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ROMA NUMISMATICS LIMITED

Auction IX 22 March 2015 Roma Numismatics Limited 20 Hanover Square Mayfair London W1S 1JY United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0) 20 3178 2874 Fax: +44 (0) 20 3178 2456 www.romanumismatics.com email: info@romanumismatics.com

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Auction IX

22 March

10:00

Greek Coins.

14:00 Roman & Byzantine Coins.

Location

The Alto Room The Cavendish Hotel London 81 Jermyn Street, London SW1Y 6JF

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Viewing At the office of Roma Numismatics: 20 Hanover Square, Mayfair London, W1S 1JY United Kingdom From February 23rd - March 20th Monday – Friday, 09:30 – 17:30 On Saturday March 21st: 11:00 - 18:00

lots will not be available for viewing during the sale.

Lot pickup will be available from 10:00am on Wednesday 25th March

Roma Numismatics Limited Richard Beale – Director Alexander Morley-Smith Leslee Arlington Garfield Juliet Holland-Rose

Special Thanks to Italo Vecchi Salem Alshdaifat Deniz Grotjohann Fenella Theis UNUS PRO OMNIBUS, OMNES PRO UNO

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ABSENTEE BIDDING If you are unable to attend the auction in person, you may submit an absentee bid that will be executed on your behalf by Roma Numismatics. Roma Numismatics will attempt to obtain the lot for you at the lowest possible price, and will not purchase the lot for you at a price higher than the maximum you specify. This service is free and confidential. Absentee bids must be sent and received in good time. To place absentee bids please submit your list of lots, together with your maximum bids, either by mail, fax, or post using the form provided, or online at www.RomaNumismatics.com. You may also participate live online during the sale at www. the-saleroom.com.

Mail, fax or postal bids The customer is responsible for submitting these in good time and confirming that the bids have been received.

Telephone bids Bids may be placed by telephone as the auction is in progress, but are accepted only at the discretion of Roma Numismatics Ltd and at the risk of the customer. Roma Numismatics Ltd will not be held responsible for any failure to execute bids by telephone during the auction resulting from technical issues, miscommunication or any other reason. Any client wishing to bid by telephone should inform Roma Numismatics Ltd no later than 72 hours before the auction, and should have a prepared list of all the lots they wish to bid on.

Internet Bidding

BID ONLINE PRIOR TO THE AUCTION, SEE BIDS UPDATED IN REAL-TIME ON THE ROMA SITE. Internet bids may be submitted prior to the auction at www.RomaNumismatics.com - these bids will be automatically executed on the website. These bids will then be carried over into the live auction and executed by the auctioneer on the day. BID ONLINE DURING THE AUCTION, HEAR THE AUCTION LIVE ON YOUR COMPUTER. Real-time bids may be placed at www.the-saleroom.com on the day of the sale. These bids will be executed live on the floor. A 3% surcharge will apply to lots won through www.the-saleroom.com. Roma Numismatics is not responsible for any missed lots or bids due to network speed or down-time. It is advisable to register as early as possible for this service, since all internet bidders must be manually approved by the auctioneer.

Successful Bids Successful bidders will be notified and invoiced within a few days of the auction. Prices realized will be published around the same time.

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ROMA NUMISMATICS AUCTION IX MAIL BID FORM First Name:

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Conditions of Sale The following terms and conditions will apply to this auction:

I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII.

All estimates are in Pounds Sterling. The opening bids will be 80% of the estimate unless there are existing higher bids. There will be a 17.5% Buyer’s Fee added to the hammer price. VAT at 20% is due on the Buyer’s Fee only, not the hammer price. The auctioneer guarantees the absolute authenticity of any and all coins sold. There is no expiration to this guarantee. Any coins subsequently found to be not authentic will be exchanged for a full refund of the purchase price. Absentee bids should be submitted and received by 20:00 on the day before the auction. It is the bidder’s responsibility to ensure that bids have been received by Roma Numismatics. All grades and descriptions are the opinion of the cataloguer. Conditions of all lots are as per the photographs displayed on the Roma Numismatics website; condition reports are available upon request. It is not possible to note all marks or defects, and thus customers are encouraged to carefully examine in person all lots that they are interested in bidding on. Bids, once placed, are final and will not be rescinded. If, however, the attribution is found to be incorrect, the item is returnable within 21 days after the sale. No other returns will be accepted except on the grounds of non-authenticity. All prospective bidders who exercise the opportunity to examine lots in hand shall assume all responsibility for any damage they cause in so doing. The auctioneer shall have sole discretion in determining the value of the damage caused, which shall be promptly paid by the prospective bidder. The auctioneer will have absolute discretion to accept or decline any bid, withdraw lots from the sale at any time until such point as the purchaser takes physical possession, re-open any lot, even after the hammer has fallen, in which a bidding error has occurred, and to determine in the event of a dispute, the final winner of a lot or to rescind the sale and put the lot up for sale again. For the protection of mail or absentee bidders, no ‘unlimited’ or ‘buy’ bids will be accepted. When identical bids are received for the same lot, preference will be given to the bid received first. A mail bid will take preference over a floor bid. Some lots may carry a reserve. The auctioneer reserves the right not to sell an item below the confidential price, or will repurchase the item on behalf of the consignor or for the account of Roma Numismatics Ltd. If a reserve exists the auctioneer reserves the right to bid on any lot on behalf of the consignor up to the amount of the reserve against any floor or mail bidders. The auctioneer also reserves the right to bid on any lot on behalf of Roma Numismatics Ltd. Title remains with the owner until such time as the customer has paid in full. Invoices are due immediately upon receipt. Roma Numismatics Ltd. reserves the right to charge interest on unpaid invoices at the rate of 2% per calendar month, except where prior agreement has been made with regards to payment arrangements. A 3.5% surcharge will be applied to debit / credit card payments or payments made via PayPal. The customer is responsible for paying all bank charges and shipping and insurance costs. A 3% surcharge will be applied to lots won through www.the-saleroom.com. Roma Numismatics is not responsible for any missed lots or bids due to network speed or down-time. By making a bid the customer agrees to the above terms and conditions and accepts to be bound by them. These conditions shall take effect and be construed in accordance with the provisions of English Law.

US COIN IMPORT RESTRICTIONS Any coins in this sale that fall under US import restrictions but may still be legally imported into the US are accompanied by documentation proving that they were outside of the source country prior to the effective date, or are accompanied by a valid export certificate issued by the country of origin. Any coins subject to US import restrictions that may not lawfully be imported into the United States of America will be clearly indicated as such with the note: ‘not suitable for US market’. Roma Numismatics will make every effort to ensure that US import restrictions affect our clients as little as possible, and will carry out all necessary importations and procedures as required on behalf of the client.

Payment Methods Invoices to be settled in Pounds Sterling immediately upon receipt unless previously agreed otherwise. Bank Transfer: Barclays Bank, 22 The Borough, Farnham, GU9 7NH, UK | Account Name: Roma Numismatics IBAN: GB81 BARC 2031 0663 0101 39 | BIC: BARC GB22 | SORT CODE: 20-31-06 | ACC #: 63010139 Cheque (in GBP only): Please make payable to Roma Numismatics Limited PayPal (add 3.5%): sales@romanumismatics.com Debit / Credit Card (add 3.5%): contact us directly on +44 (0)20 3178 2874

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COINS OF THE CELTS

SPAIN

1

2

1. Spain, Arekorata (Numantia) AR Denarius. After 133 BC. Male head right, wearing beaded necklace; pellet in circle behind / Horseman galloping to right with couched spear; Iberian ‘arekorata’ below. ACIP 1775; AB 104; CNH 26; Heiss pl. xxxi, 1–2; Vives pl. xl, 11. 3.94g, 18mm, 2h. Very Fine.

100

2. Spain, Arsaos AR Denarius. Circa 150-100 BC. Male head right; dolphin before, plow behind / Horseman galloping to right holding bipennis; Iberian ‘arsaos’ below. ACIP 1655; AB 139; CNH p. 254, 14; SNG BM Spain 923. 3.88g, 18mm, 2h. Extremely Fine.

100

3. Spain, Bolskan AR Denarius. Circa 150-100 BC. Bearded head right; Iberian ‘bon’ behind / Horseman galloping to right with couched spear; Iberian ‘bolskan’ below. ACIP 1413; AB 1911 (Osca); SNG BM Spain 710-32. 4.10g, 18mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine.

150

4. Spain, Ekualakos Æ Unit (As). Circa 150-100 BC. Male head right; dolphin to right / Horseman galloping to right with couched spear. ACIP 1846; AB 970; CNH 2; SNG BM Spain 1031-5. 9.86g, 25mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. Insignificant scratches on both sides.

200

Ex Ortiz Collection.

5

6

7

5. Spain, Turiasu AR Denarius. Early 1st century BC. Head of bearded male right, wearing necklace; Iberian ‘ka’ behind neck, ‘s’ below, ‘tu’ before / Horseman galloping to right with couched spear; Iberian ‘turiasu’ below. ACIP 1720; AB 2410; SNG BM Spain 963–7. 4.06g, 18mm, 12h. Very Fine.

100

6. Spain, Turiasu AR Denarius. Early 1st century BC. Head of bearded male right, wearing necklace; Iberian ‘ka’ behind neck, ‘s’ below, ‘tu’ before / Horseman galloping to right with couched spear; Iberian ‘turiasu’ below. ACIP 1720; AB 2410; SNG BM Spain 963–7. 3.58g, 18mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

100

7. Spain, Turiasu AR Denarius. Early 1st century BC. Head of bearded male right, wearing necklace; Iberian ‘ka’ behind neck, ‘s’ below, ‘tu’ before / Horseman galloping to right with couched spear; Iberian ‘turiasu’ below. ACIP 1720; AB 2410; SNG BM Spain 963–7. 3.61g, 19mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

1

100


BRITANNIA

Very Rare Catuvellauni Quarter Stater

2x 8. Britannia, Catuvellauni AV Quarter Stater. Tasciovanus, circa 25-20 BC. Cruciform wreaths extending from back to back crescents, teardrop ornaments in angles / Horse prancing to left, acorn-like object below. ABC 2586; VA 1688; BMC 1651-1653; S. 221. 1.03g, 14mm. Extremely Fine. Light contacts on obv. Very Rare.

1,000

9. Britannia, Catuvellauni AV Stater. Tasciovanus, circa 25-10 BC. Two crossed open wreaths, two crescents and three pellets in centre; pellet in annulet on each arm, ornaments in quarters / Celtic horseman right brandishing a carnyx; wheel motifs around, crescent between two to right, cornucopiae below. ABC 2565; BMC 1618; VA 1732-5; SCBC 217. 5.30g, 17mm. Good Very Fine.

1,500

2x 10. Britannia, Catuvellauni and Trinovantes AR Unit. Cunobelin. Camulodunum (Colchester), circa AD 8-41. CVNO on tablet; all within wreath / Griffin seated to right on tablet containing CAMV. ABC 2897; VA 2051; BMC 1868-69; S 306. 1.11g, 13mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

Of this rarity only 14 specimens are recorded, of which two are in the British Museum. It was evidently a very small coinage, struck from four currently known pairs of unlinked dies.

This Coin Published in Rudd, Ancient British Coins

2x 11. Britannia, Catuvellauni and Trinovantes AV Stater. Cunobelin. Camulodunum (Colchester), circa AD 8-41. Grain ear, CA-MV across / Horse jumping to right, branch above, CVNO below. Rudd, ABC 2795 (this coin); BMC 1828; VA 2025. 5.49g, 17mm. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, and very well preserved for the type.

2,000

12. Britannia, Corieltauvi AV Stater. Circa 40-10 BC. South Ferriby Type. Wreath motif with brick-like leaves facing inwards / Lunate Celtic horse left, anchor and pellet ornament above, eight pointed star below. ABC 1743; BMC 3148; VA 811; SCBC 390. 5.84g, 20mm. Good Extremely Fine.

2

750


13. Britannia, Corieltauvi AV Stater. Volisios Dumnocoveros, circa AD 30-60. Schematic wreath crossed by linear frames; VO-LI SI-OS in two lines across field / DVM-NOCO-VER (VE ligate), curvilinear horse standing left; three pellets to left. ABC 1980; BMC 3330-36; VA 978-1; SCBC 416. 5.08g, 20mm. Good Very Fine.

1,500

GAUL

2x 14. Northeast Gaul, the Morini AV 1/4 Stater. Circa 60-25 BC. Abstract image of boat with two sailors right(?); pellet to left; all within border of small x-like ornaments / Central bar bisected by rooted tree; bent line below, crescent and three-pronged ornament in exergue. D&T 249; Depeyrot, NC VI, 295; ABC 40; BMC –; VA 69-1; SCBC 10. 1.45g, 11mm. Extremely Fine.

550

COINS OF THE GREEKS CAMPANIA

15. Campania, Suessa Aurunca AR Didrachm. Circa 265-240 BC. Head of Apollo right, wearing laurel wreath, hair long and flowing; trophy behind / Dioskouros, wearing a pilos and holding a palm-branch tied with a fillet, riding to left with a second horse beside him; SVESANO in exergue. HN Italy 447; Sambon 864. 7.38g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

5,000

Aurunca, the ancient capital of the Aurunci, was originally located on the edge of the extinct crater of Roccamonfina, and dated back to at least the 8th century BC. On that site today there remain ruined walls of cyclopean masonry, which may have formed the fortified core of the city, or a defensive fort for the protection of the population. The Aurunci came into conflict with Rome as early as 503 BC, but following their defeat in the Latin War, were subject to Roman dominion. An apparently unmotivated attack by the Sidinici in 337 caused the Aurunci to abandon their towns in Campania in favour of the new site of Suessa, which they renamed Aurunca. In 313 the Romans made a colony of the city, renaming it to Suessa Aurunca. On account of its favourable position between the Via Appia and the Via Latina, it became a centre of industry and commerce, retaining the right of coinage.

LUCANIA

16. Lucania, Herakleia AR Stater. Circa 330 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing single-pendant earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with Skylla throwing stone held in right hand; EY to right / Herakles standing facing, torso right, strangling the Nemean Lion to right; |-HPAKΛEIΩN above, [AΠOΛ] and club to left, oinochoe below. Work 47 (same dies); Van Keuren 51 (same obv. die); HN Italy 1378; SNG ANS 66; SNG Lloyd -; Basel -; Bement 138 (same obv. die); Gulbenkian -; Hunterian 7 (same dies); McClean 825 (same obv. die); Weber 706 (same dies). 7.92g, 20mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine. Unobtrusive test punch on reverse, but very good for the type and attractively toned.

3

2,000


17. Lucania, Herakleia AR Stater. Time of Pyrrhos of Epeiros, circa 281-278 BC. Leon-, magistrate. Head of Athena facing slightly right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with Skylla throwing a stone; AP to left / |-HPAKΛEIΩN, Herakles standing facing, holding club in right hand and bow in left, lion skin draped over left arm; ΛEΩN to right. SNG ANS -; HN Italy 1389; Van Keuren 91. 7.78g, 22mm, 5h. About Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

18

1,000

19

18. Lucania, Herakleia AR Stater. Time of Pyrrhos of Epeiros, circa 281-278 BC. Filo-, magistrate. Head of Athena facing slightly right, wearing triplecrested Attic helmet decorated with Skylla throwing a stone; monogram to left / |-HPAKΛEIΩN, Herakles standing facing, holding club in right hand and bow and arrow in left, lion skin draped over left arm; to left, Nike flying right, crowning him with wreath; HA to lower left, ΦIΛΩ to outer right. Van Keuren 92; HN Italy 1390. 7.74g, 23mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine; some smoothing on obv. fields. 1,000 19. Lucania, Herakleia AR Stater. Time of Pyrrhos of Epeiros, circa 281-278 BC. Filo-, magistrate. Head of Athena facing slightly right, wearing triplecrested Attic helmet decorated with Skylla throwing a stone; monogram to left, [E to right] / |-HPAKΛEIΩN, Herakles standing facing, holding club in right hand and bow and arrow in left, lion skin draped over left arm; Nike flying right, crowning him with wreath; HA to lower left, ΦIΛΩ to outer right. Van Keuren 94; HN Italy 1392; SNG ANS 80; SNG Lloyd 278; Basel 1112. 7.77g, 22mm, 12h. Very Fine. 1,000

20

21

20. Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 330-290 BC. Ly-, magistrate. Wreathed head of Demeter left, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace / Barley ear with leaf to left; Artemis-Hekate carrying long torch on leaf, ΛY below leaf. Johnston Class C, 7; HN Italy 1590. 7.82g, 22mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. 300 21. Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 330-290 BC. Wreathed head of Demeter left, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace / Ear of barley with leaf to right, [on which fork with long handle], ΔA below leaf; META (retrograde) to left. Johnston C5.9. 7.91g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. 750

2x 22. Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 330-290 BC. Wreathed head of Demeter facing slightly right / Barley ear with leaf to right; bukranion above leaf, AΘA below. Johnston Class C, 2.2 (same dies); HN Italy 1584; SNG ANS 463-4; SNG Fitzwilliam 503; SNG München 992; Dewing 388 (all from the same dies). 7.74g, 19mm, 1h. Very Fine.

2,000

23. Lucania, Metapontion AR Stater. Circa 290-280 BC. Diademed head of Herakles right, lion skin tied around neck; club over shoulder / Barley ear of eleven grains, META and leaf to right; kantharos above leaf, B[...] below. Johnston Class D, 4.3; HN Italy 1621; SNG ANS -; SNG Lloyd -; Kraay & Hirmer 248. 7.70g, 19mm, 8h. About Extremely Fine. Very Rare, these dies not recorded by Johnston. Superb late classical style. From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Triton XIII, 5 January 2010, lot 23; Ex Leu 65, 21 May 1996, lot 54.

4

4,000


24. Lucania, Poseidonia AR Stater. Circa 470-445 BC. ΠΟΜΕΣ, Poseidon standing right, wearing chlamys around shoulders, brandishing trident / Bull standing left, ΠOME (retrograde) above. HN Italy 1114; SNG ANS 651-654 var. 7.49g, 18mm, 1h. About Very Fine. Harshly cleaned surfaces, some horn silver still present. 300 From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex HD Rauch 87, 8 December 2010, lot 43.

25. Lucania, Poseidonia AR Stater. Circa 470-445 BC. ΠΟΜΕΣ, Poseidon standing right, wearing chlamys around shoulders, brandishing trident / Bull standing to left, ΠΟΜΕΣ (retrograde) above. SNG ANS 661. 8.10g, 20mm, 4h. Very Fine. Ex Rockefeller University, Dr. Alfred E. Mirsky Collection. 500

Extremely Rare Coin of Sybaris III

26. Lucania, Sybaris AR Stater. Circa 453-448 BC. Bull standing to left on ground line / Bull standing to right on ground line, MVBA (retrograde) above. The Golden Horn Collection, 2063 (same dies); otherwise unpublished. 8.16g, 18mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Of the highest rarity - the second known specimen.

8,000

A similar specimen cited in HN Italy (1747) has the obverse type of a bull walking to right. The obverse depiction of the bull standing to left was unpublished and thought to be unique at the time of the publication and sale of the Golden Horn Collection in January 2009. This extremely rare coin can be attributed to the short-lived Sybaris III, an attempt to refound the city, sponsored by Poseidonia, after Kroton had already twice destroyed it. After the destruction of Sybaris I by Kroton in 510 BC, though many survivors fled to the Sybarite colonies of Laos and Skidros, some appear to have remained on the site which passed into Krotoniate dependency, as indicated by incuse coins bearing the joint ethnics of both Kroton and Sybaris and confirmed by a report that the Krotoniates appointed a governor at Sybaris. Sybaris II appears to have succumbed like its predecessor to an attack by the Krotoniates in 467 BC, in which conflict they appealed to the Syracusan tyrant Hieron for assistance, though none was forthcoming. In 453 BC, a full fifty-eight years after the catastrophe of 510, Sybaris was refounded again with the apparent blessing and sponsorship of Poseidonia. That city is recorded as having acted as a guarantor in a treaty between Sybaris and the Serdaioi, and indeed the coins of Sybaris III are closely modelled on the contemporary issues of Poseidonia (see Rutter, ‘Sybaris: Legend and Reality’ 1970, p. 173), suggesting that city had a significant interest in the endeavour. The refounded city advanced swiftly in wealth on account of the fertility of its lands, and after only five years again aroused the jealousy or fear of Kroton, who once more brought war against Sybaris, and drove away the inhabitants.

27. Lucania, Thourioi AR Stater. Circa 443-400 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with wreath / Bull standing left, ΘOYPIΩN above, helmet on ground line; in exergue, fish swimming to left. SNG ANS 937 (same dies); HN Italy 1767. 7.75g, 20mm, 2h. Very Fine. Ex H.D. Rauch 87, 8 December 2010, lot 62.

5

500


28. Lucania, Thourioi AR Stater. Circa 443-400 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with wreath / Bull standing right, ΘOYPIΩN above; in exergue, fish swimming to right. SNG ANS 903 (same dies); HN Italy 1775. 7.96g, 20mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

750

Ex Baldwins 68, 28 September 2010, lot 3371; Ex Dr E.O. and Mrs F.M. Halliwell Collection.

Beautiful Thourian Distater

29. Lucania, Thourioi AR Distater. Circa 400-350 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right, helmet decorated with Skylla scanning and griffin on neck-guard, Φ above / Bull butting right, ΘOYPION above; fish to right in exergue. SNG ANS 957; Noe 39, B2 (same dies). 17.14g, 18mm, 10h. Good Extremely Fine. Lightly toned.

6,000

From a North American collection; Ex Münzen und Medaillen 10, 22 March 2002, lot 147.

30. Lucania, Thourioi AR Stater. Circa 350-300 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right, helmet decorated with Skylla throwing stone / Bull butting right; above, Nike flying right, crowning bull, Σ-I-M between legs; ΘOYPI... in exergue. HN Italy 1845; SNG ANS -; cf. SNG Copenhagen 1463 (same obv. die). 7.88g, 23mm, 1h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

200

31. Lucania, Thourioi AR Distater. Circa 350 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with Skylla; B behind / Bull butting right, ΘOYPIΩN and APH in two lines above; fish in exergue. Noe N8. 15.16g, 29mm, 8h. Good Very Fine.

6

1,250


32. Lucania, Thourioi AR Distater. Circa 350 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with Skylla / Bull butting right, ΘOYPIΩN and ΣI in two lines above; fish in exergue. Noe K18. 16.01g, 24mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

2,500

Reverse Die of Excellent Style

33. Lucania, Thourioi AR Distater. Circa 350-300 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with Skylla preparing to throw stone / Bull butting right; ΘΟΥΡΙΩΝ HPA in two lines above, two fish in exergue. Noe, Thurian N10-16/N6 (for obv./rev.); cf. HN Italy 1859/1858 (for obv./ rev.). Unpublished obverse/reverse combination for distaters (see HN Italy for stater with these types); CNG 87, 18 May 2011, 177 (same dies). 15.74g, 27mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Superbly well rendered bull; a reverse dies of excellent style.

7,500

Ex Roma Numismatics II, 2 October 2011, lot 25; Privately purchased from Pars Coins, 5 January 2011.

34. Lucania, Velia AR Didrachm. Circa 290-275 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with a griffin, A above, [Φ before]; IE on outlined tablet behind neck guard / Lion attacking stag to left. HN Italy 1317; William 575; SNG ANS 1403. 7.47g, 21mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Beautiful tone and lustre.

1,000

APULIA

35. Apulia, Luceria Æ Quincunx. Circa 217-212 BC. Reduced series. Four wheel spokes on a raised disk / Four wheel spokes; ••••• (mark of value) in one quarter, L in opposite; all on a raised disk. Vecchi ICC 345; HN Italy 677a; Haeberlin pl. 71, 14-7. 32.95g, 33mm. Good Very Fine. Ex Auctiones 22, 16 June 1992, lot 2.

7

400


CALABRIA

Ex Vlasto and ex Pearce Collection, Sotheby 1898

36. Calabria, Tarentum AR Didrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Taras seated on dolphin to right, shell below, TAPAΣ (retrograde) behind / Wheel with four spokes. Vlasto 73; HN Italy 833; SNG ANS 827; Fischer-Bossert 77b (this coin). 8.07g, 20mm. Good Very Fine. Rare.

1,500

Ex Vlasto Collection; Ex Pearce Collection; Sotheby, Wilkinson and Hodge, 27 October 1898, lot 561b.

2x 37. Calabria, Tarentum AV Hemilitra - 1/12 Stater. Alexander the Molossian, King of Epeiros, circa 334-331 BC. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly left / Thunderbolt, ΑΛ-ΕΞ around. Vlasto, Alexander, type 6; cf. Fischer-Bossert G3; Vlasto 1864–5; cf. HN Italy 906. 0.64g, 9mm, 1h. Very Fine.

1,500

38. Calabria, Tarentum AR Diobol. Alexander the Molossian, King of Epeiros, circa 334-331. Head of Helios, on radiate disk, facing slightly to left / Thunderbolt, AΛΕΞΑΝΔΕΡ above, ΤΟΥ ΝΕΟΠΤΟΛΕΜΟΥ below. Traité IV, 333, pl. CCLXXXIII, 6-7 ; BMC Epirus 110, 5-6, pl. XX, 5; SNG ANS - ; Vlasto, 1873; Jameson 1123. 1.20g, 12mm, 4h. Very Fine.

39

500

40

39. Calabria, Tarentum AR Diobol. Alexander the Molossian, King of Epeiros, circa 334-331. Head of Helios, on radiate disk, facing slightly to left / Thunderbolt, AΛΕΞΑΝΔΕΡ above, ΤΟΥ ΝΕΟΠΤΟΛΕΜΟΥ below. Traité IV, 333, pl. CCLXXXIII, 6-7 ; BMC Epirus 110, 5-6, pl. XX, 5; SNG ANS - ; Vlasto, 1873; Jameson 1123. 0.87g, 9mm, 5h. Very Fine. 500 40. Calabria, Tarentum AR Diobol. Alexander the Molossian, King of Epeiros, circa 334-331. Head of Helios, on radiate disk, facing slightly to left / Thunderbolt, AΛΕΞΑΝΔΕΡ above, ΤΟΥ ΝΕΟΠΤΟΛΕΜΟΥ below. Traité IV, 333, pl. CCLXXXIII, 6-7 ; BMC Epirus 110, 5-6, pl. XX, 5; SNG ANS - ; Vlasto, 1873; Jameson 1123. 1.21g, 11mm, 12h. Very Fine. 500

Attractive Tarentum Drachm Ex Hesperia 1, 1951

41. Calabria, Tarentum AR Drachm. Circa 281-276 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet adorned with Skylla / Owl standing right on olive branch, head facing; TAP to right, ZOP upwards to left. Evans VI; HN III 975; Vlasto 1052. 3.20g, 17mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. Ex Hesperia (Clain, Stefanelli & Hecht) List 1, Spring 1951, lot 143.

8

1,000


42. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 280-272 BC. Nude youth on horseback right; EYAP-XIΔAΣ in two lines below / Taras riding dolphin left, holding torch in extended right hand, distaff in left; TAPAΣ behind. Vlasto 709; HN Italy 974; SNG ANS -; SNG France -. 7.74g, 22mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

43. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 280-272 BC. Nude youth on horseback right, crowning horse that raises left foreleg; EY above, ΑΠΟΛΛΩ and two amphorae below / Taras riding dolphin left, holding kantharos and cradling long trident; B in right field, ΤΑΡΑΣ below. Vlasto 764; SNG ANS 1118. 6.59g, 23mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

1,000

44. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 280-272 BC. Warrior on horseback right, holding shield and spears, preparing to cast spear downward; EY behind, ΣΩΣTPATOΣ below / Taras astride dolphin left, holding cornucopiae and Nike, ΠOΛY to left, thunderbolt to right; TAPAΣ below. Vlasto 713; HN Italy 1001. 6.49g, 21mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive old toning.

1,000

45. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 333-332 BC. Warrior, preparing to cast spear held in right hand, holding two spears and shield in left, on horse rearing right, eight-rayed star on hind leg; ΣA below / Taras, holding kantharos in extended right hand, cradling trident in left arm, astride dolphin left; AP to left, TAPAΣ to right; below, small dolphin left. Vlasto 602 (this obverse die); SNG ANS 995 (this obverse die); HN Italy 937. 7.85g, 22mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive lustre.

3,000

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 59, 4 April 2011, lot 489 (then sold with documentation proving it was outside Italy prior to 19 January 2011).

46. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 272-240 BC. Nude youth on horseback left, placing wreath on horse’s head; ΣΥ above, ΛΥΚI-ΝΟΣ in two lines below / Taras astride dolphin to left, hurling trident; owl standing left behind, TAPAΣ below. Vlasto 836; HN Italy 1025. 6.46g, 21mm, 8h. Good Extremely Fine.

9

500


47. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 272-240 BC. Aristokles, magistrate. Nude warrior on horseback right, holding round shield, two lances and a spear, ΔΙ behind; ΑΡΙΣΤΟΚΛΗΣ in two lines below / Taras astride dolphin to left, holding kantharos and trident; head of nymph to left behind, TAPAΣ below. Vlasto 878; HN Italy 1033. 6.41g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Unusually well detailed faces.

800

48. Calabria, Tarentum AR Reduced Nomos or Half-Shekel. Punic Occupation, circa 212-209 BC. Nude youth on horseback right, crowning horse with laurel wreath and hand holding filleted palm frond over shoulder, riding horse right; KPITOΣ below / Taras astride dolphin to left, holding trident and Nike; EK monogram to left, ZΩ monogram to right; TAPAΣ below. Vlasto 978–80; HN Italy 1080. 3.74g, 18mm, 4h. Extremely Fine.

750

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex A. Tkalec, 27 October 2011, lot 10.

49. Calabria, Tarentum AR Reduced Nomos or Half-Shekel. Punic occupation, circa 212-209 BC. Nude youth on horseback to left, crowning horse with wreath; IΩ to right, ΣΩΓENHΣ below / Taras astride dolphin to left, holding cornucopiae and Nike who crowns him with wreath; TAPAΣ below. Vlasto 975-7; HN Italy 1079. 3.86g, 18mm, 9h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

1,250

BRUTTIUM

50. Bruttium, Kaulonia AR Stater. Circa 520 BC. Apollo, nude, advancing to right, holding laurel branch in his raised right hand and with a small daimon running to right holding a branch on his outstretched left arm, to right, stag standing right, head turned back to left; all within cable border / Same types incuse to left, save for the daimon in relief; rayed border. Noe Caulonia 13a; SNG ANS 147. 7.02g, 30mm, 12h. Very Fine, areas of corrosion.

51

1,000

52

51. Bruttium, Kaulonia AR Stater. Circa 450-445 BC. Apollo, naked, advancing right, holding a branch in uplifted right hand, small daimon running right on outstretched left arm; stag on tablet in right field, looking backwards; KAVL to left / Stag standing right; branch in right field; KAV in retrograde above. Noe Caulonia 100 (same dies); SNG ANS 176; HN Italy 2046. 7.74g, 23mm, 12h. Near Very Fine. 300 52. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 530-500 BC. Tripod, legs terminating in lion’s feet; to right, heron standing left; QPO to left / Incuse tripod; to right, heron standing left; QPO to left. SNG ANS 248-50; HN Italy 2081. 7.98g, 25mm, 12h. Very Fine. Horn silver encrustations, areas of corrosion. 300

10


Hera Lakinia

53.

Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 400-325 BC. Head of Hera Lakinia facing slightly right, wearing necklace and stephane decorated with palmettes; B to right / Young Herakles, nude, holding cup in extended right hand and club in left, reclining left on lion skin draped over rock; KPOTΩNIATAΣ around, bow below. Attianese 138; HN Italy 2169; SNG ANS 375 (same dies); SNG Lloyd –; Gulbenkian 131 (same dies); Kraay & Hirmer 270 = de Luynes 728 (same dies). 7.74g, 23mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare in this grade.

17,500

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 10, 9 April 1997, lot 74. The depiction of Hera on the obverse is that of a local aspect of the deity, whose sanctuary the Heraion Lakinion was situated 10 kilometres away from Kroton at Lakinion, now Cape Colonna. The site takes its name from the sole surviving column of the temple built upon that spot in around 470 BC, which was largely intact until the sixteenth century when it was extensively quarried. Theokritos’ Korydon sings the praises of the ‘Lakinian shrine that faces the dawn’, and Livy 24.3.3-7 tells us that it was ‘a building more famous even than the city itself and held in reverence by all the peoples there around’ and that within were countless masterpieces and treasures including a column of solid gold dedicated to the goddess. By the time of Livy’s writings however, the temple had long been plundered. This facing portrait of Hera can be considered to be directly inspired by Kimon’s famous facing Arethusa tetradrachm that was widely admired and imitated throughout the ancient world; the difficulty of creating an attractive facing portrait apparently led to engravers considering the undertaking of such a die as a challenge and proof of their skill. Hera’s headdress, a low crown known as a polos, was no longer worn in classical times but was common in Mycenaean art. Many of the terracotta figurines from late Helladic IIIA Mycenaean period circa 1400–1300 BC seem to wear poloi, and its use can thus be seen as a deliberate archaism for representing a Mother Goddess. Herakles appears on the reverse of this coin in his role as ‘founder’ of Kroton. Later Krotoniate tradition conveniently bypassed Myskellos (see lot 341) in favour of associating the city with a past more ancient even than the Trojan War; according to myth Herakles landed the nearby promontory with the oxen of Gerion and was hospitably received by one Kroton and his wife Laureta. Her father Lakinio however, was discovered trying to steal on ox from Herakles’ sacred herd, resulting in Herakles fighting and killing him. In the confusion, it transpired that Herakles had also mortally wounded his host Kroton. Saddened, Herakles gave Kroton an honourable burial, and predicted the founding of a great city there that would bear his name. We see also on the reverse of this coin the fabled bow of Herakles, that Philoktetes was said to have taken with him to the land between Sybaris and Kroton, where he founded the non-Greek cities Petelia, Chrone, Krimisa and Makalla. A prophecy arose as in the Trojan War, that victory would be Kroton’s if the bow and arrows of Herakles would be theirs. Thus, these sacred relics of Philoktetes were removed from his tomb and deposited in the Krotoniate sanctuary of Apollo Aleos. This coin is therefore rare among Greek coins in that it may be considered to have a threefold significance - referring directly to the sanctuary of Hera, to Herakles as ‘founder’ of the city, and to the sanctuary of Apollo.

11


54. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 380-350 BC. Eagle standing to right, head reverted; animal skull to right / Tripod altar adorned with fillet, QPO to left, olive sprig to right. HN Italy 2147; SNG ANS 340 (same dies). 7.99g, 21mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. Attractive old tone.

1,250

Ex Dr. Eugen Nitsch Collection, A. Hess Auction 236, 3 April 1939, lot 177.

55. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 370 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, KPOTΩNIATAΣ around / Infant Herakles kneeling right, head turned left, strangling two serpents. SNG ANS 384-386; SNG Lockett 631; SNG Lloyd 618; Jameson 433; Dewing 513. 7.59g, 20mm, 10h. Very Fine. Small and unobtrusive punch on reverse.

2,500

From the Mark Christenson Collection; Ex Gerhard Hirsch Nachfolger Auction 289, 2 May 2013, lot 88; Ex New York Sale VII, 15 January 2004, lot 10; Ex New York Sale IV, 17 January 2002, lot 39. On the night that Herakles was to be born, Hera, knowing of her husband Zeus’ adultery with the mortal Alkmene, persuaded Zeus to swear an oath that the child born that night to a member of the House of Perseus would be High King. Hera did this knowing that while Herakles was to be born a descendant of Perseus, so too was Eurystheos, son of Sthenelos. Once the oath was sworn, Hera hurried to Alkmene’s dwelling and slowed the birth of Herakles by forcing Ilithyia, goddess of childbirth, to sit crosslegged with her clothing tied in knots, thereby causing Herakles to be trapped in the womb. Meanwhile, Hera caused Eurystheos to be born prematurely, making him High King in place of Herakles. She would have permanently delayed Herakles’ birth had she not been foiled by Galanthis, Alkmene’s servant, who lied to Ilithyia, saying that Alkmene had already delivered the baby. Upon hearing this, she jumped in surprise, untying the knots and thus allowing Alkmene to give birth to Herakles. Having failed to prevent his birth, Hera sent two serpents to kill the baby Herakles as he lay in his cot. While his twin brother Iphikles screamed in terror, Herakles throttled the snakes, one in each hand, and was found by his nurse playing with their limp bodies as if they were toys.

56. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 370 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, KPOTΩNIATAΣ around / Infant Herakles kneeling right, head turned left, strangling two serpents. SNG ANS 384-386; SNG Lockett 631; SNG Lloyd 618; Jameson 433; Dewing 513. 7.45g, 20mm, 8h. Very Fine. Pleasant old tone.

1,500

Ex Astarte XII, 12 September 2003, lot 34.

57. Bruttium, Lokroi Epizephyrioi AR Stater. Circa 350-275 BC. Pegasos flying left; thunderbolt below / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet; ΛOKPΩN before. Pegasi 13; HN Italy 2342. 8.55g, 23mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

12

500


MAURETANIA Unpublished Bronze of Iol in Mauretania

58. Mauretania, Iol Æ20. Circa 2nd century BC. Head of Isis left with neatly combed hair rolled up into a fringe and three spiral locks falling over back of neck / Three grain ears, Neo-Punic letter ‘beth’ above, two pellets in left field. Unpublished in the standard references, for types cf. Müller p. 177, 290 (uncertain Mauretania); Mazard 554-5 (Iol-Caesarea); Alexandropoulos 147; SNG Copenhagen 684. 3.97g, 20mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

500

The identification of the obverse bust is almost certainly that of Isis whose characteristic attribute, the vulture headdress of Hathor, is clearly depicted on the standard references. Little is known concerning the early history of the city of Iol, save that it was established by the Phoenicians in the 5th century BC to serve as a trading station. The worship of Isis was clearly prevalent in the city as evidenced by its coinage, a cult brought there by mariners and traders as so often happened in coastal cities.

NORTH AFRICA

2x 59. North Africa, Carthage AV 1/10 Stater. Circa 350-320 BC. Palm tree with two date-clusters, border of pellets / Horse’s head right. Jenkins Group III, 156. 0.93g, 8mm, 12h. About Very Fine. Rare.

250

Attractive Carthaginian Gold Stater

60. North Africa, Carthage AV Stater. Circa 350-320 BC. Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing triple-pendant earring, and necklace with eight pendants / Horse standing right; three pellets to lower right. Jenkins & Lewis group IIIf, 37; MAA 4; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG Ashmolean 2166. 9.05g, 18mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine.

3,000

61. North Africa, Carthage EL Stater. Circa 310-290 BC. Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing necklace with eleven pendants; pellet before neck / Horse standing right; three pellets in exergue. Jenkins & Lewis group V, 293/295; MAA 12. 7.35g, 17mm, 12h. Very Fine.

13

1,000


14


SICILY Second Known and Only Example in Private Hands

62.

Sicily, Motya AR Tetradrachm. Circa 415-397 BC. Eagle standing to right, Punic legend ‘mtv’ above / Crab, fish below (probably a Mero, Epinephelus guaza - see F.E. Zeuner, Fish on Ancient Coins, NCirc LXXI, 1963, pp. 142143, rather than the Polyprium cernium it is usually identified as) swimming to right. BMC 2; Jenkins, Punic 43 (O4/R6), citing the unique specimen in BMC. 17.11g, 24mm, 2h. Small area of flat striking, otherwise Good Extremely Fine. Of the highest rarity, only the second known example, and the only one in private hands.

20,000

From the Eckenheimer Collection. As the Greek colonies in Sicily increased in numbers and importance the Phoenicians, who had established numerous small outposts there, gradually abandoned their settlements in the immediate neighbourhood of the newcomers, and concentrated themselves in the three principal colonies of Solus, Panormos, and Motya. This latter, on account of the natural strength of its position (being situated on a small island connected to the mainland only by an artificial causeway), and its proximity to Carthage, became one of the chief strongholds of the Carthaginians. During the campaign of Hannibal Mago in 409 BC, the city became the base for the Carthaginian fleet, as it was again during the second expedition under Hamilcar in 407. The strategic value of Motya thus caused Dionysios I of Syracuse to direct his principal efforts to its reduction when he launched a counter-invasion of the Carthaginian territories in Sicily in 397. The citizens of Motya made preparations for a vigorous resistance by cutting off the causeway and readying themselves for a protracted siege. Dionysios was compelled to construct his own approach across the gulf, and applied his siege engines to the walls, which included the newly invented catapult. Even when the siege towers were at the walls the Motyans continued a desperate resistance, and when the walls and towers were carried by the Greek forces they continued to fight from street to street and house to house. Such was the grim resistance offered by the defenders that when at last the troops of Dionysios made themselves masters of the city, they put the whole surviving population, men, women, and children, to the sword.

15


63. Sicily, Siculo-Punic AR Tetradrachm. ‘People of the Camp’ mint, circa 320-300 BC. Head of Tanit left, wearing grain wreath, triple-pendant earring and pearl necklace; three dolphins around / Horse’s head right, palm tree behind; Punic legend below. Jenkins, Punic Sicily, pl. 21, 269 (these dies). 17.16g, 28mm, 2h. Very Fine.

1,000

64. Sicily, Siculo-Punic AR Tetradrachm. ‘People of the Camp’ mint, circa 300-289 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion’s skin headdress / Horse’s head left, palm tree behind; astragalos before, ‘MMHNT’ below. Jenkins, Punic 351 (O112/R286). 16.83g, 23mm, 3h. Very Fine.

1,500

Excellent Bronze of Agyrion

65. Sicily, Agyrion Æ Hemilitron. Circa 430 BC. Eagle standing right, olive spray behind / Four-spoked wheel. Calciati III, 2; SNG ANS 1166; SNG Copenhagen 126; SNG Morcom 513. 17.56g, 25mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Exceptional condition for the type, superior to any example on CoinArchives.

2,000

From the Eckenheimer collection. Agyrion was a powerful city of the native Sikels, and was ruled by tyrants, Agyris; a contemporary of Dionysios the Elder, was the most powerful ruler in central Sicily and along with Dionysios successfully resisted the Carthaginian forces led by Mago when they invaded the territory of Agyrion in 392 BC. The city was not colonised by Greeks until, according to Diodorus Siculus (a native of the city), the Corinthian general Timoleon drove out the last tyrant in 339 BC, settled 10,000 colonists and erected various splendid buildings. No traces remain of Agyrion since the modern city overlies the ancient one.

66. Sicily, Akragas AR Tetradrachm. Circa 470-420 BC. Sea eagle standing left with wings closed; AKRACANTOΣ around / Crab within shallow incuse circle. SNG ANS 978 (this obverse die); cf. SNG München 70. 17.20g, 27mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned. Ex Roma Numismatics II, 2 October 2011, lot 63.

16

7,500


Superb Tetradrachm of Akragas

67. Sicily, Akragas AR Tetradrachm. Circa 460-446 BC. Sea eagle standing left on Ionic capital, AKRACANTOΣ around / Crab; spiralled tendril ornament with floral terminals below; all within shallow incuse circle. Lee Group II; SNG ANS 982 var. 17.36g, 25mm, 4h. Near Mint State.

20,000

From the Eckenheimer Collection. Akragas was founded by colonists from Gela in around 582-580 BC in a highly favourable location on a plateau overlooking the sea, and was supplied with water by two nearby rivers. The city’s position benefited it greatly, and it quickly became one of the wealthiest Greek colonies in Sicily. Under the tyrant Phalaris, who seized power in the city after having been entrusted with the building of the temple of Zeus on the citadel, the city attained considerable prosperity. Phalaris also supplied the city with water, adorned it with grand public buildings, and strengthened it with defensive walls. Yet for all this, he was renowned for his cruelty and sadistic tendencies, which supposedly included cannibalism. His notorious reputation is etched in legend, as it was he who commissioned the Brazen Bull, a hollow bronze statue invented by the sculptor Perillos as a novel way to execute criminals, in which the victim would be placed, before a fire was set below the statue. A complex system of tubes converted the victim’s screams into the sounds of a bellowing bull. Perillos, expecting a reward for his service, was instead thrown into the bull to test it. Phalaris himself was said to have been killed in his brazen bull after being overthrown by Telemachos, the ancestor of Theron.

68. Sicily, Akragas AR Hemidrachm. Circa 420-406 BC. Eagle standing left on, and tearing at, hare / Crab; below, fish to right. HGC 2, 104; SNG ANS 1003–9. 1.97g, 14mm, 6h. Very Fine.

500

69. Sicily, Akragas Æ Tetras. Circa 420-406 BC. AKPA, eagle, with head lowered, standing right on hare; crab behind / Crab, crayfish left below; three pellets below crab. SNG ANS 1037; Calciati I pg. 178, 50; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG Morcom -; Laffaille -; Virzi 603. 10.52g, 22mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Very rare variety with crab in left obverse field. Exceptional for the type, and for Akragantine bronze in general. From the Eckenheimer collection.

17

3,000


70. Sicily, Akragas Æ Hemilitron. Circa 400-380 BC. Diademed head of river-god left, ΑΚΡΑΓΑΣ before / Eagle standing left on Ionic column, head right; crab to left, six pellets (mark of value) to right. CNS 89; SNG ANS 1097-1101. 18.50g, 26mm, 8h. Near Extremely Fine.

750

Ex Astarte XX, 30 October 2009, lot 13.

71. Sicily, Gela AR Didrachm. Circa 490-475 BC. Bearded horseman, nude, riding right, brandishing spear in his upraised right hand / Forepart of manheaded bull to right, CΕΛΑΣ before. Jenkins 44 (same dies); HGC 364. 8.71g, 21mm, 11h. Very Fine.

1,500

Ex Gorny & Mosch 216, 15 October 2013, lot 2133.

72. Sicily, Gela AR Didrachm. Circa 490-475 BC. Naked horseman wearing crested helmet, galloping right and brandishing spear held high in his hand / Forepart of man-headed bull with long beard right, CELA around. Jenkins 59; SNG München 258. 8.71g, 21mm, 11h. Very Fine.

1,200

From the Eckenheimer collection.

73. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga to right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath / Forepart of man-headed bull right, CEΛAΣ around. Jenkins, Gela 110 (O33/R64); Randazzo 21 (same dies); SNG ANS 23-24 (same obv. die). 17.45g, 24mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

1,500

74. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga to right, Ionic column behind, grain ear in exergue / Forepart of man-headed bull right, CEΛAΣ above. Jenkins, Gela 211 (O56/R112); SNG ANS O47/R46. 17.56g, 29mm, 3h. Very Fine.

18

2,000


Very Rare Didrachm of Gela

75. Sicily, Gela AR Didrachm. Circa 425 BC. Warrior on horseback galloping to right, spearing a fallen hoplite beneath him / Horned and diademed head of the river-god Gelas to left within olive-wreath tied on the right. Jenkins 463; Jameson 594 (same dies); Antikenmuseum Basel 287 (same dies). 8.43g, 22mm, 3h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

4,000

76. Sicily, Gela Æ Trias. Circa 420-405 BC. Bull standing right, head lowered; ••• (mark of value) in exergue / Head of young river god right, hair flowing; barley grain behind. Jenkins, Gela 506 and 520; CNS 17; SNG ANS -. 15mm, 3.51g, 5h. Good Very Fine.

500

From the Eckenheimer collection.

77. Sicily, Gela Æ Tetras. Circa 420-405 BC. Head of young river-god right, ΓΕΛΑΣ behind / Bull standing left, olive-branch above, three pellets in exergue. SNG ANS 121; Jenkins 523,3; CNS III, p. 20, 42; SNG Copenhagen -. 3.44g, 15mm, 10h. About Extremely Fine.

750

From the Eckenheimer collection.

78. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 420-415 BC. Charioteer driving slow quadriga right; above, Nike flying left, crowning charioteer; [in exergue, bird standing left, head lowered] / Forepart of man-headed bull right within shallow incuse circle. Jenkins, Gela, Group VIII, 476 (O92/R186); SNG ANS 95 (same dies). 16.74g, 25mm, 7h. Usual obverse die wear; rev. Extremely Fine. Attractive, severe style.

2,000

From a private Austrian collection.

79. Sicily, Himera AR Litra. Circa 430 BC. Bearded head right, wearing diadem / Corinthian helmet; IMEPAN (partially retrograde) around; all within circular incuse. SNG ANS -; SNG Lloyd 1028 (same dies); Rizzo pl. XXI, 13; Basel -; Gulbenkian -. 0.58g, 9mm, 9h. Very Fine. From the Eckenheimer collection.

19

250


80. Sicily, Himera AR Tetradrachm. Circa 409-408 BC. Signed by the artist MAI(...). The nymph Himera driving a galloping quadriga to right, Nike flying left above, holding wreath and tablet inscribed MAI; hippocamp left in exergue / The nymph Himera, wearing a long chiton and peplos, standing left, holding a phiale in her right hand and raising her left; to left, horned altar; to right, satyr standing right, showering in a fountain with a lion’s head spout. Basel 306; Guttmann & Schwabacher 20; Kraay-Hirmer 71; Arnold-Biucchi 22. 16.92g, 25mm, 3h. Mint State.

6,000

The reverse of this coin shows the nymph Himera at the city’s principle altar, which was likely to have been that of Asklepios. The satyr to right bathes in the warm waters of the spring at Himera. The tablet on the obverse of this coin is the only known die signed by the artist ‘MAI...’; it is very possible that the career of this evidently talented artist was cut short by the complete destruction of Himera at the hands of the Carthaginian general Hannibal Mago.

81. Sicily, Himera Æ Hemilitron. Circa 420-407 BC. Head of nymph three-quarters facing, wearing broad ampyx, hair flying to sides / Shrimp right, six pellets (mark of value) above, IME below. Calciati I, 36; SNG Morcom 601; Basel 308; Gabrici pl. ii, 12. 1.83g, 14mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine. In exceptional state of preservation.

1,000

From the Eckenheimer collection.

Very Rare Tetradrachm of Thermai

82. Sicily, Thermai AR Tetradrachm. Circa 350 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving fast quadriga to right; altar in exergue / Head of Demeter to left, wearing grain wreath, triple pendant earring and necklace; around, four dolphins swimming, prow behind. Jenkins, Punic 4; London NC 1913, p. 226, 3; Lloyd 1039. 17.35g, 25mm, 8h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

1,500

Ex Gorny & Mosch 191, 11 October 2010, lot 1111. Thermai was founded in the wake of the utter destruction of Himera and the slaughter of the majority of its citizens by the Carthaginian general Hannibal Mago, when the survivors of this devastation relocated to the nearby hot springs whose original discovery lay in myth associated with the wanderings of the hero Herakles (Diodorus Siculus IV. 23, v. 3). Though the site had long been inhabited, it was now swelled by the displaced Himerans, and the newly enlarged town was thereafter considered to be the successor to the old city of Himera, and in time appears to have become a sizeable settlement, though now subject to Carthaginian rule.

2x 83. Sicily, Kamarina AR Litra. Circa 461-435 BC. Nike flying to left, swan to left below; all within wreath / Athena standing left, holding spear, shield propped against leg. Westermark-Jenkins 88.5; SNG ANS 1112-6; SNG Ashmolean 1695. 0.74g, 11mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Very well preserved for the issue. From the Eckenheimer collection.

20

400


2x 84. Sicily, Kamarina AV Diobol. Circa 410-405 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with winged hippocamp / KA surrounded by olive sprig with two berries. SNG ANS 1209; Rizzo VII, 17; Weber 1248. 1.06g, 10mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

3,000

From the Eckenheimer collection.

85. Sicily, Katane AR Tetradrachm. Circa 465-450 BC. The river god Amenanos as a bearded, man-headed bull standing to right on ground line, Nike above flying to right holding wreath / Nike, wearing long chiton, advancing left, holding taenia in her outstretched right hand, vine in left; H to left, KATANAION around. SNG ANS -; Jameson 533 (same dies); Randazzo pl. 4, O73/R72; Rizzo pl. IX, 8 (same dies). 17.06g, 29mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

4,000

2x 86. Sicily, Leontinoi AR Pentonkion. Circa 476-466 BC. Head of roaring lion to right / Five pellets (mark of value). Boehringer, Münzgeschichte 17; HGC 2, 700; SNG ANS –; SNG Lloyd 1051; Winterthur 714. 0.25g, 7mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

250

From the Eckenheimer collection.

