin’s Auction, 27 May 1994, lot 1115.

284

300


Extremely Rare 8 Tarì Multiple

1118.

Italy, Sicily. Carlo I d’Angiò (1266-1285) AV 8 Tarì. Messina, c. 1266. + K DEI GRACIA, horseman with drawn sword galloping right, two lis on caparison; 5 pointed star below /+ REX SICILIE, long Latin cross; at sides, IC CX / NI KA; below, two triangles of pellets. MEC 14, p 201, fig. 7; Spahr 15; H. Kowalski, I reali di Carlo I d’Angiò, Rome 1979, pp. 22-3, figs 4-5; CNI pl. 11, 5; MIR Sicilia, 145/1; Friedberg cf. 653a (5 tarì). 8.55g, 17mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare; one of the heaviest known multiples.

5,000

Carlo I d’Angiò was the last monarch of the kingdom of Sicily to issue tarì and he did so in spectacular fashion by issuing early in his reign a relatively heavy coinage reproducing the galloping knight, the subject of his seal (see Kowalsky p. 23, fig. 6). This issue was also known as a ‘cavallino’, and continued those of the Hohenstaufen in being 16.3 carats fine, struck at irregular weights. The word tarì derives from the Arabic word meaning ‘fresh’, i.e. newly struck, a frequently used qualifying adjective for a coin in legal documents and thought by Italian numismatists of the 19th and 20th centuries to be the name of the coin itself. Tarì were ultimately derived from Arabic quarter-dinar or ruba’i, the standard gold coin (ideally weighing 1.05g) in circulation in the Emirate of Sicily. Tarì continued to be issue after the Norman invasion of 1061, but as time went by the gold content was increasingly reduced and the coins were struck at random weight, which means that must they have been traded as bullion. Charles of Anjou, founder of the Angevin dynasty in Naples, was the youngest son of Louis VIII and brother of King Louis IX of France. He took part in Louis IX’s crusades to Egypt in 1248 and Tunisia in 1270. After obtaining Provence by marriage in 1246, which extended his influence into Piedmont, he became a senator of Rome (1263, 1265–78) and undertook to champion the papal cause against Manfred, the Hohenstaufen who had usurped the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in 1258. In reward, he was crowned king of Naples and Sicily in 1266 by Pope Clement IV, which territories he had already received as a papal grant in 1262. Charles defeated and killed Manfred at the Battle of Benevento in 1266 and then defeated and executed the last of the Hohenstaufen line, Conradin, later that year. As leader of the Guelphs, or papal faction, he gained political hegemony in Italy and won suzerainty over several cities in Tuscany, Piedmont, and Lombardy, but his overbearing policies led to a cooling of his relations with the papacy. Planning to establish his own empire, he allied himself with the deposed Latin ruler of Constantinople, Baldwin II, against Greek Michael VIII and fought for years in the Balkans. Corfu, Epirus, and Albania were taken. The crushing taxes necessitated by his wars and his appointment of oppressive French officials to exact them led to the Sicilian Vespers in 1282. The ensuing war against the Sicilian rebels and Peter III of Aragón, chosen by the rebels as king of Sicily, continued after his death in Foggia in 1285 under Charles’s son and successor, Charles II, then a prisoner in Catalonia, so the regency passed to his French cousin Robert II of Artois, son of the younger brother of St. Loius.

285


1119. Italy, Sicily. Carlo d’Angiò AV Saluto d’oro. Naples, struck after AD 1278. + KAROL’ • DЄI • GRA • IЄRL’m • SICILIЄ • RЄX, coat-of-arms of Jerusalem and Anjou; rosette flanked by stars on either side; above, upturned crescent flanked by stars / + AVЄ • GRACIA • PLЄnA • DOmInuS TЄCUm, The Annunciation: Archangel Gabriel standing right, holding lily in left hand and pointing with outstretched right at Virgin standing facing slightly left, raising hands in adoration; between them, lily in vase. CNI XIX 1-4; Spahr -; MEC 14, 675-676; Friedberg 808; MIR 18; PannutiRiccio 1.4.45g, 21mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine.

