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ROMA NUMISMATICS LIMITED

Auction VI 29 September 2013 Roma Numismatics Limited 20 Hanover Square Mayfair London W1S 1JY United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0) 20 3178 2874 Fax: +44 (0) 20 3178 2456 www.romanumismatics.com email: info@romanumismatics.com

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Auction VI 29 September

10:00

Italian Coins.

14:00 Ancient and Medieval Coins.

Location

The Alto Room The Cavendish Hotel London 81 Jermyn Street, London SW1Y 6JF

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Viewing At the office of Roma Numismatics: 20 Hanover Square, Mayfair London, W1S 1JY United Kingdom From August 26th - September 27th Monday – Friday, 09:30 – 17:30

lots will not be available for viewing during the sale.

Lot pickup will be available from 10:00am on Friday 4th October

Roma Numismatics Limited Richard Beale – Director Adele Pullarp Alexander Morley-Smith

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ABSENTEE BIDDING If you are unable to attend the auction in person, you may submit an absentee bid that will be executed on your behalf by Roma Numismatics. Roma Numismatics will attempt to obtain the lot for you at the lowest possible price, and will not purchase the lot for you at a price higher than the maximum you specify. This service is free and confidential. Absentee bids must be sent and received in good time. To place absentee bids please submit your list of lots, together with your maximum bids, either by mail, fax, post using the form provided, or online at www.RomaNumismatics.com. You may also participate live online during the sale at www. coretech.cc.

Mail, fax or postal bids The customer is responsible for submitting these in good time and confirming that the bids have been received.

Telephone bids Bids may be placed by telephone as the auction is in progress, but are accepted only at the discretion of Roma Numismatics Ltd and at the risk of the customer. Roma Numismatics Ltd will not be held responsible for any failure to execute bids by telephone during the auction resulting from technical issues, miscommunication or any other reason. Any client wishing to bid by telephone should inform Roma Numismatics Ltd no later than 72 hours before the auction, and should have a prepared list of all the lots they wish to bid on.

Internet Bidding

BID ONLINE PRIOR TO THE AUCTION, SEE BIDS UPDATED IN REAL-TIME ON THE ROMA SITE. Internet bids may be submitted prior to the auction at www.RomaNumismatics.com - these bids will be automatically executed on the website. These bids will then be carried over into the live auction and executed by the auctioneer on the day. BID ONLINE DURING THE AUCTION, HEAR THE AUCTION LIVE ON YOUR COMPUTER. Real-time bids may be placed at www.coretech.cc on the day of the sale. These bids will be executed live on the floor. A 2.5% surcharge will apply to lots won through www.coretech.cc. Roma Numismatics is not responsible for any missed lots or bids due to network speed or down-time. It is advisable to register as early as possible for this service, since all internet bidder must be manually approved by the auctioneer.

Successful Bids Successful bidders will be notified and invoiced within a few days of the auction. Prices realized will be published around the same time.

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AN AUCTION OF IMPORTANT ITALIAN COINS 29 September 10:00 AM Immediately before our auction of ancient coins. For further information or to request a catalogue please consult our website, or contact us using the information below.

Tel: +44 (0) 20 3178 2874 Fax: +44 (0) 20 3178 2456 email: info@romanumismatics.com www.romanumismatics.com

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Conditions of Sale The following terms and conditions will apply to this auction:

I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII.

All estimates are in Pounds Sterling. The opening bids will be 80% of the estimate unless there are existing higher bids. There will be a 17.5% Buyer’s Fee added to the hammer price. VAT at 20% is due on the Buyer’s Fee only, not the hammer price. The auctioneer guarantees the absolute authenticity of any and all coins sold. There is no expiration to this guarantee. Any coins subsequently found to be not authentic will be exchanged for a full refund of the purchase price. Absentee bids should be submitted and received by 20:00 on the day before the auction. It is the bidder’s responsibility to ensure that bids have been received by Roma Numismatics. All grades and descriptions are the opinion of the cataloguer. Conditions of all lots are as per the photographs displayed on the Roma Numis matics website; condition reports are available upon request. It is not possible to note all marks or defects, and thus customers are encouraged to carefully examine in person all lots that they are interested in bidding on. Bids, once placed, are final and will not be rescinded. If, however, the attribution is found to be incorrect, the item is returnable within 21 days after the sale. No other returns will be accepted except on the grounds of non-authenticity. All prospective bidders who exercise the opportunity to examine lots in hand shall assume all responsibility for any damage they cause in so doing. The auctioneer shall have sole discretion in determining the value of the damage caused, which shall be promptly paid by the prospective bidder. The auctioneer will have absolute discretion to accept or decline any bid, withdraw lots from the sale at any time until such point as the purchaser takes physical possession, re-open any lot, even after the hammer has fallen, in which a bidding error has occurred, and to determine in the event of a dispute, the final winner of a lot or to rescind the sale and put the lot up for sale again. For the protection of mail or absentee bidders, no ‘unlimited’ or ‘buy’ bids will be accepted. When identical bids are received for the same lot, preference will be given to the bid received first. A mail bid will take preference over a floor bid. Some lots may carry a reserve. The auctioneer reserves the right not to sell an item below the confidential price, or will repurchase the item on behalf of the consignor or for the account of Roma Numismatics Ltd. If a reserve exists the auctioneer reserves the right to bid on any lot on behalf of the consignor up to the amount of the reserve against any floor or mail bidders. The auctioneer also reserves the right to bid on any lot on behalf of Roma Numismatics Ltd. Title remains with the owner until such time as the customer has paid in full. Invoices are due immediately upon receipt. Roma Numismatics Ltd. reserves the right to charge interest on unpaid invoices at the rate of 2% per calendar month, except where prior agreement has been made with regards to payment arrangements. A 3.5% surcharge will be applied to debit / credit card payments or payments made via PayPal. The customer is responsible for paying all bank charges and shipping and insurance costs. A 2.5% surcharge will be applied to lots won through www.coretech.cc. Roma Numismatics is not responsible for any missed lots or bids due to network speed or down-time. By making a bid the customer agrees to the above terms and conditions and accepts to be bound by them. These conditions shall take effect and be construed in accordance with the provisions of English Law.

US COIN IMPORT RESTRICTIONS Any coins in this sale that fall under US import restrictions but may still be legally imported into the US are accompanied by documentation proving that they were outside of the source country prior to the effective date, or are accompanied by a valid export certificate issued by the country of origin. Any coins subject to US import restrictions that may not lawfully be imported into the United States of America will be clearly indicated as such with the note: ‘not suitable for US market’. Roma Numismatics will make every effort to ensure that US import restrictions affect our clients as little as possible, and will carry out all necessary importations and procedures as required on behalf of the client.

Payment Methods Invoices to be settled in Pounds Sterling immediately upon receipt unless previously agreed otherwise. Bank Transfer: Barclays Bank, 22 The Borough, Farnham, GU9 7NH, UK | Account Name: Roma Numismatics IBAN: GB81 BARC 2031 0663 0101 39 | BIC: BARC GB22 | SORT CODE: 20-31-06 | ACC #: 63010139 Cheque: Please make payable to Roma Numismatics Limited PayPal (add 3.5%): sales@romanumismatics.com Debit / Credit Card (add 3.5%): contact us directly on +44 (0)20 3178 2874

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Aureus of Uranius Antoninus. Lot 987.

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COINS OF THE GREEKS

ETRURIA

Ex Jameson Collection

311. Etruria, Populonia AV 50 Asses. Circa 300-250 BC. Head of lion right, with open jaws and protruding tongue; mark of value below / Blank. Vecchi EC I, 20.6 (this coin); Jameson 2376 (this coin). 2.80g, 14mm. Good Extremely Fine.

10,000

Ex Torremuzza Collection; Ex Jameson Collection; Ex Hess Luzern Auction, 5 April 1955, lot 1. Populonia’s lion head gold issues with Etruscan/Roman marks of value 50, 25, 12.5 asses are all on the weight standard for a single unit of about 0.056g, close to what has been attributed to the Sicilian gold-litra standard of Agathokles’ fourth coinage of c. 295-289 BC (cf. SNG ANS 702-707). This unit weight standard also coincides with the much later Mars/eagle gold series of Rome (Crawford 44/2 and 50/1) and another two series attributed to Etruria in circa 209-208 BC (Crawford 105/2 and 106/2).

LUCANIA

312

313

312. Lucania, Metapontum AR Stater. Circa 530-500 BC. Ear of barley, META to right, all within border of pearls between double concentric circles / Incuse of obverse. SNG ANS 168-169; Noe 19. 8.21g, 29mm, 12h. Very Fine.

500

313. Lucania, Metapontum AR Stater. Circa 530-500 BC. Ear of barley, META to right, all within border of pearls between double concentric circles / Incuse of obverse. SNG ANS 168-169; Noe 19. 8.21g, 29mm, 12h. Very Fine.

300

314. Lucania, Metapontum AR Stater. Circa 340-330 BC. Helmeted head of Leukippos right; behind, lion’s head right, [monogram] below chin / Barley ear, leaf to right; club above leaf, AMI below leaf. Johnston B, 2.36 (same dies); HN Italy 1575. 7.87g, 19mm, 10h. Near Very Fine.

250

Ex Hess-Divo 317, 27 October 2010, lot 19.

315. Lucania, Metapontum AR Stater. Circa 330-290 BC. Head of Demeter right wearing grain wreath, triple-drop earring and necklace; EY under chin / Ear of barley with leaf right, star above, META to left, ΛY below. HN Italy 1592; SNG ANS 500-501; Johnston Class C, 8.1 (same dies). 7.83g, 20mm, 2h. Extremely Fine.

750

316. Lucania, Metapontum AR Stater. Circa 330-290 BC. Head of Demeter right wearing grain wreath, triple-drop earring and necklace / Ear of barley with leaf right; ΛY to left of stem, star above leaf. Johnston Class C, 8.14–5; HN Italy 1592. 7.92g, 20mm, 6h. Very Fine.

1

300


317. Lucania, Metapontum Æ15. Circa 225-200 BC. Athena Alkidemos walking left, brandishing thunderbolt / Owl standing left on ear of barley, META to right. Johnston Bronze 68; HN Italy 1704; SNG ANS 566. 3.18g, 15mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

300

318 319 318. Lucania, Poseidonia AR Stater. Circa 470-445 BC. Poseidon standing right, wearing chlamys and brandishing trident, ΠΟΜΕΣ before / Bull standing left, POME (retrograde) above. HN Italy 1114; SNG ANS 651-654 var. 7.49g, 18mm, 1h. About Very Fine. Harshly cleaned surfaces, some horn silver still present.

250

Ex HD Rauch 87, 8 December 2010, lot 43. 319. Lucania, Poseidonia AR Stater. Circa 470-445 BC. ΠΟΜΕΣ, Poseidon standing right, wearing chlamys around shoulders, brandishing trident / Bull standing to left, ΠΟΜΕΣ (retrograde) above. SNG ANS 661. 8.10g, 20mm, 4h. Very Fine.

500

Ex Rockefeller University, Dr. Alfred E. Mirsky Collection.

320. Lucania, Sybaris AR Stater. Circa 550-510 BC. Bull standing left, head reverted, VM above / Incuse bull standing right, head reverted. SNG ANS 819-820; SNG Copenhagen 1390; HN Italy 1729; Noble Numismatics 100, 24 July 2012, lot 3393 (same dies). 8.12g, 28mm, 12h. Very Fine.

1,000

Extremely Rare Stater of Sybaris III

321. Lucania, Sybaris AR Stater. Circa 453-448 BC. Bull standing right on ground line / Bull standing right ground line, MVBA (retrograde) above. The Golden Horn Collection, 2063 (same dies); otherwise unpublished. 8.16g, 18mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Of the highest rarity - the second known specimen.

10,000

A similar specimen cited in HN Italy (1747) has the obverse type of a bull walking to right. The obverse depiction of the bull standing to left was unpublished and thought to be unique at the time of the publication and sale of the Golden Horn Collection in January 2009. This extremely rare coin can be attributed to the short-lived Sybaris III, an attempt to refound the city, sponsored by Poseidonia, after Kroton had already twice destroyed it. After the destruction of Sybaris I by Kroton in 510 BC, though many survivors fled to the Sybarite colonies of Laos and Skidros, some appear to have remained on the site which appears to have passed into Krotoniate dependency, as indicated by incuse coins bearing the joint ethnics of both Kroton and Sybaris and confirmed by a report that the Krotoniates appointed a governor at Sybaris. Sybaris II appears to have succumbed like its predecessor to an attack by the Krotoniates in 467 BC, in which conflict they appealed to the Syracusan tyrant Hieron for assistance, though none was forthcoming. In 453 BC, a full fifty-eight years after the catastrophe of 510, Sybaris was refounded again with the apparent blessing and sponsorship of Poseidonia. That city is recorded as having acted as a guarantor in a treaty between Sybaris and the Serdaioi, and indeed the coins of Sybaris III are closely modelled on the contemporary issues of Poseidonia (see Rutter, ‘Sybaris: Legend and Reality’ 1970, p. 173), suggesting that city had a significant interest in the endeavour. The refounded city advanced swiftly in wealth on account of the fertility of its lands, and after only five years again aroused the jealousy or fear of Kroton, who once more brought war against Sybaris, and drove away the inhabitants.

2


322. Lucania, Thourioi AR Stater. Circa 443-400 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with wreath / Bull standing left, ΘOYPIΩN above, helmet on ground line; in exergue, fish swimming to left. SNG ANS 937 (same dies); HN Italy 1767. 7.75g, 20mm, 2h. Very Fine.

500

Ex H.D. Rauch 87, 8 December 2010, lot 62.

323. Lucania, Thourioi AR Stater. Circa 443-400 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with wreath / Bull standing right, ΘOYPIΩN above; in exergue, fish swimming to right. SNG ANS 903 (same dies); HN Italy 1775. 7.96g, 20mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

750

Ex Baldwins 68, 28 September 2010, lot 3371; Ex Dr E.O. and Mrs F.M. Halliwell Collection.

324. Lucania, Thourioi AR Distater. Circa 400-350 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right, helmet decorated with Skylla scanning; griffin on neckguard / Bull butting right; ΘΟΥΡΙΩΝ above, fish in exergue. HN Italy 1803; SNG ANS 958. 14.90g, 27mm, 5h. Very Fine.

1,500

Ex Gorny & Mosch 146, 6 March 2006, lot 40.

325. Lucania, Velia AR Didrachm. Circa 305-290 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with griffin, A behind neck-guard, Φ before chin / Lion standing right, dolphin swimming to right above, I and Φ on either side, ΥΕΛΗΤΩΝ in exergue. HN Italy 1307; SNG ANS 1375. 7.39g, 22mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine. Attractively toned, lustrous metal.

1,000

326. Lucania, Velia AR Didrachm. Circa 290-275 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with a griffin, A above, [Φ before]; IE on outlined tablet behind neck guard / Lion attacking stag left. HN Italy 1317; Williams 575; SNG ANS 1403. 7.47g, 21mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Beautiful tone and lustre.

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1,000


CALABRIA

327. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 380-340 BC. Nude rider, holding a small round shield and a lance, vaulting from a cantering horse left, ├ below / Taras seated astride dolphin to left, holding a Corinthian helmet in right hand and leaning on the back of the dolphin with the left; I and waves below. Vlasto 437 (same dies); SNG ANS 929 (same dies); SNG Lloyd 169. 7.74g, 21mm, 3h. Good Very Fine.

500

Pedigreed Tarentum Stater from the Carosino Hoard 1928

328. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 340-325 BC. Nude rider on horseback to right, holding lance in right hand and shield with two javelins in left; KAΛ below, A-N-X around / Taras seated on dolphin left, holding Phrygian helmet; KAΛ below. Vlasto 558 (this coin); Fischer-Bossert 740 a (this coin). 7.97g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Wonderful old cabinet tone.

4,000

Ex Vlasto Collection; Ex Monnaies et Médailles 88 (May 1999), lot 12; Ex Monnaies et Médailles X (1951), lot 169; From the Carosino Hoard (IG 1928).

329. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 340-335 BC. Nude rider seated on horse standing to right, crowning him with a wreath held in his right hand, Φ before; below horse, nude boy kneeling right, cleaning the horse’s left front hoof / Taras riding dolphin side-saddle to left, holding trident in his right hand and shield in his left; TAPAΣ behind, Π and waves below. Vlasto 512; HN Italy 888. 7.94g, 22mm, 12h. Very Fine. Rare.

1,000

330. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 333-332 BC. Warrior, preparing to cast spear held in right hand, holding two spears and shield in left, on horse rearing right, eight-rayed star on hind leg; ΣA below / Taras, holding kantharos in extended right hand, cradling trident in left arm, astride dolphin left; AP to left, TAPAΣ to right; below, small dolphin left. Vlasto 602 (this obverse die); SNG ANS 995 (this obverse die); HN Italy 937. 7.85g, 22mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive lustre.

4

3,000


331. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 280-272 BC. Nude youth, on horseback right, crowning horse with wreath held in his right hand, left hand on rein; ΣA behind, APE/ΘΩN in two lines below / Taras riding dolphin left, holding tripod in extended right hand, left hand resting on dolphin; CAΣ below, TAPAΣ behind. Vlasto 666; HN Italy 957; SNG ANS 1046-50; SNG France 1869. 7.63g, 22m, 6h. Good Very Fine.

300

332. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 280-272 BC. Nude youth on horseback right, crowning horse that raises left foreleg; EY above, ΑΠΟΛΛΩ and two amphorae below / Taras riding dolphin left, holding kantharos and cradling long trident; B in right field, ΤΑΡΑΣ below. Vlasto 764; SNG ANS 1118. 6.59g, 23mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

1,000

BRUTTIUM

333. Bruttium, Kaulonia AR Stater. Circa 525-500 BC. Apollo, naked, advancing right, holding a branch in uplifted right hand, small daimon running to right on outstretched left arm; stag on tablet in right field, looking backwards; KAVL to left / Apollo and stag as on obverse, but incuse to left. SNG ANS 145; SNG Lockett 579; Gulbenkian 120-121 (same dies). 7.71g, 29mm, 12h. Very Fine.

1,500

334. Bruttium, Kaulonia AR Stater. Circa 450-445 BC. Apollo, naked, advancing right, holding a branch in uplifted right hand, small daimon running to right on outstretched left arm; stag on tablet in right field, looking backwards; KAVL to left / Stag standing right; branch in right field; KAV in retrograde above. Noe Caulonia 100 (same dies); SNG ANS 176; HN Italy 2046. 7.74g, 23mm, 12h. Near Very Fine.

300

335. Bruttium, Kaulonia AR Drachm. Circa 450-445 BC. Apollo, naked, advancing right, holding a branch in uplifted right hand; stag on tablet in right field, looking backwards, KAVΛ to left / Stag standing right; barley grain to right, KAVΛ in retrograde above. Noe, Caulonia -, cf. 78 and 210 (stater and triobol, same symbol); SNG ANS -. 2.36g, 13mm, 3h. Good Fine. Extremely Rare.

5

200


336. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 530-500 BC. Tripod, legs terminating in lion’s feet; to right, heron standing left; QPO to left / Incuse tripod; to right, heron standing left; QPO to left. SNG ANS 248-50; HN Italy 2081. 7.98g, 25mm, 12h. Very Fine. Horn silver encrustations, areas of corrosion.

337

300

338

337. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 480-430 BC. Tripod, legs terminating in lion’s feet, to right, heron standing left; QPO to left / Incuse tripod. SNG ANS 273-274; HN Italy 2102. 7.86g, 21mm, 12h. Very Fine.

250

338. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 480-430 BC. Tripod, legs terminating in lion’s feet, to left, heron standing left; QPO to left / Incuse tripod. SNG ANS 275 (same dies); HN Italy 2102. 8.14g, 22mm, 11h. Very Fine.

250

339. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 480-430 BC. Tripod, legs terminating in lion’s feet; to left, heron standing right, QPO (retrograde) to right / Incuse tripod. SNG ANS 259; HN Italy 2102. 7.96g, 20mm, 11h. Very Fine.

250

Attractive Incuse Eagle of Kroton

340. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 480-430 BC. Tripod, legs terminating in lion’s feet; retrograde QPO to right / Incuse eagle flying right, pellet in centre. SNG ANS 297 (same dies); HN Italy 2108. 7.95g, 20mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Superb for the type.

6

1,000


Superb Late Delphic Tripod Stater of Kroton

341. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 425-350 BC. Eagle standing left on Ionic capital, QPOT above / Tripod terminating in lion’s feet, barley grain to left, QPOT to left, E below. HN Italy 2140*; Attianese -; SNG ANS O336/337. 7.79g, 23mm, 9h. Good Extremely Fine. Rare and superb for the type.

4,000

Ex Gorny & Mosch 190, 2010, lot 43. Despite later myths ascribing the founding of Kroton to Herakles, the city’s historical oikist is recorded as Myskellos of Rhypai who, on consulting the Delphic oracle about his lack of children was given the response that Apollo would grant children, but that first Myskellos should found the city of Kroton ‘among fair fields’. After being given directions on how to locate the site, Myskellos travelled to southern Italy to explore the land that he had been assigned, but seeing the territory of the Sybarites and thinking it superior, he returned once more to the oracle to ask whether he would be allowed to change. The answer came back that he should accept the gifts that the god gave him. A further element of the story is that Myskellos was accompanied on his expedition by Archias of Corinth; the Delphic oracle gave the pair the choice between health and wealth. Archias elected wealth, and was assigned the site of Syracuse, while Myskellos chose health: the favourable climate of Kroton, the eminent skill of its physicians and the prowess of its athletes later earned its citizens this reputation for good health. The importance of the Delphic oracle to the founding of Kroton is thus celebrated on its coinage from the earliest days, though on this coin the tripod is relegated to the reverse of the coin apparently in favour of the eagle - an aspect of Zeus - that likely represents this coinage’s striking for the purpose of an agonistic festival in honour of that god. This particular example is of superb quality, being well struck on a broad flan, displaying full borders and excellent, lustrous metal. This is undoubtedly the finest example of this type to have been offered in many years.

342. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 425-350 BC. Eagle standing left, head right, on stag’s head / Tripod; ivy leaf to left, QPO to right. HN Italy 2146; SNG ANS 350 (same dies). 7.78g, 20mm, 2h. Very Fine. Pleasant toning. Ex Peus Auction 372, 30 October 2002, lot 71.

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750


8


Herakles, Hera Lakinia and Apollo Aleos

343.

Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 400-325 BC. Head of Hera Lakinia facing slightly right, wearing necklace and stephane decorated with palmettes; B to right / Young Herakles, nude, holding cup in extended right hand and club in left, reclining left on lion skin draped over rock; KPOTΩNIATAΣ around, bow below. Attianese 138; HN Italy 2169; SNG ANS 375 (same dies); SNG Lloyd –; Gulbenkian 131 (same dies); Kraay & Hirmer 270 = de Luynes 728 (same dies). 7.74g, 23mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare in this grade.

17,500

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 10 (9 April 1997), lot 74. The depiction of Hera on the reverse is that of a local aspect of the deity, whose sanctuary the Heraion Lakinion was situated 10 kilometres away from Kroton at Lakinion, now Cape Colonna. The site takes its name from the sole surviving column of the temple built upon that spot in around 470 BC, which was largely intact until the sixteenth century when it was extensively quarried. Theokritos’ Korydon sings the praises of the ‘Lakinian shrine that faces the dawn’, and Livy 24.3.3-7 tells us that it was ‘a building more famous even than the city itself and held in reverence by all the peoples there around’ and that within were countless masterpieces and treasures including a column of solid gold dedicated to the goddess. By the time of Livy’s writings however, the temple had long been plundered. This facing portrait of Hera can be considered to be directly inspired by Kimon’s famous facing Arethusa tetradrachm that was widely admired and imitated throughout the ancient world; the difficulty of creating an attractive facing portrait apparently led to engravers considering the undertaking of such a die as a challenge and proof of their skill. Hera’s headdress, a low crown known as a polos, was no longer worn in classical times but was common in Mycenaean art. Many of the terracotta figurines from late Helladic IIIA Mycenaean period circa 1400–1300 BC seem to wear poloi, and its use can thus be seen as a deliberate archaism for representing a Mother Goddess. Herakles appears on the reverse of this coin in his role as ‘founder’ of Kroton. Later Krotoniate tradition conveniently bypassed Myskellos (see lot 341) in favour of associating the city with a past more ancient even than the Trojan War; according to myth Herakles landed on the promontory with the oxen of Gerion and was hospitably received by one Kroton and his wife Laureta. Her father Lakinio however, was discovered trying to steal on ox from Herakles sacred herd, resulting in Herakles fighting and killing him. In the confusion, it transpired that Herakles had also mortally wounded his host Kroton. Saddened, Herakles gave Kroton an honourable burial, and predicted the founding of a great city there that would bear his name. We see also on the reverse of this coin the fabled bow of Herakles, that Philoktetes was said to have taken with him to the land between Sybaris and Kroton, where he founded the non-Greek cities Petelia, Chrone, Krimisa and Makalla. A prophecy arose, as in the Trojan War, that victory would be Kroton’s if the bow and arrows of Herakles would be theirs. Thus, these sacred relics of Philoktetes were removed from his tomb and deposited in the Krotoniate sanctuary of Apollo Aleos. This coin is therefore rare among Greek coins in that it may be considered to have a threefold significance - referring directly to the sanctuary of Hera, to Herakles as ‘founder’ of the city, and to the sanctuary of Apollo.

9


344. Bruttium, Kroton AR Triobol. Circa 400-350 BC. Tripod; leaf to right, retrograde KPO to left / Upright thunderbolt; star to left; to right, eagle standing left on column, head right. SNG ANS 416; HN Italy 2185. 1.04g, 13mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. A rare variety, extremely well preserved for the issue.

200

345. Bruttium, Lokroi Epizephyrioi AR Stater. Circa 400-350 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right; thunderbolt behind / Eagle flying left, holding hare in its talons. HN Italy 2327; SNG ANS 519 corr. (same dies; thunderbolt not noted); SNG Ashmolean 1564 corr. (same dies; thunderbolt not visible). 7.43g, 21mm, 9h. Very Fine.

750

346. Bruttium, Lokroi Epizephyrioi AR Stater. Circa 350-275 BC. Pegasos flying left / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet; LOKPΩN around. Pegasi 10; HN Italy 2341. 8.62g, 23mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

750

Ex Hess-Divo 317, 27 October 2010, lot 38.

347. Bruttium, Rhegion AR Tetradrachm. Anaxilas, Tyrant. Circa 480-474 BC. Bearded, seated charioteer (Anaxilas?), holding reins with both hands, driving walking mule biga to right; bay leaf in exergue / Hare springing to right, RECINOΣ (retrograde) around. SNG ANS 625 (same dies); Caltabiano 345, 74 (same dies). 17.35g, 25mm, 2h. Extremely Fine.

2,000

From the Comery Collection. A superb example of this early type. Proclaiming himself tyrant of Rhegion in 494 BC, Anaxilas encouraged Samian and other Ionian refugees fleeing west from the Achaemenid Persians to seize Zankle from its absent ruler Skythes. Soon thereafter he besieged Zankle himself and expelled the Samians, populating the city instead with settlers from his native Messene. Renaming the city Messana, Anaxilas left control of Rhegion to his son Leophron and remained in Messana. The biga/hare tetradrachm was the innovation of Anaxilas himself, who soon after conquering Messana began a joint issue of Attic weight coinage from both Rhegion and Messana bearing the same types. We learn from Aristotle that Anaxilas won the mule-biga race at the Olympic games in either 484 or 480, and commemorates it here on his coinage. The use of the hare is almost certainly a joint reference to the abundance of the animal in the vicinity of Rhegion (according to Aristotle, Anaxilas is supposed to have also introduced it to Sicily), and to the cult of Pan that flourished among the Messenians. This hypothesis is supported by the presence of a head identified as Pan as an adjunct to the hare on later tetradrachms of Messana.

10


348. Bruttium, Rhegion AR Tetradrachm. Circa 445-435 BC. Facing lion’s head / Iocastos seated left holding staff in right hand, left hand resting on hip, RECI-N-OS around; all within laurel wreath. Herzfelder 31 (D19/R26); McClean 1861, pl 59, 8 (same dies); HN Italy 2483; Holloway ‘Art and Coinage of Magna Graecia’ p.12, 3 (this coin). 17.23g, 25mm, 9h. Very Fine.

5,000

Ex Athos D. Moretti Collection; Ex Lanz 125, 28 November 2005, lot 72; Ex Triton I, 1997, lot 177.

349. Bruttium, Rhegion Æ Onkia. Circa 425-420 BC. Facing lion’s head / R-E flanking pellet within circle. HN Italy 2516; SNG ANS -; SNG Copenhagen -. 1.51g, 12mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

200

350. Bruttium, Rhegion Æ23. Circa 218-213 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left, cornucopiae behind / Tripod, ΡΗΓΙ−ΝΩΝ across. SNG ANS 720; SNG Morcom 476. 8.16g, 23mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine. Superb, untouched patina.

350

Dies of Uncommon Beauty

351. Bruttium, Terina AR Stater. Circa 400-356 BC. Head of the nymph Terina right, wearing triple-pendant earring and pearl necklace; TEPINAIΩN before / Nike, wearing a long chiton and himation, sits left on a cippus shown in perspective, her feet crossed, the folds of her himation fall between her legs, draping the cippus; upon her outstretched right hand, held palm down, a dove alights; her left rests on the cippus. Regling, Terina 78 (dies MM/οοο); Holloway & Jenkins 84 (same obv. die); HN Italy 2629; SNG ANS 852 (same dies); SNG Lloyd 761-2 (same obv. die); BMC 41 = GPCG p. 46, 25 (same dies); Basel 242; Gulbenkian 154 (same obv. die); Kraay-Hirmer pl. 97, 280. 7.69g, 19mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

12,500

Ex Nomos Fixed-Price List 4 (2011), lot 6. The present coin hails from the age of prosperity and power of Terina, and is directly influenced by the works on the coinage of both Olympia and Syracuse. The nymph Terina’s form is evidently inspired by Euainetos’ Arethusa while the reverse is a direct evolution of the die dated c.410405 which is signed by ‘P’ (Regling 43), and which Harlan J. Berk suggests as being a possible work of the master Polykrates. That die had been undoubtedly inspired by the coinage of Elis for the 87th Olympiad in 432 (Seltman 133), which in its turn was a celebration of the masterful Nike balustrade in the Temple of Athena Nike on the Athenian Acropolis.

11


352. Bruttium, The Brettii AR Drachm. Circa 216-214 BC. Diademed and draped bust of Nike right; amphora behind / River-god Aisaros standing facing, crowning himself and holding sceptre; to right, serpent above Σ. Arslan dies 39/55; HN Italy 1961. 4.37g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

353. Bruttium, The Brettii Æ Unit. Circa 216-214 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right, ear of grain behind / Eagle standing left with wings spread, cornucopiae in left field. Pfeiler pl. 1.4; HN Italy 1942. 8.63g, 22mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Untouched patina.

500

Two Rare Carthaginian Fractions

354. Bruttium, Carthaginian Occupation EL 3/8 Shekel. Circa 216-211 BC. Head of Tanit-Demeter left, wearing grain-wreath, earring and necklace / Horse standing left. HN Italy 2014; Jenkins-Lewis 468. 1.90g, 12mm, 12h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

1,000

NORTH AFRICA 355. North Africa, Kingdom of Carthage AV 1/10 Stater. Circa 350-320 BC. Palm tree with two date-clusters, border of pellets / Horse’s head right. Jenkins Group III, 156. 0.93g, 8mm, 12h. About Very Fine. Rare.

356

250

357

356. North Africa, Republic of Carthage EL Stater. Circa 310-290 BC. Head of Tanit left, wearing wreath of grain ears, triple-pendant earring and necklace; pellet before neck / Horse standing right on double exergue line; pellet to upper left and lower right. Jenkins & Lewis group V, 249/253 (same obv./rev. die); MAA 12; SNG Copenhagen 976 var. (pellets). 7.27g, 19mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,000

Ex Coin Galleries, 20 August 1986, lot 6. 357. North Africa, Republic of Carthage EL Stater. Circa 310-290 BC. Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace / Horse standing right on single ground line, on which two pellets. Jenkins & Lewis, Group IV D, 328-329. 7.39g, 19mm, 12h. Very Fine.

750

358. North Africa, Republic of Carthage BI Shekel. Libyan Revolt, circa 241-238 BC. Head of Herakles left, wearing lion’s skin headdress / Lion prowling right; ‘M’ above, ΛIBYΩN in exergue. Carradice & La Niece 1; MAA 53. SNG Copenhagen 239. 7.73g, 26mm, 6h. Overstruck on an earlier Tanit/horse stater. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

12

400


Superbly Engraved Elephant

359. North Africa, Republic of Carthage AR Half Shekel. Carthage or Sicily, circa 213-210 BC. Head of Melkart with features of Hannibal to left / Elephant walking to right; Punic letter Aleph in exergue. Burnett Enna Hoard 123; SNG Copenhagen 383. 3.46g, 19mm, 11h. Rare. About Extremely Fine.

3,000

Initially attributed to a Spanish mint by Robinson (Num. Chron. 1964), the discovery of examples in the Enna hoard and other Sicilian hoards (Burnett, pg. 11) makes it more likely that this coin was either struck in Carthage or a military mint of unknown location in Sicily for the campaign of 213-210 BC. Though the obverse is still debated by scholars, the distinctive and idiosyncratic nature of the portrait make it very likely that it incorporates the features of the prominent general Hannibal into the image of the deity Melkart in much the same way that Alexander the Great’s features were amalgamated with the image of Herakles.

SICILY

360. Sicily, Siculo-Punic AR Tetradrachm. Lilybaion (as ‘Cape of Melkart’), circa 330-305 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron in right hand and reins in left, driving fast quadriga left; above, Nike flying right, crowning charioteer with wreath held in both hands; [RŠMLQRT in exergue] / Head of Arethusa left, wearing wreath of grain ears, triple-pendant earring, and necklace; three dolphins around. Jenkins, Punic 55; BMC 16 (same dies); SNG Lockett 742 (same dies). 16.86g, 23mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Fine Style.

1,500

361. Sicily, Siculo-Punic AR Tetradrachm. Panormos (as Ziz), circa 425-415 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving fast quadriga left; above, Nike flying left to crown charioteer / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and grain wreath; four dolphins around. Jenkins, Punic 42 (same dies). 16.87g, 26mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

13

1,000


362

363

362. Sicily, Siculo-Punic AR Tetradrachm. ‘People of the Camp’ mint, circa 320-300 BC. Head of Tanit left, wearing grain wreath, triple-pendant earring and pearl necklace; three dolphins around / Horse’s head right, palm tree behind; Punic legend below. Jenkins, Punic Sicily, pl. 21, 269 (these dies). 17.16g, 28mm, 2h. Very Fine.

1,000

363. Sicily, Siculo-Punic AR Tetradrachm. ‘People of the Camp’ mint, circa 320-300 BC. Wreathed head of Arethusa left, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace; four dolphins around / Horse’s head left; palm tree to right, Punic ‘MMHNT’ below. Jenkins, Punic, 187 (O55/R164). 17.26g, 27mm, 9h. Very Fine.

2,000

364. Sicily, Siculo-Punic AR Tetradrachm. ‘People of the Camp’ mint, circa 300-289 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion’s skin headdress / Horse’s head left, palm tree behind; astragalos before, ‘MMHNT below. Jenkins, Punic 351 (O112/R286). 16.83g, 23mm, 3h. Very Fine.

1,500

Extremely Rare Mercenary Settlement Bronze

365. Sicily. ‘AT’ mercenary settlement in North West Sicily Æ Trias. Circa 357-356 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Female seated right with bow and trident. CNS III, 287, 2. 3.60g, 14mm, 3h. Near Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

300

366. Sicily, Akragas AR Didrachm. Circa 510-480 BC. Eagle standing left, AKRA behind / Crab; EV below. SNG ANS 921. 8.78g, 21mm, 2h. Good Fine.

250

367. Sicily, Akragas AR Tetradrachm. Circa 471-430 BC. Sea eagle standing left, AKPACΑΝΤΟΣ around / Crab within incuse circle. SNG ANS 978 (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen 41. 17.22g, 27mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

3,125

368. Sicily, Akragas Æ Hemilitron. Circa 400-380 BC. Diademed head of river-god left, ΑΚΡΑΓΑΣ before / Eagle standing left on Ionic column, head right; crab to left, six pellets (mark of value) to right. CNS 89; SNG ANS 1097-1101. 18.50g, 26mm, 8h. Near Extremely Fine.

14

1,250


15


Attractive Early Tetradrachm of Gela

369. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-475 BC. Bearded charioteer, holding reins with both hands, driving walking quadriga to right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath / Forepart of man-headed bull right, CEΛAΣ around. Jenkins, Gela 104, 15; SNG ANS 22; Randazzo 19; SNG Oxford 1727 (all same dies). 17.21g, 25mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

3,000

From the Comery Collection. The city of Gela was jointly founded by colonists from Crete and Lindos, Rhodes, 45 years after the foundation of Syracuse, around 688 BC. The city took its name from the nearby river, which itself was given the appellation Gela on account of the icy coldness of its waters, the word gela meaning ‘ice’ in the languages of the Opici and Siculi, as it does in Latin. Virgil applies the epithet immanis to Gela, which some believe is in reference to the river, others the city. The latter is more correct, and is an allusion to the horned, man-headed bull depicted on their coinage which is a personification of the river Gela itself. This image of the river-god is derived from that of Achelous, the ‘father of all rivers’. Those who apply the epithet to the river make it signify ‘cruel’ or ‘monstrous’, and consider this a reference to the number of perilous whirlpools in its waters, whence Ovid remarks ‘Et te vorticibus non adeunde Gela’ (Fasti, 4, 470) - ‘And you, Gela, whose whirlpools must not be approached’.

370. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga to right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath / Forepart of man-headed bull right, CEΛAΣ around. Jenkins, Gela 109 (O33/R63); SNG ANS 23 (same dies); Hess 208, 3104 (same dies). 17.11g, 24mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

2,000

From the Comery Collection.

371. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga to right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath / Forepart of man-headed bull right, CEΛAΣ around. Jenkins, Gela 110 (O33/R64); Randazzo 21 (same dies); SNG ANS 23-24 (same obv. die). 17.45g, 24mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. From the Comery Collection.

16

1,500


372. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga to right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath / Forepart of man-headed bull right, CEΛAΣ above. Jenkins, Gela 169, 6; SNG ANS 37; Hirsch XXXIII, 326. 17.29g, 25mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

4,000

From the Comery Collection.

373. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga to right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath / Forepart of man-headed bull right, CEΛAΣ above. Jenkins, Gela 172 (O46/R101); SNG ANS 38; SNG Lockett 749; Nanteuil 279 (all from the same dies); 17.23g, 25mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

2,000

From the Comery Collection.

374. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga to right, Ionic column behind, grain ear in exergue / Forepart of man-headed bull right, CEΛAΣ above. Jenkins, Gela 211 (O56/R112); SNG ANS O47/R46. 17.56g, 29mm, 3h. Very Fine.

2,000

From the Comery Collection.

375. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga to right, Ionic column behind, grain ear in exergue / Forepart of man-headed bull right, CEΛAΣ above. Jenkins, Gela 217 (same dies); SNG ANS -; Münzen & Medaillen GmbH 10, 152. 17.16g, 32mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Some flatness on obverse. Very Rare. From the Comery Collection.

17

2,000


18


A Magnificent Group III Tetradrachm of Gela

376.

Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga to right past Ionic column / Forepart of man-headed bull right, CEΛAΣ above. Jenkins, Gela Group III 225 (O60/ R121); SNG ANS -; Ratto 24 June 1929, lot 69 (same dies). 17.42g, 28mm, 9h. Fleur De Coin. Very Rare.

10,000

From the Comery Collection. When Hieron I died, the tyranny of Syracuse was usurped by his brother Thrasyboulos, who it appears had corrupted the son of Hieron into an odious youth, that he might more easily set him aside and take the throne for himself. According to Diodorus (XI, 67) his rapacity and cruelty soon provoked a revolt at Syracuse, which Thrasyboulos sought to crush using foreign mercenaries and troops from Aetna and Katane. The Syracusans entrenched themselves in the quarter of the city called Tyche, and sent requests for assistance to Gela, Akragas, Selinos, Himera and the other inland cities of Sicily. Gela and the other cities responded, and dealt Thrasyboulos a decisive defeat on land and sea, forcing his abdication and retirement into exile. The Group III tetradrachms were struck an appreciable interval after the last issue of Group II, and appear to have been coined at the time of the expedition to Syracuse as the means of meeting the implicit expense of the campaign. The most distinctive feature of the obverse die is the Ionic column in the background, which it is reasonable to assume is a terma, or turning point. This deduction is reinforced by the presence on the first two dies of a wreath and Nike respectively, emphasising the agonistic nature of the scene. The terma is included as a stylistic and cultural symbol that serves the purpose of being a pleasant architectural adjunct that places the quadriga in a more specific context.

19


377. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga to right, Ionic column behind, grain ear in exergue / Forepart of man-headed bull right, CEΛAΣ above. Jenkins, Gela 227; SNG ANS -; Randazzo -. 17.35g, 28mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

2,000

From the Comery Collection.

378. Sicily, Gela Æ Tetras. Circa 420-405 BC. Bull standing left, ΓEΛAΣ above, three pellets in exergue / Head of river-god Gelas right, grain-ear behind. CNS III, p. 8, 7; SNG ANS 106. 3.44g, 17mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine

300

379. Sicily, Himera Æ Reduced Tetras. Circa 420-407 BC. Three-quarter facing head of nymph, head turned slightly left / Scallop shell; four pellets flanking. CNS I 37; SNG ANS -; SNG Morcom 602; Laffaille 152. 1.20g, 12mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

325

380. Sicily, Himera as Thermai Himerensis Æ16. Circa 405-350 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion’s skin / Head of Hera left, wearing stephane. CNS I, p. 118-119, 11; HGC 2, 1626; cf. SNG ANS 190 (Hera left). 2.32g, 15mm, 9h. Very Rare. From a private German collection, purchased from Roma Numismatics, June 2010.