87. Sicily, Leontinoi AR Tetradrachm. Circa 460 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Lion’s head right, with open jaws and tongue protruding; four barley grains and LEONTINON around. Boehringer 41 (same obv. die); SNG ANS 222 (same dies); SNG Lloyd 1055; Rizzo pl. XXIII, 1 (same obv. die). 17.38g, 26mm, 3h. Extremely Fine, attractively toned.

2,500

88. Sicily, Leontinoi AR Tetradrachm. Circa 430-425 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Lion’s head left, with open jaws and tongue protruding, around which LEONTINON; bay-leaf behind, three barley-corns around. Boehringer, Leontinoi 55 (same dies); Rizzo pl. XXIV, 4 (same dies); SNG ANS 257 (same dies). 17.19g, 25mm, 8h. Extremely Fine.

2,500

Ex Münzen & Medaillen List 499, 1987, lot 9.

89. Islands off Sicily, Lipara Æ Tetras. Circa 412-408 BC. Young Hephaistos, nude, seated right on stool, holding hammer in right hand, kantharos in left / Three pellets (mark of value); ΛIΠAPAION around. CNS 21; SNG Morcom 865; SNG Lloyd -; Basel -; SNG Copenhagen 1090; BMC 44; SNG München 1685. 1.29g, 13mm, 6h. Smoothing in fields, otherwise Extremely Fine and exceptionally well detailed for the type. Rare.

21

750


The Treachery of the Samians

90.

Sicily, Zankle-Messana AR Tetradrachm. Samian occupation, 494/3 BC. Facing lion’s scalp / Prow of a Samaina left, with ram, akrostolion and fighting platform on deck. Barron p. 178, 1 (same dies); HGC 2, 772. 17.24g, 20mm, 10h. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, only 5 examples cited by Barron.

12,500

From the Eckenheimer collection. In 493 BC emigrants from Samos along with some Milesians and other Ionians were invited to Sicily by Skythes, the ruler of Zankle, to assist with the founding of a new city. When the Ionian settlers were already in Italian waters, Skythes marched out with the forces of Zankle to besiege a nearby city of the native Sikels, presumably in aid of the enterprise. However at this point the Samians, who had now reached Lokroi, were persuaded by Anaxilas the tyrant of Rhegion to take advantage of the absence of the Zanklaians, and that rather than endure the hardships of founding a new colony they should take over Zankle itself while its men were away. The Samians agreed and did so; by the time Skythes had hurried back to his city he found the walls held against him. Skythes appealed for aid to his liege Hippokrates of Gela, who instead imprisoned him for the loss of his city and came to terms with the Samians. Hippokrates then enslaved the majority of the men of Zankle, but delivered 300 of the leading men to the Samians to be put to death, apparently hoping to get rid of them without himself spilling the blood of men with whom he had had treaty relations. The Samians spared these men, but enslaved most of the remaining population within the walls, of which they gave a half share to Hippokrates. The Samians, having thus taken for themselves a new city, elected to strike coins on the Euboic standard bearing the types of the lion’s scalp used at Samos and a Samian galley, though without an ethnic – presumably because they were a mixed body of Samians, Milesians and others, and thus had not yet determined a collective identity. Some of these coins are known to bear a single letter, ABΔ or E indicating their year of production; those without such a marker as in the case of the present specimen are believed to have been the first struck after the occupation, which lasted in total for a period of five years before Anaxilas himself ejected the Samians and colonised the city again, renaming it Messana.

22


91

92

91. Sicily, Messana AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Seated charioteer, holding reins with both hands, driving mule biga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath, bay leaf in exergue / Hare springing to right, two laurel leaves below, MEΣΣANION around. SNG ANS 340; Caltabiano 374. 17.24g, 27mm, 6h. Very Fine. 300 92. Sicily, Messana AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Seated charioteer, holding reins with both hands, driving mule biga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath, bay leaf in exergue / Hare springing to right, MESSANION around. SNG ANS -; Caltabiano 352 (same dies). 17.38g, 26mm, 9h. Struck from worn obverse die, otherwise Very Fine. 1,000

93

94

93. Sicily, Messana AR Tetradrachm. Circa 425-421 BC. The Nymph Messana, wearing long chiton and holding whip and reins with both hands, driving biga of mules to right; bay leaf and fruit in exergue / MEΣΣANION, hare springing right; dolphin swimming to right below. SNG Lloyd 1094 (these dies); SNG Tubingen 608 (these dies); Caltabiano 494. 17.07g, 25mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous metal. 4,000 Ex Goldberg 53, 24 May 2009, lot 1578. 94. Sicily, The Mamertinoi Æ Quadruple. Messana, circa 288-278 BC. Laureate head of Ares right; arrow behind / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt. CNS I, 7; SNG Copenhagen 437; SNG ANS 407. 17.90g, 31mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Attractive patina and smooth, glossy surfaces.

95

500

96

95. Sicily, The Mamertinoi Æ Quadruple. Messana, circa 288-278 BC. Laureate head of youthful Ares right, helmet with apex behind, APEOΣ before / Bull charging to left; MAMERTINΩN around. Särström 17-42; CNS I p. 91, 1; SNG ANS 399. 19.26g, 28mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, with a sound, untouched patina. 1,000 From the Eckenheimer collection. 96. Sicily, Morgantina Æ Hemidrachm. Circa 339/8-317 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with serpents; behind neck guard, owl standing right, head facing; MOPΓANTINΩN before / Lion standing right, devouring stag’s head; Γ above, coiled serpent below. Erim & Jaunzems issue 6, 4; Castrizio series I, 2; CNS 2; SNG Morcom 640; SNG ANS -; SNG Lloyd -; Rizzo pl. LX, 7; Basel 375; SNG Delepierre 3054. 17.24g, 21mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Very well preserved for the type. 1,250 From the Eckenheimer collection.

2x 97. Sicily, Naxos AR Litra. Circa 461-430 BC. Head of Dionysos right, wearing ivy wreath / Grape bunch on vine; leaf hanging at each side, NAXI around. Cahn, Naxos 62 (V45/R53). 0.69g, 11mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare. An attractive example of this miniature masterpiece.

1,000

In 476 BC the citizens of Naxos and Katane were forcibly removed and resettled at Leontinoi by the tyrant Hieron of Syracuse. After the fall of the Deinomenid tyranny c. 461 BC, the Naxians were able to return from their involuntary exile to their ancient homeland. The refounding of the city was celebrated with an emission of coinage for which they sought the services of the most talented engraver of the time. This master, who had already distinguished himself with his coinage for the Aitna Tetradrachm, created for Naxos the dies for a series of coins of which the tetradrachms are undoubtedly the most famous, and of which only one pair of dies was made. For the litrai which were intended for mass circulation, the master produced three pairs of dies, in which his unique style can also be clearly seen.

23


2x 98. Sicily, Naxos AR Litra. Circa 415-403 BC. Bearded head of Dionysos right, wearing ivy wreath; NAΞI to right / Grape bunch on vine; leaves flanking. Cahn 144–5 var. (unlisted dies); Campana 29; HGC 2, 973; SNG ANS 530; SNG Lloyd –; SNG München 767; BMC 25; McClean 2480; NAC 18, lot 109 = Sternberg XX, lot 320 (same obv. die). 0.43g, 12mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. A couple of minor edge chips. Rare.

800

Ex MoneyMuseum Collection, Zurich; Ex Leu 79, 31 October 2000, lot 395.

99. Sicily, Piakos Æ Tetras. Circa 425-420 BC. Head of river-god right, Π-I-A-K and three pellets before / Hound attacking fawn right, barley grain before. G. K. Jenkins, The Coinages of Enna, Galaria, Piakos, Imachara, Kephaloidion and Logane,’ AIIN suppl. 20 (1975), p. 92, group I, pl. 7, 2a; CNS III p. 197, 2; SNG ANS -; SNG Morcom -. 2.54g, 12mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Rare. An exceptional example of the type.

1,250

From the Eckenheimer collection.

100. Sicily, Segesta Æ Trias. Circa 420 BC. Head of the nymph Segesta right, wearing hair-band / Hound standing right with tail curved upwards; around, four pellets. CNS 2; SNG Copenhagen 586; SNG ANS 655-657. 7.54g, 17mm, 4h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

1,250

From the Eckenheimer collection.

101. Sicily, Segesta Æ Trias. Circa 410-400 BC. Head of the Nymph Segesta to right / Hound standing to right; four pellets within incuse circles around. Hurter, Segesta p.141ff, pl. 29, 7; CNS I p. 296 17. 4.15g, 21mm, 3h. Very Fine. Rare.

400

From the Eckenheimer collection.

102. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 485-480 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 69 (V33/R45); Randazzo 244; SNG ANS -. 17.36g, 25mm, 5h. Near Very Fine.

24

2,000


103. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 485-466 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 269 (V122/R186); Randazzo -; SNG ANS -; Rizzo -. 17.48g, 25mm, 9h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

104

1,500

105

104. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 123 (V56/R84); SNG ANS 33; Randazzo 277. 17.36g, 24mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 1,000 105. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer - (V64/R100). 17.20g, 25mm, 6h. About Very Fine. Very Rare. This die combination apparently unlisted. 1,000

106. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 149 (V66/R103); SNG ANS 42; Randazzo 316 (same dies). 17.41g, 24mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

107. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Bearded charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 153 (V68/R105); Randazzo 324 (same dies); SNG ANS 43 (same dies). 17.14g, 26mm, 6h. Very Fine. Attractive reverse.

25

1,000


108. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 218 (V213/R148); Randazzo 379; SNG ANS 74; McClean 2597. 17.33g, 26mm, 3h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

1,000

109. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 480-475 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 239E (V107E/R162E); CNG 61, 25 September 2002, lot 374 (same dies). 17.31g, 24mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

110

1,000

111

110. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 303 (V144/R210); Randazzo 467-468 (same dies); SNG ANS 99 (same dies). 17.30g, 24mm, 3h. Cut across obverse, otherwise Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare. 1,000 111. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 314 (O152/R220); Randazzo 482 (same dies); SNG ANS -. 17.36g, 24mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

112

1,000

113

112. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving walking quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRΑKΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer - (V158/R-); Randazzo 494, 496 (same obverse die). 17.29g, 25mm, 2h. Very Fine. Very Rare. This reverse die apparently unpublished. 1,000 113. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Time of Hieron I, circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow quadriga right; above, Nike flying right, crowning horses with wreath / Head of Arethusa right, hair in pearl band, wearing loop earring with single pendant and pearl necklace; ΣVRAKOΣION and four dolphins around. Boehringer 307; SNG ANS 96-113. 17.26g, 24mm, 8h. Very Fine. Pleasant cabinet tone. 1,500 Ex Stack’s Bowers and Ponterio 164, 6 January 2012, lot 101.

26


114. Sicily, Syracuse AR Litra. Second Democracy, circa 466-460 BC. Head of Arethusa right, wearing pearl tainia, SVRA before / Octopus. Boehringer Series XIII, 458; HGC 2, 1375; SNG ANS 142. 0.76g, 12mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Very well preserved for the issue.

500

From the Eckenheimer collection.

115. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Second Democracy, circa 460-450 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow quadriga right; above, Nike flying to right, crowning horses with wreath, ketos swimming to right in exergue / Head of Arethusa right, wearing earring, necklace and headband, her hair tied in a krobylos; ΣVRAKOΣION and four dolphins around. Boehringer 483; Randazzo 539; Jameson 760; SNG ANS 151. 17.46g, 26mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

2,000

116. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Second Democracy, circa 460-450 BC. Charioteer, wearing long chiton and holding the reins in both hands, driving slow quadriga right; above, Nike flying left to crown the charioteer; ketos swimming to right in exergue / Head of Arethusa right, wearing pearl diadem, earring and necklace, her hair rolled in a bun at the back, ΣYRAKOΣION and four dolphins swimming clockwise around. Boehringer 498 (V263/R353); Rizzo pl. XXXVII, 4 (these dies); BMC 87 (these dies). 17.30g, 26mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful iridescent cabinet tone.

7,500

Ex Numismatik Lanz 46, 28 November 1988, lot 67.

117. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Second Democracy, circa 450-439 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow biga right, Nike flying above to right, crowning horses; olive branch in exergue / Head of Arethusa right wearing sakkos and ampyx, earring and necklace, ΣYRAKOΣIΩN and four dolphins around. Boehringer 656; Pozzi 594. 17.27g, 27mm, 8h. Very Fine.

2,000

Ex Hess-Leu 11, 24 March 1959, lot 88.

118. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Tetras. Time of Dionysios I, circa 405-400 BC. Facing head of the nymph Arethusa, wearing necklace, turned slightly to left / Octopus. CNS 29; SNG Copenhagen 679; SNG ANS 385. 2.22g, 14mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and among the finest known. From the Eckenheimer collection.

27

1,500


The Admiration of the Ancient and Modern World

119.

Sicily, Syracuse AR Dekadrachm. Time of Dionysios I, circa 400 BC. Charioteer driving galloping quadriga to left, holding kentron in right hand, reins in left; above, Nike flies to right, a wreath in her outstretched arms to crown the charioteer; in the exergue, a panoply of arms is set on two steps: a cuirass, two greaves, and a Phrygian helmet / Head of the nymph Arethusa to left, wearing a reed wreath, triple-pendant earring, and a pearl necklace; ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ behind, four dolphins playing around her, a star below the rearmost. Gallatin XXIII-KII. 43.27g, 35mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

30,000

Ex Roma Numismatics V, 23 March 2013, lot 133. This type with a star behind Arethusa’s head and below the rearmost dolphin is one of the most infrequently encountered in the dekadrachm series. Struck from a remarkable reverse die, not only on account of the excellent style of the Arethusa portrait, but also because of the astonishing high relief in which it was engraved. Standing proud from the fields 33% more than the majority of its counterparts, this nymph commands reverence and admiration. The fortuitously superb metal quality and lustre of the fields further complement the appearance of this sculptural marvel. The dekadrachms of Syracuse have been called ‘the admiration of the ancient and modern world’, and ‘perhaps the most famous of all ancient coins’; rightly so, for by virtue of not only their impressive size and weight, but more importantly the incredibly detailed artistry of exquisite style which they bear, they represent the zenith of cultural and numismatic technological achievement at ancient Syracuse, and are among the most beautiful coins ever struck for circulation. Produced at the apex of Syracuse’s power and glory, the dekadrachm issue began circa 405 BC, following the election of Dionysios as supreme military commander of Syracuse for his achievements in the war against Carthage, and his subsequent seizure of total power. Syracuse had only recently defeated an Athenian invasion of Sicily that resulted in the utter destruction of Athens’ expeditionary force and ultimately contributed significantly to their defeat at the hands of Sparta in the Peloponnesian War. Then under Dionysios in 405, despite the ruin of great cities such as Akragas and Gela, Syracuse repulsed a Carthaginian invasion that might have resulted in a complete conquest of the island. Such glory was short-lived however, as the rule of Dionysios’ son and successor was to bring only civil strife that would weaken the power of Syracuse. Never again would the city issue coinage on such a grand scale, and with the cessation of tetradrachm production in c. 400 BC, the dekadrachms represent the last great flourishing of classical numismatic art at Syracuse before two centuries of steady decline and eventual conquest at the hands of the Romans.

28


120. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Dilitron. Time of Timoleon and the Third Democracy, circa 344-317 BC. Laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios left, ΖΕΥΣ ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΙΟΣ around / Horse rearing left, ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around. Castrizio Series II, 1; CNS 80; SNG ANS 533-41; HGC 2, 1439. 18.83g, 27mm, 4h. Very Fine.

250

Ex Peus 103, 27 April 2011, lot 48.

121. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Hemidrachm. Time of Timoleon, circa 344-338 BC. Laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios right, ZEΥΣ ΕΛΕΘΥΕPΙΟΣ around / Upright thunderbolt; barley grain in left field; ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around. CNS II, p. 167, 71; SNG ANS 474–6. 15.77g, 26mm, 8h. Good Very Fine. Sand ‘patina’ added.

500

122. Sicily, Syracuse AR Stater. Time of Timoleon and the Third Democracy, circa 344-338 BC. Pegasos flying left / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet, ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around. Pegasi 2; SNG ANS 496-507. 8.50g, 20mm, 5h. Very Fine.

750

123. Sicily, Syracuse AR Dilitron. Time of Timoleon and the Third Democracy, circa 344-317 BC. Janiform female head, two dolphins to right; ΣYRAKOΣIΩN around / Horse galloping to right. HGC 2, 1375; SNG ANS 516. 1.66g, 12mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

750

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

124. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Litra. Time of Timoleon and Third Democracy, circa 344-317 BC. Head of Persephone left, wearing grain wreath, earring and necklace; ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around / Pegasos flying left, Σ below. CNS 78; SNG ANS 526-9; HGC 2, 1442. 11.25g, 20mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Rare. From the Eckenheimer collection.

29

750


2x 125. Sicily, Syracuse AV Hemidrachm. Timoleon and the Third Democracy, circa 344-339/8 BC. Head of Zeus left, wearing laurel wreath; ZEYΣ EΛEYΘEPIOΣ around / Pegasos flying left; ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around, AP monogram to left, three pellets below. HGC 2, 1284; SNG ANS 493 corr.; SNG Lloyd 1440; Jameson 851; Rizzo pl. LVIII, 1. 2.12g, 12mm, 3h. Very Fine, minor mark on obverse.

2,000

From the Eckenheimer collection.

126. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Hemidrachm. Agathokles, circa 317-310 BC. Diademed head of Apollo left; Palladion behind, [A]I below / Gorgoneion at the centre of a triskeles of human legs with winged feet. Calciati 121/DS i. SNG ANS 545. 6.47g, 19mm. Good Very Fine. Rare.

300

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

127. Sicily, Syracuse AV Dekadrachm. Agathokles, circa 317-310 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left; kantharos behind / Charioteer driving galloping to biga right, holding kentron and reins; ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around, triskeles below. Cf. Bérend, l’or pl. 9, 1; cf. SNG ANS 552; SNG Copenhagen 747 var. (no obverse symbol); BMC 339; Triton VIII, 11 January 2005, 91. 4.30g, 15mm, 3h. Very Fine. Extremely rare variety with kantharos.

1,250

From the Eckenheimer collection.

128. Sicily, Syracuse AV Dekadrachm. Agathokles, circa 317-310 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Charioteer driving galloping to biga right, holding kentron and reins; ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around, triskeles below. SNG ANS 552. 4.27g, 14mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine.

2,000

From the Eckenheimer collection.

129. Sicily, Syracuse AV Dekadrachm. Agathokles, circa 317-310 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Charioteer driving galloping to biga right, holding kentron and reins; ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around, triskeles below. SNG ANS 549ff. 4.26g, 15mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine. From the Eckenheimer collection.

30

2,500


130. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Hemilitron. Time of Agathokles, circa 310-309 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; ΣΥΡAΚΟΣΙΩΝ around / Cavalryman charging to right on horseback, holding couched lance, monogram below. BAR Issue 15; CNS 116; HGC 2, 1460. 7.63g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare, and in exceptional condition for the issue.

2,500

From the Eckenheimer collection.

131. Sicily, Syracuse EL 50 Litrai. Time of Agathokles, circa 310-304 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left, lamp behind / Tripod lebes, phiale above, ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around. G. K. Jenkins, ‘Electrum Coinage at Syracuse,’ Essays Robinson dies O12/R16; SNG ANS -; BMFA 448 (same dies); BMC 257 (same dies). 3.62g, 14mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Very well struck and preserved for the type.

3,000

From the Eckenheimer collection.

132. Sicily, Syracuse AV Stater. Agathokles, circa 306-289 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin, singlependant earring and necklace / AΓAΘOKΛEOΣ BAΣIΛEOΣ, winged thunderbolt, monogram below. BMC 416; SNG Copenhagen -. 5.70g, 17mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Some minor scratches. Rare symbol.

5,000

This piece is from a short-lived issue known from six obverse and seven reverse dies with numerous interlinkings, which suggest a specific occasion for its striking. Three alternatives proposed are the assumption of the royal title by Agathokles in 304 BC, the marriage of his daughter to Pyrrhos of Epeiros in 297, or renewed preparations for war against Carthage - the last of which seems the most plausible; indeed we see here a type familiar to Greek mercenaries that at once recalls the gold staters of Alexander the Great, and the silver staters of Alexander of Epeiros.

133. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Hemilitron. Time of the Fourth Democracy, circa 289-287 BC. Head of Artemis left, ΣΩΤΕΙΡΑ before / Thunderbolt, ΔΙΟΣ ΕΛΕΥ-ΘΕΡΙΟΥ above and below. CNS 147 corr.; SNG ANS 746; SNG Morcom -. 7.79g, 18mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and extremely well preserved for the type.

500

From the Eckenheimer collection.

134. Sicily Syracuse Æ21. Time of Hiketas, circa 287-278 BC. ΔIOΣ EΛΛANIOY, laureate head of Apollo left, palladium behind / ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, eagle standing to left on thunderbolt, star before. CNS II, 157; SNG ANS 810. 8.74g, 21mm, 10h. Good Extremely Fine. Very attractive patina, with original earthen encrustations around edge. A wonderful bronze. From the Eckenheimer collection.

31

1,000


135. Sicily, Syracuse Æ17. Hieron II, circa 275-269 BC. Wreathed head of Kore left, ΣYPAKOΣIΩN before / Bull butting left; club above; IE in exergue. BAR issue 53; CNS 191; SNG ANS 581. 6.12g, 17mm, 3h. Very Fine.

250

From the Eckenheimer collection.

Finely Detailed Cavalryman

136. Sicily, Syracuse Æ27. Hieron II, circa 240-215 BC. Diademed head left; axe to right / Armoured cavalryman on horseback to right, holding spear; ΑΓ monogram and pellet below; IEPΩNOΣ in exergue. Cf. CNS 193 Ds 10; HGC 2, 1547 (unlisted control marks); BAR Issue 61; HGC 2, 1548. 17.39g, 27mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Exceptionally well detailed reverse.

2,000

Extremely Rare 2 1/2 Litrai

137. Sicily, Syracuse AR 2 1/2 Litrai. Time of Hieron II, circa 216-215/4 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Goddess with billowing cloak standing to left, holding scroll and filleted palm frond; Φ to lower left. CCO 303 (D5/R3); BAR Issue 69; HGC 2, 1420; SNG ANS 904 (same dies). 2.23g, 14mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, and one of the finest known examples.

1,000

138. Sicily, Syracuse AR 16 Litrai. Philistis, wife of Hieron II, circa 216-215 BC. Diademed and veiled head of Philistis to left, wreath behind / BAΣIΛIΣΣAΣ ΦIΛIΣTIΔOΣ, Nike driving quadriga right, Φ above. SNG ANS 872; SNG Copenhagen 822. 13.62g, 25mm, 8h. Near Extremely Fine. Attractive cabinet tone. Rare. From the Mark Christenson Collection; Ex ArtCoins Roma Auction 6, 10 December 2012, lot 334.

32

800


ILLYRIA

139. Illyria, Apollonia Æ25. Circa 1st Century BC. Bust of Artemis left wearing stephane; Θ below, monogram before, ONOMOKΛHΣ behind / Tripod within laurel-wreath, AΠOΛΛΩNIATAN around. Cf. SNG Copenhagen 407; cf. BMC 60, 54ff; Münzen & Medaillen Deutschland 15, 21 October 2004, lot 264. 17.81g, 25mm, 7h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

200

140. Illyria, Dyrrhachion AR Stater. Circa 400-330 BC. Pegasos flying right, Δ below / Helmeted head of Athena right; club and Δ behind, dolphin above helmet. Pegasi 31; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC Corinth 10. 8.31g, 22mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

500

EPEIROS Two Apparently Unique Coins of Epeiros

141. Kingdom of Epeiros, Pyrrhos Æ21. 297-272 BC. Laureate head of Zeus left / Thunderbolt within wreath; A above, Π below. SNG Copenhagen 102 var. (controls); Franke 61 var. (V-/R56). 5.39g, 21mm, 9h. Very Fine. Apparently unique variety.

100

142. Epeiros, Epirote Republic AR Drachm. Circa 198-168 BC. Head of Zeus Dodonaeus right, wearing oak wreath, monogram behind / ΑΠΕΙΡΩΤΑΝ, eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt, oak wreath around. BMC -; GC -; SNG Copenhagen -; Delepierre -; Dewing -; Franke -. 4.89g, 21mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. This variety with Zeus right and eagle left is apparently unpublished. Privately purchased from Maison Platt, October 1987.

33

1,000


AKARNANIA

Exceedingly Rare Bronze of Alyzeia

143. Akarnania, Alyzeia Æ Trichalkon. Circa 330-280 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / AΛY..., head of Herakles right, wearing lion’s skin headdress. Cf. BCD Akarnania 74 (Lot); Imhoof-Blumer, Akarnania, p. 50, 17 var. (club behind); Pecunem 21, 7 September 2014, 149. 5.76g, 18mm, 4h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

200

The bronzes of Alyzeia are apparently exceedingly rare: BCD only had five after some forty years of collecting, and only two appear on CoinArchives.

144. Akarnania, Leukas AR Stater. Circa 435-380 BC. Pegasos flying right; Λ below / Helmeted head of Athena right; kerykeion and Λ behind. Pegasi 95; BCD Akarnania 221. 8.52g, 22mm, 3h. Good Very Fine.

300

145. Akarnania, Leukas AR Stater. Circa 435-380 BC. Pegasos flying right; Λ below / Helmeted head of Athena right; kerykeion and Λ behind. Pegasi 95; BCD Akarnania 221. 8.44g, 22mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Some horn silver deposits.

300

146. Akarnania, Leukas AR Stater. Circa 400-375 BC. Pegasos flying right, Λ below / Helmeted head of Athena right; kantharos behind. Pegasi 29; BCD Akarnania 187. 8.37g, 22mm, 4h. Very Fine.

300

147. Akarnania, Leukas AR Stater. Circa 350 BC. Pegasos flying to right, Λ below (obscured by die break) / Head of Athena left in Corinthian helmet, Λ and kerykeion behind. Pegasi 88. 8.11g, 22mm, 3h. Very Fine.

34

250


148. Akarnania, Leukas AR Stater. Circa 350 BC. Pegasos flying right; Λ below / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; ithyphallic herm right, caduceus, and Λ behind. Pegasi 102. 8.53g, 22mm, 10h. Good Very Fine. Some horn silver deposits.

250

149. Akarnania, Leukas AR Stater. Circa 350-320 BC. Pegasos flying to right; Λ below / Helmeted head of Athena right; hippocamp to left behind. Pegasi -, cf. 107 (Λ missing). 8.34g, 22mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

500

150. Akarnania, Leukas AR Stater. Circa 350-320 BC. Pegasos flying to right; Λ below / Helmeted head of Athena right; behind, Λ and hippocamp left. Pegasi 107; BCD Akarnania 224. 8.47g, 22mm, 9h. Extremely Fine, banker’s mark on obv. Very Rare.

750

151. Akarnania, Leukas AR Stater. Circa 320-280 BC. Pegasos flying right, Λ below / Helmeted head of Athena right; amphora, grape vine and A behind. BMC 68; Pegasi 128; BCD Akarnania 278. 8.50g, 21mm, 2h. Very Fine - Good Very Fine.

500

152. Akarnania, Thyrrheion Æ18. Circa 300-250 BC. Helmeted head of Athena left, wearing crested Athenian helmet / ΘΥΡΡΕIΩΝ, owl standing left; torch in left field. BCD Akarnania 378.1; SNG Copenhagen 414. 3.97g, 18mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

35

100


THESSALY

153. Thessaly, Atrax AR Hemidrachm. Early to mid 4th century BC. Head of the nymph Bura to left, wearing pendant earring and necklace / Horse standing to right, ΑΤΡΑΓΙΟΝ around. BMC p. 14, 1, pl. II, 7 (same dies); cf also R. Ratto 26 April 1909, 2035 for the same rev. die. 2.89g, 15mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

Ex BCD Collection, Triton XV, 3 January 2012, lot 52.

154. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 400-380 BC. Signed by the artist ‘Ai...’ Head of the nymph Larissa three-quarter facing, turned slightly to left, right shoulder elevated on which sits clasp of garment, [AI] above head / Horse, with one foreleg bent and slightly lifted and tail raised, grazing right, AI below, ΛΑΡΙΣΑΙ in exergue. Lorber, Early, 20.2; SNG Copenhagen -. 6.15g, 19mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

800

Lorber states that ‘Ai...’ became the mint’s chief engraver, displacing he who signed himself ‘Simo...’. The present dies are among the finest in the entire series.

155. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 365-356 BC. Bull running to right, ΛAPIΣAION above / Thessalos, wearing a petasos, cloak and tunic, galloping on horseback to right. F. Hermann ‘Die Silbermünzen von Larissa in Thessalien’ ZfN XXXV, 1925, pl. IV, 17; C. Lorber, ‘Thessalian Hoards and the Coinage of Larissa’, AJN 20, 2008, pl. 46, 101; SNG Copenhagen 118; BCD 1136. 6.03g, 20mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,500

Privately purchased from Spink & Son Ltd., London, June 1989.

156. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 350 BC. Head of the nymph Larissa three-quarters facing, turned slightly to left, grain ears in her hair, wearing pendant earring and plain necklace with a central drop / Mare standing right with foal in the background, ΛΑΡΙΣΑΙΩΝ below exergual line. Cf. Glendining’s, 21 June 1972, lot 162 (same dies). 6.10g, 20mm, 3h. About Extremely Fine. Fine style.

3,000

Ex BCD Collection, Triton XV, 3 January 2012, lot 294.

157. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Early to mid 4th century BC. Head of the nymph Larissa facing three-quarters right, wearing double band necklace with central medallion and circular earring decorated with pellets, scroll like element dangling from it; border of dots / ΛΑΡΙΣAI above, horse with straight legs grazing right on ground line on which grows plant. Lorber, Early, 36.1. 5.97 g, 18mm, 11h. Very Fine. Lightly toned. Ex BCD Collection, Triton XV, 3 January 2012, lot 225.

36

1,000


158. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Mid 4th century BC. Head of the nymph Larissa three-quarter facing right, wearing pendant earring and plain necklace / Horse with straight legs standing to right on ground line, feeding; ΛΑΡΙΣ above, ΑΙΩΝ below. Herrmann, pl. VII, 5. 6.17g, 20mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned and sharply struck. Fine style.

1,500

Ex BCD Collection, Triton XV, 3 January 2012, lot 281.

2x 159. Thessaly, Pelinna AR Obol. Circa 425-400 BC. Horse pacing left / Warrior in throwing stance to left, wearing petasos and chiton, holding shield and javelin; ΠEΛIN around. Pozzi (Boutin) 2826 (same dies). 0.95g, 13.5mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

250

Ex BCD Collection, Triton XV, 3 January 2012, lot 516.

160. Thessaly, Pharsalos Æ21. Circa 424-405/404 BC. Three-quarter facing head of Athena turned slightly to left, wearing triple crested helmet / Warrior on horseback right, wearing petasos, holding mace overhead; behind walks a foot soldier holding a mace over shoulder; ΦAPΣ around. Lavva 291302; SNG Copenhagen 231. 9.03g, 21mm, 6h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

300

161. Thessaly, Skotussa Æ Hemi-chalkous. Circa 394-367 BC. Head of bearded Dionysos right, wearing ivy wreath / Bunch of grapes hanging from branch, Σ-Κ-Ο-Τ around; all within shallow circular incuse. BCD Thessaly I, 1339. 1.60g, 13mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

200

162. Thessaly, Trikka AR Hemidrachm. Circa 440-400 BC. The hero Thessalos, bearded, nude but for chlamys and petasos, holding band around the head of forepart of a bull right / Forepart of bridled horse right, TPIKKAIΩИ around. BCD Thessaly II 782/781.2 (for obv./rev. dies). 2.77g, 17mm, 9h. Good Very Fine.

37

300


163. Thessaly, Thessalian League Æ Chalkous. Circa 170 BC. Macedonian shield with star in centre / ΘEΣΣA-LΩN above and below, dart–sling (κεστροσφενδóνη) with dart inside. Warren, ‘Two Notes on Thessalian Coins,’ NC 1961, pl. I, 11; Rogers 4 var. (arrangement of ethnic); BCD Thessaly II 24.2. 2.94g, 15mm. Good Very Fine.

150

2x 164. Thessaly, Koinon of Thessaly Æ Assarion. Time of Hadrian, circa AD 117-138. Head of Achilles right, wearing crested Attic helmet; AXIΛΛЄYC around / Horse trotting right, ΘЄCCAΛWN around. Burrer Em. 1, Series 2, Grp. 1, 141 corr. (A35/R116; Є not E); Moustaka pl. 12, 153b; BCD Thessaly II 956.1. 3.24g, 15mm, 5h. Very Fine. Pleasing portrait of Achilles.

150

LOKRIS

165. Lokris, Lokris Opuntii AR Stater. Circa 369-338 BC. Head of Demeter left, wearing triple pendant earring and necklace / Ajax the Lesser advancing right, nude but for helmet, holding sword and shield, Boeotian helmet below; OΠONTIΩN around. BCD Lokris 12; BMC Locris 20. 11.93g, 24mm, 1h. Very Fine.

3,500

CORINTHIA

166. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 400-375 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet; trident above. Pegasi 133; Ravel 411. 8.71g, 24mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare. An excellent strike on a huge flan.

1,500

167. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 400-375 BC. Pegasos walking left, Q below / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet; dolphin above, Σ behind. Pegasi 342; Pozzi 1683; cf. BMC 386; BCD -. 8.61g, 20mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

38

2,000


168. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-345 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left; behind, N and Ares standing right, holding shield and spear. Pegasi 376; Ravel 1056; BCD Corinth 121; SNG Copenhagen 121. 8.46g, 21mm, 6h. Very Fine.

400

169. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 345-307 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left; Γ below chin, dove in wreath to right. Pegasi 419; Ravel 1029; BCD Corinth 110; SNG Copenhagen -. 8.58g, 23mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

170. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 345-307 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left, I below chin; eight rayed star behind. Pegasi 425; Ravel 1034; BCD Corinth -; SNG Copenhagen 113. 8.37g, 21mm, 12h. Very Fine.

300

171. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 345-307 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left, helmet decorated with laurel wreath; A-P below, aegis behind. Pegasi 427; Ravel 1009; SNG Copenhagen 71. 8.56g, 24mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

Ex D.V. Collection.

172. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 345-307 BC. Pegasos flying left; Q below / Laureate, helmeted head of Athena left; A-P below, plough behind. Pegasi I 441; Ravel 1022b. 8.54g, 22mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractive, old tone. Ex Roma Numismatics III, 31 March 2012, lot 121.

39

750


173. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 345-307 BC. Pegasos flying to left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left; pine cone behind, ΔI below. Pegasi 445; BCD Corinth 129; Ravel 1070. 8.47g, 23mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

500

174. Corinthia, Corinth AR Drachm. Circa 330 BC. Pegasos flying left, [Q below] / Head of nymph left, wearing earring and necklace and with hair in sakkos. Cf. BMC 184ff. 8.49g, 22mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

250

SIKYONIA

175. Sikyonia, Sikyon AR Stater. Circa 350-330 BC. Chimaera advancing left, right paw raised, SE below, [wreath above] / Dove flying left, N below beak; all within laurel wreath. BMC 57; SNG Copenhagen 48; BCD 218. 12.31g, 24mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Light deposits on reverse.

2,000

ARGOLIS

176

177

176. Argolis, Argos AR Triobol. Circa 270-260/50 BC. Forepart of wolf at bay left; Θ above / Large A; monogram to upper right; below, eagle standing right on harpa right; all within incuse square. BCD Peloponnesos 1113 (same rev. die). 2.63g, 14mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. 700 177. Argolis, Argos AR Triobol. Circa 260-250 BC. Forepart of wolf to left, Θ above / Large A, Π−Υ across field above, eagle on harpa below. BMC 79; BCD Peloponnesos 1111. 2.63g, 15mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. 700

178

179

178. Argolis, Argos AR Triobol. Circa 260-250 BC. Forepart of wolf to left, Θ above / Large A, Δ−Ε across field above, eagle on harpa below. BMC 61; BCD Peloponnesos 1109. 2.52g, 26mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. 700 179. Argolis, Argos AR Triobol. Circa 80-50 BC. Phaenos, magistrate. Forepart of wolf at bay left / Large A, trident right below crossbar, ΦAH-NOY in two lines across fields; all within incuse square. BCD Peloponnesos 1162.3 (this coin); BMC -. 2.45g, 15mm, 8h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare. 200 From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex BCD Collection, LHS 96, 8 May 2006, lot 1162.3.

40


ATTICA Excellent Archaic Athens Tetradrachm

180.

Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 490-482 BC. Archaic head of Athena right wearing crested helmet decorated with chevron and dot pattern / Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig behind, ΑΘΕ before. Cf. Svoronos Pl. 4, 26. 17.44g, 23mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. In unusually good condition for the issue, with a full crest; struck and preserved on sound, lustrous metal. Very Rare. 15,000 Athens was one of the few Greek cities with significant silver deposits in their immediate territory, a remarkable stroke of fortune upon which Xenophon reflected: ‘The Divine Bounty has bestowed upon us inexhaustible mines of silver, and advantages which we enjoy above all our neighbouring cities, who never yet could discover one vein of silver ore in all their dominions.’ The mines at Laurion had been worked since the bronze age, but it would be only later in 483 that a massive new vein of ore would be discovered that enabled Athens to finance grand new schemes such as the construction of a fleet of 200 triremes, a fleet that would later prove decisive in defending Greece at the Battle of Salamis. This coin was produced in the period before the discovery of the new deposits at Laurion, around the time of the Ionian Revolt and the subsequent first Persian invasion of Greece. Athens aided the Ionian Greeks in their rebellion against Persian tyranny with both coin and soldiers, participating in the 498 BC march on Sardes which resulted in the capture and sack of that city – the only significant offensive action taken by the Ionians, who were pushed back onto the defensive and eventually subjugated once more. Vowing to punish Athens for their support of the doomed rebellion, the Persian king Darius launched an invasion of Greece, landing at Marathon in 490 BC. Just twenty five miles from Athens, a vastly outnumbered Athenian hoplite army inflicted a crushing defeat on the Persians, who after suffering horrendous casualties turned to their ships and fled.

181. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 490-482 BC. Archaic head of Athena right wearing crested helmet decorated with chevron and dot pattern / Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig behind, ΑΘΕ before. Cf. Svoronos Pl. 5; cf. Asyut pl. XVIII. 17.23g, 20mm, 5h. Extremely Fine, struck on a large flan and displaying a complete helmet crest.

41

9,000


182. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 490-482 BC. Archaic head of Athena right wearing crested helmet decorated with chevron and dot pattern / Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig behind, ΑΘΕ before. Cf. Svoronos Pl. 5; cf. Asyut pl. XVIII. 16.92g, 21mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

5,000

From the Eckenheimer collection.

183. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 490-482 BC. Archaic head of Athena right wearing crested helmet decorated with chevron and dot pattern / Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig behind, ΑΘΕ before. Cf. Svoronos Pl. 5; cf. Asyut pl. XVIII. 17.66g, 21mm, 1h. Extremely Fine.

5,000

From the Eckenheimer collection.

184. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 490-482 BC. Archaic head of Athena right wearing crested helmet decorated with chevron and dot pattern / Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig behind, ΑΘΕ before. Cf. Svoronos Pl. 5; cf. Asyut pl. XVIII. 17.66g, 21mm, 1h. Extremely Fine.

3,000

From the Eckenheimer collection.

185

186

185. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; Dewing 1591-8. 17.12g, 24mm, 3h. Extremely Fine.

750

186. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31. 17.16g, 24mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine.

42

1,250


2x 187. Attica, Athens AR Obol. After 449 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right; olive sprig above. Svoronos pl. 9, 35-39; cf. SNG Copenhagen 24-25; Star Group V. 0.69g, 9mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Very well struck and preserved for the type.

750

Ex Monnaies et Médailles Liste 111, March 1952, lot 14.

188. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Eastern(?) imitation. Circa 350-294 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind. Kroll 15; SNG Copenhagen 64. 16.98g, 25mm, 9h. Very Fine.

500

Extremely Rare Early New Style Drachm

189. Attica, Athens AR New Style Drachm. Circa 229-197 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing to right on amphora, head facing; AΘE across fields, grain ear to right. Svoronos pl. 34, 26-29; SNG Copenhagen -. 4.15g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

750

190. Attica, Athens AR New Style Tetradrachm. Circa 154-3 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with vine tendril and Pegasos / Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; AΘE across, monograms flanking, caps of the Dioskouroi to right; all within wreath. Thompson 61 (this obv. die). 17.05g, 34mm, 12h. Very Fine. Beautifully toned. Rare early issue.

1,000

An obverse die of excellent style, vastly superior to the usual New Style tetradrachms. In approximately 165 BC, Athens introduced a new series of silver tetradrachm, referred to today as ‘New Style Coinage’. At the time, it represented a landmark change in the coinage of Athens. Although the types had not changed, and still depicted Athena on the obverse and an owl on the reverse, this new coinage saw a marked change in the artistic styles employed in the engraving. The traditional, more archaising devices that had been the norm during the previous three centuries were replaced with a contemporary interpretation of the Athena Parthenos of Pheidias, wearing her triple-crested Attic helmet adorned on its visor with the foreparts of four or more horses, and a flying Pegasos on the bowl. On the reverse, the owl was now shown standing on a horizontal amphora, with a profligacy of magistrates’ names, symbols, and other letters occupying every available space, all enclosed within a large olive wreath. These new depictions were facilitated by, or more likely the result of, the coins’ oversized flans which were broader and thinner, offering the engraver a larger canvas upon which to work, while also requiring some innovative thinking to make use of the space. The new coinage was produced on a large scale, and this apparent improvement in Athens’ economy is attributed to the city’s recovery of the port of Delos in 166 BC. As with the fifth century issues, the new coinage became an important and respected trade currency, as attested by the hoard deposits throughout the Mediterranean, and indeed the broad, thin flan also gained favour at other cities, which began to issue similar tetradrachms in imitation. The series reached a zenith in the early first century BC, but Sulla’s capture of Athens in the spring of 86 BC was a severe shock to the city’s prosperity, and caused a dramatic reduction in the issue of coinage. Until this point, the coins had been produced in an unbroken annual cycle, but there were thereafter only a few sporadic issues, and the series ceased entirely in 50-40 BC.

43


191. Attica, Athens AR New Style Drachm. Circa 128/7 BC. Dioge-, Posei-, and Ka-, magistrates. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet / ΑΘΕ, Owl standing right on overturned amphora; Dionysos standing facing in left field, Δ on amphora; ΔΙ-ΟΓ - ΠΟΣ - ΚΑ across, all within olive wreath. Svoronos pl. 46, 12; Thompson 419d; Hunter 105. 3.96g, 17mm, 11h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

500

The Sullan Coinage

192. Attica, Athens AR New Style Tetradrachm. Issue of Sulla, circa 86-84 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right on amphora, monogram left and right; all within wreath. Svoronos pl. 78, 15. 16.71g, 30mm, 12h. Extremely Fine, attractively toned. Rare.

1,000

Ex CNG 64, 24 September 2003, lot 212. In the First Mithradatic War the Roman forces under Sulla first directed their attention to the city of Athens, which was then ruled by the tyrant Aristion, a puppet of Mithradates. Upon his arrival, Sulla threw up earthworks encompassing not only the city but also the port of Piraeos. Despite several attempts by Archelaos, the Mithradatic commander in Asia, to raise the siege, Athens remained firmly blockaded. During the year or so of siege, Sulla stripped shrines and Sibyls alike of wealth to fund his war effort. From these and other sources of precious metal Sulla appears to have chosen to strike a currency that would be familiar and acceptable to the surrounding regions. The monogram series seem to have been the first issue, for which Thompson suggested a starting date of 86 BC, after Sulla captured Athens. Another series displaying a trophy are regarded as the second issue, and presumably were struck shortly before Sulla left Athens to return to Rome. It has been suggested however that Sulla would have also struck coins of Athenian type during the period of the siege itself, a sensible notion that would seem to make the trophy series fitting for a post-siege issue.

CYCLADES

193. Cyclades, Melos Æ17. Circa 4th century BC. Pomegranate / Kantharos (overstruck on coin of uncertain type and design). SNG Copenhagen 684. 3.65g, 17mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

150

MACEDON

194. Macedon, Akanthos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 525-470 BC. Bull collapsing to left, head lowered, attacked and mauled by lion upon his back to right; bukranion in exergue / Quadripartite square with raised fields. SNG ANS 6; cf. Desneux 24-27. 17.32g, 29mm. Near Extremely Fine. From the Eckenheimer collection.

44

4,000


Fine Style Akanthos Tetradrachm

195. Macedon, Akanthos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 430-400 BC. Bull with head raised, crouching to left, attacked by lion leaping on his back to right; fish below / ΑΚΑΝΘΙΟΝ around raised quadripartite square; all within incuse square. Weber 1863; Nomos sale 6, 2012, 40; Desneaux –, cf. 103. 15.26g, 24mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

7,500

From a North American collection; Ex Numismatik Lanz 151, 30 June 2011, lot 344. The ubiquitous and persistent theme of the lion-bull combat can be traced back to the figurate art of the third millennium, where the geometrical motifs are replaced by narrative symbolic representations, and the scene is characteristic of Near Eastern art in its infancy. The earliest known depiction occurs on a ewer found at Uruk dated to the latter part of the Protoliterate period, circa 3300 BC. That ewer has a relief depiction of a lion attacking a bull from behind (see Henri Frankfort, Art and Architecture of the Ancient Orient, 1963). The scene became widely distributed by 500 BC, featuring prominently in the Achaemenid Empire, and in particular at the palace of Darius in Persepolis, where it occurs no fewer than twenty seven times, including on the main staircase leading to the imperial complex. Its frequent appearances in key locations strongly suggest an important symbolic significance, which unfortunately has not survived antiquity. Explanations for the symbolism and its power over ancient peoples who reproduced it with prodigious enthusiasm have ranged from it being an expression of royal power, to it being an astronomical allusion, as well as it being an embodiment of the constant struggle between civilisation (represented by the domesticated bull), and nature (represented by the untameable lion). This latter argument may well hold true for the Mesopotamians of Uruk, who it is known took a rather grim view of the world, seeing it as a battleground of opposing powers. For further exploration of this theme, and its significance in Greek culture, see lot 408.

196. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetradrachm. Olynthos, circa 420-355 BC. Laureate head right of Apollo / Kithara with six strings, ΧΑΛΚΙΔΕΩΝ around, magistrate’s name EΠI APIΣTΩNOΣ below. SNG ANS 496, Dewing 1071. 14.48g, 24mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

5,000

Ex Goldberg 59, 30 May 2010, lot 2065. A beautiful piece with the original hoard patina intact. This example was likely part of the hoard recovered at Olynthos during excavations in the early 1930s. An outstanding example with a portrait of fine style. Olynthos, son of Herakles, was according to mythological tradition the founder of this city which rose to prominence as head of the Chalkidian League during the Peloponnesian War. In practice, Olynthos most likely took its name from the Greek olunthos: a fig which matures too early, for the area abounded with this fruit. Philip II of Macedon deprived the city of its League by both diplomacy and force, then undertook to besiege the city itself in 348 BC. Through the treachery of the city’s two leading citizens Euthykrates and Lasthenes the city was betrayed to Philip who sacked it, razed it to the ground and sold all those within into slavery, including an Athenian garrison.

45


197. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetradrachm. Olynthos, circa 383-379 BC. Laureate head of Apollo to left / Kithara with seven strings, ΧΑΛΚΙΔΕΩΝ around. Robinson & Clement 77. 14.24g, 24mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

1,500

Ex Spink 4018, 6 October 2004, lot 26.

198. Kingdom of Macedon, Archelaos AR Stater. Aigai, circa 413-399 BC. Head of Apollo right, wearing tainia / Horse standing to right within linear square. Westermark, Staters, Group II, Series 2 (O23/R35); SNG ANS 65–7. 10.62g, 21mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

750

Ex Gorny & Mosch 190, 11 October 2010, lot 127; Ex Numismatik Lank 22, 10 May 1982, lot 246.

199. Kingdom of Macedon, Archelaos AR Stater. Aigai, circa 413-400/399 BC. Head of Apollo right, wearing tainia / Horse standing right, trailing rein, ΑΡΧΕΛΑΟ around; all within incuse square. Westermark, Staters, Group II, Series 2 (O66/R82); SNG ANS 66–7; SNG Lockett 1391. 16.72g, 23mm, 2h. Extremely Fine.

2,500

Ex Gorny & Mosch 129, 8 March 2004, lot 87.

Excellent Left-Facing Philip II Tetradrachm

200. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 342-336 BC. Laureate head of Zeus facing left / Youth on horseback right, nude, holding palm; ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ above, Θ below foreleg. Le Rider 439; SNG ANS 430. 14.37g, 25mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Fine style and attractively toned. Very Rare. Ex Triton VI, 14 January 2003, lot 147.

46

4,000


2x 201. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AV 1/12 Stater. Pella, circa 340/36-328 BC. Head of Apollo right, wearing laurel wreath / ΦIΛIΠΠOY, thunderbolt; head of lion facing below. Le Rider 26 and 28 var. (D–/R16 [unlisted obv. die]); SNG ANS 209–15; SNG Alpha Bank 252–4; SNG Saroglos 45; Weber 2048 (same rev. die). 0.71g, 8mm, 4h. Very Fine. Rare.

500

202. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AV Stater. Lampsakos, circa 324. Laureate head of Apollo right / ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ, charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving racing biga to right, serpent below. Cf. Le Rider pl. 90, 6 (without monogram). 8.56g, 18mm, 3h. Very Fine.

1,000

203. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Nude youth holding palm on horseback to right, Θ beneath horse; ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ around. Le Rider 445b; SNG ANS 432. 14.38g, 26mm, 1h. Good Very Fine, double-struck reverse with graffito in field.

300

204. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AV Stater. Teos, circa 323-316 BC. Laureate head of Apollo / ΦIΛIΠΠOY, charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving racing biga to right; filleted branch below horses, spearhead in exergue. Le Rider -; SNG ANS 318. 8.56g, 17mm, 12h. Very Fine.

1,000

205. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AV Stater. Amphipolis, circa 323-315. Laureate head of Apollo right / ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ, charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving racing biga to right; trident below horses. Le Rider pl. 80, 204 (this obverse die); SNG Copenhagen 603. 8.60g, 18mm, 10h. Good Very Fine.

1,500

206. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip II AV Stater. Magnesia, circa 323-316 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / ΦIΛIΠΠOY, charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving racing biga to right; bee below horses, spearhead in exergue. Thompson, Philip 3; cf. Le Rider pl. 90, 15; SNG ANS 314. 8.70g, 18mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Attractive style.

47

2,000


48


Exceptional Distater of Alexander III

207. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Distater. Amphipolis, circa 325-323 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing to left, holding wreath in outstretched right hand and stylis over left shoulder; thunderbolt to left, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 163; Müller 1; for the date, see Troxell, p. 128. 17.23g, 22mm, 8h. Good Extremely Fine. Exceptionally well preserved for the issue; one of the very finest surviving distaters.

30,000

Alexander’s stunning conquest of the Persian Achaemenid Empire delivered into his hands a vast wealth of proportions so incredible that it was scarcely believable. At the time of the death of Alexander’s father Philip II in 336 BC the Macedonian state was indebted to the sum of five hundred talents of silver. Yet less than five years later Alexander was the wealthiest man on the face of the earth and the Macedonian kingdom spanned some three thousand miles at its greatest length. The treasuries of Susa, Babylon and Persepolis rendered a treasure estimated at some one hundred and eighty thousand talents. A significant quanity of the captured gold was sent back to Amphipolis where a part was used for the striking of the Alexandrine distaters, the heaviest gold coins the world had yet known. Valued at forty silver drachms, this new denomination meant that Alexander’s discharged veteran soldiers could be paid out their one talent in 120 distaters. In practice, the relatively low output of gold distaters compared with the staters seems to suggest that perhaps they fulfilled a more ceremonial than practical role.

208. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Distater. Amphipolis, circa 336-323 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled snake / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylus, trident in left field; AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ to right. Price 171; SNG Copenhagen 623. 17.16g, 22mm, 9h. About Extremely Fine. Ex David Walsh Collection, privately purchased in 2001.

49

15,000


Beautiful, Lustrous Surfaces

209. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Distater. Amphipolis, circa 336-323 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled snake / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylus, trident in left field; AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ to right. Price 171; SNG Copenhagen 623. 17.23g, 22mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. A well struck and detailed example with attractive lustre.