4,000

1120. Italy, Messina. Giacomo d’Aragona (1285-1367) AR Pierreale. + IA DEI GRA ARAGON SICL REX, coronated eagle within tressure of arches / + AC BARChINONE COMES, coat of arms within tressure of arches. Spahr 11; MIR 179. 3.09g, 25mm, 12h. Very Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1121

1122

1121. Italy, Milano. Æ Denaro tersolo scodellato. c.1167-1250. IMPERATOR around HE RIC N / MEDIOLANVM around small cross. Crippa I, p. 295, 2/O; MIR 52. 0.58g, 15mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1122. Italy, Milano. Gian Galeazzo Visconti (1395-1402) AR Pegione. + GALEAZ VICECOES D MEDIOLAИI 3C’, coiled Visconti serpent left; G-Z across field / S ABROSIV’ MEDIOLAИ, St Ambrosius seated facing on throne, raising hand in benediction and holding crozier. Crippa 4/a; MIR 121/1. 2.48g, 24mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

Extremely Rare Neapolitan Follaro

1123. Italy, Napoli. Sergio (840-864) Æ Follaro. SCS IANV, bust of St Gennaro facing / SERGIV and DV/X vertically either side of half length bust of duke wearing loros, holding sceptre and globus cruciger; under globus, star. MEC 5; Pannuti Riccio p. 7, 1; MIR 9. 6.97g, 26mm, 7h. Very Fine. Unusually good for the issue. Extremely Rare.

Ex Hirsch 241, 20-22 September 2005, lot 1029.

286

2,000


1124. Italy, Napoli. Carlo V (1516-1556), AR Carlino. CAROLVS IIIII IM RO, crowned bust right; in left field, R (Luigi Ram, mint master) / REX ARAGO VTRIVS SI ET within oak wreath. CNI XIX, 581; Pannuti-Riccio p. 102, 35; MIR 147. 3.22g, 25mm, 7h. Good Very Fine.

300

Ex Morton & Eden Auction, 28-29 November 2006, lot 738.

Very Rare Mezzo Ducato

1125. Italy, Napoli. Filippo II (1554-1598) AR Mezzo Ducato. 1596. PHILIPP DG REX ARA VTR, radiate and cuirassed bust right; IAF/G monogram to left (Giovanni Antonio Fasulo, mint master and Gasperi Giuno, trail master) / SICILIAE HIERVSA, crowned coat of arms; shield within ornate frame. CNI XX, 1287; Pannuti-Riccio 22; MIR 174/13. 14.79g, 34mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

300

1126. Italy. Padova. Iacopo II da Carrara (1345-1350) Carrarino da 2 soldi. * CI I T P AD’ around cross, I, A and two carts in angles / * S*PSDO CIHVS*, St Prodocimo sated facing. P to right. CNI 1; Biaggi 1729. 1.04g, 18mm, 9h. Very Fine. Rare.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1127. Italy, Siena. BI Denaro. c.1180-1200. SEHAVEIVS, :S: inverted cress patée. MIR474; CNI 1/5. 0.72g, 17mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1128. Italy, Trieste. Arlongo de’ Visgoni (1255-1281) AR Denaro. ARLON GVS EP, bishop seated facing / CIVITAS TERGESTVM, paschal lamb with banner. Paoluccci 11; CNI VI, p. 245, 3; Biaggi 2723. 0.93g, 20mm, 10h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

287

100


1129. Italy, Venezia. Pietro Ziani (1205-1229) AR Grosso. P ZIANI - S M VENETI, Doge and St. Mark standing to front / IC – XC, Christ enthroned to front. Paolucci p. 16, 1. 2.16g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1130. Italy, Venezia. Francesco Dandolo (1329-1339) AR Grosso. FRA DANDVI - S M VENETI, Doge and St. Mark standing to front / IC – XC, Christ enthroned to front. Paolucci p. 27, 2. 2.14g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1131. Italy, Venezia. Tommaso Mocenigo (1414-1423) AV Ducato. TOM MOCENICO S M VENETI, St. Mark standing right presenting banner to kneeling Doge left / • SIT • T • XPЄ • DAT • Q’ TV | RЄGIS ISTЄ DVCAT’, Christ standing facing, holding gospels and raising hand in benediction, surrounded by mandorla and stars. Paolucci p. 39, 1; Friedberg 123i. 3.38g, 20mm, 8h. Very Fine.