20

250


21


22


Fourth Known Example

381.

Sicily, Thermai Himerensis AR Didrachm. Circa 365-350 BC. Head of Hera right, wearing stephane ornamented with foreparts of three griffins to right; dolphin behind, ΘERMITAN around / Youthful Herakles seated nude to left on rock covered with lion’s skin, holding club downwards in right hand and resting left on rock; behind, strung bow and quiver with strap. Jenkins, Punic, pl.22, 7; BMC 1; de Luynes 983; Regling, Die Antike Münze Als Kunstwerk, 733. 8.51g, 24mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. Reverse double-struck. Extremely Rare, the fourth known example and the only one in private hands. From a private German collection, purchased in Munich, October 2008.

15,000

Thermai was founded in the wake of the utter destruction of Himera and the slaughter of the majority of its citizens by the Carthaginian general Hannibal Mago, when the survivors of this devastation relocated to the nearby hot springs whose original discovery lay in myth associated with the wanderings of the hero Herakles (Diodorus Siculus iv. 23, v. 3). Though the site had long been inhabited, it was now swelled by the displaced Himerans, and the newly enlarged town was thereafter considered to be the successor to the old city of Himera, and in time appears to have become a sizeable settlement, though now subject to Carthaginian rule. The first series of coinage at Thermai appear to have been tetradrachms in Punic style produced in the first half of the fourth century, in all likelihood created by engravers imported from one of the other Punic dominated cities, probably Panormos. These issues, which are today very rare, bear the distinctive sharp features associated with the contemporary work of that mint. It is probable that the didrachm issue which is known from only one set of dies, was an item of some prestige that was closely associated with the later and much greater issue of litrai in the mid fourth century. Greek in style, both denominations display an image of a youthful Herakles that appears to bear distinct resemblance to the seated figure of Pan on the staters of the Arkadian League (Jameson 1276), struck circa 363/2 BC, and to the staters of Kroton (Jameson 429) struck circa 420 BC). While it is certainly possible that this reverse type was independently devised without external influence, it is tempting to see in the positioning of Herakles a close parallel with the Arkadian reverse, especially given that the two issues should be considered contemporary to each other. The head of Hera meanwhile finds its closest parallels in the coinage of Argos, circa 370-350 BC, notably Jameson 1255 (drachm) and BMC 38 (stater). Whatever the reason or occasion for the issue of this superb type, it and its accompanying litrai represent the period of finest numismatic art at Thermai, which never again issued silver coinage of such artistic merit.

23


382. Sicily, Katane AR Litra. Circa 465-460 BC. Head of Silenos right, crowned with wreath of ivy / Winged thunderbolt, KATANE around. SNG ANS 1237ff. 0.54g, 12mm, 9h. Good Very Fine.

300

Unique Tetradrachm of Katane

383. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull swimming to right; branch above, fish below / Nike, wearing long chiton, advancing left, holding taenia in her outstretched right hand; KATANE around. Mirone -; SNG ANS -; Jameson -; SNG Copenhagen -; Randazzo - (O54/R-); Rizzo -. 17.26g, 28mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

20,000

From the Comery Collection. This reverse die, apparently hitherto unknown, enriches the corpus of Katanian coinage with a Nike of tremendous finesse and beauty. This outstanding coin, and those others present in this catalogue, were all struck within a few years of the refoundation of the city, issued in celebration of the return of the Chalkidic inhabitants of Katane to their homeland following the Aetna episode. Hieron, tyrant of Syracuse, had forcibly transferred the populations of Katane and Naxos, Katane’s parent city, to Leontinoi, renamed Katane as Aetna and settled it with 5000 colonists from Syracuse and 5000 Dorians from the Peloponnese. However, after the death of Hieron in 466 and the overthrow of his brother Thrasybulos less than a year later, relations between the newly democratic Syracuse and its former colony soured, leading to war in 461. Allied with the Sikels under Douketios, Syracuse through several battles compelled the newly settled inhabitants to retire to the fortress of Inessa (to which they gave the name of Aetna), while the old Chalkidic citizens were reinstated in the possession of the city. The obverse depicts clear civic types referencing both the life-giving river by which Katane was sited, and other types (see lots 386-9) the wine-grapes that must have been key to the city’s prosperity through use of the type of Silenos. The taenia borne by Nike on the reverse here almost certainly alludes to the fall of the Deinomenid tyranny that, with the aid of Syracuse and the native Sikels, allowed the displaced people to return to their ancestral home.

384. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull swimming to right; branch above, fish below / Nike, wearing long chiton, advancing left, holding taenia in her outstretched right hand; KATANE around. SNG ANS -; Jameson -; SNG Copenhagen -; Randazzo pl. 3, 58 (same dies); Rizzo pl. IX, 4 (same dies). 17.18g, 27mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. From the Comery Collection.

24

3,000


385. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull swimming to right; branch above, fish below / Nike, wearing long chiton, advancing left, holding taenia in her outstretched right hand; KATANE around. SNG ANS -; Jameson -; SNG Copenhagen -; Randazzo pl. 3, 58 (same dies); Rizzo pl. IX, 4 (same dies). 17.18g, 25mm, 1h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

3,000

386. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull kneeling to right; above, a nude horsetailed Silenos kneeling to right on left knee, stretching left hand over the god’s head; ketos to right in exergue / Nike, wearing long chiton, standing left, holding taenia in her outstretched right hand; KATANAION around. SNG ANS -; Jameson -; SNG Copenhagen -; Randazzo pl. 3, 67-68 (same dies); Rizzo pl. IX, 12 (same dies). 17.33g, 27mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

387. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull kneeling to right; above, a nude horse-tailed Silenos kneeling to right on left knee, stretching left hand over the god’s head; ketos to right in exergue / Nike, wearing long chiton, advancing right, holding a taenia in each hand; KATANAION before. Jameson 534 (same dies); Randazzo -; SNG ANS -; Rizzo -. 17.50g, 28mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Attractive toning. Very Rare.

2,000

From the Comery Collection. Of all the reverse dies used in this period at Katane, virtually all feature a left-facing Nike; in the famed Randazzo hoard of 1980 not a single right facing Nike was present.

388. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull kneeling to right; above, a nude horsetailed Silenos kneeling to right on left knee, stretching left hand over the god’s head; ketos to right in exergue; Nike, wearing long chiton, advancing left, holding taenia in her outstretched right hand; KATANAION around. SNG ANS -; Jameson -; SNG Copenhagen -; Randazzo -; Rizzo pl. IX, 14 (same dies); Pozzi 406 (same dies). 16.85g, 27mm, 11h. Very Fine. Obverse fields lightly smoothed. Very Rare. From the Comery Collection.

25

2,000


389. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull kneeling to right; above, a nude horse-tailed Silenos kneeling to right on left knee, stretching left hand over the god’s head; ketos to right in exergue / Nike, wearing long chiton, advancing right, holding a taenia in each hand; KATANAION before. Randazzo -; SNG ANS -; Rizzo pl. IX, 14 (same dies); Mirone 18. 17.31g, 25mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Attractively old tone. Extremely Rare.

10,000

From the Comery Collection. Two artistic dies of great merit.

390. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull standing to right on ground line, Nike above flying to right holding wreath / Nike, wearing long chiton, advancing left, holding taenia in her outstretched right hand, vine in left; H to left, KATANAION around. SNG ANS -; Jameson 533 (same reverse die); Randazzo 70-72 (same dies); Rizzo pl. IX, 7 (same dies). 17.17g, 26mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

5,000

From the Comery Collection.

391. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull standing to right on ground line, Nike above flying to right holding wreath / Nike, wearing long chiton, advancing left, holding taenia in her outstretched right hand, vine in left; H to left, KATANAION around. SNG ANS -; Jameson 533 (same dies); Randazzo pl. 4, O73/R72; Rizzo pl. IX, 8 (same dies). 17.06g, 29mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare. From the Comery Collection.

26

4,000


392. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull standing to right on ground line, Nike above flying to right holding taenia / Nike, wearing long chiton, advancing left, holding taenia in her outstretched right hand, wreath in left; H to left, KATANAION around. SNG ANS -; Jameson -; SNG Copenhagen 174 (same obv. die); Randazzo pl. 4, (O72/R73); Rizzo pl. IX, 6 (same dies). 17.28g, 30mm, 3h. Weakly struck reverse, areas of flatness on both sides, otherwise about Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

4,000

From the Comery Collection.

The Murex Nike

393. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull kneeling to right, fish below; above, a heron standing upon his back and walking left / Nike, wearing long chiton, in flight upwards to right, holding open wreath in hands, upturned murex shell below; KATANE before. Rizzo pl. IX, 1 (same dies); Kraay-Hirmer 31 (same dies); Randazzo -; SNG ANS -; Boehringer Ognina 74 (same dies); Ognina Hoard AttiMem pl. 1, 3 (same dies). 16.71g, 28mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine, obverse surface slightly rough. Extremely Rare. One of very few known examples.

10,000

From the Comery Collection. This astounding type marks a revolutionary departure from the traditional style of engraving at Katane, placing for the first time a fish and a heron around the river-god Amenanos. The only other tetradrachm of this series to display these symbols (Rizzo pl. IX, 15; Kraay-Hirmer pl. 11, 32) is almost certainly a later type produced after an interval of some years, if we may infer anything from the more classicised style of the river-god. The prominence of Amenanos, the personification of the river that flowed through the territory of Katane (whose name itself can be translated as ‘harsh land’ or ‘rough soil’), in the early coinage of that city suggests the vital import of the river to the sustenance of the city, and the fertility of the surrounding lands. The two creatures that appear here in combination with Amenanos very probably therefore represent its life-giving power both to the citizens of Katane and the local fauna. The reverse is both intriguing and novel in its portrayal of Nike not as a walking or running figure, but instead showing her in flight as she holds not the traditional taenia, but now an open wreath. Nike here bears far greater resemblance to the smaller figure that graces the obverse of other issues in the series (see for example lot 81). The presence of the murex shell beneath Nike is its only appearance on the coinage of Katane, and is important evidence for at least one source of the city’s wealth, for this mollusc was the source of the luxury ‘Tyrian’ purple dye, which product was worth more than its own weight in gold.

27


28


Unique and Unpublished Tetradrachm of Katane

394.

Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull swimming to right; Nike above, flying to right holding wreath with which she crowns Amenanos, retrograde K below / Nike, wearing long chiton, standing left, holding taenia in her outstretched right hand; heron standing to left before, KATANAION around. Mirone -; SNG ANS -; Jameson -; SNG Copenhagen -; Randazzo -; Rizzo -. 16.91g, 26mm, 8h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive metal, pleasantly toned. Apparently unique and unpublished.

30,000

From the Comery Collection. This coin represents a new addition to the corpus of coinage known for Katane; the astounding appearance of the proud bird on the reverse is completely unexpected and thus delightfully surprising. Though it is not without precedent - Kraay-Hirmer 31 and 32 display a heron above the androcephalic Amenanos - neither depict the bird standing to its full height in this manner. The symbol of the heron in this context is ambiguous - though inclusions of local fauna (principally marine animals) on the coinage of Katane may have little significance other than as representations of that coastal area’s fruitful fisheries, the prominent placement of the heron before Nike suggests a possible symbolism in the bird beyond its simple usage as a faunal decoration. We might speculate that it represents an aspect of Pallas Athena, for whom the bird served as a messenger and herald: (Iliad, X, 274: Pallas Athena sent a heron gliding down the night. They could not see it passing, but they heard its cry; and heartened by that fisher bird, Odysseus prayed ‘O child of Zeus who bears the storm cloud, hear me…. tonight, befriend me most, Athena….’ These were the prayers, and Pallas Athena, Zeus’ daughter, heard them.). This association is possibly also referenced on the coinage of Kamarina wherein the heron appears together with Athena who is depicted driving a racing quadriga, crowned by Nike.

29


395. Sicily, Katane AR Drachm. Signed by Euainetos. Circa 405 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving fast quadriga right; above, Nike flying left, crowning charioteer with wreath, KATANAIΩN in exergue / Head of river-god Amenanos left, wearing taenia; two fish and crayfish around, AMENANOΣ above, EYAI below. Mirone 73; Rizzo pl. 14, 7; SNG ANS 1263; SNG Lloyd 906; SNG Lockett 733; Franke-Hirmer pl. 13, 39R. 3.81g, 18mm, 4h. Very Fine. Some roughness and porosity. Very Rare.

300

396. Sicily, Katane AR Litra. Circa 405-403/2 BC. Head of nymph to left, wearing ampyx and sphendone / Bull butting to right, KATANAIΩN above, shrimp in exergue. C. Boehringer, ‘Kataneische Probleme: silberne Kleinstmünzen,’ Proceedings of the 9th International Numismatic Congress, Pl. 6, 8; SNG ANS 1270. 0.76g, 12mm, 6h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

500

Extremely Rare Issue of Kephaloidion

397. Sicily, Kephaloidion AR Hemidrachm (?). Circa 307-305 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress; EK ΚΕΦΑΛΟΙΔΙON around / Bull butting left on tablet; monogram AK and ΗΡΑΚΛΕΙΩΤΑΝ above. Campana, Kephaloidion 1; Jenkins, Coinages, p. 97, 1 = CNS I p. 245 (Herakleia) = Basel 345 = Numismatica Ars Classica 13, lot 345. 1.93g, 16mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Extremely rare, one of only very few examples.

3,000

From a private German collection. Once in the territory of Himera, the Sikeliote city of Kephaloidion fell into Carthaginian possession after the destruction of Himera, from where the ‘Rash Melkarth’ or ‘Promontory of Herakles’ coins appear to have been issued. The city was recovered in 393 BC by Dionysios of Syracuse, and he settled here a group of Italian mercenaries who called themselves the Herakleotai. The series of coins produced by these mercenaries is extremely rare, such that very few examples of each denomination survive - of the drachms there are believed to be only two surviving specimens, and this uncertain denomination is of similar scarcity. It is described by the ANS as a triobol, and as a hemidrachm by Jameson, though the present specimen is heavier than both of those, being slightly greater than hemidrachm weight. The great rarity of this series means that this coin represents a near singular opportunity for collectors to acquire a coin of this Hellenised city in a denomination any greater than a litra.

398. Sicily, Leontinoi AR Tetradrachm. Circa 476-466 BC. Charioteer driving quadriga to right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of roaring lion right with tongue protruding; four barley grains and ΛEONTINON around. Rizzo pl. XXII, 3 (same dies); SNG ANS 200 (same dies). 17.15g, 26mm, 9h. Very Fine. From the Comery Collection.

30

1,500


399. Sicily, Leontinoi AR Tetradrachm. Circa 440 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Lion’s head right, with open jaws and tongue protruding; four barley grains and LEONTINON around. Boehringer, Leontinoi 37 (same dies); SNG ANS 226 (same dies). 16.87g, 27mm, 3h. Very Fine.

3,125

400. Sicily, Leontinoi AR Tetradrachm. Circa 460 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Lion’s head right, with open jaws and tongue protruding; four barley grains and LEONTINON around. Boehringer, Leontinoi 41; SNG ANS 223 (same dies); SNG München 554 (same dies). 17.38g, 26mm, 5h. Very Fine.

750

Beautiful Portrait of Apollo

401. Sicily, Leontinoi AR Tetradrachm. Circa 430-425 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Lion’s head left with open jaws and tongue protruding, around which LEONTINON; bay-leaf behind, three barley-corns around. Boehringer, Leontinoi 55 (same dies); Rizzo pl. XXIV, 4 (same dies); SNG ANS 257 (same dies). 17.47g, 27mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive old collecting tone.

3,000

402. Sicily, Messana AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Seated charioteer, holding reins with both hands, driving mule biga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath, bay leaf in exergue / Hare springing to right, C above, MESSANION around. SNG ANS 336 (same dies); Caltabiano 329 (same dies). 17.35g, 26mm, 8h. Very Fine. From the Comery Collection.

31

1,000


403 404 403. Sicily, Messana AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Seated charioteer, holding reins with both hands, driving mule biga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath, bay leaf in exergue / Hare springing to right, C above, MESSANION around. SNG ANS 336 (same dies); Caltabiano 329 (same dies). 17.22g, 25mm, 1h. Very Fine. 750 From the Comery Collection. 404. Sicily, Messana AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Seated charioteer, holding reins with both hands, driving mule biga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath, bay leaf in exergue / Hare springing to right, D above, MESSANION around. SNG ANS 337 (same dies); Caltabiano 330 (same dies). 17.15g, 28mm, 10h. Very Fine. 750 From the Comery Collection.

405

406

405. Sicily, Messana AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Seated charioteer, holding reins with both hands, driving mule biga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath, bay leaf in exergue / Hare springing to right, two laurel leaves below, MEΣΣANION around. SNG ANS 340; Caltabiano 374. 17.24g, 27mm, 6h. Very Fine. 300 406. Sicily, Messana AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Seated charioteer, holding reins with both hands, driving mule biga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath, bay leaf in exergue / Hare springing to right, MESSANION around. SNG ANS -; Caltabiano 352 (same dies). 17.38g, 26mm, 9h. Struck from worn obverse die, otherwise Very Fine. 1,000 From the Comery Collection.

Lustrous Messana Tetradrachm

407. Sicily, Messana AR Tetradrachm. Circa 425-421 BC. The nymph Messana, wearing long chiton and holding whip and reins with both hands, driving biga of mules to right; bay leaf and fruit in exergue / MEΣΣANION, Hare springing right; dolphin swimming to right below. SNG Lloyd 1094 (these dies); SNG Tubingen 608 (these dies); Caltabiano 494. 17.07g, 25mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous metal.

4,000

Ex Goldberg 53, 24 May 2009, lot 1578.

408. Sicily, Messana Æ Litra. Circa 310-288 BC. Wreathed head of Pelorias left, wearing single-pendant earring and necklace; two dolphins before, ΠEΛOPIAN behind / Nude warrior (Pheraimon?) advancing left, wearing crested helmet, holding hoplon and spear; MEΣΣANIΩN behind. CNS I 55, Em. 22; SNG ANS 394; HGC 2, 834. 9.63g, 23mm, 7h. Near Very Fine. From a private German collection.

32

500


A Classic Masterpiece

409. Sicily, Naxos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 460 BC. Bearded head of Dionysos right, wearing ivy wreath, his hair tied in a krobylos behind / Nude, bearded and ithyphallic Silenos squatting facing, head left, holding kantharos in right hand, leaning on left; NAXION around. Cahn 54; SNG ANS 515; SNG Lloyd 1150; SNG Lockett 840; Gulbenkian 230-231; Rizzo pl. XXVIII, 2; Jenkins 673; SNG Fitzwilliam 1108; Kraay-Hirmer 6 (all from same dies). 16.47g, 27mm, 3h. Obverse harshly cleaned, some smoothing. Otherwise About Very Fine/Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

30,000

From the Comery Collection. One of the great masterpieces of fifth century Greek numismatic art, and one of the most famous of all Greek coins. Produced from a single set of dies, this tetradrachm was struck in commemoration of the refoundation of the city of Naxos following the return of its citizens from their forced relocation to Leontinoi by the tyrant Hieron of Syracuse. Undoubtedly the most accomplished engraver of his time, this artist is also believed to have been responsible for the unique Brussels Aetna tetradrachm - in both cases his work is a tour de force that showcases his singular ability. On the present piece, the obverse presents us with a refined portrait of Dionysos, which though bearing distincly archaized features such as the arrangement of the god’s hair, wreath and beard, shows his eye in profile. This, combined with the god’s merry expression and the deliberate extension of the design through the dotted border indicate clear progression of style away from the more formal and rigid types of previous decades. The result is, of course, the most iconic and artistically meritorious portrait of Dionysos in all of ancient coinage. Yet it is upon the reverse that the artist has worked a wonder that has earned this type such a lofty reputation as one of the most desired of all ancient Greek coins, and the most costly of all the tetradrachms. Here, the artist’s composition combines handsome naturalistic musculature with a unique and inspired design of Silenos drunkenly gazing into his wine cup as he supports himself with his other hand. In choosing to depict Silenos facing the viewer, the artist not only proves his ability to render the design in adept relief and detail, he also effortlessly demonstrates an advanced understanding and application of the principle of foreshortening in Silenos’ right leg and foot. It is this combination of a striking, masterful image of Dionysos with such a remarkable reverse scene that was so far ahead of its time that has led so many to acclaim it a triumph of late archaic art.

410. Sicily, Naxos AR Drachm. Circa 460 BC. Bearded head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia decorated with an ivy branch / Silenos, nude and bearded, squatting half-left, holding kantharos in right hand and resting his left on his knee, tail behind; NAXION around; all within shallow concave circular incuse. Cahn 55.3 (V40/R46) = E.J. Seltman, ‘Prototypes monétaires siculo-grecs,’ RIN 1898, pl. VII, 6; Rizzo pl. XXVIII, 13; SNG Lloyd 1151 = Weber 1467; Basel 385; SNG Lockett 841 = Pozzi 508; Jameson 674; de Luynes 1063; McClean 2467 (all from the same dies). 3.93g, 19mm, 1h. Extremely Rare. From the Comery Collection.

33

1,000


Extremely Rare Second Issue of Syracuse

411. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. First Democracy, circa 510-490 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; ΣΥRΑ above / Quadripartite incuse square, with circular incuse in centre containing diademed head of Arethusa to left. Boehringer 28; SNG Lloyd 1277. 17.09g, 29mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine. Attractive blue iridescent tone. Extremely Rare.

10,000

From the Comery Collection. The first issue of coinage at Syracuse features an obverse nearly identical to that of the present piece, but with a plain quadripartite incuse square reverse. This design had been inspired by the first issue of Olynthos (see Roma V, 23 March 2013, 222), whose coinage had come to Sicily along with that of many other cities in Greece and Macedon as payment for the grain and other produce exported by Syracuse and the other major trading cities of Eastern Sicily. Indeed, it was the silver from these exports that provided Syracuse with the requisite bullion to strike their own coins. The very first issue of Syracuse (Boehringer 1) featured the same quadriga and typically Thraco-Macedonian quadripartite incuse square types, but significantly also included the city’s ethnic on the obverse. Later issues (such as the present specimen) then sported a small head of Arethusa within an incuse punch in the centre of the square on the reverse (Boehringer 2-31), in much the same manner as the second issue of coinage at Olynthos, which featured an eagle within the incuse – perhaps suggestive of parallel decisions by both cities to differentiate their coinage from the other’s. As the Deinomenids came to power however, the coinage of Syracuse diverged much more decisively from that of Olynthos, by making the head of Arethusa the principal element of the reverse design.

412. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Gelon, circa 490-485 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband; ΣVRΑQΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 39 (V26/R23); Randazzo 237 (same dies); SNG ANS -; Rizzo -. 16.90g, 27mm, 6h. Very Fine. Very Rare. From the Comery Collection.

34

2,000


413. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Gelon, circa 490-485 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑQΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 66 (V32/R44); SNG ANS -; Rizzo -. 16.75g, 26mm, 10h. Very Fine. Fine Style.

1,500

From the Comery Collection.

414. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Gelon, circa 490-485 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 66 (V32/R44); Randazzo -; SNG ANS 17 (same obverse die). 17.06g, 25mm, 5h. Near Very Fine.

1,000

From the Comery Collection.

415. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 485-480 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 69 (V33/R45); Randazzo 244; SNG ANS -. 17.36g, 25mm, 5h. Near Very Fine.

1,500

From the Comery Collection.

416. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 485-480 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 72 (V35/R47); Randazzo 247; SNG ANS 18. 17.40g, 26mm, 12h. Very Fine. Rare. From the Comery Collection.

35

1,500


417. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 485-480 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 73 (V35/R48); Randazzo -; SNG ANS 18 (same dies). 16.92g, 25mm, 3h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

1,000

From the Comery Collection.

418. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 485-480 BC. Bearded charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right with wings spread, crowning horses with wreath / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 93 (V45/R62); SNG ANS 24; Randazzo -. 17.32g, 24mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. A pleasantly detailed obverse die, with the facial features of both the charioteer and Nike being well preserved.

1,500

From the Comery Collection.

419. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 485-480 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right with wings spread, crowning horses with wreath / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer -, (V45/R-); Randazzo 257; Naville 3 July, 659. 17.48g, 25mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

1,000

From the Comery Collection.

420. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 485-480 BC. Bearded charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 109 (V50/R75); Randazzo -; SNG ANS -. 17.31g, 24mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare. Only two examples cited by Boehringer.

2,000

From the Comery Collection. This obverse die is particularly detailed compared to many of its contemporaries. Particular attention should be drawn to the charioteer’s head, and the severe expression on his face.

36


421 422 421. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 485-480 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 122E (V55E/R82); SNG ANS 32 (same obv. die); Weber 1554 (same rev. die). 14.81g, 24mm, 3h. Near Very Fine. Rare. 750 From a private German collection. 422. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 123 (V56/R84); SNG ANS 33; Randazzo 277. 17.36g, 24mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 1,000 From the Comery Collection.

423 424 423. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 125; Randazzo 283; SNG ANS -; Rizzo -. 17.44g, 24mm, 9h. Very Fine. Very Rare. 1,000 From the Comery Collection. 424. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer - (V64/R100). 17.20g, 25mm, 6h. About Very Fine. Very Rare. This die combination apparently unlisted. 1,000 From the Comery Collection.

425 426 425. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 149 (V66/R103); SNG ANS 42; Randazzo 316 (same dies). 17.41g, 24mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 1,000 From the Comery Collection. 426. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Bearded charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 153 (V68/R105); Randazzo 324 (same dies); SNG ANS 43 (same dies). 17.14g, 26mm, 6h. Very Fine. Attractive reverse. 1,000 From the Comery Collection.

427 428 427. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 185 (V184/R185); Randazzo 354 (same dies); SNG ANS 58 (same dies). 17.40g, 25mm, 3h. Very Fine. Rare. 1,000 From the Comery Collection. 428. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 218 (V213/R148); Randazzo 379; SNG ANS 74; McClean 2597. 17.33g, 26mm, 3h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare. 1,000 From the Comery Collection.

37


Unlisted Reverse Die

429. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer - (V103/R-); Randazzo 389 (same obverse die); CNG 79; 17 September 2008; lot 105 (same dies, but incorrect references noted). 17.36g, 24mm, 9h. Very Fine. Very Rare, this reverse die not listed in the major works.

1,500

From the Comery Collection.

430. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 239E (V107E/R162E); CNG 61, 25 September 2002, lot 374 (same dies). 17.31g, 24mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

From the Comery Collection.

431. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 485-466 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 269 (V122/R186); Randazzo -; SNG ANS -; Rizzo -. 17.48g, 25mm, 9h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

1,500

From the Comery Collection.

432. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 303 (V144/R210); Randazzo 467-468 (same dies); SNG ANS 99 (same dies. 17.30g, 24mm, 3h. Cut across obverse, otherwise Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare. From the Comery Collection.

38

1,000


433. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow quadriga right; above, Nike flying right, crowning horses with wreath / Head of Arethusa right, hair in pearl band, wearing loop earring with single pendant and pearl necklace; ΣVRAKOΣION and four dolphins around. Boehringer 307; SNG ANS 96-113. 17.26g, 24mm, 8h. Very Fine. Pleasant cabinet tone.

1,500

Ex Stack’s Bowers and Ponterio 164, 6 January 2012, lot 101.

434. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 314 (O152/R220); Randazzo 482 (same dies); SNG ANS -. 17.23g, 23mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

1,500

From the Comery Collection.

435. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 314 (O152/R220); Randazzo 482 (same dies); SNG ANS -. 17.36g, 24mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

1,000

From a private German collection.

436 437 436. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 321 (V156/R224); McClean 2618, pl. 91, 3 (same dies). 16.66g, 26mm, 2h. Very Fine.

750

From the Comery Collection. 437. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer - (V158/R-); Randazzo 494, 496 (same obverse die). 17.29g, 25mm, 2h. Very Fine. Very Rare. This reverse die apparently unpublished. From the Comery Collection.

39

1,000


A Very Rare Plated Syracuse Tetradrachm

438. Sicily, Syracuse Fourée Tetradrachm. Ancient Counterfeit. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Cf. Boehringer 299-326 for this reverse die style, cf. Boehringer 329 for this legend positioning. 15.87g, 26mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

From the Comery Collection. Contemporary counterfeits of Sicilian silver coins are very seldom encountered. Stylistically there is no question that this could have been a surreptitious issue by any regular authority, though while the obverse is crudely engraved the reverse mimics the contemporary portraits rather well. A numismatically very interesting piece.

439. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 332 (V164/R232); Randazzo 504 (same dies); SNG ANS -. 17.36g, 22mm, 9h Near Extremely Fine.

1,000

From the Comery Collection.

440. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 164 (V72/R113); Randazzo 334 (same dies); SNG ANS 48 (same dies). 17.46g, 24mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,000

From the Comery Collection.

441. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 338 (V166/R236); Randazzo 507-9 (same dies); SNG ANS -. 17.01g, 29mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. From the Comery Collection.

40

1,000


41


42


The Demareteion Tetradrachm

442.

Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Dies by the Demareteion Master. Charioteer wearing a long chiton and holding a goad in his right hand and the reins in his left, driving a walking quadriga to right; Nike above, flying right to crown the horses; below, lion springing to right in exergue / Head of Arethusa right within linear circle, wearing olive wreath, pendant earring and necklace; her hair waved at the front and tied at the back with a ribbon; ΣVRAKOΣION and four dolphins swimming clockwise around. Boehringer 382 (V196/R269); Rizzo pl. XXXV, 4 var.; SNG ANS -. 17.32g, 26mm, 6h. Insignificant mark on reverse, otherwise Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

50,000

From the Comery Collection. The series of coins known as the Demareteia are among the most famous and revered of all the ancient coins, being acclaimed as masterpieces of late archaic art. The engraver responsible for the series, the ‘Demareteion Master’ is rightly placed among the first rank of accomplished artists. The series takes its name from queen Demarete, wife of the Syracusan tyrant Gelon, who Diodoros (XI. 26) reports as having intervened on behalf of the defeated Carthaginians at the peace negotiations following the Battle of Himera: ‘For when the ambassadors who had been dispatched from Carthage came to him and begged him with tears to treat them humanely, he granted them peace, exacting of them the expense he had incurred for the war, two thousand talents of silver, and requiring them further to build two temples in which they should place copies of the treaty. The Carthaginians, having unexpectedly gained their deliverance, not only agreed to all this but also promised to give in addition a gold crown to Demarete, the wife of Gelon. For Demarete at their request had contributed the greatest aid toward the conclusion of the peace, and when she had received the crown of one hundred gold talents from them, she struck a coin which was called from her a Damareteion. This was worth ten Attic drachmas and was called by the Sicilian Greeks, according to its weight, a pentekontalitron.’ The identity of the coin Diodoros mentions has long presented a mystery, fiercely debated, since the crown was said to be of gold and there were no known gold coins of Syracuse until many years later. At various times it has been claimed that Diodoros must have been referring to a gold issue of which no specimens survive, or another silver coin with which we are not familiar. Yet he specifically mentions the denomination and standard of the coin, and the case for the companion dekadrachm of this type being the coin referred to by Diodoros can no longer be seriously disputed. Though we shall not present here arguments relating to the dating of the series, the consensus is that the coin was struck some time after the Battle of Himera, most likely under Hieron, with the date range proposed by Alföldi, E. Boehringer and Arnold-Biucchi of 475-470 seming the most plausible. The superior style and workmanship of the coin certainly appears to commemorate a victory, noting in particular the extraordinary presence of a laurel wreath adorning Arethusa; yet a purely commemorative nature for this coin is probably too simplistic an interpretation. The dekadrachms struck by Dionysios I are now agreed to have been intended to pay for mercenaries; the theory that the Athenian dekadrachms were struck in commemoration of the victory over the Persians at Marathon or Salamis too has been discredited. We should see in the Demareteion series a product of expedience - a means of paying mercenary soldiers - which though presented in a remarkable form is nonetheless an economic solution rather than a commemorative frivolity.

43


Beautifully Toned Transitional Phase Tetradrachm

443. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 470-466 BC. Charioteer driving walking quadriga right, holding kentron and reins; Nike above, flying right, crowning horses, ketos to right in exergue / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring and necklace, hair tied with pearl headband; ΣVRΑΚΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 412. 17.33g, 28mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine (NGC graded XF*, Strike 5/5, Surface 5/5). Very Rare.

10,000

Boehringer’s group XIII marks an important transitional phase in the coinage of Syracuse during which time significant experimentation and stylistic innovation appears to have been encouraged within the mint. In this period we observe a rapid stylistic progression from dies directly influenced by the beautiful Demareteion tetradrachms (such as the present specimen) through to the larger ‘realistic’ style heads (see following lot). This brief series contains many of the most desirable and sought after coins of Syracuse.

444. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Second Democracy. Circa 460-450 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath, ketos swimming to right in exergue / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRAKOΣION and four dolphins around. Boehringer 483; Randazzo 539; Jameson 760; SNG ANS 151. 17.46g, 26mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

2,000

From the Comery Collection.

445. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Second Democracy, circa 450-440 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband; ΣVPΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 539 (V275/R373); SNG ANS 176. 17.01g, 24mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. From a private German collection.

44

3,750


446. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Drachm. Time of Dionysos I, circa 405-367 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet with laurel-wreath, ΣΥΡΑ above / Sea-star between two dolphins. SNG ANS 460. 32.20g, 30mm, 2h. Very Fine.

300

Three Attractive Timoleontic Staters

447. Sicily, Syracuse AR Stater. Time of Timoleon and the Third Democracy, circa 341-317 BC. Pegasos flying left / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet, ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around. Calciati 2; SNG ANS 496-510. 8.63g, 23mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous metal. Struck on a very broad flan.

2,000

448. Sicily, Syracuse AR Stater. Time of Timoleon and the Third Democracy, circa 344-338 BC. Pegasos flying left / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet, ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around. Pegasi 2; SNG ANS 496-507. 8.57g, 21mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

1,500

449. Sicily, Syracuse AR Stater. Time of Timoleon and the Third Democracy, circa 344-338 BC. Pegasos flying left / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet, ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around. Pegasi 2; SNG ANS 496-507. 8.50g, 20mm, 5h. Very Fine.

750

450. Sicily, Syracuse Æ20. Time of Timoleon, circa 344-317 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right; cornucopiae behind / Pegasos flying right; NI below. CNS 85, Ds41/R15; HGC 2, 1486. 5.42g, 20mm, 9h. Very Fine. Rare.

45

250


Two Superb Third Democracy Bronzes

451. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Dilitron. Time of Timoleon and the Third Democracy, circa 344-317 BC. Laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios left, ΖΕΥΣ ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΙΟΣ around / Horse rearing left, ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around. Castrizio Series II, 1; CNS 80; SNG ANS 533-41; HGC 2, 1439. 18.70g, 27mm, 4h. Extremely Fine; light die shift on reverse; attractive untouched patina. A superb example of the type.

3,000

From a private German collection. The cultural revival that arose in Syracuse after the ousting of the tyrant Hiketas by Timoleon and the Corinthian expedition is reflected in the coinage of the period, wherein we see the creation of several new denominations and types. Principal among these is the wonderful silver stater depicting the head of Zeus Eleutherios, the Liberator (Rizzo pl. LVIII, 2 and Tkalec, 25 October 1996, lot 15), the engraver of which was an artist of clear talent who also engraved dies for the parallel gold and bronze issues. The quality of the workmanship evident in the dies used for the present piece is of a level that was hitherto unknown in bronze coinage at Syracuse – the most capable artists had traditionally chosen silver or gold as their canvas, the former being the more prestigious medium on account of the size of the flans. Yet in this new issue of large bronzes, the master engraver responsible for the above mentioned silver stater found a larger canvas intended for much greater mintage on which his work could find recognition, and clearly resolved to reproduce his Zeus head in bronze. The image of Zeus Eleutherios, most prominent among the types of the Third Democracy led by Timoleon, is a clear statement of rejoicing at the city’s deliverance from oppressive tyranny under the Carthaginian-backed Hiketas, and is on an artistic par with the finest issues of Olympia, the Arkadian League, and Philip II of Macedon. The free horse depicted on the reverse rearing up on its hind legs too is an immediately apparent expression of the now unfettered citizenry, muscular and vital, delighting in its new freedom. The symbolism of the coin is thus powerful and beautifully engraved, representing a grand new coinage for a renewed age of liberty and prosperity.

452. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Dilitron. Time of Timoleon and the Third Democracy, circa 344-317 BC. Laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios left, ΖΕΥΣ ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΙΟΣ around / Horse rearing left, ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around. Castrizio Series II, 1; CNS 80; SNG ANS 533-41; HGC 2, 1439. 18.73g, 26mm, 3h. Very Fine. Ex Gemini VII, 9 January 2011, lot 178.

46

1,250


453. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Hemidrachm. Time of Timoleon and the Third Democracy, circa 344-338 BC. Laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios right, ZEΥΣ ΕΛΕΘΥΕPΙΟΣ around / Upright thunderbolt; barley grain in left field; ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around. CNS II, p. 167, 71; SNG ANS 474–6. 15.77g, 26mm, 8h. Extremely Fine.

1,500

From a private German collection.

454. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Hemidrachm. Time of Timoleon, circa 344-338 BC. Laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios right, ZEΥΣ ΕΛΕΘΥΕPΙΟΣ around / Upright thunderbolt; barley grain in left field; ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around. CNS II, p. 167, 71; SNG ANS 474–6. 15.77g, 26mm, 8h. Good Very Fine. Earthen highlights.

500

455. Sicily, Syracuse AR Stater. Time of Agathokles, circa 305-295 BC. Pegasos flying left / Helmeted head of Athena right. Pegasi 18; SNG ANS -. 6.66g, 20mm, 9h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

750

456. Sicily, Syracuse AR Stater. Time of Agathokles, circa 305-295 BC. Pegasos flying left, eight-rayed star above / Helmeted head of Athena right. Pegasi -; SNG ANS -. 6.72g, 21mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

47

1,250


An Exceptional Stater of Hiketas

457. Sicily, Syracuse AV 60 Litrai. Time of Hiketas, circa 279-278 BC. Head of Persephone to left, wearing grain wreath, pendant earring and pearl necklace; poppy bud behind, QE below / Nike driving galloping biga to right; moon above; Q below horses; EPI IKETA in exergue. Jameson 871; Buttrey 2-C/2-D; SNG Fitzwilliam 1362. 4.28g, 18mm, 2h. Very Rare. Good Extremely Fine. Splendid, lustrous surfaces.

15,000

Ex Noble Numismatics 96, 5 April 2011, lot 4909. After Agathokles’ assassination by Maenon, the latter put the former tyrant’s grandson to death and seized command of his army that was then besieging Aetna, directing it instead against Syracuse. Hiketas was entrusted with the command of a sizeable force by the Syracusans to defend the city. Despite later seizing supreme power, Hiketas apparently never styled himself as king, as evidenced by the lack of any title on the reverse of this coin. During his reign he defeated Phintias of Akragas and took that city, then turned his attention to the Carthaginians. He was however dealt a severe defeat in battle against their forces at the river Terias and as a result was expelled from Syracuse. This coin was produced to pay for this ill-fated campaign of 279 BC. It is interesting that after his defeat the Syracusans continued to issue gold coins of his types but with his name erased in the die.

A Very Rare Denomination

458. Sicily, Syracuse AR 5 Litrai. Philistis, wife of Hieron II. Circa 218/7-214 BC. Diademed and veiled bust left / Nike driving walking biga left, [K before]; BAΣIΛIΣΣA above, ΦIΛIΣTIΔOΣ below. CCO 229 (D2/R1); BAR issue 66; SNG ANS -; Enna -. 4.51g, 17mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

1,250

From a private German collection.

459. Sicily, Syracuse AR 10 Litrai. Hieronymos, circa 215-214 BC. Diademed head of Hieronymos left; K (retrograde) behind / BAΣIΛEOΣ IEPΩNYMOY, winged thunderbolt; ΞΑ above. Holloway 55 (same dies); SNG ANS 1032. 8.53g, 24mm, 1h. Fleur De Coin. From a private German collection.

48

3,750


460. Sicily, Syracuse AR 12 Litrai. Fifth Democracy. Circa 214-212 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing crested Corinthian helmet / Artemis standing left, discharging arrow from bow, hound running left at her feet; ΣYPAKOΣIΩN to right, ΞA to left. SNG Copenhagen 878; SNG ANS 1040. 10.23g, 23mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

750

Ex H.D. Rauch 87, 8 December 2010, lot 76.

ILLYRIA

461. Illyria, Apollonia AR Hemidrachm. Circa 100-10 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet; ΑΝΔΡΩΝΟΣ before / Obelisk, ΑΠΟΛΛΩΝΙΑΤΑΝ and ΤΙ-ΜΗΝ across upper and lower fields. SNG Copenhagen -; BMC 74. 1.70g, 13mm, 11h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

250

462. Illyria, Dyrrhachion AR Stater. Circa 350-300 BC. Pegasos flying to right, Δ below / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; club and E behind, dolphin above. Pegasi 41. 8.63g, 22mm, 9h. Good Very Fine.

300

EPEIROS

463. Epeiros, Epirote Republic AR Drachm. Circa 198-168 BC. Head of Zeus Dodonaeus right, wearing oak wreath, monogram behind / ΑΠΕΙΡΩΤΑΝ, eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt, oak wreath around. BMC -; GC -; SNG Copenhagen -; Delepierre -; Dewing -; Franke -. 4.89g, 21mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. This variety with Zeus right and eagle left is apparently unpublished.

1,000

Privately purchased from Maison Platt, October 1987.

AKARNANIA

464. Akarnania, Leukas AR Stater. Circa 435-380 BC. Pegasos flying right, Λ below / Helmeted head of Athena right; caduceus and Λ behind. Pegasi 95; BCD Akarnania 221. 8.18g, 23mm, 3h. Very Fine.

49

300


465. Akarnania, Leukas AR Stater. Circa 320-280 BC. Pegasos flying right, Λ below / Helmeted head of Athena right; amphora, grape vine and A behind. BMC 68; Pegasi 128; BCD Akarnania 278. 8.50g, 21mm, 2h. Very Fine - Good Very Fine.