20,000

210. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Amphipolis, circa 325-319 BC. Head of Athena to right, wearing triple crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, trident head downward in left field; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ to right. Price 172b-d; SNG Saroglos 103. 8.56g, 18mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

1,000

211. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 323-318/7 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated to left, holding sceptre; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, bee alighting on rose to left. Price 206; Moore 23-43. 17.20g, 25mm, 6h. Minor scrape on obverse, otherwise Extremely Fine.

50

750


212. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 315-310 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, holding sceptre; Boeotian shield in left field, coiled serpent under throne, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 249; SNG Copenhagen 728; Muller 754. 17.30g, 26mm, 2h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

1,500

213. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 275-272/1 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left holding lotus-tipped sceptre; AΛΞANΔPOY to right, Macedonian helmet in left field, ΘE monogram below throne. Price 623; Mathisen, Administrative VI.7. 17.15g, 28mm, 8h. Very Fine.

300

214. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Uncertain mint in Greece or Macedon, circa 310-275 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated to left holding sceptre; sistrum above A to left, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right, monogram below throne. Price 840. 17.07g, 26mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Interesting symbol.

500

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group 84, 5 May 2010, lot 315.

215. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Kallatis, circa 250-225 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right, monogram to left. Price 901. 8.53g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

51

3,000


216. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Kyzikos, circa 280-275 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left holding sceptre, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right; long torch and monogram in left field, monogram in circle below throne. Price 1341 (same obv. die); SNG France -; SNG München -; SNG Alpha Bank -; SNG Saroglos -. 17.06g, 29mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

300

Ex Triton XII, 6 January 2009, lot 195.

Wonderful Style

217. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Magnesia ad Maeandrum, circa 323-319 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triplecrested Corinthian helmet decorated with serpent / Nike standing left, wings spread, holding laurel-wreath in her right hand and stylis in her left; AΛEΞANΔPOY to right, a filleted thyrsos to left. Price 1943; Thompson / Bellinger, Yale Classical Studies 1955, 10. 8.72g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare. Wonderful style, struck in high relief and exceptionally well preserved.

218

4,000

219

218. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Magnesia ad Maeandrum, circa 200-196 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding eagle and sceptre; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, monogram in left field, maeander pattern in exergue. Cf. Price 2004-2030. 16.97g, 26mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare. 300 219. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Civic Issue of Kaunos, circa 300-280 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion’s skin / Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, drapery about legs and waist, holding sceptre and eagle; double headed axe before, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 2074; Müller 1128. For the reattribution to Kaunos, see R.H.J. Ashton, ‘Kaunos, not Miletos or Mylasa,’ NC 2004, pp. 33-46. 17.05g, 28mm, 12h. Very Fine, obv. die worn. 300

220. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Civic Issue of Kaunos, circa 300-280 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion’s skin / Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, drapery about legs and waist, holding sceptre and eagle; double headed axe before, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 2074; Müller 1128. For the reattribution to Kaunos, see R.H.J. Ashton, ‘Kaunos, not Miletos or Mylasa,’ NC 2004, pp. 33-46. 17.12g, 29mm, 12h. Extremely Fine, obv. die worn.

52

300


221. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. ‘Teos’, circa 310-301 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ to right, monogram in circle and Π in left field. Price -, cf. 2300. 8.60g, 19mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Lustrous.

2,500

222. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Sardes, circa 334-323 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; serpent in left field; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right. Price 2532. 8.59g, 17mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

1,000

Beautifully Detailed Alexander Stater

223. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Side, circa 325-320 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ to right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ to left, ΦI ΛY under left wing. Price -, cf. 2963. 8.61g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous.

3,000

224. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Kition, circa 325-320 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ to right, TK monogram to left. Price 3104. 8.58g, 17mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

2,000

225. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Kition in Cyprus, circa 325-320 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left holding sceptre, TK monogram in left field; AΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ below throne. Price 3110; Newell, ‘Kition’ 12. 17.03g, 26mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex A. Tkalec, 9 May 2011, lot 28.

53

400


226. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Arados, circa 325-323 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; AΛEΞANΔPOY to right, AP monogram in left field. Price 3423 (Byblos). 8.55g, 19mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

1,500

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

227. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Sidon, circa 333-305 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ to left, club under right wing. Price 3460. 8.59g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine.

1,250

228. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Miletos, circa 323-319 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin, and necklace / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, monogram to left, doubleheaded axe below wing. Price 2114. 8.56g, 17mm, 1h. Extremely Fine.

2,000

229. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Babylon, circa 311-305 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with serpent, pendant earring and pearl necklace / BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY, Nike standing left, wings spread, holding laurelwreath in her right hand and stylis in her left, MI in right field, monogram within wreath in left field. Price 3745. 8.55g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine.

1,500

230. Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander III ‘the Great’ AV Stater. Babylon, circa 311-305 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with serpent, pendant earring and pearl necklace / BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY, Nike standing left, wings spread, holding laurelwreath in her right hand and stylis in her left, MI in left field, monogram within wreath in right field. Price 3748. 8.54g, 17mm, 3h. Extremely Fine.

54

2,000


231. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip III Arrhidaios AV Stater. Babylon, circa 323-318/7 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet ornamented with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis, BAΣIΛEΩΣ to left, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ to right; ΛY below left wing, M below right wing. Price P178. 8.59g, 18mm, 4h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,500

232. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip III Arrhidaios AV Stater. Abydos, circa 323-316 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; ΦΙΛΙΠΠOY to right, monogram, pentagram and cornucopiae to left. Price P36; Thompson, Abydos 171a. 8.56g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

3,000

233. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip III Arrhidaios AV Stater. In the types of Philip II. Abydos, circa 323-317 BC. Struck under Leonnatos, Arrhidaios, or Antigonos I Monophthalmos. Head of Apollo right, wearing laurel wreath / ΦIΛIΠΠOY, charioteer, holding kentron in right hand, reins in left, driving biga right; ΠΔ monogram below, grain ear in exergue. Le Rider pl. 90, 12 (same obv. die); Thompson, Philip –; ADM II series IX, 127a (same dies); SNG ANS 305 (same obv. die). 8.70g, 17mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare issue, Thompson records only six examples from one obverse and two reverse dies (note: the Vinchon and Bourgey sales refer to the same coin). 2,000

234. Kingdom of Macedon, Philip V AR Drachm. Zoilos, mintmaster. Pella or Amphipolis, struck circa 184-179 BC. Diademed head right / Club, BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ around; monogram above, two monograms below; all within oak wreath, star to outer left. Mamroth, Philip 32; SNG München -; SNG Alpha Bank -; SNG Saroglos -; Pozzi 975. 4.23g, 20mm, 12h. Very Fine. Rare.

750

Ex Monnaies et Médailles Liste 137, August 1954, lot 35.

235. Macedon under Roman Rule, First Meris AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, 167-149 BC. Bust of Artemis right, wearing stephane, quiver and bow over shoulder, all within tondo of Macedonian shield / ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝΩΝ ΠΡΩΤΗΣ, horizontal club, monograms above and below, all within oak wreath. AMNG 177 (only 14 recorded); SNG Copenhagen 1314; BMC 7, McClean 749. 17.02g, 33mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare. Ex Noble Numismatics 96, 5 April 2011, lot 4990.

55

1,000


236. Macedon under Roman Rule Æ21. Amphipolis, circa 187-31 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right / Legend and monograms within oak-wreath. SNG Copenhagen -, cf. 1318-1319, C. Publilius, AMNG III 8.1. 7.96g, 21mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

200

THRACO-MACEDONIAN TRIBES

237. Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Derrones AR Dodekadrachm. Circa 480-465 BC. Male driver, holding goad in right hand, reins in left, driving ox cart to right on ornate ground line; above, crested Corinthian helmet right / Clockwise triskeles with central dot, palmette to left. AMNG III 56.5 var.; SNG ANS 930/931; Rosen 120-121 var. 37.81g, 34mm, 10h. Good Very Fine.

2,500

From the Mark Christenson Collection.

238. Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Derrones AR Dodekadrachm. Circa 480-465 BC. Male driver, holding goad in right hand and reins in left, driving ox cart left; above, crested Corinthian helmet to left / Clockwise triskeles of legs; Θ between legs; all within incuse square. Svoronos, Hellenisme -, cf. p. 9, 15 and pl. II, 1 (same obverse die); Traité -, cf. 1450 and pl. XLIV, 7; AMNG -, cf. p. 56, 7 and pl. XXV, 18; SNG ANS -. 38.10g, 36mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine.

6,000

From the Mark Christenson Collection; Ex Gemini VII, 9 January 2011, lot 219; Ex Helios 1, 17 April 2008, lot 62; Ex Triton VII, 12 January 2004, lot 154.

239. Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Mygdones or Krestones AR Stater. Circa 485-480 BC. Goat kneeling to right, rosette above / Quadripartite incuse square. Lorber, Goats, Issue 4; AMNG III 4 (Aigai); Asyut 150 (Aigai). 8.59g, 23mm. Good Very Fine. Pleasantly toned. Rare.

56

3,000


THRACE

240. Thrace, Ainos AR Tetradrachm. Antiadas, magistrate. Circa 453-450 BC. Head of Hermes right, wearing petasos on which AINI / Goat walking right within linear frame, outside which Pan stands right holding lagobolon, raising left arm, ΑΝΤΙΑΔΑΣ around; all within incuse square. Jameson 1050; May, Ainos 85 (A55/P68). 16.49g, 24mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

7,500

The coinage of Ainos consistently displayed Hermes on one side and a goat on the other, the reasons for which are that the goat represented the source of Ainos’ prosperity, and Hermes was the patron god of the city. According to a poem by Kallimachos, the sculptor Epeios, who constructed the Trojan Horse, also made a wooden statue (xoanon) of Hermes, which was washed out to sea and recovered by fishermen on the Hebros river. The fishermen, thinking it just a piece of driftwood, tried to burn it in their bonfire. When it failed to burn they took fright and threw it back into the sea, which promptly cast it back again. The natives accepted it as a relic of the gods, and erected the sanctuary of Hermes Perpheraios (the Wanderer) at the future site of Ainos. Engraved in beautiful early classical style, this obverse die that bears the city’s ethnik is arguably the most handsome of all the profile issues of Ainos. This issue under the magistrate Antiadas was the last struck in May’s Period I, after which the Athenian coinage decree led to an interruption in the issue of tetradrachms that lasted until 435/4 when Ainos was granted a special dispensation to resume tetradrachm issues.

241. Thrace, Ainos AR Tetradrachm. Antiadas, magistrate. Circa 453-450 BC. Head of Hermes right, wearing petasos on which AINI / Goat walking right within linear frame, outside which Pan stands right holding lagobolon, raising left arm, ΑΝΤΙΑΔΑΣ around; all within incuse square. Jameson 1050; May, Ainos 85 (A55/P68). 16.04g, 24mm, 3h. Extremely Fine.

4,000

242. Thrace, Abdera AR Tetrobol. Circa 395-360 BC. Protes, magistrate. Griffin, forepaws raised, springing left from grain ear / Laureate head of Apollo left; ΠΡΩTHΣ to right; all in linear border within shallow incuse square. May 331 (A-/P281 [unlisted rev. die]); AMNG II 123; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC 44a. 2.78g, 16mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful lustre.

500

243. Thrace, Abdera AR Tetradrachm. Circa 365-345 BC. Gryphon crouching left, ΑΒΔΗ-ΡΙΤΕΩΝ above and below / Laureate head of Apollo to right, ΕΠΙ ΕΥΡΗΣΙΠΠΟΥ around. Dewing 1264; May 541. 10.04g, 24mm, 3h. About Extremely Fine. From the Mark Christenson Collection; Ex Hirsch 279-280, 8 February 2012, lot 4176; Ex Gorny & Mosch 186, 8 March 2010, lot 1173.

57

1,500


Unique Quarter Stater of Abdera

244. Thrace, Abdera AV 1/4 Stater. Epimeletes Polyphantos, circa 336-311 BC. ΑΒΔΗ-ΡΙΤΕΩΝ, Griffin crouching left / Laureate head of Apollo left, ΕΠΙ ΠΟΛ-ΥΦΑΝΤΟΥ around. Unique and unpublished; for the same empimeletes, cf. J.M.F. May, The Coinage of Abdera (540-345 BC), edited by C.M. Kraay and G.K. Jenkins, Issue IX, London 1966, Group CXXXVII 547-8; M. Price, ‘Thrace, 1980’, in Coin Hoards VII, 1985, pp. 42-3, 50, fig. 5, 15 [= Triton sale 2, 1998, 347 (6.40g) = Leschorn II, p. 766]. 2.10g, 12mm, 12h. Very Fine. Unique and of significant numismatic interest.

7,500

The above mentioned Thrace 1980 hoard found wrapped in a sheet of lead near Abdera is of very considerable numismatic significance. The presence in this uncirculated hoard of posthumous Philip II types issued under Philip III together with the second known Abderan gold stater indicates that May’s period IX, dated to c. 375-360, should be considerably lowered. Another hoard from Kasamovo in Bulgaria, found in 1894 (IGCH 741), but not noted by May, Kraay and Jenkins, in which the epimeletai (overseers or supervisors, commonly called magistrates by modern numismatists) from periods V, VIII and IX are present together with coins of the Thracian Chersonese on a similar weight standard, also argue for the down dating of these three periods. The metrology of the later Abderan coinage is complex in the extreme, to the point that the only gold piece known at the time (signed by the epimeletes ΙΚΕΣΙΟΥ, weighing 6.42 and now in Oxford) is defined as a stater on p. 39, but as a half-stater on pp. 265, 267, 269 and on p. 274, catalogue no. 462. The discovery of the Abdera 1980 hoard gold stater signed by Polyphantos confirms a local Thracian weight standard of about 6.4 grams, exactly the double of two extant ‘half-staters’ of nearby Maroneia with an average weight of 3.2 grams (cf, Schönert-Geiss, Maroneia, 597, 1-2). The above newly discovered gold 1/4 Stater is logically based on the ‘Attic’ gold standard, which was presumably intended to circulate with the gold 1/4 staters in the name of Philip of the same weight, dated to c. 336-328 BC (cf, Le Rider 47-82 and SNG ANS 281-227).

245. Thrace, Apollonia Pontika AR Tetradrachm. Mid 4th century BC. Satyros, magistrate. Laureate head of Apollo left / ΣΑΤYΡΟΣ, upright anchor; A and crayfish flanking, all within shallow incuse square. Unpublished in the standard references, for general type cf. Topalov, Apollonia 50; SNG BM Black Sea 165; Traité IV 1622. 17.04g, 24mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Apparently unique, unpublished for this magistrate.

2,500

246. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AV Stater. Uncertain mint, circa 305-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander the Great right, wearing horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, resting left elbow on shield, transverse spear behind; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛYΣΙΜΑΧΟY to left, monogram in inner left field. Müller 478. Thompson, Essays Robinson –. 8.51g, 19mm, 2h Good Extremely Fine, superbly lustrous. Ex Stacks, Bowers & Ponterio 160, 17 June 2011, lot 6019.

58

3,000


247. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lampsakos, circa 297-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, spear behind; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ to left, ΠA monogram in circle to outer left, torch to outer right. Thompson 42; Müller –. 17.18g, 28mm, 11h. Extremely Fine.

248

750

249

248. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lampsakos, circa 297-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, spear behind; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ to left, monogram in inner left field, crescent in exergue. Thompson 49; SNG Copenhagen 1097. 16.64g, 31mm, 12h. Some scrapes, otherwise Extremely Fine. 1,000 249. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lampsakos, circa 297-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, spear behind; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ to left, monogram in inner left field, crescent in exergue. Thompson 49; SNG Copenhagen 1097. 16.87g, 31mm, 12h. Slightly wavy flan, otherwise about Extremely Fine. 1,500 Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 64, 17 May 2012, lot 2206.

250. Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lampsakos, circa 297-281 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, spear behind; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ to left, monogram in inner left field, crescent in exergue. Thompson 49; SNG Copenhagen 1097. 17.21g, 32mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

251

4,000

252

251. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Stater. Circa 520-500 BC. Ithyphallic satyr advancing right, carrying off protesting nymph / Quadripartite incuse square. Le Rider, Thasiennes 1; SNG Copenhagen 1007; HGC 6, 331. 9.64g, 21mm. Extremely Fine. 1,000 Ex A. Tkalec, 29 February 2012, lot 28. 252. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Stater. Circa 500-480 BC. Ithyphallic satyr right, carrying off protesting nymph / Quadripartite incuse square with windmill pattern. Le Rider Thasiennes, pl. 1, 2; Jameson 1066; SNG Copenhagen 1009; Dewing 1313. Extremely Fine. 1,500

59


253. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Stater. Circa 480-463 BC. Ithyphallic satyr advancing right, carrying off protesting nymph / Quadripartite incuse square. Le Rider, Thasiennes 5; SNG Copenhagen 1010; HGC 6, 331. 8.69g, 21mm. Near Extremely Fine.

1,500

254. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Obol. Circa 463-411 BC. Dolphin right over dolphin left, pellets around / Quadripartite incuse square. SNG Copenhagen 1020. 0.48g, 9mm. Extremely Fine.

200

255. Islands off Thrace, Thasos AR Drachm. Circa 411-340 BC. Bearded head of Dionysos left, wearing wreath of ivy with berries / Herakles kneeling to right, wearing lion skin and drawing bow, ΘΑΣΙΟΝ behind, head of Pan to right; all within linear square in shallow square incuse. Very Fine.

256

257

300

258

256. Thracian Dynasts, Koson AV Stater. Circa 44-42 BC. Roman consul walking left, accompanied by two lictors, monogram before, KOΣΩN in exergue / Eagle with spread wings standing left on sceptre, clutching laurel wreath in right talon. RPC 1701; BMC Thrace p. 208, 2. 8.59g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 400 257. Thracian Dynasts, Koson AV Stater. Circa 44-42 BC. Roman consul walking left, accompanied by two lictors, monogram before, KOΣΩN in exergue / Eagle with spread wings standing left on sceptre, clutching laurel wreath in right talon. RPC 1701; BMC Thrace p. 208, 2. 8.58g, 18mm, 12h. Very Fine. 500 From the Mark Gibbons Collection. 258. Thracian Dynasts, Koson AV Stater. Circa 44-42 BC. Roman consul walking left, accompanied by two lictors, monogram before, KOΣΩN in exergue / Eagle with spread wings standing left on sceptre, clutching laurel wreath in right talon. RPC 1701; BMC Thrace p. 208, 2. 8.42g, 19mm, 11h. Mint State. 1,000 From the Mark Christenson Collection.

MOESIA

259

260

259. Moesia, Tomis Æ16. Pseudo-autonomous issue. Circa 1st-early 2nd centuries. Turreted, diademed, and draped female bust right / Lion seated to right, left paw raised. AMNG 2514 and pl. V, 24; SNG Budapest -. 2.69g, 16mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 200 From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 52, 7 October 2009, lot 778.

CIMMERIAN BOSPOROS 260. Cimmerian Bosporos, Pantikapaion Æ21. Circa 4th/3rd century BC. Head of Pan right / Forepart of griffin left; below, sturgeon left. MacDonald 69; HGC 7, 113. 6.91g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 200

60


61


62


CRETE A Spectacular Master-Engraved Stater of Aptera

261.

Crete, Aptera AR Stater. Signed by Pythodoros. Circa 4th century BC. Α[ΠΤAΡΑΙΩΝ] around head of Artemis Aptera to right, with hair elaborately curled upwards around a stephane ornamented with palmettes; she wears an elaborate crescent and solar-disk pendant earring with three drops and a pearl necklace; to right in smaller letters the artist’s signature: ΠΥΘΟΔΟΡΟΥ / Warrior hero Apteros, called Ptolioikos, standing facing, his bearded head left, wearing crested helmet and cuirass, holding in his left hand a spear and shield decorated with a sunburst, his right is raised towards a sacred fir tree in left field; ΠΤΟΛΙΟΙΚΟΣ around. Le Rider, Monnaies crétoises, p. 36, 269-70, pl. 9, 11-12; Svoronos, Crète, p. 15, pl. 1, 10 (same dies); BMC 1, pl. 2, 3 (same dies); BMFA Suppl. 108 (same dies); LIMC VII/1, p. 588, VII/2, sv. Ptolioikos 2 (same rev. die); for the engraver’s signature see L. Forrer, Notes sur les signatures de graveurs sur les monnaies grecques, Bruxelles 1906, pp. 277-284. 11.78g, 24mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare. Of exceptionally fine style and quality, and among the very finest of the few known examples. 50,000 From the Eckenheimer Collection. The stunningly beautiful obverse female portrait is that of Artemis Aptera (or Aptara as inscribed on the coins, a local form of the Cretan Artemis Diktynna), the patron goddess of the city. Before her image in small characters proudly appears the name of the artist Pythodoros, a master die-engraver who also worked at Polyrherion on the equally beautifully styled female head which has been defined as that of Britomartis, ‘sweet maiden’ in the Cretan dialect. Also identified as Artemis Diktynna, Britomartis in Cretan myth was caught in a fisherman’s net (diktyon) while trying to escape the advances of Poseidon, and was the subject of several Cretan coin types inspired by a statue then attributed to Daedalos, who was reputed to be the father of Cretan art (cf. Le Rider pp. 114-6, 3-6 pl. 28, 19-38; Svoronos 15-16, pl. 26, 4-5; Traité pl. 261, 25; BMC 1-2). Both images are very much influenced by the Sicilian school of die engraving as epitomised by the celebrated artists such as Kimon, Phrygillos, Eukleidas, Euainetos and Eumenes. The reverse type is of no less mythological and historic interest; the warrior in question is Apteros, called Ptolioikos, a title literally meaning ‘dweller in the city’. He is shown saluting a tree, a scene which can be interpreted as a rendering of what must surely be a now lost myth concerning the oiktistes or founder of the city. The fine remains of the ancient polis of Aptera or Aptara (IACP 947), the modern Palaiokastro, are situated near the Minoan site of Megala Chorapia on the south side of Suda Bay, the safest anchorage in Crete throughout Greek, Venetian and Ottoman times, and which is today an important NATO naval base. Eusebius informs us that the city was founded by an eponymous hero, Apteros in the year 1503 BC (Chronicon 44c). The first historical mention of Aptera dates from the 7th century BC when a contingent of archers is reported to have fought along with Spartans in the war against Messene (Pausanius, Description of Greece IV 20, 8). Various attempts in antiquity were made to explain the city’s name: notably, that it was the site of the song contest of the Muses and Sirens. In this story the latter lost their wings in a fight that ensued after their defeat (Stephen of Byzantium sv. Aptera; ‘aptera’ = ‘wingless’). The city’s name most likely derives from one of the epithets of Artemis, Aπτερα (cf. Inscriptionis Cretae 2), similar to that of the statue in the temple of Athena Nike on the Acropolis at Athens, which later took on the name of Nike Apteros, meaning ‘wingless’ Nike. From the fourth century BC Aptera produced coins on the Aiginetan weight standard, but by later Hellenistic times it gradually declined in favour of its powerful neighbour Kydonia and was finally absorbed by Rome in 67 BC.

63


Unique and Unpublised Stater of Axos

262. Crete, Axos AR Stater. Early 4th century BC. Young beardless head right with short cropped hair / Tripod with handles and animal feet. Unpublished variant, for general type cf. Le Rider 238-43 pl. 8, 16-20; Svoronos p. 10, 3, pl. 1 (Apollonia); BMFA Suppl. 107 (Apollonia or Axos). 11.70g, 25mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

10,000

From the Eckenheimer Collection. The ancient city of Axos occupied the hill above the modern village of the same name. The protecting deity of Axos was probably Apollo, perhaps called Axios, whose son Oaxos was according to tradition the eponymous founder of the city. Two archaic temples have been excavated at Axos, one on the acropolis and a second below it to the east. Temple I is attributed to Apollo and Temple II has been attributed to Aphrodite on the basis of votive figurines. The young and beardless male head on the obverse of this coin, used in conjunction with the tripod-lebes, must then surely be intended to represent Apollo. The nature of the coin itself seems archaic, primitive even, considering the date to which its production is assigned. In this it somewhat resembles and recalls the highly stylized efforts of some Celtic engravers, yet its stylistic simplicity is not so surprising when we consider the relatively backward nature of Crete in the Archaic and Classical periods: though Crete was a pioneer of art and culture in the 10th-7th centuries, a major change occured circa 630 BC, which seems to have led to a petrification of Cretan institutions, and Cretan art and culture lost all their innovative power. The cities of Crete became inward-looking, and internecine war became the norm among the city-states of Crete, many of which sought to challenge the power of Knossos and gain superiority over the others. Interestingly, the only attestation of a post-Minoan king on Crete occurs at Axos, which according to Herodotos was ruled by the basileos Etearchos, who reigned sometime in the 8th or 7th centuries and was the maternal grandfather of Battos, the oikistes (founder) of Kyrene.

263. Crete, Axos AR Drachm. Early 4th century BC. Young beardless head right with short cropped hair / Tripod with handles and animal feet. Unpublished variant, same dies as previous lot, for general type cf. Le Rider 238-43 pl. 8, 16-20; Svoronos p. 10, 3, pl. 1 (Apollonia); BMFA Suppl. 107 (Apollonia or Axos). 5.89g, 19mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished. From the Eckenheimer Collection.

64

3,000


Very Rare and Well Preserved Stater of Gortyna

264. Crete, Gortyna AR Stater. Circa 4th century BC. Europa seated half right within branches of a plane tree, naked to waist, wearing a polos; she holds a bird (dove?) tipped sceptre in left hand, and with her right hand cuddles Zeus in eagle form, seated next to her with folded wings / Cretan bull standing right, head facing, bee below. Le Rider p. 79, 67, pl. 19, 3 (same dies); Svoronos 70, pl. 14, 17 (same dies). 11.76g, 26mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and in exceptional condition for the type.

15,000

From the Eckenheimer Collection. This coin type evokes the myth of Europa and the bull, an ancient story linking the Greek and Semitic worlds. Europa was the daughter of the king of Tyre, and in the Cretan myth, Zeus first takes the form of a bull to carry her off to the island of Crete, and then an eagle, to make love to Europa in a scene reminiscent of Leda and the swan. Her depiction here is unconventional; instead of her usual appearance as a scantily-clad young woman she wears a polos (an archaic headdress which in this period was usually only associated with deities such as Hera or Artemis), and holds a birdtipped sceptre - both symbols of royalty. Indeed, according to myth Zeus made Europa the first queen of Crete, and it is in that station that we see her now.

265. Crete, Gortyna AR Drachm. Circa 4th century BC. Head of Persephone to right, hair bound with barley wreath, wearing triple pendant earring and necklace / ΓΟΡΤΙΝΙΩΝ, Cretan bull standing to right, head reverted. Le Rider p. 83, 90. pl. 20, 16 (same dies); Svoronos 90, pl. 15, 10 (same dies); Treité pl. 254, 13 (same dies). 5.89g, 19mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, only two examples recorded by Le Rider.

5,000

From the Eckenheimer Collection.

266. Crete, Gortyna AR Drachm. 4th century BC. Head of Persephone right, hair bound with barley wreath, wearing triple pendant earring and necklace / Head of Cretan bull to right. Le Rider p. 84, 91. pl. 20, 17 (same dies); Svoronos –; BMC 38, pl. 11, 2 (same dies); Grose 7112, pl. 240, 10. 5.59g, 21mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, only three examples recorded by Le Rider. 2,000 From the Eckenheimer Collection.

65


Herakles and the Hydra

267.

Crete, Phaistos AR Stater. Mid 4th century BC. Herakles standing in fighting attitude to right, wearing Nemean lion skin, seizing with his left hand one of the heads of the Lernean Hydra, and with his right hand preparing to strike with; bow and bowcase in left field / Bull standing to left. Svoronos 66, pl. XXIV, 23 (these dies); Le Rider pl. XXIII, 11 (same dies); BMFA Suppl. 125 (same dies). 11.41g, 27mm, 4h. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, only two examples recorded by Le Rider.

20,000

From the Eckenheimer Collection. The obverse of this coin depicts the second of Herakles’ Twelve Labours set by Eurystheos, the agent of Hera. He was tasked with slaying the ancient serpent-like monster that resided in the lake of Lerna in the Argolid, which guarded an underwater entrance to the underworld. Upon cutting off each of the Hydra’s heads however, Herakles found that two more would grow back in its place, an expression of the hopelessness of such a struggle for any but the hero. Realizing that he could not defeat the Hydra in this way, Herakles called on his nephew Iolaos for help. Iolaos then came upon the idea (possibly inspired by Athena) of using a firebrand to cauterize the stumps after each decapitation. When Hera saw that Herakles was gaining the upper hand she sent a large crab to distract the hero, but Herakles crushed it underfoot. He cut off the last and strongest of the Hydra’s heads with a golden sword given to him by Athena, and so completed his task. Hera, upset that Herakles had slain the beast she raised to kill him, placed it in the vault of the heavens as the constellation Hydra, and she turned the crab into the constellation Cancer. The encounter with the Lernean Hydra is not only well attested in epic, but is also the subject of some of the earliest securely identifiable Herakles scenes in Greek art. On two Boiotian fibulae of c. 750-700 BC (BM 3025, Philadelphia 75-35-1), the hydra is attacked by Herakles, at whose feet is the crab sent by Hera. This particular form of the scene would later be replicated on the coins of Phaistos (cf. Svoronos 60, pl. XXIV, 20), even including the crab. The present example is the earliest in the Herakles-Hydra series at Phaistos, and consequently is more archaistic in style. It has been extensively argued that the later designs of Phaistos copy a now lost masterpiece of sculpture or painting, perhaps even a statue group by the great sculptor Lysippos (see Lehmann, ‘Statues on Coins’, New York 1946; see also Lacroix, ‘Les Reproductions de Statues sur les Monnaies Grecques’, Liege 1949; see also Lattimore, ‘Lysippian Sculpture on Greek Coins’, California Studies in Classical Antiquity Vol. 5 1972). The present type however most likely draws its inspiration from a locally significant vase or wall painting, given that the composition is pictorial in nature, showing Herakles’ bow and quiver behind him in the field. Though the particular source of inspiration for this type is not known, clear parallels can be seen in surviving Greek art of the late Archaic and early Classical periods, notably on an Attic black figure Lekythos now in the Louvre (CA598) which depicts Herakles and the Hydra in a similar combat pose.

66


Exceptional and Extremely Rare Stater of Polyrhenion

268.

Crete, Polyrhenion AR Stater. 4th century BC. Magistrate Charisthe. Laureate head of Zeus to right / Head of sacrificial bull facing, with pendant fillets hanging from horns; [ΧΑΡΙΣΘΕ above], ΠΟΛΥΡΗΝΙΟΝ around. Le Rider p. 38, 305, pl. 10, 11; Svoronos p. 276, 4 pl. 25, 23-24 (same dies). 11.69g, 25mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, and among the finest known examples.

20,000

From the Eckenheimer Collection. Polyrhenion, one the oldest Dorian settlement of Crete, whose etymology is ‘rich in lambs’, which according to Strabo was settled in archaic times by Achaian and Lakonian immigrants who settled into one city the existing population, which had lived in villages, some 7 km inland from the Bay of Kissamos. Excavations from 1938 have exposed several building foundations which defy identity, but it may safely be presumed that one of these was a temple dedicated to Zeus. The bull sacrifice was a universal and key element of Greek religion, and it held particular significance in Crete which was rich in mythological traditions relating to the bull as a divine animal, being either divinely directed or indeed itself a theriomorphic god in bull form. Indeed, the central importance of the bull in Cretan culture was an ancient one predating even the arrival of the Mycenean Greeks in the 14th century BC; twentieth century archaeological excavations begun by Arthur Evans in 1900 dramatically ‘resurrected’ the lost Minoan civilisation and uncovered a wealth of artifacts which, among other things, portray the bull as a major religious symbol. The mythical origin of the idea of bull or ox sacrifice was believed to be from the story of Prometheos in Hesiod’s Theogamy (521-616). At Mekone, in a a sacrificial meal marking the ‘settling of accounts’ between mortals and immortals, Prometheos purposely deceives Zeus by assigning to him a good-looking portion ‘wrapped in glistening fat’ that consists of nothing but bones, thus ensuring humans would keep the meat for themselves and burn the bones wrapped in fat as an offering to the gods.

TROAS

269. Troas, Alexandreia Troas AR Tetradrachm. Year 148 = 153 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Apollo Smintheos (the Mouse God), draped, walking to right holding bow and arrow, quiver over shoulder; ΑΠΟΛΛΩNΟΣ and date PMH to right, monogram and ΖΜΙΘΕΩΣ to left, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔ in exergue, ΠYΘOΓENOY below. BMC -; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock -; SNG München -; SNG Tübingen -; Bellinger -; Fritze -; Leschhorn -. 16.98g, 35mm, 6h. Very Fine. Apparently Unique.

67

3,500


Apollo Smintheos, the Mouse God

270.

Troas, Alexandreia Troas AR Tetradrachm. Year 174 = 128/7 BC. Anaxikratos, magistrate. Laureate head of Apollo left, with flying wreath ties and two spiral locks falling over back of neck / Apollo Smintheos (the Mouse God), laureate and draped, standing to right holding bow and unstrung arrow in left hand, patera in right, quiver over shoulder; ΑΠΟΛΛΩNΟΣ and date POΔ to right, monogram and ΖΜΙΘΕΩΣ to left, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΕΩΝ in exergue, ANAΞIKPATOΣ below. BMC -; Bellinger -; Leschorn Lexicon I & II -; for general type cf. Bellinger A133-7. 16.88g, 31mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. A historically and artistically important coin. Apparently unique and unpublished, and very possibly the finest known example of the series, which is otherwise only found in heavily circulated condition. 7,500 Assuming that the era in use began in 301 as Bellinger suggests (p. 94, note 18), the date of this issue, year 174, probably equates to c.128/7 BC. For an up to date commentary on the dating of this coinage cf. A. Meadows, ‘The earliest coinage of Alexandria Troas’ in NC 2004, pp. 47-70, especially p. 70. Recent excavations have revealed that the Hellenistic incarnation of the temple of Apollo Smintheos was constructed circa 150-125 BC, therefore around the supposed time of the striking of this coin. For a very informative discussion on the statue of Apollo Smintheos at the shrine of Hamaxitos near Alexandria Troas attributed to Skopas, who is said to have a mouse at the foot of the god, cf. L. Lacroix, Les reproduction de statues sur les monnaies grecques, pp. 76-86, especially pp. 83-6. In the opening of Homer’s Iliad the shrine of Apollo Smintheos (Smitheos on the coin) is mentioned as the temple where the daughter of the Trojan priest Chryses, (possibly named after the town next to the temple which was sometimes called Chryse), who was called as Chryseis, ‘the girl from Chryse’, was taken captive by Agamemnon. This provoked Chryses to appeal to the god in the vocative as Σμινθεῦ (Smintheu, ‘O, Sminthian’) when imploring him to send a plague against the Greeks, presumably by mice. The epithet Smintheos was attributed by the later Greeks to a Pelasgian or Mysian origin and was taken to mean ‘destroyer of mice’. The consonantal string -nth(e.g. Corinth) is considered by modern philologists to be non-Greek and possibly Luwian in origin. The passage of Homer gives no indication as to its meaning, and so myths about Apollo Smintheos primarily arose from attempts to aetiologise the epithet.

68


AEOLIS

271. Aeolis, Myrina AR Tetradrachm. Circa 155-145 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Apollo Grynios standing right, holding branch and phiale; omphalos and amphora at his feet, MΥΡINAIΩN behind, monogram in left field; all within wreath. Sacks, ANS MN 30, Issue 18; SNG Copenhagen 221; BMC 11. 14.50g, 33mm, 12h. About Extremely Fine. Pleasant lustre around the devices.

500

IONIA

272. Ionia, Uncertain mint EL Hekte. Circa 600-550 BC. Phokaic standard. Figural type. Crab / Quadripartite incuse square. Rosen Sale 81 (same dies); Helios 2, lot 159; CNG 79, lot 360; Tkalec (2008), lot 37; otherwise unpublished. 2.57g, 10mm. Very Fine.

500

Finest Known Example

2x 273. Ionia, Uncertain mint EL Hekte. Circa 600-550 BC. Phokaic standard. Lion standing to right, head turned backwards, tail curved upwards over body / Quadripartite incuse square. Rosen -; Weidauer -; cf. SNG von Aulock 1797 (hemihekte); Gemini VI, 10 January 2010 157. 2.71g, 11mm. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, undoubtedly the finest of very few specimens known.

5,000

Unique and Unpublished Hemidrachm

274. Uncertain northern Greece or western Asia Minor AR Hemidrachm. Circa 5th century BC. Horned horse crouching left / Quadripartite part incuse square. Unpublished in the standard references. 2.25g, 11mm. Very Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

500

Horned horse types are known for the period following Alexander’s invasion of the Persian empire and India, cf. Seleukos I of Syria SC 1; HGC 9, 23, and are not to be confused with unicorns which were not part of Greek mythology, but which were considered to be real animals (albeit living in far-off lands), and were included as such in accounts of natural history by various writers including Ctesias and Strabo.

275. Ionia, Ephesos EL Hemihekte - 1/12 Stater. Phanes, circa 625-600 BC. Forepart of a stag to right, his head reverted to left / Incuse square with irregular pattern. BMFA 1816; Weidauer 36 (same dies). 1.18g, 8mm. Good Very Fine. Rare.

69

750


Extremely Rare Gold Stater of Ephesos

276.

Ionia, Ephesos AV Stater. Circa 133-88 BC. Draped bust of Artemis to right, wearing stephane, necklace of pearls and with her bow and quiver over her shoulder / Cult statue of the Artemis of Ephesos facing, a fillet hanging from each hand, deer to inner left, bee to inner right; Ε-Φ across fields. B.V. Head, ‘On the chronological sequence of the coins of Ephesus’, Num. Chron. 1880, p. 69, 2, and plate 5, 3 = Berlin, SM 219. 8.51g, 20mm, 12h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare, possibly only the second example known.

20,000

The Hellenistic era gold coinage struck at Ephesos is extremely rare and rarely well preserved. Previously thought to have all been struck during the Mithradatic wars, this is now believed not to be the case. Some appear to be dated by the era of the Province of Asia and the dates they bear are too early for them to be Mithradatic War issues. That being said, they were not necessarily all issued at the same time, and such undated types as the present specimen could well have been issued much later. For an in depth discussion on the dating of this series cf. Gilbert K. Jenkins, ‘Hellenistic gold coins of Ephesus’, in Festschrift E. Akurgal, Anadolu-Anatolia 21, 1978/80, Ankara, 1987, pp. 183-8, pls. A-B. The reverse of this coin depicts the famous cult statue of Ephesian Artemis, housed in the great temple of Artemis that is considered one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The original image of the goddess was a wooden xoanon that had represented a pre-Hellenic goddess who the Greeks later equated with Artemis. This first image, which was kept decorated with jewellery, was possibly lost in a flood in the 8th or 7th century which destroyed the temple; excavations have discovered the tear-shaped amber drops of elliptical cross-section which must have dressed it. In circa 550 BC, when reconstruction of the temple was begun (partly financed by Kroisos), it was undertaken in grand style and was supposedly the first Greek temple to be built of marble. The wooden xoanon was replaced by a new ebony or grapewood statue sculpted by Enoidos, which presumably survived until the temple was again destroyed, this time by an act of arson on the part of one Herostratos. The second destruction of the temple coincided with the birth of Alexander the Great; Plutarch later noted that Artemis was too preoccupied with Alexander’s delivery to save her burning temple. The form of the goddess is distinctly near-eastern in appearance; characteristics such as her legs being enclosed in a tapering pillar-like term are closely related to Egyptian and Hittite images, and the curious feature of the many protruberances on her chest (usually described as breasts or eggs) are decidedly non-Greek in origin, and indeed have defied explanation or identification for centuries, though an association with fertility seems implicit.

277. No Lot.

70


278. Ionia, Miletos EL Stater. Circa 600-550 BC. Lion reclining left, head right, within rectangular frame / Central oblong punch containing a running fox and three pellets, two of which are connected by bar; flanked by square punches containing stellate pattern and stag’s head right, respectively. Weidauer 126; SNG Kayhan 440. 13.68g, 20mm. Very Fine. Rare.

2,500

279. Ionia, Miletos EL Trite - 1/3 Stater. Circa 600-550 BC. Lion reclining left, head reverted, within rectangular frame / Two square punches containing geometric and stellate designs. SNG Kayhan 442; Pozzi 2464. 4.60g, 13mm. Near Very Fine. Very Rare.

280

1,000

281

280. Ionia, Miletos EL Hemihekte – 1/12 Stater. Circa 600-550 BC. Lydo-Milesian standard. Head of lion right / Incuse punch of stellate pattern. Weidauer –; Traité I –; SNG Kayhan 446-8; Boston MFA –; Rosen –; Elektron I 66. 1.19g, 7mm. Very Fine.

200

281. Ionia, Miletos EL Hemihekte – 1/12 Stater. Circa 600-550 BC. Lydo-Milesian standard. Head of lion right / Incuse punch of stellate pattern. Weidauer –; Traité I –; SNG Kayhan 446-8; Boston MFA –; Rosen –; Elektron I 66. 1.13g, 8mm. Very Fine.

200

2x 282. Ionia, Miletos EL 1/24 Stater. Circa 560-545 BC. Lion’s head facing / Rough incuse square. ATEC 210; SNG Kayhan 453-454; Klein 416. 0.55g, 5mm, 3h. Very Fine.

283

150

284

283. Ionia, Phokaia EL 1/48 Stater. Circa 625-600 BC. Head of seal right / Quadripartite incuse. Bodenstedt 2.1. 0.29g, 5mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

250

284. Ionia, Phokaia EL 1/24 Stater. Circa 625-600 BC. Head of seal right / Quadripartite incuse. Bodenstedt 2.2; SNG von Aulock 1774; Rosen Collection 328. 0.66g, 7mm. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

300

Second Known Example

2x 285. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 625-522 BC. Head of roaring lion to right, tongue protruding; seal upwards behind. Bodenstedt 11; BMFA -; SNG Copenhagen -; Rosen -. 2.60g, 10mm. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, Bodenstedt notes only 1 example in Berlin. Possibly only the second known example, and if so the only one in private hands. 2,500

71


2x

2x

2x

286

287

288

286. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 500-480 BC. Head of a griffin with open jaws to left; behind head, seal swimming upwards / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 12. 2.60g, 10mm. Very Fine. Rare. 750 287. Ionia, Phokaia AR Diobol. Circa 500-480 BC. Female head left, wearing helmet or close fitting cap / Rough incuse square. SNG Kayhan 522-526; SNG von Aulock 1813. 1.32g, 10mm. Good Very Fine. 100 288. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 480-387 BC. Head of Hephaistos left; seal behind / Quadripartite incuse punch. Bodenstedt 69; SNG Copenhagen –; Boston MFA 1910. 2.56g, 10mm. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 750 2x

2x

2x

289

290

291

289. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 478-387 BC. Wreathed head of Dionysos left; seal behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 89; SNG Copenhagen –; Boston MFA –; McClean 8253. 2.51g, 10mm. Good Very Fine.

250

290. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 387-326 BC. Head of Aphrodite left, hair in veil; below, seal left / Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 98; Boston MFA 1926; SNG von Aulock 7954. 2.53g, 11mm. Good Very Fine. Rare, only seven coins recorded by Bodenstedt, six of which are in museums.

500

291. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 387-326 BC. Head of Queen Omphale left, wearing Herakles’ lion skin headdress and ear pendant, club over shoulder; beneath, seal / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 107; SNG Copenhagen 1029. 2.50g, 10mm. Good Very Fine. 1,000 For his murder of Iphitus, the great hero Herakles was commanded by the Delphic Oracle Xenoclea to remand himself as a slave to Queen Omphale of Lydia for the period of a year, during which time he was made to perform women’s tasks, wear women’s clothing and hold a basket of wool while Omphale and her maidens did their spinning. Ovid (Fasti) tells us that Omphale even wore the skin of the Nemean Lion and carried Herakles’ olivewood club.

Extremely Rare Hemistater of Samos

2x 292. Islands off Ionia, Samos EL Hemistater. Circa 600-570 BC. Euboic-Samian Standard. Rough surface with irregular markings / Incuse square and rectangle with irregular markings. Konuk, Electrum, Type 1, pl. 2, B = SNG Kayhan 628; Nicolet-Pierre & Barrandon pl. V, 3; Barron pl. XXX, 2 = Traité I 373 (same die and punches); HGC 6, 1165. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, one of only two examples offered at auction in over fifteen years.

12,500

293. Ionia, Smyrna AR Tetradrachm. Circa 150-143 BC. Metrodoros, magistrate. Turreted head of Tyche right / ΣΜΥΡΝΑΙΩΝ and magistrate’s monogram within laurel wreath. Milne, Silver 5a corr. (monogram), obv. die D; Milne, Autonomous 165a corr. (same); SNG Copenhagen –; SNG von Aulock 2162 var. (different monogram); SNG Fitzwilliam 4575; Boston MFA 1933 = Warren 1129. 16.80g, 35mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

72

1,500


Exceptional Stater of Teos

294.

Ionia, Teos AR Stater. Circa 478-449 BC. Female griffin with curved wings crouching to right on semicircle and pellet ornamented base, left forepaw raised; panther’s head below paw, THION around / Quadripartite incuse square. J.M. Balcer, The Early Silver Coinage of Teos, SNR 47 1968, 103; BMC 19. 11.68g, 24mm. Good Extremely Fine. An exceptional example, well struck on a very broad flan. Rare; 20 specimens are present in CoinArchives, of which this is by a considerable margin the finest. 10,000 Ex Künker 216, 8 October 2012, lot 425; Ex Lanz 30, 26 November 1984, lot 267. Teos was founded by Minyans from Orchomenus along with Ionians and Boiotians perhaps as early as the ninth century BC. On account of its outstanding position between two perfect harbours Teos was a flourishing seaport with strong trade relations throughout the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean until the middle of the sixth century BC when Cyrus the Great invaded Lydia and Ionia. Fearing conquest and enslavement, the inhabitants of Teos fled overseas to the newly founded colonies of Abdera in Thrace and Phanagoria on the Asian side of the Cimmerian Bosporus. Abdera took the principal type of the griffin for its coinage, though the monster now faced to the left, or West, perhaps a consequence of their people’s flight from their homeland. However, Teos appears to have recovered fairly quickly; it seems that Teos was refounded by Abdera sometime soon after the Persian conquest of c. 545. Though this refoundation is not explicitly attested in any extant literature, an intriguing passage in the inscription of public imprecations from Teos (see P. Herrmann, ‘Teos und Abdera im 5. Jahrhundert v. Chr’, Chiron xi, 1981) alludes to ‘my mother’ being Abdera and ‘the mother of my mother’ being Teos, thus providing the only evidence for the refounding of Teos by Abdera. Strabo supports the refoundation hypothesis by stating that some of the colonists of Abdera later returned to Teos (xiv 1.30), and it is highly plausible since the city soon after contributed 17 ships to the Ionian revolt, and the Teians were present at the ill-fated battle of Lade in 494 BC in the centre of the line next to the large Chian navy. This is further supported by the numismatic evidence which shows that Teos’ first coinage was contemporary with that of Abdera, and Abdera’s were struck only soon after its colonization by the refugees from Teos; Kraay (Archaic and Classical Greek Coins, 1976) suggests that the coinages were started in planned conjunction. The present coin is an exemplary specimen of the early classical coinage of Teos, being exceptionally well engraved with a multitude of fine details in a beautiful archaizing style which leaves us in no doubt about the talent of the die cutter; of particular note are the fierce head of the beast and its splendid curved wings. Careful attention has been paid even to the panther head adjunct and the ornate base upon which the griffin crouches.

295. Ionia, Teos AR Trihemiobol. Circa 478-449 BC. Griffin seated right, forepaw raised / Quadripartite incuse square. Cf. Balcer 118. 1.22g, 12mm. Very Fine.

73

100


LESBOS

All images on this page are 2x enlargements.

296 297 296. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Head of ram right; below, cockerel standing left / Incuse head of lion left; rectangular punch to right. Bodenstedt 11; HGC 6, 936. 2.52g, 11mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. 1,000 297. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Head of roaring lion right / Incuse head of calf right; rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 13; HGC 6, 938; SNG von Aulock 1685; Boston MFA 1679-81; BMC 18-22. 2.50g, 10mm, 1h. Very Fine. 300

298

299

298. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Forepart of winged boar right / Incuse head of roaring lion to right, rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 15; HGC 6, 940. Good Extremely Fine. 1,000 299. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Forepart of winged boar right / Incuse head of roaring lion to right, rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 15; HGC 6, 940. 2.54g, 10mm. About Extremely Fine.

300

500

301

300. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 521-478 BC. Head of ram right; [below, cockerel standing left] / Incuse head of lion right; rectangular punch behind. Bodenstedt 16; SNG von Aulock 7719. 2.09g, 11mm, 12h. Very Fine. 300 301. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 454-427 BC. Forepart of boar right / Head of lion right within linear square. Bodenstedt 41 (dies a/a); Traité pl. CLIX, 30; Boston MFA 1684; BMC Lesbos pg. 159, 31; SNG Copenhagen 309; SNG von Aulock 1694. 2.48g, 10mm, 6h. Very Fine. 300

302

303

302. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 412-378 BC. Head of Ares right, wearing crested helmet decorated with forepart of griffin / Head of Amazon right, wearing ornate helmet, in linear border within incuse square. Bodenstedt 65; HGC 6, 991; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA 1711; BMC 95–7; Gulbenkian 888; Pozzi 2330. 2.54g, 11mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. 750 303. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 412-378 BC. Head of Kybele right, wearing turreted crown and single-pendant earring / Head of Hermes right, wearing petasos, in linear square within shallow incuse square. Bodenstedt 75; HGC 6, 1001; SNG von Aulock 1725; Boston MFA 1714. 2.53g, 11mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Rare. 1,000

304

305

304. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Head of Dionysos right, wearing ivy-wreath / Mask of Silenos facing in thin square frame. Bodenstedt 90; Traité II 2, col. 2200, pl. 161, 1; BMC 77; SNG Copenhagen 324; SNG von Aulock 1718. 2.57g, 10mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 305. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Head of Dionysos right, wearing ivy-wreath / Mask of Silenos facing in thin square frame. Bodenstedt 90; Traité II 2, col. 2200, pl. 161, 1; BMC 77; SNG Copenhagen 324; SNG von Aulock 1718. 2.56g, 11mm, 12h. Well centred, Good Very Fine. From the Mark Christenson Collection.

74

1,000

500


MYSIA

306. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-480 BC. The infant Herakles, nude and muscular, seated facing, head turned right, supporting himself with his left hand while holding tunny by the tail with his right / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 13, 169 and pl. V, 17; SNG France 316; SNG von Aulock 7314. 16.07g, 19mm. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

7,500

307. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Head of roaring lioness left, tunny fish behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 39; Boston 1414; SNG France 178. 16.24g, 19mm. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

6,000

308. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Head of roaring lioness left, tunny fish behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 39; Boston 1414; SNG France 178. 16.08g, 19mm. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

4,000

Beautiful Lion Stater

2x 309. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Roaring lion standing to left on tunny fish / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 42; SNG France 182. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare and very well preserved.

75

12,500


310. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Ketos to left; tunny fish above / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 52; Boston MFA 1407; SNG France -. 16.04g, 19mm. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

5,000

311. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Heads of lion and ram, conjoined, back-to-back; below, tunny fish to left / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze I 54; cf. SNG France 190 (hekte); Boston MFA 1422 = Warren 1543. 16.06g, 22mm. Very Fine. Very Rare, only two other examples have been offered at auction in the past fifteen years.

7,500

Superb Archaic Head of Athena

312. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet; tunny fish behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 63; Boston 1432. Gulbenkian II, 608. 16.14g, 19mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and among the finest known of the type. Two unobtrusive control marks on obverse.

15,000

313. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Archaic male head with a pointed beard to left, tunny fish below to left / Quadripartite incuse square. Rosen 446; Greenwell 78, pl. III, 31; Imhoof-Blumer, p. 242, 69; Von Fritze 66, pl. II, 19; SNG von Aulock -. 16.06g, 22mm. Very Fine. Very Rare. Superb archaic style.

76

10,000


Exceptional Sphinx Stater

314. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Winged sphinx crouching to left; tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 72, pl. II, 25; Boston 1450; SNG France 200. 16.14g, 20mm. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and easily the finest and most complete of only nine examples offered in the past fifteen years.