200

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1132. Italy, Verona. Time of Frederick II (1218-1250) AR Grosso da 20 denari piccoli veronesi. +CI+ EV+CI+IV and VE–RO–N–A. around cross / + VERO-NA and CI II CI II around cross. CNI 21 Biaggi 2971. 1.65g, 20mm, 12h. Very Fine.

150

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

MEXICO

1133. Mexico, Mexico City. Carlos I with Juana, King of Spain (1516-1556) AR Real. Crowned coat of arms flanked by assayer M – I / Pillars of Hercules. Calicó Typo 110, Num. 156. 3.13g, 23mm, 8h. Very Fine.

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

288

150


POLAND Second Known Example

1134. Poland. Adalbert of Gniezno (1177-1200) AR Denar. +ADALBERTVS (retrograde), head of St Adalbertus of Gniezno facing / Same type. Unpublished in the standard references, for type cf. Kopicki 247 (one sided brakteat); Frynas -; cf. Lanz sale 152, 2011, 841. 0.23g, 16mm. Very Fine. Extremely Rare - the second known example. 1,500 St Adalbert was born in 939 of a noble Bohemian family and died in 997. He assumed the name of the Archbishop Adalbert (his name had been Wojtech), under which he studied at Magdeberg. He became bishop of Prague from were he was obliged to flee on account of the enmity he had aroused by his efforts to reform the clergy of his diocese. He went to Rome and was released by Pope John XV from his episcopal obligations, withdrew to a monastery and occupied himself in the most humble duties. Recalled by his people, who received him with great enunciation he was nevertheless expelled a second time and returned to Rome. The people of Hungary were just then turning towards Christianity and Adalbert went among them as a missionary, and almost certainly baptized King Geysa and his family, as well as King Stephen. He afterwards evangelized the Poles, and was made Archbishop of Gniezno (Gnesen) in central western Poland. But he again relinquished his see, and set out to preach to the pagans in what was to become the Kingdom of Prussia. He was at first successful, but his imperious manner in commanding them to abandon paganism irritated some local shamans and he was martyred in 997. His feast is celebrated on the 23 April, and he is called the Apostle of Prussia. Boleslas I, Prince of Poland is said to have ransomed his body for an equivalent weight of gold. He is thought to be the author of the war-song, “Boga-Rodzica”, which the Poles used to sing when going to battle. St. Adalbert was later declared the patron saint of Bohemia, Poland, Hungary and Prussia.

PORTUGAL

1135. Portugal, Lisboa. Manuel I (1495-1521) AR 20 Reais. MANVEL P R P ET D GINE, crowned large M flanked by 2 annulets / MANVEL P R P ET D GINE, crowned coat of arms. Gomz 24.01. 1.78g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

100

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

SCOTLAND

1136

1137

1136. Scotland. William I ‘The Lion’ (1165-1214) AR Sterling. LE REI WILAO… Head left with sceptre / hVE WALTER Eh, short double cross, stars in angles. Burns p. 80, 21 pl. 6, 56; S. 5029.1.52g, 18mm, 3h. Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1137. Scotland. Alexander III (1249-1286) AR Sterling. Uncertain mint, c.1280-1286. Crowned lead left with sceptre / Long cross with four mullets of six points. S 5054. 1.38g, 19mm, 9h. Very Fine. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1138. Scotland. Robert II (1371-1390) AR Groat. Edinburgh. Crowned bust left; lis tipped sceptre before, with star at base; all within double polylobe, with trefoil in spandrels / P TЄCTOR m’S · Z · LIB ΛTOR mS/VILL Λ ЄD InBV RGҺ, long cross. S. 5131. 3.71g, 28mm, 9h. Very Fine. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

289

200


Outstanding James IV Unicorn

1139.