THESSALY

500

Jason’s Sandal

466. Thessaly, Larissa AR Obol. Circa 479-460 BC. Head of the nymph Larissa right / Sandal of Jason left within incuse square, ΛARI above. BCD Thessaly II 348.3. 0.90g, 9mm, 6h. Near Very Fine. Rare.

200

468

467

467. Thessaly, Larissa AR Obol. Circa 475-450 BC. Torso of the hero Thessalos to left, grappling the head of a bull with his arms / Head of bridled horse right, ΛA below; all within incuse square. SNG München 42; Herrmann, pl. I, 25; BCD Thessaly 147. 0.91g, 11mm, 3h. Good Fine.

150

468. Thessaly, Larissa AR Obol. Circa 475-450 BC. Head and neck of bull right, head facing / Head and neck of bridled horse right; A-Λ below; all within incuse square. Liampi, Corpus 18 (V10/R11); BCD Thessaly II 148 (same dies). 0.93g, 10mm, 12h. Good Fine.

150

469. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 400-380 BC. Signed by the artist ‘Ai...’ Head of the nymph Larissa three-quarter facing, turned slightly to left, right shoulder elevated on which sits clasp of garment, [AI] above head / Horse, with one foreleg bent and slightly lifted and tail raised, grazing right, AI below, ΛΑΡΙΣΑΙ in exergue. Lorber, Early, 20.2; SNG Copenhagen -. 6.06g, 19mm, 8h. Very Fine. Rare.

500

Ex Hess-Divo 317, 27 October 2010, lot 169. Lorber states that ‘Ai...’ became the mint’s chief engraver, displacing he who signed himself ‘Simo...’. The present dies are among the finest in the entire series.

470. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 365-356 BC. Bull running to right, ΛAPIΣAION above / Thessalos, wearing a petasos, cloak and tunic, galloping on horseback to right. F. Hermann ‘Die Silbermünzen von Larissa in Thessalien’ ZfN XXXV, 1925, pl. IV, 17; C. Lorber, ‘Thessalian Hoards and the Coinage of Larissa’, AJN 20, 2008, pl. 46, 101; SNG Copenhagen 118; BCD 1136. 6.03g, 20mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine. Privately purchased from Spink & Son Ltd., London, June 1989.

50

1,500


471. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 365-356 BC. Head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly left / Horse standing right, preparing to lie down; ΛΑΡΙΣ-ΑΙΩΝ around. Lorber, Hoard, Phase L-II; BCD Thessaly II 316. 5.76g, 19mm, 12h. Near Very Fine.

500

472. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 350 BC. Head of the nymph Larissa three-quarters facing, turned slightly to left, grain ears in her hair, wearing pendant earring and plain necklace with a central drop / Mare standing right with foal in the background, ΛΑΡΙΣΑΙΩΝ below exergual line. Cf. Glendining’s, 21 June 1972, lot 162 (same dies). 6.10g, 20mm, 3h. About Extremely Fine. Fine style.

3,000

Ex BCD Collection, Triton XV, 3 January 2012, lot 294.

473. Thessaly, Pelinna AR Obol. Circa 425-400 BC. Horse pacing left / Warrior in throwing stance to left, wearing petasos and chiton, holding shield and javelin; ΠEΛIN around. Pozzi (Boutin) 2826 (same dies). 0.95g, 13.5mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

250

Ex BCD Collection, Triton XV, 3 January 2012, lot 516.

CORINTHIA

474. Corinthia, Corinth AR Drachm. Circa 550-500 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Quadripartite incuse square of swastika-like pattern. Ravel period I; BCD Corinth 5 (same dies); SNG Copenhagen 1. 2.69g, 15mm. Good Fine.

200

475. Corinthia, Corinth AR Diobol. Circa 475-450 BC. Head of Pegasos right / Δ within incuse square. BCD Corinth 36. 0.90g, 9mm, 9h. Good Fine. Rare.

100

476. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 400-375 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left; dolphin above, cockerel behind. Pegasi 26; BCD Corinth -. 8.60g, 23mm, 8h. Die break on reverse, otherwise Good Extremely Fine. Rare.

51

300


477. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 400-375 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet; trident above. Pegasi 133; Ravel 411. 8.71g, 24mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare. An excellent strike on on a huge flan.

1,500

478. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 405-345 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet, forepart of horse behind. Pegasi -; Ravel 433. 8.58g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare. A beautiful depiction of Pegasos.

1,000

479. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 400-375 BC. Pegasos flying right, Q below / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet decorated with serpent; tripod behind. Pegasi 254; Ravel 671. 8.46g, 21mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

500

480. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 400-375 BC. Pegasos flying right, Q below / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; Y above, tripod behind. Pegasi 255; Ravel 666. 8.40g, 20mm, 3h. Very Fine. Rare.

300

481. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 400-375 BC. Pegasos walking left, Q below / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet; dolphin above, S behind. Pegasi 342; Pozzi 1683; cf. BMC 386; BCD -. 8.61g, 20mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

52

2,000


482. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-300 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena right; kantharos and N behind. Pegasi 379; Ravel 1061; BMC 374. 8.56g, 20mm, 10h. Very Fine.

300

483. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-300 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left; behind, N within wreath of grain ears. Pegasi 386; BCD 128; Ravel 1069; SNG Copenhagen 119; BMC 372. 8.58g, 22mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,000

Ex D.V. Collection.

484. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-300 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left, helmet decorated with laurel wreath; A-P below, aegis behind. Pegasi 427; Ravel 1009; SNG Copenhagen 71. 8.56g, 24mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

Ex D.V. Collection.

485. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-300 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left, helmet decorated with laurel wreath; A-P below, Chimaera to left behind. Pegasi 428; Ravel 1010. 8.65g, 22mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

486

750

487

486. Corinthia, Corinth AR Drachm. Circa 350-300 BC. Pegasos flying left / Head of Aphrodite left; monogram behind. BCD Corinth -; SNG Copenhagen -. 2.17g, 14mm, 12h. Reverse double-struck, otherwise Good Very Fine. Rare.

250

Ex CNG E-sale 217, 26 August 2009, lot 80. 487. Corinthia, Corinth AR Drachm. Circa 350-300 BC. Pegasos flying left / Head of Aphrodite left; Δ behind. BMC Corinth 292; SNG Copenhagen 83. 2.46g, 16mm, 1h. Layer of horn silver remaining, Very Fine. Rare.

53

250


A Beautiful Head of Aphrodite in Miniature

488. Corinthia, Corinth AR Drachm. Circa 308-307 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Head of Aphrodite left, wearing earring and necklace, hair tied with ribbon and bound at top, falling loose behind; Δ-O across fields. Ravel, Chiliomodi Hoard, pl. X, 15; BCD 150. 2.80g, 15mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive old toning.

2,000

There was no other city in mainland Greece where the cult of Aphrodite flourished such as it did at Corinth. The goddess had her temple atop the monolithic rock known as the Acrocorinth, widely regarded as the most impressive acropolis in all of Greece. This mountain peak which towered over the city was assigned to Helios by Briareos when he acted as adjudicator between that god and Poseidon in their contest for the city, and was handed over, the Corinthians said, by Helios to Aphrodite. The temple of Aphrodite here was particularly wealthy, and according to Strabo it at one time possessed over a thousand temple slaves. A certain number of these appear to have performed a ritual courtesan function, such that Corinth became famed for its pleasures of the flesh, and rich because of it. As early as the fifth century BC we find reference to this in Pindar’s Eulogies (fragment 122): ‘Guest-loving girls! Servants of Peitho in wealthy Korinthos! Ye that burn the golden tears of fresh frankincense, full often soaring upward in your souls unto Aphrodite.’ It is fitting therefore that upon the drachms of Corinth we find a multitude of beautifully engraved images of the goddess Aphrodite. The present portrait certainly ranks among the most attractive of these.

ATTICA

489. Attica, Athens AR Obol. Circa 500-480 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig behind, AΘE to right. Svoronos pl. 7, 50; SNG Copenhagen 25. 0.53g, 8mm, 6h. Very Fine. Rare.

300

Full-Crested Athens Tetradrachm

490. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.10g, 24mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned. Struck on a broad flan, displaying a full crest - very rare thus.

54

3,000


491. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.22g, 27mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,000

492. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.16g, 26mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine.

493

1,000

494

493. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 37. 16.94g, 27mm, 8h. Very Fine.

500

494. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 37. 17.01g, 25mm, 9h. Some porosity and corrosion, otherwise Extremely Fine.

1,000

495. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.19g, 25mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

55

1,000


496. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.22g, 25mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

1,000

497. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.18g, 24mm, 3h. Good Very Fine.

1,000

498. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.20g, 24mm, 4h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

499. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.29g, 27mm, 9h. Mint State. Some areas of flatness.

56

1,000


500. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.21g, 28mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

501. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.21g, 25mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

502

1,000

503

502. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.20g, 25mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Scattered marks.

1,000

503. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.19g, 25mm, 8h. Very Fine.

1,000

504. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.18g, 25mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. A virtually complete crest.

57

1,000


505. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.22g, 23mm, 4h. About Extremely Fine.

2,500

506. Attica, Athens AR Hemiobol. Circa 449-420 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig behind, AΘE to right. Kroll 14; SNG Copenhagen 59; Svoronos pl. 13, 43-45. 0.34g, 7mm, 8h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

300

507. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Eastern(?) imitation. Circa 350-294 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind. Kroll 15; SNG Copenhagen 64. 16.98g, 25mm, 9h. Very Fine.

500

508. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Eastern imitation. Circa 350-294 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind. Kroll 15; SNG Copenhagen 64. 17.23g, 24mm, 8h. Extremely Fine.

500

509. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Eastern imitation. Circa 350-294 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind. Kroll 15; SNG Copenhagen 64. 17.09g, 24mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

500

510. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Eastern imitation. Circa 350-294 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind. Kroll 15; SNG Copenhagen 64. 17.23g, 24mm, 9h. Good Extremely Fine.

58

500


59


60


The Rare and Important ‘DEMOS’ Issue

511.

Pontus, in the name of Athens AR New Style Tetradrachm. Circa 86-85 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with Pegasos / Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora upon which also Perseus (?); A-ΘE above, O ΔEMOΣ across; all within wreath. Thompson 1365a (same dies); Svoronos Pl. 78, 27 (same dies). 16.83g, 29mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare; one of only nine known specimens, and the only one in private hands.

5,000

This extremely rare coin boldly and very deliberately states that it has been issued by ‘the people’ of Athens, immediately marking it out as a piece of immense interest issued under extraordinary circumstances. Jongkees notes that this ‘points to a situation where the people were opposed to a dominant power which could be regarded as not representing the Athenian people.’ Thompson’s examination of the evidence and information available on this issue is thorough; he concludes that the issue should be attributed to the pro-Mithradatic faction of Athenians who went into exile in Pontos when Athens was threatened by Sulla (see Ferguson, Hellenistic Athens, p. 448 citing Plutarch, Lucullus, XIX; see also Thompson p. 447). In 87 Sulla circumvallated not only Athens, but also the port of Piraeus. He levelled the sacred groves of Greece for timber, and plundered the temples for coin. The people in Athens were reduced to eating grass and leather. The suffering was so great that even cannibalism was reported. Sulla eventually mined the walls, bringing down a nine hundred foot section, and conducted a brutal and bloody sack of the city. Thompson thus argues that in the wake of this disaster and with the now helpless city at the mercy of Sulla, the exiles in Pontos considered themselves the true representatives of the free Athenian people. Thompson hypothesises that Mithradates sponsored an emission of coinage in the Athenian style at a Pontic mint as an expedient political manoeuvre to reassure his Athenian partisans that his armies would defeat Sulla and free Athens from Roman hegemony. This conclusion is supported by the available evidence: the silver is virtually pure, containing far less gold or copper than regular Athenian new-style issues, and analysis indicates it is not Athenian in origin. The style of the obverse suggests the work of an engraver in a remote area of the Hellenistic world rather than being the product of either a Roman or coerced Athenian artist. The unusually rendered figure standing upon the amphora is variously identified as Harmodios, Theseus or the personified Demos, but may more easily be interpreted as Perseus. A hero so closely associated with Athens and the Pontic kings who claimed him as an ancestor fits perfectly within the scenario; Thompson notes that ‘the legend lent itself to the political context of 86 BC so that one might see in the armed warrior Mithradates, the modern Perseus, prepared to slay the monster Sulla on behalf of Athena and the Athenian people.’ While it is conceded that the lack of defining characteristics makes a positive identification impossible, any of the suggested personages are nonetheless fitting as ‘champions of the people against tyranny’. The find spots of the known examples also lend credence to a Pontic issue. An example which appeared at the Istanbul market is considered to have an Anatolian provenance; three examples were found at Karystos; two more were found at Cesme, a mainland site opposite Chios on Turkey’s Aegean coast; most importantly, one example now residing at Istanbul is documented as having been found at the site of Amisos, a royal residence of the Pontic kings and the city to which the pro-Mithradatic Athenians fled.

61


MACEDON An Akanthian Archaic Masterpiece

512. Macedon, Akanthos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 500-480 BC. Bull, with head raised and reverted, kneeling to left, attacked by lion leaping on to its back; bukranion below dotted exergual line / Quadripartite incuse square, the raised parts in the four squares forming open flower of four petals. Desneux, 72 46f (this coin); Jameson 929 (this coin); SNG Lockett 1281. 17.24g, 28mm. Good Extremely Fine.

15,000

Ex R. Jameson and W. Niggeler collections; Ex M端nzen und Medaillen AG, 88, 1999, lot 131; Ex Bank Leu - M端nzen und Medaillen, Niggeler I, 1965, lot 213. The ubiquitous and persistent theme of the lion-bull combat can be traced back to the figurate art of the third millennium, where the geometrical motifs are replaced by narrative symbolic representations, and the scene is characteristic of Near Eastern art in its infancy. The earliest known depiction occurs on a ewer found at Uruk dated to the latter part of the Protoliterate period, circa 3300 BC. That ewer has a relief depiction of a lion attacking a bull from behind (see Henri Frankfort, Art and Architecture of the Ancient Orient, 1963). The scene became widely distributed by 500 BC, featuring prominently in the Achaemenid Empire, and in particular at the palace of Darius in Persepolis, where it occurs no fewer than twenty seven times, including on the main staircase leading to the imperial complex. Its frequent appearance in key locations strongly suggests an important symbolic significance, which unfortunately has not survived antiquity. Explanations for the symbolism and its power over ancient peoples who reproduced it with prodigious enthusiasm have ranged from it being an expression of royal power, to it being an astronomical allusion, as well it being an embodiment of the constant struggle between civilisation (represented by the domesticated bull), and nature (represented by the untameable lion). This latter argument may well hold true for the Mesopotamians of Uruk, who it is known took a rather grim view of the world, seeing it as a battleground of opposing powers. Ultimately however what we may be expected to see could be far simpler and more elemental: potent symbols of power and fertility - both attributes that royal houses, city states and ordinary men alike should be proud to display.

513

514

513. Macedon, Akanthos AR Tetrobol. Circa 470-390 BC. Forepart of bull left, head right, Akanthos flower above / Quadripartite incuse square. SNG ANS 34. 2.15g, 15mm. Good Fine.

200

514. Macedon, Akanthos AR Tetrobol. Circa 470-390 BC. Forepart of bull left, head right / Quadripartite incuse square. SNG ANS 32. 2.42g, 15mm. Good Fine.

62

200


An Akanthian Classical Masterpiece

515. Macedon, Akanthos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 425 BC. Bull running to left, head lowered, attacked by lion upon his back to right; tunny fish swimming to left in exergue / Quadripartite square with raised fields, ΑΚΑΝΘΙΟΝ around; all within incuse square. Cf. Desneux 97/102 var. (obverse) and 103 (reverse die R92). 16.65g, 27mm. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare, the second known example of this die pair. Very possibly the most beautiful of all surviving tetradrachms of Akanthos. Ex Nomos 2, 18 May 2010, lot 52.

20,000

In marked contrast to the preceding tetradrachm that displayed an archaic and highly stylised depiction of the lion-bull combat scene wherein the principle composition was executed in pellets and rounded shapes in the manner of a frieze, the present piece is high classical in style, possessing a fluidity of movement that is epitomised in the bull’s transcending of the exergual line in its bid to shake off its assailant. The remarkable realism with which both animals are engraved is deserving of particular mention. The lion’s maned head immediately captures the viewers attention, drawing the eye to the bull’s curved tail, its detailed rear quarters, and to the bull’s front right claw which curves around and grasps the underside of the bull’s flank - a technical triumph. From here our gaze must turn to observe the determined glare in the bull’s eye as it makes its bid to fend off the lion.

Extremely Rare ‘Trojan’ Issue Depicting Aeneas

516. Macedon, Aeneia AR Tetrobol. Circa 475-450 BC. Bearded head of Aeneas left, wearing crested Corinthian helmet / AINEAΣ around raised square in four parts, all within incuse square. SNG ANS 73 (same dies); SNG Copenhagen 34. 2.34g, 20mm, 6h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

500

Aineia appears to have been a comparatively small city on the north-eastern coast of Chalkidike, and appears to have been largely bypassed by historical events, or at least is not recorded as having any part in them, though the city is attested in Athenian fiscal documents. According to myth it was founded by Trojans escaping their doomed city, and was named for the famous hero Aineias (Aeneas) who appears on the obverse of this coin as oikist. The city produced a series of tetrobols and other small denominations from the end of the sixth century BC, and a very rare issue of tetradrachms in the mid fourth century. At first the city exclusively utilised the head of Aeneas as its type, some dies being engraved in marvellous archaic style; later Athena and a nymph or unnamed goddess are displayed as the obverse types, paired with a bull on the reverse (see following lots).

63


517

518

517. Macedon, Aeneia AR Tetrobol. Circa 475-450 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right, wearing crested helmet decorated with a laurel wreath / Bull standing right, head reverted, AINEA in exergue, all within incuse square. SNG ANS 74. 2.28g, 19mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 300 518. Macedon, Aeneia AR Tetrobol. Circa 475-450 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested helmet decorated with laurel-wreath / Bull standing right, head reverted, within incuse square, ΑΙΝΕΑ below. SNG ANS 74. 2.33g, 14mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare. 200

519. Macedon, Argilos AR Hemiobol. Circa 495-477 BC. Forepart of Pegasos right within border of dots / Quadripartite incuse square. Liampi, Argilos period IV, 101-116; SNG ANS 763; Rosen 116. 0.39g, 8mm. Lightly toned, Extremely Fine.

250

Eion in Support of Persia

520. Macedon, Eion AR Drachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Two geese, one standing right and the other standing left, with its head reverted; annulet between / Square incuse punch. SNG ANS 268. 3.83g, 19mm. Good Very Fine.

200

This coinage was struck on the Persian weight standard, which supports the belief that they were struck during the Persian occupation of this area. Sear notes that the coinage struck in this portion of Macedon may have been minted by the sons of the Macedonian king Alexander I, who were partisan to the Persians. After the Persians were expelled, Alexander had his sons blinded and banished from his kingdom.

521 522 521. Macedon, Olynthos AR Tetrobol. Before 432 BC. Horse standing right attached by bridle to Ionic column behind / Eagle flying, holding serpent in beak, OΛYN around, all within incuse square. SNG ANS 465. 2.38g, 19mm, 12h. Very Fine. Rare.

200

522. Macedon, Olynthos AR Tetrobol. Before 432 BC. Horse standing right attached by bridle to Ionic column behind / Eagle flying, holding serpent in beak, OΛYN around, all within incuse square. SNG ANS 465. 2.38g, 20mm, 3h. Very Fine. Rare.

200

523. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetrobol. Olynthos, circa 425-420 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, A behind / Kithara of seven strings, XAΛKIΔEΩN around. Robinson & Clement Group B, 15d (same dies); SNG ANS 515. 2.30g, 20mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

200

524 525 524. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetrobol. Olynthos, circa 425-420 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Kithara of seven strings, XAΛKIΔEΩN around. Robinson & Clement Group C, 20 (A16/P11); SNG ANS 514. 2.22g, 19mm, 9h. Good Very Fine.

200

525. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetrobol. Olynthos, circa 425-420 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left, Δ behind / Kithara of seven strings, XAΛKIΔEΩN around. Robinson & Clement Group C, 34; SNG ANS 518-9 (same obverse die). 2.33g, 20mm, 12h. Very Fine.

64

200


War with Sparta

526. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetradrachm. Olynthos, circa 382-379 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Kithara of seven strings, XAΛKIΔEΩN around; all within incuse square. Robinson & Clement Group H, 18 bis (A17/P16 bis); SNG ANS –; CNG 88, lot 82 (same dies). 14.50g, 25mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

3,000

The extensive ‘Group H’ coinage appears to have been produced in order to finance the Olynthian war effort against a Spartan campaign to subdue the city and dissolve the Chalkidian League in 382-379 BC. The Macedonian king Amyntas sought the aid of Sparta against the growing threat of the Chalkidian League; his disposition was shared by the cities of Akanthos and Apollonia, who anticipated imminent conquest by the League. Sparta, keen to reassert its presence in northern Greece, consented and a force of 10,000 was mobilised. An advance force of 2,000 under Eudamidas succeeded in separating Potidaea from the League; meanwhile the main force under Teleutias, brother of the Spartan king Agesilaos II, proceeded slowly, being augmented by allied contingents as it went. Teleutias thus arrived in Olynthian territory at the head of a substantial army and won an initial victory outside the city walls of Olynthos. In the spring of 381 however, Teleutias allowed himself to be drawn in too close to the walls, whereupon his forces came under missile fire and were routed with heavy losses by an Olynthian sortie, Teleutias himself being killed in the engagement. With the death of Teleutias, command passed to king Agesipolis I, who in 380 recommenced operations against the League, taking the city of Toroni in an assault. Agesipolis’ success was short-lived however, as he was seized with fever and died within seven days. After three years of protracted but indecisive warfare, Olynthos consented to dissolve the Chalkidian League, though this dissolution appears to have been little more than a token formality, since in the following year the League appears among the members of the Athenian naval confederacy, and twenty years later Demosthenes reported the power of the League as being much greater than before the Spartan expedition. Olynthos itself is at this time spoken of as a city of the first rank, and the Chalkidian League then comprised thirty-two cities.

527. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetradrachm. Olynthos, circa 382-379 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Kithara of seven strings, XAΛKIΔEΩN around; all within incuse square. Robinson & Clement Group H, 20 (A18/P17); SNG ANS –; Naville X, lot 400 (same dies). 14.53g, 24mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

3,000

528. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetradrachm. Olynthos, circa 382-379 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Kithara of seven strings, XAΛKIΔEΩN around; all within incuse square. Robinson & Clement Group H - (these dies not published). 14.47g, 25mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine.

3,000

529. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetradrachm. Olynthos, circa 382-379 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Kithara of seven strings, XAΛKIΔEΩN around. Robinson & Clement Group H, 20; SNG ANS -; Naville X, lot 400 (same obverse die). 14.60g, 25mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Ex Hirsch 271, 17 February 2011, lot 1852.

65

3,750


530 531 532 530. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetrobol. Olynthos, circa 382-379 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Kithara of seven strings, XAΛKIΔEΩN around. Robinson & Clement Group H, 63 (A48/P44); SNG ANS 525 (same dies). 2.41g, 14mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 250 531. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetrobol. Olynthos, circa 382-379 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Kithara of seven strings, XAΛKIΔEΩN around. Robinson & Clement Group H, 65 (same dies); SNG ANS 525 (same obv. die). 2.38g, 14mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. 300 532. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetrobol. Olynthos, circa 382-379 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Kithara of seven strings, XAΛKIΔEΩN around. Robinson & Clement Group H, 77 (A54/P51); SNG ANS 530 (same dies). 2.41g, 16mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 300

533

534

533. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetrobol. Olynthos, circa 382-379 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Kithara of seven strings, XAΛKIΔEΩN around. Robinson & Clement Group H, 84 (A58/P55); SNG ANS 533 (same dies). 2.46g, 15mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 300 534. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetrobol. Olynthos, circa 382-379 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Kithara of seven strings, XAΛKIΔEΩN around. Robinson & Clement Group I, 91 (A60/P59); SNG ANS 534 (same obverse die). 2.40g, 15mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 300

535

536

537

535. Macedon, Skione AR Tetrobol. Circa 424 BC. Youthful male head right / Corinthian helmet right, ΣΚΙ around, all within incuse square. SNG ANS 712. 2.31g, 14mm, 12h. Good Fine. Rare. 300 536. Macedon, Skione AR Tetrobol. Circa 424 BC. Youthful male head right / Corinthian helmet right, ΣΚΙ around, all within incuse square. SNG ANS 712. 2.18g, 14mm, 12h. Good Fine. Rare. 300 537. Macedon, Terone AR Tetrobol. Circa 500-400 BC. Oinochoe, T-E across fields / Quadripartite incuse square. SNG ANS 53. 2.38g, 15mm. Good Very Fine. Small flan crack on obverse.

538

539

300

540

538. Kingdom of Macedon. Perdikkas II AR Tetrobol. Struck 443-437 BC. Rider on prancing horse right, holding two spears / Forepart of lion right within incuse square. SNG ANS 47-51. 2.11g, 19mm, 3h. Good Fine. 250 539. Kingdom of Macedon. Perdikkas II AR Tetrobol. Struck 443-437 BC. Rider on prancing horse right, holding two spears / Forepart of lion right within incuse square. SNG ANS 47-51. 2.20g, 20mm, 12h. Good Fine. 200 540. Kingdom of Macedon. Perdikkas II AR Tetrobol. Struck 437-431 BC. Rider on prancing horse right, holding two spears; plant below / Forepart of lion right within incuse square. SNG ANS 52. 2.37g, 20mm, 3h. Good Fine. 200

541. Kingdom of Macedon. Philip II AR 1/5 Tetradrachm. Lifetime issue. Amphipolis, circa 348-342 BC. Head of Artemis facing slightly left, quiver over shoulder / Youth on horseback right, holding palm and rein; below horse’s raised foreleg, forepart of Pegasos right. Le Rider 510 (D244/R453); SNG ANS 570. 2.35g, 14mm, 4h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 300

66


67


68


Superb Tetradrachm of Philip II

542.

Kingdom of Macedon. Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Lifetime issue. Pella, circa 342-336 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback right, holding reins and long palm branch; tripod below horse, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ around. Le Rider 226 (D127/R182). 14.39g, 25mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

20,000

The presence of Zeus’s head on the obverse of Philip’s coinage was a novelty in Macedonian coinage, and its sudden appearance is closely connected with both types of Philip’s tetradrachms - both the more mature, cloaked rider, and the younger, nude rider holding a victor’s palm - as well as his other denominations. While in his extensive work Le Rider identifies the mature horseman found on Philip’s coinage as the king himself, he makes no attempt to explain the young rider holding the palm branch as seen on this example. Caltabiano however proposes that the use of the heads of Zeus and Apollo on Philip’s coinage, as well as the older and younger horsemen, suggest an important father-son relationship: that of Philip and his heir Alexander. Isokrates proposed that Zeus here represents ‘the conceit of a royal power’ whose right to rule comes directly from Zeus, and whose continuity is assured by the hereditary principle. This interpretation is reinforced by the heroon that Philip built in the Sanctuary of Zeus at Olympia after his victory at Chaeroneia, in which were contained the statues of Philip and Olympias, his parents Amyntas and Eurydice, and his son Alexander. The latter, whose chryselephantine image stood in an eminent position, had played a glorious and distinguished role in the battle, breaking and routing the Greek right flank with his cavalry. Thus, if we are to see in the cloaked older rider the figure of Philip himself, we must see in the younger rider a representation of his son Alexander. For a more detailed treatment of this subject, see Caltabiano, Ancient Macedonia, Sixth International Symposium, vol. 1, pp 197-205. Perfectly struck from dies of arresting style, this coin is one of the most beautiful of all the many thousands of known tetradrachms of Philip II. The design of this remarkable Zeus portrait draws on the earlier coinages of Elis, Epeiros and the Arkadian League for inspiration, and incorporates a device of the ‘Aetna Master’, whose tetradrachms and drachms at Naxos feature a head of Dionysos that spills over the border - a bold statement of skill and a desire to be free of the constraints that bind other artists working in this medium. Thus in deliberately transcending the border with elements of the portrait, in this case the hair and the laurel wreath, the intended effect is to create the impression of a God that cannot be contained, while simultaneously demonstrating the prowess of the artist. Engraved in extraordinarily high relief and possessing an expression of serene majesty, this Zeus portrait easily ranks on a par with the finest contemporary works.

543. Kingdom of Macedon. Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Lifetime issue. Pella, circa 342-336 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback right, holding reins and long palm branch; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, thunderbolt below horse, [N] in exergue. Le Rider 222-306. 14.50g, 25mm, 11h. Very Fine.

69

1,000


Very Rare and Attractive Hemistater

544. Kingdom of Macedon. Philip II AV Hemistater. Lifetime issue. Amphipolis, circa 340-328 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Forepart of lion to right, crescent below, ΦIΛIΠΠOY above. Le Rider 2 (D1/R2); SNG ANS 280 var. (same obverse die; scallop shell on reverse). 4.30g, 14mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and exceptional condition for the issue, being both well preserved and struck on a very large flan.

10,000

545. Kingdom of Macedon. Philip II AV Stater. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Charioteer driving galloping biga right, holding kentron and reins; facing bust of Sol and monogram below horses, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ in exergue. Le Rider 250. 8.54g, 18mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous metal.

3,000

546. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Obol. Amphipolis, circa 320-317 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Thunderbolt, AΛEΞA-NΔPOY around. SNG Copenhagen 696; Price 157. 0.71g, 10mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Some earthen encrustations.

200

547. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater (contemporary imitation). Circa 307-300 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; upright thunderbolt in left field. For prototype, cf. Price 164. 8.53g, 21mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

70

1,000


548. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Amphipolis, circa 320-320 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ to right, Boeotian shield to left. Price 176. 7.95g, 17mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous metal.

2,000

549. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 315-310 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, holding sceptre; Boeotian shield in left field, coiled serpent under throne, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 249; SNG Copenhagen 728; Muller 754. 17.30g, 26mm, 2h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

1,500

550. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Kallatis, circa 250-225 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right, monogram to left. Price 901. 8.53g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

551

3,000

552

551. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Drachm. Abydos, circa 310-301 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, monogram in left field, monogram below throne, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 1538. 4.06g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 200 552. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Drachm. Erythrai, circa 310-301 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, monogram in left field, club below throne, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 1888. 4.25g, 19mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. 200

553. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Civic issue of Kaunos, circa 300-280 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, drapery about legs and waist, holding sceptre and eagle; double headed axe before, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 2074; Müller 1128. For the reattribution to Kaunos, see R.H.J. Ashton, ‘Kaunos, not Miletos or Mylasa,’ NC 2004, pp. 33–46. 17.18g, 29mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine. When one compares these dies to the contemporary issues of the type from this mint, which are uniformly of poor style and execution, it is not implausible to conceive of this having been a special issue intended for some specific purpose or occasion, such is its medallic quality.

71

3,000


554. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Miletos, circa 323-319 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin, and necklace / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, monogram to left, doubleheaded axe below wing. Price 2114. 8.56g, 17mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine.

3,000

555. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Miletos, circa 323-319 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin, and necklace / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, monogram to left, doubleheaded axe below wing. Price 2114. 8.61g, 18mm, 10h. Extremely Fine.

2,500

556 557 558 556. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Drachm. Miletos, circa 295-294 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, monogram in left field, double headed axe below throne, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 2148. 4.29g, 18mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. 200 557. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Drachm. Mylasa, circa 300-280 BC. Head of Herakles right, lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, monogram in left field, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 2487. 4.27g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

150

558. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Drachm. Chios, 290-275 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, monogram in left field, grapes below monogram, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 2525. 4.26g, 20mm, 1h. Extremely Fine.

300

559. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Sardes, circa 325-323 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Nike standing right, holding wreath and stylis, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, head left wearing Phrygian cap in left field. Price 2543; Müller -. 8.59g, 18mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

560. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Drachm. Sardes, circa 319-315 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, monogram in left field, monogram below throne, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 2687. 4.27g, 19mm, 12h. Very Fine.

150

561. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Salamis or Western Asia Minor mint, circa 332-323 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet, serpent decoration on bowl / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; harpa in left field, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 3136; Troxell, New, Group I, 7 (dies 3/a). 8.62g, 19mm, 12h. About Extremely Fine. Rare.

72

3,000


562. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Sidon, circa 333-305 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to left, filleted palm branch below right wing. Price 3470. 8.58g, 17mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

1,500

563. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Struck under Philip III Arrhidaios. Babylon, circa 323-317 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with serpent, and necklace; M to left / Nike standing left, holding wreath in extended right hand and cradling stylis in left arm, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right BAΣIΛEΩΣ to left; ΛY below left wing. Price 3691; SNG München –; SNG Alpha Bank –; SNG Saroglos –; SNG Ashmolean –. 8.59g, 18mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

2,000

564. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Struck under Philip III Arrhidaios. Susa, circa 322-320 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right, BAΣΙΛEΩS to left; ΛA below left wing, monogram below right wing. Price 3845 corr. (location of control letters); SNG München –; SNG Alpha Bank –; SNG Saroglos 171; SNG Ashmolean 3106. 8.53g, 17mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare. Sharply struck, beautiful portrait.

3,000

565. Kingdom of Macedon. Philip III Arrhidaios AV Stater. Abydos, circa 323-316 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike alighting left, holding wreath and stylis; ΦΙΛΙΠΠOY to right, monogram, pentagram and cornucopiae to left. Price P36; Thompson, Abydos 171a. 8.56g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

3,000

566. Kingdom of Macedon. Philip III Arrhidaios AV Stater. Babylon, circa 323-31 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin, single-pendant earring and necklace / Nike standing left, holding wreath in extended right hand and cradling stylis in left arm, ΦΙΛΙΠΠOY to left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ to right; below left wing, facing head of Helios; [KY below right wing]. Price P203; SNG München –; SNG Alpha Bank –; SNG Saroglos –. 8.57g, 18mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Fine style.

73

3,000


567. Kingdom of Macedon. Kassander Æ13. Uncertain mint, circa 319-297 BC. Helmet right / Spearhead. SNG München 1035; SNG Alpha Bank -. 1.51g, 13mm, 9h. Very Fine.

200

568. Kingdom of Macedon. Peithon as satrap, for Antigonos I Monophthalmos AV Stater. Babylon, circa 315-311 BC. In the name and types of Alexander. Head of Athena right, wearing triple crested Corinthian helmet adorned with serpent on the bowl, pendant earring and pearl necklace / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑΛEΞANΔPOY, Nike standing left, wings spread, holding wreath and stylis; MYP monogram within wreath below, HP monogram to left. Price 3716 var. (sphinx, not serpent on helmet). 8.51g, 19mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

2,000

Bold Portrait of Poseidon

569. Kingdom of Macedon. Antigonos III Doson AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 228-227. Head of Poseidon to right, wearing wreath of seaweed / Apollo seated to left on prow upon which inscribed ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ, holding bow in his right hand; monogram below. SNG Alpha Bank 1046-1047; SNG Berry 362. 17.11g, 31mm, 12h. Ex Nomos Fixed Price List 2009, 42; Ex Triton IX, 10 January 2006, lot 832. Good Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

5,000

Attractive Didrachm of Philip V

570. Kingdom of Macedon. Philip V AR Didrachm. Zoilos, magistrate. Pella or Amphipolis, circa 184-179 BC. Diademed head right / Club left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ above, ΦIΛIΠΠOY below, three monograms around; all within oak wreath, star to left. Mamroth 25; SNG Alpha Bank 1055. 8.47g, 27mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Lightly toned. Ex Roma Numismatics II, 2 October 2011, lot 255; Ex George Fekula Collection, privately purchased from Harlan J Berk, March 1995.

74

3,000


Very Rare Stater of Ennea-Hodoi (?)

571. Macedon, Ennea-Hodoi (?) AR Stater. Circa 500-480 BC. Cow standing right, head left towards calf suckling left below; pellet above / Quadripartite incuse square divided diagonally. HPM p. 139, 2; AMNG III/2, p. 134, 7 (Uncertain mint); Traité I 1290 (Korkyra); SNG ANS 924-5; BMC -; cf. Rosen 158; Asyut -. 9.78g, 19mm. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

4,000

The obverse of this coin presents us with a rare georgic scene of a cow suckling its calf; though such scenes relating to rural life are relatively rare in Greek coinage, the motif of the cow with its calf is one that does appear to have captured the imagination of ancient peoples across the Mediterranean, occurring in such diverse places as Ashdod in the Levant, Karia, Mysia, Cyprus, Macedon, Euboia, Epeiros and Illyria. Perhaps the only other design to have won such favour among unrelated ancient peoples is the lion attacking a bull scene, that appears to have spread from Mesopotamia across much of Asia Minor and Europe. The extraordinary prevalence of this type therefore causes inevitable problems in attributing the type to a city or people where no legend is present. What is certain is that the coins originate from the Chalkidian region, within which several possibilities have been proposed, namely Ennea-Hodoi, the Bottiaei, Aineia and Neapolis. The attribution of the present type by Svoronos to the Bottiaei tribe, which others have subsequently copied, should be seen as spurious - his identifying these coins as belonging to the Bottiaei was based solely on the fact that he had not yet assigned any other coins to them. Equally suspect is the assignment of these coins to Aineia, whose early tetrobols and later tetradrachms are distinct both in type (a bull with head reverted) and fabric. The most plausible attribution based on the available evidence is that made by E. S. G. Robinson to Ennea-Hodoi, based on the coins of similar design (though clearly issued some decades later) that bear the abbreviated ethnic EN. This city Ennea-Hodoi, or ‘Nine Roads’, controlled the valley of the Strymon, a strategically important crossing from Macedonia to Thrace that was also rich in dense forests essential for naval construction, and close in proximity to the gold and silver mines of Mount Pangeion. By virtue of this value, a colonisation of Ennea-Hodoi was attempted by Athens in 465 BC which resulted in failure and the loss of the colony, and again in 437 BC under Hagnon, son of Nicias - this new settlement took the name Amphipolis.

THRACE

572. Thrace, Ainos Æ19. Circa 200-150 BC. Bare headed and draped bust of Hermes right, kerykeion over left shoulder / Asklepios standing left, holding serpent-staff, AIN-IΩN around. AMNG Thrakien, p. 199, 405a; Weber, NC 1892, p. 188, 5 and pl. 15, 4. 2.61g, 19mm, 7h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

300

573. Thrace, Abdera AR Tetrobol. Circa 395-360 BC. Protes, magistrate. Griffin, forepaws raised, springing left from grain ear / Laureate head of Apollo left; ΠΡΩTHΣ to right; all in linear border within shallow incuse square. May 331 (A-/P281 [unlisted rev. die]); AMNG II 123; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC 44a. 2.78g, 16mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful lustre.

500

Striking Portrait of Herakles

574. Thrace, Dikaia AR Trihemiobol. Circa 500-475 BC. Cockerel standing right ΔΙΚΑΙΑ around / Head of Herakles wearing lion’s skin right, within incuse square. SNG ANS -; SNG Copenhagen - ; BMC -; cf. Hirsch 267, 5 May 2010, lot 119. 0.71g, 10mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Unpublished in the standard references. Exceptionally well-preserved portrait.

500

The trihemiobols of Dikaia bearing the ethnic of that city are very rare; this remarkable specimen is exceptional on account of the size of the flan, the excellent preservation of detail, and the markedly superior style to all other known dies of this denominational series. Indeed, the quality of workmanship evident in the Herakles die allows us to more accurately date this issue to the latter part of the series: unlike most other examples of this denomination which bear a frontal eye, here the eye is clearly in profile, more in keeping with the emerging classical artwork of the mid fifth century. Executed by an artist of clear talent and confidence, the portrait of Herakles on the reverse of this coin is an aesthetic delight, and all the more impressive for its being rendered on such a tiny canvas.

75


575

576.

575. Thrace, Maroneia AR Tetradrachm. Circa 386-347 BC. Choregos, magistrate. Horse prancing left, rein trailing / Vine with four bunches of grapes within linear square border; EΠI-XOP-HΓ-O around; cicada to upper left; all within shallow incuse square. Schönert-Geiss 439 (V16/R25); BMC 26 (these dies). 10.96g, 23mm, 5h. Very Fine.

750

576. Thrace, Maroneia AR Tetradrachm. Circa 386-347 BC. Philonikos, magistrate. Horse prancing right / Vine with four bunches of grapes within linear square border; EΠI-ΦΙΛ-ΟΝΙ-KOY around; all within shallow incuse square. Schönert-Geiss 486 (V32/R56); Traité II/4, 1477 and pl. CCCXLII, 13 (same dies). 10.86g, 22mm, 3h. Very Fine. Very Rare, only two examples known to Schönert-Geiss.

1,000

577. Thrace, Maroneia AR Tetradrachm. Circa 386-347 BC. Philonikos, magistrate. Horse prancing right / Vine with four bunches of grapes within linear square border; EΠI-ΦΙΛ-ΟΝΙ-KOY around; all within shallow incuse square. Schönert-Geiss 486 (V32/R56); Traité II/4, 1477 and pl. CCCXLII, 13 (same dies). 11.00g, 23mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare, only two examples known to Schönert-Geiss.

1,500

578. Islands off Thrace, Samothrace AR Obol. Circa 500-475 BC. Winged sphinx seated left, raising paw / Quadripartite incuse square. SNG ANS -; BMC - ; HGC 308; Cf. SNG Copenhagen Suppl. 101 (slightly different reverse pattern). 1.03g, 10mm. Very Fine. Very Rare.

150

579. Islands off Thrace, Samothrace AR Obol. Circa 500-475 BC. Forepart of winged sphinx left / Quadripartite incuse square. Cf HGC 307 (Sphinx right); SNG ANS -; SNG Copenhagen; BMC -. 0.45g, 8mm. Good Fine. Extremely Rare.

580

300

581

580. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Diobol. Circa 510-480 BC. Satyr running right / Quadripartite incuse square. Le Rider, Thasiennes 4; HGC 6, 333; Rosen 144. 1.15g, 11mm. Extremely Fine. Good metal.