17,500

315. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Winged sphinx crouching to left; tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 72, pl. II, 25; Boston 1450; SNG France 200. 16.10g, 21mm. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

10,000

316. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Siren, with two spiralled plumes on crown of head, standing to left, holding tunny fish by the tail in right hand, left hand outstretched / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 74, pl. II, 29; Boston 1441; cf. SNG France 203 (hekte). 16.17g, 19mm. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

7,500

The mythical Sirens are best known to us from two ancient epics: the ‘Argonautica’ by Apollonios in which Jason and the Argonauts have to travel past them on their quest for the Golden Fleece, and Homer’s ‘Odyssey’, where they are portrayed as a pair of dangerous creatures that lure passing sailors to their deaths with their sweet music (Odyssey XII, 40). They are supposed to have inhabited an island with a particularly rocky shoreline onto which sailors would be drawn by their desire to hear the Sirens sing, leading to shipwreck. Speaking to Odysseus and warning him of the dangers he would encounter further into his journey, Queen Circe describes the Sirens as sitting in a meadow, with around them ‘a great heap of bones of mouldering men’ (XII, 45).

77


317. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-500 BC. Siren, with two spiralled plumes on crown of head, standing to left, holding tunny fish by the tail in right hand, left hand outstretched / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 74, pl. II, 29; Boston 1441; cf. SNG France 203 (hekte). 16.10g, 18mm. Very Fine. Very Rare.

4,000

Very Rare and Beautiful Crouching Lion

318. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Lion crouching to right, right forepaw raised; tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 75; Traité pl. 176, 23; SNG France -. 15.96g, 19mm. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare - only one other specimen is listed in CoinArchives.

20,000

Fine Style Athena with Crested Helmet

319. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Head of Athena to left, wearing crested Attic helmet, base of crest decorated with zig-zag and pellet pattern; below, tunny fish to left / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze I 76; Greenwell 25; SNG France –; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA 1446; Dewing –; Gillet 1053 = Kunstfreund 3 = Jameson 2171 = Weber 4971; Gulbenkian 609 (all from the same obv. die). 16.08g, 20mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

78

10,000


320. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 550-450 BC. Head of Athena to left, wearing crested Attic helmet, base of crest decorated with zig-zag and pellet pattern; below, tunny fish to left / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze I 76; Greenwell 25; SNG France –; SNG von Aulock –; Boston MFA 1446; Dewing –; Gillet 1053 = Kunstfreund 3 = Jameson 2171 = Weber 4971; Gulbenkian 609 (all from the same obv. die). 16.12g, 20mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

10,000

2x 321. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Dog standing left, fore-paw raised; tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 93; SNG France 231. 2.67g, 11mm. Very Fine.

500

Finest and Most Complete Known

322. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Forepart of winged lioness to left; tunny fish behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 96; SNG France 237; Boston –. 16.09g, 19mm. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare, the finest and most complete specimen offered to the market in at least the past 15 years. An exceptional specimen.

15,000

323. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Forepart of winged lioness to left; tunny fish behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 96; SNG France 237; Boston –. 16.01g, 21mm. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and among the finest specimens known of the type.

79

15,000


324. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Forepart of winged lioness to left; tunny fish behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 96; SNG France 237; Boston –. 16.06g, 21mm. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and among the finest specimens known of the type.

15,000

325. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Griffin crouching to left, right forepaw raised; tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 99; Boston 1455; SNG France 240. 16.03g, 20mm. Very Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

Finest Known Winged Dog Stater

326. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Winged dog seated to left, head reverted to right; tunny fish below to left / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 104; BMFA 1433; SNG France 245. 16.07g, 21mm. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, and undoubtedly the finest of very few specimens known.

20,000

Kyzikos, purportedly the first Milesian colony, was located on the southwest shore of the Propontis in ancient Mysia next to the river Aisepos. Its prosperity was due principally to its two fine harbours, which made the city a convenient stopping point for merchant ships trading between the Aegean and Black Seas. Its principal export was the tunny, of which its waters had abundant stock. The prevalence of winged beings in Kyzikene coinage is a reflection of archaic mythological convention that assigned wings to most divine or sacred entities as an immediately visible and understandable symbol of their nature, and in the case of gods, of their power to move at will across great distances. In the case of the winged animals, we should probably understand these to be attributes of or animals sacred to a particular Olympian god.

80


327. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Winged dog seated to left, head reverted to right; tunny fish below to left / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 104; BMFA 1433; SNG France 245. 16.15g, 22mm. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, and among the finest known.

10,000

328. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Winged dog seated to left, head reverted to right; tunny fish below to left / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 104; BMFA 1433; SNG France 245. 16.10g, 21mm. Very Fine. Extremely Rare, and exceptional for the type.

15,000

329. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Female head left, wearing circular earring and necklace, hair bound in Kekryphalos or sphendone, tunny fish left below / Quadripartite incuse square. SNG France -; BMFA -; Hurter & Liewald -; apparently unpublished in the standard references, for type cf. Von Fritze 106 (hekte). 16.12g, 22mm. Good Very Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished as a stater.

7,500

330. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Nude youth kneeling left, holding tunny fish / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 112, pl. III, 31; Boston 1487; SNG France 253. 16.10g, 20mm. Extremely Fine.

6,000

331. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Nude youth kneeling left, holding tunny fish / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 112, pl. III, 31; Boston 1487; SNG France 253. 16.19g, 19mm. Extremely Fine.

81

7,500


332. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Nude youth kneeling left, right hand holding tunny by its tail / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze I 112; SNG France 253; Boston MFA 1487. 16.02g, 21mm. Extremely Fine.

10,000

333. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Nude youth kneeling left, holding tunny fish / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 112, pl. III, 31; Boston 1487; SNG France 253. 15.85g, 19mm. Extremely Fine.

10,000

Extremely Rare and Superb Gorgoneion Stater

334. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Facing gorgoneion with mouth open and tongue protruding, six serpents on top of head, another below each ear; below, tunny fish to left / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 129, pl. IV, 15; Boston 1445 = Warren 1492; cf. SNG von Aulock 7295 (hemihekte); SNG France –. 16.12g, 20mm. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare, and among the finest known.

20,000

While the origin or inspiration for many of the types used at Kyzikos is obscure or uncertain, the apotropaic design used on this type may be reasonably considered to have been taken from the drachms of Apollonia Pontika on the Black Sea coast of Thrace. Both on account of its relatively proximity to Kyzikos and the latter’s strategic location on the main trade route, Apollonia would inevitably have had close trade economic ties with this city.

Unique Hekte Depicting Nike Sacrificing

2x 335. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 450-400 BC. Nike crouching left, sacrificing with knife she holds in her right hand a ram she holds by the horn with her left; tunny fish below to left / Quadripartite incuse square. Cf. Hurter & Liewald 8 (stater and myshemihekte); cf. Triton XVII, 7 January 2014, 375 (twelfth stater); otherwise unpublished. 2.65g, 11mm. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, apparently unique and unpublished as a hekte.

82

3,000


Second Known

2x 336. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 450-400 BC. Bee with straight wings, seen from above; tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze -; Greenwell -; Rosen -; Boston MFA -; Triton VI, 14 January 2003, 313. 2.65g, 10mm. Good Very Fine. Apparently only the second known example.

4,000

Extremely Interesting Image of a Prince or Strategos

2x 337. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 450-400 BC. Prince or strategos, wearing armour with cloak behind and holding transverse sceptre, standing left [on tunny fish?], in pose of acclamation / Quadripartite incuse square. Triton XIII, 5 January 2010, 175 (same dies); otherwise unpublished. 2.66g, 10mm. Good Very Fine. Apparently only the second known specimen, and the finer of the two.

5,000

2x 338. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 400-380. Nike flying to right with extended arms; tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 153, pl. 5, 1. 2.68g, 10mm. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

2,000

Konon’s Victory over the Persian Fleet

339. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 400-380 BC. Nike, bare to the waist, kneeling to left while holding aplustre in her raised right hand, kneeling left; tunny fish below to left / Quadripartite incuse square. BMFA 1546; SNG Paris 301; Von Fritze 154. 15.97g, 19mm. About Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and in excellent condition for the type.

15,000

Brett (BMFA p. 202) suggests that this reverse type commemorates the Athenian admiral Konon’s annihilation of the Persian fleet at Knidos in 394; Kyzikos participated in an alliance coinage in celebration of this event.

83


2x 340. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 400-380 BC. Owl standing to right on tunny fish, head facing; on either side, six-rayed star / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 180, pl. V, 28. 2.65g, 11mm. Very Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

341. Mysia, Kyzikos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 380-340 BC. Head of Kore Soteira left, hair in sphendone covered with a veil, two grain ears in hair / Head of lion left, tunny fish to left below, scallop shell to right; KYZIKHNΩN around. Von Fritze -; SNG France -. 14.99g, 23mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

342

2,000

343

342. Mysia, Kyzikos AR Stephanophoric Tetradrachm. Circa 170 BC. Head of Kore Soteira right, wearing oak wreath / KYZI-KHNΩN above and below horizontal torch; monogram ΔΙ above and monogram ΜΤΒ below; all within oak wreath. Unpublished in the standard references, for general type cf. Von Fritze, Nomisma IX, 33-5; SNG BnF 449-51; SNG von Aulock 1232; Weber 5042 (all with different monograms). 16.54g, 32mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine, slightly porous surfaces. Very Rare, apparently unpublished with these monograms. 2,000 343. Mysia, Kyzikos AR Stephanophoric Tetradrachm. Circa 170 BC. Head of Kore Soteira right, wearing oak wreath / KYZI-KHNΩN above and below horizontal torch; monogram ANK above and monogram ΠAE below; all within oak wreath. Unpublished in the standard references, for general type cf. Von Fritze, Nomisma IX, 33-5; SNG BnF 449-51; SNG von Aulock 1232; Weber 5042 (all with different monograms). 16.51g, 36mm, 12h. Very Fine. Flan slightly bent at 6 o’clock obv. Very Rare, apparently unpublished with these monograms. 2,000

344

345

344. Mysia, Kyzikos AR Stephanophoric Tetradrachm. Circa 170 BC. Head of Kore Soteira right, wearing oak wreath / KYZI-KHNΩN above and below horizontal torch; monogram HYP above and monogram ΦΛI below; all within oak wreath. Unpublished in the standard references, for general type cf. Von Fritze, Nomisma IX, 33-5; SNG BnF 449-51; SNG von Aulock 1232; Weber 5042 (all with different monograms). 17.02g, 36mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine, smoothed on obverse. Very Rare, apparently unpublished with these monograms. 2,000 345. Mysia, Kyzikos AR Stephanophoric Tetradrachm. Circa 170 BC. Head of Kore Soteira right, wearing oak wreath / KYZI-KHNΩN above and below horizontal torch; monogram ΜΗΠ above and monogram ΗΑΒ(?) below; all within oak wreath. Unpublished in the standard references, for general type cf. Von Fritze, Nomisma IX, 33-5; SNG BnF 449-51; SNG von Aulock 1232; Weber 5042 (all with different monograms). 16.69g, 42mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare, apparently unpublished with these monograms. 2,000

346. Mysia, Kyzikos AR Stephanophoric Tetradrachm. Circa 170-150 BC. Draped bust of Kore right, wearing oak wreath / KYZI-KHNΩN, torch; monograms above and below; all within laurel wreath. Cf. Von Fritze II 33 (for type); SNG France -; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock -; Triton XI, 8 January 2008, lot 213; otherwise apparently unpublished. 16.87g, 33mm, 12h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare, apparently the second known example. 2,500

84


Attractive Early Lampsakos Stater

347.

Mysia, Lampsakos EL Stater. Circa 480-450 BC. Forepart of Pegasos with curved wings to left, vine with bunches of grapes around / Quadripartite incuse square. A. Baldwin, Period I, pl. I, 11; BMC 9; Traité pl. 8, 2. 15.22g, 20mm. Extremely Fine.

12,500

Lampsakos was founded in around 654/3 BC by Phokaian colonists, and in the sixth century became a dependency of Lydia; when the Lampsakenes had captured Miltiades, the Athenian tyrant of the Chersonesos, they were forced by Kroisos to set him free. After the fall of the Lydian kingdom in 547, the city then fell under the dominion of Persia. Lampsakos joined the Ionian cities in revolt in 499, but was conquered by Daurises in 498 or 497, and thereafter remained under Persian control until it was given by Artaxerxes to the exiled Athenian general Themistokles as part of the governorship of the Magnesian district. Themistokles’ district also included the cities of Myos, and Magnesia itself, who along with Lampsakos paid him revenue of 50 talents per year, for ‘meat’, ‘bread’ and ‘wine’ respectively. At an uncertain date after the death of Themistokles in 459 BC, Lampsakos joined the Delian League, and is recorded in the tribute lists from 453/2, paying a phoros of fifteen talents. The dating of this issue has long proven to be difficult, with earlier scholars having attributed it to as far back as 525-500, though this has been shown to be unlikely, not least on account of the style being of a more dynamic and baroque nature than the rather static designs of the Archaic period. At the time Baldwin published her study of the electrum coinage of Lampsakos in 1914, she knew of just fourteen varieties encompassing approximately forty specimens of all of Lampsakene electrum. As for coins from the first period under which this coin falls, she knew of just thirteen specimens. Of course while additional specimens have appeared over the past century, this coin is still a rarity. The style is much more refined than the earliest issues of the period, and while it is tempting to perceive the Pegasos motif as one symbolising freedom, and thus try to place this as a product of the Ionian revolt, the general modern consensus is that the issue should belong to the period of 480-450. This being the case, it should reasonably be viewed within the context of Themistokles’ control of the city – under his control, Lampsakos was required to pay tribute, for which purpose a substantial issue of coinage was necessary. The subsequent issue has the same types and is also of a highly refined engraving style, but shows the letter Ξ below the winged horse of the obverse, thus tying it to the Athenian Coinage Decree and the banning of the use of non-Athenian silver soon after 450 BC.

85


86


Unique and Unpublished Demeter Stater

348.

Mysia, Lampsakos AV Stater. Circa 370-360 BC. Head of Demeter left, wearing wreath of grain ears in caught up and back swept hair, crescent-shaped earring with quadruple pendant and pearl necklace / Forepart of Pegasos to right with curved wing. Unpublished in the standard references; the closest parallels for this obverse type are the Demeter to right and veiled Demeter types, cf. A. Baldwin, Lampsakos: The Gold Staters, AJN 1924, 9, pl. 1, 15, and 16, pl. I, 30-1. 8.49g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine, very slight double strike on obverse. Lustrous and superb surfaces. Unique and unpublished. 40,000 The present coin represents a remarkable and important addition to the corpus of Lampsakene gold staters. Baldwin identified three types struck at Lampsakos which bore the image of Demeter: one displays a grain-wreathed head to right (Baldwin 9), another a veiled head with a wreath of lotus (Baldwin 16), and the other a half-length cthonic figure rising from the earth holding grain (Baldwin 25); of the first two types, Baldwin was able to find only two known examples each. The present specimen should therefore be viewed as most closely related to Baldwin 9 and 16, though inferring a direct relationship between the types or viewing them as necessarily contemporaneous is to be avoided given the paucity of information we possess concerning the dating of the issues, which are thought to have been struck over a period of some fifty to sixty years. Baldwin does however comment that the frequency of Demeter’s depiction on the Lampsakene coinage (now four times) ‘seems to warrant the conclusion that her cult was prominent at Lampsakos’. Unfortunately little information survives or can be gleaned from the site today concerning the religious practices of the Lampsakenes or of the sanctuaries present in their city. Yet history does furnish us with with the knowledge that the wine produced at Lampsakos was both excellent and famous (indeed the city was granted to the exiled Athenian general Themistokles by Artaxerxes specifically for this reason). That being the case, it is not surprising that we should also find Dionysos featured on the staters of the city, being celebrated as the patron god of winemaking. It is plausible therefore to see the repeated use of Demeter types as either an invocation or honouring of the goddess responsible for the fertility of the earth and growth of the vines that so contributed to the wealth and fame of the city.

87


Beautiful Zeus Stater, Ex Hirsch 1909

349. Mysia, Lampsakos AV Stater. Circa 350 BC. Laureate head of Zeus left, sceptre over right shoulder, tip showing behind his neck / Forepart of Pegasos facing to right, within shallow incuse square. Baldwin 29; SNG von Aulock 7394 (same dies); BMC 28, pl. XIX, 6; SNG France 1138 (same obverse die); Babelon, TraitĂŠ II, pl. CLXXI, 3; Boston 1594; Kraay - Hirmer pl. 202, 729. 8.42g, 17mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine.

35,000

Privately purchased from Spink & Son Ltd., London, 7 August 1984; Ex Gustav Philipsen Collection, Jacob Hirsch Auction XXV, 29 November 1909, lot 1790.

350

351

350. Mysia, Pergamon AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm. Circa 135-128 BC. Cista mystica with serpent within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and quiver; MH above, civic monogram to left, serpent-entwined club with lion’s skin to right. Kleiner-Noe, Series 31b, 102-5. 12.61g, 24mm, 12h. Very Fine. 100 351. Mysia, Pergamon AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm. Circa 135-128 BC. Cista mystica with serpent within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and quiver; EP above, civic monogram to left, winged thunderbolt to right. Kleiner-Noe, Series 28, 91-5. 12.49g, 28mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 150

352

353

352. Mysia, Pergamon AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm. Circa 135-128 BC. Cista mystica with serpent within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and quiver; EP above, civic monogram to left, winged thunderbolt to right. Kleiner-Noe, Series 28, 91-5. 12.70g, 27mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. 150 353. Mysia, Pergamon AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm. Circa 135-128 BC. Cista mystica with serpent within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and quiver; EP above, civic monogram to left, winged thunderbolt to right. Kleiner-Noe, Series 28, 91-5. 12.70g, 29mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 150

88


354. Mysia, Pergamon AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm. Circa 135-128 BC. Cista mystica with serpent within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and quiver; EP above, civic monogram to left, winged thunderbolt to right. Kleiner-Noe, Series 28, 91-95. 12.49g, 26mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

355

150

356

355. Kingdom of Pergamon, Eumenes I AR Tetradrachm. Circa 263-241 BC. Laureate head of Philetairos right / Athena seated left, left elbow resting on shield, crowning ΦIΛETAIΡOY with wreath held in her extended right hand, spear diagonally in background, ivy leaf in outer left field, A in inner left field, bow in right field. SNG France 1612. 16.95g, 31mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine, struck in high relief.

1,250

356. Kingdom of Pergamon, Eumenes I AR Tetradrachm. Circa 263-241 BC. Laureate head of Philetairos right / Athena seated left, left elbow resting on shield, crowning ΦIΛETAIΡOY with wreath held in her extended right hand, spear diagonally in background, ivy leaf in outer left field, A in inner left field, bow in right field. SNG France 1612. 17.07g, 30mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. 1,250

LYDIA

357. Kingdom of Lydia, Alyattes EL Trite. Sardes, circa 610-546 BC. Head of roaring lion right, sun with multiple rays on forehead / Two incuse square punches. Weidauer 86-89; Linzalone Coll. 1090, SNG von Aulock 2868-2870, SNG Kayhan 1013. 4.71g, 13mm. Very Fine.

750

From the Mark Christenson Collection.

3x 358. Kings of Lydia, Kroisos AV Hekte - 1/6 Stater. Light standard. Sardes, circa 560-546 BC. Confronted foreparts of lion and bull / Incuse rectangular punch. Walburg group IV, 3 (same punches); Berk 8; Traité I 406 = de Luynes 2801; SNG Kayhan –; SNG von Aulock –; Weber 6772 (same punches). 1.35g, 9mm. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

750

359. Lydia, Apollonis AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm. In the name of the Pergamene pretender Eumenes III Aristonikos. Year 3 = 132/1 BC. Cista mystica with serpent in ivy wreath / ΑΠ-ΟΛ, two serpents entwined around bow and quiver; to left and right heads Zeus and Dionysos; to left and right of serpent’s coil, BA and EY; on lower part of bow case, Γ. Klein-Noe p. 103, Series 2, 2 a-h; SNG von Aulock 2897. 12.37g, 27mm, 12h. Very Fine. Rare. 1,000 360. Lydia, Sardes-Synnada AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm. Circa 166-160 BC. Cista mystica with serpent within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and quiver; civic monogram to left, thyrsos to right. Kleiner-Noe, Series 1, 1-4; SNG Berry 1142; SNG von Aulock 3121. 12.64g, 28mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare. 300

89


KARIA

361. Karia, uncertain dynast AR Stater. Kaunos (?), circa 480-460 BC. Winged male figure, nude, with winged heels, in kneeling stance to right; Karian monogram over right wing / Lion standing to left, head right, raising right forepaw, Karian letters and monogram above; all within incuse square. Troxell, Winged 41; E.S.G. Robinson, ‘A Find of Archaic Coins from South-west Asia Minor,’ NC 1936, 10; Rosen 624 var. (letters); K. Schefold, Meisterwerke griechischer Kunst (Basel/Stuttgart, 1960), 448. 11.83g, 20mm, 9h. Double-struck, otherwise Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

3,500

362. Karia, Achaemenid Period AR Tetradrachm. Circa 341-334 BC. Persian king or hero in kneeling-running stance right, drawing bow / Satrap on horseback right, thrusting spear; to left, bearded male head right. Konuk, Influences, Group 5 var. (head of Herakles); SNG Copenhagen (Persian Empire) 290-291 var. (same); Traité II 121 var. (same); CNG 72, 14 June 2006, 801. 14.66g, 23mm, 11h. About Very Fine. Very Rare, and unpublished in the standard references with this symbol.

2,000

2x 363. Satraps of Karia, Hekatomnos AR Diobol. Mylasa, circa 392/1-377/6 BC. Bearded head of Hekatomnos right / Forepart of bull left, E to left; all within incuse square. Winzer 13.1; Traité II 2494 (Pergamon). 1.38g, 12mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine, lightly porous. Rare, and in excellent condition for the issue.

500

3x 364. Satraps of Karia, Pixodaros AV 1/24 Stater. Circa 341-335 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Labrys; Π-I flanking handle. Babelon, Perses 411–3; Traité II 107; SNG von Aulock 2374; SNG Kayhan –; SNG Copenhagen –. 0.32g, 5mm, 1h. About Good Very Fine. Rare, and well preserved for the issue.

365

750

366

365. Satraps of Karia, Pixodaros AR Didrachm. Halikarnassos, circa 340-334 BC. Laureate head of Apollo, three quarters facing, drapery at neck / Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding double-axe (labrys) and lotus-tipped sceptre; ΠIΞΩΔAPOY to right. SNG von Aulock 2375; SNG Copenhagen 596. 7.01g, 19mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine. Attractively toned. 1,250 From the Mark Christenson Collection; Privately purchased from B. P. Murphy. 366. Karia, Knidos AR Drachm. Circa 350-330/20 BC. Rhodian standard. Teleas, magistrate. Head of Aphrodite right, wearing stephane, earring and necklace, TE monogram behind / Forepart of lion to right, TEΛEAΣ before, KNI below. BMC 46; SNG Keckman 181; SNG Copenhagen 272. 3.13g, 14mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare. 300

90


Impressive Facing Helios, Ex Marmaris Hoard 1971

367. Islands off Karia, Rhodos, Rhodes AR Tetradrachm. Circa 404-385 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; POΔION above, grain ear and Δ to left; all within incuse square. Hecatomnus 56 (A37/P48); IGCH 1209 = Bérend, SNR 51, pl. 5, 51 (this coin). 15.24g, 26mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, one of apparently only two known examples.

40,000

From a European collection, privately purchased from NAC; From the Marmaris Hoard, 1971 (IGCH 1209). In Pindar’s ode, the island of Rhodos was said to be born of the union of Helios the sun god and the nymph Rhodos, and the cities Lindos, Ialyssos and Kameiros were named for their three sons. The Persians invaded and overran the island, but were in turn defeated by forces from Athens in 478 BC. The cities then joined the Athenian League, although when the Peloponnesian War broke out in 431 BC, Rhodes remained largely neutral, even though officially it was still a member of the League. In 408 BC the cities of the island united to form one territory, building for themselves a new capital, the city of Rhodes, on the northern end of the island. Its regular plan was superintended by the Athenian architect Hippodamos. In 357 BC however, the island was conquered by the king Mausolos of Karia, and later it fell to the Persians in 340 BC. To the great relief of its citizens, Rhodes became a part of the growing Macedonian empire in 332 as Alexander the Great passed through Asia Minor, liberating or conquering the Persian lands as he went. Following the death of Alexander, Rhodes formed strong commercial and cultural ties with the Ptolemies in Alexandria, and together formed the Rhodo-Egyptian alliance that controlled trade throughout the Aegean in the 3rd century BC. The city developed into a maritime, commercial and cultural centre; its coins circulated throughout the Mediterranean. Its famous schools of philosophy, science, literature and rhetoric shared masters with Alexandria. Its school of sculptors developed a rich, dramatic style that can be characterized as ‘Hellenistic Baroque’.

368. Islands off Karia, Kos AR Tetradrachm. Athamas, magistrate, circa 345-340 BC. Head of bearded Herakles (with features of Maussolos?) right, wearing Nemean lion skin headdress / Veiled head of Demeter (with features of Artemisia?) left, AΘAMA to right, KΩION below. Ingvaldsen 7a (this coin); Pixodaros 8c (this coin). 15.13g, 23mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare. Struck on a very broad flan, well centred, and with a beautiful old tone.

5,000

Ex Leu 91, 10 May 2004, lot 166; Ex CNG XIV, 20 March 1991, lot 169; Ex Leu 45, 26 May 1988, lot 227; From the Pixodarus Hoard of 1978 (CH 9, 421). It has been suggested that the reverse portrait is that of Artemisia in the guise of Demeter, based on similarities between her features as they appear on the statue of Aretmisia from the Mausoleum, now in the British Museum, and those as they appear on the coinage. If that were the case, then almost certainly the obverse portrait we see would be that of Mausolos himself as Herakles.

91


LYCIA Unique and Important Lycian Stater of Kheriga

369. Dynasts of Lycia, Kheriga AR Stater. Kadyanda, circa 410-400 BC. KHADAWÃTI EI, (retrograde, in Lycian), head of Athena right, wearing Attic crested helmet decorated with griffin right / KHEREWKH-T W (retrograde, in Lycian), head of Hermes left, wearing winged petasos. Unpublished in the standard references; for types cf. Peus sale 407, 2012, 762-5 (Kadyanda). 8.43g, 24mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished, and of considerable numismatic interest.

7,500

Known to history since the records of ancient Egypt and the Hittite empire in the Late Bronze Age, Lycia was populated by speakers of the Luwian language group. Written records began to be inscribed in stone in the Lycian language (a later form of Luwian) sometime after the conquest of Lycia for the Achaemenid Persian empire by the Median general Harpagos in 546 BC. This conquest was a bloody one, with the Lycians apparently effecting a determined resistance which resulted in the decimation of the native Luwian speakers and an influx of Persian speakers. Herodotus related that in the Xanthos Valley an army of Xanthians sallied out to meet the Persians, fighting determinedly, although vastly outnumbered. Driven into the citadel, they collected all their property, dependants and slaves into a central building, and burned them up. Then, after taking an oath not to surrender, they died to a man fighting the Persians, foreshadowing Spartan conduct at the Battle of Thermopylae a few generations later. Due to an influx of Greek speakers following Alexander III of Macedon’s overthrow of the Persian empire and the sparsity of the remaining Lycian speakers, Lycia became totally Hellenized under the Macedonians, and the Lycian language disappeared from inscriptions and coinage, becoming totally extinct by the beginning of the first century BC. The lack of sufficient surviving inscriptions and keys to comparison with other contemporary languages has resulted in a considerable level of ignorance in modern times concerning Lycia, its government and personalities. Indeed, Kheriga was thought by M. Six (Monnaies Lyciennes, 1886/7) to be the wife of Kuprilli, despite his name being a masculine one. More modern study has placed Kheriga as fifth in the line of succession since the Persian-installed Lycian dynasty was established in Darios I’s reorganizing of the satrapies in 525 BC, and has judged him to be the grandson of Kuprilli, succeeding at Xanthos in circa 400 BC. He is mentioned numerous times on the grand stele of Xanthos.

370. Dynasts of Lycia, Artumpara AR Stater. Circa 410-400 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing plain Attic crested helmet / ARTUMI-[RA?] (in Lycian), Athena seated left, holding lance in left hand and shield with extended left hand, above which owl to left and large A; diskeles in left field. Unpublished in the standard references, for types cf. Mørkholm/Zahle, 36; Hurter, Tissaphernes-Fund, pl. 8, 1; Traité 2 pl. 99, 1 (all dynast Kherei). 8.07g, 22mm, 9h. Very Fine, weakly struck. Apparently unique and unpublished.

92

3,000


371. Dynasts of Lycia, Artumpara AR Stater. Telmessos, circa 400-370 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing plain Attic crested helmet / ARTUM-PRA (in Lycian), bearded head of Satrap right, wearing Persian kyrbasia. Traité 389 pl. 100, 15; BMC 111 (same dies). 8.03g, 22mm, 4h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

2,000

372. Dynasts of Lycia, Artumpara AR Stater. Tlos, circa 400-370 BC. TL…A..E (in Lycian), bearded head of Satrap right, wearing Persian kyrbasia / A-RRTUMP-AR (in Lycian), head of Athena right, wearing decorated Attic crested helmet. Unpublished in the standard references, but see Nomos 5, 2011, 198 (same dies) and for legend cf. BMC 111. 8.11g, 23mm, 10h. Good Very Fine, weakly struck in parts. The second recorded example, and one of only a very few coins of this dynast known.

2,000

Artumpara was a late satrap or dynast of Lycia who was involved in putting down the revolt of Datames; he himself seems to have been defeated by Perikles, who at one point seems to have ruled over most of Lycia. The appearance of the satrap’s head on the obverse is quite unexpected so early this may have been a sign of a growing independence that did not go over well with his Persian overlords.

373. Dynasts of Lycia, Vekhssere II and Ddimi AR Stater. Patara, circa 400-390 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing decorated Attic crested helmet / UKHSSER DDIMI PTTR-RA (in Lycian), head of Hermes right, wearing winged petasos. Müseler/Nollé VII, 1; Peus 407, 2012, 768. 8.37g, 24mm, 4h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

2,000

374. Lycia, uncertain dynast and mint AR Stater. Circa 400-390 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing decorated Attic crested helmet of Athenian style / Head of Athena right, wearing plain crested helmet right, diskeles behind. Unpublished in the standard references, for similar obverse and reverse types cf. Traité 396 (Xanthos, obol). 8.34g, 23mm, 12h. Very Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

93

2,000


375. Lycia, uncertain dynast and mint AR Stater. Circa 400-390 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing decorated Attic crested helmet / Garbled legend, Female head right, wearing ampyx and sphendone. Unpublished in the standard references, for similar reverse type cf. Traité 392-3, pl. 100, 18-19 (Xanthos). 8.24g, 19mm, 10h. Very Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

2,000

A Beautiful Image of Hermes

376. Lycia, uncertain dynast and mint AR Stater. Circa 400-390 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing decorated Attic crested helmet of Athenian style / Head of Hermes or Kabeiros left, wearing winged Pilos, diskeles behind. Unpublished in the standard references, for similar obverse and reverse types cf. Peus sale 407, 2012, 770 (Xanthos). 8.29g, 22mm, 4h. Good Very Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

3,000

377. Lycia, uncertain dynast and mint AR Stater. Circa 400-370 BC. Head and forepaw of roaring lion right / Head of Athena left, wearing plain Attic crested helmet, diskeles beneath. Unpublished in the standard references, for obverse and reverse types cf. Traité 501 pl. 104, 21 (Xanthos). 7.63g, 20mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

2,000

378. Lycia, uncertain dynast and mint AR Stater. Circa 400-370 BC. Head and forepaw of roaring lion right / Head of Athena right, wearing plain Attic crested helmet with raised cheek guard, diskeles above. Fellows pl. 18, 3; Traité 501 pl. 104, 21 (Xanthos). 8.21g, 30mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

94

3,000


379. Lycia, uncertain dynast and mint AR Stater. Circa 400-370 BC. Bearded head of Satrap right, wearing Persian kyrbasia / Laureate head of Apollo right, diskeles behind. Unpublished in the standard references, for reverse type cf. SNG von Aulock 4197 and Mørkholm/Neumann 1978, 240a, Traité 394 and BMC 106 (Xanthos). 8.29g, 21mm, 2h. Extremely Fine and of considerable numismatic interest.

3,000

380. Lycia, uncertain dynast and mint AR Stater. Circa 400-370 BC. Head and forepaw of roaring lion right / Head of Athena right, wearing plain Corinthian helmet, diskeles behind. Unpublished in the standard references, for reverse type cf. Traité 501 pl. 104, 21 (Xanthos). 8.31g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

3,000

381. Dynasts of Lycia, Mithrapata AR Stater. Circa 385-375 BC. Lion’s scalp facing / Head of Mithrapata left; MITHR-A-P-ATA in Lycian around, triskeles to lower right; all within incuse square. Leonis pl. XXXIV, 11; Schwabacher in Essays Robinson pl. 12, 8. 9.79g, 25mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

3,000

Ex Künker 204, 12 March 2012, lot 314.

382. Lycia, Kragos AR Hemidrachm. Circa 48-23 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Lyre, K-P across, grain ear to lower left. SNG von Aulock -, cf. 4301; Troxell 106. 1.99g, 16mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Ex Künker 89, 8 March 2004, lot 1420.

150

383. Lycia, Oinoanda AR Stater. Circa 200 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right; A and sceptre behind / Eagle standing right on winged thunderbolt, OINOAN across. Ashton, Oinoanda 1 (A1/P1), otherwise unpublished. 8.19g, 21mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare, one of less than six examples known.

95

750


384. Lycia, Oinoanda AR Stater. Early Second Century BC. Laureate head of Zeus right; B and lotus-tipped sceptre behind / Eagle standing right on thunderbolt; before, round shield over sword; OINO-ANΔЄ Ѡ-N in exergue. Ashton, “The coinage of Oinoanda,” NC 2005, 4 (A3/P3) (this coin). 7.79g, 20mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare. 1,000 From the Mark Christenson Collection; Ex Gemini IV, 8 January 2008, lot 205.

385. Lycia, Patara AR Stater. Circa 400-390 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing decorated Attic crested helmet / PT-T (in Lycian), head of Hermes right, wearing winged petasos. Unpublished in the standard references, for types and legend cf. BMC 120 and Traité 417-8 pl. 101, 13-14. 8.28g, 22mm, 10h. Near Extremely Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

3,000

386. Lycia, Patara AR Stater. Circa 400-390 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing plain Attic crested helmet with raised cheek guard / PTTR-RZ-Ã (in Lycian), Head of Hermes left, wearing winged petasos, kerykeion behind. Unpublished in the standard references, for types and legend cf. BMC 120 and Traité 417-8 pl. 101, 11. 8.56g, 24mm, 10h. Near Extremely Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

5,000

387. Lycia, attributed to Pinara AR Stater. Circa 400-390 BC. Eagle with spread wings standing three-quarter right, Π in left field and diskeles in right / PLLEWI (in Lycian), female head right, wearing ampyx and sphendone, diskeles behind. Unpublished in the standard references, for similar reverse type and legend cf. SNG Copenhagen Suppl. 488; for similar obverse and reverse types cf. Peus sale 407, 2012, 772-3 (tetrobol and diobol). 8.49g, 23mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

4,000

388. Lycia, Tlos AR Drachm. Circa 400-390 BC. Bearded head of Satrap right, wearing Persian kyrbasia / TLAHW (in Lycian), head of Athena right, wearing plain Attic crested helmet, diskeles below. Unpublished in the standard references, for types cf. Hurter, Tissaphernes-Fund, pl. 8, 9-13 and SNG Copenhagen Suppl. 461 (Dynast ddenewele). 4.20g, 18mm, 7h. Very Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished. 1,500

96


389. Lycia, attributed to Xanthos AR Stater. Circa 400-390 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing plain Attic crested helmet / ARÑNAHA (in Lycian), head of Hermes or Kabeiros right, wearing winged pilos, diskeles behind. Peus 407, 2012, 770; Müseler/Nollé VII, 25. 8.40g, 22mm, 6h. Very Fine, worn obverse die. Artistic reverse die. Extremely Rare.

2,000

PAMPHYLIA

390. Pamphylia, Aspendos AR Stater. Circa 375-325 BC. Two naked wrestlers grappling, LΦ between them / Slinger advancing right about to discharge his shot, triskeles on right, EΣTFEΔIIYΣ on left. SNG Copenhagen 227; SNG von Aulock 4565. 10.76g, 24mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

500

CILICIA

391. Cilicia, Satraps. Mazaios AR Stater. Tarsos, circa 361-334 BC. Baaltars seated left, holding eagle, ear of corn and bunch of grapes in right hand, lotus-headed sceptre in left, Aramaic legend ‘BLTRZ’ = Baaltars, to right, Aramaic letters on left and below seat / Lion attacking a bull to left, Aramaic legend above ‘MZDI’ = Mazaios; monogram below. SNG Levante 106. 10.97g, 24mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

392. Cilicia, Satraps. Mazaios AR Stater. Tarsos, circa 361-334 BC. Baaltars seated left, holding eagle, ear of corn and bunch of grapes in right hand, lotus-headed sceptre in left, Aramaic legend ‘BLTRZ’ = Baaltars, to right, Aramaic letters on left and below seat / Lion attacking a bull to left, Aramaic legend above ‘MZDI’ = Mazaios. SNG France 2, 335; SNG Levante 100ff. 10.94g, 23mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

2,000

393. Cilicia, Kelenderis AR Stater. Circa 450-400 BC. Nude ephebe left, holding whip and dismounting from horse at the gallop in a calpe or anadates race, Π below / KEΛE, goat crouching left, head to right. SNG Levante 19; SNG von Aulock 5623; SNG France 51. 10.88g, 22mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Very well preserved for the type.

1,000

The anabates or calpe (‘dismounter’) race was a late introduction to the Olympics, in which the rider dismounted for the last stretch and ran beside the horse. Its origin was probably a military exercise since speed and agility were essential for a horseman in battle, and it is still included in modern gymkhanas (For elucidation, cf. S. Swaddling, The Ancient Olympic Games, London 2004, p. 89).

97


Ex Nelson Bunker Hunt Collection

394. Cilicia, Kelenderis AR Stater. Circa 350-330 BC. Nude rider right, holding whip and dismounting from horse; Φ before / Goat kneeling to right, head reverted; KEΛEN above, O below; bull countermark (of Issos?) in field. BMC -; SNG France 2 -, cf. 72; SNG Levante -; Nelson Bunker Hunt Collection, Sotheby’s June 1990, 564 (this coin). 10.19g, 26mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Excellent late classical style.

2,000

Ex Nelson Bunker Hunt Collection, Sotheby’s, 19 June 1990, lot 564.

395. Cilicia, Nagidos AR Stater. Circa 400-385/4 BC. Aphrodite seated left, holding phiale over altar to left; to right, Eros standing left, crowning her with wreath / Dionysos standing left, holding grape bunch on vine and thyrsos. Casabonne Type 4; Lederer 25 (same dies); SNG France –; SNG Levante –; BMC 12 (same dies). 10.72g, 23mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

396. Cilicia, Nagidos AR Stater. Circa 400-384 BC. Aphrodite seated left, holding phiale in extended right hand over altar to left; to right, Eros standing left, crowning her with wreath he holds aloft in right hand / Dionysos standing left, holding grape bunch on vine in right hand, thyrsos in left; A in wreath to left, NAΓIΔEΩN around. Casabonne Type 4; Lederer 26 (same dies); SNG France 21 var. (control mark); SNG Levante –. 10.63g, 23mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

500

397. Cilicia, Nagidos AR Stater. Circa 400-385/4 BC. Aphrodite seated left, holding phiale over altar to left; to right, Eros standing left, crowning her with wreath / Dionysos standing left, holding grape bunch on vine and thyrsos. Casabonne Type 4; Lederer 25 (same dies); SNG France –; SNG Levante –; BMC 12 (same dies). 10.63g, 22mm, 3h. Extremely Fine.

98

500


398. Cilicia, Nagidos AR Stater. Circa 400-385/4 BC. Aphrodite seated left, holding phiale over altar to left; to right, Eros standing left, crowning her with wreath / Dionysos standing left, holding grape bunch on vine and thyrsos. Casabonne Type 4; Lederer 25 (same dies); SNG France –; SNG Levante –; BMC 12 (same dies). 10.57g, 23mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

399. Cilicia, Nagidos AR Stater. Circa 400-380 BC. Head of Dionysos right, wearing ivy wreath / Head of Aphrodite right, hair bound in sphendone. SNG Levante 2 var. (spacing of ethnic); SNG Levante Suppl. -; SNG France -; SNG von Aulock -. 10.67g, 22mm, 11h. Minor areas of flat striking, otherwise Extremely Fine. Rare.

2,500

400. Cilicia, Seleukeia Æ24. Circa 2nd-1st centuries BC. Helmeted head of Athena right, EY behind / ΣEΛEYKEΩN ΤΩΝ ΠΡΟC ΤΩΙ ΚΑΛΩΚΚΑΔΝΩΙ, Nike advancing left, holding wreath; ΑΘ-ΛΑ in two lines in left field. SNG France 891; SNG Levante –. 8.08g, 24mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

500

401. Cilicia, Tarsos AR Stater. Tarkumuwa (Datames), Satrap of Cilicia and Cappadocia. Circa 375 BC. Baaltars seated right, torso facing, cradling eagle-tipped sceptre in right arm, holding grain ear and grape bunch in extended left hand; B’LTRZ in Aramaic to left, thymiaterion to right; below throne, forepart of sphinx right; all within crenelated wall / Satrap, wearing Persian dress, seated right, inspecting arrow held in both hands; TRDMW in Aramaic to left, winged solar disk to upper right, bow to lower right. Casabonne Type 2; Moysey Issue 6, 17a corr. (same dies; sphinx not dog); SNG France –; SNG Levante –; SNG von Aulock –; Pozzi 2849. 10.51g, 24mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and better than the published examples.

1,000

BITHYNIA

2x 402. Bithynia, Kalchedon AR Hemidrachm. Circa 367/6-340 BC. Forepart of a bull left, KALX above; monogram before / Three grain ears. SNG BM Black Sea 110; SNG Copenhagen 354. 2.08g, 12mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

99

200


Finely Detailed Prusias I Tetradrachm

403. Kingdom of Bithynia, Prusias I AR Tetradrachm. Nikomedia, circa 210-182 BC. Diademed head right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΡΟΥΣΙΟΥ, Zeus standing left, holding wreath in right hand, lotus tipped sceptre in left, thunderbolt above ANΣ monogram in inner left. Cf. Rec. gén. p. 220 pl. 29.10-11; SNG von Aulock 6878; HGC 7, 614. (all with an additional ME monogram). 16.65g, 35mm, 11h. Extremely Fine, sharply struck and boldly detailed. Extremely rare variant.

2,500

404. Kings of Bithynia, Nikomedes II Epiphanes AR Tetradrachm. Undated, circa 149-127 BC. Diademed head right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΝΙΚΟΜΗΔΟΥ, Zeus Stephanophoros standing left; to inner left, eagle standing left on thunderbolt above monogram. Rec gén. p. 228; HGC 6, 642. 17.03g, 37mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

405. Kings of Bithynia, Nikomedes III Euergetes AR Tetradrachm. Nikomedia, year 203 = 96/5 BC. Diademed head right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΝΙΚΟΜΗΔΟΥ, Zeus Stephanophoros standing left, holding wreath and long sceptre; in inner left, eagle standing left on thunderbolt above monogram and ΓΣ. Rec. gén. p. 232; cf. De Callataÿ p. 60, D143 (different monogram); HGC 7, 645. 16.93g, 32mm, 12h. Near Mint State, very rare in such excellent condition.

100

1,000


PONTOS Beautiful and Rare First Mithradatic War Stater

406. Kingdom of Pontos, Mithradates VI Eupator AV Stater. Pergamene year Γ (3 = 86 BC). Diademed head right / Stag grazing left; BAΣIΛEΩΣ above, MIΘPAΔATOY EYΠATOPOΣ in two lines below; to left, star-in-crescent and to right: Γ above monogram; monogram in exergue; all within Dionysiac wreath of ivy and fruit. Callataÿ 1997, D8-9. 8.40g, 20mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

15,000

Struck at the height of the First Mithradatic War, the year 86 saw a complete reversal of Mithradates’ fortunes, as Sulla first reduced Athens by a lengthy siege and then proceeded to annihilate Mithradates’ armies in two pitched battles. Sulla’s army took Athens on February 12 after a brutal year-long siege. Athens had chosen the wrong side in this struggle, and his battle hardened legions, veterans of the Social War, thoroughly sacked the city. Soon afterwards he captured the harbour of Piraios, which he thoroughly looted and ravaged by fire. The Persian commander Archelaos’ naval blockage of Attica eventually forced Sulla to march into Boiotia seeking sustenance for his army, despite his concerns about exposing himself to the superior Pontic cavalry forces. At Chaeroneia in Boiotia Sulla’s army of 40,000 was confronted by Archelaos’ force, which numbered some 120,000 infantry and cavalry. The result of the engagement was a crushing defeat for the Pontic army. Appian and Plutarch claim that only 10,000 survived and escaped to the nearby town. They add that 14 Romans were not accounted for at the end of the battle, two of which returned at nightfall, making the Roman casualty count an unbelievable 12 soldiers. This defeat would be closely followed by another equally disastrous encounter at Orchomenos, leading to the total collapse of the Pontic forces in Greece. This gold stater fully embodies the grand ambitions and megalomaniacal notions of Mithradates VI. Portraying himself on his coinage with an uplifted gaze and Dionysiac free flowing hair (an association strengthened on the reverse with the Dionysiac wreath of ivy), we are undoubtedly expected to see in Mithradates a divinely-inspired heroic king who fights for Greek freedom against the ruthless and expansionist Romans.

PHOENICIA

407. Phoenicia, Tyre AR Half-Shekel. Dated CY 36 = 91/90 BC. Laureate head of Herakles-Melkart right, lion’s skin tied around neck / ΤΥΡΟΥ ΙΕΡΑΣ ΚΑΙ ΑΣΥΛΟΥ, eagle standing left with right foot on prow of ship, palm branch over right shoulder, club in left field, Phoenician aleph between legs, SΛ (date) – Δ across fields. BMC 223. 6.90g, 23mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Ex Gemini IX, 9 January 2012, lot 165.

101

500


CYPRUS Divinely Inspired Heroic Triumph

408.

Cyprus, Kition AR Stater. Baalmelek II, circa 425-400 BC. Herakles in fighting stance to right, wearing lion skin upon his back and tied around neck, holding club overhead in right hand and bow extended before him in left hand; monogram or ankh to right / Lion attacking stag crouching right; L B’LMLK (in Aramaic) above; all inside dotted border within incuse square. Tziambazis 19; Babelon, Perses 678; BMC 35; Sunrise 110 (this coin). 10.75g, 25mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Rare. Exceptional state of preservation - apparently the finest known example of the type, which is otherwise nearly uniformly badly struck and preserved. 4,000 Ex Gorny & Mosch 185, 8 March 2010, lot 176. Various attempts have been made to explain the meaning of the lion attack motif, often centred on possible astrological or cosmological significances, or associations with particular deities. One interpretation that has gained traction in recent years is that the motif is apotropaic in nature, serving to ward off evil in a similar function to the gorgoneion, which like the lion attack motif is very prevalent in ancient Greek coinage, though there is little evidence to support such a notion. G. E. Markoe (‘The Lion Attack in Archaic Greek Art’, Classical Antiquity Vol. 8, 1, 1989) convincingly suggests that a more likely explanation may be found in the examination of archaic Greek epic poetry, particularly in Homeric literature, wherein a lion attacking cattle or sheep is repeatedly employed as a simile for the aggression and valour of combatant heroes. In notable passages, Agamemnon’s victorious advance against the Trojans in the Iliad (11.113ff and 129) and Hektor’s successful pursuit of the Achaeans (15.630ff) are both likened to a lion triumphing over its hapless prey. In both of these cases the allusion is completed by the defeated being compared to fleeing prey animals. In all, there are twenty five examples present in the Iliad of heroic warriors being compared to leonine aggressors, with the victims variously compared to boars, sheep, goats, bulls or deer. The repetition of this literary device is clearly demonstrative of how deeply rooted the imagery was in the Greek (and perhaps more generally human) consciousness. Of further and great significance is the involvement of the gods as the primary instigators of heroic leonine aggression in almost every case, and as it is made clear that the lion itself is an animal that is divinely directed to its prey (11.480, by a daimon), so then is the lion attack a metaphor for divinely inspired heroic triumph. Greek art of the seventh century BC frequently pairs the motif with a scene of heroic triumph. On the New York Nessos amphora for example, the image of a lion attacking a deer is prominently displayed above the main scene, which shows Herakles defeating the centaur Nessos. The present coin therefore represents a continuation of the artistic response to a heroic literary tradition expressed in Homeric poetry.

102


409. Cyprus, Salamis AR Stater. Euelthon, circa 515-480 BC. Ram kneeling left, ethnic above and below / Blank. Cf. Asyut 787–803; Tziambazis 95; BMC 2; Traité II, 919; SNG Copenhagen 31. 11.10g, 18mm. Attractive old cabinet tone with golden highlights. Rare.

500

From the Mark Christenson Collection.

KYRENAIKA

2x 410. Kyrenaika, Kyrene AV 1/10 Stater. Circa 4th century BC. ΘEO..., Magristrate. Head of Karneius left, with short hair, ΘEO around / Female head (Kyrene?) right. BMC 143-144 var. (arrangement of legend). 0.80g, 8mm, 9h. Good Very Fine.

500

From the Mark Christenson Collection; Ex Auktionshaus H. D. Rauch GmbH Auction 92, 22 April 2013, lot 1145.

411. Kyrenaika, Kyrene AV Stater. Time of Ophellas, Ptolemaic governor, first reign, circa 322-313 BC. Polianthes, magistrate. Nike, driving fast quadriga right, holding kentron and reins; KΥΡANAIΩN above / Zeus Ammon standing left, holding patera and lotus-tipped sceptre; thymiaterion to left, ΠOΛIANΘEYΣ to right. Naville 84; Mørkholm, Cyrene, p. 151, no. 23; SNG Copenhagen 1210. 8.61g, 20mm, 11h. Very Fine. Rare.

3,000

EGYPT

412. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy I, as satrap, AR Tetradrachm. Memphis, circa 323 BC. In the name and types of Alexander III. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, drapery about legs and waist, holding sceptre and eagle; AΛEΞANΔPOY to left, rose before, moneyer’s signature ΔI-O beneath. Price 3971. 16.65g, 26mm, 12h. Very Fine.

300

413. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Ptolemy I Soter AV Stater. In the names and types of Alexander III. Sidon, circa 316-315 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with serpent / Nike standing left, holding laurel wreath and stylis; Σ to left, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right. Price 3503; Muller 1321. 8.63g, 17mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

103

1,250


414. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy I, as satrap, AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria, circa 309-305 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant skin headdress / Athena Alkidemos advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield; helmet, monogram, and eagle on thunderbolt to right, AΛEΞANΔPOY to left. Svoronos 164; SNG Lockett 3393; SNG Copenhagen -. 15.72g, 28mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned. 2,000

415. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria, circa 309-305 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant skin headdress / Athena Alkidemos advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield; helmet, monogram, and eagle on thunderbolt to right, AΛEΞANΔPOY to left. Svoronos 168; Jenkins, Early, group a; SNG Copenhagen 19. 15.46g, 27mm, 12h. Etremely Fine. 2,000 From the Mark Christenson Collection.

416. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy I AV Triobol. Alexandria, circa 295-282 BC. Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, with aegis tied round neck / ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle with spread wings standing left on thunderbolt, A in left field. Svoronos 182. 1.64g, 10mm, 12h. Good Fine. Very Rare. 200

417. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, with Arsinöe II AV Half Mnaïeion (Tetradrachm). Alexandria, circa 270-260 BC. Conjoined busts of diademed and draped Ptolemy II, and diademed and veiled Arsinöe II right; AΔEΛΦΩN above, Gallic shield behind / Conjoined busts of diademed and draped Ptolemy I, and diademed and veiled Berenike I; ΘEΩN above. Svoronos 604; SNG Copenhagen 133; Noeske 38; Boston MFA 2275; Dewing 2753-4. 13.88g, 20mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Minor marks. 3,000

418. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy VI Philometor AR Tetradrachm. First sole reign. Alexandria, circa 180-170 BC. Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis / Eagle standing to left on thunderbolt, BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY around. Svoronos 1489; SNG Copenhagen 262-8. 14.14g, 28mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautiful multi-hued iridescent toning. 1,500

104


419. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Ptolemy VI Philometor AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria, circa 180-170 BC. Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis knotted round neck / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ around. Svoronos 1489; SNG Copenhagen 265. 14.20g, 28mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

ARABIA

750

Two Very Rare Tetradrachms of Quataban

420. South Arabia, Qataban AR Tetradrachm. Uncertain ruler, circa 350-320 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet / ΑΘE, Owl standing right, head facing; behind, crescent and olive spray; in right field, royal Qatabanian monogram composed of South Arabian letter hl. Huth 344; van Alfen in CCK, pl. 20, 41. 16.58g, 21mm, 10h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 4,000

421. South Arabia, Qataban AR Tetradrachm. Uncertain ruler, circa 350-320 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet / ΑΘE, Owl standing right., head facing; behind, crescent and olive spray; in right field, royal Qatabanian monogram composed of South Arabian letter hl. Huth 344; van Alfen in CCK, pl. 20, 41. 16.63g, 24mm, 10h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 4,000

PERSIA

422. Persia, Achaemenid Empire AV Daric. Time of Artaxerxes II or Artaxerxes III AV Daric. Circa 400-350 BC. Great King of Persia in kneelingrunning pose right, wearing kidaris, holding bow in his left hand and spear with his right / Rectangular incuse punch. BMC 78ff; Carradice, The ‘Regal’ Coinage of the Persian Empire, CAAPE, Pl. XIII, 50-51. 8.33g, 16mm. Very Fine.

2,000

SYRIA

423

424

423. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Seleukos I Nikator AV Stater. Babylon, circa 311-300 BC. In the name of Alexander III. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled serpent / Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis; H below left wing, monogram in wreath below right wing; BAΣIΛEΩΣ to left, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right. Price 3707. 8.54g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 1,500 424. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Seleukos I Nikator AV Stater. Babylon, circa 311-300 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing single pendant earring, necklace, and triple-crested Corinthian helmet adorned with a serpent / BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY, Nike standing left, holding wreath in extended right hand, cradling stylis in left arm; monogram in wreath in left field, H below left wing. SC 81.10 corr. (griffin on helmet); Price 3717 corr. (same); HGC 9, 3a; SNG Saroglos –. 8.53g, 19mm, 3h. Very Fine. 1,500

105


Third Known Distater of Seleukos I

425. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Seleukos I Nikator AV Distater. Cappadocian, Syrian, or Mesopotamian mint after 305 BC. Attic standard. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet ornamented with serpent on bowl / Nike standing left, holding wreath in right hand and stylis in left, monogram in lower left field; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to left, ΣEΛEYKOY to right. BMC -, cf. 4, 37; SC 195 (same dies); Kritt, The Early Seleucid Mint at Susa, p. 126, AH (same dies); Newell, The Coinage of the Eastern Seleucid Mints from Seleucus I to Antiochus III, NS 1, 1938, - cf. 417. 17.13g, 23mm, 4h. Extremely Fine, minor marks and die-shift on reverse. Of the highest rarity, apparently one of only three specimens known.

50,000

It seems highly probable that the exceedingly rare distaters of Seleukos I were struck for some ceremonial or commemorative purpose rather than for circulation alongside the regular Alexandrine staters - the paucity of surviving specimens would seem to rule this out. Possible events that would have warranted the striking of such a grand type are the foundation of Seleukeia on the Tigris in 305/4, at which time Seluekos also claimed the title Basileos, or the defeat of Antigonos at the Battle of Ipsos in 301, a victory which seems to have been celebreated on the Seleukid coinage with the tetradrachms of Nike erecting a trophy of Macedonian arms. A later date also remains possible, since Alexandrine type staters continued to be struck into the 280s, and the defeat of Lysimachos at Corupedion in 281 also represents a momentous event for Seleukos’ empire. This last battle of the diadochi gave Seleukos control of nearly every part of Alexander’s former realm except for Ptolemaic Egypt. This reunification of the Macedonian empire was to be short lived however; not long after the battle, after crossing the Hellespont to take control of Lysimachos’ European territories, Seleukos was assassinated by Ptolemy Keraunos.

426. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Seleukos I Nikator AR Tetradrachm. Susa, circa 300-294 BC. Head of Seleukos I right, wearing helmet covered with panther skin and adorned with bull’s ears and horns, panther skin tied around neck / Nike standing right, wearing peplos, crowning trophy of Macedonian arms set on sapling tree from which branch sprouts near base; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ around; monogram to lower left, monogram in lower middle field. SC 173.4; Kritt Tr. 19 (A16/P11); ESM 426; HGC 9.16.14g, 26mm, 7h. Very Fine. Porous surfaces, heavily scratched.

3,000

427. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Seleukos I Nikator AR Tetradrachm. Susa, circa 300-294 BC. Head of Seleukos I right, wearing helmet covered with panther skin and adorned with bull’s ears and horns, panther skin tied around neck / Nike standing right, wearing peplos, crowning trophy of Macedonian arms set on sapling tree, from which branch sprouts near base; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ around, E-ΔI in fields. SC 173.11; ESM 413; Hoover 20 var. (different monograms). 17.10g, 27mm, 1h. About Extremely Fine.

106

7,500


Fine Style Tetradrachm of Antiochos I

428. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos I Soter AR Tetradrachm. Seleukeia on the Tigris, circa 281-261 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos I to right / Apollo seated to left on omphalos, holding bow in left hand and sighting along arrow held in right; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ to left, AP monogram to outer left, HP monogram to outer right. SC 379.3a; HGC 9; ESM 149; Houghton 950; SNG Spaer 289. 17.21g, 29mm, 2h. Good Extremely Fine, minor edge bump to 4 o’clock (obv.). Exceptionally well preserved for the issue, rare thus.

10,000

From a European collection, privately purchased from D. Gorny Giessener Münzhandlung, 1992. Antiochos I was the son of Seleukos I and Apama, Seleukos’ Persian wife. His date of birth is unknown, but was probably circa 320 BC as he was old enough to lead the Seleukid cavalry at the battle of Ipsos in 301. When Seleukos was assassinated in 281, Antiochos was probably in Ekbatana, where he had maintained court ruling the eastern satrapies on behalf of his father since 294. With his accession, Antiochos faced immediate attacks by Ptolemy II in Asia Minor and revolts of the cities of Syria. He left his eldest son, Seleukos, as governor of the eastern satrapies and marched west to meet the threats, which he soon overcame. However, it was not long before his attention was once again drawn to disturbances, this time from a menacing force of warlike Celtic tribes that had crossed over the Hellespont in the winter of 278/7 and invaded Asia Minor, and also shortly thereafter, renewed hostilities with Ptolemy II (First Syrian War, 274-271 BC). After defeating the Celts and receiving the title of Saviour (Soter) by the Greek cities of Asia Minor, Antiochos concluded an uneasy truce with Ptolemy which allowed him to focus on public relations and administrative work in Asia Minor. His subsequent reign was relatively peaceful, with the exceptions of sedition by his son and co-regent, Seleukos, whom he was forced to execute and replace with his younger son, the future Antiochos II, and the loss of northwest Asia Minor to Eumenes I of Pergamon. The figure of Apollo seated on the omphalos gained prominence under Antiochos, publicizing his supposed descent from the god, and became the characteristic reverse type for most Seleukid precious metal coinage down through the reign of Antiochos IV.

429. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Alexander I Balas AR Tetradrachm. Antioch, dated SE 165 (148-147 BC). Diademed head right / Zeus Nikephoros seated left; monogram to inner left, EΞP (date) and monogram in exergue. SC 1784. 16.26g, 29mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

107

500


The Seleukeian Cult of Zeus Casios

430.

Seleukid Kings of Syria, Alexander I Balas AR Tetradrachm. Seleucia Pieria, year 166 = 147/6 BC. Laureate head of Zeus to right, with full beard and with his hair arranged in long curls of archaizing form / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, thunderbolt, ϚΞΡ (= 166) and monogram above, two monograms below; all within elaborate laurel wreath with ties to right. CSE 409; Gulbenkian 1044; A. Houghton, ‘A Tetradrachm of Seleucia Pieria at the Getty Museum,’ J. Getty Museum Journal 10 (1982), A2/P4 and fig. F = SC 1798 = Wealth of the Ancient World 112. 16.70g, 23mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, one of as few as fifteen known specimens, of which at least seven are in museum collections. 10,000 From a European collection; Ex Gemini VII, 9 January 2011, lot 575. This rare and remarkable tetradrachm represents a very interesting episode in the history of the Seleukid empire. Of humble origins, Alexander Balas pretended that he was the son of Antiochus IV Epiphanes and Laodice IV, and thus heir to the imperial throne. He was ‘discovered’ by Heracleides, a former minister of Antiochus IV and brother of Timarchus, an usurper in Media who had been executed by the reigning king Demetrius I Soter. Alexander’s claims were recognized by the Roman Senate and Ptolemy Philometor of Egypt; he was even granted the hand in marriage of Cleopatra Thea, a daughter of the Ptolemaic dynasty. Though his revolt was initially unsuccessful, in 150 BC Alexander was able to defeat Demetrios, and claim overlordship of the empire. Despite his victory however, Alexander remained heavily dependent on Ptolemaic support. Antioch refused to acknowledge him, and struck its own series of posthumous coinage in the name of Antiochos IV. Alexander was therefore forced to strike his own coinage at Seleukeia, previously only a peripheral mint, but which at the beginning of his reign was the only city in northern Syria completely under his control. Thus we see here a tetradrachm which unlike the usual royal issues, employs types that are directly related to the city in which it was struck. The Pheidian-influenced portrait of Zeus on the obverse clearly represents Zeus Casios, whose cult in the city of Seleukeia was well noted. The reverse type of the thunderbolt was also an important cult symbol, which Appian (Syr. 58) tells us was held in great reverence by the inhabitants of Seleukeia. Zeus Casios was himself a Hellenization of Ba’al Zaphon, the latter term being derived from the mountain named Hazzi (or Casios to the Greeks), which remained in use from the 2nd millennium BC onwards. Zeus Casios was locally venerated as a storm god renowned for his battle against the sea monster now known as Typhon, whose name and various features are derived from Zaphon.

108


431. Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos VII Euergetes (Sidetes) AR Tetradrachm. Cappadocian mint, circa 138-129 BC. Posthumous issue. Diademed head right / Athena Nikephoros standing left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY to right, EϒΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ to left; to outer left, monogram above A; O to inner left, Λ to inner right; all within laurel wreath. SC 2148; HGC 9, 1069. 16.64g, 28mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

ELYMAIS

432. Kingdom of Elymais, Kamnaskires V AR Tetradrachm. Seleucia on the Hedyphon, Year 267 = 46/5 BC. Diademed and draped bust left, with pointed beard; star and anchor behind / Diademed and draped male bust with short beard left, legend around, date in exergue. Van’t Haaff p. 75, subtype 1-4. 14.28g, 28mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

433. Kingdom of Elymais, Kamnaskires V AR Tetradrachm. Seleucia on the Hedyphon, Year 267 = 46/5 BC. Diademed and draped bust left, with pointed beard; star and anchor behind / Diademed and draped male bust with short beard left, legend around, date in exergue. Van’t Haaff p. 75, subtype 1-4. 14.01g, 30mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

434. Kingdom of Elymais, Kamnaskires V AR Tetradrachm. Seleucia on the Hedyphon, Year 267 = 46/5 BC. Diademed and draped bust left, with pointed beard; star and anchor behind / Diademed and draped male bust with short beard left, legend around, date in exergue. Van’t Haaff p. 75, subtype 1-4. 13.61g, 28mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

109

2,500


PERSIS Two Rare and Attractive Tetradrachms of Bagadat

435. Kings of Persis, Bagadat (Bayadad) AR Tetradrachm. Early-mid 3rd century BC. Head right, with short beard, moustache, and earring, wearing satrapal cap (kyrbasia) with flaps tied behind / Fire temple of Ahura-Mazda; Bagadat standing left, standard to right. Alram 515; BMC p. 196, 2; Sear GC 6186. 16.44g, 29mm, 4h. Near Extremely Fine.

6,000

436. Kings of Persis, Bagadat (Bayadad) AR Tetradrachm. Early-mid 3rd century BC. Head right, with short beard, moustache, and earring, wearing satrapal cap (kyrbasia) with flaps tied behind / Fire temple of Ahura-Mazda; Bagadat standing left, standard to right. Alram 515; BMC p. 196, 2; Sear GC 6186. 16.08g, 30mm, 4h. Near Extremely Fine.

BAKTRIA

6,000

Beautiful and Un-cut Stater of Diodotos

437. Baktria, Greco-Baktrian Kingdom, Diodotos I and II AV Stater. Struck in the name of Antiochos II. Mint A (near Aï Khanoum), circa 240-225 BC. Diademed head right / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY, Zeus Bremetes advancing left, extended left arm draped with aegis, preparing to hurl thunderbolt in right hand; N in inner left field above eagle standing to left. Cf. Holt Series A, Group 7 (tetradrachm); Bopearachchi –; Bopearachchi & Rahman –; SNG ANS –; SC 629 (Antiochos II of Syria). 8.31g, 17mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very well preserved for the type, without the usual test cut.

4,000

Demetrios I was the Seleukid satrap of Baktria, who seized the opportunity presented by the death of Antiochos II Theos to secede from the empire and declare himself king of Baktria. Justin (XLI, 4) tell us: ‘Diodotus, the governor of the thousand cities of Baktria, defected and proclaimed himself king; all the other people of the Orient followed his example and seceded from the Macedonians.’ The newly born kingdom was highly urbanised and extremely wealthy as a result of its favourable position on one of the main east-west trade routes.

110


Superb Stater of Eurkratides I

438.

Baktria, Greco-Baktrian Kingdom, Eukratides I AV Stater. Circa 170-145 BC. Diademed and draped bust right, wearing crested helmet adorned with bull’s horn and ear; all within pelleted border / BAΣIΛEΩΣ MEΓAΛΟΥ above, EYKPATIΔOY below, the Dioskouroi on rearing horses right, holding palm fronds and spears; monogram in lower right field. Al. N. Oikonomedes, ‘The Gold Coinage of the Indo-Greek King Eukratides I (171-155 B.C.),’ North American Journal of Numismatics 7.6 (1968), Group B; F.L. Holt, ‘Eukratides of Baktria,’ Coins, Cults, History and Inscriptions III: Studies in Honor of Al. N. Oikonomedes, pp. 72-76; Bopearachchi 5 var. (unlisted monogram); cf. Bopearachchi 7A (drachm); Bopearachchi & Rahman -; cf. SNG ANS 163 (monogram); MIG Type 176 var. (unlisted monogram); MACW -; Triton I , 618 (same dies); Tkalec (29 February 2000), 199; Triton VIII, 645 (same obv. die). 8.52g, 19mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine, struck from a superbly sharp reverse die and with wonderful lustre in the fields.

50,000

The close die links (only one obverse die and two reverse dies) suggest that this issue was very limited and struck for a special occasion, no doubt at the same time as the fabulous 20 stater medallion weighing 169.2g now in the Bibliothèque Nationale in France, which is the largest gold coin to have been struck in antiquity. The occasion that merited such grand celebration was undoubtedly the victory over Demetrios of India and the conquest of the western parts of the Indo-Greek kingdom: ‘Eukratides led many wars with great courage, and, while weakened by them, was put under siege by Demetrios, king of the Indians. He made numerous sorties, and managed to vanquish 60,000 enemies with 300 soldiers, and thus liberated after four months, he put India under his rule’ (Justin XLI, 6). Eukratides The Great was one of the last but most important Greco-Baktrian kings, responsible for the overthrow of the Euthydemid dynasty and for waging numerous campaigns against the Indo-Greek kings, temporarily holding territory as far east as the Indus. By the range, quantity and quality of his coinage, which included the above mentioned medallion, we can surmise that his was a reign of considerable significance and prestige. Eukratides was murdered on his way home from India, apparently by his son, who hated his father so much that he ‘ran with his chariot over the blood of his father, and ordered the corpse to be left without a sepulture’ (Justin XLI,6). The subsequent civil war between rival members of the dynasty, combined with external pressures from the Indo-Greeks, Sogdians and Parthians led to the ultimate collapse of the Greko-Baktrian Kingdom a mere fifteen years later, when it was conquered by the Parthians under Mithradates.

111


439

440

439. Baktria, Greco-Baktrian Kingdom, Eukratides I ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Circa 170-145 BC. Helmeted and diademed bust of Eukratides right / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ MEΓAΛOY EYKPATIΔOY, the Dioskouroi with palms and spears on horseback right, monogram to right. Mitchiner I, Type 177e; Bopearachchi 203 ser. 6E. 16.99g, 32mm, 11h. Near Mint State. 1,500 440. Baktria, Greco-Baktrian Kingdom, Eukratides I ‘the Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Circa 170-145 BC. Helmeted and diademed bust of Eukratides right / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ MEΓAΛOY EYKPATIΔOY, the Dioskouroi with palms and spears on horseback right, monogram to right. Mitchiner I, Type 177e; Bopearachchi 203 ser. 6E. 17.00g, 32mm, 12h. Near Mint State. 2,000

Very Rare and Exceptional Quality Strato I

441. Baktria, Indo-Greek Kingdom, Strato I Soter AR Tetradrachm. Circa 105-85/0 BC. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ KAI ΔΙΚΑΙΟΥ ΣΤΡΑΤΩΝΟΣ, helmeted, diademed, and draped bust right / ‘Maharajasa pracachasa dhramikasa Stratasa’ in Kharosthi, Athena Alkidemos standing left, brandishing thunderbolt and aegis; monogram to left. Bopearachchi 23A; Haughton, Silver 14; Bopearachchi & Rahman -; SNG ANS 996 (same dies). 9.89g, 28mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Exceptional condition and metal quality for the issue. Very Rare.

5,000

Extremely Rare Heroic Portrait Type

442. Baktria, Indo-Greek Kingdom, Strato I Soter AR Tetradrachm. Circa 105-85/0 BC. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ ΣΤΡΑΤΩΝΟΣ, diademed heroic bust left, seen from behind, wearing aegis on shoulder and brandishing spear / ‘Maharajasa tratarasa dhramikasa Stratasa’ in Kharosthi, Athena Alkidemos standing left, brandishing thunderbolt and aegis; monogram to left. SNG ANS 993. 9.77g, 28mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Exceptional condition and detail. Extremely Rare.

112

7,500


443. Baktria, Indo-Greek Kingdom, Strato I Soter AR Tetradrachm. Circa 105-85/0 BC. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ ΔΙΚΑΙΟΥ ΣΤΡΑΤΩΝΟΣ, diademed and draped bust right / ‘Maharajasa tratarasa dhramikasa Stratasa’ in Karosthi, Athena Alkidemos standing left, brandishing thunderbolt and aegis; monogram to left. Bopearachchi 26; SNG ANS 994 var. (monogram to right). 9.63g, 28mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Exceptional condition and metal quality for the issue. Very Rare.

7,500

444. Baktria, Indo-Greek Kingdom, Heliokles II Dikaios AR Tetradrachm. Circa 90-75 BC. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΔIKAIOY HΛIOKΛEOYΣ, diademed and draped bust right / ‘Maharajasa dhramikasa Hiliyakresasa’ in Kharosthi, Zeus standing left, brandishing thunderbolt in right hand and holding long sceptre in left; monogram to inner left. SNG ANS -, cf. 1139-1141 for obv, 1149 for same rev. monogram. 9.65g, 27mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. Apparently unique variety of a very rare type.

5,000

445. Baktria, Indo-Greek Kingdom, Philoxenos Aniketos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 125-110 BC. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANIKHTOY ΦΙΛOΞENOY, diademed heroic bust left, seen from behind, wearing crested helmet, aegis on shoulder and brandishing spear with right hand / ‘Maharajasa apadihatasa Philasinasa’ in Kharosthi, Philoxenos, in military attire, on horse rearing right; Σ and monogram to upper left. Bopearachchi 9C; SNG ANS 1198. 9.75g, 27mm, 12h. Near Mint State. Lustrous; superb metal quality for the issue. Extremely Rare.

113

7,500


446. Baktria, Indo-Greek Kingdom, Diomedes Soter AR Tetradrachm. Circa 115-105 BC. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ ΔIOMHΔOY, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, wearing crested helmet adorned with bull’s horn and ear / ‘Maharajasa tratarasa Diyamitasa’ in Kharosthi, the Dioskouroi, holding palm fronds and spears, on horses rearing right; monogram to lower right. Bopearachchi 5A; Bopearachchi & Rahman –; SNG ANS 1220. 9.81g, 28mm, 12. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

3,000

447. Baktria, Indo-Greek Kingdom, Diomedes Soter AR Tetradrachm. Circa 115-105 BC. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ ΔIOMHΔOY, diademed and draped bust right / ‘Maharajasa tratarasa Diyamitasa’ in Kharosthi, the Dioskouroi on rearing horses right, holding palm fronds and spears; monogram to lower right. Bopearachchi 3A; Bopearachchi & Rahman –; SNG ANS 1215. 9.77g, 26mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Exceptional metal quality for issue. Very Rare.

5,000

448. Baktria, Indo-Greek Kingdom, Hermaios Soter, with Kalliope AR Tetradrachm. Circa 105-90 BC. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ EPMAIOY KAI KAΛΛIOΠHΣ, conjoined busts of Hermaios, diademed and draped, and Kalliope, draped and wearing stephane, right / ‘Maharajasa tratarasa Hiramayasa Kaliyapaya’ in Kharosthi, Hermaios, in military attire, on horse rearing right, bow in bow case and spear attached to saddle; monogram to lower right. Bopearachchi 1B; Bopearachchi & Rahman 518; SNG ANS 1317-1318. 9.74g, 26mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Superb metal quality for the issue. Very Rare.

4,000

PARTHIA

449. Kings of Parthia, Mithradates II AR Tetradrachm. Seleukia on the Tigris, circa 119-109 BC. Diademed and draped bust left, wearing long beard, earring, and torque; all within pelleted border / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΜΕΓΑΛΟΥ ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ, archer (Arsakes I) seated right on omphalos, holding bow in outstretched right hand; palm to outer right; TV in exergue. Sellwood 24.4; Shore 67. 15.68g, 30mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

450. Kings of Parthia, Mithradates II AR Drachm. Ekbatana, 109-96/5 BC. Diademed and draped bust left / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΝ ΜΕΓΑΛΟV ΑΡΣΑΚΟV ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟVΣ, Archer (Arsakes I) seated right, holding bow. Sellwood 27.2; Shore 86. 4.27g, 26mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Struck on a very impressive large flan.

114

100


Two Exceptional Dinars of Shapur I

451. Sasanian Kings, Shapur I AV Dinar. Ctesiphon, AD 260-272. Draped bust right, wearing diadem and mural crown surmounted by a korymbos; one pellet above and two below diadem ties / Fire-altar flanked by two regal attendants wearing mural crowns, symbol to left of flames. SNS type IIc/1b, style P, group d/1 (pl. 31, 143); Göbl type I/1; Saeedi AV5; Sunrise 740. 7.38g, 21mm, 3h. Fleur De Coin. Extremely Rare.

10,000

Shapur was the second shahanshah (king of kings) of the Sasanian empire, apparently joining his father Ardashir I as king in joint rule in AD 240, and then succeeding in around 242 as sole ruler. Shapur had accompanied his father on campaign against the Parthians who then still controlled much of the Iranian plateau, and already before his accession was praised for his intelligence and learning, as well as for boldness and kindheartedness. Continuing his father’s war with the Roman empire, Shapur conquered the Mesopotamian fortresses of Nisibis and Carrhae, advancing into Syria, which required the young emperor Gordian III to set out with a vast army to counter the Sasanian threat. Gordian’s army won battle after battle, at last routing the Sasanian army at Resaena, forcing Shapur to hand back all of his gains. Gordian’s death and the succession of Philip ‘the Arab’ ended the Roman campaign against Shapur, who was able to extract considerable advantages from Philip including an enormous indemnity in gold. Shapur soon resumed his attacks on Rome, and in 253 met and annihilated a Roman army of 60,000 at the Battle of Barbalissos, and proceeded then to burn and ravage the Roman province of Syria. Armenia was conquered, and Georgia submitted to Sasanian control. With his northern borders secure, Shapur then led an army which penetrated deep into Syria, plundering all the way to Antioch which quickly fell to his forces. The Roman counter-offensive under emperor Valerian was slow, but by 257 Antioch had been recovered and the province of Syria returned to Roman control. Shapur’s speedy retreat caused the Romans to launch a hasty pursuit of the Sasanians all the way to Edessa, where they were severely defeated by the Persians, and Valerian along with the survivors of his army were led away into captivity. The defeat and capture of Valerian surely marks the greatest achievement in the reign of Shapur, who is also called ‘the Great’, and the submission of Valerian is commemorated in a mural at Naqsh-e Rustam, which shows the emperor bending the knee before Shapur on horseback. Valerian’s army was sent to Bishapur, and the soldiers were used in engineering and development works, such as the Band-e Kaisar (Caesar’s dam) near the ancient city of Susa.

452. Sasanian Kings, Shapur I AV Dinar. Ctesiphon, AD 260-272. Draped bust right, wearing diadem and mural crown surmounted by a korymbos; one pellet above and two below diadem ties / Fire-altar flanked by two regal attendants wearing mural crowns, symbol to left of flames. SNS type IIc/1b, style P, group d/1 (pl. 31, 143); Göbl type I/1; Saeedi AV5; Sunrise 740. 7.39g, 21mm, 3h. Fleur De Coin. Extremely Rare.

115

10,000


Very Rare Drachm of Ohrmazd (Hormizd) I

453. Sasanian Kings, Ohrmazd (Hormizd) I AR Drachm. AD 272-273. Bust right, wearing diadem and crown with korymbos / Fire altar with attendants facing inwards. Göbl 38; Paruck 101; Saeedi 117; Sunrise -. 4.12g, 26mm, 4h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

454

5,000

455

454. Sasanian Kings, Vahrām (Bahram) I AR Drachm. AD 273-276. Bust right, wearing diadem and radiate crown with korymbos / Fire altar; flanked by two attendants, the left wearing crown with korymbos, the right with mural crown; taurus symbol to right of flames. SNS type Ib/1B; Göbl type I/1; Paruck 106; Saeedi 127 var. (fravahr symbol to right of flames). 4.22g, 17mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. 500 455. Sasanian Kings, Vahrām (Bahram) I AR Drachm. AD 273-276. Crowned bust right / Fire altar flanked by two attendants; fravahr symbol to right of flames. SNS Type I(1)/1a; Göbl Type I/1. 4.13g, 26mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. 600

Extremely Rare Dinar of Vahrām (Bahram) II

456. Sasanian Kings, Vahrām (Bahram) II AV Dinar. AD 276-293. Draped bust right, wearing curved winged crown surmounted by a korymbos / Firealtar flanked by two regal attendants, the one to left wearing winged crown with korymbos, the one to right wearing mural crown. SNS type I/1; Göbl type I/1; Saeedi -; Sunrise 765 (listed as unpublished with curved wing). 7.35g, 22mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, apparently only the second known example.

116

10,000


JUDAEAN COINS

457. Claudius Æ22 of Caesarea Panias, Judaea. AD 41-54. Laureate head right / Anchor within wreath. RPC 4848; Rosenberger 1; BMC 3. 10.79g, 22mm, 12h. Very Fine. Rare.

1,000

458. Judaea, First Jewish War AR Shekel. Dated year 2 (AD 67/8). Hebrew script (SHKL YSHRAL) ‘Shekel of Israel’, and date above Omer cup with beaded rim / Hebrew script (YROSHLM H GDSHEH) ‘Jerusalem the Holy’, sprig of three pomegranates. Hendin 1358; Meshorer AJC II p. 260, 8. 13.59g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous surfaces.

459

460

3,000

461

459. Judaea, Bar Kokhba Revolt AR Zuz. Year 2 (= 133/4 CE). Paleo-Hebrew: ‘Simon’ around bunch of grapes / Paleo-Hebrew: ‘year two of the freedom of Israel’, palm branch. Mildenberg 40 (O7/R12); TJC 248; Hendin 1394. 3.24g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

750

460. Judaea, Bar Kokhba Revolt AR Zuz. Year 2 (= 133/4 CE). Paleo-Hebrew ‘Sm’ within wreath / Paleo-Hebrew: ‘year two of the freedom of Jerusalem’, Jug with palm branch. Mildenberg 21 (O5/R15); TJC 250; Hendin 1391. 3.19g, 18mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

750

461. Judaea, Bar Kokhba Revolt AR Zuz. Attributed to year 3 (= 134/5 CE). Paleo-Hebrew ‘Simon’ within wreath / Paleo-Hebrew: ‘for the freedom of Jerusalem’, Jug with palm branch. Mildenberg 85 (O15/R52); TJC 283a; Hendin 1422. 3.01g, 18mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Lightly toned. 750

462. Judaea, Bar Kokhba Revolt Æ22. Attributed to year 3 (= 134/5 CE). Paleo-Hebrew: ‘for the freedom of Jerusalem’, Vine leaf on tendril / PaleoHebrew: ‘Simon’, Seven-branched palm tree. Mildenberg 102(O8/R66); TJC 291; Hendin 1437. 9.74g, 26mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Attractive desert patina.

117

150


ROMAN PROVINCIAL COINS

463. P. Cornelius P. f. Lentulus Spinther, as Imperator, AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm. Laodicea in Phrygia, circa 57-54 BC. Serpents emerging from cista mystica; the whole within wreath / P LENTVLVS P F IMP, Bow-case between two serpents, caduceus in right field, ΛΑΟ in left; below, ΑΠΟΛΛΩΝΙΟΣ ΔΑΜΟΚΡΑΤΟΥ ΖΩΣΙΜΟΣ in three lines. Stumpf 76, pl. 2, 28; BMC18. 11.67g, 28mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

500

Ex Monnaies et Médailles Liste 178 avril 1958 N°21.

464. Marc Antony and Octavian Æ26 of Thessalonica, Macedonia. Circa 37 BC. AΓΩNOΘEΣIA, head of Agonothesia right / ANT KAI in two lines in wreath. RPC I, 1552. 13.67g, 26mm, 7h. Very Fine.

200

465. Caligula and Rhoemetalkes III Æ20 of Thrace. Circa AD 38-46. ΓΑΙΩ ΚΑΙΣΑΡΙ, laureate head of Caligula left / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ retrograde, eagle standing facing, wings spread and head left. RPC 1726. 4.46g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

250

466. Galba AR Tetradrachm of Antioch, Syria. AD 68-9. AYTOKPATWP CEPOYIOC ΓAΛBAC CEBACTOC, bare head right / Eagle standing facing on opposed laurel branches, head left, wreath in beak, palm in left field; ETOYC B in exergue. Prieur 99; RPC 4197. 15.03g, 27mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

1,000

467. Domitian Æ27 of Perinthus, Thrace. AD 81-96. ΑΥΤΟΚ ΚΑΙΣΑΡ ΔΟΜΙΤΙΑΝΟΣ ΣΕΒ ΓΕΡ, laureate head right / ΠΕΡΙΝΘΙΩΝ, Dionysus standing left, holding cantharus and thyrsus; at feet, panther standing to left with head reverted head. RPC II 364; Schönert-Geiss, Perinthos 302-4; Varbanov 28 (same dies). 10.65g, 28mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group 87, 18 May 2011, lot 823.

118

200


468

469

468. Domitian Æ31 of Perinthus, Thrace. AD 81-96. ΑΥΤΟΚ ΚΑΙΣΑΡ ΔΟΜΙΤΙΑΝΟΣ ΣΕΒ ΓΕΡ, laureate head right / ΠΕΡΙΝΘΙΩΝ, Homonoia standing left, holding cornucopiae and patera over lighted altar to left. Schönert, Perinthos 282 (same obv. die); Varbanov 33; RPC II 361. 18.96g, 31mm, 7h. Very Fine. 200 From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex HLT Collection, Classical Numismatic Group 87, 18 May 2011, lot 822; Ex Waddell FPL 31, May 1988, no. 54. 469. Domitian Æ32 of Philippopolis, Thrace. AD 81-96. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XIIII CENS PER P P, laureate head right / ΦIΛΙΠΠOΠOΛEITΩN, Tyche standing left, holding patera in right hand, grain ears in left; to left, river god Hebrus reclining right, holding reed in his left hand, reed behind him. RPC II 351; BMC Thrace -; SNG Copenhagen -; Mionnet I pg. 415, 340. 17.34g, 32mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare. 300 From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

470

471

470. Domitian Æ28 of Flaviopolis, Cilicia. Year 17 = AD 89/90. ΔOMETIANOC KAICAP, laureate bust right Athena countermark / ΦΛAVIOΠOΛEITΩN ETOYC ZI, laureate and draped busts of the Dioscuri face to face, each with star on forehead. BMC 1; SGI 861; SNG Levante 1529; C/M Howgego 190. 12.00g, 28mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Numismatic Fine Art XXVI, 14 August 1991, lot 236.

200

471. Nerva Æ Didrachm of Rhodes, Islands off Caria. AD 96-98. ΑYΤΟΚΡΑΤOΡ ΚΑΙCΑΡ ΝΕΡΟYΑΝ CΕΒΑCΤΟ, Laureate head right / Uncertain female figure (Rhodes?) standing right, clasping hands with Helios, holding sceptre, standing left; ΔΙΔΡΑXΜΟΝ between. Karl -; SNG München -; cf. SNG von Aulock 2860; BMC 417. 23.07g, 35mm, 2h. Good Very Fine, well defined portrait. 500 From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Sternberg VII, 24 November 1977, lot 604.

472. Hadrian BI Tetradrachm of Alexandria, Egypt. Year 16, AD 131/2. AΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑ CΕΒ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / Serapis seated left, holding sceptre; Cerberus seated at feet; L IS (date) across field. Köln 1042; Dattari 1478; Milne 1324; Emmett 892. 13.45g, 24mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

119

100


473. Antinous Æ Diobol of Alexandria, Egypt. Dated RY 19 of Hadrian = AD 134-135. ANTINOOY HPWOC, draped bust right, wearing hem-hem crown / Antinoüs on horseback to right holding caduceus, I-Θ below. Köln 1277; Dattari 2084; Emmett 1346. 23.34g, 34mm, 12h. Good Fine.

2,000

474. Antoninus Pius BI Tetradrachm of Alexandria, Egypt. Year 7 = AD 143/4. ΑΝΤωΝΙΝΟC CΕΒ ΕΥCΕΒ, laureate head right / Serapis in slow quadriga to left, LZ above. Dattari 2374; Geissen 1438; Milne 1753.12.56g, 23mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

200

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Nomos 8, 22 October 2013, lot 227.

475

476

475. Marcus Aurelius Æ Diassarion of the Koinon of Thessaly. AD 161-180. AYT M AYP ANTωNЄINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / KOINON ΘЄCCAΛωN, Athena Itonia striding right, hurling spear held in her right hand, shield on her left arm. Burrer, MA-G 2 var. (bust type); BCD Thessaly II 960.4 var. (legend breaks); BCD Thessaly I 1412 var. (as last); Rogers 95a. 12.13g, 24mm, 7h. Good Very Fine. 100 476. Marcus Aurelius, as Caesar, Æ27 of Philippopolis, Thrace. AD 139-161. M AYPH OYH-POC KAICAP, draped bust right / ΠΙΛΙΠΠΟ-ΠΟΛΕΙΤΩΝ, Nude Apollo standing to front, holding branch in left hand and patera over lighted altar with right. Varbanov 808 var. (bust and legend); cf. Moushmov 5128. 10.43g, 27mm, 7h. Good Very Fine. Apparently unpublished variant. 250

477. Lucius Verus AR Didrachm of Caesarea, Cappadocia. AD 161-166. AYTOKP OYHPOC CЄBACTOC, bare headed and cuirassed bust left / YΠATOC B, Mount Argaeus, with trees and star at summit. SNG Copenhagen - (cf. 249, bust right); BMC - (cf. 194). 6.89g, 21mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

300

478. Commodus Æ18 of Nicopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior. Circa AD 177-192. ΑVΤ ΚΑΙ AV ΚΟΜΟΔΟC, laureate head right / ΝΙΚΟΠΟΛΙ ΠΡΟC ICΤΟ, tripod with serpent entwined around two legs. Cf. Varbanov 2196; Moushmov 890; Pick 1250. 2.79g, 18mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare. From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

120

200


479. Julia Domna Æ26 of Philadelphia, Lydia. AD 193-217. ΙΟΥΛΙΑ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΗ, draped bust right / ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΕΩΝ, nude Apollo standing to right, tending a laurel tree; behind, a stele inscribed ΕΠΙ ΙΟΥΛΙΑΝ. SNG Copenhagen -; von Aulock -; BMC -; Imhoof-Blumer, Stadtmünzen p. 125, 40, and pl. V, 15. 8.29g, 6h, 26mm. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

500

An Amazon at Rest

480. Caracalla Æ33 of Amisus, Pontus. Year 241 = AD 209/10. ΑΝΤΩΝΙΝΟC CΕΒΑCΤ, laureate and cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield; countermark: capricorn / ΑΜΙCΟ ΕΛΕΩΘΕΡΑ, Amazon standing left gathering fruit, at foot of tree Amazonian shield and bipennis; in exergue, ETCMA. A. Malloy, The Coinage of Amisus, New York 1970, 161; for countermark: Howgego 299. 18.65g, 33mm, 7h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

500

The figure in this image can be identified as an Amazon on account of the axe and the shape of the shield set against the tree, which conforms to Roman ideals of Amazonian apparel. A close parallel may be found on a relief adorning a marble sarcophagus in the Capitoline museum (inv. scu 726), in which an Amazon battles Greeks armed with such a shield and double-bladed axe. Here we see this Amazon in a moment of rest, gathering fruit from a laden tree she has come upon. According to Apollonios of Rhodes’ in Argonautica, the mythical Amazons lived just to the east of Amisos in three towns near Themiscrya near the mouth of the Thermodon (modern Terme) river.

Extremely Rare Issue of Tarsus

481. Caracalla Æ34 of Tarsus, Cilicia. Circa AD 214-217. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ Μ ΑΥΡ CΕΟΥΗΡΟC ΑΝΤΩΝΕΙΝΟC CΕΒ Π Π, bust of Caracalla to right, wearing the diadem and robes of a Demiourgos / ΑΝΤΩΝΙΑΝΗC CΕYHP AΔP MHT TAPCOY AMK ΓB, Caracalla on horseback to left, right hand raised; before him stands Tyche, presenting him with the diadem of a Demiourgos. SNG France 1525. 17.34g, 34mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

1,250

482. Caracalla AR Tetradrachm of Tyre, Phoenicia. AD 213-217. AYT KAI ANTѠNINOC CЄ, laureate head right; beneath neck, eagle right passing head behind truncation; in right field, club with haft upwards / ΔHMAPX ЄΞ YΠATΔ, laureate head of Melkart right, lion skin around neck. Prieur 1543. 15.00g, 25mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

121

350


483. Caracalla AR Tetradrachm of Cyrrhus in Cyrrhestica, Syria. AD 215-217. AYT K MA ANTΩNINOC C, radiate and cuirassed bust left, holding shield and spear over left shoulder, with right hand raised / ΔHMAPX ЄΞ YΠATOΔ, eagle, head right, holding wreath in beak, standing on filleted thyrsus. Prieur 915. 12.19g, 25mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

250

Beautiful Portrait of Caracalla

484. Caracalla AR Tetradrachm of Laodicea ad Mare, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria. AD 205-207. AYT • KAI • ANTΩNЄINOC • C •, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / • ΔHMAPX • ЄΞ • VΠATOC • B •, eagle standing facing on ground line, head and tail right, with wings displayed, holding wreath in beak; star between legs. McAlee, Severan Group 1, 5; Prieur 1130. 13.00g, 27mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine, with a bold and expressive portrait. Lustrous metal.

4,000

485. Geta Æ34 of Mylasa, Caria. AD 198-209. ΠO CEΠTIMIOC ΓETA C KAIC, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right / MYΛA-CEΩN, statue of Zeus Labraundos within tetrastyle temple. SNG von Aulock 2630. 16.46g, 34mm, 6h. Very Fine.

500

486. Geta Æ23 of Dium, Arabia Petraea. AD 207-208. ΠCEΠ ΓETA C, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right / Haddad standing facing, holding eagle-tipped sceptre and Nike; recumbent bull to either side, WN upwards on right, date AOC downwards on left, ΔEIHN in exergue. Rosenberger 7; Spijkerman 8, pl. 24 (same dies); SNG ANS 1281. 9.31g, 23mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare, and in excellent condition for the type. Desert ‘patina’ added.

122

300


487. Severus Alexander Æ Medallion of Perinthos, Thrace. AD 222-235. AV K M AVP CEVH AΛEΞANΔPOC AVΓ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / ΠEPINΘIΩN ΔIC NEΩKOPΩN, Serapis, bearded, wearing long chiton and himation, standing facing, head left, with his right hand raised and holding long sceptre, lit altar to left. Varbanov 442. 36.58g, 42mm, 6h. Good Very Fine, lightly smoothed Very Rare.

500

488. Gordian III Æ25 of Gadara, Syrian Decapolis. AD 238-244. Dated CY 303 = AD 239/40. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Galley left with captain, seven oarsmen, and steersman on deck; ΓT (date) below. Spijkerman 93; Rosenberger 90; SNG ANS 1332-8. 14.14g, 25mm, 2h. Very Fine.

100

489. Otacilia Severa Æ23 of Deultum, Thrace. AD 244-249. Draped Bust right / Concordia-Homonoia with patera and Cornucopia standing left. Varbanov 3057. 7.70g, 23mm, 2h. Good Very Fine.

200

Ex Gorny & Mosch 204, 5 March 2012, lot 1702.

Unique Tetradrachm of Uranius Antoninus

490. Uranius Antoninus BI Tetradrachm. Emesa, Syria. AD 253-254. AYTOK COYΛΠ ANTWNINOC CE, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / ΔHMAPX EΞ OVCIAC VΠATO, Eagle standing facing, head and tail left, with wings spread, holding wreath in beak; S–C below wings, B in exergue. Unpublished in the standard references, cf. Prieur 1060 for similar with eagle’s head and tail to right. 13.62g, 26mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Unique and unpublished.

123

5,000


COINS OF THE ROMAN REPUBLIC

491. Anonymous AR Didrachm. South Italy (Neapolis?), 300-276 BC. Bearded head of Mars left, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; oak spray behind / Head of bridled horse right, [ROMANO inscribed on base]; stalk of grain behind. Crawford 13/1; Sydenham 1; HN Italy 266. 18mm, 7.39g, 9h. Near Very Fine. Rare.

750

492. Anonymous AR Drachm. Rome, circa 234-231 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Horse prancing left, ROMA above. Sydenham 28; Crawford 26/2; HN Italy 307. 3.19g, 15mm, 8h. Near Very Fine. Extremely Rare, only the third example to appear at auction in thirty years.

493

1,000

494

493. Anonymous AR Didrachm (Quadrigatus). Uncertain mint, 225-214 BC. Laureate head of Janus / Jupiter, holding thunderbolt and sceptre in quadriga right, driven by Victory; ROMA incuse on tablet below. Crawford 28/3; Sydenham 64; RSC 24. 5.90g, 23mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

500

494. Anonymous AR Didrachm (Quadrigatus). Rome, circa 225-214 BC. Laureate head of Janus / Jupiter, hurling thunderbolt and holding sceptre, in galloping quadriga right driven by Victory; ROMA in relief within linear frame. Crawford 28/3; Sydenham 65; RSC 24. 6.75g, 20mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. 750

495

496

495. Anonymous AR Didrachm (Quadrigatus). Rome, circa 225-214 BC. Laureate head of Janus / Jupiter, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, in quadriga to right, driven by Victory; ROMA incuse on tablet below. Crawford 28/3; Sydenham 64; RSC 23. 6.65g, 24mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine. 1,000 496. Anonymous AR Didrachm (Quadrigatus). Rome, circa 225-214 BC. Laureate head of Janus / Jupiter, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, in quadriga to right, driven by Victory; ROMA incuse on tablet below. Crawford 28/3; Sydenham 64; RSC 23. 6.66g, 24mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine. 1,000

497. Anonymous Æ Aes Grave Quadrans. Circa. 225-217 BC. Reduced libral standard. Head of Hercules left, wearing lion skin headdress, three pellets below / Prow of galley left, ear of barley above, three pellets below. Vecchi ICC 98; Haeberlin pl. 45, 3; Sydenham –; Thurlow-Vecchi 66b; Crawford 40/1a. 32.25g, 33mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare - only two examples on CoinArchives.

124

750


498. Anonymous AR Quinarius. Rome, from 211 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind / The Dioscuri riding right, ROMA within linear frame. Crawford 44/6. 1.97g, 18mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone.

300

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

A Selection of Exceptional Quality Quinarii

499

500

499. Anonymous AR Quinarius. After 211 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, V behind / The Dioscuri riding right, stars above, ROMA in linear frame below. Sydenham 141; Crawford 44/6. 2.23g, 15mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. 750 500. Anonymous AR Quinarius. After 211 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, V behind / The Dioscuri riding right, stars above, ROMA in linear frame below. Sydenham 141; Crawford 44/6. 2.43g, 15mm, 10h. Fleur De Coin. 750

501

502

501. Anonymous AR Quinarius. Rome, from 211 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; V behind / The Dioscuri on horseback to right, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 44/6; Sydenham 141; RSC 3. 1.81g, 14mm, 5h. Fleur De Coin. 750 502. Anonymous AR Quinarius. Rome, from 211 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; V behind / The Dioscuri on horseback to right, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 44/6; Sydenham 141; RSC 3. 2.50g, 13mm, 2h. Fleur De Coin. 750

503. Anonymous AR Quinarius. Rome, from 211 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; V behind / The Dioscuri on horseback to right, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 44/6; Sydenham 141; RSC 3. Fleur De Coin.

750

504. Anonymous AR Quinarius. Rome, from 211 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; V behind / The Dioscuri on horseback to right, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 44/6; Sydenham 141; RSC 3. 2.21g, 15mm, 5h. Fleur De Coin.

125

1,000


A Beautiful Gold Issue of the Republic

505. Roman Republic AV 60 Asses. Circa 211-207 BC. Bearded and draped head of Mars right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; LX (mark of value) below / Eagle standing to right on thunderbolt with spread wings; ROMA below. Bahrfeldt 4; Sydenham 226; Crawford 44/2. 3.36g, 14mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine.

7,500

Ex Triton II, 1 December 1998, lot 688.

506. Anonymous AR Denarius. Rome, 207 BC. Head of Roma right, wearing winged helmet ornamented with griffin’s head, X behind / The Dioscuri on horseback to right, each holding couched spear; crescent above, ROMA in relief in linear frame below. Crawford 57/2; Sydenham 219; RSC 20i. 4.36g, 21mm, 10h. Near Mint State.

507

500

508

507. Anonymous AR Victoriatus. Sicily, circa 211-208. Laureate head of Jupiter right / Victory standing right, crowning trophy; below ROMA. Sydenham 83; RRCH 54; Crawford 70/1. 3.30g, 18mm, 2h. Good Very Fine, some areas of flat striking.

300

508. Anonymous AR Victoriatus. Sicily, circa 211-208. Laureate head of Jupiter right / Victory standing right, crowning trophy; below ROMA. Sydenham 83; RRCH 54; Crawford 70/1. 3.14g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine, some areas of flat striking.

300

509. C. Poblicius Q. f. AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 80 BC. Draped bust of Roma right, helmet decorated with corn ears and control mark above head, ROMA behind / Hercules strangling the Nemean lion, club at his feet, bow and arrow on left, C. POBLICI. Q. F on right. Poblicia 9; Crawford 80/1; Sydenham 768. 3.91g, 20mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine. Lustrous.

126

900


510

511

510. Anonymous AR Victoriatus. Rome, 211-208 BC. Laureate bust of Jupiter right / Victory standing right, crowning trophy, VB in field, ROMA in exergue. Crawford 95/1b; Sydenham 113. 3.21g, 17mm, 10h. Very Fine. 500 511. Furius Purpurio AR Denarius. Rome, 169-158 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind / Luna in a biga right, PVR below horses, murex shell above, ROMA within linear frame in exergue. Crawford 187/1; Sydenham 424. 3.24g, 19mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful old tone with iridescent highlights. 500 The murex shell symbol makes a punning allusion to the moneyer’s name. The shells, found mainly around the southern Mediterranean coastline, were left to decompose and the purple ink which resulted was used to make purple dye. This dye was highly valued throughout the ancient world, and used in Rome to colour the senatorial togas.

512. C. Scribonius AR Denarius. Rome, 154 BC. Helmeted head of Roma, X behind / The Dioscuri riding right, C. SCR below; ROMA in linear frame. Crawford 201/1; Sydenham 380; Kestner 1927, 1930; BMC Rome 730-2; Scribonia 1. 3.89g, 18mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. Stunningly vivid flame-like iridescence. A fitting aura for these divinities.

1,000

Ex Roma Numismatics IV, 30 September 2012, lot 449 (ÂŁ4,200).

513

514

513. Ti. Minucius C. f. Augurinus AR Denarius. Rome, 134 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; mark of value behind / TI MINVCI C.F. AVGVRINI, ionic column surmounted by statue; at base, two stalks of grain; on left, L. Minucius Augurinus standing right, holding patera, foot on modius; on right, M. Minucius standing left, holding lituus, around ROMA,. Crawford 243/1; Sydenham 494; Minucia 9. 3.94g, 19mm, 2h. Very Fine. 150 514. M. Marcius M. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 134 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, XVI monogram below chin, modius behind / Victory in biga right, M MARC ROMA in two lines below horses, divided by two ears of corn. Marcia 8; Crawford 245/1; Sydenham 500. 3.96g, 19mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine. 500

515

516

515. L. Minucius AR Denarius. Rome, 133 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; XVI mark of value behind / Jupiter driving galloping quadriga right, hurling thunderbolt and holding sceptre; ROMA below, L. MINVCI in exergue. Crawford 248/1; Sydenham 470; Minucia 15. 3.95, 20mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. 250 From the Mark Gibbons Collection. 516. Q. Caecilius Metellus AR Denarius. Rome, 130 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; mark of value below chin / Jupiter driving triumphal quadriga right, holding palm frond, reins, and thunderbolt. Crawford 256/1; Sydenham 509; Caecilia 21. 3.93g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 300

127


517. Q. Fabius Maximus AR Denarius. Rome, 127 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, XVI monogram below chin, ROMA behind and Q MAX before / Cornucopiae superimposed on thunderbolt, all within wreath. Crawford 265/1; Fabia 5; Sydenham 478; Catalli 358. 3.92g, 18mm, 2h. Good Extremely Fine.

400

518. L. Cosconius, L. Licinius and Cn. Domitius AR Serrate Denarius. Narbo, 118 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind, L COS CO M F around / Warrior in biga right, holding shield, carnyx and reins, hurling spear, L LIC CN DOM in exergue. Crawford 282/2. 3.92g, 20mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

300

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

519. D Junius L. f. Silanus AR Denarius. Rome, 91 BC. Diademed bust of Salus right, SALVS below, C before, all within torque / Victory in biga right; ROMA beneath; D SILANVS in exergue. Crawford 337/2c; Sydenham 645. 3.96g, 18mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

350

Privately purchased from MĂźnzzentrum in 1976.

520. Gargilius, Ogulnius and Vergilius AR Denarius. Rome, circa 86 BC. Head of Apollo right, wearing oak wreath; thunderbolt below / Jupiter in quadriga to right, holding reins and hurling thunderbolt, control mark above; GAR below, OGVL VER in exergue. Gargilia 1; Ogulnia 5 and Vergilia 3; Sydenham 721; Crawford 350A/1a. 3.70g, 19mm, 3h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

300

521. C. Norbanus AR Denarius. Rome, 83 BC. Diademed head of Venus right, C. NORBANVS below, LVII behind / Ear of barley, fasces, and caduceus. Crawford 357/1b; Sydenham 739. 3.92g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. 500 Ex Harlan J Berk 166, 15 October 2009, lot 241.