Scotland. James IV (1488-1513) AV Unicorn. IΛCOBVS DЄI GRΛCIΛ RЄX SCOTR, unicorn standing left, crown of three lis at neck, holding arms of Scotland; 6-point star stops, im: lis / ЄXVRGΛT DЄ ЄT DISIPЄnT nImICI, large twelve point star over cross fleury; six-point star stops, im: lis. S 5315; Friedberg 18. 3.85g, 25mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare. Of outstanding quality, easily the finest example on CoinArchives.

10,000

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. Widely regarded as the most successful of the Renaissance Stewart monarch’s of Scotland, James IV ruled for 25 years, having taken the throne at the age of fifteen, supposedly at the head of an army of rebellious Scottish nobles at the Battle of Sauchieburn. Although his father was an unpopular and ineffective ruler, it is said that James IV wore a belt of iron around his waist for the rest of his life in penance for his role in his father’s death. Well educated and a polyglot, according to Spanish envoy Pedro de Ayala in 1498 James spoke Latin, German, Flemish, Italian and Spanish, and he is also known to have been the last king of the Scots to speak Scottish Gaelic. A patron of the arts, it was during James’ reign that the printing press was introduced to Scotland in 1507, and the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh, St Leonard’s College, St Andrews University and King’s College, Aberdeen were founded. The present coin featuring the unicorn was a type instituted towards the end of the reign of James III. Remaining the official animal of Scotland to this day, the unicorn has been a Scottish heraldic symbol since the twelfth century when it was used on an early form of the Scottish coat of arms by William I. Unicorns were worshipped by the ancient Babylonians, and written descriptions of them appear in texts from the ancient Persians, the Romans, the Greeks and ancient Jewish scholars, all describing a horse-like creature whose single horn had magical properties and could heal disease. In Celtic mythology, the Unicorn of Scotland symbolised innocence and purity, healing powers, joy and even life itself, and was also seen as a symbol of masculinity and power. James IV’s most notable achievement as king of Scotland would not pay dividends for generations: ‘The Marriage of the Thistle and the Rose’ took place at Holyrood on 8 August 1503, when James took the hand of Henry VII of England’s daughter Margaret. This paved the way for his grandson, James VI of Scotland, to become James I of England based upon the Tudor blood in his veins. However despite this alliance with England, when Henry VIII joined the Holy Alliance against France and England invaded France in 1513, James felt that he had to assist Scotland’s old ally under the ‘Auld Alliance’ and led his army - one of the largest ever to cross the border - south. The English forces led by Lord Surrey inflicted a crushing defeat, and James along with many of his nobles and a great part of his army were killed in the disastrous Battle of Flodden, three miles south-east of Coldstream, Northumberland on 9 September 1513. James IV was the last British monarch to be killed in battle.

290


291


1140. Scotland. Mary (1542-1567) AR Testoon. 1555. Large crowned M / Coat of arms on cross. Edinburgh, NMS 285-300; S 5402. 7.33g, 28mm, 8h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1141

1142

1141. Scotland. Mary (1542-1567) BI Plack. 1557. Crowned coat of arms / Ornate cross with cross in centre. Edinburgh,NMS 938-50; S 5437. 1.89g, 22mm, 3h. Very Fine. Rare. 100 From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection. 1142. Scotland. James VI (1567-1625) AR Two Shillings. Crowned rose / Crowned thistle. S 5509. 1.89g, 22mm, 3h. Very Fine. Rare. From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

100

SWITZERLAND

1143. Switzerland, Geneva. Bishop Conrad (1019-1030) AR Denier. + GENEVA CIVITAS, temple / + CONRADVS EPS, cross with four pellets in angles. HMZ 1-268a; Stroehlin collection 9. 1.25g, 21mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

500

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

1144. Switzerland, St. Gallen Abbey. AR Brakteat. 13th century. Paschal lamb standing left with banner. HMZ 1-469. 0.43g, 22mm. Extremely Fine.

250

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

UNITED STATES

1145. United States, Massachusetts Bay Colony AR “1652” Shilling. Small Pine Tree issue, struck c.1675-1682. MASATHVSETS IN, pine tree in beaded circle / NEW ENGLAND AN DOM, 1652 XII in beaded circle. Breen 61; Noe 29. 4.59g, 23mm, 12h. Very Fine. Attractive old collection tone.

From the Dr. Murray Gell-Mann Collection.

292

1,500