150

581. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Diobol. Circa 500-463 BC. Satyr running right / Quadripartite incuse square. Le Rider, Thasiennes 4; SNG Copenhagen 191-194 (Lete in Macedon). 1.16g, 11mm. Good Very Fine.

76

200


582. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Stater. Circa 480-463 BC. Satyr advancing right, carrying off protesting nymph / Quadripartite incuse square. Le Rider, Thasiennes 5; SNG Copenhagen 1010-11. 8.57g, 22mm. Extremely Fine.

500

583. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Stater. Circa 480-463 BC. Satyr advancing right, carrying off protesting nymph / Quadripartite incuse square. Le Rider, Thasiennes 5; SNG Copenhagen 1010-11. 9.37g, 22m. Extremely Fine.

500

584. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Obol. Circa 463-411 BC. Dolphin right over dolphin left, pellets around / Quadripartite incuse square. SNG Copenhagen 1020. 0.48g, 9mm. Extremely Fine.

585

586

200

587

585. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Hemiobol. Circa 411-404 BC. Bald head of satyr right / Two dolphins swimming in opposite direction, ΘAΣ around; all within shallow incuse square. Le Rider, Thasiennes –; SNG Copenhagen 1033-4; HGC 6, 340. 0.46g, 9mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. 200 586. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Hemiobol. Circa 411-404 BC. Female head left, wearing diadem and necklace / Dolphin leaping left, ΘΑΣ below. 0.28g, 9mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Unpublished in the standard references. 200 587. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Hemiobol. Circa 411-404 BC. Head of nymph left, hair bound with taenia / Dolphin leaping left, ΘΑΣ around. Le Rider, Thasiennes 13; SNG Copenhagen 1035; HGC 6, 341. 0.26g, 9mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. 200

Exceptionally Rare Silver Coin of Seuthes

588. Kings of Thrace. Seuthes I or II AR Trihemiobol. Circa 424-405 BC or 405-386 BC. Forepart of horse to right / ΣEV within linear border. Peter p.77 = Topalov p.172. 0.84g, 10mm, 12h. Mint State. Of the highest rarity.

1,000

Apparently only the second known example, this is one of only half a dozen known silver coins in the name of Seuthes. This coinage has been most frequently attributed to Seuthes I, though given the paucity of information and find evidence a definitive attribution to this king remains elusive. Stylistic and metrological analysis suggest a date of issue in the period of the mid-5th to mid-4th century BC (see Peter, p. 78), though this could equally well apply to either Seuthes I or II. The former is ingloriously remembered for ending the campaign of his uncle King Sitalkes in Macedon, after allowing himself to be bribed by the Macedonian king Perdikkas II. Thucydides speculated that Seuthes had a hand in the death of his uncle, to whose throne he succeeded in 424 BC. Yet, under his rule, the Odrysian kingdom grew to new heights of power and wealth. Upon his death he was succeeded by Amadokos I, who made Seuthes II ruler of the kingdom’s Aegean shore territories.

77


Lustrous Stater of Lysimachos

589. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AV Stater. Uncertain mint, circa 305-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander the Great right, wearing horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, resting left elbow on shield, transverse spear behind; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛYΣΙΜΑΧΟY to left, monogram in inner left field. Müller 478. Thompson, Essays Robinson –. 8.51g, 19mm, 2h Good Extremely Fine, superbly lustrous.

3,000

Ex Stacks, Bowers & Ponterio 160, 17 June 2011, lot 6019.

590. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lysimacheia, circa 305-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing horn of Ammon / Athena enthroned left, holding Nike and resting left elbow on shield, spear resting to her right; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑXΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, lion head and monogram in inner field. Müller 47; Thompson -. 16.93g, 28mm, 12h. Very Fine. Rare.

500

591. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria Troas, circa 297-282 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing horn of Ammon / Athena seated left, holding Nike, with shield and spear; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑXΟΥ crowned by Nike to left , horse’s head in inner left field, star on throne. Thompson 149. 16.92, 26mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

592. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lampsakos, circa 297-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing horn of Ammon / Athena seated left, holding Nike, with shield and spear; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑXΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, HP monogram to inner left, crescent in exergue. Thompson 47; Müller 401. 17.18g, 28mm, 12h. Good Very Fine, knock on reverse.

78

500


A Magnificent Drachm of Lysimachos

593. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AR Drachm. Ephesos, circa 294-287 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on rim of shield, transverse spear in background, E-Φ with bee between to inner left; BAΣIΛEΩΣ to right, ΛYΣIMAXOY to left. Thompson 168; Müller 421. 4.33g, 19mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin.

5,000

A specimen of remarkable quality and style possessing radiant golden tones around the obverse portrait, and deep violet hues on the reverse. This high relief coin easily ranks among the finest known drachms of Lysimachos.

594. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Ephesos, circa 294-287 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, resting arm on shield, transverse spear behind; bee to left, monogram in exergue. Thompson 166. 17.26g, 29mm, 12h. About Very Fine.

595

200

596

595. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Kallatis, circa 258-262 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, resting arm on shield, transverse spear behind; monogram to left, KAL on throne, ornamented trident in exergue. Müller -, cf. 258. 16.77g, 32mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

300

596. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Byzantion, circa 88-86 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, resting arm on shield, transverse spear behind; monogram to left, BY on throne, ornamented trident in exergue. Müller -, De Callataÿ -. 16.66g, 30mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Unpublished in the standard references.

79

300


597

598

597. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Byzantion, circa 88-86 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, resting arm on shield, transverse spear behind; monogram to left, BY on throne, ornamented trident in exergue. Müller -, De Callataÿ -. 16.84g, 35mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Unpublished in the standard references.

300

598. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Byzantion, circa 88-86 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, resting arm on shield, transverse spear behind; monogram to left, BY on throne, ornamented trident in exergue. Müller -, cf. De Callataÿ D1-5/R1-9. 16.75g, 35mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

300

Finest Style Portrait of Seuthes III

599. Kings of Thrace. Seuthes III Æ21. Circa 323-316 BC. Laureate head of Seuthes right / Horseman riding right, ΣEYΘOY above, star below. Peter p. 182; Topalov 116; Dimitrov group B; SNG Copenhagen 1073; CNG 76, 12 September 2007, 236 (same obverse die). 6.85g, 21mm, 12h. Fine-style portrait; Good Very Fine. Rare.

1,000

The portraits on the bronze issues of Seuthes III vary considerably in quality of style, and range from crude, hooknosed caricatures, to the present speciment that was clearly engraved by an artist of significantly greater talent than those others who also produced dies for the Odrysian kingdom of Thrace. This portrait bears considerable resemblance to the incredible bronze head of Seuthes III found during the excavation of his tomb.

600. Thracian Dynasts, Koson AV Stater. Circa 44-42 BC. Roman consul walking left, accompanied by two lictors, monogram before, KOΣΩN in exergue / Eagle with spread wings standing left on sceptre, clutching laurel wreath in right talon. RPC 1701; BMC Thrace p. 208, 2. 8.59g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

400

SKYTHIA

601. Skythia, Olbia Cast Æ45. Circa 470-460 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing Attic helmet; to left, dolphin upward; all within incuse circle / Wheel with four spokes (‘solar disk’). Anokhin 157; Karyshkovskij –; Frolova & Abramzon 139 corr. (no letters on rev.[?]); SNG BM Black Sea –; SNG Pushkin –; SNG Stancomb –; Sutzu II –. 82.28g, 45mm. Good Fine, as found, with a thick rough green patina. Extremely Rare, approximately only four of this type known, two of which are in museums. Ex Alex Shubs Collection.

80

3,500


602. Skythia, Olbia Cast Æ43. Circa 460-450 BC. Paus(a)-, magistrate. Head of Athena left, wearing Attic helmet; to left, dolphin upward; all within incuse circle / Wheel with four spokes (‘solar disk’); retrograde [EΠI] ΠAY[Σ] around rim of wheel. Cf. Anokhin 160 (larger denomination); Karyshkovskij –; Frolova & Abramzon –; SNG BM Black Sea –; SNG Pushkin –; SNG Stancomb –; Sutzu II –. 73.36g, 43mm. Fine, green-brown patina, a few scratches. Extremely Rare, one of only three examples known, and the only one in private hands.

3,000

Ex Alex Shubs Collection.

603. Skythia, Olbia Cast Æ39. Circa 437-410 BC. Facing gorgoneion with protruding tongue / Wheel with four spokes (‘solar disk’); A-P-I-X in quarters. Anokhin 169; Karyshkovskij p. 463, 3; Frolova & Abramzon 160–9; SNG BM Black Sea 386; SNG Pushkin 43–6; SNG Stancomb –; Sutzu II 97. 28.32g, 39mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. Approximately only fourteen examples known, eight of which are in museums.

3,000

Ex Alex Shubs Collection; Ex CNG 87, 18 May 2011, lot 247.

604. Skythia, Olbia cast Æ27. Circa 437-410 BC. Facing gorgoneion, with solid eyes / Wheel with four spokes and central pellet (‘solar disk’); A-P-I-X counter-clockwise in quarters. Anokhin 171 var. (orientation of letters); Karyshkovskij p. 468. 1–8 var. (same); Frolova & Abramzon 179 (same rev. die); SNG BM Black Sea 388–9 var. (same); SNG Pushkin 49 var. (same); SNG Stancomb 345 var. (same); Sutzu II –. 10.07g, 27mm, 2h. Very Fine. Very rare, apparently only twenty-three examples known, twelve of which are in museums.

400

Ex Alex Shubs Collection.

605. Skythia, Olbia AR Didrachm. Circa 200-190 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin; countermark to left (Macedonian helmet within incuse circle) / Club left; OΛBIO above; AP monogram, ΔM, and AΘ monogram below. Anokhin 455 (with c/m); Karyshkovskij p. 422, Таб. XX=A, 12; Frolova & Abramzon 1876 (with c/m); SNG BM Black Sea 617 (with c/m); SNG Pushkin –; SNG Stancomb –; Sutzu II –. 7.87g, 20mm, 12h. Good Very Fine, original dark grey/green patina with earthen highlights. Extremely Rare, apparently only nine examples known, six of which are in museums. Erroneously described as a bronze coin in Triton XVI. Ex Alex Shubs Collection.

81

3,500


606. Tauric Chersonesos, Chersonesos Æ21. Circa 65–63 BC. Draped bust of Artemis Parthenos right, bow and quiver behind neck / Eagle standing left, head right, wings spread, on thunderbolt; monogram to right, XEP below. Anokhin 827–8; Anokhin, Khersonesa 197–8; SNG BM Black Sea –; SNG Pushkin –; SNG Stancomb –; Sutzu II 47–8 corr. (monogram). 6.72g, 21mm, 1h. Very Fine. Some roughness, smoothing. Very Rare.

1,000

Ex Alex Shubs Collection.

607. Tauric Chersonesos, Karkinitis Cast Æ ‘arrow’. Circa 470-460 BC. Anokhin 601; Kutajsov Type II; SNG BM Black Sea –; SNG Pushkin –; SNG Stancomb 449. 0.92g, 20mm. Very Rare.

500

Ex Alex Shubs Collection.

Beautiful Zeus Applique

608. Hellenistic Gold Repoussé and Chased Applique. Uncertain place of manufacture, probably Asia Minor. Circa 300-200 BC. Head of Zeus to right, wearing laurel wreath. Very fine workmanship. 0.99g, 26mm, 12. From a private German collection.

10,000

TROAS Unpublished Tetradrachm of Abydos

609. Troas, Abydos AR Tetradrachm. After 387 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Eagle standing right with wings closed, ΔIOΓENHΣ above, ABY below. BMC -; Traité -, cf. 2452, pl. 168, 4 (different magistrate); cf. Hill in NC 1923, 20 (same magistrate, drachm); SNG Copenhagen -. 14.99g, 23mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

5,000

The series of Rhodian-weight tetradrachms to which this issue belongs appears to have been produced after the Peace of Antalkidas in 387 BC, in which Abydos came under the rule of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. Though Abydos had been a member of the Delian League, it revolted against Athenian rule in 412/411, allying itself to Sparta. The Persian-brokered peace that ended the Corinthian War between Athens and its allies Thebes, Corinth and Argos on the one hand, and Sparta on the other, was a highly favorable outcome for King Artaxerxes, as it granted him total control of all of the cities of Asia, with both the Athenian alliance and Sparta surrendering their territorial claims there. Situated at a strategically important point on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont, Abydos became an important port while allied to Sparta, and issued an extremely rare series of gold staters on the Attic standard.

82


610. Troas, Assos AR Drachm. Circa 350 BC. Helmeted head of Athena left / Bukranion; ΑΣΣΙOΝ around. SNG München 151; SNG von Aulock -; SNG Copenhagen 226-7. 2.91g, 15mm, 8h. Some scrapes, rough surfaces, otherwise Extremely Fine. Rare.

300

611. Troas, Dardanos AR Triobol. Circa 400-350 BC. Glauketas, magistrate. Horseman, wearing chiton, chlamys and petasos, on horse galloping right, with right hand raised / Cock right, ear of corn in right field, ΔAP-ΓΛAYKETHΣ around. BMC 2; SNG von Aulock 7593 var. (magistrate’s name). 2.48g, 14mm, 4h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

500

AEOLIS

612

613

612. Aeolis, Kyme AR Tetradrachm. Circa 165-140 BC. Metrophanes, magistrate. Head of the Amazon Kyme right, wearing taenia / Horse prancing right; one-handled cup below raised foreleg, KYMAIΩN to right, MHTPOΦANHΣ below; all within wreath. Oakley obv. die 1; SNG Copenhagen 104; SNG von Aulock -. 16.79g, 33mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractive old tone.

750

613. Aeolis, Myrina AR Tetradrachm. Circa 155-145 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Apollo Grynios standing right, holding branch and phiale; omphalos and amphora at his feet, MΥΡINAIΩN behind, monogram in left field; all within wreath. SNG Copenhagen 221; BMC 11. 14.50g, 33mm, 12h. About Extremely Fine. Pleasant lustre around the devices.

614

500

615

614. Aeolis, Myrina AR Tetradrachm. Circa 155-145 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Apollo Grynios standing right, holding branch and phiale; omphalos and amphora at his feet, MΥΡINAIΩN behind, monograms in left field. SNG Copenhagen 223; BMC -. 15.98g, 31mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

615. Aeolis, Myrina AR Tetradrachm. Circa 155-145 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Apollo Grynios standing right, holding branch and phiale; monogram to left, omphalos and amphora at feet to right, MYPINAIΩN and monogram to left; all within laurel wreath. SNG Copenhagen 221; Sacks Issue 18. 16.92g, 31mm, 12h. Very Fine.

IONIA

500

Unique Early Electrum Hekte

616. Ionia, Uncertain mint EL Hekte (1/6 Stater). Circa 530-520 BC. Lydo-Milesian standard. Unbridled horse galloping left / Quadripartite incuse square. Cf. BMC pl. I, 26 (stater) for similar type. 2.24g, 11mm. Very Fine. Apparently unique, unpublished in the major references.

83

1,000


84


Shining Sun

617.

Ionia, Ephesos (?) EL Stater. Circa 575-560 BC. Forepart of bridled horse left, sunburst before; lotus flower on its back / Rectangular incuse punch between two square incuse punches, all with roughly patterned surfaces. Weidauer 138 (these dies); Mitchiner 135; ACGC 56. 14.36g, 21mm. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare - the finest of only six specimens known. Sharply struck and lustrous.

20,000

The lotus flower that appears upon the horse’s back is an element common to several electrum staters from uncertain mints attributed to Lydia or Ionia, all struck on the Milesian standard: the recumbent lion type (Rosen 245; NAC 72, 16 May 2013, 369), bull kneeling with its head reverted (Rosen 148), and two rampant lions upright on their hind legs with heads reverted and paws extended (Rosen 149). On all of these coins the lotus flower may initially appear incidental, though its commonality to all types indicates otherwise – it is evidently to be seen as the key element of the obverse type that links the different animal designs together. The lotus flower appears only sporadically in Greek mythology, though it had a deep rooted use in Egyptian art and legend, where it was taken as a symbolic representation of the sun on account of its physical behaviour: it closes at night time and descends into the water, rising and flowering again at dawn. In Egyptian creation myth, the lotus was the first thing to spontaneously form from chaos, and it was from the lotus that the sun itself was born on the first day. The eastern coastal areas of the Mediterranean in the sixth century BC had been for a long time familiar with Egyptian religious beliefs that spread as a consequence of trade and population dispersal; the lotus’ insinuation in its Egyptian meaning into Greek culture is evident in the lotus-tipped sceptre carried by Zeus on the coinages of Karia, Mysia and Kilikia (among others), being a legacy of the assimilation of an attribute of the major Egyptian solar deity Ra with the principal god of the Greek pantheon Zeus. The lotus’ appearance here as a polyvalent symbol can best be understood then in the context of assimilated Egyptian beliefs, representing at once both a solar and divine aspect, as well as a clear allusion to the minting city’s location. Interestingly however, the lotus is not the only solar element present on this coin – immediately before the horse’s chest we can discern the presence of a sunburst similar in depiction to those found on the contemporary coinage of Alyattes. This element may have been included on account of its being more universally familiar, being well understood to signify what we now refer to as Anatolia, which comes from the Greek Aνατολή (Anatolē) meaning the ‘East’ or more literally ‘sunrise’, used to refer to the Ionian colonies on the west coast of Asia Minor. Moreover the horse was itself considered a solar symbol, not only throughout the East, but also among Celtic and Germanic tribes, suggesting a common ancient root to this association. Such preponderance of solar symbology is indeed only fitting for this metal, and is in fact an overt statement of the coin’s composition: ἤλεκτρον, the Greek word for electrum, is derived from the word ἠλέκτωρ (ēlektōr) - ‘shining sun’.

85


Attractive Tetradrachm of Ephesos

618. Ionia, Ephesos AR Tetradrachm. Menekrates, magistrate. Circa 380-370 BC. Bee with straight wings; E-Φ flanking / Forepart of stag right, head reverted; palm tree to left, MENEKPATHΣ to right. Pixodarus class C, obv. die 18; SNG Kayhan –; SNG von Aulock –; SNG Copenhagen 231. 15.31g, 24mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Exceptional for the type.

3,000

Ex Triton 13, 5 January 2010, lot 182.

619. Ionia, Herakleia ad Latmon AR Tetradrachm. Circa 190 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with volute, Pegasos and five foreparts of horse / Club of Herakles right, HPAKΔEΩTΩN above, Nike below between two monograms, all within oak wreath. SNG Copenhagen 781; SNG Lockett 2823. 16.16g, 29mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

620. Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum AR Tetradrachm. Circa 155-145 BC. Stephanophoric type. Erasippos, son of Aristeos, magistrate. Diademed and draped bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver over shoulder / Apollo Delphios standing left, left elbow resting on tall tripod behind, holding in right hand a branch tied with fillet; EPAΣIΠΠOΣ APIΣTEOY to left, MAΓNHTΩN to right, meander pattern below; all within laurel wreath. Jones obv. die 32; SNG von Aulock 2042; SNG Copenhagen –. 16.60g, 29mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

750

621. Ionia, Miletos AR Drachm. Circa 340-325 BC. Nossos, magistrate. Laureate head of Apollo left / Lion walking left, head reverted, star above, monogram before, ΝΟΣΣΟΥ in exergue. Deppert-Lippitz 182 (V5/R18); BMC -. 3.58g, 15mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, one of very few known examples.

86

750


622. Ionia, Phokaia EL 1/24 Stater. Circa 625-522 BC. Head of seal left / Incuse square punch. Bodenstedt Em. 2.2 (unlisted dies); Boston MFA –; BMC 9. 0.65g, 6mm. As Struck. Rare.

300

623. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 625-522 BC. Forepart of bull right, head left; small seal above / Incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 9 (unlisted dies); Boston MFA -; BMC –; SNG von Aulock 7946. 2.59g, 11mm. Extremely Fine. Very rare, only seven examples noted by Bodenstedt.

1,000

624. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 500-480 BC. Head of a griffin with open jaws to left; behind head, seal swimming upwards / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 12. 2.62g, 10mm. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare, only seven examples noted by Bodenstedt of which four are in museums.

2,000

625. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 500-480 BC. Head of a griffin with open jaws to left; behind head, seal swimming upwards / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 12. 2.57g, 10mm. Very Rare. Near Extremely Fine. Sold in Roma III for £4200, but not paid for.

2,000

626. Ionia, Phokaia EL 1/24 Stater. Circa 625-522 BC. Head of a griffin with open jaws to left; behind head, seal swimming upwards / Rough incuse square. Bodenstedt 12. 0.65g, 9mm. Good Extremely Fine.

2,000

627. Ionia, Phokaia EL 1/24 Stater. Circa 625-522 BC. Head of a griffin with open jaws to left; behind head, seal swimming upwards / Rough incuse square. Bodenstedt 12. 0.64g, 7mm. Good Extremely Fine.

2,000

628. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 625-522 BC. Goat half-kneeling left, seal above / Rough incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 19; SNG von Aulock 7945. 2.60g, 10mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare. Three examples listed by Bodenstedt, all in public collections.

87

2,000


No Ordinary Girl

629. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 625-522 BC. Head of African girl left, seal downward behind / Quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 24; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC -; SNG von Aulock -; Boston MFA -. 2.56g, 10mm. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare. 5,000 Only one example of this type is cited by Bodenstedt (in Karlsruhe), and only one example has been offered at auction in the last decade (Triton XII, 6 January 2009, lot 296), and that example was in poor state of preservation - it was so badly damaged that the gender of the portrait could not be distinguished; nonetheless it commanded a hammer price of $4,250. The appearance of an ‘Aethiopian’ girl on this hekte is both surprising and remarkably beautiful; surprising on account of the fact that though Aethiopians - the Greek name for all Africans characterised by dark skin and short hair - feature regularly in Greek art, their depiction on coins is by contrast very infrequent. We know that the Greeks were well acquainted with black Africans, since they appear often in Greek literature as mythical or semi-mythical characters and warriors; it appears that they were known in the Greek world as early as the Minoan period, where they were employed by Minoan commanders as auxiliary troops. Indeed, if we may believe Quintus of Smyrna, the Greeks encountered ‘Aethiopians’ in the army of Memnon at Troy. Black African contingents also formed a part of Xerxes’ army and according to some scholars fought at Marathon (see Frazer, J. G., 1913: Pausanias’s Description of Greece, II. Macmillan, London, p 434; and Graindor, P., 1908: Les Vases au Nègre. Musée Belge, p 29). Of the surviving art objects representing black Africans, many appear to be the work of artists who modelled from life. These depictions invariably display an astonishing degree of individuality, vitality, and energy, presenting scenes and designs that appealed to the craftsmen; one might surmise that the exotic appearance of such individuals presented the artist with a challenge to represent the distinctive features of blacks, whose aesthetic attractiveness is readily conveyed in pieces such as the present hekte. The closest parallels we find in the numismatic record for this portrait can be seen in the silver staters of an uncertain (possibly Karian) mint that have appeared in 2008 (Gemini IV, 195) and 2009 (NAC 52, 177) that bear an incuse head of a negroid man, and a small issue of silver fractions on Lesbos that also show a male head, this time in relief. Both however are highly stylised, and may not necessarily represent the features of a particular individual. In considering the present piece and the astounding realism and distinctiveness of the portrait, it seems highly likely that the girl depicted here existed, and modelled for this engraver. If this be the case, we may see here a truly rare thing in numismatics – the face of an ordinary girl, no queen or deity, so beautiful that her image was deemed appropriate for the civic coinage of a Greek city-state.

630 631 630. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 625-522 BC. Lion pouncing left, seal above / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 27, Boston 1902. 2.58g, 10mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare - only 2 examples recorded by Bodenstedt. 3,000 631. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 480 BC. Forepart of man-headed bull left, collar with row of pearls; behind, seal swimming upward / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 35 (b/β). 2.58g, 10mm. Very Rare. Extremely Fine. A pleasing example of this type. Sold in Roma III for £2000, but not paid for. 2,000

632 633 632. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 387-326 BC. Head of Queen Omphale left, wearing Herakles’ lion skin headdress and ear pendant, club over shoulder; beneath, seal / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 107; SNG Copenhagen 1029. 2.50g, 10mm. Good Very Fine. 1,000 For his murder of Iphitus, the great hero Herakles was commanded by the Delphic Oracle Xenoclea to remand himself as a slave to Queen Omphale of Lydia for the period of a year, during which time he was made to perform women’s tasks, wear women’s clothing and hold a basket of wool while Omphale and her maidens did their spinning. Ovid (Fasti) tells us that Omphale even wore the skin of the Nemean Lion and carried Herakles’ olivewood club. 633. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 387-326 BC. Head of Queen Omphale left, wearing Herakles’ lion skin headdress and ear pendant, club over shoulder; beneath, seal / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 107; SNG Copenhagen 1029. 2.54g, 11mm. Extremely Fine. 1,250

88


The Earliest Coinage of Samos

634. Ionia, Samos EL Stater. Euboic-Samian standard. Circa 600 BC. Uncertain amorphous type / Two parallel rectangular incuses with broken surfaces. E.S.G. Robinson. “Some Electrum and Gold Greek Coins” in Centennial Publication of the American Numismatic Society. New York. 1958, 8, and pl. 29, 8; Weidauer 195-196; ACGC 66 (Ashmolean Museum, Oxford [Loan collection], found in Samos); Barron p. 15; ATEC 88. 17.45g, 21mm. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

10,000

C. Kraay (Archaic and Classical Greek Coins, 1976) ascribed these coins to a period in Samian history of prosperity and creativity around the end of the seventh century or early sixth century BC; in contrast to much of the contemporary early electrum coinage of Asia Minor whose mints remain uncertain or debated, the early coinage of Samos has been identified to its mint thanks to a locally discovered hoard and other finds of single coins on that island. Operating on a different weight standard (the Euboic-Samian, rather than Milesian) to much of Ionia, the Samian electrum stands apart; it is also distinguished by the use of two parallel rectangular punches on the staters, one rectangle and one square on the half stater, and a square only on smaller denominations. The nature of the obverse is the most unusual feature of this coinage however, since though the Samians were renowned artists and artificers, it is but an incoherent design of amorphous shapes. While many numismatists have attempted to read meaning into and find patterns within these shapes, it seems likely that they do not represent anything particular, and such efforts are akin to ascribing shapes to cloud formations. Rather, these amorphous obverses should be viewed in the same class as the striated pattern staters of Ephesos. A later type features a facing lion’s head emerging from the incoherent background, which Kraay notes is ‘reminiscent of the similar head which is the first step towards a reverse type on the Athenian Wappenmünzen’.

LESBOS

635. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Head of roaring lion right / Incuse head of calf right; rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 13; SNG Copenhagen 301. 2.57g, 10mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

500

636. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Forepart of winged boar flying to right / ncuse head of roaring lion right; rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 15; SNG von Aulock 7717. 2.57g, 11mm, 8h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

637. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Forepart of winged boar flying to right / Incuse head of roaring lion right; rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 15; SNG Copenhagen -. 2.57g, 10mm, 11h. Very Fine.

89

500


638. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Head of ram right; [below, cockerel standing left] / Incuse head of lion right; rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 16; SNG von Aulock 7719. 2.09g, 11mm, 12h. Very Fine.

300

639. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 440-400 BC. Head of an aged satyr facing right, wearing a taenia / Two confronted heads of rams, palmette above, all within incuse square. Bodenstedt 37. 2.48g, 10mm, 4h. Very Fine.

300

640. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 412-378 BC. Turreted head of Artemis-Kybele right, turret decorated with a palmette / Head of Hermes right, wearing petasos, in linear border within shallow incuse square. Bodenstedt 75; SNG von Aulock 1725; SNG Copenhagen 327. 2.55g, 10mm, 12h. Some die rust, otherwise Extremely Fine.

750

MYSIA

641. Mysia, Kyzikos AR Drachm. Circa 390-340 BC. Veiled head of Kore Soteira left, hair bound with sphendone / Head of roaring lion left, KY-ZI around; tunny fish below. Von Fritze II 23; SNG BN 408. 3.18g, 14mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

250

642. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500 BC. Forepart of lioness left, with collar of pearls, tunny fish swimming upward behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 39; SNG France 178. 2.65g, 11mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

500

643. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Ram kneeling left, head reverted; tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 47; SNG France -; BMC 48. 16.04g, 20mm. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

3,000

644. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 440-400 BC. Herakles, nude, kneeling to right, holding bow in left hand, [club in right hand] / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 69, pl. IV 36; SNG France 197. 16.00g, 23mm. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

90

5,000


645. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-460 BC. Bull walking left on tunny fish left / Mill sail incuse. Von Fritze 88; SNG France 222-223; Boston MFA 1466. 15.64g, 21mm. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

5,000

Well Detailed Perseus Hekte

646. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 400 BC. Perseus kneeling right wearing winged cap and cloak, head reverted, tunny fish below; in his left hand, Perseus holds the head of Medusa / Quadripartite incuse square. Traité II 2, pl. 174, 19; von Fritze 162; SNG Paris 312. 2.65g, 11mm. Extremely Fine. Rare.

647

2,000

648

647. Mysia, Kingdom of Pergamon. Attalos I AR Tetradrachm. Circa 241-197 BC. Laureate head of Philetairos right / Athena seated left, crowning ΦIΛETAIΡOY with wreath, shield resting at side, spear behind; bee and monogram to left, bow to right. Westermark VI A, V.CIII:B. 16.98g, 28mm, 12h. Very Fine.

500

648. Mysia, Pergamon AR Tetradrachm. Cistophoric type. Circa 95-92 BC. Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Bow case between two serpents; monogram to left, AM above, thyrsos to right. Kleiner, Hoard 3; SNG France 1725. 12.61g, 26mm, 12h. Very Fine.

649

200

650

649. Mysia, Pergamon AR Tetradrachm. Cistophoric type. Circa 95-92 BC. Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Bow case between two serpents; monogram to left, BA above, thyrsos to right. Kleiner, Hoard 30. 12.66g, 27mm, 12h. Extremely Fine, some scratches. Extremely Rare, Kleiner records only one example.

300

650. Mysia, Pergamon AR Tetradrachm. Cistophoric type. Circa 92-88 BC. Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Bow case between two serpents; AΣ and monogram above, city monogram to left, thyrsos to right. Kleiner, Hoard 29; Pinder -; SNG France -. 12.60g, 28mm, 12h. Very Fine.

200

651. Mysia, Priapos Æ11. Circa 300-200 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Crab, strung harpa below, A above. SNG von Aulock 7526; Klein 290. 1.05g, 11mm, 11h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

91

200


LYDIA

652. Kingdom of Lydia AV Twelfth Stater. Time of Kroisos. Sardes, circa 560-547 BC. Light standard. Confronted foreparts of lion, with extended right foreleg, and bull / Incuse square punch. Walberg Group VI, 4 (same rev. punch); Berk 10-3; Traité –; SNG Kayhan –; Gulbenkian 759. 0.66g, 6mm. Very Fine.

500

653. Kingdom of Lydia AV Stater. In the types of Kroisos. Time of Cyrus to Darios I. Sardes, circa 547-520 BC. Confronted foreparts of lion, with extended right foreleg, and bull / Two incuse square punches of unequal size. Carradice 8; Boston MFA 2073; SNG von Aulock 2875. 8.05g, 16mm. Near Extremely Fine.

5,000

Kroisos is credited with issuing the first true gold coins with a standardised purity for general circulation. His kingdom represented the last bastion against Persian expansion westwards into Greek lands; encouraged by a prediction of the Delphic Oracle that if he attacked Persia he would destroy a great empire, Kroisos made his preparations for war with Cyrus the Great. The war resulted in defeat for Kroisos; his numerically superior army was smashed, and the capital Sardes was captured along with Kroisos and his family, who were immolated on the orders of Cyrus. Lydia became a satrapy of the Persian Empire, though it continued to mint coins in the traditional types, and indeed the legendary wealth of Kroisos was used by Cyrus to form the basis of a new Persian gold standard currency.

Extremely Rare Aphrodite Issue of Philadelphia

654. Lydia, Philadelphia Æ26. Circa AD 161-180. Draped bust of the Senate right / Twin spiral columns surmounted by an arch, within which stands Aphrodite, nude, covering herself with her hands. SNG Copenhagen 354; Imhoof-Blumer 124, 37 and pl. V, 14. 8.39g, 26mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

1,000

The reverse of this extremely rare and superbly preserved coin depicts a Hellenistic or Roman statue of Aphrodite of the ‘Venus Pudica’ type, a style born from the masterwork of the sculptor Praxiteles - the renowned Aphrodite of Knidos, which was the first life sized representation of the nude female form. Such was its beauty and fame in antiquity that it was extensively copied; though the positions of Venus’ hands sometimes changed (in this case the left hand) the basic form remained unchanged. Praxiteles’ original did not survive; it may have been removed to Constantinople and destroyed during the Nika riots.

KARIA

Unpublished Scorpion Tetartemorion

655. Karia, Uncertain mint AR Tetartemorion. Circa 500-450 BC. Scorpion / Incuse punch. Cf. Helios 7, 12 December 2011, 394. 0.19g, 7mm. Toned Very Fine. Extremely Rare, unpublished in the standard references.

300

Exceptional Pixodaros Didrachm

656. Satraps of Karia. Pixodaros AR Didrachm. Circa 341-335 BC. Laureate head of Apollo facing, turned slightly to right, drapery tied around neck / Zeus Labraundos standing right holding lotus tipped sceptre and bipennis ; ΠIΞOΔAPOY to right. Pixodarus 25h (A3/P11 – this coin); Babelon, Perses 414-21; Traité II 111; SNG von Aulock 2375-6; SNG Kayhan 891-2; SNG Copenhagen 597. 6.91 g, 20mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautifully toned. Ex Leu 91, 10 May 2004, lot 173; Ex Peus 343, 26 April 1995, lot 150; From the Pixodarus Hoard (CH IX, 421).

92

3,000


657. Karia, Kaunos AR Hemidrachm. Circa 490-470 BC. Winged female figure (Iris?) running right with hands outstretched, looking back / Griffin standing right, foreleg raised, within incuse square. Konuk 36 (O10/R14); Troxell 16 (same dies); SNG Keckman 813; SNG von Aulock 8039. 2.66g, 13mm, 9h. Very Fine. Very rare denomination.

300

Attractive Late Rhodian Tetradrachm

658. Islands off Karia, Rhodos AR Tetradrachm. Cretan War issue. Circa 205-190 BC. Ainetor, magistrate. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly to right / Rose with bud to right, butterfly to left; AINHTOP above, P-O below. Ashton 262; SNG Keckman -; SNG Copenhagen -. 13.37g, 25mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

5,000

One of the final tetradrachm issues at Rhodos.

659. Islands off Karia, Kos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 285-258 BC. Kleinos, magistrate. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion’s skin / Crab, ΚΩΙΟΝ above, ΚΛΕΙΝΟΣ and bow in bowcase below, all within dotted square border. SNG Copenhagen -; BMC -; SNG von Aulock 2753; Dewing 2388. 15.10g, 27mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous surfaces. Very Rare.

3,000

PAMPHYLIA

660 661 660. Pamphylia, Aspendos AR Stater. Circa 400-300 BC. Two wrestlers grappling, NF between / Slinger in throwing stance to right, triskeles in right field, EΣTFEΔIIYΣ to left. SNG Copenhagen 232. 10.86g, 23mm, 12h. Very Fine.

300

661. Pamphylia, Aspendos AR Stater. Circa 375-325 BC. Two naked wrestlers grappling, LF between them / Slinger advancing right about to discharge his shot, triskeles on right, EΣTFEΔIIYΣ on left. SNG Copenhagen 227; SNG von Aulock 4565. 10.76g, 24mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

500

662. Pamphylia, Perge AR Tetradrachm. Circa 200-100 BC. Laureate head of Artemis right, with bow and quiver over shoulder / Artemis standing left, holding sceptre and wreath, deer standing to left, head reverted and uplifted; APTEMIΔOΣ to right, ΠEPΓAIAΣ to left. Colin Series 2, Emission 10 (5.2 / 15.5). 15.16g, 28mm, 12h. About Very Fine.

93

600


CILICIA

663. Cilicia, Satraps. Mazaios AR Stater. Tarsos, circa 361-334 BC. Baaltars seated left, holding eagle, ear of corn and bunch of grapes in right hand, lotus-headed sceptre in left, Aramaic legend ‘BLTRZ’ = Baaltars, to right, Aramaic letters on left and below seat / Lion attacking a bull to left, Aramaic legend above ‘MZDI’ = Mazaios; monogram below. SNG Levante 106. 10.97g, 24mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

BITHYNIA

1,000

Fine Style Portrait of Prusias I

664. Kings of Bithynia. Prusias I AR Tetradrachm. Circa 228-180 BC. Diademed head right / Zeus Stephanophoros standing left; to inner left, eagle standing left on thunderbolt above ME ligate and monogram, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΠΡΟΥΣΙΟΥ to left. BMC 2; Waddington 9b; Jameson 1387; SNG von Aulock 6878. 16.80g, 33mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

665

2,000

666

665. Kings of Bithynia. Nikomedes III Euergetes AR Tetradrachm. Dated 118/117 BC. Diademed head right / Zeus Stephanophoros standing left; to inner left, eagle standing left on thunderbolt above monogram and date (year 180), ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΝΙΚΟΜΗΔΟΥ to left. De Callataÿ D35/R1. 16.75g, 34mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 300 666. Kings of Bithynia. Nikomedes III Euergetes AR Tetradrachm. Dated 107/106 BC. Diademed head right / Zeus Stephanophoros standing left; to inner left, eagle standing left on thunderbolt above monogram and date (year 191), ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΝΙΚΟΜΗΔΟΥ to left. De Callataÿ -; BMC -. 16.87g, 33mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. 300

667

668

667. Kings of Bithynia. Nikomedes III Euergetes AR Tetradrachm. Dated 101/100 BC. Diademed head right / Zeus Stephanophoros standing left; to inner left, eagle standing left on thunderbolt above monogram and date (year 196), ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΝΙΚΟΜΗΔΟΥ to left. De Callataÿ D107/R1. 16.92g, 34mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. 300 668. Kings of Bithynia. Nikomedes III Euergetes AR Tetradrachm. Dated 97-96 BC. Diademed head right / Zeus Stephanophoros standing left; to inner left, eagle standing left on thunderbolt above monogram and date (year 201), ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΝΙΚΟΜΗΔΟΥ to left. De Callataÿ DB3/R1. 16.97g, 32mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. 300

94


PAPHLAGONIA

Homer

669. Paphlagonia, Amastris Æ20. Circa 2nd century AD. OMHPOC, bearded bust of the poet Homer, right / AMATCPIANΩN, River-god Meles reclining left, holding lyre in right hand and reed in left hand; MEΛHC in exergue. SNG Stancomb 1053. 5.23g, 20mm, 8h. Very Fine.

200

PHOENICIA

670. Phoenicia, Arados AR Half-Shekel. Circa 425-400 BC. Merman right, holding dolphin in each hand / Galley to right. BMC p. 1, 1, pl. I, 1; Baramki, pl. XIV, 1. 3.29g, 13mm, 12h. Very Fine.

200

671. Phoenicia, Arados Æ22. Dated year 130 (= 130/129 BC). Turreted head of Tyche right / Poseidon seated left on galley with figurehead of Athena Promachos. HGC 78; Duyrat 2357. 6.29g, 22mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine.

200

KYRENAIKA

672. Kyrenaika, Kyrene AR Obol. Circa 500-480 BC. Silphium plant / Head of Zeus Ammon right, square border of dots. SNG Copenhagen 1181; BMC -. 0.65g, 8mm, 12h. Very Fine.

150

673. Kyrenaika, Kyrene AR Didrachm. Circa 332-313 BC. Head of Apollo Karneios right / Silphium plant, monogram in left field, crab in right field, KY-PA across. SNG Copenhagen 1243; BMC 257. 7.70g, 21mm, 12h. Very Fine. Rare.

500

EGYPT

674. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Ptolemy I, as satrap, AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria, circa 309 BC. Head of deified Alexander right with horn of Ammon, wearing mitra of Dionysos and elephant headdress, aegis around neck / Athena Alkidemos advancing right, brandishing spear in right hand and holding shield on left arm; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOY to left, EY and eagle standing on thunderbolt in right field. Zervos XIV; BMC 11; Kraay/Hirmer 798 var.; SNG Copenhagen 15; Svoronos 42. 15.71g, 26mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

95

750


The Extremely Rare ‘ALEXANDREION’ Issue

675. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Ptolemy I, as satrap, AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria, circa 309 BC. Head of deified Alexander right with horn of Ammon, wearing mitra of Dionysos and elephant headdress, aegis around neck / Athena Alkidemos advancing right, brandishing spear in right hand and holding shield on left arm; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΕΙΟΝ to left, ΑΠ monogram in inner left field, EY above eagle standing on thunderbolt in right field. Zervos Issue XV; Jenkins, ANSMN 9, p. 25, pl. iv, 3; cf. Svoronos 44 (same controls, but ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ). 16.39g, 26mm, 12h. About Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

7,500

Among the first issues of Ptolemy’s Alexander-Athena tetradrachm there exist a small number of coins that bear the remarkable legend ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΕΙΟΝ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ, and an even smaller minority with the legend ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΕΙΟΝ, without the addition of ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ. The significance of these issues has provoked considerable debate; Svoronos proposed that the legend ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΕΙΟΝ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ announced the transfer of Ptolemy’s capital from Memphis to Alexandria, thus interpreting it as ‘Ptolemy’s coin of Alexandria’ - an interpretation supported by both Mørkholm and Price. This argument is however challenged by numerous scholars, backed by literary and papyrological evidence that indicate, as first suggested by Zervos, that the legend should in fact be understood to mean ‘Ptolemy’s coin of Alexander’. Here, ‘of Alexander’ should be understood to reference not only the deified former king, but more importantly the (Attic) weight standard of his coinage. It was Zervos’ hypothesis that since at this time Ptolemy began issuing coins on alternative weight standards, this was a necessary declaration on the coin itself that it corresponded to the standard then in use throughout the rest of the Macedonian territories. Zervos records thirty-two specimens of the ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΕΙΟΝ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ type, and only nineteen of the present type, including both the ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΕΙΟΝ type and the normal ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOY legend (see the following lot). The number of coins bearing this remarkable legend is therefore quite considerably less than the immediately preceding issue bearing Ptolemy’s name. Svoronos records only five examples of this type, all in public institutions. To this point none of the Diadochi, who were then still nominally satraps, had dared to inscribe their own names upon their coinage. That this legend should have been amended shortly afterwards to remove ‘ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ’, as on the present specimen, is perhaps best explained then as a belated realisation that such a brazen display on a satrapal coin could prove dangerously inflammatory.

676. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Ptolemy I, as satrap, AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria, circa 309 BC. Head of deified Alexander right with horn of Ammon, wearing mitra of Dionysos and elephant headdress, aegis around neck / Athena Alkidemos advancing right, brandishing spear in right hand and holding shield on left arm; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOY to left, ΑΠ monogram in inner left field, EY above eagle standing on thunderbolt in right field. Zervos Issue XV; Svoronos 44; SNG Copenhagen –; Boston 2253. 16.64g, 29mm, 12h. About Extremely Fine.

1,000

A Beautiful Stater of Ptolemy I

677. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Ptolemy I Soter, as satrap, AV Stater. In the name and types of Alexander III of Macedon. Memphis or Alexandria mint, circa 323-311 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing single pendant earring, necklace, and triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath in extended right hand, cradling stylis in left arm; AΛEΞANΔPOY to right. Svoronos -; Zervos issue 72; Price 3961. 8.62g, 19mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Fine style, with lustrous metal. Very Rare.

96

4,000


Extremely Rare Signed Die

678. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Ptolemy I Soter, as satrap, AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria, circa 313-312 BC. Head of the deified Alexander III to right, wearing mitra of Dionysos and elephant skin headdress, with aegis around his neck, and with horn of Ammon on his forehead; small K between elephant’s ear and aegis / Athena Promachos advancing right, hurling spear with her right hand and with shield over her extended left arm; AΛEΞANΔPOY to left, eagle with closed wings standing on thunderbolt to right with ΔI below. Svoronos 33α (K not noted); Zervos Issue 16, obv. die 273; SNG Copenhagen –; BMC 12 corr. (control marks). 16.37g, 28mm, 12h. About Extremely Fine, rev. porous. Extremely Rare with the K signature mark - 9 examples from 2 obverse dies noted by Zervos.

7,500

There are very few instances of signed dies known for Alexander, though one of these, a lifetime drachm struck at Miletos, is also signed ‘K’ (Price 2090A; ADM I 80); we might speculate that this could represent the work of the same individual, though of course this is far from certain. From a private German collection; Ex CNG 90, 23 May 2012, lot 761; Ex Roma Numismatics II, 2 October 2011, lot 337.

679. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Ptolemy II Philadelphos, with Arsinöe II, Ptolemy I, and Berenike I AV Half Mnaïeion (Tetradrachm). Alexandria, circa 270-260 BC. Conjoined busts of diademed and draped Ptolemy II, and diademed and veiled Arsinöe II right; AΔEΛΦΩN above, Gallic shield behind / Conjoined busts of diademed and draped Ptolemy I, and diademed and veiled Berenike I; ΘEΩN above. Svoronos 604; SNG Copenhagen 133; Noeske 38; Boston MFA 2275; Dewing 2753-4. 13.91g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

5,000

680. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Arsinöe II Philadelphos AV Mnaïeion (Oktadrachm). Struck under Ptolemy VI-VIII. Alexandria, circa 180-116 BC. Head right, veiled and wearing stephane; lotus-tipped sceptre in background, K behind / APΣINOHΣ ΦIΛAΔEΛΦOY, double cornucopiae, grape bunches hanging at sides, bound with fillet. Svoronos 1242, 1374, and 1498–9; SNG Copenhagen 321–2; Noeske –; Boston MFA 2293 and 2298. 27.71g, 28mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

7,000

681. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Ptolemy VI Philometor AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria, circa 180-170 BC. Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis knotted round neck / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ around. Svoronos 1489; SNG Copenhagen 265. 14.20g, 28mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

97

750


A Beautiful Portrait of Cleopatra

682. Cleopatra VII Æ Diobol of Alexandria, Egypt. 51-30 BC. Diademed and draped bust right / KΛEOΠATPAΣ BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae to left, Π to right. Svoronos 1871; Weiser 183; SNG Copenhagen 419-21; Noeske 380-2. 20.83g, 28mm, 12h. Good Very Fine, earthen highlights.

7,500

The bronze coinage of Cleopatra, unlike the silver tetradrachms issued from Antioch which bear the image of Marc Antony on the reverse, presents us with a more accurate depiction of this queen who so captivated two of Rome’s most powerful statesmen. On those tetradrachms, Cleopatra’s face takes on the distinctive features of Antony with the result that she seems stern and matronly, with the (unfair) semblance of many additional years behind her. In contrast we see here a softer, more feminine portrait that is more representative of the queen’s true appearance, as corroborated by other artefacts such as the famous bust in the Altes Museum, Berlin. The bronze portrait of Cleopatra is unfortunately nearly always found in worn condition; the present example is exceptional not only on account of the sensitive treatment of her portrait on the obverse, but also because the reverse legend KΛEOΠATPAΣ BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ is complete and fully legible. Furthermore, due in great part to the desirability of the issue and its normally poor to average state, many coins of this type are lamentably tooled or heavily smoothed to enhance the detail; remarkably, this specimen displays an untouched patina.

PERSIA Rare Greco-Persian Wars Daric

683. Persia, Achaemenid Empire AV Daric. Time of Darios I-Xerxes I, circa 505-480 BC. Great King of Persia in kneeling-running pose right, shooting bow / Incuse punch. Carradice Type II (pl. XI, 11); BMC Arabia -; SNG Copenhagen -. 8.31g, 16mm. Extremely Fine. Rare.

684

3,000

685

684. Persia, Achaemenid Empire AV Daric. Time of Darios I-Xerxes I, circa 505-480 BC. Great King of Persia in kneeling-running pose right, shooting bow / Incuse punch. Carradice Type II (pl. XI, 11); BMC Arabia -; SNG Copenhagen -. 8.35g, 16mm. Good Very Fine. Rare. 2,500 685. Persia, Achaemenid Empire AV Daric. Time of Darios I-Xerxes I, circa 505-480 BC. Great King of Persia in kneeling-running pose right, shooting bow / Incuse punch. Carradice Type II (pl. XI, 11); BMC Arabia -; SNG Copenhagen -. 8.35g, 16mm. Very Fine. Rare. 2,250

98


686. Persia, Achaemenid Empire AV Daric. Time of Artaxerxes II or Artaxerxes III AV Daric. Circa 400-350 BC. Great King of Persia in kneelingrunning pose right, wearing kidaris, holding bow in his left hand and spear with his right / Rectangular incuse punch. BMC 78ff; Carradice, The ‘Regal’ Coinage of the Persian Empire, CAAPE, Pl. XIII, 50-51. 8.33g, 16mm. Very Fine.

2,000

687. Persia, Alexandrine Empire AV Double Daric. Babylon, circa 331-311 BC. Great King of Persia in kneeling-running pose right, wearing turreted crown and quiver over shoulder, holding bow in left hand and transverse, apple tipped spear in left / Oblong incuse, bilaterally striated. Dewing 2676; BMC 3. 16.71g, 18mm. Very Fine. Very Rare.

3,000

SELEUKID KINGDOM

688. Seleucid Kingdom. Seleukos I Nikator, as satrap, AV Stater. Babylon, circa 311-300 BC. In the name and types of Alexander III. Head of Athena right, wearing single pendant earring, necklace, and triple-crested Corinthian helmet adorned with a serpent / BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY, Nike standing left, holding wreath in extended right hand, cradling stylis in left arm; H below left wing, monogram in wreath below right wing. SC 81.7; Price 3707; HGC 9, 3a; SNG Saroglos 159. 8.58g, 18mm, 1h. Extremely Fine.

2,500

689. Seleucid Kingdom. Seleukos I Nikator, as satrap, AV Stater. Babylon, circa 311-300 BC. In the name and types of Alexander III. Head of Athena right, wearing single pendant earring, necklace, and triple-crested Corinthian helmet adorned with a serpent / BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY, Nike standing left, holding wreath in extended right hand, cradling stylis in left arm; monogram in wreath in left field, H below left wing. SC 81.10 corr. (griffin on helmet); Price 3717 corr. (same); HGC 9, 3a; SNG Saroglos –. 8.53g, 19mm, 3h. Very Fine.

690

2,000

691

690. Seleukid Kingdom. Seleukos I Nikator AR Tetradrachm. 312-281 BC. Seleukeia on the Tigris, circa 300-281 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding sceptre, ΣEΛEYKOY to right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ below; monogram in left field; ΔI monogram below throne. SC 117.1c. 17.07g, 28mm, 4h. Extremely Fine.

1,500

691. Seleukid Kingdom. Seleukos I Nikator AR Tetradrachm. 312-281 BC. Seleukeia on the Tigris, circa 300-281 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding sceptre, ΣEΛEYKOY to right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ below; monogram in left field; ΔI monogram below throne. SC 117.1c. 17.00g, 27mm, 6h. Very Fine.

99

1,000


A Victory Over Macedonians

692.

Seleukid Kingdom. Seleukos I Nikator AR Tetradrachm. Susa, circa 300-294 BC. Head of Seleukos I right, wearing helmet covered with panther skin and adorned with bull’s ears and horns, panther skin tied around neck / Nike standing right, wearing peplos, crowning trophy of Macedonian arms set on sapling tree, from which branch sprouts near base; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ around, E-ΔI in fields. SC 173.11; ESM 413; Hoover 20 var. (different monograms). 17.07g, 27mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Superb style.

10,000

The trophy series of Seleukos was issued over an extended period, and used 67 obverse dies and at least 93 reverses that we are aware of. The type is generally assumed to commemorate the victories of Seleukos as he pushed eastwards into India, occupying territory as far as the Indus, and eventually waging war against the Mauryan Empire. This campaign against Chandragupta Maurya was however a failure. While there is no record of what transpired to prevent Seleukos achieving his aims, the two leaders eventually reached an accord whereby Seleukos ceded some of his easternmost territory in exchange for a gift of 500 war elephants. The massive beasts were to play a significant role in the coming wars of the Diadochi, in particular at the Battle of Ipsos in 301 BC. The assertion that the trophy reverse commemorates a victory by Seleukos in the east or in the Upper Satrapies, and his subsequent assumption of a the royal title in 305/4 BC is problematic. The dating of the issue was proposed by Kritt (The Early Seleucid Mint of Susa, 1997) and subsequently accepted by the numismatic community seemingly without question. Moreover, the important detail of the trophy’s composition is ignored. The trophy is unquestionably built from Macedonian arms, as evidenced by the Vergina Sun (or Argead Star) clearly emblazoned on the shield. That this should therefore represent an eastern victory is impossible, particularly given the inconclusive nature of Seleukos’ campaign against Chandragupta, and its stale conclusion. The issue bears far more significance when viewed in the context of a victory over other Macedonians - for which we should look to the battle of Ipsos, in which Seleukos’ elephants played a decisive role in the victory over Antigonos.

100


101


693

694

693. Seleukid Kingdom. Seleukos I Nikator AR Tetradrachm. Sardes, circa 282-281 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Nikephoros seated left, ΣEΛEYKOY to right, BAΣΙΛEΩΣ below; monogram in left field, AΣ below throne. SC 3.3a. 17.20g, 26mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

694. Seleukid Kingdom. Antiochos II Theos AR Tetradrachm. Laodikeia ad Mare, circa 261-246 BC. In the name and types of Seleukos I. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / ΣEΛEYKOY to right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue; Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, dolphin left above monogram; monogram below throne. SC 576 var. (unpublished controls). 17.02g, 28mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine. Unpublished with these control marks.

750

Attractive Early Portrait of Seleukos II

695. Seleukid Kingdom. Seleukos II Kallinikos AR Tetradrachm. Sardes, circa 246/5 BC. Diademed head right / Apollo standing left, testing arrow and leaning on tall tripod, BAΣIΛEΩΣ to left, ΣEΛEYKOY to right; monogram to inner left. Cf. SC 654.5, 655.1 for occurrence of same control, different placement, combined with other marks. 16.51g, 28mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

1,500

The present tetradrachm is of significant iconographic interest, presenting a portrait of Seleukos II that is possessed of unusually great aesthetic quality, and which differed considerably in style and appearance from all other depictions of the king. Houghton and Lorber consider that the early issues of the Sardes mint may be ordered by virtue of stylistic development, and place the large portrait heads which most closely resemble in scale the Sardian portraits of Antiochos II, at the start of the series. Seleukos II is here depicted not as the youthful king whose boyish features normally appear on his coinage; rather we are confronted with a mature visage bearing stern features vaguely reminiscent of his father, but startlingly far closer in resemblance to the face of his great-grandfather Seleukos I. It is far from unreasonable to suppose that the accession of the new king should stir recollection of the deeds of his namesake, the first and greatest of the Seleukids. That the artist responsible for this die should thus have looked to the founder of the dynasty for direct inspiration could perhaps be explained as fanciful licence, but more likely it is intended as a deliberate association between Seleukos Nikator and the newly crowned king - a hopeful augury for a glorious reign. Houghton and Lorber posit that placing the issues of Seleukos with sideburns first in the series would provide better control linkage with the last Sardian coinage of Antiochos II. If indeed these issues should be regarded as the first coinage of Seleukos II at Sardes, this presents a further possible explanation for the present portrait: it is quite possible that the mint was not yet in possession of an image of Seleukos II from which to work, and that an idealised representation incorporating the features of his great-grandfather was thus a necessary but fitting expedient.

696

697

696. Seleukid Kingdom. Seleukos II Kallinikos AR Tetradrachm. Nisibis, circa 246-225 BC. Diademed head right / Apollo standing left, testing arrow and leaning on tall tripod, BAΣIΛEΩΣ to left, ΣEΛEYKOY to right; monograms to outer left and right. SC 749.1. 16.88g, 28mm, 5h. Very Fine.

300

697. Seleucid Kingdom. Alexander I Balas AR Tetradrachm. Antioch, dated SE 165 (148-147 BC). Diademed head right / Zeus Nikephoros seated left; monogram to inner left, EΞP (date) and monogram in exergue. SC 1784. 16.26g, 29mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

102

500


698

699

698. Seleukid Kingdom. Demetrios II AR Tetradrachm. First reign. Antioch, dated SE 168 (145-144 BC). Diademed head right / Nude Apollo seated left on omphalos, holding arrow in right hand, left hand resting on bow; palm to outer left, monograms to inner left, K between legs, ΗΞΡ (date) in exergue. SNG Spaer 1601 var. (monogram between legs); SMA 207; Houghton -. 16.46g, 29mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. 400 699. Seleukid Kingdom. Antiochos VII Euergetes (Sidetes) AR Tetradrachm. Cappadocian mint, circa 138-129 BC. Posthumous issue. Diademed head right / Athena Nikephoros standing left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY to right, EϒΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ to left; to outer left, monogram above A; O to inner left, Λ to inner right; all within laurel wreath. SC 2148; HGC 9, 1069. 16.64g, 28mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. 500

Extremely Rare Hadad Issue of Antiochos XII

700. Seleukid Kingdom. Antiochos XII AR Tetradrachm. Damascus, dated year 227 (86/85 BC). Diademed head right / Cult statue of Hadad standing facing on double basis, flanked by two bull foreparts, holding grain stalk in right hand; BAΣIΛEΩS ANTIOXOY ΔIONYΣOY to right, EΠIΦANOYΣ ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ KAΛΛINIKOY to left, monogram and SKC in exergue; all within a laurel wreath. SC 2472A; SNG Spaer -; Houghton & Spaer -; Newell, LSM -; Houghton -; CNG 79, 17 September 2008, 429 (same obverse die). 15.83g, 28mm, 12h. Extremely Rare - apparently only the second known example.

5,000

This type has been suggested to very likely be the rarest ‘type’ in the entire Seleukid series, with less than ten ‘Hadad’ coins known to exist, two of which (including the present specimen) are the only silver coins known to bear Antiochos’ epithet ‘Dionysos’, which is otherwise only found on his bronze coinage. The Seleukid Kingdom in the time of Antiochos XII was a shadow of its former self, reduced to Atioch and a few Syrian cities. Antiochos ruled a southern separatist realm centred on Damascus, and was the last Seleukid ruler of any military reputation. Attempting to halt the rise of the Nabataeans, Antiochos was killed in battle, resulting in the loss of Damascus. The appearance of a Semitic deity with Assyrian/Babylonian origins on the reverse of this coin reflects the prevalence of Hadad’s cult in Syria well into the first century AD; this storm god was equated with Zeus by the Greeks, and later by the Romans with Jupiter Dolichenus. The god appears on coinage as late as 208/9 AD, and organised worship of Hadad is known to have continued well into the third century AD, probably surviving in isolated pockets until much later.

ELYMAIS

Very Rare Tetradrachm of Kamnaskires III

701. Kings of Elymais. Kamnaskires III, with Anzaze, AR Tetradrachm. Circa 82-75 BC. Conjoined busts left of Kamnaskires and Queen Anzaze; monogram above anchor symbol behind; countermark: Nike standing left / Zeus seated left, holding sceptre and Nike, who crowns him, MAKEΔΩN before; IΛCIΛEΩC KΛMNΛIKIPOY KΛI IΛIIΛIICHC ANZAZH (BAΣIΛEΩΣ KAMNΣKIROY KAI BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ ANZAZHΣ) around, date in exergue. BMC 245/1; Alram 454. 15.96g, 29mm, 12h. Extremely Fine, struck on sound metal and exceptionally well preserved and detailed for the issue. Very Rare.

4,000

The Kingdom of Elymais may be simply described as the land between Babylonia and Persis, though very little is known today it or its kings. For approximately a century after the disintegration of Alexander’s empire, the principle city of this region, Susa, and the surrounding lands were ruled by the Seleukids. After Seleukia itself, Susa was the second largest city in Seleukid control. Even after the Parthian conquest of the region, Susa retained a considerable degree of autonomy, maintaining its Greek city-state organization and eventually gaining apparent independence in 147 BC under Kamnaskires I Megas Soter, whose coins depict him as a Greek prince in Seleukid style, with Greek legends. Over time however, the Greek influence in Elymais appears to have significantly diminished, with both Greek legends and portraiture becoming increasingly blundered, until finally we see the sixth king of this dynasty, Kamnaskires III and his wife and co-regent Anzazes, in distinctly Parthian style.

103


SASSANIAN KINGDOM

703 704 702 Sasanian Kingdom. Ardashir I AR Drachm. AD 224-240. Bust right, wearing diadem and close-fitting headdress and korymbos and no earflaps / Fire altar with flames and diadems. SNS I, Type III. 3.84g, 25mm, 9h. Very Fine.

100

703 Kushano-Sassanian Kings of India. Vahram I AR Drachm. 325-350 AD. Crowned bust of king right, wearing crown with korymbos and flying ribbons / Fire altar flanked by attendants; legend below altar. Göbl, Hunnen, 8. 3.78g, 30mm, 3h. Very Fine. 704 No lot.

100

JUDAEA The Menorah and Showbread Table

705. Mattatayah Antigonus Æ Prutah. Circa 40-37 BC. Traces of paleo-Hebrew (Mattatayah the Priest) around showbread table / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIΓONOY; seven-branched menorah. Hendin 1168; TJC 41; AJC I Group Z; Samuels 46 (this coin). 1.54g, 16mm, 12h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

12,500

This coin represents what it probably the most important type in Jewish numismatics. Struck towards the end of his doomed conflict with Herod, this type was issued by Mattathias Antigonos whilst besieged in Jerusalem. During the Second Temple period, depictions of these most sacred of artifacts were prohibited, thus their appearance on this coinage was both unprecedented and extremely significant. A member of the Hasmonean dynasty and High Priest, Mattathias must have intended this coinage to serve an inspirational function. The showbread table and menorah are direct references to the temple itself, and are probably intended to instill in the populace a fear that these holy objects might fall into the hands of the besieging army. This army, though nominally commanded by Herod who was himself a Jew, was largely a Roman force sent by Marc Antony, and led by Gaius Sosius. That the showbread table and the menorah could fall into Roman hands would have been unthinkable, and indeed during the assault of the city the defenders fought bitterly until they were driven back into the Temple’s inner court and overrun by Roman troops. Only by bribing Sosius and his officers was Herod able to spare the temple from being sacked. That such important types should be struck on flans far smaller than the dies is perhaps disappointing, but not at all surprising given the siege conditions of its issue and the lack of provisions and material within the city. As a depiction of the menorah though, this type is of the greatest importance and interest. Its form here is identical to its appearance on the Arch of Titus in Rome as it was carried in triumphal procession following the sack of Jerusalem in AD 70.

706. Claudius Æ22 of Caesaraea Panias, Judaea. AD 41-54. Laureate head right / Anchor within wreath. RPC 4848; Rosenberger 1; BMC 3. 10.79g, 22mm, 12h. Very Fine. Rare.

104

1,000


707. Judaea, First Jewish War AR Shekel. Dated year 2 (AD 67/8). Hebrew script (SHKL YSHRAL) “Shekel of Israel”, and date above Omer cup with beaded rim / Hebrew script (YROSHLM H GDSHEH) “Jerusalem the Holy”, sprig of three pomegranates. Hendin 1358; Meshorer AJC II p. 260, 8. 13.59g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous surfaces.

3,000

708. Trajan Æ30 of Caesarea Maritima, Judaea. AD 98-117. Laureate head right, slight drapery on far shoulder / Tetrastyle temple, Tyche standing left within, holding bust and sceptre. Half-length figure of river-god to right, altar before temple recess. Kadman 22; Rosenberger 19; SNG ANS 761; Hendin 835. 24.87g, 30mm, 1h. Very Fine.

500

709 710 709. Trajan Æ16 of Tiberias, Judaea. Year 90 (= AD 108/9). Laureate head right / Anchor. Rosenberger 10. 2.33g, 16mm, 12h. Very Fine.

200

710. Judaea, Bar Kokhba Revolt AR Zuz. Year 2 (= AD 133/134). SM’ within wreath / Jug with lulav. Mildenberg 31; AJC 250b; Hendin 1391. 3.19g, 18mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

750

711. Judaea, Bar Kokhba Revolt AR Zuz. Year 2 (= AD 133/134). Bunch of grapes / Lulav. Mildenberg 40; AJC 248; Hendin 1394. 3.24g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

750

712. Judaea, Bar Kokhba Revolt AR Zuz. AD 132-136. SIMON within wreath / Jug with lulav. Mildenberg 107; AJC 274; Hendin 1422. 3.01g, 18mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Lightly toned.

105

750


106


THE ROMAN REPUBLIC

713. Anonymous AR Didrachm. Uncertain mint (Neapolis?), circa 275-270 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left, ROMANO before / Horse galloping right, star of eight rays above. Crawford 15/1a; HN Italy 275. 7.35g, 21mm, 9h. Very Fine. Rare.

1,000

714. Anonymous AR Didrachm. Uncertain mint, 225-214 BC. Laureate head of Janus / Jupiter, holding thunderbolt and sceptre in quadriga right, driven by Victory; ROMA incuse on tablet below. Crawford 28/3; Sydenham 64; RSC 24. 5.90g, 23mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

500

715. Anonymous AR Didrachm. Uncertain mint, 225-214 BC. Laureate head of Janus / Jupiter, holding thunderbolt and sceptre in quadriga right, driven by Victory; ROMA incuse on tablet below. Crawford 30/1; Sydenham 64. 6.34g, 24mm, 7h. Very Fine.

300

Bold Head of Mars

716. Anonymous AV 60 As. After 211 BC. Bearded and draped head of Mars right, wearing Corinthian helmet; mark of value ↓X below / Eagle standing right, with spread wings, on thunderbolt; ROMA below. Sydenham 226; Bahrfeldt 4.24 and pl. I, 24 (these dies); Crawford 44/2. 3.36g, 15mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Ex NAC 51, 5 March 2009, lot 5; Ex Gorny & Mosch Auction 138, 7 March 2005, lot 183.

107

7,500


717. Anonymous AR Denarius. Rome, from 211 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; X behind / Dioscuri riding right, ROMA in linear border in exergue. Sydenham 167; Crawford 44/5. 4.33g, 20mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautiful iridescent toning.

1,000

718. Anonymous AR Quinarius. Rome, from 211 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind / The Dioscuri riding right, ROMA within linear frame. Crawford 44/6. 1.97g, 18mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone.

300

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

719. ROMA Series AR Quinarius. South East Italian mint, 211-210 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, V behind / The Dioscuri riding right, ROMA ligate below, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 84/2. 2.06g, 15mm, 3h. Very Fine.

200

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

720. L Series AR Victoriatus. Luceria, 211-208 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right / Victory crowning trophy, L between, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 97/1b. 3.33g, 17mm, 11h. Extremely Fine.

300

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

721. L Series Æ Sextans. Luceria, 211-208 BC. Head of Mercury right, L below, two pellets above / Prow right, ROMA above, two pellets below. Crawford 97/6a. 10.04g, 24mm, 3h. Very Fine. Very Rare. From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

108

250


722. L Series Æ Dextans. Luceria, 211-208 BC. Head of Ceres right / Victory in quadriga right, L above, ROMA below horses, S and four pellets in exergue. Crawford 97/16. 21.56g, 34mm, 3h. Near Good Fine. Extremely Rare.

500

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

723. Spearhead Series AR Denarius. South East Italian mint, 209 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind / The Dioscuri riding right, spearhead below, ROMA in exergue. 2.94g, 18mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Pleasant lustre. From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

300

724. Cornucopiae Series AR Denarius. Rome, 207 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind / The Dioscuri riding right, cornucopiae below, ROMA in linear frame. Crawford 58/2. 3.88g, 19mm, 2h. Good Very Fine.

300

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

725. Trident Series AR Denarius. Rome, 206-195 BC. Helmeted head of Roma, X behind / The Dioscuri riding right, trident right below horses, ROMA within linear frame in exergue. Crawford 115/1; Sydenham 268-268a; BMC Rome 442-5 and Italy 302-3; Kestner 1310-5; RSC (Anonymous) 20ii. 3.99g, 18mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

750

Ex Sotheby’s, 4 December 1986, lot 35.

726. A. Terentius Varro AR Denarius. Uncertain mint, 206-200 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind / The Dioscuri riding right, VAR monogram below, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 126/1. 3.42g, 20mm, 2h. Very Fine.

109

300


727. Staff and Feather Series AR Denarius. Uncertain mint, 206-200 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, with curl on left shoulder; staff before, X behind / The Dioscuri riding right, feather below, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 130/1a. 3.15g, 18mm, 9h. Very Fine.

200

728. Sextus Quinctilius AR Denarius. Rome, 189-180 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, curl on left shoulder / The Dioscuri riding right, SX Q below, ROMA in linear frame. Crawford 152/1b. 3.97g, 19mm, 3h. Very Fine.

300

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

729. Juventius Thalna AR Denarius. Rome, 179-170 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind / Luna in biga right, TAL ligate below, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 161/1. 3.73g, 19mm, 9h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

300

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

730. ‘Matienus’ AR Denarius. Rome, 179-170 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind / The Dioscuri riding right, MAT monogram below, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 162/2a. 3.64g, 19mm, 11h. Good Fine.

150

731. Helmet Series AR Victoriatus. Rome, 179-170 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right / Victory standing right, crowning trophy; helmet between, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 168/1. 2.95g, 17mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

300

732. C. Juventius Thalna AR Denarius. Rome, 154 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind / Victory in biga right, C TAL ligate below, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 202/1a. 3.92g, 19mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

110

300


733. C. Terentius Lucanus AR Denarius. Rome, 147 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; X and Victory behind / The Dioscuri riding right, C TER LVC below. Crawford 217/1; RSC Terentia 10. 3.78g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Vivid toning.

300

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

734. M. Aurelius Cotta AR Denarius. Rome, 139 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, COTA below chin, X behind / Hercules, holding club and reins, driving galloping biga of centaurs right, the centaurs each carrying branch; M. AVRELI below, ROMA in linear border in exergue. Crawford 229/1a. 3.77g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

750

735. M. Marcius M. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 134 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, XVI monogram below chin, modius behind / Victory in biga right, M MARC ROMA in two lines below horses, divided by two ears of corn. Marcia 8; Crawford 245/1; Sydenham 500. 3.96g, 19mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

736. M. Furius L. f. Philus AR Denarius. Rome, 120 BC. M FOVRI L F, laureate head of Janus / Roma standing left, holding spear and crowning trophy of Gallic arms with wreath; star above, ROMA to right, PHLI in exergue. Crawford 281/1; Sydenham 529; Furia 18. 3.91g, 19mm, 7h. Extremely Fine, excellent for the type. Lightly toned.

750

737. L. Cosconius, L. Licinius and Cn. Domitius AR Serrate Denarius. Narbo, 118 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind, L COS CO M F around / Warrior in biga right, holding shield, carnyx and reins, hurling spear, L LIC CN DOM in exergue. Crawford 282/2. 3.92g, 20mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

111

300


738. Cn. Cornelius L. f. Sisena AR Denarius. Rome, 118-107 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, SISENA behind, ROMA before, X below chin / Jupiter in quadriga right, holding sceptre and reins and hurling thunderbolt, star on either side, head of Sol and crescent above, anguipede giant holding thunderbolt below, CN CORNEL L F in exergue. 3.46g, 21mm, 12h. Near Good Fine. Very Rare.

200

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

739. M. Sergius Silus AR Denarius. Rome 116-115 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; ROMA and XVI monogram behind / Soldier on horseback rearing left, holding sword and severed head of barbarian; Q M SERGI below, SILVS in exergue. Crawford 286/1; RSC Sergia 1. 3.89g, 20mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine. Very good for the type.

300

740. Anonymous AR Denarius. Rome, 115-114 BC. Head of Roma right, wearing winged and crested helmet, hair falling in two locks down neck, X behind, ROMA below / Roma, helmeted, seated right on two shields, holding spear before her; wolf standing right at her feet, head turned back, suckling Romulus and Remus, in left and right fields, two birds flying towards her. Crawford 287/1; Sydenham 530; Kestner 2478-81; BMC Italy 562-5; RSC (Anonymous) 176. 3.92g, 21mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

500

Ex NAC 4, 27 February 1991, lot 191.

741. Anonymous AR Denarius. Rome, 115-114 BC. Head of Roma right, wearing winged and crested helmet, hair falling in two locks down neck, X behind, ROMA below / Roma, helmeted, seated right on two shields, holding spear before her; wolf standing right at her feet, head turned back, suckling Romulus and Remus, in left and right fields, two birds flying towards her. Crawford 287/1; Sydenham 530; Kestner 2478-81; BMC Italy 562-5; RSC (Anonymous) 176. 4.04g, 20mm, 9h. Good Very Fine.

300

742. L. Manlius Torquatus AR Denarius. Rome, 113-112 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, ROMA behind, X below chin, torque as border / Horseman charging left, L TORQVA below, Q above, EX S C in exergue. Crawford 295/1; Sydenham 545. 3.92g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine; attractive toning around the devices. Rare.

112

500


743. L. Thorius Balbus AR Denarius. Rome, 105 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right wearing goat’s skin, I. S. M. R. behind / Bull charging right, P above, L. THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue. Thoria 1; Crawford 316/1; Sydenham 598. 4.00g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Iridescent toning.

400

744. Q. Minucius Thermus M. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 103 BC. Helmeted head of Mars left / Two warriors in combat, one on left protecting a fallen man; Q TERM MF in exergue. Sydenham 592; Crawford 319/1. 3.88g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

250

745. Q. Minucius Thermus M. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 103 BC. Helmeted bust of Mars left / Two warriors in combat, one on left protecting a fallen man; Q TERM MF in exergue. Sydenham 592; Crawford 319/1. 3.86g, 19mm, 10h. Extremely Fine.

500

Very Rare Social War Issue

746. The Social War, Marsic Confederation. C. Papius C.f. Mutilus AR Denarius. Circa 90 BC. Helmeted head of Italia right, wreath and star behind, legend below / The Dioscuri galloping apart, with spears reverted, Oscan legend ‘C. PAAPI C’ below. Sydenham 635; HN Italy 426c; Campana 4. 3.89g, 20mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

5,000

Marcus Livius Drusus, who was Tribune of the Plebeians in 91 BC, attempted to bring Roman citizenship to the Italian allies. This, along with his land reform proposals, proved unpopular with the Senate and Roman landowners and he was assassinated before his plans were actioned. With the promise of citizenship rights removed, a rebellion of the Italian allies began, known as the Social War (cf. Livy, Periochae 71). During this war, the allies struck coins which were often inspired by the types found on Roman denarii, with some, like the present example, detailing the names of the rebel generals.

747. L. Titurius L. f. Sabinus AR Denarius. Rome, 89 BC. Bearded head of King Tatius right, SABIN downwards behind, monogram before / Rape of the Sabine women, LTITVRI in exergue. Crawford 344/1a; Sydenham 698; Tituria 1. 3.83g, 20mm, 8h. Extremely Fine.

113

300


748. C. Norbanus AR Denarius. Rome, 83 BC. Diademed head of Venus right, C. NORBANVS below, LVII behind / Ear of barley, fasces, and caduceus. Crawford 357/1b; Sydenham 739. 3.92g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

Ex Harlan J Berk 166, 15 October 2009, lot 241.

749. L. Manlius and L. Cornelius Sulla AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Sulla, 82 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, L. MANLI before, PRO. Q behind / Sulla in quadriga right, L. SVLLA IM in exergue. Manlia 4; Crawford 367/5; Sydenham 757. 4.02g, 17mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Iridescent toning.

300

750. Q. Fabius Maximus AR Denarius. Rome, 82-80 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, Q MAX (MA ligate) below, ROMA behind, lyre before / Cornucopiae over thunderbolt, all within wreath. Crawford 371/1; Sydenham 718. 3.76g, 17mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Scarce.

300

751. A. Postumius A. f. Sp. n. Albinus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 81 BC. Draped bust of Diana right, with bow and quiver over shoulder, bucranium above / Togate figure standing left on rock, holding aspergillum over bull, between them, lighted altar, A POST A F S N ALBIN around. Postumia 7; Sydenham 745; Crawford 372/1. 3.87g, 19mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Old cabinet tone with blue and gold iridescent highlights. Light marks on reverse.

300

752. A. Postumius A. f. Sp. n. Albinus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 81 BC. Draped bust of Diana right, with bow and quiver over shoulder, bucranium above / Togate figure standing left on rock, holding aspergillum over bull, between them, lighted altar, A POST A F S N ALBIN around. Postumia 7; Sydenham 745; Crawford 372/1. 4.06g, 19mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

400

753. A. Postumius A. f. Sp. n. Albinus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 81 BC. Veiled head of Hispania right, HISPAN behind / Togate figure standing left, raising hand; legionary eagle to left; fasces with axe to right. Crawford 372/2; RSC Postumia 8. 4.05g, 19mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

114

400


754. C. Poblicius Q. f. AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 80 BC. Draped bust of Roma right, helmet decorated with corn ears and control mark above head, ROMA behind / Hercules strangling the Nemean lion, club at his feet, bow and arrow on left, C. POBLICI. Q. F on right. Poblicia 9; Crawford 80/1; Sydenham 768. 3.91g, 20mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine. Lustrous.

900

755. C. Naevius Balbus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Diademed head of Venus right, SC behind, C below chin / Victory in triga right, C NAE BALB in exergue. Crawford 382/1a; Sydenham 769. 3.75g, 18mm, 5h. Very Fine.

200

756. C. Naevius Balbus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Diademed head of Venus right, SC behind / Victory in triga right, CXXVII above, C NAE BALB in exergue. Crawford 382/1b; Sydenham 769. 3.84g, 20mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

300

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

757. L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; aplustre behind / Griffin springing right; prow of galley below. Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1. 3.98g, 18mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Pleasant toning.

500

758. L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; writing tablet behind / Griffin springing right; scrinium below. Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1. 3.83g, 21mm, 8h. Good Extremely Fine. Struck on a large flan. Ex Frank Sternberg Auction 23, 29 October 2000, lot 391; Ex NAC 5, 25 February 1992, lot 310.

115

750


759. L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; two flutes behind / Griffin springing right; pan pipes below. Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1. 4.01g, 19mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

300

Ex Gorny & Mosch Auction 97, 1999, lot 554.

760. L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; sack behind / Griffin springing right; aryballos with handles below. Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1. 3.84g, 18mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin.

750

761. L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; aryballos behind / Griffin springing right; strigil below. Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1. 3.81g, 19mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Small corrosion spot on reverse; toned.

500

Ex Auction AG Basel 13, 1983, lot 540.

762. L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; bucket with handle behind / Griffin springing right; wineskin below. Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1. 3.98g, 20mm, 9h. Good Very Fine.

300

Ex Münzen & Medaillen Auction 1 1997, lot 622.

763. L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; fishtail behind / Griffin springing right; fish below. Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1. 4.03g, 18mm, 4h. Near Extremely Fine.

400

764. L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; harpa behind / Griffin springing right; dragon’s head below. Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1. 3.79g, 19mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

116

500


765. L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; symbol behind / Griffin springing right; symbol below. Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1. 3.93g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautiful iridescent toning.

1,250

766. L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; harp behind / Griffin springing right; instrument below. Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1. 4.08g, 18mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

Ex Numismatik Lanz 50, 1989, lot 506.

767. M. Volteius M. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 75 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right / Capitoline temple, M VOLTEI M F below. Crawford 385/1. 3.79g, 17mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine. Attractive golden tone on reverse.

450

Ex Hess-Divo 314, 4 May 2009, lot 1365; Ex Numismatik Lanz 48, 22 May 1989, lot 486.

768. L. Plaetorius L. f. Cestianus AR Denarius. Rome, 74 BC. Diademed and draped bust of Juno Moneta right, MONETA behind / Victorious boxer running right, holding caestus and palm branch, L PLAETORI to left, L F Q SC to right, control mark below. Sydenham 792a; Crawford 396/1b. 3.44g, 18mm, 5h. Good Fine. Rare.

200

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

769. M. Plaetorius M. f. Cestianus AR Denarius. Rome, 69 BC. Female bust left, hair confined in hairnet, control-mark behind / Pediment of temple, within pediment, anguipede figure holding cornucopiae, M PLAETORI on entablature; CEST S C in exergue. Plaetoria 9b; BMC 3521; Sydenham 800; Crawford 405/1b. 3.45g, 18mm, 9h. Fine. Very Rare. From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

117

200


770. M. Plaetorius M. f. Cestianus AR Denarius. Rome, 69 BC. Male head right, with flowing hair, control mark behind / Winged caduceus, M PLAETORI on left, CEST EX SC on right. Crawford 405/5. 3.70g, 18mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive underlying lustre.

500

771. Q. Pomponius Musa AR Denarius. Rome, 66 BC. Laureate head of Apollo, star behind / Urania standing left, holding rod and pointing to globe resting on tripod, Q POMPONI on right, MVSA on left. Crawford 410/8. 3.90g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

750

772. L. Manlius Torquatus AR Denarius. Rome, 65 BC. Head of Sibyl right, wearing ivy-wreath, [SIBVLLA below] / Tripod on which stands amphora, star on either side, L TORQVAT to left, III VIR to right, torque as border. Crawford 411/1. 3.86g, 17mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

773. L. Cassius Longinus AR Denarius. Rome, 63 BC. Head of Vesta left, wearing veil and diadem, kylix behind, control mark before / LONGIN III V, voter left, dropping tablet marked ‘V’ into cista on right. Crawford 413/1; Sydenham 935. 3.93g, 19mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautiful golden toning.

500

774. L. Cassius Longinus AR Denarius. Rome, 63 BC. Head of Vesta left, wearing veil and diadem, kylix behind, control mark before / LONGIN III V, voter left, dropping tablet marked ‘V’ into cista on right. Crawford 413/1; Sydenham 935. 3.94g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

500

Ex NAC 54, 24 March 2010, lot 930.

775. L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus AR Denarius. Rome, 62 BC. PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA, head of Concordia wearing veil and diadem / Trophy, togate figure on right, three captives on left, TER above, PAVLLVS in exergue. Crawford 415/1. 3.97g, 20mm, 4h. Good Very Fine.

118

300


776. L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus AR Denarius. Rome, 62 BC. PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA, head of Concordia wearing veil and diadem / Trophy, togate figure on right, three captives on left, TER above, PAVLLVS in exergue. Crawford 415/1. 3.95g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

300

777. Aulus Gabinius, Proconsul, AR Tetradrachm of Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria. Circa 57-55 BC. In the name and types of the Seleucid king Philip I. Diademed head right / Zeus Nicephorus seated left; Gabinius monogram to inner left; all within laurel wreath. McAlee 1; RPC 4124; Prieur 1. 14.81g, 26mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

200

778. L. Marcius Philippus AR Denarius. Rome, 56 BC. Head of Ancus Marcius right, wearing diadem, lituus behind, ANCVS below / Aqueduct on which stands equestrian statue, flower at horse’s feet, PHILIPPVS to left, AQVA MAR ligate within arches of aqueduct. Crawford 425/1. 3.94g, 18mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone.

300

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

779. Faustus Cornelius Sulla AR Denarius. Rome, 56 BC. Bust of Diana right, draped and wearing diadem, crescent above, lituus behind / Sulla seated left, on left Bocchus kneeling and holding olive-branch, on right, Jugurtha kneeling with hands tied, FELIX downwards. Crawford 426/1. 3.87g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

400

780. Cn. Plancius AR Denarius. Rome, 55 BC. Head of Diana Planciana right, wearing petasus, CN. PLANCIVS AED CVR S.C / Cretan ibex standing right, bow and quiver behind. Plancia 1; Crawford 432/1; Sydenham 933. 3.93g, 18mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine.