522. P. Crepusius AR Denarius. Rome, 82 BC. Laureate bust of Apollo right, control symbols before and behind / Horseman right, brandishing spear; control-numeral behind; P•CREPVSI in exergue. Sydenham 738a; Crawford 361/1c. 4.07g, 17mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. 400

128


523

524

523. C. Mamilius Limetanus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 82 BC. Bust of Mercury right, draped and wearing winged petasos; caduceus and M behind / C•MAMIL LIMETAN, Ulysses walking right, holding staff in left hand and extending right hand to Argus. Crawford 362/1; Sydenham 471 ; Mamilia 6. 3.77g, 19mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine. 400 The Mamilia gens pretended to derive its origin from Mamilia, the daughter of Telegonus, the reputed son of Ulysses and Circe, and thus C. Mamilius, as monetal triumvir, caused this subject to be adopted on his coins. The reverse shows Ulysses, after a long absence, returning in beggar’s dress to Ithaca, where he was recognised at once by his old dog, Argus, who died of joy at seeing his former master. 524. C. Mamilius Limetanus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 82 BC. Bust of Mercury right, draped and wearing winged petasos; caduceus and M behind / C•MAMIL LIMETAN, Ulysses walking right, holding staff in left hand and extending right hand to Argus. Crawford 362/1; Sydenham 471 ; Mamilia 6. 3.73g, 18mm, 9h. Extremely Fine, excellent quality. Lightly Toned. 1,000

525. L. Censorinus AR Denarius. Rome, 82 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Marsyas standing left, holding wineskin over shoulder; to right, column surmounted by statue of Minerva (?) standing left; L. CENSOR down left. Crawford 363/1d; Sydenham 737; Kestner 3154; BMCRR Rome 2657; Marcia 24. 3.84g, 19mm, 3h. Extremely Fine.

300

526. L. Cornelius Sulla and L. Manlius Torquatus AR Denarius. Rome, 82 BC. L MANLI PRO Q, head of Roma facing right, helmeted / Sulla as triumphator, crowned by Victory, in quadriga right, holding reins and a caduceus; L SVLLA IM in exergue. Crawford 367/3; Sydenham 759; RBW 1384; RCV 287. 3.81g, 19mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

250

527. A. Postumius A. f. Sp. n. Albinus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 81 BC. Draped bust of Diana right, with bow and quiver over shoulder, bucranium above / Togate figure standing left on rock, holding aspergillum over bull, between them, lighted altar, A POST A F S N ALBIN around. Postumia 7; Sydenham 745; Crawford 372/1. 4.06g, 19mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

400

528. A. Postumius A. f. Sp. n. Albinus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 81 BC. Veiled head of Hispania right, HISPAN behind / Togate figure standing left, raising hand; legionary eagle to left; fasces with axe to right. Crawford 372/2; RSC Postumia 8. 4.05g, 19mm, 4h. Extremely Fine.

From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

129

400


529. L. Cornelius Sulla AR Denarius. Uncertain mint, 81 BC. Diademed head of Venus right, E behind / EX – SC, Cornucopiae, all within wreath. Cornelia 44; Sydenham 763; Crawford 376/1. 3.48g, 18mm, 5h. Very Fine. Scrape on reverse edge.

1,000

530. L. Procilius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 80 BC. Bust of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin; S•C behind / Juno Sospita driving biga right, holding spear and shield; serpent below; L•PROCILLI•F in exergue. Crawford 379/2; Sydenham 772; Procilia 2. 4.03g, 19mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

400

531. C. Naevius Balbus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Diademed bust of Venus right; S•C behind / Victory in triga right, control number above; C•NAE•BALB in exergue. Crawford 382/1a; Sydenham 769. 3.78g, 19mm, 3h. Fleur De Coin. Beautiful old tone with pleasant iridescent highlights.

500

532. L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; aplustre behind / Griffin springing right; prow of galley below. Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1. 3.98g, 18mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Pleasant toning.

500

533. L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 79 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat’s skin; symbol behind / Griffin springing right; symbol below. Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1. 3.93g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautiful iridescent toning.

1,250

534. L. Rustius AR Denarius. Rome, 76 BC. Helmeted head of Mars right, S•C behind; XVI monogram below chin / Ram standing right, L•RVSTI below. Crawford 389/1; Sydenham 782; Rustia 1. 3.90g, 18mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

130

400


535

536

535. L. Lucretius Trio AR Denarius. Rome, 74 BC. Laureate head of Neptune right, trident at shoulder and control number behind / Infant Genius riding dolphin right; L. LVCRETI TRIO in two lines below. Crawford 390/2; Sydenham 784; Lucretia 3. 3.76g, 17mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine. Very well detailed reverse. 750 536. L. Plaetorius L. f. Cestianus AR Denarius. Rome, 74 BC. Diademed and draped bust of Juno Moneta right, MONETA behind / Victorious boxer running right, holding caestus and palm branch, L PLAETORI to left, L F Q SC to right, control mark below. Sydenham 792a; Crawford 396/1b. 3.44g, 18mm, 5h. Good Fine. Rare. 200 From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

537. Mn. Aquillius Mn. f. Mn. n. AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 71 BC. Helmeted bust of Virtus right, VIRTVS III VIR around / The consul Manius Aquillius standing facing, holding shield and raising slumped Sicilian by the arm; MN AQVIL right; MN F MN N left; SICIL in exergue. Crawford 401/1; Sydenham 798. 4.00g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, attractively toned.

300

The moneyer was probably the son of Manius Aquillius, who shared the consulship with Gaius Marius in 101 BC. Following the consulship, Aquillius was sent to crush the slave revolt in Sicily. He completely subdued the insurgents, and earned a triumph in Rome in 100 BC. In 98 BC, Lucius Fufius accused Aquillius of corruption during his governance of Sicily. In the trial he was defended by Marcus Antonius Orator (the grandfather of Marc Antony), and despite overwhelming evidence against him, he was acquitted as a result of his military achievements. Cf. Plutarch, The Life of Marius.

538

539

538. Q. Fufius Kalenus and Mucius Scaevola Cordus AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 70 BC. Jugate heads right of Honos, laureate, and Virtus, wearing crested helmet; KALENI below; HO behind; VIRT before / Italia standing right holding cornucopiae, and Roma standing left, foot on globe and holding sceptre, clasping hands; winged caduceus and ITAL behind Italia; RO behind Roma, CORDI in exergue. Crawford 403/1; Sydenham 797; Fufia 1. 3.83g, 20mm, 5h. Scratches on obverse, otherwise about Good Very Fine. 300 539. M. Sergius Silus AR Brockage Denarius. Rome 116-115 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right; ROMA and XVI monogram behind / negative of obverse. Crawford 286/1; RSC Sergia 1. 3.94g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

540

150

541

540. M. Plaetorius M. f. Cestianus AR Denarius. Rome, 69 BC. Male head right, with flowing hair, control mark behind / Winged caduceus, M PLAETORI on left, CEST EX SC on right. Crawford 405/5. 3.70g, 18mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive underlying lustre.

500

541. Q. Pomponius Musa AR Denarius. Rome, 66 BC. Laureate head of Apollo, star behind / Urania standing left, holding rod and pointing to globe resting on tripod, Q POMPONI on right, MVSA on left. Crawford 410/8. 3.90g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. 750

131


ERATO, RAREST OF THE MUSES

542. Q. Pomponius Musa AR Denarius. Rome, 56 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, wearing hair rolled back and loose locks over forehead; flower on stem behind / Erato, the Muse of Erotic Poetry, standing slightly right, head facing, wearing long flowing tunic and peplum, playing lyre; Q • POMPONI to left, MVSA to right. Crawford 410/6; Sydenham 814; Kestner -; BMC 3612; Pomponia 12. 3.67g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Light graffito and edge flaw on obverse. Extremely Rare, one of very few examples.

15,000

Q. Pomponius Musa’s issue of coinage featuring the Muses of Greek mythology are a pun alluding to the moneyer’s name. Of all the nine Muses, coins featuring Erato, the Muse of Erotic Poetry, are far rarer than any other. Seemingly based on the celebrated group of statues by an unknown Greek hand from Ambracia, which were brought to Rome by M. Fulvius Nobilior after his capture and plunder of the city in 189 BC, these statues were the centrepiece of the temple built by him after his triumph in 187. The remains of the Aedes Herculis Musarum have been found situated near the Circus Flaminius, where an inscription has been found during excavation that attests to their presence.

543

544

543. L. Marcius Philippus AR Denarius. Rome, 56 BC. Head of Ancus Marcius right, wearing diadem, lituus behind, ANCVS below / Aqueduct on which stands equestrian statue, flower at horse’s feet, PHILIPPVS to left, AQVA MAR ligate within arches of aqueduct. Crawford 425/1. 3.94g, 18mm, 5h. Good Very Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone. 300 From the Andrew McCabe Collection. 544. Q. Cassius Longinus AR Denarius. Rome, 55 BC. Head of Libertas right / Curule chair within temple of Vesta; urn to left, voting tablet inscribed AC (Absolvo Condemno) to right. Crawford 428/2; Sydenham 918; Cassia 8. 3.52g, 19mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. 350

545. Cn. Plancius AR Denarius. Rome, 55 BC. Head of Diana Planciana right, wearing petasus, CN. PLANCIVS AED CVR S.C / Cretan ibex standing right, bow and quiver behind. Plancia 1; Crawford 432/1; Sydenham 933. 3.93g, 18mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine.

132

500


546. Q. Servilius Caepio (M. Junius) Brutus AR Denarius. Rome, 54 BC. Bare head of L. Junius Brutus right; BRVTVS downward to left / Bare head of C. Servilius Ahala right; AHALA downward to left. Crawford 433/2; Sydenham 907; Junia 30; Kestner 3487-9; BMCRR Rome 3864-7; RBW 1543. 3.45g, 20mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

750

Ex Tradart, 18 November 1993, lot 179; Ex Frederick Knobloch Collection, Stack’s, 3 May 1978, lot 512.

547. T. Carisius AR Denarius. Rome, 46 BC. Head of Sibyl Herophile right, hair elaborately decorated with jewels and enclosed in a sling and tied with bands / Sphinx seated right. Crawford 464/1; CRI 69; Sydenham 983b; Carisia 11a. 4.25g, 19mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Very well detailed for the type, and (unusually) bearing complete designs on both obverse and reverse.

750

548. Lollius Palikanus AR Denarius. Rome, 45 BC. Laureate head of Honos right, HONORIS downwards behind / Curule chair between two grain-ears, PALIKANVS above. Crawford 473/2; CRI 87; Sydenham 961; Lollia 1. 4.04g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

750

549. L. Mussidius Longus AR Denarius. Rome, 42 BC. Veiled head of Concordia right, XVI monogram below chin, CONCORDIA behind / Shrine of Venus Cloacina, inscribed CLOACIN, L MVSSIDIVS LONGVS above. Crawford 494/42b; BMC 4244; Sydenham 1093a. 4.14g, 20mm, 7h. Good Very Fine.

400

550. C. Vibius Varus AR Denarius. Rome, 42 BC. Bust of Minerva right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet and aegis / Hercules, naked, standing left, resting right hand on club set on ground and holding lion skin over left arm; C • VIBIVS downwards on right, VARVS downwards on left. Crawford 494/38; CRI 194; Sydenham 1140; Kestner 3748-9; BMCRR Rome 4303-5: Vibia 26. 3.79g, 20mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

133

500


COINS OF THE IMPERATORS

551. Q. Metellus Pius Scipio AR Denarius. African mint, 47-46 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right, beard and hair in ringlets / Elephant walking right, SCIPIO above, IMP in exergue. Crawford 459/1; Caecilia 47. 4.04g, 16mm, 12h. Very Fine.

400

552. Sextus Pompey AR Denarius. Spanish mint, 45 BC. Head of Pompey Magnus right, SEX MAGN before, IMP behind, SAL below / Pietas standing left, holding palm and sceptre, PIETAS behind. Crawford 477/1b. 3.20g, 19mm, 9h. Good Fine. Extremely Rare.

300

Ex Andrew McCabe Collection.

Rare Sextus Pomey Denarius

553. Sextus Pompey AR Denarius. Massilia, 44-43 BC. Bare head of Pompey Magnus right, NEPTVNI behind, trident before, dolphin swimming to right below / Galley with billowing sail and bank of rowers moving to right, star in left field, Q NASIDIVS below. Sear 235; Crawford 483/2; Sydenham 1350; RSC 20. 3.80g, 19mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

1,500

554. Sextus Pompey AR Denarius. Sicily, 42-40 BC. The Pharos of Messana surmounted by a statue of Neptune; in foreground, galley left adorned with legionary eagle, sceptre and trident; MAG PIVS IMP ITER around / Scylla left, wielding a rudder in both hands; PRÆF CLAS ET ORÆ MARIT EX SC around. Crawford 511/4; Sydenham 1348; Sear, Imperators 335. 3.92g, 19mm, 3h. Areas of flatness, otherwise Extremely Fine. Ex Randy Haviland Collection; Ex UBS Auction 55, 16 September 2002, lot 1866.

134

1,500


555. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 49-48 BC. Elephant advancing right, trampling on serpent; CAESAR in exergue / Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, securis (surmounted by wolf’s head), and apex. Sear 9; Crawford 443/1; CRI 9; Sydenham 1006; RSC 49; Kestner 3515-20; BMCRR Gaul 27-30; RBW 1557. 3.95g, 16mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine.

750

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

556. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 49-48 BC. Elephant advancing right, trampling on serpent; CAESAR in exergue / Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, securis (surmounted by wolf’s head), and apex. Sear 9; Crawford 443/1; Sydenham 1006; RSC 49; Kestner 3515-20; BMCRR Gaul 27-30; RBW 1557. 3.95g, 18mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,000

557. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 49-48 BC. Elephant advancing right, trampling on serpent; CAESAR in exergue / Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, securis (surmounted by wolf’s head), and apex. Sear 9; Crawford 443/1; Sydenham 1006; RSC 49; Kestner 3515-20; BMCRR Gaul 27-30; RBW 1557. 3.93g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,000

558. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 49-48 BC. Elephant advancing right, trampling on serpent; CAESAR in exergue / Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, securis (surmounted by wolf’s head), and apex. Sear 9; Crawford 443/1; Sydenham 1006; RSC 49; Kestner 3515-20; BMCRR Gaul 27-30; RBW 1557. 3.80g, 19mm, 7h. Near Mint State, obv. slightly off-centre.

1,000

559. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 49-48 BC. Elephant advancing right, trampling on serpent; CAESAR in exergue / Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, securis (surmounted by wolf’s head), and apex. Sear 9; Crawford 443/1; Sydenham 1006; RSC 49; Kestner 3515-20; BMCRR Gaul 27-30; RBW 1557. 3.84g, 18mm, 7h. Near Mint State.

1,000

560. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 49-48 BC. Elephant advancing right, trampling on serpent; CAESAR in exergue / Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, securis (surmounted by wolf’s head), and apex. Sear 9; Crawford 443/1; Sydenham 1006; RSC 49; Kestner 3515-20; BMCRR Gaul 27-30; RBW 1557. 3.83g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautifully lustrous surfaces.

135

1,500


Beautiful Julius Caesar Denarius

561. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Travelling military mint, 48-47 BC. Laureate head of Pietas right; LII behind / Trophy of Gallic arms; axe surmounted by an animal’s head to right; CAESAR below. Crawford 452/2; Sear 11; Sydenham 1009. 3.89g, 19mm, 10h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,200

Ex Gorny & Mosch 200, 10 October 2011, lot 2378. Ex H. D. Rauch 85, 26 November 2009, lot 316. Since the numerals behind the head of Pietas have long been recognized to represent Caesar’s age at the time, this denarius was struck shortly after the battle of Pharsalus, where Pompey met his ultimate defeat, and Caesar became master of Rome. The reverse deliberately references Caesar’s Gallic victories, rather than his recent victory over fellow Romans, the celebration of which would have been distasteful; Caesar’s conduct after the battle was similarly conciliatory - he forgave the large part of Pompey’s officers and army. The depiction of Pietas wearing the corona civica, or oak wreath, however, may be a subtle allusion to his Pompeian victory. This award was granted to any citizen who had personally saved the life of another citizen; in this case, Caesar had saved the citizen-body of Rome and the Empire from further civil war.

562. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. African mint, 47 BC. Diademed bust of Venus right / Aeneas advancing left, carrying palladium in right hand and Anchises on left shoulder; CAESAR to right. Julia 10; Crawford 458/1; Sydenham 1013; Sear 55. 3.95g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

563. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. African mint, 47 BC. Diademed bust of Venus right / Aeneas advancing left, carrying palladium in right hand and Anchises on left shoulder; CAESAR to right. Julia 10; Crawford 458/1; Sydenham 1013; Sear 55. 3.89g, 19mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned. Ex Schweizer Kreditanstalt, 1981, lot 60.

136

500

750


564. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. African mint, 47 BC. Diademed bust of Venus right / Aeneas advancing left, carrying palladium in right hand and Anchises on left shoulder; CAESAR to right. Julia 10; Crawford 458/1; Sydenham 1013; Sear 55. 3.89g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Lightly toned.

750

565. M. Junius Brutus AR Denarius. Rome, 54 BC. Bust of Libertas right, LIBERTAS behind / Consul L. Junius Brutus, between two lictors, preceded by accensus, all walking left; BRVTVS in exergue. Sydenham 906; Crawford 433/1; Junia 31. 3.64g, 20mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine, minor marks on obverse.

500

566. M. Junius Brutus and L. Sestius AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Brutus (Smyrna?), 43-42 BC. L. SESTI PRO Q, head of Libertas, draped and wearing veil / Q CAEPIO BRVTVS PRO COS, tripod, axe on left, simpulum on right. Crawford 502/2; Sydenham 1290; Sear 201. 3.80g, 17mm, 12h. Extremely Fine, some deposits.

750

567. M. Junius Brutus AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Brutus in Asia Minor, 42 BC. Veiled, draped bust of Libertas right; L SESTI PRO Q around; P in left field / Tripod between sacrificial axe and simpulum, all within beaded border; Q CAEPIO BRVTVS PRO COS around. Junia 37; Sydenham 1290; Crawford 502/2. 3.73g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

568. C. Cassius Longinus and P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Brutus (Smyrna?), 43-42 BC. C. CASSI IMP, tripod with cauldron, decorated with two laurel-branches / LENTVLVS SPINT, jug and lituus. Crawford 500/1; Sydenham 1308; Sear 201. 3.83g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 1,250 From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group E-Auction 248, 26 January 2011, lot 353.

137


138


Well Preserved Marc Antony and Octavian

569. Marc Antony and Octavian AV Aureus. M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetore. Mint moving with Antony (Ephesus ?), spring – summer 41 BC. M·ANT·IMP AVG III VIR·R·P·C M·BARBAT·Q·P, bare head of M. Antony right / CAESAR·IMP·PONT·III·VIR·R·P·C, bare head of Octavian right. Babelon Antonia 50 and Barbatia 1; C. 7; Bahrfeldt 77; Sydenham 1180; Sear Imperators 242; Calicó 109; Crawford 517/1a. 8.15g, 21mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine, very well preserved for the type. Rare.

25,000

Struck in the East in the period of relative peace following the Triumvirate’s defeat of Brutus and Cassius, this aureus represents a reaffirmation of the bond between the victors. It also demonstrates the improvement of Octavian’s standing within the Triumvirate itself, as he now received Spain, which was taken from Lepidus. Lepdius was then reduced to holding only Africa, and he assumed a clearly tertiary role in the Triumvirate; his portraits on Roman coinage, already few in number, disappear entirely.

570. Marc Antony and Octavian AR Denarius. M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetore. Military mint moving with Antony (Ephesus?), 41 BC. M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P, bare head of Marc Antony right / CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right, with slight beard, right. Sear 243; Crawford 517/2; Sydenham 1181. 3.82g, 18mm, 1h. Extremely Fine.

1,250

Ex A. Tkalec, 27 October 2011, 156.

571. Marc Antony and Octavian AR Denarius. M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetore. Military mint moving with Antony (Ephesus?), 41 BC. M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P, bare head of Marc Antony right / CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian, with slight beard, right. Sear 243; Crawford 517/2; Sydenham 1181. 3.82g, 21mm, 11h. About Extremely Fine. Light iridescent toning.

139

1,500


140


Extremely Rare Marc Antony

572.

Marc Antony and Lucius Antony AV Aureus. M. Cocceius Nerva, proquaestor pro praetore. Mint moving with Antony (Ephesus ?), spring – summer 41 BC. M·ANT·IMP·AVG VIR·R·P C·M·NERVA PRO Q·P, bare head of Marc Antony / L·ANTONIVS COS, bare head of Lucius Antony to right. Bahrfeldt 80 var. (III VIR); Sydenham 1184 var. (same); C 2 var. (same); Sear Imperators 245a; Calicó 111; Crawford 517/4b. 8.13g, 22mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. An extremely rare variant (only 6 specimens known) of an already extremely rare type; in exceptional condition for the issue, and certainly finer than the example of NAC 250, 18 November 2013, lot 250 (CHF 350,000).

50,000

Following the victory at Philippi over the Liberators Brutus and Cassius, Antony assumed direct control of the East. Ruling from Ephesus as a king in all but name, he consolidated Rome’s hegemony in the East, receiving envoys from Rome’s client kingdoms and intervening in their dynastic affairs, extracting enormous financial ‘gifts’ from them in the process. Meanwhle Octavian had returned to the West, tasked with the difficult and unpopular job of assigning land grants to the demobilised legionaries. Since there was insufficient state-controlled land to fulfil the alotments to the veterans, Octavian was faced with the difficult choice of alienating the citizen-body by confiscating private land, or alienating many Roman soldiers who might back a military rebellion against the Triumvirate’s rule. Octavian chose the former; as many as eighteen Roman towns through Italy were affected by the confiscations, with entire populations driven out. Exploiting the hostile sentiments of the Senate over the issue of the land grants, Antony’s wife Fulvia schemed with Antony’s younger brother Lucius, who was consul that year. Together they encouraged the Senate to oppose Octavian’s land policies; Fulvia it seems hoped to delay the land settlements until Antony returned to Rome, so that he could share credit and the gratitude of the soldiers. The conflict between Octavian and Fulvia caused great political and social unrest throughout Italy. Tensions escalated into open war when Octavian divorced Clodia Pulchra, Fulvia’s daughter from her first husband. Together Fulvia and Lucius raised an army to oppose Octavian militarily. They raised eight legions and held Rome for a brief time before being forced to retreat to Perugia. Lucius had expected that his brother’s legions in Gaul would come to their aid, but Antony, facing the grave political embarrassment caused by Fulvia’s actions, gave no instructions to his legions. Octavian laid siege to the city, eventually causing it to surrender out of starvation. While Octavian pardoned Lucius for his role in the war and even granted him the governorship of Spain, Fulvia was exiled along with her children to Sicyon in Greece. Struck in early 41 BC prior to Lucius and Fulvia taking up arms against Octavian, this extremely rare aureus type, which was accompanied by a significant issue of denarii, is evidence of Antony’s pride at his younger brother’s assumption of the consulship.

141


573

574

573. Marc Antony AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony, 41 BC. Head of Marc Antony right, lituus behind, M ANTONIVS IMP III VIR R P C around / Pietas standing left, holding turibulum and cornucopiae upon which two storks perch, PIETAS - COS across fields. Crawford 516/5. 3.70g, 19mm, 12h. Good Fine. 250 From the Andrew McCabe Collection. 574. Marc Antony AR Denarius. Uncertain (Corcyra?) mint, Summer 40 BC. Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus, imperator. Bare head right; lituus to left; ANT • IMP • III • VIR • R • P • C around / CN • DOMIT • AHENOBARBVS IMP, Prow right; star of sixteen rays above; CN • DOMIT • AHENOBARBVS IMP around. Crawford 521/2; CRI 258; RSC 10a; Sydenham 1179; Kestner -; BMCRR East 112. 3.62g, 19mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

575

750

576

575. Marc Antony AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Patrae?), 32-31 BC. ANT. AVG. III. VIR. R. P. C, praetorian galley to right / LEG VI, Aquila between two standards. RSC 33; Crawford 544/19; Sydenham 1223. 3.62g, 17mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 500 576. Marc Antony Legionary AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Patrae?), 32-31 BC. Praetorian galley to right / CHORTIS SPECVLATORVM, three legionary standards, each decorated with prow and two wreaths. Crawford 544/12. 3.68g, 16mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine. Rare. 750 One of the rarest of the legionary denarii, this issue pays tribute to Antony’s speculatores. The cohortis speculatorum was a selection of the ablest naval soldiers formed into a single force, whose main role was to accompany Antony on his nautical explorations, acting in some sense as a personal guard. The prows decorating the three standards refer to the original role of the speculatores as mounted soldiers positioned on an elevated part of the ship from where they were able to look out.

577. Octavian AR Denarius. Uncertain Italian mint (Brundisium or Rome?), 30-29 BC. Bare head right / Military trophy facing, composed of helmet, cuirass, shield and crossed spears, set on prow of galley right; crossed rudder and anchor at base; IMP CAESAR across fields. CRI 419; RIC 265a; RSC 119; BMCRE 625 = BMCRR Rome 4352; BN 57-63. 3.65g, 21mm, 9h. About Extremely Fine.

1,500

578. Octavian AR Denarius. Rome, 28 BC. Laureate bust of Apollo of Actium right, with features of Octavian / Octavian, veiled and in priestly robes, ploughing right with team of oxen; IMP•CAESAR in exergue. RIC 272; BMC 638; RSC 117. 3.66g, 18mm, 4h. Good Very Fine. Attractively toned.

500

579. Octavian AR Imitative Denarius. 28 BC or later. CAESAR (S retrograde) COV VI, bare head right, lituus behind / Crocodile standing right, jaws open; AEGYPTO above, CAPTA below. cf. Sear, Imperators 430; cf. BMC 650; cf. BN 905; cf. C. 2; cf. RIC 275a; Davis A/1b; Gemini X, 13 January 2013, 539 (same dies). 3.82g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

142

1,000


143


COINS OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE

580. Augustus AR Denarius. Spanish mint (Tarraco?), circa 20-16 BC. Laureate head right / Two laurel trees, CAESAR above, AVGVSTVS below. RIC 51; RSC 47. 3.84g, 18mm, 5h. Very Fine.

300

581. Augustus AR Denarius. Spanish mint (Colonia Caesaraugusta?), 19-18 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS, head left, wearing oak wreath / Eight-rayed comet with tail upwards, DIVVS IVLIVS across fields. RIC I 37b; RSC 97; BMCRE 326-7 = BMCRR Gaul 138-9; BN 1298-304. 3.64g, 21mm, 4h. Near Extremely Fine.

3,000

Privately purchased from Tradart.

582. Augustus AR Denarius. Spanish mint (Colonia Caesaraugusta?), 19-18 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS, head right, wearing oak wreath / Eight-rayed comet with tail upwards, DIVVS IVLIVS across fields. RIC 37a; C. 98; BMC 323; BN 1292. 3.95g, 21mm, 4h. Good Very Fine.

750

Ex Cayón Numismática, 15 September 2011, lot 3301.

583. Augustus AR Denarius. Colonia Patricia (?), circa 19 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS, bare head left / SIGNIS above, RECEPTIS below, SPQR around, round shield inscribed CL • V; aquila and signum flanking. RIC I 86b; cf. RSC 267; BMCRE 420-1 = BMCRR Rome 4402; CRE Ashmolean 75-6. 3.71g, 19mm, 12h. Very Fine, attractively toned.

500

584. Augustus AR Denarius. Uncertain mint, 17 BC. CAESAR, youthful head right (possibly Gaius Caesar), within oak-wreath / AVG-VST, to left and right of candelabrum ornamented with rams’ heads; all within wreath entwined with bucrania and paterae. RIC 540; BMC 684. 3.86g, 17mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous surfaces. Very Rare. Ex Gorny & Mosch 176, 10 March 2009, lot 2074.

144

3,000


585. Augustus AR Denarius. Lugdunum, 7-6 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE, laureate head right / AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT, Gaius and Lucius Caesars standing facing, each togate and resting hand on shield, spear behind each shield, simpulum and lituus above, C L CAESARES in exergue. RIC 207. 3.80g, 20mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

750

586. Augustus AR Denarius. Lugdunum, 7-6 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE, laureate head right / AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT, Gaius and Lucius Caesars standing facing, each togate and resting hand on shield, spear behind each shield, simpulum and lituus above, C L CAESARES in exergue. RIC 207. 3.80g, 19mm, 2h. Very Fine.

200

587. Augustus AR Brockage Denarius. Lugdunum, 7-6 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE, laureate head right / Negative of obverse. 3.85g, 17mm, 12h. Very Fine.

200

588. Divus Augustus Æ Dupondius. Rome, circa AD 37-41. Struck under Caligula. DIVVS AVGVTSVS, radiate head left, S-C across fields / CONSENSV SENAT ET EQV ORDIN P Q R, Augustus seated left on curule chair, holding branch. C. 97; BMC Gaius 88; RIC Gaius 56; CBN Gaius 134. 16.15g, 30mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Minor corrosion spots on obv. Well preserved for the type.

1,000

589. Tiberius AR Denarius. Lugdunum, AD 15-18. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia as Pax seated to right, holding spear and olive branch, no footstool; ornate chair legs, triple line below. RIC 28; Lyon 146; RSC 16b. 3.71g, 17mm, 10h. Extremely Fine. Attractive, light tone.

750

590. Tiberius AR Denarius. Lugdunum, AD 36-37. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia as Pax seated right, holding spear and olive branch, feet on footstool; ornate chair legs, single line below. RIC 30; Lyon 152; RSC 16a. 3.76g, 18mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Attractive portrait style.

145

750


591. Tiberius AR Denarius. Lugdunum, AD 36-37. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia as Pax seated right, holding spear and olive branch, feet on footstool; ornate chair legs, single line below. RIC 30; Lyon 154; RSC 16a. 3.64g, 20mm, 8h. Good Very Fine.

750

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

592. Tiberius AR Denarius. Lugdunum, AD 36-37. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia as Pax seated right, holding spear and olive branch, feet on footstool; ornate chair legs, single line below. RIC 30; RSC 16a; BMC 48. 3.80g, 18mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,500

593. Germanicus Æ As. Struck under Claudius. Rome, AD 50-54. GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, bare head of Germanicus right / TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P IMP P P, large SC. RIC 106; C. 9; BMC 215. 12.20g, 29mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

594. Caligula Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 39-40. C CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON AVG P M TR P III P P, Pietas, veiled and draped, seated left on stool, holding patera in extended right hand and resting left elbow on small draped figure standing facing on basis; PIETAS in exergue / DIVO AVG SC in two lines across field, sacrificial scene before temple: Gaius (Caligula), veiled and togate, standing left, holding patera in right hand over garlanded altar, raising hem of toga with left hand; victimarius holding bull for sacrifice and attendant holding a patera standing on either side; garlanded hexastyle temple of Divus Augustus in background, with pediment decorated with sacrificial scene, quadriga and Victories as acroteria, and statues of Romulus and Aeneas along roof line. RIC 44; BMC 58†; BN 104. 28.95g, 36mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Earthen encrustations.

1,250

595. Claudius Æ As. Restitution issue under Titus. Rome, AD 80-81. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head right / IMP T VESP AVG REST, Minerva advancing right brandishing spear and holding shield, S-C across fields. RIC 487; BM 301; C. 105. 12.99g, 28mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

146

500


De Germanis

596. Nero Claudius Drusus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 41-54. NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP, laureate head left / DE GERMANIS on architrave of triumphal arch surmounted by equestrian statue to left between two trophies. RIC I 72 (Claudius); von Kaenel Type 14 (unlisted dies); RSC 4; BMCRE 102. 3.48g, 18mm, 4h. Good Very Fine, flan crack. Rare.

3,000

597. Nero AV Aureus. Rome, AD 57-58. NERO CAESAR AVG IMP, bare head right / PONTIF MAX TR P IIII P P, oak wreath, EX โ€ข S C within. RIC I 14; Calicรณ 423. 7.61g, 19mm, 12h. Very Fine.

2,000

Vividly Toned Nero Denarius

598. Nero AR Denarius. Rome, AD 64-65. NERO CAESAR, laureate head right / AVGVSTVS GERMANICVS, Nero, radiate and togate, standing facing holding branch and Victory on globe. RIC 47; WCN 22; BMC 60; RSC 45. 3.41g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. A choice example of this attractive type which is very difficult to obtain in high grade.

5,000

Ex Triton V, 15 January 2002, lot 1885. This coin, in remarkable condition for its issue, depicts the famous bronze statue the Colossus of Nero. The emperor was portrayed in the guise of Sol, and it was originally placed by the entrance of his golden palace. Designed and constructed by Zenodorus the Greek from AD 64 to 68, the reverse therefore predates the much anticipated work. The 103 foot tall statue was moved by Hadrian to outside the Flavian Amphitheatre in 128 using 24 elephants, giving the building its current name: the Colosseum.

147


599. Nero AV Aureus. Rome, AD 64-65. NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head of Nero right / IVPPITER CVSTOS, Jupiter seated left on throne, holding thunderbolt and sceptre. RIC 52; Calicó 412. 7.12g, 19mm, 6h. Good Fine - Near Very Fine.

1,500

600. Nero Æ Dupondius. Rome, AD 64. NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GER PM TR P IMP P P, radiate head right / MAC AVG, façade of the Macellum Magnum; [II (mark of value) in exergue]. RIC 162, 187; BMCRE 195; CBN II, 153, 312; C. 130. 13.13g, 30mm, 6h. About Good Very Fine.

650

Ex ACR 3, 31 May 2011, lot 294.

601. Nero Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 65. NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head right / Roma, helmeted and in military dress, seated left on cuirass, holding Victory in right hand and with left hand resting on parazonium, various shields around and behind, S-C across fields, ROMA in exergue. RIC 275. 26.21g, 34mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

1,750

Ex Roma Numismatics V, 23 March 2013, lot 694.

602. Nero Æ As. Rome, AD 65. NERO CAESAR AVG GERM IMP, laureate head right / Victory flying left, holding shield inscribed SPQR; S-C across fields. RIC 312; WCN 285. 11.13g, 28mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

500

603. Nero Æ Dupondius. Lugdunum (Lyon), AD 64-67. NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER PM TR P IMP P P, laureate head left / VICTORIA AVGVSTI, Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm, S-C across fields, II in exergue. RIC 412; BMC 351. 12.94g, 28mm, 4h. Good Very Fine.

148

300


604. Nero Æ Sestertius. Lugdunum (Lyon), AD 66. IMP NERO CAESAR AVG PONT MAX TR POT P P, laureate head left; globe at point of neck / Triumphal arch surmounted by emperor in facing quadriga accompanied by Pax and Victory, flanked by two soldiers; statue of Mars in side niche. RIC 500; WCN 452; Lyon 191. 27.79g, 36mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine. Well detailed reverse.

3,000

605. Nero Æ Sestertius. Lugdunum (Lyon), circa AD 67. IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P M TR POT P P, laureate head left, with small globe at point of bust / DECVRSIO in exergue, S-C across fields; Nero on horseback riding right, holding spear; behind him, soldier on horseback right, holding vexillum. RIC 578; BMC -; Mac Dowall, Nero 488. 27.52g, 38mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Olive green patina, some smoothing in fields. Rare.

Exceptional Civil War Denarius

2,000

606. Civil War, Vindex AR Denarius. Uncertain mint in Gaul, AD 68. Bare head of Augustus to right / AVGVSTVS, Capricorn to right, holding globe attached to rudder between front hooves, cornucopiae above back. RIC 82; RSC 21a; Nicolas A2; Martin A2; BMC 45-7. 3.18g, 19mm, 4h. Near Mint State. Extremely Rare, one of very few known examples.

7,500

This coin is a restitution of the type issued under Augustus (RIC 126), and forms one of a rare series of coins that are direct copies of existing types. The consistent use of Augustan propaganda on his coinage lends weight to the understanding that Vindex was not anti-Roman in his agenda for the Civil War of AD 68, but more specifically anti-Neronian and anti-tyrannical. The significance of the constellation Capricorn to Augustus is subject to debate, with some ancient sources reporting that it was his birth sign and others relating that he was conceived under the sign - the latter tying in with his official birthday on 23rd-24th September. Under the tropical zodiac, the sun transits Capricorn from late December to late January, marking midwinter and the shortest day of the year. For this reason it was often considered a hostile sign but Augustus chose to interpret it positively since it had governed two major events in his life - the granting of imperium to him by the Senate in January 43 BC, and the acceptance of the title Augustus on 16 January 27 BC.

149


607. Galba AR Denarius. Spanish mint (Tarraco?), April-late AD 68. GALBA IMPERATOR, laureate head right, globe at tip of neck / DIVA AVGVSTA, Livia, draped, standing left, holding patera in right hand and leaning on long sceptre in left hand. RIC I 36; RSC 45; BMCRE 169; BN 19. 3.52g, 17mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Almost invisible scratches on reverse. Bold, and superb style for the issue.

2,000

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Triton XVI, 9 January 2013, lot 1049.

608. Galba Æ Sestertius. Rome, July AD 68-January 69. IMP SER GALBA AVG TR P, laureate and draped bust right / Victory alighting to right, holding wreath in outstretched right hand and palm over left shoulder. RIC -, cf. 251-252; BMC -; Stacks Bowers & Ponterio 1743, 12 January 2013, 6082 (same obverse die). 27.65g, 36mm, 5h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

2x

3,000

2x

609. Galba AR Quinarius. Lugdunum (Lyon), AD 68-69. SER GALBA IMP CAESAR AVG P M T P, laureate head right / VICTORIA GALBAE AVG, Victory, draped, standing right on globe holding wreath and palm. RIC 132. 1.66g, 15mm, 8h. Very Fine. Rare.

400

610. Galba AV Aureus. Rome, July AD 68-January AD 69. IMP SER GALBA AVG, bare head right / SPQR OB CS in two lines within oak wreath. RIC 164; Calicó 509. 7.03g, 20mm, 6h. About Very Fine.

3,000

611. Otho AV Aureus. Rome, January-April AD 69. IMP OTHO CAESAR AVG TR P, wigged head of Otho right / SECVRITAS P R, Securitas standing left, holding wreath in right hand and cradling sceptre in left arm. RIC 7; BMCRE 13; Calicó 531b. 7.19g, 20mm, 6h. Very Fine.

150

10,000


612. Otho AR Denarius. Rome, 15 January-8 March AD 69. IMP OTHO CAESAR AVG TR P, bare head left / SECVRITAS P R, Securitas standing left holding wreath and sceptre. BMC 20; C. 19; RIC 12 (R3). 3.37g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

1,500

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Gemini VIII - Heritage, 14 April 2011, lot 295. This type is rare with a left facing portrait - there was only one specimen in the Reka Devnia hoard, compared to 27 specimens of the same type with portrait right.

613. Vitellius AR Denarius. Lugdunum (Lyon), March-July AD 69. A VITELLIVS IMP GERMAN, laureate head right, globe at point of neck / IO MAX CAPITOLINVS, Jupiter Maximus Capitolinus seated left within distyle temple, holding thunderbolt and sceptre. RIC 56; Lyon 6; RSC 39. 3.28g, 18mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and in excellent condition for the issue.

2,500

Ex Helios 6, 9 March 2011, lot 136; Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 46, 2 April 2008, lot 523.

614. Vitellius AR Denarius. Rome, April-December AD 69. A VITELLIVS GERMANICVS IMP, bare head right / XV VIR SACR FAC, tripod-lebes surmounted by dolphin right; raven standing to right below. RIC 70; RSC 115; BMCRE 3; BN -. 3.04g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

615. Vitellius AR Denarius. Rome, AD 69. A VITELLIVS GERMAN IMP TR P, laureate bust right / CONCORDIA P R, Concordia seated left with patera and cornucopiae. RIC 73; BMC 7; RSC 20. 3.46g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Pleasantly toned.

1,500

616. Vitellius AR Denarius. Rome, April-December AD 69. A VITELLIVS GERMAN IMP TR P, laureate head right / Victory seated left, holding wreath and palm. RIC 88; RSC 119. 3.44g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine. From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

151

500


617. Vitellius AR Denarius. Rome, April-December AD 69. A VITELLIVS GERM IMP AVG TR P, laureate head right / Victory seated left, holding patera and palm branch. RIC 110; RSC -. 3.45g, 18mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine.

750

618. Vespasian AV Aureus. Lugdunum (Lyon), AD 70. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate bust right / COS III TR POT, Neptune standing to left with foot on prow, holding trident and dolphin. RIC 1113; Calicó -. 7.17g, 19mm, 6h. Good Fine - Near Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

2,000

619. Vespasian AV Aureus. Lugdunum (Lyon), AD 71. IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III, laureate head right / PACI AVGVSTI, Nemesis advancing right, holding caduceus over snake. RIC 1130; Calicó 655; BMC 401. 7.17g, 20mm, 7h. Very Fine.

1,000

620. Vespasian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 71. IMP CAES VESPAS AVG P M TR P P P COS III, laureate head of Vespasian right / PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, holding branch in right hand and cornucopiae cradled in left arm. RIC 181. 27.15g, 33mm, 6h. Very Fine.

1,000

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group 87, 18 May 2011, lot 987.

621. Vespasian Æ Dupondius. Lugdunum (Lyon), AD 71. IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, radiate head of Vespasian right, globe at point of bust / Victory flying left, holding shield inscribed SPQR. RIC 1153. 11.92g, 28mm, 6h. Very Fine. Rare.

152

300


622. Vespasian Æ Sestertius. Lugdunum (Lyon), AD 72. IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS IIII, laureate head right, globe at tip of neck / IVDAEA CAPTA, Vespasian standing to right before palm tree, holding spear and parazonium, foot on helmet; to right, Jewess seated right on cuirass, in attitude of mourning; SC in exergue. RIC II 1181; Lyon 63; Hendin 1544; BMCRE 812; BN 814; Brin 57. 25.04g, 36mm, 6h. Very Fine.

2,000

623. Vespasian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 77-78. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head left / Vespasian standing left, holding spear and parazonium, crowned by Victory standing left, holding wreath and palm; COS VIII in exergue. RIC II 936; Calicó 625; BMCRE 205; BN 183; Biaggi 318. 7.06g, 19mm, 6h. About Very Fine.

3,000

624. Divus Vespasian AR Denarius. Struck under Titus. Rome, AD 80-81. DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIAN, laureate head right / Victory standing left placing shield on trophy, captive seated at foot of trophy, EX - SC across fields. RIC 59a; RSC 144. 3.52g, 18mm, 7h. Good Very Fine.

500

625. Divus Vespasian Æ Sestertius. Rome AD 80-81. Struck under Titus. DIVO AVG VESP, the deified Vespasian seated to right, holding sceptre and Victory in cart drawn by a quadriga of elephants with riders / IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII around large S•C. RIC (Titus) 257. 27.05g, 35mm, 6h. Very Fine. Earthen encrustations.

2,000

626. Titus, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 73. T CAES IMP VESP CEN, laureate head right / PAX AVG, Pax standing left, resting left elbow on column and cradling palm branch in left arm, holding winged caduceus over tripod to left. RIC 542a; Calicó 744. 7.36g, 20mm, 1h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

153

5,000


Highly Impressive Portrait of Titus as Caesar

627. Titus, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Ephesus, AD 76. T CAES IMP VESP AVG, laureate head right, annulet below / COS V, bull standing to right on ground line. C. 56; BMC 486 (Vespasian); RIC 1483 Vespasian (Vespasian); CBN Vespasian 374; RPC 1458; BN 374. 2.75g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and in exceptional condition for the issue. Minor flan crack.

4,000

Ex Triton V, 15 January 2002, lot 1927. Aesthetically, this Ephesian denarius of Titus is highly impressive. The quality of the engraving on both obverse and reverse is extremely high, far surpassing that of the companion Rome mint issue. The portrait of the emperor is bold and vigorous, and is possessed of far more lifelike qualities than most contemporary issues. Titus’ head and facial features are well proportioned, and the crown of laurels set upon his head seems to rest farther back than normal – the effect is quite charming, and further enhances what is a most fair and pleasing likeness. The reverse of this coin is an example of the favour demonstrated by the Flavians towards the types employed by Augustus, evoking the memory of that golden period of stability and prosperity.

628. Titus, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 77-8. T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS, laureate bust right / Roma, helmeted, seated right on two shields, left foot on helmet, holding spear before her; wolf standing right at her feet, head turned back, suckling Romulus and Remus, in left and right fields, two eagles flying towards her; COS VI in exergue. RIC 954; BMC 223; Calicó 738a. 7.12g, 20mm, 6h. Near Very Fine.

154

2,000


Recalling the Foundation Myth of Rome

629. Titus, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 77-8. T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS, laureate bust right / Roma, helmeted, seated right on two shields, left foot on helmet, holding spear before her; wolf standing right at her feet, head turned back, suckling Romulus and Remus, in left and right fields, two eagles flying towards her; COS VI in exergue. RIC 954; BMC 223; Calicó 738a. 7.36g, 19mm, 10h. Extremely Fine.

25,000

The Flavians came to power after a year of civil war, vicious intrigue and three short lived reigns which all ended in bloodshed. Vespasian and his son Titus thus sought to restore security and confidence by establishing a clear and peaceful succession through a strong father and son line, both of whom had proven themselves capable generals and administrators. As part of their efforts to promote a sense of stability after the turmoil of the Year of the Four Emperor, Titus, along with his father Vespasian and brother Domitian, struck a series of coinage which recalled the types of the Republican and Augustan periods, evoking the memory of the golden age inaugurated by Augustus in the early years of empire. The implicit message was that the Flavian line was taking up the mantle dropped by the now defunct Julio-Claudian dynasty, and shouldering with renewed purpose the burden of governance that the latter had so often abused. This iconic reverse design portrays the Roman foundation myth in a novel manner, showing the goddess Roma watching over the twins Romulus and Remus as they are suckled by the she-wolf, patiently awaiting the day that Rome will be built.

630. Titus Æ Sestertius. Uncertain Mint in Thrace, AD 80-81. IMP T CAES DIVI VES P F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII, laureate head right / IVD CAP and S C across fields, palm tree; to left, Jewess, in attitude of mourning, seated left on shields and helmet; to right, Jew standing right, head left, hands bound behind back, helmet and shield before. RIC II -; H.A. Cahn, ‘An Imperial Mint in Bithynia,’ INJ 8 (1984-5), 3 var. (Jew’s head right); RPC II 503 var. (same); cf. BMCRE 169; Hendin -. 24.25g, 34mm, 7h. Very Fine. An apparently unpublished variety. Very Rare.

155

1,000


631. Domitian, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 76-77. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right / COS IIII, legend across fields, cornucopiae with ribbons hanging down each side. RIC 918; Calic贸 817. 7.00g, 20mm, 6h. Near Very Fine, scrape on reverse edge.

1,500

632. Domitian, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 77-78. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right / She-wolf suckling twins, COS V above, boat in exergue. RIC 961; BMC 240; BN 209. 3.40g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

300

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

633. Domitian, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 77-78. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right / Captive kneeling to right, offering up standard with vexillum; COS V in exergue. C. 48; BMC Vespasian 231; RIC Vespasian 959; CBN Vespasian 205; Calic贸 819. 7.25g, 19mm, 6h. Very Fine.

3,000

634. Domitian, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 79. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, laureate head right / PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, two clasped hands holding aquila set on prow. RIC 246 (Vespasian); BMC 267; C. 392; Calic贸 916. 7.05g, 19mm, 6h. Very Fine.

3,000

635. Domitian, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, 80-81 AD. CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII, laureate bust right / PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, goat standing left within laurel wreath. RIC 267 (Titus); RSC 390. 3.47g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

156

500


Domitian’s Personal Protectress

636. Domitian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 81. IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M, laureate head right / TR P COS VII DES VIII P P, Minerva advancing right, holding spear and shield. C. 559; BMC 11 note; RIC 57; CBN 27; Calicó 922. 7.25g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, scattered marks and light scrape on reverse edge.

12,000

Domitian’s reign is today characterised as being totalitarian but efficient and generally benign in nature, contrary to the somewhat unjust vilification he received after his death. His economic programme was rigorously efficient, maintaining the Roman currency at a standard it would never again achieve. Persecution of religious minorities was non-existent. His foreign policy was realistic, and at a time when tradition dictated aggressive conquest, he largely rejected this in favour of peace and consolidation. This protectionist attitude appears to have extended to his religious beliefs; of all the deities he regarded Minerva as his protectress, and thus a great many images of her were promulgated during his reign. This dedication extended even to the army: a new legion was founded in AD 82 to fight against the Chatti in Gaul, the Legio I Minervia who were acknowledged in 89 by Domitian for suppressing the revolt of the Governor of Germania Superior, and were awarded the cognomen Pia Fidelis Domitiana.

637. Domitian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 81. IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M, laureate head right / TR P COS VII DES VIII P P, draped throne on which a winged thunderbolt. RIC 69; Calicó 928. 7.02g, 19mm, 5h. Very Fine. Very Rare, no examples on CoinArchives.

2,000

638. Domitian Æ As. Rome, AD 82. IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M, laureate head right / TR P COS VIII DES VIIII, Minerva standing right, holding spear and shield. RIC 110. 11.35g, 27mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Minor roughness.

200

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Robert O. Ebert Collection.

639. Domitian AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm. Ephesus (or Rome for circulation in Asia), AD 82. IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M COS VIII, laureate head right / Aquila between two signa. RIC II 843; RPC II 865; RSC 667. 11.16g, 26mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

157

500


640. Domitian and Domitia AV Aureus. Rome, AD 82-83. IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM, laureate head of Domitian to right / DOMITIA AVGVSTA IMP DOMIT, draped bust of Domitia to right, her hair bound up in elaborate coiffure with end falling down neck in long plait. RIC 210; C. 3; Calicó 943a. 7.70g, 19mm, 6h. About Good Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

10,000

641. Domitian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 82. IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M, laureate head right / TR P COS VIII DES VIIII P P, Minerva advancing right, holding javelin and shield; S-C across. RIC 103; C. 586. 22.30g, 34mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

500

642. Domitian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 85. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS POT P P, laureate bust of Domitian right wearing aegis / Emperor standing left, holding spear; German captive kneeling right before, presenting shield set amongst various arms; S-C across fields, broken spear in exergue. RIC 357; C. 489; BMC 337; BN 358. 28.40g, 35mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Rare. An interesting historical type, and relatively well preserved for the issue.

1,000

Having lived his whole life in the shadow of his father and brother’s military victories, and having had none for himself, upon being proclaimed emperor Domitian soon found an opportunity to win glory for himself. Leaving Rome for Gaul in late AD 82-early 83, ostensibly to conduct a census, he unexpectedly launched a campaign against the Chatti in Germania, who had been part of Arminius’ coalition of tribes that had annihilated Varus’ column in the Teutoberg forest. For this purpose, Domitian raised a new legion, Legio I Minervia. Little information survives of the campaign, though apparently enough early victories were achieved for Domitian to return to Rome in late 83, where he awarded himself a triumph, conferred upon himself the title of Germanicus and struck a series of commemorative coinage depicting his subjugation of the Chatti. Domitian’s campaign was viewed most unfavourably by ancient writers, who noted that it was an unprovoked attack and mocked his supposed accomplishments.

643. Domitian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 95-96. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV, laureate head right / IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P, Minerva, holding shield and hurling spear, standing left on prow, owl at her feet. RIC 788. 3.51g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

158

200


Domitian’s Winged Minerva

644. Domitian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 95-96. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV, laureate head right / IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P, winged figure of Minerva flying left, holding spear and shield. C. 294; BMC 237; RIC 791; CBN 210. 3.56g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

750

The iconography of this coin is most intriguing. This is the only depiction of a winged Minerva in all of Roman coinage, and indeed the concept itself has few parallels in surviving classical art. The closest comparable figure may be found in the winged statue of Minerva Victrix at Ostia, which originally formed part of the decoration of the upper gate known as the Porta Romana. This winged form of Minerva may well have been taken from earlier Greek images of Athena, such as that shown on a black-figure vase found at Orvieto and illustrated in Röm. Mitt. XII, pl. xii, which shows two representations of Athena – one winged and one without wings. With the exception of Nike-Victoria, most of the Greco-Roman gods had shed their wings by the early classical period; that such an archaism should be revived in the time of Domitian is therefore quite inexplicable, save perhaps for the possibility that it was simply an act of whimsy by an emperor who was known to favour Minerva above all other gods.

645. Domitia AR Denarius. Rome, AD 81-84. DOMITIA AVGVSTA IMP DOMIT, draped bust right, hair falling in long plait behind neck / CONCORDIA AVGVST, peacock standing to right on ground line. C. 2; BMC 61 (Domitian); RIC 151 (Domitian); CBN 65. 3.57g, 19mm, 5h. About Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

5,000

Ex Barry Feirstein Collection, Numismatica Ars Classica 39, 16 May 2007, lot 115; Ex James Fox Collection, CNG 40, 4 December 1996, lot 1465; Ex Nelson Bunker Hunt Collection, Sotheby’s 21 June 1990, lot 713; Ex Leu 28, 5 May 1981, lot 422. Together with Jupiter and Minerva, the goddess Juno was worshipped in Rome as part of Capitoline Triad of supreme deities. The peacock seen on the reverse of this rare and attractive denarius was often depicted as a symbol of Juno, signifying her watchful and warlike countenance. That the peacock was specifically linked to Juno is affirmed by Ovid in his Metamorphoses, Book 1, where he relates that after Jupiter was caught with his lover Io, she was turned into a pure white heifer by his enraged wife Juno. Set under the guard of Argus, the hundred-eyed watchman, Io was rescued by Hermes, who had been sent by Jupiter to free her. Juno transfered the eyes from the body of Argus to the tail feathers of the peacock after he had been killed by Hermes.

646. Julia Titi AR Denarius. Rome, AD 80-81. IVLIA AVGVSTA TITI AVGVSTI F, draped bust right / VENVS AVGVST, Venus standing right, seen from behind, half nude with drapery hanging low beneath her posterior, holding sceptre in her left hand and helmet in her right and leaning with her left elbow on a column to her left. RIC 388 (Titus); RSC 14. 3.45g, 19mm, 5h. Extremely Fine; minor flan flaws in reverse fields. Rare.

2,500

Despite the nobility and quality of her father Titus, Julia was no model of womanly virtue. Although a married woman, she and her uncle Domitian carried on an affair that gained public notoriety and was thoroughly condemned by contemporary Roman writers.

159


Rare Nerva Aureus

647. Nerva AV Aureus. Rome, AD 96. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS II P P, laureate head right / CONCORDIA EXERCTIVVM, clasped right hands. RIC 2; Calicó 954; BMC 4; C 15. 7.40g, 19mm, 1h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

15,000

The aurei of Nerva are remarkably difficult to find in anything more than passably good condition, and locating an aesthetically pleasing example is harder still. The present example is possessed of a fine style portrait, and fortunately lacks the circulation mark that mar so many other specimens. Following the many tumultuous years of the Julio-Claudians and of Domitian, the elderly peace-monger Nerva served as a balm for the ravaged and exhausted Empire. He recovered the irritated bond of the senate and the army and adopted Trajan who would go on to have a successful 19 year reign after him. The image of two hands clasped on the reverse of this outstanding coin is significant in portraying Nerva’s calming influence on Rome. His brief but arguably vital reign ended when he died naturally in 98.

648

649

648. Nerva AR Denarius. Rome, AD 97. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right / FORTVNA P R, Fortuna seated left, holding corn ears in right hand and cradling sceptre in left arm. C. 79; BMC 41; RIC 17. 3.42g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine. Attractive portrait. From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

350

649. Nerva AR Denarius. Rome, AD 97. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate bust right / LIBERTAS PVBLICA, Libertas standing left, holding pileus and sceptre. RIC 19; BMC 46. 3.36g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 500

Very Rare Aureus of Trajan

650. Trajan AV Aureus. Rome, AD 98. IMP CΛES NERVΛ TRAIAN AVG GERM, laureate head right / PONT MAX TR POT COS II, Germania, nude to waist, seated left on pile of shields, resting left arm on hexagonal shield and holding olive branch in outstretched right hand. RIC 15; BMCRE 8; Woytek 23a; Calicó 1070. 7.52g, 18mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

160

7,500


Exceptional Trajan Aureus

651. Trajan AV Aureus. Rome, AD 98-99. IMP CAES NERVA TRAIAN AVG GERM, laureate head right / P M TR P COS II P P, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder set on prow with her right hand and cornucopiae with her left. BMC 31; Woytek 53a; Calicó 1042; Hill 50; RIC 4; Biaggi 501. 7.30g, 18mm, 8h. Fleur De Coin. Rare, and in exceptional state of preservation.

30,000

Well centred and boldly struck, this aureus possesses a brilliant and mirror-like mint lustre; it is both a highly impressive and visually exceptionally pleasing coin. Aged forty-five when this coin was issued, the portrait here is of a vigorous and forceful ruler in the prime of his life. After the peaceful but politically strained rule of the aged Nerva, the seamless transition of power into the hands of a popular general who was already named Caesar and a serving consul when the emperor passed must have seemed like nothing less than a total (and near miraculous) rejuvenation of the principate. Indeed, the early years of the reign of Trajan were hailed as the beginning of a new golden age, a time of peace and prosperity which would last for nearly a century until the megalomania of Commodus and his ruinous fiscal policies wrought an inevitable return to civil war and economic decline. The aurei of Trajan, like those of his predecessor Nerva, are most difficult to find in such exemplary condition. This is on account of the predominantly peaceful state of affairs within the Roman territories at this time, and the economic stability this conferred. There was consequently very little hoarding of newly-minted coins as is associated with times of uncertainty or war.

652. Trajan AV Aureus. Rome, AD 102. IMP CAES TRAIANVS AVG GERM DACICVS, laureate bust right with aegis on far shoulder / P M TR P COS IIII P P, statue of Hercules holding club and lion’s skin standing facing on low plinth. RIC -; Woytek 99e; BMC -; Calicó 1055. 7.03g, 19mm, 6h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

2,000

Struck at the end of the succssful campaign against the Dacians in AD 102, in which Trajan reduced their leader Decebalus to the status of client king, for which victory he celebrated a triumph, the obverse legend of this extremely rare aureus notes the new title of Dacicus Maximus which he was awarded upon his return to Rome. The reverse of this coin is believed to depict a statue of Hercules Gaditanus. Trajan had been born in the Spanish city of Italica in Baetica, an area where this cult of Hercules Gaditanus was especially popular. The emperor apparently viewed him as his patron, and between 100 and 115 produced a number of coins bearing his image, of which this is one. The statue itself was situated near the great altar of Hercules in the Forum Boarium, the Ara Maxima Herculis Invicti.

161


653. Trajan AV Aureus. Rome, AD 103-107. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind / COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC, Ceres standing left, holding two grain ears in left hand and long torch in right. RIC 109; BMC 259; Woytek 291f; Calicó 996b. 7.01g, 19mm, 6h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

3,000

654. Trajan Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 103-107. IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC PM TR P COS V P P, laureate bust right, with drapery on left shoulder / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Trajan on horse riding right, spearing fallen Dacian; S C in exergue. Woytek 203b; RIC 534. 27.85g, 34mm, 6h. Very Fine. Pleasing patina.

750

A Pile of Dacian Arms

655. Trajan Æ As. Rome, AD 104/5-107. IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate bust right, with drapery on left shoulder / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, decorated oval shield set before two spears, sword, vexillum and oblong shield; SC below. C. 569; BMC 951; RIC 584; CBN 532; Woytek 198bB. 11.83g, 27mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

2,000

This simple but very attractive type is part of a series of issues issued to mark Trajan’s victories over the Dacians, who he had vanquished now for a second time (see following lot). The pile of arms displayed on the reverse is clearly identifiable as ‘barbarian’ in origin; comparisons with surviving sculpture such as the friezes on Trajan’s column can attest to this. The Dacians were similarly equipped to contemporary Celtic tribes and Roman auxiliaries, and favoured shields that were flat or only slightly dished, usually oval but sometimes hexagonal in shape, and capable of covering most or all of the body for use in a shieldwall.

162


Trajan’s Second Triumph

656.

Trajan AV Aureus. Rome, AD 106. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Trajan as triumphator in slow quadriga to left, holding branch and sceptre; car ornamented with Victory bearing wreath. Calicó -; RIC -; BMC -; Woytek 195n. 7.29g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, possibly only the second known example.

25,000

The reverse of this coin depicts Trajan’s second triumph in AD 106, which he celebrated for his great victory earlier that year in the Second Dacian War. Trajan had in 101-102 launched an offensive against the powerful Dacian king Decebalus with whom Domitian had signed an unfavourable (and some would argue shameful) treaty some twenty years before, the price of which was the payment of an annual ‘subsidy’ of eight million sestertii and the presentation of a diadem from Domitian to Decebalus. In that war, Trajan succeeded in defeating the Dacians in a series of pitched battles, and reduced Decebalus to the status of client king. The victory was celebrated with a triumph (Trajan’s first), and later by the construction of the Tropaeum Traiani. Although this victory had greatly eroded Decebalus’ power, he nonetheless began to rearm straight away, to harbour Roman runaways and to pressure the neighbouring barbarian tribes to ally themselves with him. In 104 he organised a failed attempt on Trajan’s life by means of some Roman deserters, as well as capturing Trajan’s legate Longinus who he tried to use as a bargaining chip; Longinus however took poison to avoid compromising his country and emperor. Then finally in 105 Decebalus launched an invasion of the Roman-held territories north of the Danube. Trajan was not unprepared; by 105 the concentration of Roman troops assembled in the middle and lower Danube regions amounted to fourteen legions – half of the entire Roman army. Trajan ordered the construction of a massive bridge over the Danube designed by Apollodorus of Damascus, which for over 1,000 years was the longest arch bridge ever built both in terms of total and span length. The counter-offensive consisted mostly of the reduction of the Dacian fortress network which the Romans systematically stormed while denying the Dacians the ability to manoeuvre in the open. At last Decebalus’ main stronghold of Sarmizegetusa was taken by storm and razed to the ground. Decebalus himself escaped, but soon after committed suicide as a Roman cavalry scout named Tiberius Claudius Maximus was closing on him. Maximus delivered the head and right hand of the enemy king to his emperor, by whom he was decorated and immortalised in a relief on Trajan’s column. Trajan’s second triumph was understandably a grand affair, which was accompanied by spectacular games that the emperor held in celebration: ten thousand gladiators fought in these games, and ten thousand animals were sacrificed in thanks to the gods. The riches of Dacia (estimated recently at 165 tons of gold and 331 tons of silver) were invested in a series of important public works, the jewels of which were the forum and great market in Rome which bore his name, and the magnificent celebratory column depicting the glorious achievements of the campaign.

163


657. Trajan Æ Dupondius. Rome, AD 108-109/110. IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, radiate bust right, slight drapery / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder on prow and cornucopiae. RIC II 502; Woytek 330b. 15.16g, 27mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

200

658. Trajan Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 109-110. IMP CAES NERVA TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P P COS V P P, laureate bust right with slight drapery on left shoulder / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Spes walking left holding flower; S-C across fields. RIC 519; Woytek 338. 24.99g, 35mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

1,500

659. Trajan AV Aureus. Rome, AD 113-114. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Genius standing facing, head left, holding patera and grain ears. Woytek 420f; BMC 42; Calicó 109; RIC 275. 7.04g, 20mm, 7h. About Very Fine.

2,000

The Port of Ostia

660. Trajan Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 113. IMP CAES NER TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PORTVM TRAIANI, aerial view of Trajan’s hexagonal harbour at Ostia, with entrance at bottom, buildings and colonnades surrounding the harbour, and three ships anchored within. RIC -, cf. 632 (bust variant); C. -, cf. 306 (same); BMC -; Lanz 106, 27 November 2001, lot 381 (same dies); Woytek 470f. 23.76g, 34mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Dark green patina. Extremely Rare.

10,000

Ex Numismatik Lanz 156, 2 June 2013, lot 304. The first proper harbour at Ostia was excavated under Claudius and finished in AD 64, and became the main trading centre for goods entering Rome from the western half of the Empire while Puteoli, on the Bay of Naples, continued to receive shipments from the east. However the harbour silted up over time, and so Trajan ordered the construction of a new basin, designed in hexagonal form and behind the original harbour, to offer better protection. Finished in AD 113, Trajan’s new harbour at Ostia proved so popular that the the grain fleet from Alexandria in Egypt sailed to Ostia instead of Puteoli, and in the course of the second century Ostia became the main harbour of Rome for goods from the entire Empire.

661. Trajan Æ Dupondius. Rome, AD 114-116. IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, radiate and draped bust right / SENATVS POPVLVSQVE ROMANVS, Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and cornucopiae; S-C across. RIC II 674; Woytek 535v. 12.13g, 27mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautiful patina and superb, untouched surfaces.

164

2,000


662. Trajan AV Aureus. Rome, AD 116. IMP CAES NER TRAIAN OPTIM AVG GER DAC PARTHICO, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS VI P P S P Q R, Parthia seated right, head facing, in attitude of mourning, and Parthian seated left in attitude of mourning below trophy, PARTHIA CAPTA in exergue. RIC 324; Woytek 560f; BMC 603; Calicó 1035a. 7.12g, 19mm, 6h. Very Fine.

4,000

Commemorating his final great campaign, this aureus of Trajan is a clear indication to the people of Rome that the Emperor had succeeded in expanding the Empire still further through his conquest of Parthia and the capture of the Parthian capital, Ctesiphon. However, the areas of Armenia and Mesopotamia that Trajan conquered were unwieldy and difficult to secure, and it was left to the new Emperor Hadrian in AD 117 to abandon these indefensible lands in favour of a smaller, but more easily governable, empire. Trajan’s campaign against the Parthians was prompted by their installation of a puppet king in Armenia who was unacceptable to the Roman emperor. Both the Parthian and Roman Empires had shared a hegemony over the Armenian kingdom for fifty years, but Trajan decided to remove the king and annexe Armenia as a Roman province. After this success he moved southwards, receiving acknowledgement of hegemony from various tribes on the way to Mesopotamia, a large part of which he had conquered by the time this coin was struck in AD 116.

Expansion of the Empire

663. Trajan AV Aureus. Rome, AD 116. IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIM AVG GER DAC PARTHICO, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / REGNA ADSIGNATA, Trajan seated to left on platform with two attendants standing behind him; before platform, three kings standing right. RIC 367; Woytek 564f; BMC 613; Calicó 524. 7.26g, 19mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

20,000

This historically significant type proclaims Trajan’s assignment of rulers to the freshly conquered kingdoms of Armenia, Parthia and Mesopotamia following his victories in the East. In his campaign of AD 114-116 Trajan expanded the territories of the empire to what was then the greatest extent of Rome’s borders; her dominion now stretched from the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean to the waters of the Caspian Sea and the Persian Gulf. Trajan had his statue set up on the shore of the latter, and sent the Senate a laurelled letter declaring the war to be at a close but bemoaning that he was too old to go on any further and repeat the conquests of Alexander the Great, to whose conquests this expedition was widely compared. The admiration and respect in which Trajan held the Macedonian king was evidenced by his determination to return to Babylon where he intended to offer sacrifice to Alexander in the house where he had died in 323 BC. The successes referenced on this coin were to be short-lived however, as shortly after his death revolts erupted in Armenia, Mesopotamia, Cyprus and Cyrene, as well as in North West Africa and along the Northern borders of Europe, prompting his successor Hadrian to abandon much of the newly gained territory in favour of a smaller but more defensible empire.

165


664. Plotina AR Denarius. Rome, AD 112-114. PLOTINA AVG IMP HADRIANI, draped bust right, wearing double stephane / CAES AVG GERMA DAC COS VI P P, altar decorated with figure of Pudicitia standing on curule chair; ARA PVDIC in exergue. RIC Trajan 733; BMC Trajan 529; Woytek 706. 2.81g, 21mm, 7h. Extremely Fine, faint brush marks. Extremely Rare, and in superb condition for the issue.

4,000

665. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 117. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIAN OPT AVG GER DAC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PARTHIC DIVI TRAIAN AVG F P M TR P COS P P, Justitia seated left, holding patera and sceptre, IVSTITIA in exergue. RIC 6; RSC 875; RCV 3500. 3.53g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

666. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 117. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA, laureate bust right, with slight drapery on far shoulder / PARTH F DIVI NER NEP P M TR P COS, Pietas standing left, raising right hand, PIE-TAS across fields. RIC 13. 3.40g, 19mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine.

2x

250

2x

667. Hadrian AR Quinarius. Rome, AD 118. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, slight drapery / P M TR P COS III, Victory advancing right, holding palm frond and wreath. RIC 36a; King 15; RSC 1052. 1.39g, 14mm, 6h. Very Fine. Rare.

166

200


668. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 118. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS II, bust of Sol, radiate and draped, right; ORIENS in exergue. RIC 43b; Calicó 1295. 7.20g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

10,000

669. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 118. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust left with slight drapery on far shoulder / P M TR P COS II, Pietas, veiled, standing left and raising right hand, PIE-TAS across fields. RIC 45. 2.60g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

250

670. Hadrian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 118. IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, with drapery on far shoulder / PONT MAX TR POT COS II, Roma, helmeted, seated right on cuirass and holding spear in left hand, clasps hands with Hadrian, who stands left, togate; S-C across fields, ADVENTVS AVG in exergue. RIC 547. 23.73g, 35mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, untouched surfaces. Rare, and excellent for the type.

1,500

671. Hadrian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 119. IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder / PONT MAX TR POT COS III, Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and cornucopiae; S-C across field. RIC 563b; C. 1192 var. 25.40g, 35mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

800

672. Hadrian Æ As. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, drapery on left. shoulder / PONT MAX TR POT COS III, Pietas standing slightly to left, raising both hands; altar before; PIE-AVG S-C across fields. RIC 579c; C. 1022. 10.08g, 26mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine; well detailed reverse.

167

500


673. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS III, Jupiter standing facing, holding thunderbolt and sceptre. RIC 63c; Calic贸 1301b; BMC 103. 7.06g, 18mm, 7h. Very Fine. Rare.

4,000

674. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS III, Pax seated left, holding Victory on globe and palm. RIC 95; C. 1147c. 3.10g, 19mm, 8h. Near Mint State.

500

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex A. Tkalec, 9 May 2011, lot 154.

675. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right with slight drapery on far shoulder / P M TR P COS III, Aeternitas standing left, holding heads of Sol and Luna, AET-AVG across fields. RIC 114. 3.16g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine.

200

676. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS III, the Genius of the Roman People standing to left, holding patera and cornucopiae; GEN P R across fields. RIC 123; BMC 273; C. 796; Calic贸 1267. 6.64g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

7,500

677. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate head right / P M TR P COS III, Hilaritas standing facing, both hands raising veil from her face, HIL-AR P-R in two lines across fields. RIC 126. 3.36g, 18mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

168

250


678. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, with drapery on far shoulder / P M TR P COS III, Salus seated left, holding patera, feeding snake rising from altar, SALVS AVG in exergue. RIC 137 var. (SAL AVG), cf. RIC 139. 3.27g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

300

679. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 119-124/5. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate head right / P M TR P COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass with shield at side, holding Victory in outstretched right hand and sceptre in left. RIC 77; RSC 1103. 3.19g, 18mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin. Exceptional in this state of preservation.

680

1,000

681

680. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, with drapery on far shoulder / COS III, Hercules seated right on cuirass, holding club resting on shield, and distaff. RIC 149. 3.13g, 17mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Pleasant underlying lustre. 500 681. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, Neptune standing left, right foot on prow, holding trident and dolphin. RIC 157. 3.35g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine. Rare. 250

682

683

682. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, Neptune standing left, right foot on prow, holding sceptre and acrostolium. RIC 158. 3.44g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. 300 683. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, Pudicitia, veiled, seated left. RIC 178. 3.40g, 21mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine. 300

684

685

684. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, Victory seated left, holding wreath and palm, globe in exergue. RIC 184. 3.38g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. 300 685. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, Roma standing left, holding Victory and spear. RIC 161. 3.46g, 20mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine.

169

300


686. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder / COS III, Hadrian on horseback right, raising right hand. RIC 186; Strack 146; Calicó 1215a; BMC 430-2. 7.24g, 21mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine.

10,000

This attractive equestrian aureus was struck to mark the triumphant return to Rome of the emperor, and shows him riding into the city accepting the honours and praise of the people. Mattingly and Sydenham argue that during his four year absence from Rome there had been little change in the coinage, no development of style, and the mint had been virtually inactive. Upon his return there was a great new output of coinage, of which this is a stunning example. Hadrian drops the long legends favoured by his predecessor Trajan, preferring to simplify them to HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS on the obverse and COS III on the reverse. This new obverse legend very distinctly calls into mind the coinage of the first emperor Augustus, while the new, larger and more gracious style of imperial portrait that fills the fields of the flan is a complete change from the small, careful and cramped types of Trajan. Reverse types such as this one complement the new style and the result is a very attractive and artistic coin.

687. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder / COS III, eagle standing on thunderbolt, head right. RIC 190. 3.18g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

688

300

689

688. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, star within crescent. RIC 200. 3.41g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous surfaces. 300 689. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / COS III, seven stars above crescent. RIC 202; C. 4656. 3.00g, 19mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine. 300

690. Hadrian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, with drapery on far shoulder / COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, with her right foot on a helmet, holding Victory and a cornucopiae, shields behind; SC in exergue. RIC 636. 25.23g, 32mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,500

691. Hadrian Æ As. Rome, AD 125-128. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right with drapery on left shoulder / COS III, Minerva advancing right, brandishing javelin and holding shield, S-C across fields. RIC 664 var. (drapery). 12.70g, 27mm, 6h. Very Fine, smoothing in fields.

170

200


Pedigreed to 1914

692. Hadrian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bareheaded and draped bust right / FELICITAS AVGVSTI, Hadrian standing to right holding scroll, clasping hands with Felicitas who stands to right holding caduceus; SC in exergue. RIC -; Strack 644; Banti 332; BMC 1501 note = E Gohl, RIN XX (1907), 98. 25.18g, 32mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

1,500

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Robert O. Ebert Collection; Ex Coin Galleries, 14 June 1993, lot 260; Ex Buddy Ebsen Collection, Superior, 7 June 1987, lot 4477; Ex Virgil M. Brand Collection, Sotheby’s 1 February 1984, lot 521; Ex Raffaele Garrucci Collection, J. Hirsch XXXIV, 5 May 1914, lot 1086.

693. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right / FELICITATI AVGVSTI, galley with four oarsmen right, hortator at stern; flag at bow. RIC II 240; RSC 712. 3.41g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Pleasant underlying lustre.

500

694. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right / FELICITATI AVGVSTI, galley with four oarsmen right, hortator at stern; flag at bow. RIC II 240; RSC 712. 3.59g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

695

750

696

695. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right / PIETAS AVG, Pietas standing left by altar, raising both hands. RIC 257. 3.04g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 200 696. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right / SALVS AVG, Salus standing right, feeding snake coiled round altar. RIC 267. 3.42g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Attractive underlying lustre. 200

697

698

697. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right / SALVS AVG, Salus standing right, feeding snake coiled round altar. RIC 267. 3.28g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. 300 698. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right / SALVS AVG, Salus standing left, sacrificing out of patera over altar and holding sceptre. RIC 268. 3.23g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone. 150

171


699. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right / VICTORIA AVG, Victory standing right, drawing out fold of dress and holding branch. RIC 282. 3.42g, 18mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine.

250

700. Hadrian AV Aureus. Rome, circa AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right / VICTORIA AVG, Victory standing left, holding palm in left hand and eagle, which bears wreath in beak, in outstretched hand right. RIC 284; Calicó 1397; C. 1459. 7.27g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

10,000

This reverse type most likely makes reference to Hadrian’s victory over Simon Bar Kochba in Judaea during the last Romano-Jewish war.

701. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right / AEGYPTOS, Egypt reclining left, holding sistrum and resting arm on basket around which snake coils, ibis before her. RIC 296. 3.52g, 17mm, 7h. Very Fine.

150

702. Sabina AR Denarius. Rome, AD 128-136. SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P, draped and diademed bust right / VESTA, Vesta seated left holding palladium and sceptre. RIC 410. 3.23g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

703. Diva Sabina AR Denarius. Rome, circa AD 137. DIVA AVG SABINA, draped bust right, wearing wreath of corn ears / CONSECRATIO, eagle standing on sceptre, head right. RIC 421. 3.04g, 17mm, 6h. Very Fine. Rare.

500

704. Diva Sabina AR Denarius. Rome, circa AD 137. DIVA AVG SABINA, draped bust right, wearing diadem / PIETATI AVG, altar. RIC 422c. 3.07g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine. Minor flan crack. Rare.

172

500


705. Aelius, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 136-138. L AELIVS CAESAR, bare head right / TRIB POT COS II, Concordia seated left, holding patera, resting elbow on cornucopiae; CONCORDIA in exergue. RIC II 443 note (Hadrian); BMCRE 1001-2 (Hadrian); RSC 11a. 3.05g, 19mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine, scratches on reverse.

200

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

706. Aelius, as Caesar Æ As. Rome, AD 137. L AELIVS CAESAR, bare head right / TR POT COS II, Concordia seated left, holding patera; CONCORD in exergue. RIC 1070 (Hadrian). 11.77g, 25mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

500

Apparently Unique

707. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 140-143. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, bareheaded, draped and cuirassed bust right / GENIVS POP ROMANI, Genius of the Roman people standing facing, head right, holding sceptre and cornucopiae. RIC 70 var.; C -, cf. 405-407; Calicó -; BMC -. 7.13g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Apparently unique variant.

5,000

The known coins of this type all feature a bare-headed or laureate left facing bust, or, much less frequently, a laureate bust to right. The present example with its bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust to right appears to be a very well preserved example of a previously unknown variety.

708. Antoninus Pius Æ Dupondius. Rome, AD 140-144. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, radiate head right / FELICITAS AVG, Felicitas standing left, holding branch and caduceus; S-C across fields. RIC 658; C. 367. 13.88g, 27mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Ex ACR 6, 10 December 2012, lot 929.

173

500


709. Antoninus Pius AR Denarius. Rome, AD 152-153. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVI, laureate head right of Antoninus Pius / COS IIII, Fortuna standing right, holding rudder on globe and cornucopiae. RIC 222; Cohen 270. 3.56g, 18mm, 12h. Mint State.

200

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex A. Tkalec, 9 May 2011, lot 160.

Three Rare Aurei of Antoninus Pius

710. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 157-158. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P IMP II, bare head right / TR POT XXI COS IIII, Salus standing right, holding snake in her arms which she feeds from a patera held in her left hand. RIC 279b; Calic贸 1683. 7.15g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine. Rare.

1,000

711. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 158-159. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, bareheaded bust to right, drapery on left shoulder / TEMPL DIVI AVG REST, octastyle temple of Divus Augustus surmounted by a quadriga and statues on the corners and by the steps; COS IIII in exergue. Calic贸 1625; RIC -; C. -. 7.16g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine, edge scrape on obv. Very Rare. There are no examples of this variety in CoinArchives, and it was unknown to RIC and Cohen.

3,000

712. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 159-160. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXIII, bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed bust right / PIETATI AVG COS IIII, Pietas standing facing, head left, holding globe in extended right hand and child in her left arm; a child standing to either side. RIC III 302; Calic贸 1601a; Biaggi 750; BMCRE 983. 7.23g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

174

5,000


A Faustina Aureus of Great Beauty and Style

713. Diva Faustina Senior AV Aureus. Rome, after AD 141. DIVA FAVSTINA, diademed, veiled and draped bust of the deified Faustina to left / AVGVSTA, Ceres standing to left, veiled, holding torch in each hand. C. 76; BMC A. Pius 407; RIC A. Pius 357b; Calicó 1759 (this obverse die). 6.88g, 19mm, 11h. Fleur De Coin. A coin of great beauty and style.

20,000

Annia Galeria Faustina was born into a distinguished and well connected family; her father Marcus Annius Verus was three times consul and prefect of Rome, and she counted Sabina and Matidia as her maternal aunts. Sometime between AD 110 and 115 she married Titus Aurelius Fulvius Boionius Arrius Antoninus (who would later gain favour with Hadrian, be adopted and succeed to the throne, and be known to history as Antoninus Pius). Her marriage to Antoninus was a happy one and she bore him two sons and two daughters; her namesake, the only one to survive to adulthood, would marry the future emperor Marcus Aurelius. Faustina was by all accounts a beautiful woman noted for her wisdom, though the Historia Augusta criticized her as having ‘excessive frankness’ and ‘levity’. Throughout her life, as a private citizen and as empress, Faustina was involved in assisting charities for the poor and sponsoring the education of Roman children, particularly girls. When she died in AD 140 shortly after her fortieth birthday her husband Antoninus was devastated. To honour her memory he had her deified, built a temple for her in the Forum and issued a prodigious coinage in her name as Diva Faustina. The most fitting and touching act of this grieving husband and emperor was to ensure her legacy of charitable work would be continued: he established an institution called Puellae Faustinianae (‘The Girls of Faustina’) to assist orphaned Roman girls, and he created a new alimenta or grain dole to feed the poor.

714. Diva Faustina Senior AV Aureus. Rome, AD 150. DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust of Faustina to right, her hair bound with pearls and piled up on top of her head / AVGVSTA, Ceres standing to left, holding two torches. Biaggi 808; BMC 403; Calicó 1758; C. 75; RIC 357a. 7.34g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

175

5,500


715. Diva Faustina Senior ร† Sestertius. Rome, AD 146-161. Struck under Antoninus Pius. DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right / AETERNITAS, Aeternitas standing left, holding globe surmounted by phoenix in right hand, lifting hem of dress with left. RIC III 1105 (Pius); Banti 5. 21.82g, 38mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine.

1,000

716. Marcus Aurelius, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 147-148. AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG PII F, bareheaded and draped bust right / TR POT II COS II, Fides standing facing, head right, holding grain ears and plate of fruits. RIC III 440b (Pius); Calicรณ 1926. 7.26g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

10,000

717. Marcus Aurelius, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 157-158. AVRELIVS CAES ANTON AVG P II F, bare head right / TR POT XII COS II, Apollo standing left, holding patera and lyre. RIC 474a; Calicรณ 1966. 6.83g, 18mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. Highly lustrous surfaces.

7,500

718. Marcus Aurelius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 161. IMP CAES M AVREL ANTONINVS AVG, laureate head right / CONCORDIAE AVGVSTOR TR P XV, togate figures of Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus clasping hands; COS III in exergue. C. 70; RIC 10; Calicรณ 1822. 7.22g, 19mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine.

5,000

719. Marcus Aurelius AV Aureus. Rome, March-December AD 161. IMP CAES M AVREL ANTONINVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PROV DEOR TR XV COS III, Providentia standing left, holding globe and cornucopiae. Calicรณ 1904; BMC 14; C. -; RIC 20. 7.00g, 19mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare, only two other examples on CoinArchives, both in low grade.

176

15,000


720. Marcus Aurelius AV Aureus. Rome, March-December AD 161. IMP CAES M AVREL ANTONINVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PROV DEOR TR XV COS III, Providentia standing left, holding globe and cornucopiae. Calicó 1904; BMC 14; C. -; RIC 20. 7.27g, 20mm, 11h. About Good Very Fine. Very Rare, only two other examples on CoinArchives, both in lower grade.

7,500

721. Marcus Aurelius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 164. ANTONINVS AVG ARMENIACVS, laureate, cuirassed bust right / P M TR P XVIII • IMP II COS III, Victory standing right, holding stylus in right hand, resting left hand on round shield inscribed VIC AVG in two lines, set on palm tree. C. 466 (misdescribed); BMC 270 note; RIC 90 var. (with drapery); Calicó 1887 var. (with drapery). 6.76g, 18mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

5,000

722. Marcus Aurelius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 164. ANTONINVS AVG ARMENIACVS, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P XVIII • IMP II COS III, Victory standing right, holding stylus in right hand, resting left hand on round shield inscribed VIC AVG in two lines, set on palm tree. RIC 90; MIR 18, 94-2/37; Calicó 1887; BMCRE 270 note. 7.04g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

7,500

723. Marcus Aurelius AV Aureus. Rome, December 164-August 165. ANTONINVS AVG ARMENIACVS, laureate and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P XIX • IMP II COS III, Victory standing right, holding stylus in right hand, resting left hand on round shield inscribed VIC AVG in two lines, set on palm tree. C. 475 var. (bare-headed); BMC 364 note; RIC 128; Calicó 1890. 6.80g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

5,000

724. Marcus Aurelius Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 164-165. M AVREL ANTONINVS AVG ARMENIACVS P M, laureate bust right / TR POT XIX IMP II COS III, Mars standing to right with spear and shield; S-C across fields. RIC 898; BMC 1229; C. 796. 24.52g, 32mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

750

725. Marcus Aurelius AR Denarius. AD 168. M ANTONINVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head right / TR P XXII IMP V COS III, Aequitas seated left, holding scales and cornucopiae. BMC 467; RIC 191. RSC 899. 2.93g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Flan flaw on reverse.

177

250


Victory in Germania

726.

Marcus Aurelius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 172. M ANTONINVS AVG TR P XXVI, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / IMP VI COS III, Victory standing right, holding shield inscribed VIC GER set on tree. RIC 256; C. 270; Calicó 1865. 7.00g, 19mm, 12h. Mint State. Extremely Rare. No examples have appeared at auction in over 15 years.

25,000

In the early 160s Germanic tribes and other nomadic people began launching a series of raids along the northern border of the empire, particularly into Gaul and across the Danube. This new impetus westwards was probably due to attacks from tribes further east. A first invasion of the Chatti in the province of Germania Superior was repulsed in 162. A far more serious incursion happened in late 166 or early 167 when a force of 6,000 Langobardi and Lacringi invaded Pannonia. This invasion was defeated by local forces (vexillations of the Legio I Adiutrix and the Ala I Ulpia Contariorum) with relative ease, but they marked the beginning of what was to come. In the same year, Vandals (Astingi and Lacringi) and the Sarmatian Iazyges invaded Dacia, and succeeded in killing its governor, Calpurnius Proculus. In 169 the Iazyges defeated and killed Claudius Fronto, Roman governor of Lower Moesia, who was attempting to subdue the tribes living between the Danube and the province of Dacia. While the Roman army was bogged down in this campaign other tribes took the opportunity to raid across the border. To the east, the Costoboci crossed the Danube, ravaged Thrace and descended the Balkans, reaching Eleusis, near Athens, where they destroyed the temple of the Eleusinian Mysteries. The worst was yet to come. In the west the Marcomanni, led by Ballomar, had formed a coalition of Germanic tribes. They crossed the Danube and won a decisive victory over a force of 20,000 Roman soldiers near Carnuntum. The larger part of this host then proceeded southwards towards into, while the remainder ravaged Noricum. The Marcomanni razed Opitergium (Oderzo) and besieged Aquileia - this was the first time hostile forces had entered Italy since 101 BC, when Gaius Marius defeated the Cimbri and Teutones. The praetorian prefect Furius Victorinus was defeated and slain while trying to relieve the city. The invaders would not be ejected until 171, a ‘victory’ which required stripping various border regions of their forces to concentrate against the Marcomanni, the establishment of a new military command, the fortification of the Alpine borders and the strengthening of the Danubian fleet. In 172 Aurelius led a counter-invasion across the Danube into Marcomannic territory. Few details survive of this punitive campaign, but it is clear that the Romans achieved success. The Marcomanni and their allies, the Naristi and the Cotini were subjugated, and the chief of the Naristi was killed by the Roman General Marcus Valerius Maximianus. The reverse of this coin celebrates the successes of Aurelius’ counter-attack, and perhaps to a lesser extent the expulsion of the Germanic invaders that had ravaged the Alpine provinces.

178


The Rain and Lightning Miracles

727.

Marcus Aurelius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 172. M ANTONINVS AVG TR P XXVI, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Marcus Aurelius to right / IMP VI COS III, Marcus Aurelius in military dress standing to left, holding thunderbolt in his right hand and reversed spear in his left; behind him stands Victory, who crowns him with a wreath held in her right hand, and holds a palm with her left; between them, pellet. Biaggi 856; BMC 566; C. 308; Foss 46; RIC 264; Sear II 4860; Calicó 1873. 6.95g, 20mm, 6h. Near Mint State. Very Rare.

25,000

The image of the emperor on the reverse of this coin is not only unusual, but also historically very interesting. Aurelius has here assumed the symbols of Jupiter, holding a thunderbolt and spear while Victory crowns him with laurels; we should interpret this image as representing the close connection between the supreme god Jupiter and the person of the emperor who was not only the head of state but also the pontifex maximus. Yet the dating of this issue seems to precede two important events that occurred across the Danube in the campaign of 172-4 against the Quadi and Sarmatian Iazyges: namely, the ‘lightning miracle’ and the ‘rain miracle’, which two incidents are recorded on the column of Marcus Aurelius in Rome. The Historia Augusta (Marcus 24.2) tells us that in the case of the ‘lightning miracle’ the emperor ‘summoned a thunderbolt from heaven against a siege-engine of the enemy by means of his prayers’ - the column clearly shows a stone enclosure filled with Romans, and outside a siege tower struck by a bolt of lightning that has burst into flames. The second and more important of the two events, the ‘rain miracle’ as related by Cassius Dio, describes how the Legio XII Fulminata was surrounded and entangled in a defile, suffering from thirst, and almost forced to surrender. A sudden storm then gave abundance of rain which refreshed the Romans, while hail and thunder confounded their enemies who were struck down by bolts of lightning. Thus the Romans were able to achieve a near bloodless victory. This was considered for a long time afterwards to have been a miracle and nothing less than divine intervention by Jupiter on behalf of the Romans. That the issue pre-dates the rain miracle seems relatively certain, since it is well attested that Aurelius’ seventh acclamation as Imperator occurred in the immediate aftermath of the rain miracle. The depiction then of Aurelius on the reverse of this coin, wielding the power of Jupiter, seems curiously prophetic.

179


The Golden Equestrian Statue of MarcusAurelius

728. Marcus Aurelius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 173-174. M ANTONINVS AVG TR P XXVIII, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind / IMP VI COS III, Marcus Aurelius on horseback right, raising right hand, parazonium at his side. Calicó 1869; RIC 294; C. 303. 7.09g, 19mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin. Extremely Rare, no examples have been offered at auction for more than 15 years.

25,000

Perhaps struck to coincide with a triumph relating to his campaigns against the Marcomanni, Quadi and Iazyges which was delayed until after a revolt in the east led by Avidius Cassius could be put down, the reverse of this coin depicts the famous equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius. Cast in bronze and clad in gold, it is today the only fully surviving bronze statue of a pre-Christian emperor. Although there had been many imperial equestrian statues, most were melted down for their metal to be used either for coin or new sculptures. Many were also destroyed for no better reason than because medieval Christians thought that they were pagan idols. It is only because this statue was erroneously believed to be of Constantine, the first Christian emperor, that it was not also destroyed. The original position of the statue is debated, though the Forum Romanum and the Piazza Colonna (where Aurelian’s column stands) are likely suggestions. In the 8th century it stood in the Lateran Palace in Rome, from where it was relocated in 1538 to the Piazza del Campidoglio (Capitoline Hill) during Michelangelo’s redesign of the Hill. Though he disagreed with its central positioning, he designed a special pedestal for it. The original statue is now on display in the Capitoline Museum in Rome, and a replica now overlooks Rome in its stead. Standing at over 4 metres tall, the statue shows Marcus Aurelius holding his right hand out and slightly open in the traditional gesture of peace and clemency; some historians assert that a fallen enemy may have been sculpted begging for mercy under the horse’s raised hoof (based on accounts from medieval times which suggest that a small figure of a bound barbarian chieftain once crouched underneath the horse’s front right leg). It is a fitting representation of an emperor who has been universally admired as a philosopher-emperor, and who saw himself not as a conqueror but as a bringer of peace - an attitude evidenced by the emperor being garbed in a toga rather than military dress.

729. Marcus Aurelius Æ Dupondius. Rome, AD 174-175. M ANTONINVS AVG GERM TR P XXIX, radiate head right / LIBERALITAS AVG VII IMP VII COS III, Liberalitas standing left, holding abacus and cornucopiae. RIC 1152. 13.20g, 26mm, 4h. Near Extremely Fine. Glossy dark patina.

180

350


Celebrating Marriage

730. Faustina Junior AV Aureus. Rome, circa AD 145. Struck under Antoninus Pius. FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust left, wearing hair fastened in bun at back of head / CONCORDIA, dove standing to right. RIC III 503b (Pius); Strack 507; Calicó 2044c (same dies); Biaggi 922 (same obv. die); BMCRE 1090. 7.32g, 20mm, 4h. Near Mint State; very minor marks, light brush mark on left obv. field. Rare.

15,000

Struck under her father Antoninus Pius, this magnificent aureus commemorates the April AD 145 marriage of Annia Galeria Faustina Junior to her maternal cousin Marcus Aurelius. The marriage was arranged by her father Antoninus at the time of his adoption and nomination as successor by Hadrian. Faustina had previously been engaged to Lucius Verus, whose father had been Hadrian’s designated heir until the time of his death. At the time of the engagement Antoninus also formally adopted Aurelius. Since Aurelius was therefore legally Antoninus Pius’ son, under Roman law he was marrying his sister; Antoninus would thus have had to formally release Faustina from his paternal authority for the ceremony to take place. Little is specifically known of the ceremony, but the Historia Augusta claims it to have been noteworthy. The reverse type featuring the dove and the legend CONCORDIA relate directly to the invocation of the goddess for a harmonious and stable marriage, while the dove is known to be monogamous throughout its lifetime. Faustina accompanied Aurelius on various military campaigns, which perhaps gave rise to the vicious rumours and negative views that Roman sources generally give of her character. The Historia Augusta alleges that she consorted with soldiers, gladiators and men of rank, and that she was perhaps behind the revolt of Avidius Cassius against her husband in 175. However, she was held in high esteem by her husband and was given divine honours after her death.­

731. Faustina Junior AR Denarius. Rome, AD 147-150. FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right, with strings of pearls in hair / VENVS, Venus standing facing, head left, holding apple and dolphin-entwined rudder. RIC 517c (Pius); RSC 266a. 3.74g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

200

732. Lucius Verus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 161. IMP CAES L AVREL VERVS AVG, bare head right / CONCORDIAE AVGVSTOR TR P, Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, both togate, standing facing each other, clasping hands; in exergue, COS II. C 44; BMC 31; RIC 450; Calicó 2111. 7.33g, 19mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

181

7,500


733

734

733. Lucius Verus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 161. IMP L AVREL VERVS AVG, bare head right / PROV DEOR TR P COS II, Providentia standing left, holding globe and cornucopiae. RIC 463; C. 144. 3.38g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, attractively toned. 200 734. Lucius Verus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 161-162. IMP L AVREL VERVS AVG, bare bust right / PROV DEOR TR P II COS II, Providentia, standing left, holding globe and cornucopiae. RIC 482. 3.46g, 17mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 500

735. Lucius Verus Æ Sestertius. AD 163-164. L VERVS AVG ARMENIACVS, laureate head right / TR P IIII IMP II COS II, Mars standing right, holding spear and shield set on ground; S-C across fields. RIC 1384; MIR 18, 87-16/30; BMCRE 1115 note (Aurelius); C. 232. 23.18g, 31mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Dark brown patina.

500

Ex Tony Hardy Collection, CNG E-Auction 120, 10 August 2005, lot 202.

736. Lucius Verus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 167. L VERVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head right / TR P VII IMP IIII COS III, Aequitas standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae. RIC 576 (Aurelius); MIR 18, 146-14/30; RSC 297. 3.31g, 19mm, 11h. Near Mint State.

200

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex A. Tkalec, 27 October 2011, lot 186.

737. Lucilla Æ Sestertius. AD 169-183. LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in bunch at back of the head / IVNO REGINA, Juno standing facing in long dress, veiled head turned left, holding sceptre and patera; at her feet, peacock left, S-C across fields. RIC 1751; C. 43; BMC 1207. 25.98g, 34mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Lightly tooled and smoothed.

1,500

738. Commodus, as Caesar, Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 175-176. Struck under Marcus Aurelius. L AVREL COMMODO CAES AVG FIL GERM SARM, bareheaded, draped and cuirassed bust right / IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding sceptre and thunderbolt and unfolding mantle above Commodus standing left, holding palladium and parazonium; S-C across fields. RIC 1525; BMC 1524; C. 244. 29.95g, 31mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Rare. From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Numismatik Lanz 157, 9 December 2013, lot 330.

182

1,000


Ex Biaggi Collection, Calic贸 Plate Coin

739.

Commodus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 177. IMP L AVREL COMMODVS AVG GERM SARM, laureate and draped bust right / TR P II COS P P, two captives seated at foot on trophy of arms, one with hands bound, the other in attitude of mourning; DE SARM in exergue. RIC 634 (Aurelius); Calic贸 2239 (this coin); Mazzini 98 (this coin); Biaggi 985 (this coin). 7.20g, 19mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

10,000

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 49, 21 October 2008, lot 291; Ex Biaggi Collection, privately purchased in 1958. That this was the best example which could be found by either Biaggi for his superlative collection or by Calic贸 for his comprehensive illustrative work on the Roman aurei is an indicator of how rare this coin actually is. It is furthermore the only example present on CoinArchives, being the only specimen of its type to have been offered to the market since electronic records began. The victory to which the reverse of this coin refers is that achieved by Marcus Aurelius over the Sarmatian Iazyges in AD 175, in the closing phase of the First Marcomannic War. After several military successes, Aurelius ended hostilities by signing a treaty with the Iazyges which secured the release of over 100,000 Roman captives, and which additionally required that 6,000 Sarmatian auxiliary cavalrymen be provided to the Roman army. Most of these (approximately 5,500) were immediately dispatched to Britain, a deployment which has been theorised by Susan V. Tomory (A New View of the Arthurian Legends, Institute of Hungarian studies) to have played a part in the development of the Arthurian legend. This was a decisive victory for Aurelius, and indeed the Iazyges never again represented a threat to the empire. Assuming the title Sarmaticus, Aurelius and Commodus celebrated a joint triumph on 23 December 176, in commemoration of which the Aurelian column was erected to mirror the achievements of his predecessor Trajan. Four days later Commodus was granted the title of Imperator, and in the middle of the following year he was proclaimed Augustus to formally share power alongside his father.

183


Apparently Unique

740.

Commodus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 183-184. M COMMODVS ANTON AVG PIVS, laureate and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P VIIII IMP VI COS IIII P P, Jupiter standing to left, holding sceptre and thunderbolt; at his feet, an eagle standing to left with head reverted. BMC 116 var.; RIC 70 var.; Calicó 2299 var. 7.19mm, 20mm, 12h. Near Mint State. Apparently Unique.

20,000

One of only three examples of this type that have appeared at auction in fifteen years, this coin’s rarity is dramatically underestimated by RIC and Calicó. The Biaggi specimen, which was sold in NAC 49 in October 2008 (lot 295) and subsequently resold by Hirsch was only ‘Very Fine’ in grade, and was the best example that could be found by Calicó for inclusion in that reference work. A further example with a variant bust type was recently offered in a Heritage auction. The cataloguers of that coin also noted the discrepancy between its stated rarity in the references and the number of actual examples present in the market. This example is also a variant of RIC 70/Calicó 2299, as the bust does not display the drapery which is present on the Biaggi/Calicó or BM examples. The obverse die is in fact one used in conjunction with the Jupiter seated type (RIC 69); its use with this reverse die is previously unknown. The meglomania of Commodus’ later years is well attested in the ancient sources, with his worship of Hercules becoming so intense that eventually he came to believe himself an incarnation of the mythological hero. Other reverse types boldly proclaim his aspirations to divinity and attest to Commodus’ belief that he was a demi-god and the son of Jupiter - the sponsor, or guardian, of the security and health of the emperor.

184


Rare Bimetallic Medallion

741.

Commodus Æ Bimetallic Medallion. Rome, AD 189. M COMMODVS ANTONINVS PIVS FELIX AVG BRIT, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right / MINER VICT P M TR P XIIII IMP VIII, Minerva, helmeted, wearing chiton and himation, standing left, holding spear in left hand and Victory on right; oval shield at feet to left, trophy of arms with shields at base to right; COS V P P in exergue. Gnecchi II, p. 57, 48; MIR p. 18, 1132 (issue 59/60). 70.01g, 41mm, 6h. Very Fine. Extremely Rare.

7,250

Ex Numismatik Lanz 145, 5 January 2009, lot 127; Ex Egger XXXIX, 15 January 1912, lot 1057; Deaccessioned from the collection of Emperor Franz Josef I of Austria. Medallions were struck relatively often during this period, produced by the mint of Rome toward the end of the year, their purpose being not for financial circulation but for distribution as commemorative gifts to foreign dignitaries or other persons of merit. Their bimetallic composition was for primarily aesthetic reasons, and a means by which Rome (and the mint workers) could show off a technical accomplishment. Commodus is often credited by the ancient sources with the near destruction of the Roman Empire, through a combination of disinterest in the governance of Rome and an all-consuming belief that he was of god-like status. With his accession, says the contemporary historian Cassius Dio, “our history now descends from a kingdom of gold to one of iron and rust, as affairs did for the Romans of that day” (LXXII.36.4). By the latter years of his reign when this medallion was struck, Commodus believed Hercules was his divine patron, and he worshipped him so intensely that eventually he came to believe himself an incarnation of the mythological hero, reinforcing the image he was cultivating of himself as a demigod who, as the son of Jupiter, was the representative of the supreme god of the Roman pantheon. The growing megalomania of the emperor permeated all areas of Roman life, as is witnessed in the material record by the innumerable statues erected around the empire that had been set up portraying him in the guise of Hercules, and his coinage.

185


742. Pertinax AR Denarius. Rome, January-March AD 193. IMP CAES P HELV PERTIN AVG, laureate head right / OPS DIVIN TR P COS II, Ops seated left, holding two grain ears. RIC 8a; RSC 33. 3.54g, 18mm, 6h. Very Fine, attractively toned. Rare.

750

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group 90, 23 May 2012, lot 1593.

Rare and Well-Pedigreed Didia Clara Aureus

743. Didia Clara, Daughter of Didius Julianus, AV Aureus. March-May AD 193. DIDIA CLARA AVG, draped bust right / HILAR TEMPOR, Hilaritas standing left, holding palm branch in right hand and cornucopiae in left. C. 2; BMC 13 (Didius Julianus); RIC 10 (same); Calicó 2402. Very Fine. Scattered marks and scratches. Extremely Rare.

20,000

Ex Sotheby’s ‘Collection of Highly Important Greek and Roman Coins’, 20 June 1979; lot 123; Ex Münzen & Medaillen XXI, 9 March 1960, lot 64; Ex Vicomte de Quelen Collection, Rollin-Feuardent, 7 May 1888, lot 1267. This aureus, struck in the year her father bought the throne of the Roman Empire at auction, shows Didia Clara as the proud bearer of the title Augusta which she and her mother Manlia Scantilla had assumed. Although she was allegedly the most beautiful woman in all of Rome, we know hardly anything about her life. She was married to Cornelius Repentinus, who served as a prefect of Rome during her father’s brief reign. Silver coins of this enigmatic Augusta are rare, and in gold they are very seldom seen.

744. Didia Clara AR Denarius. Rome, AD 193. Struck under Didius Julianus. DIDIA CLARA AVG, draped bust right / HILAR TEMPOR, Hilaritas standing left, holding long palm frond and cornucopiae. RIC 10; RSC 3. 2.38g, 18mm, 12h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

186

1,000


745. Didia Clara AR Denarius. Rome, AD 193. Struck under Didius Julianus. DIDIA CLARA AVG, draped bust right / HILAR TEMPOR, Hilaritas standing left, holding long palm frond and cornucopiae. RIC 10; RSC 3. 3.09g, 17mm, 11h. Very Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

Apparently Unique and Unpublished

746. Pescennius Niger AR Denarius. Antioch, AD 193-194. IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVST AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIAE AVG, Niger standing left, holding globe and sword hilt, crowned by Victory standing left behind him, holding palm. RIC -; BMC -; RSC -. Cf. CNG 69, 8 June 2005, lot 1648 & HJ Berk 126, 23 April 2002, lot 348 & Roma 7, 22 March 2014, lot 1090 for same reverse but with different obv. bust type. 2.89g, 19mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautifully sound metal, attractively toned.

7,500

Apparently unique and unpublished, and undoubtedly the finest of just four coins bearing this reverse type, and certainly also in the first rank of all surviving denarii of Pescennius Niger. The scarcity of Pescennius Niger’s coinage today belies the fact that it was struck on a monumental scale, and we can only assume that after his defeat at the hands of Septimius Severus in AD 194 his coins were meticulously recalled and melted. Although it has been extensively published, there are such a huge number of minor varieties that no single catalogue is without numerous lacunae. It appears that the all of Niger’s coins were struck at Antioch and possibly a subsidiary mint operating at Caesarea in Cappadocia.

747. Pescennius Niger AR Denarius. Antioch, AD 193-194. IMP CAES C PESCEN NIG IVST AVG, laureate head right / VICTOR IVST AVG, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm. RIC -, cf. 81a-f; BMC -; C. -. 3.16g, 18mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Apparently unique variety of this very rare type.