119

500


781. P. Cornelius Lentulus Marcellinus AR Denarius. Rome, 50 BC. Bare head of the consul M. Claudius Marcellus right, triskeles behind, MARCELLINVS before / M. Claudius Marcellus advancing right, carrying trophy into tetrastyle temple, MARCELLVS in right field, COS QVINC in left field. Crawford 439/1; RSC Claudia 11. 3.76g, 19mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

500

782. P. Cornelius Lentulus Marcellinus AR Denarius. Rome, 50 BC. Bare head of the consul M. Claudius Marcellus right, triskeles behind, MARCELLINVS before / M. Claudius Marcellus advancing right, carrying trophy into tetrastyle temple, MARCELLVS in right field, COS QVINC in left field. Crawford 439/1; RSC Claudia 11. 3.88g, 18mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

500

783. L. Cornelius Lentulus and C. Claudius Marcellus AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Pompey, 49 BC. Facing head of Medusa in centre of triskeles with grain ear between each leg / Jupiter standing facing, holding thunderbolt in right hand and eagle in left; LENT MAR upwards to left, COS upwards to right, (NT and MAR ligate). Crawford 445/1; Sear 4; Sydenham 1029; Cornelia 64a. 3.52g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

750

Ex LHS Auction 103, 5 May 2009, lot 200.

A Superb Example

784. L. Cornelius Lentulus and C. Claudius Marcellus AR Denarius. Apollonia, 49 BC. Bust of Apollo right; L•LENT•C•MARC COS around / Jupiter standing right, eagle in left hand, thunderbolt in right; flower and Q in left field; garlanded altar in right field. Crawford 445/2. 3.71g, 19mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. Lustrous and attractively toned. Rare.

120

1,000


785. L. Plautius Plancus AR Denarius. Rome, 47 BC. Head of Medusa, facing, with coiled snake on either side, L. PLAVTIVS below / Victory facing, holding palm and leading four horses, PLANCVS below. Crawford 453/1a; Sydenham 959. 3.79g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractive lustre and golden toning.

1,500

786. L. Plautius Plancus AR Denarius. Rome, 47 BC. Head of Medusa, facing, with coiled snake on either side, L. PLAVTIVS below / Victory facing, holding palm and leading four horses, PLANCVS below. Crawford 453/1a; Sydenham 959. 4.03g, 19mm, 9h. Good Very Fine.

750

Rare Denarius of M. Cato

787. M. Cato AR Denarius. Utica, 47-46 BC. Draped female bust right, M CATO PRO PR before / Victory seated right, holding patera, VICTRIX in ex. Crawford 462/1c; Sydenham 1052; Porcia 9. 3.82g, 16mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Rare. Excellent condition for the type.

750

Following Caesar’s victory at the battle of Thapsus, Cato fled to Utica along with the remaining Pompeians, where this type was struck. Having been pursued by Caesar, Cato refused an offer of clemency and committed suicide. The reverse design recalls those of an ancestor, another M. Cato, who struck coins at Rome in 89 BC.

788. Mn. Cordius Rufus AR Denarius. Rome, 46 BC. Corinthian helmet with crest on which an owl stands; RVFVS left / The aegis of Minerva with head of Medusa in the centre; MN CORDIVS around. Crawford 463/2; Sydenham 978; Cordia 4. 3.97g, 18mm, 3h. Good Very Fine.

300

789. Lollius Palikanus AR Denarius. Rome, 45 BC. Laureate head of Honoris right, HONORIS downwards behind / Curule chair between two grainears, PALIKANVS above. Crawford 473/2; CRI 87; Sydenham 961; Lollia 1. 4.04g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

121

750


790. P. Accoleius Lariscolus AR Denarius. Rome, 43 BC. Draped bust of Diana Nemorensis right, P ACCOLEIVS LARISCOLVS around / Triple cult statue of Diana Nemorensis facing, cypress grove behind. Crawford 486/1. 3.42g, 18mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

500

791. Petillius Capitolinus AR Denarius. Rome, 43 BC. Head of Jupiter right, CAPITOLINVS behind / Hexastyle temple, roof decorated with horse at each side and horseman at apex, uncertain figure within pediment. Crawford 487/1. 3.82g, 18mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

750

792. L. Livineius Regulus AR Denarius. Rome, 42 BC. Head of L. Regulus right, REGVLVS downwards behind, PR before / Curule chair, three fasces on either side, L LIVINEIVS above, REGVLVS in exergue. Crawford 494/27. 3.78g, 19mm, 8h. About Extremely Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone.

750

Ex Baldwins 55, 7 May 2008, lot 2001; Ex Edward Hildyard Collection.

793. L. Mussidius Longus AR Denarius. Rome, 42 BC. Veiled head of Concordia right, XVI monogram below chin, CONCORDIA behind / Shrine of Venus Cloacina, inscribed CLOACIN, L MVSSIDIVS LONGVS above. Crawford 494/42b; BMC 4244; Sydenham 1093a. 4.14g, 20mm, 7h. Good Very Fine.

400

794. C. Numonius Vaala AR Denarius. Rome, 41 BC. Bare head of Numonius Vaala right, C. NVMONIVS before, VAALA behind / A warrior armed with a shield and sword advancing left, attacking a rampart which is defended by two soldiers, VAALA in exergue. Numonia 2; Crawford 514/2; Sydenham 1087. 3.09g, 20mm, 9h. Good Fine. Very Rare. From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

122

200


123


COINS OF THE IMPERATORS

795. Pompey Magnus AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Pompey, 49 BC. CN PISO PRO Q, Head of Numa Pompilius right wearing diadem inscribed NVMA / Prow of galley right, MAGN above, PRO COS below. Sear 7; BMC 62; Crawford 446/1; Calpurnia 30. 4.15g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Attractive dark cabinet tone.

300

Choice Example from Fine Style Dies

796. Pompey Magnus and M. Poblicius AR Denarius. Spanish mint, 46-45 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; M POBLICI LEG PRO PR around / Hispania standing right, with shield slung on back, holding two spears in left hand and presenting long palm branch to soldier standing left on prow of ship; CN MAGNVS IMP around. Pompeia 9 and Poblicia 10; Sydenham 1035a; Sear 48a; RSC 1a; Crawford 469/1e. 3.85g, 20mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned, with areas of weak strike.

2,000

Ex Goldman Roman Imperatorial Collection; Ex Triton V, 15 January 2002, lot 1832.

797

798

797. Q. Metellus Pius Scipio AR Denarius. African mint, 47-46 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right, beard and hair in ringlets / Elephant walking right, SCIPIO above, IMP in exergue. Crawford 459/1; Caecilia 47. 4.04g, 16mm, 12h. Very Fine.

400

798. Sextus Pompey AR Denarius. Spanish mint, 45 BC. Head of Pompey Magnus right, SEX MAGN before, IMP behind, SAL below / Pietas standing left, holding palm and sceptre, PIETAS behind. Crawford 477/1b. 3.20g, 19mm, 9h. Good Fine. Extremely Rare.

300

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

799. Sextus Pompey AR Denarius. Massilia, 44-43 BC. Bare head of Pompey Magnus right, NEPTVNI behind, trident before, dolphin swimming to right below / Galley with billowing sail and bank of rowers moving to right, star in left field, Q NASIDIVS below. Sear 235; Crawford 483/2; Sydenham 1350; RSC 20. 3.80g, 19mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

1,500

800. Sextus Pompey AR Brockage Denarius. Massilia, 44-43 BC. Bare head of Pompey Magnus right, NEPTVNI behind, trident before, dolphin swimming to right below / Brockage reverse. Sear 235; Crawford 483/2; Sydenham 1350; RSC 20. 3.77g, 21mm. Good Very Fine. Rare. From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

124

1,000


801. Sextus Pompey AR Denarius. Sicily, 42-40 BC. The Pharos of Messana surmounted by a statue of Neptune; in foreground, galley left adorned with legionary eagle, sceptre and trident; MAG PIVS IMP ITER around / Scylla left, wielding a rudder in both hands; PRÆF CLAS ET ORÆ MARIT EX SC around. Crawford 511/4; Sydenham 1348; Sear, Imperators 335. 3.92g, 19mm, 3h. Areas of flatness otherwise Extremely Fine.

1,500

Ex Randy Haviland Collection; Ex UBS Auction 55, 16 September 2002, lot 1866.

802. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 49-48 BC. Elephant walking right, trampling on serpent, CAESAR in exergue / Simpulum, aspergillum, axe (surmounted by wolf’s head), and apex. Sear 9; Crawford 443/1; Sydenham 1006. 3.83g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautifully lustrous surfaces.

1,500

803. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 48-47 BC. Laureate head of Pietas right; LII behind / Trophy of Gallic arms; axe surmounted by an animal’s head on right; CAESAR below. Crawford 452/2; Sear 11; Sydenham 1009. 3.90g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

500

804. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 48-47 BC. Laureate head of Pietas right; LII behind / Trophy of Gallic arms; axe surmounted by an animal’s head on right; CAESAR below. Crawford 452/2; Sear 11; Sydenham 1009. 3.66g, 19mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

750

805. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. African mint, 47 BC. Diademed bust of Venus right / Aeneas advancing left, carrying palladium in right hand and Anchises on left shoulder; CAESAR to right. Julia 10; Crawford 458/1; Sydenham 1013; Sear 55. 3.89g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Lightly toned.

750

806. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. African mint, 47 BC. Diademed bust of Venus right / Aeneas advancing left, carrying palladium in right hand and Anchises on left shoulder; CAESAR to right. Julia 10; Crawford 458/1; Sydenham 1013; Sear 55. 3.95g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

125

500


807. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Uncertain mint, 46 BC. Head of Ceres right, wearing grain ear wreath; COS TERT downwards behind, DICT ITER upwards before / Emblems of the augurate and pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, capis, and lituus; M to right, AVGVR above, PONT • MAX below. Crawford 467/1b; CRI 57a; Sydenham 1024; Kestner 3639-40; BMCRR Africa 23-5; RSC 4. 3.94g, 17mm, 12h. About Extremely Fine, with old cabinet toning.

500

Ex Chiltern Collection.

808. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar in Spain, 46-45 BC. Head of Venus right, wearing stephane; Cupid behind shoulder / Trophy of Gallic arms between two seated captives: female resting head in right hand to left, and bearded male with hands tied behind back on right; CAESAR in exergue. Crawford 468/1; CRI 58; RSC 13; Sydenham 1014; Kestner 3641-3643; BMCRR Spain 86. 4.04g, 19mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

500

809. Julius Caesar Æ Dupondius. Uncertain mint, 45 BC. Draped bust of Victory right, CAESAR DIC TER before / Minerva standing left, holding trophy over shoulder and holding spear and shield decorated with gorgoneion, snake before, C CLOVLI PRAEF around. Crawford 476/1a; Sear 62. 12.22g, 28mm, 12h. Near Very Fine.

300

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

810. Divus Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Struck under L. Mussidius Longus. Rome, 42 BC. Wreathed head of Julius Caesar right / L. MVSSIDIVS LONGVS, cornucopiae on globe, between rudder on left, and caduceus and apex on right. Sear 116; Crawford 494/39b; Sydenham 1096c. 3.97g, 19mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

1,000

Beautiful Mint Lustre

811. M. Junius Brutus and P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther AR Denarius. Smyrna, 43-42 BC. Sacrificial axe, simpulum and sacrificial dagger, BRVTVS below / Jug and lituus, LENTVLVS SPINT below. Sear 198; Crawford 500/7; Sydenham 1310. 4.01g, 19mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. Beautiful mint lustre.

2,000

Very Rare Quinarius of Brutus

812. M. Junius Brutus AR Quinarius. Military mint travelling with Brutus, 43-42 BC. Sella against which rests staff, modius below, L SESTI above, PRO Q in exergue / Tripod, simpulum on left, apex on right, Q CAEPIO BRVTVS PRO COS around. Crawford 502/4. 1.66g, 14mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

126

1,000


Extremely Rare Gold Issue

813. C. Cassius Longinus and P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther AV Aureus. Military mint moving with Cassius, probably Smyrna, 43-42 BC. Diademed head of Libertas right, wearing diadem and veil, LEIBERTAS before, C. CASSI. IMP behind / Jug and lituus, LENTVLVS SPINT in two lines below. Cassia 15; Bahrfeldt 58; Sydenham 1306; Sear 220; Calicó 66a; Crawford 500/4. 8.12g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

10,000

Along with Brutus, Cassius was one of the main conspirators in the tyrannicide of Julius Caesar. The two formed an allegiance against the combined forces of Marc Antony and Octavian; however Plutarch suggests that there was a great deal of tension between the two. He presents Cassius as an unpopular man, who used fear to keep his soldiers in check, describing him as a a man of “violent temper” whose character was less sincere than his ally’s. Not a great deal is known about P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther, but the jug and lituus which accompany his legend are symbolic of his membership to the college of augurs. The deliberately archaic spelling of LEIBERTAS is most likely an attempt to recall Rome’s ancient republican tradition which Brutus and his allies were fighting to restore.

A Superior Example

814. C. Cassius Longinus and P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Cassius, probably Smyrna, 43-42 BC. Diademed head of Libertas right, LEIBERTAS before, C. CASSI. IMP behind / Jug and lituus, LENTVLVS SPINT in two lines below. Sear 221; Crawford 500/3; Sydenham 1307. 3.68g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Golden toning and lustrous surfaces.

2,000

815. Marc Antony AR Quinarius. Military mint travelling with Antony, 43-42 BC. Lituus, jug and raven, M ANT (ligate) IMP above / Victory right, crowning trophy. Crawford 489/4. 1.73g, 12mm, 8h. Very Fine. Rare.

127

200


816. Marc Antony AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony, 41 BC. Head of Marc Antony right, lituus behind, M ANTONIVS IMP III VIR R P C around / Pietas standing left, holding turibulum and cornucopiae upon which two storks perch, PIETAS - COS across fields. Crawford 516/5. 3.70g, 19mm, 12h. Good Fine.

250

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

817. Marc Antony, Octavian, and M. Barbatius AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Ephesus?), 41 BC. M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P, bare head of Marc Antony right / CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian, with slight beard, right. Sear 243; Crawford 517/2; Sydenham 1181. 3.77g, 19mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

2,500

818. Marc Antony, Octavian, and M. Barbatius AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Ephesus?), 41 BC. M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P, bare head of Marc Antony right / CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian, with slight beard, right. Sear 243; Crawford 517/2; Sydenham 1181. 3.82g, 21mm, 11h. About Extremely Fine. Light iridescent toning.

1,500

819. Marc Antony, Lucius Antonius and L. Cocceius Nerva AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Marc Antony, 41 BC. M·ANT·IMP·AVG III VIR·R·P·C·M NERVA PROQ·P, bare head of Marc Antony right / L·ANTONIVS COS, bare head of Lucius Antonius right. B. Antonia 48 and Cocceia 2; Sydenham 1185; Sear 246; Crawford 517/5a. 3.81g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

3,500

820. Marc Antony and Cleopatra VII Æ19 of Chalkis, Syria. 36-31 BC. Bare head of Marc Antony right / Draped bust of Cleopatra right, wearing stephane. RPC 4771; BMC 15 (Berytus); SNG München 1006; SNG Copenhagen 383 (Phoenicia). 8.91g, 21mm, 12h. Very Fine.

128

300


Cohortis Speculatorum

821. Marc Antony Legionary AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Patrae?), 32-31 BC. Praetorian galley to right / CHORTIS SPECVLATORVM, three legionary standards, each decorated with prow and two wreaths. Crawford 544/12. 3.84g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Attractively toned. Rare.

500

One of the rarest of the legionary denarii, this issue pays tribute to Antony’s speculatores. The cohortis speculatorum was a selection of the ablest naval soldiers formed into a single force, whose main role was to accompany Antony on his nautical explorations, acting in some sense as a personal guard. The prows decorating the three standards refer to the original role of the speculatores as mounted soldiers positioned on an elevated part of the ship from where they were able to look out.

822. Marc Antony Legionary AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Patrae?), 32-31 BC. ANT·AVG·III·VIR·R·P·C·, praetorian galley to right / LEG II, aquila between two standards. RSC 27; Sydenham 1216; Sear 349; Crawford 544/14. 3.79g, 18mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

750

823. Marc Antony Legionary AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Patrae?), 32-31 BC. ANT·AVG·III·VIR·R·P·C·, praetorian galley to right / LEG VI, aquila between two standards. Crawford 544/18; RSC 33. 3.77g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Struck on a broad flan.

1,000

824. Marc Antony Legionary AR Denarius. Military Mint moving with Antony (Patrae?), 32-31 BC. ANT. AVG. III. VIR. R. P. C, praetorian galley to right / LEG XVI, aquila between two standards. Sear 372; Crawford 544/31; Sydenham 1236. 3.83g, 16mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

825. Octavian AR Denarius. Uncertain Italian mint (Brundisium or Rome?), 30-29 BC. Bare head right / Military trophy facing, composed of helmet, cuirass, shield and crossed spears, set on prow of galley right; crossed rudder and anchor at base; IMP CAESAR across fields. CRI 419; RIC 265a; RSC 119; BMCRE 625 = BMCRR Rome 4352; BN 57-63. 3.94g, 21mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine. Ex Chiltern Collection; Ex Tony Hardy Collection, CNG 64, 24 September 2003, lot 903.

129

3,000


COINS OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE

826. Augustus AR Cistophorus. Ephesus, 28-20 BC. IMP CAESAR DIVI F COS VI LIBERTATIS VINDEX, laureate head right / Pax standing left on parazonium, holding caduceus, snake emerging from cista mystica in right field, PAX in lower left field, all within laurel-wreath. RIC 476; RPC 2203. 11.82g, 27mm, 1h. Very Fine.

500

827. Augustus AR Cistophorus. Ephesus, 25 BC. IMP CAESAR, bare head right / Garlanded altar sculpted with two confronted hinds, AVGVSTVS above. RIC 479. 11.87g, 28mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

3,125

Ex Triton XIII, 5-6 January 2010, lot 306.

828. Augustus AR Cistophorus. Ephesus, 24-20 BC. IMP CAESAR, bare head right, lituus before / AVGVSTVS, Capricorn right, head left, with cornucopiae on its back, all within wreath. RIC 480; RPC 2213. 11.91g, 26mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Beautifully toned.

500

829. Augustus AR Denarius. Uncertain Spanish mint, 19-18 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS, oak-wreathed head right / Eight-rayed comet with tail upwards, DIVVS - IVLIVS across fields. RIC 37a. 3.68g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

750

830. Augustus AR Denarius. Struck by Q. Rustius. Rome, circa 19 BC. Q RVSTIVS FORTVNAE, jugate busts of Fortuna Victrix wearing round helmet and Fortuna Felix, diademed, ANTIAT in exergue / CAESAR AVGVSTO, ornamented rectangular altar inscribed FOR RE, EX SC in exergue. RIC 322. 3.88g, 20mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. Ex St James Auction 10, 6 November 2008, lot 33.

130

1,000


831. Augustus AR Cistophorus. Pergamum, 19-18 BC. IMP IX TR PO V, bare head right / Hexastyle temple inscribed ROM ET AVGVST, COM ASIAE across fields. RIC 506. 10.71g, 28mm, 12h. Very Fine.

400

832. Augustus AR Denarius. Uncertain mint, 17 BC. CAESAR, youthful head right (possibly Gaius Caesar), within oak-wreath / AVG VST, to left and right of candelabrum, ornamented with rams’ heads, within wreath entwined with bucrania and paterae. RIC 540; BMC 684. 3.86g, 17mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous surfaces. Very Rare.

3,000

Ex Gorny & Mosch 176, Munich 2009, lot 2074.

833. Augustus AR Denarius. L. Mescinius Rufus, moneyer. 16 BC. Laureate head right / L MESCINIVS RVFVS, Mars, helmeted and cloaked, holding spear and parazonium, standing facing on pedestal inscribed SPQR V PR RE CAES in three lines. C. 463; RIC 351. 4.10g, 19mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine; iridescent toning. Rare.

1,500

Ex NAC 59, 4 April 2011, lot 1836.

A Beautiful Example

834. Augustus AV Aureus. Lugdunum, 15-13 BC. AVGVSTVS DIVI • F, bare head right / Bull butting right, left foreleg raised, lashing his tail; IMP X in exergue. RIC 166a; Lyon 18; Calicó 212; BMCRE 450 = BMCRR Gaul 162; BN 1372. 7.90g, 20mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine. Rare. Ex Triton XI, 8-9 January 2008, lot 834.

131

20,000


835. Augustus AR Denarius. Lugdunum, 15-13 BC. AVGVSTVS DIVI F, bare head right / Bull butting right, IMP X in exergue. RIC 167a; BMC 451. 3.69g, 18mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Lightly toned.

750

836. Augustus AR Denarius. Lugdunum, 15-13 BC. AVGVSTVS DIVI F, bare head right / Bull butting right, IMP X in exergue. RIC 167a; BMC 451. 3.55g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

2,000

837. Augustus AR Denarius. Rome, 13 BC. AVGVSTVS CAESAR, bare head right / C.ANTISTIVS REGINVS, simpulum and lituus above tripod and patera; III.VIR below. RIC 410; RSC 347; BMC 120. 3.85g, 19mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

1,500

838. Divus Augustus Æ Dupondius. Struck under Caligula. Rome, AD 39. DIVVS AVGVSTVS, radiate head left, S-C across fields / CONSENSV SENAT ET EQ ORDIN P Q R, Augustus laureate and togate, seated left on curule chair holding branch and globe. RIC 56. 15.55g, 30mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

300

839. Divus Augustus Æ Dupondius. Struck under Claudius. Rome, AD 50. DIVVS AVGVSTVS, radiate head left, S-C across fields / DIVA AVGVSTA, Livia seated left, holding corn ears and long torch. RIC 101. 15.98g, 31mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

132

500


Tiberius’ Succession

840. Tiberius AV Aureus. Lugdunum, AD 14-15. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / TR POT XVI, Tiberius, laureate and cloaked, in slow quadriga right, holding laurel branch and eagle-tipped sceptre; IMP VII in exergue. RIC 1; Calicó 307. 7.65g, 20mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

10,000

This type recalls the aureus issued under Augustus in commemoration of Tiberius’ triumphal procession upon his return to Rome, awarded on account of his successful campaigns in Germany and Pannonia. It was on this occasion that Tiberius’ rank and powers were made equal to thos of Augustus himself, an act which ensured that upon the passing of Augustus there would be no interregnum, and that Tiberius would continue to rule without possible upheaval.

841. Tiberius AV Aureus. Lugdunum, 36-37 AD. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia as Pax seated right on chair with ornamented legs above a single exergual line, holding long vertical sceptre in right hand and branch in left. RIC 29; Calicó 305a; BMC 46. 7.83g, 20mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Struck from an obverse die of fine style on a remarkably broad flan.

7,500

842. Tiberius AR Denarius. Lugdunum, AD 36-37. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia as Pax, seated right, holding long vertical sceptre and branch, on chair with ornamented legs above one exergual line. RIC 30; RSC 16a; BMC 48. 3.49g, 19mm, 3h. Extremely Fine.

300

843. Agrippina Senior Æ Sestertius. Struck under Claudius, circa AD 42-43. AGRIPPINA M F GERMANICI CAESARIS, draped bust right / TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P IMP P P around large SC. RIC 102; BMC 219; C. 3. 29.52g, 36mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Area of smoothing/repair on reverse.

133

1,000


844. Caligula Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 37-38. C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS P M TR POT, Pietas seated left, holding patera and resting arm on small draped figure standing facing on basis, PIETAS in exergue / Hexastyle temple, garlanded and surmounted by quadriga, before which Caligula sacrifices with patera over altar, one attendant leads bull while a second holds patera. DIVO - AVG and S - C across fields. RIC 36. 31.62g, 37mm, 7h. Very Fine.

750

845. Nero, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 51-54. NERONI CLAVDIO DRVSO GERM COS DESIGN, bare-headed and draped bust right / EQVESTER OR DO PRINCIPI IVVENT inscribed on shield, spear behind. RIC 78; Calicó 407. 7.71g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

846

5,000

847

846. Nero AV Aureus. Rome, AD 64-65. NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / CONCORDIA AVGVSTA, Concordia seated left holding patera and cornucopiae. RIC 48; Calicó 405. 7.15g, 18mm, 8h. Good Fine.

500

847. Nero AV Aureus. Rome, AD 64-65. NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / IVPPITER CVSTOS, Jupiter, bare to the waist, seated on a throne facing left, holding a thunderbolt in right hand and a long sceptre in left. RIC 52; Calicó 412; BMC 67. 7.04g, 19mm, 6h. Good Fine.

500

848. Nero AR Denarius. Rome, AD 64-5. NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / IVPPITER CVSTOS, Jupiter, bare to the waist, seated on a throne facing left, holding a thunderbolt in right hand and a long sceptre in left. RIC 53; BMC 74. 3.55g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Pleasant tone. Rare.

3,000

849. Nero Æ Dupondius. Lugdunum, AD 64-67. NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER PM TR P IMP P P, laureate head left / VICTORIA AVGVSTI, Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm, S-C across fields, II in exergue. RIC 412; BMC 351. 12.94g, 28mm, 4h. Good Very Fine.

134

300


850. Galba AR Denarius. Possibly Narbo, AD 68. SER GALBA IMPERATOR, laureate head right / VICTORIA P R, Victory, draped, standing on globe facing, head left, holding wreath in right hand and palm branch in left. RIC 111; BMC 227. 3.67g, 18mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,250

851. Galba AR Quinarius. Lugdunum, AD 68-69. SER GALBA IMP CAESAR AVG P M T P, laureate head right / VICTORIA GALBAE AVG, Victory, draped, standing right on globe holding wreath and palm. RIC 132. 1.71g, 15mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

750

852. Otho AR Denarius. Rome, AD 69. IMP M OTHO CAESAR AVG TR P, bare head right / VICTORIA OTHONIS, Victory, draped, flying right, holding wreath in right hand and palm in left. RIC 14; BMC 22. 3.59g, 17mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

853. Vitellius AR Denarius. Rome, AD 69. A VITELLIVS GERMANICVS IMP, bare head right / Victory, draped, seated right, holding patera in right hand and palm in left. RIC 71; BMC 4. 3.40g, 19mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Scarce.

2,000

Ex Arden Collection.

Excellent Sestertius of Vespasian

854. Vespasian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 71. IMP CAES VESPAS AVG P M TR P P P COS III, laureate head right / SALVS AVGVSTA, Salus seated left, holding patera in right hand and sceptre in left, S C in exergue. RIC 245; BMC 574-575. 27.10g, 32mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Untouched surfaces.

3,750

855. Vespasian AV Aureus. Lugdunum, AD 71. IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III, laureate head right / PACI AVGVSTI, Nemesis advancing right, holding caduceus over snake. RIC 1130; Calicó 655; BMC 401. 7.17g, 20mm, 7h. Very Fine.

135

1,000


From the Boscoreale Hoard of 1895

856. Vespasian AV Aureus. Lugdunum, circa AD 72-73. IMP CAES VESPAS AVG P M TR P IIII P P COS IIII, laureate head right / PACI AVGVSTI Nemesis advancing right, pointing caduceus at snake before her. C. 284; BMC 403; CBN 307; RIC 1180; Calic贸 656. 7.19g, 20mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

12,500

From the Boscoreale Hoard of 1895.

857. Vespasian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 76. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right / AETERNITAS, Aeternitas standing left, holding heads of Sol and Luna, lighted altar before her. RIC 838; Calic贸 588. 7.17g, 20mm, 7h. Good Fine.

2,000

858. Divus Vespasian AR Denarius. Struck under Titus. Rome, AD 80-81. DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIAN, laureate head right / Victory standing left placing shield on trophy, captive seated at foot of trophy, EX - SC across fields. RIC 59a; RSC 144. 3.52g, 18mm, 7h. Good Very Fine.

500

Very Rare Aureus of Titus

859. Titus, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 73. T CAES IMP VESP CEN, laureate head right / PAX AVG, Pax standing left, resting left elbow on column and cradling palm branch in left arm, holding winged caduceus over tripod to left. RIC 542a; Calic贸 744. 7.36g, 20mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

136

5,000


Uncommonly Well Detailed

860. Titus, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 76. T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS, laureate head right / IOVIS CVSTOS, Jupiter standing facing, holding patera over altar in right hand and sceptre in left. RIC 874. 3.14g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful, lustrous surfaces.

750

861. Titus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 79. IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head right / TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P, Ceres seated left, holding ears of corn in right hand, and torch in left hand. RIC 21; Calicó 763. 6.79g, 19mm, 6h. Near Very Fine. Rare.

750

862. Domitian, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 73-75. CAES AVG F DOMIT COS II, laureate head right / Domitian on horse left, raising right hand and holding sceptre in left. RIC 679. 7.15g, 21mm, 6h. About Very Fine. Pleasant, lustrous surfaces.

3,000

863. Domitian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 85. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V, laureate bust right / IMP XI COS XII CENS P P P, Minerva standing left holding spear. RIC 431. 3.51g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine; beautiful lustre. Rare.

750

Very Rare ‘Germania’ Aureus of Domitian

864. Domitian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 86. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V, laureate head right / IMP XI COS XII CENS P P P, Germania seated right on shield, broken spear below. RIC 432; Calicó 874. 7.37g, 20mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

137

7,500


An Exceptional Dupondius of Domitian

865. Domitian Æ Dupondius. Rome, AD 86. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XII CENS PER P P, radiate bust right, wearing aegis on far shoulder / FORTVNAE AVGVSTI, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopiae, S-C across fields. RIC 479. 13.05g, 30mm, 7h. Small pit in obverse field, otherwise Good Extremely Fine.

2,000

866. Nerva AR Denarius. Rome, AD 97. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate bust right / LIBERTAS PVBLICA, Libertas standing left, holding pileus and sceptre. RIC 19; BMC 46. 3.36g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

500

867. Trajan Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 103-111. IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC PM TR P COS V P P, laureate bust right, with drapery on left shoulder / Trajan on horse riding right, spearing fallen Dacian. C 503; RIC 534. 27.85g, 34mm, 6h. Very Fine. Pleasing patina.

750

868. Trajan Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 109-110. IMP CAES NERVA TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P P COS V P P, laureate bust right with slight drapery on left shoulder / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Spes walking left holding flower, S-C across fields. RIC 519; Woytek 338. 24.99g, 35mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

138

1,500


Parthia Capta

869. Trajan AV Aureus. Rome, AD 116. IMP CAES NER TRAIAN OPTIM AVG GER DAC PARTHICO, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS VI P P S P Q R, Parthia seated right, head facing, in attitude of mourning, and Parthian seated left in attitude of mourning below trophy, PARTHIA CAPTA in exergue. RIC 324; BMC 603; Calicó 1035a. 7.12g, 19mm, 6h. Very Fine.

4,000

Commemorating his final great campaign, this aureus of Trajan is a clear indication to the people of Rome that the Emperor had succeeded in expanding the Empire still further through his conquest of Parthia and the capture of the Parthian capital, Ctesiphon. However, the areas of Armenia and Mesopotamia that Trajan conquered were unwieldy and difficult to secure, and it was left to the new Emperor Hadrian in AD 117 to abandon these indefensible lands in favour of a smaller, but more easily governable, empire. Trajan’s campaign against the Parthians was prompted by their installation of an unacceptable puppet king in Armenia; both the Parthian and Roman Empires had shared a hegemony over the Armenian kingdom for fifty years, thus now Trajan decided to remove the king and annexe Armenia as a Roman province. After this success he moved southwards, receiving acknowledgement of hegemony from various tribes on the way to Mesopotamia, a large part of which he had conquered by the time this coin was struck in AD 116.

870. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 117. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA, laureate bust right, with slight drapery on far shoulder / PARTH F DIVI NER NEP P M TR P COS, Pietas standing left, raising right hand, PIE-TAS across fields. RIC 13. 3.40g, 19mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine.

250

871. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 117. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA PATRI, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / DIVI NER NEP P M TR P COS, radiate and draped bust of Sol right, ORIENS in exergue. RIC 16; Calicó 1293. 7.34g, 20mm, 6h. Good Fine - Very Fine.

1,500

872. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 118. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS II, Concordia seated left, holding patera, resting her elbow on a statue of Spes, cornucopiae below throne, CONCORD in exergue. RIC 39a. 3.46g, 20mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Attractive early portrait.

400

Attractive Sol Issue

873. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 118. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS II, bust of Sol, radiate and draped, right; ORIENS in exergue. RIC 43b; Calicó 1295. 7.20g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Rare.

139

10,000


874. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 118. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS II, Pietas, veiled, standing left and raising right hand; PIE-TAS across fields. RIC 45. 3.27g, 20mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin. Attractive old cabinet toning.

800

875 Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 118. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust left with slight drapery on far shoulder / P M TR P COS II, Pietas, veiled, standing left and raising right hand, PIE-TAS across fields. RIC 45. 2.60g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

250

876. Hadrian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 118. IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, with drapery on far shoulder / PONT MAX TR POT COS II, Roma, helmeted, seated right on cuirass and holding spear in left hand, clasps hands with Hadrian, who stands left, togate; S-C across fields, ADVENTVS AVG in exergue. RIC 547. 23.73g, 35mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, untouched surfaces. Rare, and excellent for the type.

1,500

Invoking the Favour of the Gods

877. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS III, Hercules seated facing, on shield and cuirass, holding club and distaff, with lion’s skin below left arm. RIC 55; Calicó 1318; BMC 97. 7.15g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

12,500

Succeeding Trajan as emperor in AD 117 whilst on campaign in the east, Hadrian returned to Rome in 118. However, by 119 he was already planning his next foray abroad, and we see him invoking the favour of the gods on his coinage in advance of the journey. Hercules, the great adventurer and traveller, was one of those whose blessing was sought. That Hercules is present on the coinage of Hadrian is only natural after his appearance on types of his adoptive father Trajan, and his presence is further explained by Hadrian’s familial ties with southern Spain, (he is thought to have been born in the city of Italica), where the cult of Hercules was prominent. Other reverse types struck under Hadrian explicitly mention the cult of Hercules Gaditanus, who enjoyed the highest honours in southern Spain. The present reverse shows Hercules in the style that many Italian citizens would have been familar with, seated and resting after his toils in the manner of statues from Kroton and the south. The inclusion of the distaff in this image of Hercules is somewhat unusual. Rather than alluding to his masculinity and strength as shown through the Twelve Labours, it draws attention to the story of the period when Hercules, as penance for the murder of Iphitus, was remanded as a slave to Omphale for a year and was subjected to holding the yarn for her maids as they spun. This Greek myth, which survived through the writings of the early Roman writer Ovid among others, is not one we immediately associate with Hercules today, though it was a more common feature of his cult in antiquity.

140


878. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS III, Jupiter standing facing, holding thunderbolt and sceptre. RIC 63c; Calicó 1301b; BMC 103. 7.06g, 18mm, 7h. Very Fine. Rare.

4,000

Rare Depiction of Oceanus

879. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right with drapery on far shoulder / P M TR P COS III, Oceanus, reclining left, holding anchor resting arm on a dolphin, claws on his head. RIC 75. 3.10g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine. Scarce.

300

Hadrian’s reign is characterised by his travels abroad as he gave direct instruction for the defence and enhancement of the empire, and this is reflected on his coinage from quite early in his reign. Seeking to invoke the help of as many of the gods as possible, reverse types from before his departure feature all manner of deities to provide protection and safety to the emperor on his travels, including this type showing Oceanus. Depicted reclining casually, complemented by his usual attributes of anchor, dolphin and crab claws on the head, Oceanus represented the lesser known waters of the Atlantic, which may explain his scarcity on the coinage. That he is present speaks of an inpending journey out of the Mediterranean, which we know would have taken Hadrian to Britannia to quell the uprising and leave us the indelible mark of Hadrian’s Wall marking the boundary between Roman territory and the barbarian hordes.

The River Tyne in Britannia

880. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate head right / P M TR P COS III, river-god reclining left, holding rudder and leaning on inverted urn. RIC 79; Calicó 1337. 7.24g, 21mm, 7h. Excellent portrait, Extremely Fine. Scarce.

15,000

Of all the deities depicted on the coinage of Hadrian, the river-god is the hardest to place. Usually called Tiber for the obvious resonance that this river has to Rome as a connection to the sea and the port at Ostia, Mattingly identified this figure as a personification of the river-god Tina, the deity of the River Tyne in northern England. This identification fits well with Hadrian’s presence in Britannia during 119-121, and complements the type of Britannia, who appears on the bronze coinage of this period. This coin can easily be seen as a reference to the natural barrier of the river that the Roman engineers tasked with constructing Hadrian’s Wall encountered at the eastern end of their route, which was the counterpart to the Solway Firth in the west - Hadrian had in AD 121 set a line between these two features as the official border between Caledonia and Britannia.

141


881. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, with drapery on far shoulder / P M TR P COS III, Aeternitas standing left, holding heads of Sol and Luna. RIC 81. 3.33g, 19mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin.

300

882. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate head right / P M TR P COS III, Pax seated left holding Victory on globe and branch. RIC 95. 3.30g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

300

883. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right / P M TR P COS III, Hadrian, in military dress, standing left, holding rudder on globe and spear. RIC 110; BMC 237. 3.32g, 18mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Unusually well detailed reverse.

750

884. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right with slight drapery on far shoulder / P M TR P COS III, Aeternitas standing left, holding heads of Sol and Luna, AET-AVG across fields. RIC 114. 3.16g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine.

200

885. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right with drapery on far shoulder / P M TR P COS III, Concordia seated left, holding patera, cornucopiae below her chair, statue of Spes below her elbow, CONCORD in exergue. RIC 118. 3.18g, 20mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

300

886. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate head right / P M TR P COS III, Hilaritas standing facing, both hands raising veil from her face, HIL-AR P-R in two lines across fields. RIC 126. 3.36g, 18mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

142

250


143


887. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right / P M TR P COS III, Hadrian seated left on platform, making distribution to citizen standing right; LIBERAL AVG III in exergue. RIC 129 var. (draped bust and exergual legend). 3.28g, 19mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine. Scarce.

500

889 888 888. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate head right / P M TR P COS III, Hadrian seated left on platform, accompanied by soldier, making distribution to citizen, standing right, figure of Liberalitas behind, LIBERAL AVG III in two lines in exergue. RIC 131. 3.18g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine. Scarce.

250

889. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, with drapery on far shoulder / P M TR P COS III, Salus seated left, holding patera, feeding snake rising from altar, SALVS AVG in exergue. RIC 137 var. (SAL AVG), cf. RIC 139. 3.27g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

300

Rare Medallion of Hadrian

890. Hadrian Æ Medallion. Rome, circa AD 123-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, slight drapery on far shoulder / Eagle standing left, head right, on thunderbolt, between owl perched right on shield and peacock in splendour, standing left on sceptre, COS III in exergue. Gnecchi 64; Cohen 431; Banti 207. 27.84g, 35mm, 12h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

5,000

This intriguing medallion’s ornithological reverse type is a symbol of the Capitoline Triad - the eagle, peacock and owl representing Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva respectively as their sacred birds.

891. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, with drapery on far shoulder / COS III, Hercules seated right on cuirass, holding club, which rests on shield, and Victory. RIC 148. 3.43g, 19mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin.

1,000

892. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, with drapery on far shoulder / COS III, Hercules seated right on cuirass, holding club resting on shield, and distaff. RIC 149. 3.13g, 17mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Pleasant underlying lustre.

144

500


Spectacularly Toned

893. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, Minerva standing left, feet together, holding spear and shield. RIC 154. 3.54g, 19mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin. Bold, toning. Rare.

1,000

894. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, Neptune standing left, right foot on prow, holding trident and dolphin. RIC 157. 3.35g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine. Rare.

250

895. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, Neptune standing left, right foot on prow, holding sceptre and acrostolium. RIC 158. 3.44g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

300

896. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, Abundantia standing left, right foot on modius, holding hook and cornucopiae. RIC 169. 3.51g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

200

897 898 897. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, Pudicitia, veiled, seated left. RIC 178. 3.40g, 21mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine.

300

898. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, Victory seated left, holding wreath and palm, globe in exergue. RIC 184. 3.38g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

300

899. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, Hadrian standing left, in military dress, holding Victory and spear. RIC 185 var. (standing right and no shield). 3.46g, 20mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Rare.

145

300


Hadrian’s New Coinage

900. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder / COS III, Hadrian on horseback right, raising right hand. RIC 186; Strack 146; Calicó 1215a; BMC 430-2. 7.24g, 21mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

8,000

This attractive equestrian aureus was struck to mark the triumphant return to Rome of the emperor, and shows him riding into the city accepting the honours and praise of the people. Mattingly and Sydenham argue that during his four year absence from Rome there had been little change in the coinage, no development of style, and the mint had been virtually inactive. Upon his return there was a great new output of coinage, of which this is a stunning example. Hadrian drops the long legends favoured by his predecessor Trajan, preferring to simplify them to HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS on the obverse and COS III on the reverse. This new obverse legend very distinctly calls into mind the coinage of the first emperor Augustus, while the new, larger and more gracious style of imperial portrait that fills the fields of the flan is a complete change from the small, careful and cramped types of Trajan. Reverse types such as this one complement the new style and the result is a very attractive and artistic coin.

901. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder / COS III, eagle standing on thunderbolt, head right. RIC 190. 3.18g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

300

902. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder / COS III, eagle standing on thunderbolt, head right. RIC 190. 3.32g, 19mm, 6h. Very Fine. Rare.

146

250


Rare Denarius Depicting Sacrificial Implements

903. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, sacrificial knife, lituus, apex and simpulum on axe. RIC 199. 3.29g, 19mm, 5h. Very Fine. Rare.

250

904. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, star within crescent. RIC 200. 3.41g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous surfaces.

300

905. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome. AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, seven stars above crescent. RIC 202. 3.56g,19mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Attractive lustre.

300

906. Hadrian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, with drapery on far shoulder / COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, with her right foot on a helmet, holding Victory and a cornucopiae, shields behind; SC in exergue. RIC 636. 25.23g, 32mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,500

907. Hadrian Æ As. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right with drapery on left shoulder / COS III, Minerva advancing right, brandishing javelin and holding shield, S-C across fields. RIC 664 var. (drapery). 12.70g, 27mm, 6h. Very Fine, smoothing in fields.

147

200


908. Hadrian AR Cistophorus. Uncertain mint in Asia, circa AD 129. IMP CAESAR AVGVSTVS, bare head of Augustus right / HADRIANVS AVG P P REN, Hadrian, veiled, standing left, holding corn ears in right hand and wrapping left in toga. RIC 532; Metcalf 92. 10.80g, 31mm, 6h. Good Very Fine; struck on a broad flan. Very Rare.

1,500

Two Attractive Felicitati Issues

909. Hadrian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 132-135. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, bare-headed, draped bust left / FELICITATI AVG, galley moving left, six figures within, S-C across fields, COS III P P in exergue. RIC 706; cf. BMC 1386 ff. 23.97g, 33mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

2,000

The galley appears on several types of Hadrian’s, and was struck in both silver and bronze. It is thought to have celebrated the safe return to Rome of the emperor after his second great tour of the empire, but it has been suggested that it is imbued with further symbolism than a standard type representing the arrival of the emperor: the legend of FELICITATI AVG is used to convey the good tidings not only of Hadrian’s arrival, but also the happiness, security and prosperity that he has carried with him to the provinces of the empire.

910. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right / FELICITATI AVG, galley travelling left. RIC 240. 3.41g, 19mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Pleasant underlying lustre.

500

911. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right / PIETAS AVG, Pietas standing left by altar, raising both hands. RIC 257. 3.04g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

148

200


912. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right / SALVS AVG, Salus standing right, feeding snake coiled round altar. RIC 267. 3.28g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

913

300

914

913. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right / SALVS AVG, Salus standing right, feeding snake coiled round altar. RIC 267. 3.42g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Attractive underlying lustre.

200

914. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right / SALVS AVG, Salus standing left, sacrificing out of pater over altar and holding sceptre. RIC 268. 3.23g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone.

150

915. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate bust right / TELLVS STABIL, Tellus standing left holding plough-handle and rake, two corn ears behind. RIC 276. 3.35g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

916. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right / VICTORIA AVG, Victory standing right, drawing out fold of dress and holding branch. RIC 282. 3.42g, 18mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine.

250

Attractive Equestrian Type

917. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right / Hadrian on horseback right, raising right hand. RIC 293; Calic贸 1166. 7.28g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Scarce.

149

8,000


918

919

918. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right / AEGYPTOS, Egypt reclining left, holding sistrum and resting arm on basket around which snake coils, ibis before her. RIC 296. 3.52g, 17mm, 7h. Very Fine. 150 919. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right / AFRICA, Africa with elephant skin headdress, reclining on rock, holding scorpion and cornucopiae, basket of fruit before her. RIC 299. 3.53g, 18mm, 6h. Good Fine. 150

Africa Restored

920. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare-headed and draped bust right / RESTITVTORI AFRICAE, Hadrian, togate, standing left, holding roll in left hand and extending right to raise up kneeling figure of Africa, wearing elephant-skin headdress and holding corn ears; two corn ears between them. RIC 322; Calicó 1349. 7.36g, 19mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

12,500

Mattingly has noted that, with the advent of the ‘travel series’ of which this coin is part, the Roman people were being shown just how the Empire worked. The provinces were no mere dependencies, but contributors to the maintenance of the whole; each was in need of, and received, the personal attention of the emperor during a period of relative stability. The different interactions of the Emperor with the provinces are shown on the various types of the series, and here Hadrian is portrayed in his role as benefactor to the provice of Africa, a key producer of grain for the city of Rome - as evidenced by the grain ears placed between the two figures. In AD 128 Hadrian’s arrival in the province of Africa coincided with a period of rain that ended a long drought, a good omen that would to those inclined to superstition, have been viewed as evidence of the emperor’s favour with the gods. Hadrian’s primary purpose was to inspect Legio III Augusta, whose main operating base he had moved from Theveste to Lambaesa for strategic reasons. The emperor’s address to the troops survives to this day. In addition, Hadrian’s visit was characterised by his usual provision of orders for the construction of public buildings and other infrastructure projects. The surviving baths at Leptis Magna are a prime example of Hadrian’s direction in this matter.

921. Antinous Æ Diobol of Alexandria, Egypt. Dated RY 19 of Hadrian = AD 134-135. ANTINOOY HPWOC, draped bust right, wearing hem-hem crown / Antinoüs on horseback to right holding caduceus, I-Θ below. Köln 1277; Dattari 2084; Emmett 1346. 23.34g, 34mm, 12h. Good Fine.

150

2,000


922 923 922. Antinous PL Tessera of Alexandria, Egypt. AD 117-138. Bust of Antinoüs, wearing hem-hem crown / Bust of Zeus Ammon right. Unpublished in the standard references. For general type cf. Dattari 2903. 2.53g, 17mm, 11h. Very Fine.

100

923. Antinous PL Tessera of Alexandria, Egypt. AD 117-138. Bust of Antinoüs, wearing hem-hem crown, before bust of Isis left / Nilus seated left on hippopotamus, holding cornucopiae. Cf. Dattari 6443 and Dattari-Savio 2007, pl. 323, 11678. 4.50g, 21mm, 1h. Very Fine.

200

924 925 924. Antinous PL Tessera of Alexandria, Egypt. AD 117-138. Bust of Antinoüs, wearing hem-hem crown, before bust of Isis left / Nilus seated left on hippopotamus, holding cornucopiae. Cf. Dattari 6443 and Dattari-Savio 2007, pl. 323, 11678. 4.87g, 20mm, 7h. Very Fine.

100

925. Antinous PL Tessera of Alexandria, Egypt. AD 117-138. Antinoüs on horseback right, wearing hem-hem crown and holding sceptre / Isis or Alexandria standing facing. Unpublished in the standard references. For obverse cf. Dattari 6444. 4.20g, 21mm, 11h. Very Fine.

100

926 927 926. Antinous PL Tessera of Alexandria, Egypt. AD 117-138. Antinoüs on horseback right, wearing hem-hem crown and holding sceptre / Zeus Ammon standing left, before Nilus, seated right. Dattari-Savio 2007, pl. 322, 6451-6473. 3.67g, 22mm, 2h. Very Fine.

100

927. Antinous PL Tessera of Alexandria, Egypt. AD 117-138. Antinoüs on horseback right, wearing hem-hem crown and holding sceptre / Zeus Ammon standing left, before Nilus, seated right. Dattari-Savio 2007, pl. 322, 6451-6473. 5.34g, 23mm, 11h. Very Fine.

100

928. Sabina AR Denarius. Rome, AD 128-136. SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P, draped bust right, with hair waved and wearing diadem / CONCORDIA AVG, Concordia seated left, holding patera and leaning left elbow on figure of Spes; cornucopiae under chair. RIC 398. 3.27g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Toned.

750

929. Sabina AR Denarius. Rome, AD 128-136. SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P, draped bust right, with hair coiled and piled on top of head / Vesta seated left, holding palladium and sceptre, S C in exergue. RIC 408. 3.21g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

151

750


Attractively Toned

930. Sabina AR Denarius. Rome, AD 128-136. SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P, draped and diademed bust right / VESTA, Vesta seated left holding palladium and sceptre. RIC 410. 3.17g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

931

750

932

931. Sabina AR Denarius. Rome, AD 128-136. SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P, draped and diademed bust right / VESTA, Vesta seated left holding palladium and sceptre. RIC 410. 3.23g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

932. Diva Sabina AR Denarius. Rome, circa AD 137. DIVA AVG SABINA, draped bust right, wearing wreath of corn ears / CONSECRATIO, eagle standing on sceptre, head right. RIC 421. 3.04g, 17mm, 6h. Very Fine. Rare.

500

Rare Diva Sabina

933. Diva Sabina AR Denarius. Rome, circa AD 137. DIVA AVG SABINA, draped bust right, wearing diadem / PIETATI AVG, altar. RIC 422c. 3.07g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine. Rare.

500

934. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 138. IMP T AEL CAES HADRI ANTONINVS, bare head right / AVG PIVS P M TR P COS DES II, Pietas standing to right by altar, raising right hand and holding box of incense. RIC 13; Calic贸 1469. 6.03g, 18mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Scarce.

3,000

935. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 140-143. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / IOVI STATORI, Jupiter standing facing, holding sceptre and thunderbolt. RIC 72c; Calic贸 1552. 5.72g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Scarce.

152

2,000


936. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 148-149. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P TR P XII, bare head right / COS IIII, Aequitas standing left holding scales and cornucopiae. RIC 177; Calicó 1498. 5.65g, 17mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

4,000

A Striking Portrait of Antoninus Pius

937. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 153-154. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVII, laureate head left / COS IIII, Antoninus, togate, standing left, holding globe in right hand and scroll in left. RIC 233e; Calicó 1530; BMC 815. 7.22g, 20mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin. Ex John Whitney Walter Collection, Stack’s Auction, 29 November 1990, lot 47.

153

7,500


938. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 157-158. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P IMP II, bare head right / TR POT XXI COS IIII, Salus standing right, holding snake in her arms which she feeds from a patera held in her left hand. RIC 279b; Calicó 1683. 7.15g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine. Rare.

1,000

939. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 158-159. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, laureate head right / VOTA SVSCEPTA DEC III, Antoninus, veiled, standing facing, head left, sacrificing with patera over tripod, left arm at side, COS IIII in exergue. RIC 294a (d); Calicó 1714. 7.30g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Scarce.

3,000

940. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 159-160. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXIII, laureate head right / PIETATI AVG COS IIII, Pietas standing left between two children, holding globe and child. RIC 302; Calicó 1602; BMC 984. 7.32g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

3,000

941. Diva Faustina Senior AV Aureus. Rome, AD 141-61. DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right / AVGVSTA, Ceres veiled, standing left, holding torch and sceptre. RIC 356; Calicó 1763b; BMC 395. 7.31g, 19mm, 7h. Very Fine.

2,000

942. Marcus Aurelius Æ17 of Pautalia, Thrace. AD 161-188. [AVT KAI M AVP] ANTΩNINOC, bare head right / ΠΑVTAΛΙΩΤΩΝ, Hermes, wearing petasus, seated left on rock, holding caduceus. Varbanov II 4456; SNG Copenhagen. -; SNG Tübingen -. 4.39g, 17mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Ex Numismatik Lanz 147, 2 November 2009, lot 360.

154

300


943. Marcus Aurelius AR Denarius. Rome, AD 168-169. M ANTONINVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head right / FORT RED TR P XXIII IMP V, Fortuna seated left, holding rudder and cornucopiae; COS III in exergue. RIC 205. 3.41g, 20mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Toned; several marks and scratches.

300

944. Marcus Aurelius Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 168-169. M ANTONINVS TR P XXIII, laureate head right / COS III, emperor on horseback right, in military dress and holding spear, armed soldier in front, three soldiers behind; PROFECTIO AVG S C in two lines in exergue. RIC 963; C. 500. 24.97g, 32mm, 5h. Very Fine. Rare.

The Capitoline Equestrian Statue of Marcus Aurelius

650

945. Marcus Aurelius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 172-173. M ANTONINVS AVG TR P XXVII, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / IMP VI COS III, Marcus Aurelius on horseback right, raising right hand and holding parazonium. RIC 281; C. 302; Calicó 1867. 7.33g, 20mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

8,000

The reverse of this coin depicts the famous gilt bronze equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius now on display in the Capitoline Museum in Rome. The statue shows Marcus Aurelius holding his right hand out and slightly open in the traditional gesture of peace and clemency; a fitting representation of an emperor who has been universally admired as a ruler-philosopher. Standing at over 4 metres tall, and with a replica now positioned overlooking Rome on the Piazza del Campidoglio, this larger-than-life statue remains an important symbol of Roman history, evident from its appearance on the reverse of the modern Italian €0.50 piece.

946. Lucius Verus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 165. L VERVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head right / TR P V IMP III COS II, Parthian seated right, hands bound behind back, with bow, quiver and weapons at feet. RIC 540. 3.03g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

155

250


156


CalicĂł Plate Coin

947.

Commodus, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 178. L AVREL COMMODVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / TR P III IMP II COS P P, Castor standing left, holding spear and horse by its bridle. RIC 648; CalicĂł 2337 (this coin); BMC 774/775. 7.35g, 21mm, 11h. Fleur De Coin. Very Rare.

30,000

Ex Numismatic Fine Arts 16, 2 December 1985, lot 482. When this type was minted Commodus was only 16 or 17 years old, and yet the reverse legend declares him to have held tribunician power three times, been acclaimed imperator twice, consul once, and ironically, to be pater patriae - father of the state. That he was offered this honorific, accepted it and used it immediately upon his coinage is an indication of his disposition, for it was the custom of emperors to decline the honour if offered to them too early or while they were too young. Even Nero declined the title when it was offered to him in the first year of his reign, accepting it only later. It was also customary for the honoured to defer the usage of the title for a suitable length of time out of humility - Hadrian deferred its use for eleven years. Only the previous year had Commodus been granted the rank of Augustus, thus formally sharing power with his father, being also consul in that year - the youngest in Roman history up until that time. The reverse displays Castor as the patron of the Equites and protector of the young emperor, and represents Commodus in his role as princeps iuventutis, a title of great honour even in the days of the republic that since the reign of Augustus had been conferred on those who were intended to succeed to the throne, and which Commodus had received in AD 175. The unhealthy overindulgence of Commodus by his father Marcus Aurelius, which may have in part led to his megolamania in later life, was perhaps due to his being Aurelius’ only surviving son. He was showered with honours beyond his years, including having been made Caesar at the age of five. Yet still in this time, never far from his father or his entourage of worthy tutors, Commodus did not publicly display any of the maniacal tendencies that would later come to characterise his reign.

157


948. Crispina AV Aureus. Rome, AD 180-183. CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left holding Victory and sceptre, dove below throne. RIC 287; Calicó 2377e. 7.32g, 20mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful lustre. Rare.

15,000

Auction of the Empire

949. Didius Julianus Æ25 of Prusa ad Olympum, Bithynia. AD 193. ΑΥΤ Κ Μ ΔΙΔΟC ΙΟΥΛΙΑΝΟC ΑΥΓ, laureate and cuirassed bust right / Hexastyle temple with shield in pediment, ΠΡ-ΟΥ across field, CΑΕΩΝ in exergue. BMC 15. 5.81g, 25mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Possibly the fourth known and finest example.

1,500

The previous emperor Pertinax having been murdered after just three months in the imperial palace, Didius Julianus was raised to the purple by the Senate after a shameful episode where, the sources record, the empire was auctioned to the highest bidder. A former senator and consular colleague of Pertinax, Julianus was challenging the city prefect and father-in-law of Pertinax, Flavius Sulpicianus, who had not been well received by the Praetorian guard. However Julianus’ time in the palace was limited by the challenges of three provincial governors, all of whom made claim on the imperial throne. Pescennius Niger, governor in Syria, Clodius Albinus in Britain and Septimius Severus in Upper Pannonia all had themselves acclaimed emperor, though Severus, who was closest to Rome, was able to march towards Italy, meanwhile allying himself with Albinus, and depose Julianus after just two months. That this coin, the only provincial type of Julianus, was struck in a province so far from Rome within the time frame of a reign as short as his might perhaps be explained by the familiarity of the province with their former governor, as noted by the Historia Augusta (Didius Julianus, II, 2).

Very Rare Didia Clara

950. Didia Clara AR Denarius. Rome, AD 193. DIDIA CLARA AVG, draped bust right / HILAR TEMPOR, Hilaritas standing left, holding branch and cornucopiae. RIC 10 (Didius); RSC 3. 3.09g, 17mm, 11h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

158

2,000


951

952

951. Pescennius Niger AR Denarius. Antioch, AD 193-194. IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVST AVG, laureate head right / BONI EVENTVS, Fides standing facing, head left, holding basket of fruit and corn ears. RIC 5b. 3.12g, 17mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

952. Pescennius Niger AR Denarius. Antioch, AD 193-194. IMP CAES C PESCEN NIGER IVSTI AV, laureate head right / CELERI FRVGIFER, Fides standing left, holding basket of fruit and corn ears. RIC 11. 2.98g, 21mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

Ex Hamburger, 1925, lot 1114.

953. Pescennius Niger AR Denarius. Antioch, AD 193-194. IMP CAES C PESCEN NIGER IVST AV, laureate head right / ROMAE AETERN, Roma seated left, holding Victory and spear. RIC 69. 3.47g, 20mm, 12h. Near Very Fine. Very Rare.

500

‘Son’ of the Divine Marcus Aurelius

954. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 195. L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VII, laureate head right / DIVI M P II F PM TR P III COS II P P, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and trophy. RIC 66; C.-; Calicó 2448. 7.27g, 20mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. Very Rare.

20,000

Ex Gemini 1, 11 January 2005, lot 395. The death of Commodus marked the beginning of a turbulent year for the Empire, with five individuals claiming the throne in quick succession. Pertinax was immediately instated as emperor, but after just three months he was assasinated by the Praetorian Guard and succeeded by Didius Julianus. Three simultaneous challengers arose; Pescennius Niger in Syria, Clodius Albinus in Britain and Septimius Severus in Pannonia. Severus made an ally of Albinus and appointed him as Caesar having entered Rome without opposition in AD 193. With Albinus placated and defending the west, he marched east and defeated Pescennius Niger, in so doing finally secured rule of the empire. Having removed the most serious threat to his power, Severus now sought to establish the legitimacy of his succession and in 195 styled himself son of the deified Marcus Aurelius (Dio, LXXVI.7), to which the reverse legend of this type refers (DIVI MARCVS PII FILIVS). In addition, Septimius renamed Bassianus, his eldest son, as Marcus Aurelius Antoninus. Thus did Severus hope to legitimise his rule by portraying it as a natural succession and continuation of the Antonine adoptive emperors. Seeing that Severus had no intention of sharing power, Albinus proclaimed himself emperor but was defeated at the Battle of Lugdunum in 197, paving the way for a Severan dynasty that spanned the next four decades.

159


160


‘Bringer of Peace’

955.

Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 201. SEVERVS AVG PART MAX, laureate head right / FVNDATOR PACIS, Severus, veiled, standing left, holding branch and scroll. RIC 160; Calicó 2459; C. 202; BMC 189. 7.25g, 19mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin. Very Rare.

20,000

Ex Numismatik Lanz Auction 112, 25 November 2002, lot 598. Severus’ rise to power required him to remove the threats of two others who had been proclaimed emperor, Pescennius Niger in the East and Clodius Albinus in the West. Having routed Niger and pacified the eastern provinces, and after his victory against Albinus at the Battle of Lugdunum, Severus consolidated support in the western provinces and then turned his attention back to increasing the bounds of the Roman Empire eastwards. In 197 Severus invaded Parthia and captured the Parthian capital Ctesiphon. The sack of Ctesiphon was particularly devastating. Severus gave his soldiers liberty to plunder the city at will and brutal slaughter ensued. According to Cassius Dio, as many as 100,000 women and children were sold into slavery, and an enormous amount of treasure was carried off from the city. Ctesiphon was however not garrisoned, and Severus withdrew from the city. Though he failed to reduce the city of Hatra, which had also held out against Trajan, the northern half of Mesopotamia was annexed to the empire, and for this victory Severus took the title parthicus maximus, as seen on the obverse legend of this type. While he could not claim total victory over the Parthians, he had dealt a severe blow to that kingdom, which endured no more than another twenty seven years before a revolt by the Sassadids overran the weakened empire. The reverse however reiterates Severus’ role as a bringer of peace and stability, who had successfully dealt with both the usurpers within the empire and Rome’s external enemies. Indeed, the reign of Severus can be considered to have been a prosperous and largely stable period - a last golden period before the coming of an age of iron and rust.

161


162


Hope for a Dynasty

956.

Septimius Severus, with Caracalla and Geta, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 202-210. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / CONCORDIA AVGVSTORVM, Caracalla and Geta, each laureate and togate, standing facing each other, jointly holding Victory standing left on globe with their right hands. RIC 255; Calicó 2435; BMC 312. 7.35g, 20mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

12,500

This reverse type neatly shows the hope Severus held for unity and amity between his two sons, and his wish for them to rule together following his death and thus continue the dynasty he had founded. Imperial propaganda presented the image of a happy family that shared the responsibilities of rule: Severus’ wife Julia Domna was his trusted counsellor, his older son Caracalla his second in command, and his younger son, appointed Augustus in 209, was entrusted with administrative and bureaucratic duties. Yet the brothers’ disdain for one another is well-attested; Dio Cassius relates that ‘the two pretended to love and commend each other, but in all that they did they were diametrically opposed, and anyone could see that something terrible was bound to result from the situation.’ Following Severus’ death whilst on campaign in Caledonia in 211, the two brothers returned to Rome from Britannia to their joint rule under the watchful eye of their mother. The brothers argued and fought over every law and every appointment, the situation becoming sufficiently unbearable that by the end of the year during the festival of Saturnalia, Caracalla attempted to have Geta murdered, without success. Later, under the pretext of meeting for a reconciliation, Caracalla had Geta murdered in his mother’s arms by members of the Praetorian Guard loyal to him. After a tumultuous and bloodthirsty reign of less than six years, Caracalla was murdered by an officer of his personal bodyguard while relieving himself at a roadside near Carrhae. Though after a brief interlude the line of Severus’ father Bassianus would continue for some time yet in the form of Elagabalus (Caracalla’s first cousin, once removed) and later Severus Alexander, Caracalla’s death firmly extinguished Septimius’ dream for his sons to continue the Severan dynasty he had laboured to establish.

163


Two Indian Imitations The following two lots are examples of contemporary Indian imitations of Roman aurei. There was significant trade between Rome and India in the first two centuries AD, with India’s perfumes, spices and gems exchanged for Rome’s linen, glass and wine. Large quantities of Roman gold and silver coins have been found in South India alongside many examples of local imitations, some faithful to the original style, others not so. Many of these coins display indications of having been mounted for jewellery, suggesting that the style of the Roman coins, as well as the precious metal they were made from, was deemed fashionable by the wealthy citizens of India. From the early 3rd century onwards, direct Indo-Roman trade declined, and communications with India passed into the hands of intermediaries, making the following two examples among the latest of their kind.

957. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Contemporary Indian imitation, circa AD 202. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / FELICITAS SAECVLI, facing bust of Julia Domna, draped, between profile busts of Caracalla, laureate and draped on left facing right, and Geta, draped, cuirassed and bare-headed on right facing left. Cf. RIC 181; Cf. Calicó 2589-2593. 7.32g, 21mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

7,500

The issue of which this coin is an imitation depicts all four members of the Severan family, highlighting the importance of familial unity to the peace and stability of the Empire and alluding to the future succession of power from father to son. The placement of Julia Domna between the two princes is poignant, not only due to her position at the centre of Severus’ rule, but also for the mediatory role she played between her feuding sons.

958. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Contemporary Indian imitation, circa AD 202-210. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / LIBERALITAS AVGG V, Liberalitas standing left holding scales and cornucopiae. Cf. RIC 277; Cf. Calicó 2478. 7.27g, 20mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

6,000

959. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 202-210. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / RESTITVTOR VRBIS, Roma seated left on shield, holding Victory and sceptre, shield behind. RIC 288; Calicó 2529; BMC 358. 7.07g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Rare.

20,000

As the protecting goddess of the city of Rome, Roma is represented on this reverse type referencing Septimius Severus’ beneficent rule as founder of peace and restorer of the city, following the tumultuous reign of Commodus and the civil wars that followed his assassination. Septimius strengthened the southern borders of the empire by expansion of the Limes Tripolitanus, a frontier zone of defensive forts in north Africa, and expanded the empire in the east during his successful Parthian campiagn.

164


960. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 202-210. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / RESTITVTOR VRBIS, Roma seated left on shield, holding Victory and sceptre, shield behind. RIC 288; Calicó 2529; BMC 358. 7.23g, 21mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin. Attractive, lustrous surfaces. Rare.

20,000

Severus’ Military Victories

961. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 202-210. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / VICTORIAE, Victory in biga galloping right, holding whip, AVGG in exergue. RIC 299; Calicó 2559. 7.35g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Rare.

20,000

A highly succcessful military commander, Septimius Severus enlarged the Roman Empire significantly both in the east and north Africa. The triumphal arch which still stands in the Forum in Rome was dedicated in 203 to commemorate the Parthian campaign and provide a lasting monument to his achievements. The Historia Augusta relates that, following the victory against the Parthians, the Senate granted Severus a military triumph, but that suffering from gout he gave permission for Caracalla to lead the procession instead.

165


962. Caracalla Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 202-210. M AVREL ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder / VICTORIAE BRITTANNICAE, two Victories, standing right and left facing each other, setting shield on palm; below, to captives seated back to back; SC in exergue. RIC 465b. 25.85g, 33mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

1,500

Impressive and Fine Style Portrait of Caracalla

963. Caracalla AR Tetradrachm of Laodicea ad Mare, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria. AD 205-207. AYT • KAI • ANTΩNЄINOC • C •, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / • ΔHMAPX • ЄΞ • VΠATOC • B •, eagle standing facing on ground line, head and tail right, with wings displayed, holding wreath in beak; star between legs. McAlee, Severan Group 1, 5; Prieur 1130. 13.00g, 27mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine, with an expressive portrait. Lustrous metal.

4,000

Aelia Capitolina

964. Caracalla AR Tetradrachm of Aelia Capitolina, Judaea. AD 215-217. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΑΝΤωΝΙΝΟC CΕ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ΕΞ ΥΠΑΤΟCΤΔ, eagle standing on thyrsos with fillets, bunch of grapes between legs and wine-jar in right field. Prieur 1624 var. (winejar in left field). 11.36g, 27mm, 5h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

166

1,000


965. Geta Æ34 of Mylasa, Caria. AD 198-209. ΠO CEΠTIMIOC ΓETA C KAIC, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right / MYΛA-CEΩN, statue of Zeus Labraundos within tetrastyle temple. SNG von Aulock 2630. 16.46g, 34mm, 6h. Very Fine.

500

966. Geta Æ23 of Dium, Arabia Petraea. AD 207-208. ΠCEΠ ΓETA C, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right / Haddad standing facing, holding eagle-tipped sceptre and Nike; recumbent bull to either side, WN upwards on right, date AOC downwards on left, ΔEIHN in exergue. Rosenberger 7; Spijkerman 8, pl. 24 (same dies); SNG ANS 1281. 9.31g, 23mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare, and in excellent condition for the type.

300

Attractive Late Portrait of Geta

967. Geta AR Denarius. Rome, AD 210-212. P SEPT GETA PIVS AVG BRIT, laureate and bearded head right / LIBERALITAS AVG V, Liberalitas standing left, holding abacus and cornucopiae. RIC 88 var. (rudder on reverse); BMC 65 var. (same). 3.18g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Rare.

300

968. Macrinus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 217-218. IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right / AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing, head left, holding scales and cornucopiae. RIC 53. 3.37g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

969. Diadumenian, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 217-218. M OPEL ANT DIADVMENIAN CAES, bare-headed, draped bust right / PRINC IVVENTVTIS, Diadumenian standing facing, head right, holding standard and sceptre, two more standards to right. RIC 102. 3.68g, 20mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Scarce. Ex DNW Auction 73, 14 March 2007, lot 533.

167

500


970. Diadumenian, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 217-218. M OPEL ANT DIADVMENIAN CAES, bare-headed, draped bust right / PRINC IVVENTVTIS, Diadumenian standing facing, head right, holding standard and sceptre, two standards behind him. RIC 102. 2.99g, 20mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Hairline flan crack. Scarce.

500

‘Restoration of the Dynasty’

971. Elagabalus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 218-219. IMP CAES M AVR ANTONINVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTOR ANTONINI AVG, Victory walking right, holding wreath and palm. RIC 154; C. 288; BMC 30; Calicó 3038. 6.22g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Fine style portrait. Rare.

15,000

Ex HSA 22110. This aureus and the following can be seen to make reference to the successful restoration of the Antonine family, to which Elagabalus claimed to belong, after the defeat of Macrinus and his son Diadumenian. The public slur implied by the reverse legend that they were ‘dynastic interlopers’ fitted well with the story of events that Julia Maesa, Elagablus’ grandmother and maternal aunt of Caracalla, was promoting. She was responsible for instigating the revolt against Macrinus by suggesting that he had engineered the murder of Caracalla and that Elagabalus, as an illegitimate son of Caracalla’s, was the rightful heir. After only a few months in office and never having entered his capital in Rome, Macrinus was engaged in battle by the army he had once commanded, was routed and fled towards Italy. He was captured and executed in Cappadocia, leaving Elagabalus, an unproven youth of 13, free to travel to Rome as the new emperor.

972. Elagabalus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 218-219. IMP CAES M AVR ANTONINVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTOR ANTONINI AVG, Victory walking right, holding wreath and palm. RIC 154; C. 288; BMC 30; Calicó 3038. 6.77g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Rare.

168

12,500


Triumphal Entrance to Rome

973. Elagabalus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 220-221. IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P III COS III P P, Elagabalus in slow quadriga left, holding branch and sceptre, star in field. RIC 35; Calicó 3013a; BMC 183. 6.49g, 21mm, 4h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

25,000

Elagabalus was the hereditary High Priest of the Sun-god El-Gabal, a role which he brought with him to Rome from his hometown of Emesa in Syria, and which he appears to have taken far more seriously than his role as Emperor. His wanton disregard for the ancient customs and practices at Rome, and his extreme devotion to his role as High Priest, have come to characterise his reign and led eventually to his demise at the hands of the Praetorian guard after his grandmother Julia Maesa, who had engineered his accession, diverted their support to his cousin Severus Alexander. A type that was struck during each year of his reign, it must be inferred that the reverse scene depicted here is that of Elagabalus entering Rome in triumph after the defeat of his predecessor Macrinus and his son Diadumenian. This particular aureus only has slight reference to his fanatical religious zeal in the form of the star in the upper left field of the reverse, bringing El-Gabal into the picture. On later issues of this type we find a ‘horn’ on the Emperor’s forehead on the obverse, thought by some to signify solar rays emanating from the head of Elagabalus, but more likely was intended to antagonise Roman sensibilities by referencing his depraved religious practices.

974. Elagabalus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 221-222. IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned and draped bust right / SACERD DEI SOLIS ELAGAB, emperor standing right, sacrificing over lighted altar, holding patera and club, star in right field. RIC 131. 3.17g, 18mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

100

975. Severus Alexander Æ38 of Tarsus, Cilicia. Circa AD 231-235. A K M A CЄOY AΛЄIANΔPOC CЄB, draped bust right, wearing crown of demiurgus, Π-Π across fields / ΔѠPE AAΛEXANΔPOY TA MH, galley sailing left, two dolphins below, AMΓ in left field, KB in right field. SNG France 1577 (these dies); SNG Levante 1089 (these dies); BMC 213. 26.10g, 38mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

3,000

A rare reverse type, this issue was struck to celebrate the gift of grain given by Severus Alexander to Tarsus on the occasion of his visit to the city in 231/232. The Emperor and his army were passing through Cilicia on campaign against the Sassanid Persians, who had made serious incursions into Roman territory the previous year under Ardashir I. Although Severus Alexander celebrated a triumph on his return, the historical sources disagree as to the extent of Roman success and suggest that the campaign ended inconclusively.

169


170


976. Orbiana Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 225-227. SALL BARBIA ORBIANA AVG, diademed, draped bust right / CONCORDIA AVGVSTORVM, Severus Alexander standing right, togate, holding scroll and clasping hands with Orbiana standing left. RIC 657. 19.30g, 31mm, 11h. Very Fine. Rare.

2,000

977. Maximus, as Caesar, Æ26 of Pella, Macedon. AD 235-238. C IVL VER MAXIMVS CAES, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right / COL IVL AVG PELLA, Tyche seated left. SNG ANS 634. 9.79g, 26mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

500

978. Maximus Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 236. C IVL VERVS MAXIMVS CAES, bare-headed, draped bust right / PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Maximus in military dress standing left, holding wand, two legionary signa to right, S-C across fields. RIC 9. 18.25g, 30mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Attractive dark patina.

1,500

Ex Wayne C. Phillips Collection of Roman Sestertii; Ex CNG Mail Bid Sale 84, 5 May 2010, lot 1182.

Rare and Extremely Fine Gordian II Denarius

979. Gordian II AR Denarius. Rome, AD 238. IMP M ANT GORDIANVS AFR AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PROVIDENTIA AVGG, Providentia standing facing, head to left, leaning on column to right and holding a wand and cornucopiae, globe at her feet. BMC 19; C. 5; RIC 1. 3.33g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

3,000

980. Gordian II AR Denarius. Rome, AD 238. IMP M ANT GORDIANVS AFR AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PROVIDENTIA AVGG, Providentia standing facing, head to left, leaning on column to right and holding a wand and cornucopiae, globe at her feet. BMC 19; C. 5; RIC 1. 3.38g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

171

2,000


981. Balbinus AR Antoninianus. Rome, AD 238. IMP CAES D CAEL BALBINVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / CONCORDIA AVGG, clasped hands. RIC 10; RSC 3. 5.56g, 23mm, 12h. Very Fine.

300

Outstanding Denarius of Pupienus

982. Pupienus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 238. IMP C M CLOD PVPIENVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PAX PVBLICA, Pax seated left holding branch and sceptre. RIC 4. 3.42g, 21mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Lightly toned. A well-detailed portrait.

1,000

The Usurper Pacatian

983. Pacatian AR Antoninianus. Viminacium, AD 248-249. IMP TI CL MAR PACATIANVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PAX AETERNA, Pax standing left, holding branch and transverse sceptre. RIC 5. 4.64g, 22mm, 7h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

8,000

Tiberius Claudius Marinus Pacatianus was raised to the purple by his troops, and then killed by them within a matter of months and before Trajan Decius, sent by the Emperor Philip I, was able to tackle him himself. Usurping power in the region of the Danube, later writers such as Zosimus relate that he was an officer of the army and perhaps of senatorial rank. Though no specific reasons for the rebellion are clear from the sources, the Danube frontier is known to have been threatened repeatedly by the Goths, and the sheer number of uprisings in this area led by the army is suggestive of serious and continuing unrest. Though at least seven reverse types are known for Pacatian, the remaining coinage is extremely rare and in the main of poor quality. One reverse type, featuring Roma seated, securely dates Pacatian’s revolt to AD 248 as it commemorates the 1000th anniversary of the founding of Rome, an event that Philip I also marked on his coinage. Viminacium is taken to be the mint for Pacatian’s coinage due to similarities in style to other issues from this mint, and also because for the period of the rebellion no coins of Philip I were produced there.

172


Attractive Aureus of Herennia Etruscilla

984. Herennia Etruscilla AV Aureus. Rome, AD 249-251. HER ETRVSCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right / PVDICITIA AVG, Pudicitia seated left, drawing veil from face and holding sceptre. RIC 59a; C. 18; Calicó 3308. 4.02g, 20mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine; small contact mark at 1 o’clock on obverse. Very Rare.

10,000

Ex Numismatik Lanz Auction 150, 13 December 2010, lot 395.

985. Aemilian AR Antoninianus. Rome, AD 253. IMP AEMILIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / HERCVL VICTORI, Hercules standing right leaning on club, holding bow. RIC 3b; RSC 13. 3.50g, 22mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

300

986. Macrianus Æ Antoninianus. Antioch, AD 260-261. IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust of Macrianus right, slight drapery on left shoulder / IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter enthroned left, holding patera and sceptre, eagle at feet, star in left field. RIC 9. 3.56g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Pleasant desert patina. Very Rare.

173

300


174


Ex Biaggi Collection

987.

Uranius Antoninus AV Aureus. Emesa, AD 253-254. L IVL AVR SVLP VRA ANTONINVS, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm. RIC 9; Calic贸 3397 (this coin); Biaggi 1427 (this coin); Delbruek, NC 1948, p. 20 and fig. 16 (this coin). 5.91g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

50,000

Ex NAC 40, 16 May 2007, lot 810; Said to have been found in Beirut. A tantalisingly obscure figure, Lucius Julius Aurelius Sulpicius Uranius Antoninus struck a series of coins in gold and silver quite unlike anything his contemporaries were able to produce: the purity and weight of the metal used was far above that found under the legitimate emperors Valerian and Gallienus. Also in marked contrast, Uranius does not afford himself the usual imperial titles on his aurei or denarii, the latter being struck from the same dies as the former. However, his billon and bronze coinage is more typical of the provincial coinage of the period, including the use of the greek translations of Imperator and Augustus. The literary sources are unclear about Uranius: Zosimus places him as a usurpur during the reign of Gallienus, and John Malalas, a contemporary Christian writer, notes that he was the hereditary high priest of the sun-god El Gabal, a principal deity of Emesa. It is understood that Uranius came to prominence while trying to defend the city of Emesa from the army of the Sassanid king Shapur I, who was returning from sacking Antioch. Numismatic evidence from a provincial bronze coin securely dates the reign of Uranius to the 565th year of the Seleucid Era, providing a chronological anchor of AD 253/4 for his rebellion, neatly tying in with the literary sources. It is probable that in the uncertain period after the death of Trebonianus Gallus and the civil war between Aemilian and Valerian, and in the face of possible attack by the Sassanid Persians Uranius was acclaimed imperator by garrisoned troops to deal with the imminent threat. That his gold and silver does not mark him out with the imperial titles, while his bronze coinage does, might perhaps be explained thus: in an attempt to avoid notice in Rome as another claimant to the imperial throne, coinage that might circulate further was kept neutral and inoffensive, while bronze coins destined to be used locally and within the nearby Persian Empire clearly showed his dominance of the area, especially practical for his defence of Emesa. However, in the end nearly all that can be said with a reasonable degree of confidence is that Uranius Antoninus rose to prominence in the unsettled conditions of the mid 3rd-Century, only to vanish into historical obscurity. Whether he was assassinated or voluntarily abdicated may never be known.

175


988. Carausius Æ Antoninianus. Londinium, AD 292. IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right / PAX AVGGG, Pax standing left, holding olive branch and vertical sceptre, S-P across fields, MLXXI in exergue. RIC 141. 4.64g, 23mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

300

Fine Style Zenobia

989. Zenobia Æ Antoninianus. Antioch, AD 272. S ZENOBIA AVG, draped bust right, set on crescent / IVNO REGINA, Juno standing facing, looking left, holding patera and sceptre; at feet left, a peacock; star in left field. RIC V 2 corr. (no star); Carson, Q. Tic VII, 1978, 4; BN 1267a. 3.57g, 22mm, 7h. Extremely Fine; among the finest known examples, struck from dies of fine style. Extremely Rare.

10,000

The issues struck for Zenobia at Antioch are of uniformly superior style to those produced at Emesa, and the present issue closely resembles the portraiture of Otacilia Severa and Salonina, whose coins had been struck there. The wife of the ruler of Palmyra, Septimia Zenobia came to power as regent for her son Septimius Vaballathus in AD 267 after the murder of her husband Septimius Odenathus, who had been entrusted with the defence of the Roman provinces in the east by the Emperor Gallienus. A strong character and very ambitious, Zenobia expanded her sphere of influence through the capture of the province of Egypt and the expulsion of the Roman prefect Tenagino Probus and his forces in 269, a campaign aided in its success in part due to the turmoil inside the Roman Empire after the death of Gallienus. The Roman east remained under the control of the kingdom of Palmyra under the subsequent emperors Claudius II and Quintillus, and when Aurelian came to power in 270 he pragmatically chose to acknowledge Zenobia and Vabalathus in order to allow himself time to first deal with the breakaway Gallic Empire. Though the mint for the rare portrait coins of Zenobia has long been a topic of debate, it is generally agreed now that they were struck in Syria, most likely at Emesa or Antioch, both Roman mints that were taken by Zenobia during her advance into Roman territory and expansion of her empire. The imperial title Augusta is proudly displayed on her coinage, but Zenobia’s power was not to last. Having subdued the uprisings in the west, Aurelian marched on her with an army. Their forces met outside Antioch, resulting in a battle that routed Zenobia’s army, which fled to Emesa. Zenobia and her son attempted to escape through the desert with the help of the Sassanid Persians, but were captured by Aurelian’s horsemen and subsequently taken to Rome to be displayed during the emperor’s triumphant return to the city.

Pleasing Probus Medallion

990. Probus Æ30 Medallion. Rome, AD 276-282. IMP PROBVS PF AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust left, holding spear forward and shield decorated with scene of profectio / MONETA AVG, three Monetae standing facing, heads left, each holding scales in their right hands above a stack of coins at their feet, and cornucopiae in their left hands. Gnecchi II p.118, 24; Cohen 376. 21.13g, 30mm, 5h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

176

2,000


991. Probus Æ Antoninianus. Serdica, AD 276-282. IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield / SOLI INVICTO, Sol in spread quadriga, holding whip, KA•Γ in exergue. RIC 862. 3.20g, 23mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

150

992. Diocletian AR Siliqua. Siscia, AD 294-295. DIOCLETIANVS AVG, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before archway of campgate, SIS in exergue. RIC 46a. 3.13g, 19mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. Very Rare.

1,000

Reformer in Egypt

993. Domitius Domitianus Æ Follis. Alexandria, AD 295-296. IMP C L DOMITIVS DOMITIANVS AVG, laureate bust right / GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius of the Roman people standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae, eagle with wings spread standing at his feet, Γ in right field, ALE in exergue. RIC 20. 8.40g, 27mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

1,500

Stationed in an Egypt that was overtaxed and burdened with considerable administrative corruption, Domitian Domitianus took the purple in an effort to ameliorate the lot of the local people. He instituted agricultural reforms and repairs to the decrepit irrigation channels, undertook a reform of the local coinage in order to improve commerce, and strengthened the province militarily. Diocletian’s response was swift and brutal, and he invaded Egypt. However, despite being heavily outnumbered Domitianus was able to withstand Diocletian’s advance for months, and although by December of 297 Diocletian had control of Egypt, Alexandria refused to capitulate. Domitianus’ ultimate fate is unrecorded, however he was likely killed or assassinated. In his fury, Diocletian authorised a general sack of the city and a massacre of the population.

994. Domitius Domitianus Æ Follis. Alexandria, AD 295-296. IMP C L DOMITIVS DOMITIANVS AVG, laureate bust right / GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius of the Roman people standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae, eagle with wings spread standing at his feet, Γ in right field, ALE in exergue. RIC 20. 11.18g, 26mm, 12h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

177

1,000


178


Severus II as Caesar

995. Severus II, as Caesar, AR Argenteus. Serdica, AD 305-306. SEVERVS NOB C, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, three-turreted camp-gate with no doors, pellet in doorway, ·SM·SDB· in exergue. RIC -; Gautier 24 var. (officina); RSC -; Cf. NAC 62, 6 October 2011, lot 2089 (same obv. die). 3.29g, 21mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. Of the Highest Rarity.

8,000

Most likely struck to mark the commencement of the Second Tetrarchy in AD 305, this extremely rare coin is one of only a handful known, a few having come to light in a hoard about a decade ago. Struck using the same obverse dies as several known specimens, the reverse die of this issue is new, having the inclusion of a pellet in the doorway of the camp gate. The scarcity of these types might be explained by the short period of time during which Severus held the position of Caesar before being elevated by Galerius after the death of Constantius I in summer 306 - in a matter of months he was raised from the senior ranks of the army to Augustus in the West. However, his time as Augustus came to an abrupt end when he was tasked with the supression of the revolt of Maxentius in Rome: he marched on the city at the head of an army previously commanded by Maximian, father of Maxentius, to whom his soldiers deserted. Severus fled to Ravenna where, in 307, he was persuaded by Maxentius to surrender. Despite Maximian’s assurances that he would be treated with respect, Severus was nonetheless displayed as a captive and later imprisoned at Tres Tabernae. When Galerius invaded Italy to suppress Maxentius and Maximian himself, the Maxentius ordered Severus’s death. He was executed (or forced to commit suicide) on 16 September 307.

‘Persecution Issue’

996. Time of Maximinus II Æ16. ‘Persecution Issue’. Antioch, AD 310-313. GENIO ANTIOCHENI, Tyche seated facing, river-god Orontes swimming below / APOLLONI SANCTO, Apollo standing left, holding patera and lyre; Γ in right field, SMA in exergue. Vagi 2954; Failmezger 229. 1.58g, 16mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

150

An active campaign of persecution against local Christians by Maximinus II reached its height during 310-313 the eastern cities in Nicomedia, Antioch, and Alexandria. Christians were subject to confiscation of land and property, and expelled from the cities; Churches were closed and ransacked. These three major mint cities struck a series of small bronzes honoring the old Greco-Roman gods - Jupiter, Apollo, Tyche, and Serapis among them. The persecutions subsided in AD 313 as a result of the Edict of Milan, jointly issued by Constantine and Licinius - the senior emperors - which proclaimed a policy of religious freedom, and returned confiscated property to the Christians.

179


180


Sicut Decennalia, Sicut Vicennalia

997.

Licinius I AV Aureus. Nicomedia, AD 317-318. LICINIVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / IOVI CONS LICINI AVG, Jupiter standing left on platform, holding Victory on globe and leaning on sceptre; eagle with wreath in beak at feet; SIC X SIC XX in two lines on face of platform; SMNΓ in exergue. Calicó 5104a; RIC 18 corr. (obverse legend). 5.29g, 2mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. Extremely Rare.

25,000

Struck to celebrate his decennalia in AD 317 this beautifully detailed aureus was minted during a period of uneasy peace between Licinius and his co-emperor Constantine. The reverse, marked on the platform with SIC X SIC XX, gives thanks for ten years of rule and seeks the gods’ favour for a further ten such years, that they might be enjoyed in health and prosperity. Licinius may well have held such hopes, for 317 marked a high point of peace and stability, and it was in this year that he elevated his young son to the rank of Caesar, despite his being only two years old. Alas, it was not to be. After 317 the uneasy truce the two Augusti maintained after their previous conflicts quickly soured again; Licinius reneged on the jointly issued Edict of Milan in 320, beginning a new persecution of Christians in the Eastern Roman Empire - an act that further alienated him from his colleague. Then in 321 tempers rose when Constantine pursued a band of Sarmatians that had been ravaging his territory across the Danube into Licinius’ realm. When this was repeated in 323 Licinius accused Constantine of breaking the treaty between them. Given the pretext he needed for war, Constantine wasted no time in invading Licinius’ lands, defeating his fleet in 323 and routing his army at the Battle of Adrianople. By 325, having been defeated again at sea at the Battle of the Hellespont and on land at the final pitched Battle of Chrysopolis, Licinius and his son were prisoners of Constantine who despite promising clemency, soon found cause to have both father and son executed. The reverse design of this aureus featuring Jupiter atop a platform, at first standing and later seated, was an innovation in design that became a standard type at Nicomedia with little variation until the Battle of Chrysopolis in AD 324, when Licinius was defeated by Constantine I. That he should end the use of Jupiter so prominently on the coinage is not surprising given the opposing beliefs of Licinius and Constantine. The latter had taken readily to Christianity, using the Chi-Rho symbol as his talisman, emblazoning it on the shields and standards of his army, while himself placing the worshi of Sol Invictus first and foremost among the religions of his territory. Licinius on the other hand might have seen himself as being the bastion of traditional Roman religious beliefs, taking Jupiter as his patron and protector, evidenced publicly as seen here in the legends of his coins. This religious rivalry was borne out at the Battle of Chrysopolis, where Licinius drew up his battle line with images of the Roman gods prominently displayed in the ranks; this was mirrored by a multitude of Chi-Rho symbols in the opposing army of Constantine. Apparently, Licinius had developed a superstitious dread of the symbol which he allowed to infect the morale of his soldiers. The resulting slaughter of his army was viewed by Christians throughout the empire as a triumph of their god over the old pagan deities, further hastening the decline of traditional Roman religious beliefs.

181


998. Constantine I Æ Follis. Londinium, AD 310-312. CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right / ADVENTVS AVG N, prince riding left, right hand raised, left holding spear, on horse pawing seated captive to left; PLN in exergue. RIC 142. 3.77g, 23mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Scarce.

300

999. Constantine I AV Solidus. Thessalonica, AD 324. Head right, with plain diadem, looking upwards / CONSTANTINVS AVG, Victory seated left on throne, holding Victory on globe and cornucopiae, shield behind, SMTSΒ in exergue. RIC 131. 4.41g, 20mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine.

4,000

1000 1001 1000. Helena Æ Follis. Nicomedia, AD 325-326. FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and mantled bust right, wearing necklace / SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE, Securitas standing left, lowering branch and raising robe with right hand; MNΓ in exergue. RIC 129. 3.24g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

100

1001. Helena Æ Follis. Antioch, AD 327-328. FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and mantled bust right, wearing necklace / SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE, Securitas standing left, lowering branch and raising robe with right hand; SMANTS in exergue. RIC 80. 3.85g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine; pleasant desert patina. Extremely Rare.

100

1002. Constantius II, as Caesar, Æ Follis. Antioch, AD 324-325. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left / CONSTANTIVS CAESAR in three lines, star above, SMANTΔ below. RIC 55. 2.51g, 18mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

100

1003. Julian II Æ Follis. Sirmium, AD 361-363. D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / SECVRITAS REI PVB, bull standing right, two stars above, star BRISM palm in exergue. RIC 107. 9.02g, 28mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

182

150


1004. Valens AR Siliqua. Constantinople, AD 364-367. DN VALENS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VOT V within wreath, •C•Δ in ex. RIC 13d. 1.80g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

Ex Lanz 14, 18 April 1978, lot 449.

1005. Theodosius I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 382-383. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / CONCORDIA AVGGG Θ, Constantinopolis seated facing, head right, foot on prow, holding sceptre and globe, CONOB in exergue. RIC 45d; Depeyrot 33/3. 4.43g, 21mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

1,000

1006. Aelia Flaccilla Æ2. Antioch, AD 383-388. AEL FLACCILLA AVG, draped bust right, with elaborate headdress, necklace and mantle / SALVS REIPVBLICAE, empress standing facing, holding scroll across chest with both hands; ANTЄ in exergue. RIC 62. 5.69g, 22mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Scarce.

200

1007. Honorius AV Solidus. Sirmium, AD 393-395. DN HONORIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTOR-IA AVGGGZ, emperor standing right, holding standard and Victory on globe, his foot on captive, S-M across fields, COMOB in exergue. RIC 14d. 4.32g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Scarce.

1,000

1008. Honorius AV Solidus. Milan, AD 408-423. DN HONORIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, emperor standing right, holding standard and Victory on globe, foot on captive seated left. RIC 1350. 4.42g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine; scrape across ear of protrait. Rare.

183

750


1009 1010 1009. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 408-420. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, helmeted, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust three quarters facing, holding spear over right shoulder and shield, decorated with horseman motif, on left arm / CONCORDIA AVGG Θ, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head turned right, holding sceptre and Victory on globe, with left foot on prow; star in left field, CONOB in exergue. RIC 202. 4.43g, 21mm, 6h. Very Fine; graffito on obverse. Scarce.

750

1010. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 430-440. DN THEODOSIVS PF AVG, helmeted, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust three quarters facing, holding spear over right shoulder and behind head, and shield with horseman and enemy motif / VOT XXX MVLT XXXXS, Constantinopolis enthroned to left, holding globus cruciger and sceptre; shield behind throne, star in right field, CONOB in exergue. RIC 257; Depeyrot 81/1. 4.47g, 21mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Scarce.

750

1011. Aelia Pulcheria AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 423-429. AEL PVLCHERIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right, wearing necklace and earrings, and being crowned by the Hand of God / VOT XX MVLT XXXI, Victory standing left, holding long jewelled cross, with star in upper left field, CONOB in exergue. RIC 227. 4.44g, 22mm, 12h. Very Fine. Struck on a large flan.

1,000

1012. Leo I AV Solidus. Constantinople, circa AD 465/466. D N LEO PERPET AVG, helmeted, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust three quarters facing, holding spear over right shoulder and shield, decorated with horseman motif, on left arm / VICTORIA AVGGG Γ, Victory standing left, holding long jewelled cross; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIRB 3b; LRC 527; Depeyrot 93/1; RIC 605. 4.19g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Scarce.

1013

1,000

1014

1013. Leo I AV Solidus. Constantinople, circa AD 465/466. D N LEO PERPET AVG, helmeted, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust three quarters facing, holding spear over right shoulder and shield, decorated with horseman motif, on left arm / VICTORIA AVGGG A, Victory standing left, holding long jewelled cross; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIRB 3b; LRC 527; Depeyrot 93/1; RIC 605. 4.43g, 20mm, 6h. Very Fine. Scarce.

500

1014. Leo I AV Solidus. Constantinople, circa AD 465/466. D N LEO PERPET AVG, helmeted, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust three quarters facing, holding spear over right shoulder and shield, decorated with horseman motif, on left arm / VICTORIA AVGGG Γ, Victory standing left, holding long jewelled cross; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIRB 3b; LRC 527; Depeyrot 93/1; RIC 605. 4.44g, 20mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Scarce.

750

1015. Leo I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 465/466. D N LEO PERPET AVG, helmeted, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust three quarters facing, holding spear over right shoulder and shield, decorated with horseman motif, on left arm / VICTORIA AVGGG A, Victory standing left, holding long jewelled cross; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIRB 3b; LRC 527; Depeyrot 93/1; RIC 605. 4.39g, 21mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Scarce.

184

500


1016. Zeno AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 476-91. D N ZENO PERP AVG, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust facing holding spear and shield / VICTORIA AVGGG Δ, Victory standing left, supporting long jewelled cross, star in right field, CONOB in exergue. RIC 905. 4.46g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

750

1017. Zeno, with Leo II as Caesar, AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 476-477. D N ZENO ET LEO NOV CAES, helmeted, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust three-quarters facing, holding spear and shield with horseman and enemy motif / VICTORIA AVGGGZ, Victory standing left, supporting long jewelled cross; star in right field, CONOB in ex. RIC 906; Depeyrot 107/1. 4.51g, 21mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

Extremely Rare Zenonis Solidus

2,500

1018. Zenonis AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 475-476. AEL ZENONIS AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, wearing necklace and earring, crowned by the Hand of God / VICTORIA AVGGG, Victory standing left, holding long cross; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. Cf. RIC 1004; Depeyrot 105/2; MIRB 2a. 3.92g, 20mm, 12h. Fine. Of the highest rarity, one of very few known examples.

3,000

Aelia Zenonis was empress for a short period of time during the reign of her husband Basiliscus, who was proclaimed emperor in 475 after a plot to depose Zeno. However, after a reign of little more than a year Basiliscus was evicted from the throne by a resurgent Zeno, who had the support of the senate and the power of the imperial treasury, which he had removed from Constantinople on his departure, forcing Basiliscus to raise taxes and fuel his own unpopularity. Agreeing not to shed their blood, Zeno had Basiliscus, Zenonis and their son Marcus sent to Cappadocia where they were imprisoned in a dry cistern to die from exposure.

1019. Zenonis Æ4. Constantinople, AD 475-6. A ZENONIS, pearl-diademed, draped bust right, wearing necklace and earrings / Zenonis monogram within wreath. RIC 1017. 1.37g, 11mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

ISSUES OF THE MIGRATION PERIOD

500

1020. Germanic Migration Period. Imitative Æ Nummus. DN…, laureate and draped bust of emperor right / Legend around wreath within which cross potent; below, two pellets. Cf. BMC Vandals pl. 4, 44. 1.12g, 14mm, 9h. Very Fine.

100

1021. Germanic Migration Period. Odovacar Æ Nummus. Ravenna, AD 476-493. Draped and cuirassed bust right / Monogram. RIC 3502; BMC Vandals p. 45, 10; Ranieri 235. 0.98g, 11mm, 8h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

185

800


1022

1023

1024

1022. Gepids in Sermium. Imitative Siliqua in the name of Anastasius. AD 491-518. DN ANASTASIVS AV, diademed and draped head right / Garbled legend around monogram of Theoderic. Cf. Demo 69-81; MIB I, 46; Metlich p. 43, fig. 22. 0.94g, 17mm, 9h. Good Very Fine.

500

1023. Gepids in Sermium. Imitative Siliqua in the name of Anastasius. AD 491-518. DN ANASTASIVS A, diademed and draped head right / A INVICTA + A RVMANI, around monogram of Theoderic; below, star. Cf. Demo 77; MIB I, 46; Metlich p. 43, fig. 22. 0.95g, 15mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

500

1024. Gepids in Sermium. Imitative Siliqua in the name of Justin. AD 518-526. Garbled legend around diademed and draped head right / Monogram of Theoderic; above, +; below, O. Cf. Demo 194; Metlich p. 43, fig. 23. 0.87g, 13mm, 12h. Very Fine.

500

1025. Ostrogoths, Italy Æ Double Follis. Countermark LXXXIII (Claudius Æ Sestertius). Head of Claudius right / Spes walking left (RIC 99). Cf. MEC 65. 22.94g, 34mm, 5h. Fine. Green patina.

300

1026 1027 1026. Ostrogoths, Italy Æ Follis. Countermark LII (Imitative Augustus Æ As). … TR PONT MAX TR…. Head of Augusts right / … AET…S LAMIA IIIVR A…, around large SC (RIC –; CBN –), Cf. MEC 73. 7.74g, 27mm, 5h. Fine. Dark patina.

100

1027. Ostrogoths, Italy Æ Follis. Countermark LII (Vespasian Æ Dupondius). IMP CAES VESP AVG P M TR COS VI …, radiate head of Vespasian right / FELICITAS, Felicitas standing left (cf. RIC 715). Cf. MEC 73. 14.00g, 28mm, 5h. Fine. Earthy dark patina.

1028

150

1029

1028. Ostrogoths, Italy Æ Follis. Countermark LII (Domitian Æ As). CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS II, laureate head right / AEQVITAS AVGVST SC, Aequitas standing left (RIC 657). Cf. MEC 75. 12.67g, 28mm, 5h. Fine.

150

1029. Ostrogoths, Italy Æ Follis. Countermark LII (Hadrian Æ As). Laureate head right / S C, Minerva advancing right (RIC 664). MEC –. 10.10g, 25mm, 5h. Fine.

100

1030. Ostrogoths, Italy. Theoderic AR Half-Siliqua. Ravenna, AD 493-526. Struck in the name of Anastasius. DN ANASTASIVS AVG, diademed and draped bust right / Christogram within wreath. Metlich 43; MEC 117. 1.33g, 12mm. Fine. Test cut on rim.

186

100


1031. Ostrogoths, Italy. Theoderic AR Half-Siliqua. Ravenna, AD 493-526. Struck in the name of Justin I. DN IVSTINVS P F AVG, diademed and draped bust right / Monogram of Theoderic within wreath. Metlich 55; MEC 121. 0.69g, 11mm, 6h. Very Fine. Toned.

250

1032. Ostrogoths, Italy. Theodoric Æ Follis. Rome, AD 493-526. INVICTA ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma right / Eagle with raised wings standing left, head right; to left of eagle, XL; in exergue, E between two pellets. Metlich 76b; MEC 106. 11.59g, 25mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Dark patina.

500

1033. Ostrogoths, Italy. Theoderic Æ 10 Nummi. Rome, AD 493-526. FELIX RAVΕΝΝA, draped bust of Ravenna right, wearing mural crown / RE monogram within wreath, X below. Metlich 78a; MEC 145; Ranieri 260 (Ravenna). 2.95g, 17mm, 6h. Good Fine. Green patina.

100

A Run of Coins of Athalaric

1034. Ostrogoths, Italy. Athalaric Æ Follis. Rome, AD 526-534. INVICTA ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma right / She-wolf standing left, head front, suckling Romulus and Remus; above, XL; in exergue, IIII between two pellets (officina 4). Metlich 82a; MEC 96. 15.11g, 28mm, 12h. Fine.

100

1035. Ostrogoths, Italy. Athalaric Æ Half-Follis. Rome, AD 526-534. INVICTA ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma right. / Fig tree between two standing eagles, with wings raised and heads reverted; in exergue, XX. Metlich 83b. MEC 110. 6.77g, 22mm, 12h. Near Very Fine. Green patina.

1036

1037

250

1038

1036. Ostrogoths, Italy. Athalaric Æ 10 Nummi. Rome, AD 526-534. INVICTA ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma right / D N / ATHAL / ARICVS / REX, below, X. Metlich 86; MEC 133. 3.71g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Dark green patina.

250

1037. Ostrogoths, Italy. Athalaric Æ 5 Nummi. Rome, AD 526-534. INVICTA ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma right / DN AΤΗALΛRICVS RIX around large V. Metlich 87b; MIB I, pl. 40, 79. 1.75g, 13mm, 5h. Good Fine. Dark patina.

150

1038. Ostrogoths, Italy. Athalaric Æ Nummus. Rome, AD 526-534. Struck in name of Justinian I. …. IAN.., diademed and draped bust right / Monogram of Athalaric. Metlich 88, MEC 135. 1.32g, 10mm, 6h. Fine. Dark green patina.

187

100


1039. Ostrogoths, Italy. Witigis Æ 10 Nummi. Ravenna, AD 536-539. INVICTA ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma right / D N / WIT / ICES / REX in four lines within wreath, X below. Metlich 92; Ranieri 308. 3.57g, 16mm, 6h. Near Good Very Fine. Dark green patina.

250

1040. Lombardic Kingdom of Italy. Anonymous AV Tremissis. 6th - 7th century AD. Crude bust right within linear border / Uncertain design within linear border. Unpublished in the standard references. 1.05g, 18mm. Extremely Fine.

250

1041. Lombardic Kingdom of Italy AV Tremissis. Struck in the name of Justin II. Uncertain mint, AD 565-578. DN IVSTI NVS PP AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM / CON, Victory standing facing holding wreath and cross on globe. Cf. MEC 298299; BMC Vandals 123. 1.48g, 18mm, 5h. Very Fine.

200

Fourth Recorded Specimen

1042. Lombardic Kingdom of Italy. Aistulf Æ Follis. Ravenna, Year 1 = AD 751-2. [D N AIS]T - VLF R, bearded bust facing, hair parted in middle / Large M with cross above, [ΛΝΝΟ] to left and I to right, mintmark [R]AV below. MEC 324; Ranieri 848. 0.75g, 15mm, 8h. Very Fine. Ragged flan. Only the fourth specimen recorded, and the second with legible date.

250

1043. Lombardic Kingdom of Italy. Gottschal EL Solidus. Beneventum, AD 739-742. Struck in the name of Justinian II. D N I – ••• – NVSPP, diademed bust facing, holding globus cruciger in right hand / VICTOR – IVGVSTO, cross potent on globe set on four steps; in field, D – G; in exergue, CONOB. MEC 1091; CNI 3; Oddy 406. 3.95g, 21mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

2,000

1044. Lombardic Kingdom of Italy. Sicardo EL Solidus. Beneventum, AD 832-839. SICARDV, diadmed and draped bust facing, holding globus cruciger in right hand, VICTOR PRINCI / CONOB, cross potent, in the field, S-I. CNI 3; MEC 1108. 3.46g, 23mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

188

600


1045. Merovingian Kingdom, Austrasia AV Tremissis. Domgermain (Meurthe-Moselle), circa AD 585-675. DOMN VEMIO, diademed bust right / +AVDERICV MONE, cross potent on two steps within dotted border. Lafaurie, J & Pilet-Lemière, Cahiers Ernst-Babelon 8 Monnaies du haut moyen âge découvertes en France (V-VIII siècle), Cahiers Ernst-Babelon 8, Paris 2003. p. 227, 57.463.5; Depeyrot -; Belfort -; Prou -; MEC -. 1.30g, 13mm, 11h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare, only the second example known.

5,000

1046. Merovingian Kingdom, Austrasia AV Tremissis. Abrinktas (Avranches, Manche), circa AD 585-675. ABRANKATAS, standing figure with radiate head holding spear / BERVLFVS around cross. Unpublished in the standard references, for mint and moneyer cf. Depeyrot II, p. 173, 6 and Belfort 8. 1.30g, 14mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

5,000

COINS OF THE BYZANTINE EMPIRE

1047. Anastasius I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 507-518. D N ANASTASIVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear in right hand over right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG B, Victory standing left holding long staff surmounted by christogram, star in left field, CONOB in exergue. DOC 7h; MIBE 7; Sear 5. 4.45g, 20mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine. Beautiful mint lustre.

750

1048. Justin I Æ 1½ Nummi. Thessalonica, circa AD 518-522. DN IVSTINVS I I, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / T between two stars. MIBE N75; DOC -; Sear -. 0.98g, 11mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare - possibly only the fifth known example.

500

1049. Maurice Tiberius AV Light Weight Solidus. Constantinople, AD 582-602. O N MAVRC Tib PP AVG, draped and cuirassed bust facing, wearing plumed helmet and holding globus cruciger; star in right field / VICTORIA AVGG Γ, angel standing facing, holding long staff surmounted by christogram and globus cruciger, CONOB in exergue. MIBE 11; DOC -; BMC 4; Sear 481. 4.34g, 23mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

189

300


1050. Maurice Tiberius AV Solidus. Carthage, dated IY 5 (AD 586/7). D N mAVRI TIb PP AN Є, helmeted, draped, and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA AVGG Є, angel standing facing, holding staurogram and globus cruciger. MIBE 25a; DOC -; Sear 549. 4.44g, 18mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Rare.

1,000

1051. Phocas AV Solidus. Constantinople, circa AD 607-609. d N FOCAS PЄRP AVG, draped and cuirassed facing bust, wearing crown without pendilia, holding cross on globe / VICTORIA AVGV I, angel standing facing, holding staff surmounted by christogram and cross on globe; CONOB in exergue. MIBE 9; DOC 10j; Sear 620. 4.40g, 21mm, 7h. Good Very Fine.

200

1052. Heraclius AV Solidus. Constantinople, circa AD 616-625. dd NN hЄRACLIVS ЄƮ hЄRA CONSƮ PP AVG, facing busts of Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine, each wearing chalmys and crown with cross on circlet; cross above / VICTORIA AVGU B, Cross potent on three steps, CONOB in exergue. MIB 11; DOC 13d; Sear 738. 4.38g, 21mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine. Beautiful mint lustre.

1053

300

1054

1053. Heraclius AV Solidus. Constantinople, circa AD 616-625. dd NN hЄRACLIVS ЄƮ hЄRA CONSƮ PP AVG, facing busts of Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine, each wearing chalmys and crown with cross on circlet; cross above / VICTORIA AVGU I, cross potent on three steps, CONOB in exergue. MIB 11; DOC 13d; Sear 738. 4.48g, 21mm, 8h. Near Extremely Fine.

300

1054. Heraclius AV Solidus. Constantinople, circa AD 616-625. dd NN hЄRACLIVS ЄƮ hЄRA CONSƮ PP AVG, facing busts of Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine, each wearing chalmys and crown with cross on circlet; cross above / VICTORIA AVGU Є, cross potent on three steps, CONOB in exergue. MIB 11; DOC 13d; Sear 738. 4.47g, 19mm, 7h. Good Very Fine.

250

1055. Heraclius AV Solidus. Constantinople, circa AD 625-629. dd NN hЄRACLIVS ЄƮ hЄRA CONSƮ PP AVG, facing busts of Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine, each wearing chalmys and crown with cross on circlet; cross above / VICTORIA AVGU Γ, cross potent on three steps, CONOB in exergue. MIB 21; DOC 20c; Sear 743. 4.44g, 21mm, 7h. Good Very Fine.

190

250


1056. Heraclius AV Solidus. Constantinople, circa AD 651-652. dd NN hЄRACLIVS ЄƮ hЄRA CONSƮ PP AVG, facing busts of Heraclius, with long beard and whiskers, and Heraclius Constantine, with short beard and moustache, each wearing chalmys and crown with cross on circlet; cross above / VICTORIA AVGU I, cross potent on three steps, K in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIB 21; DOC -; BMC 24; Sear 751. 4.44g, 20mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine.

200

1057. Constans II AV Solidus. Constantinople, circa AD 651-652. dN CONSƮANƮINVS PP AVG, bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA AVGV A, cross potent on three steps, CONOBI in exergue. MIB 22var; DOC -: Sear 955. 4.40g, 21mm, 6h. As struck; graffiti on reverse.

200

1058. Constans II AV Solidus. Constantinople, circa AD 651-652. dN CONSƮANƮINVS PP AVG, bust facing, with long beard and moustache, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA AVGV and officina letter I, cross potent on three steps, CONOB+ in exergue. Sear 958; MIB 24. 4.46g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

250

1059. Constans II Æ Follis. Syracuse, circa AD 663-668. Constans on left, with long beard, wearing military attire and holding long cross, and Constantine IV, beardless, wearing chlamys and holding globus cruciger / Large M, mongram above, Heraclius to left, Tiberius to right, both beardless and holding globus cruciger, SCL in exergue. MIB 210; DOC 180; Sear 1110. 4.90g, 23mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

150

1060. Tiberius III AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 698-705. D TibЄRIVS PЄ AV Γ, curaissed bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and holding spear / VICTORIA AVGV Γ, Cross potent on three steps, CONOB in exergue. MIB 1; Sear 1360. 4.45g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

191

750


1061. Justinian II, Second Reign, AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 705-711. d N IhS ChS RЄX RЄGNANTIVM, facing bust of Christ, raising hand in benediction and holding Book of Gospels, arms of cross behind / d N IVSTINIANVS MVLTVS AN, crowned facing bust of Justinian, wearing loros, holding cross potent set on three steps and globus cruciger inscribed PAX. Sear 1413; MIB 1; DOC 1. 4.12g, 22mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

3,000

Exceptional Justinian II Solidus

1062. Justinian II, Second Reign, AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 705-711. d N IhS ChS RЄX RЄGNANTIVM, bust of Christ facing, with cross behind head, with curly hair and short beard, wearing pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction and holding Book of Gospels in left hand / D N IVSTINIANVS ЄT TIbЄRIVS P P A’, crowned half-length figures of Justinian, on left, and smaller figure of Tiberius, on right, both wearing divitision and chlamys, jointly holding with their right hands a cross potent on two steps. Sear 1414; MIB 2; DOC 2. 4.41g, 21mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin. Beautiful lustre.

3,000

Ex Goldberg 53, 24 May 2009, lot 2189; Ex Christov Family Collection; Ex Triton III, 30 November - 1 December 1999, lot 1309.

1063. Justinian II, Second Reign, AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 705-711. d N IhS ChS RЄX RЄGNANTIVM, bust of Christ facing, with cross behind head, with curly hair and short beard, wearing pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction and holding Book of Gospels in left hand / D N IVSTINIANVS ЄT TIbЄRIVS P P A’, crowned half-length figures of Justinian, on left, and smaller figure of Tiberius, on right, both wearing divitision and chlamys, jointly holding with their right hands a cross potent on two steps. Sear 1414; MIB 2; DOC 2. 4.46g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

192

3,000


1064. Justinian II, Second Reign, AV Solidus. Rome, circa AD 705-711. d N IhS ChS RЄX RЄGNANTIVM, facing bust of Christ, raising hand in benediction and holding Gospels, arms of cross behind / d N IVSTINIANVS MVLTVS AN, crowned facing bust of Justinian, wearing loros, holding cross potent set on three steps and globus cruciger inscribed PAX. Cf. MIB 26; Sear 1439. 4.32g, 18mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

3,000

1065. Constantine V with Leo IV AV Solidus. Syracuse, circa AD 751-775. CO…, busts of Constantine V, bearded, and Leo IV, facing, each wearing crown and chlamys; cross above / … LEO P A M, bearded bust of Leo III facing, wearing crown with cross on circlet and loros, and holding cross potent on base. DOC 15; Spahr 323; Sear 1565. 3.82g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

Extremely Rare Sole Reign Syracuse Issue

1066. Irene, Sole Reign, AV Solidus. Syracuse, circa AD 797-802. IREN BASIL, facing crowned bust of Irene wearing loros, holding globus cruciger in right hand and cruciform sceptre in left, pellet in outer left field / IREBASILIS, same type as obverse, but C in field left, I in right. DOC –; Spahr –; Sear –; D’Andrea, Faranda, Vichi 240; Anastasi 455. 3.79g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

10,000

The powerful personality of Irene had always overshadowed that of her son Constantine, and only an army mutiny had prevented her from taking power as senior Augustus in 790. After a short period in exile, she returned to Constantinople and began to eliminate her enemies, including her son: by 797 she had discredited him to the point that she could have him deposed, blinded and murdered with little outcry. From this point, she reigned alone. Struck after 797, this solidus from the mint at Syracuse shows one of two known types depicting Irene on both the obverse and reverse, and marks a distinct shift from the types of her predecessors. Gone is the cross-on-steps reverse type, or figures of deceased members of the dynasty, to be replaced by two facing busts of Irene. Here we have Irene proclaiming herself Empress and sole ruler in the most public way possible. However, after just five years on the throne she herself was deposed and replaced by her Minister of Finance, Nicephorus.

193


Extremely Rare Issue of Nicephorus I and Stauracius from Syracuse

1067. Nicephorus I and Stauracius AV Solidus. Syracuse, circa AD 803-811. ….. bAS, bust of Nicephorus facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, holding cross potent and akakia / …. dЄSPOT. Bust of Stauracius facing, beardless, wearing crown and chlamys, holding globus cruciger and akakia. DOC –; Spahr –; BMC 11; D’Andrea, Faranda, Vichi 248; Anastasi 468. 3.87g, 21mm, 6h. Mint State. Extremely Rare.

4,000

1068. Theophilus AV Solidus. Naples, circa AD 829-831. – ΘEOFI LOS bASILE, facing bust, wearing crown and loros, holding globus cruciger and cruciform sceptre / CVRIE bΘHΘH TO SO dOVLO E, patriarchal cross on three steps; stars flanking, two pellets above. Unpublished variant, Cf. DOC 31; Ricotti-Prina 63; Sear 1684. 3.87g, 23mm, 6h. As Struck, Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

200

1069. Michael III AV Tremissis. Syracuse, circa AD 842-866. mI XAHΛ, crowned facing bust, wearing loros, holding globus surmounted by patriarchal cross / mI XAHΛ, crowned facing bust, wearing chlamys, holding globus surmounted by patriarchal cross. DOC 9; Spahr 436; Sear 1694. 1.64g, 13mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

200

1070. Michael III AV Tremissis. Syracuse, circa AD 842-866. mI XAHΛ, crowned facing bust, wearing loros, holding globus cruciger / mI XAHΛ, crowned facing bust, wearing chlamys, holding globus cruciger. DOC 9; Spahr 437; Sear 1695. 0.96g, 13mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, edge crack.

194

200


1071. Constantine VII and Romanus II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 945-59. +IhS XPS RЄX RЄGNANƮIUM, bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction and holding Book of Gospels in left hand / CONSƮANƮ CЄ ROMAN AVGG, facing busts of of Constantine VII, with short beard and wearing loros on left, and Romanus II, beardless and wearing chlamys on right, both crowned and holding between them long patriarchal cross. Sear 1751; DOC 15; cf. Füeg 3A. 4.46g, 19mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

500

1072. Michael VII AV Histamenon. Constantinople, 1071-1078. Christ seated facing on straight-backed throne / Crowned facing bust of Michael, holding labarum and globus cruciger. DOC 1; Sear 1869. 4.43g, 26mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

800

1073. Theodore II AR Aspron Trachy. Magnesia, AD 1254-1258. St. Tryphon, beardless and nimbate, standing facing, holding cross in front of chest / Crowned figure of Theodore standing facing, wearing divitision and chlamys, holding labarum and globus surmounted by patriarchal cross. DOC 6.3; Sear 2138. 2.67g, 28mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

750

1074. Western Byzantine 12 Solidi Æ Weight. Line over SOL / X II. Cf. S. Bendall, Byzantine Weights, An Introduction, 1996, 154 (18 Solidi). 53.00g, 42 x 39mm. Very Fine, dark patina.

195

200


MEDIEVAL COINS

1075. Crusader States. Baldwin II Æ Follis. Edessa, circa AD 1110. ΒΑΓΔΟΙΝΟC ΔΟΥΛΟ CΤΑΥ, Baldwin in conical helmet and chain armour, standing left, with sheathed sword at hip, holding globus cruciger / Floriated cross with rays at centre and scroll at foot. Metcalf Ashmolean, 109-112; CCS p. 244, 9. 3.33g, 22mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Dark patina. Unusually good for the issue.

500

1076 1077 1078 1076. Crusader States. Bohemond III Æ Denier. Antioch, AD 1149-1163. + PRINCEPS, large inverted S flanked by four pellets / + ANTIOVIA around cross pattée surrounded by four pellets. Metcalf, Ashmolean, 468; CCS p. 209, 44. 0.62g, 16mm, 12h. Very Fine. Rare.

200

1077. Crusader States. Bohemond IV Æ Denier. Antioch, AD 1201-1216. + IOAMVNDV around large B / + ANTIOCIHIA (retrograde) around cross pattée. CCS p. 221, 87 (this coin). 0.72g, 16mm, 7h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

400

Ex Abramowitz Collection, Superior Sale, 8 December 1993, lot 549 (part of). 1078. Duchy of Athens, William de la Roche Æ Denier. Thebes, AD 1280-1287. + G DVX ATEnES, Fleut-de-lis / + ThEBE CIVIS, Genoese gateway; pellet at centre. Metcalf, Ashmolean, 862-865; CCS p. 385, 82. 0.51g, 16mm, 2h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

500

1079. Cyprus, Venetian Occupation Recoinage of 1518 AR 9-Solidi. (Countermarked AR Marcello of GIovanni Mocenigo. Venice, struck under Assayer I-M (Zuanne Marcello, 19 December 1481 to 13 November 1482). St Mark standing right, presenting banner to kneeling Doge / Christ Pantokrato enthroned facing; central countermarked figure ‘9’ above control number ‘3’, four punchmarked circles applied towards edge. Cf. Pitsillides 29; Pao 903 var, fig.2; Paulucci p. 49, 3 for host coin). 2.97g, 26mm, 12h. Coin - Fine. Countermarks - Very Fine.

500

Ex Sotheby’s, 14 October 1999, lot 205.

1080. Chios, Filippo Maria Visconti AV Ducat. AD 1421-1436. S PETRVS, - D. MEDIO…., St. Mark standing/ SIT T PE DΛT Q´ TV RЄGIS ISTЄ DVCΛ • , Christ standing within mandorla containing ten stars. Schlumberger pl. XIV, 14; Gamberini 398; Friedberg 4. 3.53g, 21mm, 3h. Very Fine. Rare.

400

1081. Venetians in the Levant, ‘K’ Series AV Ducat. Smyrna (?), struck in the name of Andrea Dandolo, AD 1344-1354. S/R/V/Є/R/Є/T/I D/V/ΛNDK DΛRDVIO, St. Mark standing right, holding Gospels and presenting flag (type 2) to Doge kneeling left / • SIT . T Є • D • Λ • TQ TV K(retrograde) ЄGIS ISTЄ DVЄ • ΛT •, Christ standing facing, raising hand in benediction and holding Gospels, surrounded by elliptical halo containing 9 stars. Cf. CNI VII 37; Schlumberger -; cf. Bell 9, 32, 33, and 36 (for similar flag type). 3.50g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

400

The ‘K’ Series ducats were struck in the Asia Minor littoral, or more precisely Smyrna. The Smyrnaean association is with the Knights Hospitaller, placing the issue after 1371, although they appear in the Chios hoard of 1435. The type saw rapid debasement to a rather pale electrum.

196


1082 1083 1084 1082. Venetians in the Levant, AV Ducat. Imitating Venice with garbled legends, 14th Century. St. Mark standing right, presenting banner to kneeling Doge / Christ standing within mandorla containing 9 stars. Cf. Schlumberger pl. 14, 11-19; Lunardi CS12. 3.52g, 20mm, 3h. Very Fine.

250

1083. Venetians in the Levant, AV Ducat. Imitating Venice with garbled legends, 14th Century. St. Mark standing right, presenting banner to kneeling Doge / Christ standing within mandorla containing 9 stars. Cf. Schlumberger pl. 14, 11-19; Lunardi CS12. 3.45g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

250

1084. Venetians in the Levant, AV Ducat. Imitating Venice with garbled legends, 14th Century. St. Mark standing right, presenting banner to kneeling Doge / Christ standing within mandorla containing 9 stars. Cf. Schlumberger pl. 14, 11-19; Lunardi CS12. 3.47g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

250

1085. Germany, Freiburg AR Groschen. AD 1476-1529. + MONETA FRIBVRGENSIVM, imperial eagle of city arms with two rings attached / + SANCTVS NICOLAVS, florate cross. Morard, Cahn & Villard, Monnaies de Friboug / Freiburger Münzen, 1969, 18; HMZ 2-244. 1.93g, 25mm, 2h. Very Fine. Rare.

1,500

ISLAMIC COINS

1086 1087 1088 1086. Tulunid Dynasty. Khumarawayh b. Ahmad AV Dinar. 270-282h / AD 884-896. Misr 282h; Album 661. 4.05g, 21mm, 6h. Very Fine.

200

1087. Tulunid Dynasty. Huran b. Khumarawayh AV Dinar. 283-292h / AD 896-905. Misr 286h; Album 667. 3.86g, 21mm, 9h. Very Fine.

200

1088. Fatimid Caliphate. al-Mu’izz Ma’add AV Dinar. 341-365h / AD 953-975. Misr 363h; Album 697. 4.18g, 21mm. Very Fine.

1089

1090

200

1091

1089. Fatimid Caliphate. al-Mustansir Abu Tamin Ma’add AV ¼-Dinar. 427-487h / AD 1036-1094. Album 721. 0.81g, 18mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

150

1090. Fatimid Caliphate. al-Mustansir Abu Tamin Ma’add AV ¼-Dinar. 427-487h / AD 1036-1094. Album 721. 0.98g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

100

1091. Sicilian imitative AV ¼-Dinar. Uncertain mint and date, garbled legends. Cf. D’Andrea, Faranda, Vichi, al-Mustansir 372 and Spahr, Al-Zahir 24-25. 0.66g, 17mm, 9h. Very Fine.

197

100


MULTIPLE LOTS 1092. 700 Greek Æ Mixed Denominations. Mostly Seleukid and Egyptian issues. Some interesting types; some rarities. Fine-Good Very Fine. Most gFVF. Would form the basis of a good collection of this area, or is suitable for dealer stock. Viewing is absolutely recommended. Lot sold as seen - no returns. 5,500 1093. 2146 Judaean Æ Mixed Denominations. Some interesting types; some rarities. Fine-Good Very Fine. Most gF-VF. Could form the basis of a collection of this period, or is suitable for dealer stock. Viewing is absolutely recommended. Lot sold as seen - no returns. 18,000 1094. 600 Roman Imperial and Provincial Æ Mixed Denominations. Fine-Good Very Fine. Average quality is gF-VF. Could form the basis of a collection, or is suitable for dealer stock. Viewing is absolutely recommended. Lot sold as seen - no returns. 5,000 1095. 700 Roman Judaea Æ Mixed Denominations. Mostly from the Decapolis. Some interesting types; some rarities. Fine-Good Very Fine. Most gF-VF. Could form the basis of a good collection of this area, or is suitable for dealer stock. Viewing is absolutely recommended. Lot sold as seen - no returns. 5,500 1096. 48 Late Roman Æ Folles. Mostly Maxentius and Constantine I. Some with original silvering. Good Fine to Good Extremely Fine. Overall quality is VF-EF. Would form the basis of a good collection of this period, or is suitable for dealer stock. Viewing is absolutely recommended. Lot sold as seen - no returns. 2,000 1097. 502 Constantinian era Æ3s. Includes Constantine and his sons, Licinius I and II, Helena and Fausta. Some interesting types; some rarities. Very Fine to Good Extremely Fine. Average quality is VF-EF. Some with original silvering. Would form the basis of a good collection of this period, or is suitable for dealer stock. Viewing is absolutely recommended. Lot sold as seen - no returns. 4,250 1098. 1300 Roman Æ Mixed Denominations. From time of Constantine to Theodosius I. Some interesting types; some rarities. Fine-Good Very Fine. Average quality is gF-VF. Could form the basis of a collection of this period, or is suitable for dealer stock. Viewing is absolutely recommended. Lot sold as seen - no returns. 10,500 1099. 1900 Roman Æ Mixed Denominations. Some interesting types; some rarities. Fine-Good Very Fine. Most gF-VF. Could form the basis of a collection of this period, or is suitable for dealer stock. Viewing is absolutely recommended. Lot sold as seen - no returns. 15,000

End of Sale

198


Auction VI Session 2: Ancient Coins  

Roma Numismatics Auction VI Session 2: Ancient Coins

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