187

1,000


748. Pescennius Niger AR Denarius. Antioch, AD 193-194. IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVST AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIAE AVG, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch. RIC IV 86 var. (obv. legend and bust type); RSC 74 var. (same). 2.30g, 18mm, 2h. Near Very Fine, porous, scrapes on bust. Rare bust type, apparently unpublished with this reverse type.

300

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

749. Clodius Albinus, as Caesar, Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 194-195. D CLOD SEPT ALBIN CAES, bareheaded bust right, slight drapery / FELICITAS COS II, Felicitas, draped, standing left, holding caduceus and sceptre; S-C across field. RIC 52b; Banti 6. 21.60g, 29mm, 12h. Very Fine. Attractive green patina.

1,000

750. Clodius Albinus, as Caesar, Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 194-195. D CLOD SEPT ALBIN CAES, bare head of Clodius Albinus right / MINERVA PACIF COS II, Minerva standing left, holding olive branch, spear and shield; S-C across fields. RIC 54; BMCRE 535. 20.14g, 30mm, 6h. Good Very Fine, a bold and well rendered portrait.

1,000

751. Septimius Severus Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 196. SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIII, laureate and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P IIII COS II P P, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm branch; S-C across fields. C. 420; BMC 591; RIC 725. 15.76g, 28mm, 5h. Very Fine.

188

500


752. Septimius Severus AR Denarius. Laodicea, AD 198. L SEP SEVERVS PER AVG P M IMP XI, laureate head right / SALVTI AVGG, Salus seated right, feeding serpent coiled around altar. RIC 497. 3.36g, 20mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

150

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

753. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 202-210. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / RESTITVTOR VRBIS, Roma seated left on shield, holding Victory and sceptre, shield behind. RIC 288; Calicó 2529; BMC 358. 6.76g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

4,500

Contemporary Indian Imitation

754. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Contemporary Indian imitation, circa AD 202-210. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / LIBERALITAS AVGG V, Liberalitas standing left holding scales and cornucopiae. Cf. RIC 277; Cf. Calicó 2478. 7.27g, 20mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

6,000

There was significant trade between Rome and India in the first two centuries AD, with India’s perfumes, spices and gems exchanged for Rome’s linen, glass and wine. Large quantities of Roman gold and silver coins have been found in South India alongside many examples of local imitations, some faithful to the original style, others not so. Many of these coins display indications of having been mounted for jewellery, suggesting that the style of Roman coins (as well as the precious metal they were made from) was deemed fashionable by the wealthy citizens of India. From the early third century onwards, direct Indo-Roman trade declined, and communications with India passed into the hands of intermediaries, making the this coin among the latest of its kind.

189


Hope for a Dynasty

755.

Septimius Severus, with Caracalla and Geta, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 209. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / CONCORDIA AVGVSTORVM, Caracalla and Geta, both laureate and togate, standing facing one another, supporting between them a globe surmounted by Victory standing left, holding wreath in right hand and palm frond in left. RIC IV 255; Calicó 2435a; Biaggi 1064; BMCRE 312. 7.30g, 21mm, 12h. Near Mint State. Very Rare.

20,000

This reverse type neatly shows the hope Severus held for unity and amity between his two sons, and his wish for them to rule together following his death and thus continue the dynasty he had founded. Imperial propaganda presented the image of a happy family that shared the responsibilities of rule: Severus’ wife Julia Domna was his trusted counsellor, his older son Caracalla his second in command, and his younger son, appointed Augustus in 209, was entrusted with administrative and bureaucratic duties. Yet the brothers’ disdain for one another is well-attested; Dio Cassius relates that ‘the two pretended to love and commend each other, but in all that they did they were diametrically opposed, and anyone could see that something terrible was bound to result from the situation.’ Following Severus’ death whilst on campaign in Caledonia in 211, the two brothers returned to Rome from Britannia to their joint rule under the watchful eye of their mother. The brothers argued and fought over every law and every appointment, the situation becoming sufficiently unbearable that by the end of the year during the festival of Saturnalia, Caracalla attempted to have Geta murdered, without success. Later, under the pretext of meeting for a reconciliation, Caracalla had his brother slain in his mother’s arms by members of the Praetorian Guard loyal to him. After a tumultuous and bloodthirsty reign of less than six years, Caracalla was assassinated by an officer of his personal bodyguard while relieving himself at a roadside near Carrhae. Although after a brief interlude the line of Septimius’ father Bassianus would continue for some time yet in the form of Elagabalus (Caracalla’s first cousin, once removed) and later Severus Alexander, Caracalla’s death firmly extinguished Septimius’ dream for his sons to continue the Severan dynasty he had laboured to establish.

190


756. Julia Domna AR Antoninianus. Rome, AD 215-217. IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane, set on crescent / LVNA LVCIFERA, Luna driving biga of horses to left, with fold of drapery floating around and above head. RIC 379a (Caracalla); RSC 106. 3.35g, 19mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

757. Caracalla AR Denarius. Rome, AD 198-199. IMP CAES M AVR ANTON AVG, laureate and draped bust right / SECVRIT ORBIS, Securitas seated right on throne, resting head upon hand and holding sceptre; lighted and garlanded altar to right. RIC IV 22; C. 571. 3.15g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Well detailed reverse.

400

758. Caracalla Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 210-213. M AVREL ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / SECVRITATI PERPETVAE, Securitas seated to right in front of altar, propping head on hand and holding sceptre; S-C in exergue. RIC 512a; C. 576. 24.36g, 31mm, 12h. Very Fine.

750

759. Caracalla AR Denarius. Rome, AD 214. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right / P M TR P XVII COS IIII P P, Jupiter, naked to waist, standing left, holding thunderbolt and sceptre; eagle at feet left. RIC 240; C. 239. 3.26g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

250

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

760. Geta, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Laodicea ad Mare, AD 198-200. L SEPTIMIVS GETA CAES, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right / SPEI PERPETVAE, Spes advancing left, holding flower and lifting hem of skirt. Cf. RIC 96 (bust); BMC 688; RSC 192a. 3.96g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

191

150


761. Macrinus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 218. IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae. RIC IV 53; Clay Issue 3; RSC 2b (Antioch). 3.41g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine, area of roughness on reverse. Rare bust type for issue.

250

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

762. Macrinus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 217-218. IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right / AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing, head left, holding scales and cornucopiae. RIC 53. 3.37g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

763. Macrinus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 217-218. IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing facing, head right, resting foot on globe, holding two standards. RIC 67; BMC 65; RSC 23f. 3.26g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

200

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

764. Macrinus Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 217-218. IMP CAES M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate, cuirassed bust right / PONTIF MAX TR P P P, Felicitas standing left holding long caduceus and cornucopiae; S-C across fields. C. 80; RIC 121. 25.94g, 32mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine; minor cleaning marks on obverse.

3,000

765. Diadumenian, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 217-218. M OPEL ANT DIADVMENIAN CAES, bare-headed, draped bust right / PRINC IVVENTVTIS, Diadumenian standing facing, head right, holding standard and sceptre, two more standards to right. RIC 102. 3.68g, 20mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Scarce. Ex DNW Auction 73, 14 March 2007, lot 533.

192

500


766. Diadumenian, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 217-218. M OPEL ANT DIADVMENIAN CAES, bare-headed, draped bust right / PRINC IVVENTVTIS, Diadumenian standing facing, head right, holding standard and sceptre, two more standards to right. RIC 102. 2.99g, 20mm, 7h. Extremely Fine. Hairline flan crack. Scarce.

500

767. Diadumenian, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 217-218. M OPEL ANT DIADVMENIAN CAES, bare headed, draped and cuirassed bust right / PRINC IVVENTVTIS, Diadumenian standing facing, head right, holding standard and sceptre, two more standards to right. RIC 102. 2.73g, 19mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine.

500

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex A. Tkalec, 29 February 2012, lot 213.

768. Julia Paula AR Denarius. Rome, AD 219-220. IVLIA PAVLA AVG, draped bust right / CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left, holding patera in her extended right hand, resting left arm on armrest; star in left field. RIC IV 211 (Elagabalus); Thirion 452; RSC 6a; BMCRE 172-4. 3.53g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

769. Julia Paula AR Denarius. Rome, AD 219-220. IVLIA PAVLA AVG, draped bust right / CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left, holding patera in her extended right hand, resting left arm on armrest; star in left field. RIC IV 211 (Elagabalus); Thirion 452; RSC 6a; BMCRE 172-4. 3.46g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

200

770. Julia Maesa Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 220-222. Struck under Elagabalus. IVLIA MAESA AVG, draped bust right / SAECVLI FELICITAS, Felicitas standing left, holding long caduceus and sacrificing out of patera over lighted altar to left; S-C across, star in right field. RIC 422; Thirion 427; Banti 11. 22.42g, 29mm, 12h. Very Fine.

193

300


771. Severus Alexander AR Denarius. Rome, AD 225. IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate and draped bust right / VICTORIA AVG, Victory running left, holding wreath and palm. RIC IV 180; BMCRE 268; RSC 564. 2.52g, 20mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine.

200

772. Severus Alexander AR Denarius. Rome, AD 231. IMP SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate bust right, slight drapery / FIDES MILITVM, Fides seated left, holding signum in each hand. RIC IV 193; BMC 684; RSC 51. 3.08g, 20mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

150

From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Classical Numismatic Group e254, 20 April 2011, lot 312.

773

774

773. Severus Alexander AR Denarius. Rome, AD 231. IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG, laureate bust right, slight drapery / PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, holding grain ears over modius in right hand, anchor in left. RIC IV 252; RSC 508a. 3.53g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

100

774. Severus Alexander AR Denarius. Rome, AD 232. IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right / MARS VLTOR, Mars advancing right, holding spear and shield. RIC 246. 3.33g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. 125

775. Orbiana Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 225-227. SALL BARBIA ORBIANA AVG, diademed, draped bust right / CONCORDIA AVGVSTORVM, Severus Alexander standing right, togate, holding scroll and clasping hands with Orbiana standing left. RIC 657. 19.30g, 31mm, 11h. Very Fine. Rare.

2,000

776. Julia Mamaea AR Denarius. Rome, circa AD 232. IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed and draped bust right / FECVND AVGVSTAE, Fecunditas standing left, holding cornucopiae and extending right hand over child before her. RIC 331; RSC 5. 3.22g, 19mm, 12h. Near Mint State. 250 Ex Freeman & Sear MBS 15, 27 June 2008, lot 405.

194


777. Maximinus I AR Denarius. Rome, AD 236. IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P II COS P P, Maximinus standing left between two signa, raising hand and holding sceptre. RIC IV 3; BMCRE 77-9; RSC 55. 2.90g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine, light green deposit. Superbly rendered reverse.

200

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

778. Maximinus I Æ Sestertius. Rome, late AD 236-237. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, holding signum in each hand. RIC IV 78; BMCRE 140-1; Banti 4. 17.34g, 32mm, 1h. About Extremely Fine.

1,000

779. Maximus Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 236. C IVL VERVS MAXIMVS CAES, bare-headed, draped bust right / PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Maximus in military dress standing left, holding wand, two legionary signa to right; S-C across fields. RIC 9. 18.25g, 30mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Attractive dark patina.

1,500

Ex Wayne C. Phillips Collection of Roman Sestertii; Ex CNG Mail Bid Sale 84, 5 May 2010, lot 1182.

780. Gordian II Æ Sestertius. Rome, March-April AD 238. IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AFR AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / ROMAE AETERNAE, Roma seated left, holding Victory and sceptre; oval shield below seat. RIC IV 5; BMC 23-6; Banti 4. 19.05g, 31mm, 12h. Very Fine.

2,500

781. Balbinus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 238. IMP C D CAEL BALBINVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PROVIDENTIA DEORVM, Providentia standing left, holding a wand in lowered right hand over a globe at feet to left, and cornucopiae in left hand. RIC 7; RSC 23. 3.21g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Roma Numismatics IV, 30 September 2012, lot 644; Ex DNW 73, 14 March 2007, lot 548.

195

750


782. Balbinus AR Antoninianus. Rome, AD 238. IMP CAES D CAEL BALBINVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / CONCORDIA AVGG, clasped hands. RIC 10; RSC 3. 5.56g, 23mm, 12h. Very Fine.

300

783. Pupienus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 238. IMP C M CLOD PVPIENVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS II P P, Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and sceptre. RIC 6. 2.51g, 21mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

500

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

784. Gordian III AV Aureus. Rome, AD 240. IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / LIBERALITAS AVG II, Liberalitas standing facing, head left, holding abacus and cornucopiae. RIC 42; Calicó 3205. 4.99g, 20mm, 6h. Very Fine.

2,000

785. Gordian III AV Aureus. Rome, late AD 240-early AD 243. IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / VIRTVTI AVGVSTI, the ‘Farnese’ Hercules standing facing, head right, resting right hand on hip and placing left on club set on rock; lion skin beside club. RIC 108; Calicó 3242; Biaggi 1373-4. 5.27g, 21mm, 6h. Very Fine.

196

2,000


786. Gordian III AV Aureus. Rome, late AD 240-early AD 243. IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / VIRTVTI AVGVSTI, the ‘Farnese’ Hercules standing facing, head right, resting right hand on hip and placing left on club set on rock; lion skin beside club. RIC 108; Calicó 3242. 5.03g, 20mm, 12h. About Extremely Fine.

2,500

787. Gordian III AR Denarius. Rome, AD 240. IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana Lucifera standing right, holding long torch. RIC 127; RSC 69. 3.08g, 20mm, 1h. Mint State.

150

788. Gordian III AR Denarius. Rome, AD 238-244. IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and sceptre, leaning on shield set on ground. RIC 131; RSC 347. 3.19g, 21mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine, attractive old tone.

150

789. Gordian III Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 244. IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / FELICIT TEMPOR, Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and cornucopiae. RIC 328a; Banti 27. 18.80g, 31mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Sharp, well detailed portrait.

300

790. Philip I Æ As. Rome, AD 244. IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / PAX AETERNA, Pax standing facing, head left, holding branch and transverse sceptre. RIC 184b. 9.59g, 24mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Very well preserved for the issue. From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

197

300


791. Philip II, as Caesar, AR Antoninianus. Rome, AD 244-246. M IVL PHILIPVS CAES, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PRINCIPI IVVENT, Philip II standing left, holding globe and spear. RIC 218. 3.93g, 23mm, 6h. Near Mint State.

150

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

792. Philip II, as Caesar, Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 245. M IVL PHILIPPVS CAES, bare headed and draped bust right / PRINCIPI IVVENT, prince standing right, holding spear and globe; S-C across. RIC 255. 19.31g, 31mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

750

793. Herennia Etruscilla AV Aureus. Rome, AD 249-251. HER ETRVSCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right / PVDICITIA AVG, Pudicitia seated left, drawing veil from face and holding sceptre. RIC 59a; C. 18; Calicó 3308. 4.02g, 20mm, 12h. Extremely Fine; small contact mark at 1 o’clock on obverse. Very Rare.

10,000

Ex Numismatik Lanz Auction 150, 13 December 2010, lot 395.

794. Trebonianus Gallus Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 253. IMP CAES C VIBIVS TREBONIANVS GALLVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / APOLLO SALVTARI, Apollo standing left, holding branch and resting hand on lyre set on rock; S-C across fields. RIC 104a; Banti 6. 17.53g, 30mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

198

350


795. Aemilian AR Antoninianus. Rome, AD 253. IMP AEMILIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / HERCVL VICTORI, Hercules standing right leaning on club, holding bow. RIC 3b; RSC 13. 3.50g, 22mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

300

796. Aemilian AR Antoninianus. Rome, AD 253. IMP CAES AEMILIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P I P P, Aemilian standing left, sacrificing over altar from patera and holding sceptre; standard behind to the left. RIC IV 7; RSC 32. 3.34g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

250

797. Divus Valerian II Æ Sestertius. Rome, circa AD 258. Consecration issue, struck under Valerian I and Gallienus. DIVO CAES VALERIANO, bareheaded and draped bust right / CONSECRATIO, Funeral pyre in five tiers, the highest and lowest ornamented with festoons, the three between with standing figures, surmounted by Valerian II in spread biga; SC in exergue. RIC 35; Banti 3; Hunter 6.18.61g, 29mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Rare.

1,250

798. Postumus Ӕ Sestertius. Lugdunum, AD 261. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVG, Victory walking left, holding wreath and palm, captive at foot; SC in exergue. Bastien 100; Elmer 247; RIC 170. 13.47g, 31mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

799. Postumus AR Antoninianus. Trier, AD 266. IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / DIANAE LVCIFERAE, Diana advancing right, holding torch with both hands. RIC V 299; Mairat 118-9; AGK 11; RSC 33. 3.57g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

199

150


800. Postumus AR Antoninianus. Augusta Treverorum, AD 266. IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / MERCVRIO FELICI, Mercury standing facing, head right, holding caduceus and coin purse. RIC 313; C. 192; Elmer 413. 3.81g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

200

801. Carausius Æ Antoninianus. ‘C’ mint, AD 286-293. IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right / PAX AVG, Pax standing left holding branch and sceptre; S–P across field. C. 194; RIC 475; Hunter 131. 4.92g, 23mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. An exceptional example of the type, sharply struck, well detailed and perfectly preserved.

1,000

802. Claudius II Gothicus Æ Antoninianus. Mediolanum, circa AD 268-269. IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind / FIDES MILIT, Fides standing facing, head left, holding standards; S in exergue. Cf. RIC V 149 (bust type); Huvelin, ‘Chronologie du règne de Claude II le Gothique,’ QT XXI (1992), pg. 312; Venèra 9251; cf. Cohen 89 (same). 4.10g, 20mm, 12h. Near Mint State. Rare.

200

803. Claudius II Gothicus Æ Antoninianus. Siscia, AD 268-269. IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / VIRTVS AVG, Mars walking right, holding spear and trophy; P in exergue. RIC 172; C. 315. 3.21g, 20mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine.

100

804. Divus Claudius II Gothicus Æ Antoninianus. Mediolanum, November AD 270-January 271. Struck under Quintillus or Aurelian. DIVO CLAVDIO GOTHICO, radiate head right / CONSECRATIO, lighted altar; T in exergue. Normanby 1141; RIC V 264; Mairat 54. 2.84g, 19mm, 6h. Near Mint State.

200

100


201


202


Spectacular Double Aureus of Aurelian

805.

Aurelian AV Binio (Double Aureus). Antioch, January-September AD 275. IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right / RESTITVTOR ORIENTIS, Sol standing left with one hand raised and the other holding whip, chlamys over shoulder; at feet, two captives looking to left; IL in exergue. RIC -; C. -; BN -; MIR -; Calicó -; NAC 27, 12 May 2004, 479. 6.99g, 23mm, 12h. Near Mint State. Extremely Rare, apparently the second known specimen.

17,500

In 272, Aurelian turned his attention to the lost eastern provinces of the empire, the so-called Palmyrene Empire ruled by Queen Zenobia, which encompassed Syria, Palestine, Egypt and large parts of Asia Minor. Despite a pragmatic acknowledgement of Zenobia and Vabalathus at the beginning of his reign, and having granted them both the titles they craved, Aurelian’s driving ambition was to reunify and secure the sundered parts of the Roman empire. Marching east, Asia Minor was recovered with minimal resistance. Every city but Byzantium and Tyana surrendered quickly, and having spared Tyana from sack and despoliation supposedly because Apollonius of Tyana (a first century philosopher whom he greatly admired) appeared to him in a dream and implored him to mercy, many more cities submitted peacefully knowing that they would be treated leniently. Within six months, Aurelian stood at the gates of Palmyra. Zenobia was captured while attempting to flee, and paraded in golden chains in Aurelian’s triumph in Rome. The recovery of Egypt by the future emperor Probus and a return to Palmyra to deal with a Palmyrene rebel named Antiochus finally secured the eastern provinces. Aurelian was given the title of Restitutor Orientis (Restorer of the East) by the Senate, who would soon after confer upon him the title of Restitutor Orbis (Restorer of the World) when he brought the breakaway Gallic provinces back into the fold, thus reunifying the empire. In 275, Aurelian was preparing another campaign against the Sassanids. The deaths of Shapur I and Hormizd I in quick succession (272 and 273 respectively), and the rise to power of a weaker ruler (Bahram I), set the conditions for an invasion of the Sassanid Empire. Aurelian however never reached Asia Minor. He was assassinated by officers of the Praetorian guard who had been tricked by one of the emperor’s secretaries into believing Aurelius had ordered their executions. Zosimus tells us the secretary’s name was Eros, and that he feared punishment because he had told a lie on a minor issue. Thus perished one of the most competent and promising emperors of the age.

203


806. Zenobia Æ Antoninianus. Antioch, March-May AD 272. S ZENOBIA AVG, draped bust right, set on crescent / IVNO REGINA, Juno standing facing, looking left, holding patera and sceptre; at feet left, a peacock; star in left field. RIC 2 corr. (no star); Carson, Q. Tic VII, 1978, 4; BN 1267a. 3.79g, 20mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

6,000

The wife of the ruler of Palmyra, Septimia Zenobia came to power as regent for her son Septimius Vabalathus in AD 267 after the murder of her husband Septimius Odenathus, who had been entrusted with the defence of the Roman provinces in the east by the Emperor Gallienus. A strong character and very ambitious, Zenobia expanded her sphere of influence through the capture of the province of Egypt and the expulsion of the Roman prefect Tenagino Probus and his forces in 269, a campaign aided in its success in part due to the turmoil inside the Roman Empire after the death of Gallienus. The Roman east remained under the control of the kingdom of Palmyra under the subsequent emperors Claudius II and Quintillus, and when Aurelian came to power in 270 he pragmatically chose to acknowledge Zenobia and Vabalathus in order to allow himself time to first deal with various barbaric incursions and usurpers. Though the mint for the rare portrait coins of Zenobia has long been a topic of debate, it is generally agreed now that they were struck in Syria, most likely at Emesa or Antioch, both Roman mints that were taken by Zenobia during her advance into Roman territory and expansion of her empire. The imperial title Augusta is proudly displayed on her coinage, but Zenobia’s power was not to last. Having subdued the uprisings in the west, Aurelian marched on her with an army. Their forces met outside Antioch, resulting in a battle that routed Zenobia’s army, which fled to Emesa. Zenobia and her son attempted to escape through the desert with the help of the Sassanid Persians, but were captured by Aurelian’s horsemen and subsequently taken to Rome to be displayed during the emperor’s triumphant return to the city.

807. Probus Silvered Æ Antoninianus. Rome, AD 276. IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG, radiate bust left, wearing imperial mantle and holding eagletipped sceptre / SOLI INVICTO, Sol standing facing in spread quadriga, raising hand and holding globe and whip; RB below. RIC 204; Pink VI/1 p. 55. 4.34g, 22mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Exceptionally well preserved.

150

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

808. Probus Æ Antoninianus. Serdica, AD 276-282. IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield / SOLI INVICTO, Sol in spread quadriga, holding whip, KA•Г in exergue. RIC 862. 3.20g, 23mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

150

809. Divus Nigrinianus, son of Carinus, BI Antoninianus. Rome, AD 284. DIVO NIGRINIANO, radiate, youthful head right / CONSECRATIO, eagle standing facing with wings spread, head turned to left; KAA in exergue. C. 2; RIC 472. 3.45g, 22mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Very well preserved silvering.

2,500

Only a single inscription and the coins attest to the existence of Nigrinian, apparently a son of Carinus by Magnia Urbica, who died at a young age and was consecrated.

204


Extremely Rare Numerian Aureus

810.

Numerian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 284. IMP NVMERIANVS P F AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / VIRTVS AVGG, Hercules standing to right, leaning on club with his left hand and resting his left on his hip. Biaggi -; Calicó 4332-33; C. 100; RIC 407. 4.66g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

30,000

The great rarity of this coin is in large part due to the brevity of Numerian’s reign. In 282, the legions of the upper Danube in Raetia and Noricum rebelled and proclaimed the praetorian prefect Marcus Aurelius Carus emperor in opposition to Probus. Probus’ army, stationed in Sirmium, decided they did not wish to fight Carus and assassinated Probus instead. Carus, already sixty, immediately elevated his sons Carinus and Numerian to the rank of Caesar. In 283 Carus determined to take advantage of a succession crisis within the Sassanid empire, and marched east at the head of an army along with Numerian, while Carinus was left in charge in the West. The invasion met with great success, and the army was able to make huge incursions into Persian lands, and even capture the capital Ctesiphon. The campaign came to a premature end when Carus died suddenly (according to some sources, from a lightning strike). Numerian made an orderly retreat from Persia, and subsequently died in mysterious circumstances during the journey west. Amid rumours of murder, the prefect Aper was executed by the man who went on to become emperor. Diocletian, previously an officer under Carus, was acclaimed by the army and proceeded to continue the march west, meeting Carinus’ army in battle in Moesia and emerging as victor and emperor. The reverse of this stunning aureus typifies the propagandist nature of Roman coinage, and bestows on Numerian the quality of ‘virtus’, which encompassed valour, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth - the necessary attributes of a Roman and especially of an emperor. Coupled with the standing figure of Hercules, with his usual attributes of club and lion’s skin, this reverse references the military victories that Numerian and Carus achieved in the east and likens them to the completion of Hercules’ labours.

205


811. Diocletian AV Aureus. Antioch, AD 284-286. IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / IOVI CONSERVATORI AVG, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, O at his feet; SMA in exergue. C. 272; RIC 316; Depeyrot 1/1; Calicó 4515a. 4.27g, 21mm, 6h. Heavy brush marks in fields, otherwise Good Extremely Fine.

4,000

812. Diocletian AR Argenteus. Rome, AD 294. DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG, laureate head right / PROVIDENTIA AVGG, six-turreted camp gate with the four tetrarchs swearing oath over tripod. RIC 10var. (legend). 3.22g, 19mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

750

Ex Hirsch 196, 24 September 1997, lot 916.

813. Diocletian AR Argenteus. Ticinum, circa AD 294. DIOCLETIANVS AVG, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, the four tetrarchs sacrificing before campgate with six turrets. RIC VI 14a; Jelocnik 24; RSC 516d. 3.10g, 18mm, 5h. Near Mint State. Ex Numismatik Lanz 76, 18 May 1996, lot 817.

700

814. Diocletian AR Argenteus. Nicomedia, AD 295. DIOCLETIANVS AVG, laureate head right / VICTORIAE SARMATICAE, four-turreted camp gate with open doors; SMNΓ in exergue. RIC 22a; RSC 492a. 3.32g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

800

Ex Numismatik Lanz 123, 30 May 2005, lot 856.

815. Diocletian AR Argenteus. Rome, AD 295-297. DIOCLETIANVS AVG, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, tetrarchs sacrificing over altar before six-turreted enclosure. RIC 27a; RSC 516e. 3.21g, 18mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

206

650


816. Diocletian AR Argenteus. Siscia, AD 294-295. DIOCLETIANVS AVG, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before archway of campgate, SIS in exergue. RIC 46a. 3.13g, 19mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. Very Rare.

1,000

817. Maximian AR Argenteus. Rome, AD 294. MAXIMIANVS AVG, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with six turrets. RIC 27b; RSC 622e. 3.28g, 18mm, 6h. Mint State.

550

Ex Hirsch 198, 11 February 1998, lot 759.

818. Maximian AR Argenteus. Siscia, AD 295. MAXIMIANVS AVG, laureate head right / VICTORIA AVGG, the four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with six turrets; *SIS in exergue. RIC 55; Jelocnik -; RSC 547†b. 2.53g, 18mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine, very attractively toned. Privately purchased from Tradart, 1980s.

600

819. Constantius I, as Caesar, AR Argenteus. Ticinum, circa AD 294. CONSTANTIVS CAESAR, laureate head right / VICTORIA SARMAT, tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with six turrets. RIC 13a; C. 286; Sisak Hoard 35 and pl. 6, 1. 3.30g, 19mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin.

600

820. Constantius I, as Caesar, AR Argenteus. Siscia, AD 294. CONSTANTIVS CAESAR, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with eight turrets. RIC VI 44a; Jelocnik 9b; RSC 315†c. 3.29g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Privately purchased from Tradart, 1980s.

207

450


Severus II as Caesar

821.

Severus II, as Caesar, AR Argenteus. Serdica, AD 305-306. SEVERVS NOB C, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, three-turreted camp-gate with no doors, pellet in doorway, ·SM·SDB· in exergue. RIC -; Gautier 24 var. (officina); RSC -; Cf. NAC 62, 6 October 2011, lot 2089 (same obv. die). 3.29g, 21mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. Of the Highest Rarity.

8,000

Most likely struck to mark the commencement of the Second Tetrarchy in AD 305, this extremely rare coin is one of only a handful known, a few having come to light in a hoard about a decade ago. Struck using the same obverse dies as several known specimens, the reverse die of this issue is new, having the inclusion of a pellet in the doorway of the camp gate. The scarcity of these types might be explained by the short period of time during which Severus held the position of Caesar before being elevated by Galerius after the death of Constantius I in summer 306 - in a matter of months he was raised from the senior ranks of the army to Augustus in the West. However, his time as Augustus came to an abrupt end when he was tasked with the suppression of the revolt of Maxentius in Rome: he marched on the city at the head of an army previously commanded by Maximian, father of Maxentius, to whom his soldiers deserted. Severus fled to Ravenna where, in 307, he was persuaded by Maxentius to surrender. Despite Maximian’s assurances that he would be treated with respect, Severus was nonetheless displayed as a captive and later imprisoned at Tres Tabernae. When Galerius invaded Italy to suppress Maxentius and Maximian himself, Maxentius ordered Severus’ death. He was executed (or forced to commit suicide) on 16 September 307.

822. Maximinus II Æ Nummus. Nicomedia, AD 311. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right / IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory and sceptre, Г right, SMN in exergue. RIC 69b. 4.67g, 22mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Ex Roma Numismatics E-Sale 4, 28 December 2013, lot 917.

208

100


Calico Plato Coin

823. Licinius I AV Aureus. Thessalonica, circa AD 310. LICINIVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, chlamys hanging from left shoulder, holding thunderbolt in right hand and vertical sceptre in left; to left, eagle standing left, holding wreath in beak; A in right field, •SM•TS• in exergue. RIC VI 44a var. (control letter); Calicó 5121a (this coin); Depeyrot 5/2. 5.37g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

7,500

Pleasent Facing Bust of Licinius

824. Licinius I AV Aureus. Nicomedia, AD 321-322. LICINIVS AVG OB D V FILII SVI, bareheaded, draped and cuirassed bust facing / IOVI CONS LICINI AVG, Jupiter seated facing enthroned on platform, holding Victory on globe in right hand and sceptre in left; eagle with wreath in beak in left field; SIC X SIC XX in two lines on platform, SMNΔ in exergue. RIC 41; C. 128 var.; Calicó 5094; Alföldi 262; Jameson 477; Depeyrot 31/1. 5.30g, 21mm, 12h. Scattered marks, scuff on obverse, otherwise Good Extremely Fine.

15,000

Extremely Rare Nummus of Martinian

825. Martinian Æ Nummus. Nicomedia, AD 324. D N M MARTINIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on globe in right hand and eagle-tipped sceptre in left, captive on ground to right, X-IIΓ above, eagle to left holding wreath in beak; SMNΓ in exergue. RIC 45; C.3. 2.64g, 20mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, and very well preserved for the issue.

209

5,000


210


Honouring the Army of Gaul

826.

Constantine I AV Solidus. Trier, AD 312-313. CONSTANTINVS PF AVG, laurel and jewel diademed head right / VIRTVS EXERCITVS GALL, Mars walking to right, carrying spear and trophy, chlamys over left shoulder; TR in exergue. RIC -; Depeyrot 26/1. 4.39g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, Depeyrot notes only one example.

25,000

The reverse of this coin honours the army of Gaul which was responsible for supporting Constantine’s (illegal) elevation to the purple upon the death of his father at Eboracum (York) in AD 306, fought under him against the Frankish and Germanic tribes in several campaigns between 306 and 310, and which ultimately delivered him Rome and sole rule of the West in 312. The army of Gaul was a battle-hardened and effective force, regularly tested against the barbarian tribes which at this time made frequent incursions into Roman lands. They had also demonstrated a strong sense of loyalty to Constantine in 308 when the former emperor Maximian, then an exile in his realm, attempted to subvert a contingent of the army by declaring that Constantine was dead, taking the purple and pledging a large donative to any who would support him. Maximian failed to win them over and was forced to flee, and then commit suicide. It was on account of this devoted and veteran army that Constantine was able to win a crushing victory over the numerically superior force of Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge. The army of Gaul was drawn up in two lines, according to their customary tactics, but Constantine, perceiving that the opposing force outnumbered him and could envelop his line, suddenly reduced the second line and extended the front of his first to match that of Maxentius. Such manoeuvres in the moment of danger can only be executed without confusion by experienced troops, and commonly prove decisive. Yet because the battle was begun towards the end of the day and was contested with great obstinacy throughout the night there was, in the words of E. Gibbon, ‘less room for the conduct of the generals than for the courage of the soldiers’ (Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 1, Ch. XIV, 150). Maxentius’ units were forced back until he had no choice but to attempt a desperate retreat over the wooden pontoon bridge he had hastily built across the Tiber, the stone one having been destroyed in the course of siege preparations. This bridge collapsed, trapping Maxentius’ soldiers who either surrendered or, like his Praetorian cohorts, were killed to a man. Maxentius himself drowned while trying to swim across the river in desperation for escape. Thus from the very moment he had defeated Maxentius, gold, silver and bronze coins were struck at Constantine’s former capital and stronghold of Augusta Treverorum (Trier) celebrating the glory and heroism of the Gallic Army (‘GLORIA EXERCITVS GALL’ and ‘VIRTVS EXERCITVS GALL’).

211


827. Constantine I with Crispus and Constantine II, as Caesars, AR Miliarense. Sirmium, AD 320-324. CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, bare head right / CRISPVS ET CONSTANTINVS CC, confronted, bare-headed busts of Crispus and Constantine II, SIRM in exergue. RIC 14; RSC 3. 4.28g, 20mm, 2h. Good Very Fine, surfaces slightly corroded. Very Rare.

2,000

During his reign Constantine I made reforms to the monetary system that started with the introduction of a new gold coin, the solidus, and was followed by the re-establishment of pure silver coinage in place of the debased coins in circulation. This example, weighing 4.28g, is classified as a miliarense, which is the name applied to the pure silver coins of similar weight struck after 325. It could, therefore, be an early prototype as it was struck during the four year period that Constantine I used the city of Sirmium as his capital before moving to Nicomedia in AD 324.

828. Constantine I AV Solidus. Nicomedia, AD 335. Rosette diademed head right, with uplifted gaze / VICTORIA CONSTANTINI AVGVSTI, Victory, wearing long dress, seated to right on cuirass inscribing VOT XXX on shield held by Genius; SMNC in exergue. RIC 175; Depeyrot 44/1. 4.48g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine; slightly wavy flan. Rare.

4,000

829. Constantine I AV Solidus. Nicomedia, AD 335. CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA CONSTANTINI AVG, Victory seated to right on cuirass, inscribing VOT XXX on shield supported by winged Genius; SMNC in exergue. RIC 178; Depeyrot 44/2. 4.39g, 21mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

5,000

830. Constantine I AR Third Siliqua. Struck under Constantinople, AD 330. Pearl-diademed and draped bust right, wearing pearl necklace / Large K. RIC -; Bendall, Anonymous Type 4; RSC -; Mazzini 287; Göbl, Antike Numismatik (1978), pl. 10, 144. 1.04g, 12mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

1,000

831. Helena Æ Follis. Nicomedia, AD 325-326. FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and mantled bust right, wearing necklace / SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE, Securitas standing left, lowering branch and raising robe with right hand; MNΓ in exergue. RIC 129. 3.24g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

212

100


Stunning Solidus of Constantine II

832.

Constantine II AV Solidus. Siscia, AD 337-340. CONSTANTINVS PF AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA CONSTANTINI AVG, Victory standing to right, holding shield inscribed VOT XXX, foot on captive seated before; •SIS• in exergue. RIC 4. 4.40g, 22mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, no examples on CoinArchives.

10,000

Constantine II had a brief and somewhat wretched reign. When his father Constantine I ‘the Great’ died in AD 337 he became senior Augustus, ruling jointly with his brothers Constans and Constantius II. Possessed of a milder temper than his younger siblings, at the meeting at Sirmium in Pannonia where the empire was divided between the three, Constans and Constantius managed to trump Constantine by handing him only Britannia, Gaul and Hispania, a poor share of the empire for the senior Augustus. An uneasy peace characterised the years after the division of the empire, with Constantine having some control over the lands of his brother Constans as he was his guardian, and so feeling consoled in his position. However, after the death of Hannibalianus and the division of the lands under his control between Constans and Constantius, trouble flared: Constantine demanded that Constans hand over the provinces of Africa to recompense his elder brother for the gains he had made in Thrace and Macedonia. Growing increasingly bitter, and after further infighting over the borders of certain African provinces controlled by Carthage had occured, in 340 Constantine launched an unsuccessful invasion of Italy. The 24-year old emperor was killed in battle, and disgraced by being flung into a river by Constans’ men. Probably struck early in his reign, this particularly rare solidus uses a reverse type of his father’s. At the time of his death, Constantine I had recently celebrated thirty years as emperor, and Constantine II twenty years as Caesar. The elder Constantine had also successfully reconquered Dacia by 336, a province relinquished under Aurelian sixty years before. This reverse marks the celebration of these achievements and the assumption of VOTA XXX by Constantine II.

213


214


Unique 1 1/2 Multiple of Constans

833

Constans AV Multiple of 1 1/2 Solidi. Siscia, AD 337. FL IVL CONSTANS PF AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VIRTVS CONSTANTIS AVG, Constans in military attire standing to left, holding labarum and reversed spear; at his feet, a seated captive with hands tied behind; SIS* in exergue. Depeyrot -; Bastien, Donativa -; Toynbee -; Gnecchi -; RIC -, for types cf. Aquileia 3 = Paolucci - Zub, La monetazione di Aquileia romana, Padova 200, 365. 6.81g, 27mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Apparently unique and unpublished.

35,000

This unique and impressive gold multiple belongs to the period immediately following the assumption of the Augustate by Constantine II, Constantius and Constans following the death of their father Constantine I. Constantine had died on 22 May 337 and was buried consecrated in the church of the Holy Apostles in what was, according to Eusebius, essentially a Roman military funeral. There was, of course, no precedent for burying a Christian emperor. The all important army was induced to accept the authority only of the dead emperor’s sons; by the summer all the descendants of Theodora and their partisans were massacred and bloody purges of all potential rivals continued well into 338. The singular legend on the reverse of this coin expresses Constantinian ‘constant’ valour and heroism, qualities that an heir of Constantine would have been very keen to emphasize. The realistic ‘Constantinian’ style of the portrait engraved by a very competent die cutter used to reproducing the image of Constantine furthermore argues for this being a donative issue to be dated early in the reign of the three Augusti as part of the payments so necessary to secure the loyalty of the army, the backbone of the regime and the ultimate source of power for all Roman emperors.

215


834. Constans AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 337-340. DN CONSTANS PF AVG, laureate head right / VICTORIA CONSTANTIS AVG, Victory seated to right on cuirass, inscribing shield supported by winged genius with VOT X; CONS in exergue. RIC 7; C. 146; Depeyrot 1/4. 4.09g, 21mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

2,500

835. Constans AV Solidus. Thessalonica, AD 337-340. FL IVL CONSTANS PF AVG, pearl and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VIRTVS EXERCITVM, the emperor in military attire, standing left and holding trophy and shield, two captives at his feet; TES in exergue. C. 191; RIC 34; Depeyrot 4/7. 4.46g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

4,000

836. Constans AV Solidus. Trier, AD 342-344. FL IVL CONSTANS PF AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / OB VICTORIAM TRIVMFALEM, two Victories standing facing one another, holding between themselves a wreath inscribed VOT X MVLT XV in four lines; TR in exergue. RIC 124; Depeyrot 4/4; DOC 73; Cohen 88. 3.98g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

2,500

837. Constans AR Siliqua. Siscia, AD 340-350. FL IVL CONSTANS PF AVG, laurel and rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm frond; SIS(pellet-in-crescent) in exergue. RIC 163; RSC 316†. 3.22g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine, attractively toned.

1,000

838. Constantius II, as Caesar, Æ Nummus. Antioch, AD 324-325. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left / CONSTANTIVS CAESAR in three lines, star above, SMANT Δ below. RIC 55. 2.51g, 18mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

216

100


839. Constantius II AV Solidus. Trier, AD 347-348. CONSTANTIVS AVGVSTVS, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIAE DD NN AVGG, two Victories standing facing holding between them a wreath inscribed VOT XX MVLT XXX in four lines; TR in exergue. RIC VIII 132; Depeyrot 6/1. 4.45g, 23mm, 6h. Near Mint State.

3,000

840. Constantius II AV Solidus. Cyzicus, AD 347-361. FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, pearl-diademed, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder and round shield decorated with cavalryman motif / GLORIA REIPVBLICAE, Roma and Constantinopolis seated on thrones facing one another, holding between them shield inscribed VOT XXX MVLT XXXX in four lines; SMK in exergue. RIC 39. 4.52g, 21mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

841. Constantius II AV Solidus. Antioch, AD 347-355. FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / GLORIA REIPVBLICAE, Roma seated facing and Constantinopolis seated facing slightly left, with right foot on prow, each holding sceptre and supporting shield between them inscribed VOT XX MVLT XXX in four lines; SMANΓ in exergue. RIC 83; Depeyrot 6/3. 4.35g, 21mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

2,500

842. Constantius II AV Solidus. Antioch, AD 347-355. FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / GLORIA REIPVBLICAE, Roma, seated facing on left, and Constantinopolis, seated left on right, supporting round shield inscribed VOT XX MVLT XXX; SMANΔ in exergue. RIC 83; Cohen 108. 4.50g, 21mm, 11h. About Extremely Fine. 3,000

843. Constantius II AV Solidus. Antioch, AD 347-355. FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / GLORIA REIPVBLICAE, Roma and Constantinopolis seated facing, the latter with foot on prow, holding between them a shield inscribed VOT XX MVLT XXX in four lines; SMANS in exergue. RIC 86. 4.42g, 21mm, 5h. Extremely Fine, scrape on reverse.

217

1,500


844. Constantius II AR Siliqua. Sirmium, AD 351-355. DN CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VOTIS XXX MVLTIS XXXX in four lines within wreath, SIRM in exergue. RIC 17. 3.17g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

845. Constantius II AR Siliqua. Sirmium, late AD 353-early 354. DN CONSTANTIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VOTIS XXX MVLTIS XXXX in four lines within wreath; •SIRM in exergue. RIC 17; RSC 342-3f. 3.33g, 23mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine, beautifully toned.

500

846. Vetranio BI Centenionalis. Siscia, AD 350. DN VETRA NIO PF AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; A to left / CONCORDIA MILITVM, Vetranio, in military attire, standing left, holding a labarum, ornamented with a Christogram, in each hand; A in left field, •ΓSIS* in exergue. RIC 281; LRBC 1168; Hunter –. 5.58g, 23mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Near complete original silvering.

400

847. Julian II Æ Nummus. Sirmium, AD 361-363. D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / SECVRITAS REIPVB, bull standing right, two stars above, star BSIRM palm in exergue. RIC 107. 9.02g, 28mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

218

150


Extremely Rare Solidus of Valentinian

848. Valentinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 364-367. D N VALENTINIANVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VIRTVS ROMANORVM, Valentinian and Valens standing facing in military dress, heads turned towards each other, each holding spear in outer hand and together supporting globe on which stands Victory, who reaches out with wreathes held in both hands to crown them; CONSP in exergue. RIC 5a1; C. 60. 4.48g, 21mm, 5h. Minor scrape on rev., otherwise Good Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

3,000

849. Valens AV Solidus. Antioch, AD 365. DN VALENS PER F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / RESTIVTOR REIPVBLICAE, Valens standing facing, head right, holding labarum and Victory on globe; ANTI* in exergue. RIC IX 2d; Depeyrot 22/2. 4.59g, 22mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Struck on a broad flan with full borders, lending a medallic appearance to this coin.

2,000

850. Valens AR Siliqua. Constantinople, AD 364-367. DN VALENS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VOT V within wreath, •C•Δ in exergue. RIC 13d. 1.80g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

Ex Lanz 14, 18 April 1978, lot 449.

2x

2x

851. Valens AV 1 1/2 Scripulum. Thessalonica, AD 367-375. DN VALENS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / PAX PERPETVA, Victory standing facing, holding wreath in each hand; TESOB in exergue. RIC 24b, C. 23. 1.68g, 14mm, 11h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

219

750


Very Rare and Interesting Roman Silver Ingot

852. Roman silver ingot or bar with assayers stamps. Late fourth century AD. Horizontal central stamp in dotted rectangular frame: LVCIAN[VS] / OBRI•SIC Christogram; two lateral vertical stamps each with: DDD … / … / … /… NNN. For similar gold bars from Kronstadt in Transylvania with similar central stamps ending OBRI SIC Christogram, cf. J.P.C. Kent, ‘Coinage and Currency, AD 300-700’, in Wealth of the Roman World, London, 1977, 535-6 (CM 1894-12-7-1 and CM 1894-12-7-2) and A.M. Burnett, Coinage in the Roman World, 1987, p. 135, 160 (CM 1894-12-71). 72.2g Good condition, stamps somewhat weak.

7,500

The central stamp of this remarkable silver bar informs us that a certain Lucianus is responsible for the testing of its purity exactly as we see on the gold bars from Kronstadt in Transylvania, now in the British Museum Collection. To ensure the continued purity of the gold and silver coinage, in circa AD 364-7 the three Domini Nostri: Valentinian I, Valens and Gratian ordered all gold and silver coins paid as tax to be melted down into bars before being turned back into coin. It is possible that as so many forgeries had entered into circulation and it would be easier for the government to test a smaller number of larger bars than millions of individual coins. The assaying activity is reflected on coins and bar stamps by the additional letters OB or OBRI, standing for obrysa, obryzon or obryziacus, meaning assayed/refined or tested by fire, which in coins is confirmed by following the mint city’s initials, i.e. CONOB, and on stamps OBRI. This test or assay for silver coins was called pusulatum, meaning blistered (fired) and abbreviated as PS, PST PV or PVS after mint initials of many late Roman silver coin issues, e.g. RIC IX, Constantinople 11-13. The bar’s weight is difficult to quantify. At 72.2 grams it may have been intended to be a quarter of a Roman libra, ideally about 81 grams. Due to no weight indication, as usual with silver bars, we must accept that the stamps guaranteed the fineness of the silver which could be used to produce state issued argentei which modern numismatists erroneously call siliquae (from the seed of the carob tree used for the smallest weight in the Roman metrological system, i.e. 1/6 of a scruple or 1/1728 of a libra which may be calculated as 0.19 grams).

Gold Bars from the British Museum Collection, shown for comparison only, not included in the auction.

853. Gratian AV Solidus. Trier, AD 373-375. DN GRATIANVS PF AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGG, two emperors seated facing, each holding with right hand a globe between them; above, Victory facing with wings spread; palm frond upright on exergual line between them; TROBC in exergue. RIC 39c; C. 38; Depeyrot 43/4. 4.46g, 20mm, 11h. Near Mint State.

220

2,500


854. Theodosius I, with Arcadius and Honorius, Æ Exagium Solidi Weight. Constantinople, AD 402-408. DDD NNN GGG, diademed and draped facing busts of Honorius, Theodosius, and Arcadius respectively / EXAGIVM SOLIDI, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae; wreath between palm branches in exergue. Bendall, Byzantine Weights 9; Sabatier 8; Cf. Göbl, Antike 228-9; RIC X, p. 8. 4.22g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, and of excellent style. Unaltered by piercing or plugging, rare thus.

2,000

Official solidus weights, based on a standard ‘imperial pound’, came into being with the law of Julian of AD 363, which established a zygostates - an official weigher of solidi in each city to restore confidence in the solidus, which had become subject to widespread clipping. Exagium derives from the Latin exigere ‘to drive out’ - in this case, the underweight solidi, thereby maintaining an acceptable weight standard necessary for the imperial gold coinage to circulate at full value. Many, if not most, such exagia display holes and/or plugs to bring the exagium to the correct weight. Unmodified exagia are thus a rarity.

855. Arcadius AV Tremissis. Milan, AD 395-408. DN ARCADIVS PF AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and globus cruciger; M-D in fields, COM in exergue. Depeyrot 18/1; RIC 1214. 1.34g, 13mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Rare.

500

856. Honorius AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 397-402. DN HONORIVS PF AVG, helmeted bust facing, holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman spearing fallen enemy / CONCORDIA AVGG I, helmeted Constantinopolis seated facing, head to right, placing right foot on prow and holding sceptre and Victory on globe; COMOB in exergue. RIC 8, officina I=10; Depeyrot 55/2, p. 246 (23 specimens from officina 10); Hahn 13g; Cohen 3. 4.46g, 19mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine, some minor surface marks. Rare.

1,500

857. Honorius AV Solidus. Milan, AD 408-423. DN HONORIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, emperor standing right, holding standard and Victory on globe, foot on captive seated left. RIC 1350. 4.42g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine; scrape across ear of portrait. Rare.

221

750


858. Honorius Æ Exagium Solidi Weight. DN HONORIVS AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; all within square beaded border / EXAGIVM SOLIDI, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae; all within square beaded border. Bendall, Byzantine Weights, p. 17, 5; Sabatier 3. NGSA 5, 3 December 2008, 322 (same obverse die). 4.24g, 21mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

2,000

No mint marks indicate where the exagium solidi were manufactured – the only differentiation that can be discerned is that the exagia from the West are square, and those from the East are round.

859. Theodosius II AV Tremissis. Constantinople, AD 416. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory advancing to front, head left, holding wreath and globus cruciger; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIRB 45; LRC 319; Depeyrot 70/1; RIC 213. 1.48g, 14mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

860. Theodosius II AV Tremissis. Constantinople, AD 416. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory advancing to front, head left, holding wreath and globus cruciger; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIRB 45; LRC 319; Depeyrot 70/1; RIC 213. 1.51g, 14mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

861. Theodosius II AV Semissis. Constantinople, AD 439. DN THEODOSIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGG, Victory seated right on cuirass, holding a shield on which is inscribed XXX XXXX in two lines; star in left field, christogram in right field, CONOB in exergue. RIC 270; Depeyrot 80. 2.24g, 18mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

500

862. Aelia Eudocia AV Tremissis. Constantinople, AD 444. AEL EVDOCIA AVG, pearl-diademed and draped bust right / Cross within wreath. RIC 335; MIRB 50; LRC 461; Depeyrot 72/2. 1.50g, 14mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

222

500


Attractive Solidus of Galla Placidia

863.

Galla Placidia AV Solidus. Rome, AD 426-430. DN GALLA PLACIDIA PF AVG, pearl-diademed and draped bust right, wearing necklace and crowned above by the hand of God; christogram on shoulder / VOT XX MVLT XXX, Victory standing left, supporting long jewelled cross, star in upper field; R-M across fields, COMOB in exergue. C 13; RIC 2007; Depeyrot 45/2; LRC 826. 4.47g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 54, 24 March 2010, lot 656.

7,500

Born in 392 to the emperor Theodosius I, Galla Placidia was present in Rome during its siege from 408-410, and was captured by the Visigoths in 410. Their leader Ataluf, seeking peace with the emperor Honorious, who was half brother of Placidia, killed the two rival Gallic emperors Jovinus and Sebastianus in 413. To ensure amity, Honorius offered Placidia to him as a wife and they married in 414 with a lavish ceremony. Ataluf and Placidia’s only son Theodosius died in infancy in 415, the same year that Ataluf was himself killed by Eberwolf, a former devoted follower of the Germainc chieftain Sarus, who had died fighting under Jovinus and Sebastianus. Thus ended the fledgling Romano-Visigothic line. Sarus’ brother Sigeric was acclaimed the new king of the Visigoths, and the remaining children of Ataluf from a previous marriage killed, and treated Placidia with contempt, even making her walk 12 miles alongside captives as he rode ahead on his horse. These actions prompted a relative of Ataluf’s named Wallia to usurp him. Having taken power, he chose to surrender to Honorius, using Placidia as a peace offering. Her half brother immediately married her off to Constantius III in 417. They had two children, a girl named Justa Grata Honoria and a son named Valentinian. Placidia was now once again a part of the Roman court, and became regularly involved with political issues. In 418 there was a papal succession crisis, and letters from Placidia herself to bishops survive as she fervently urged them to assist in choosing a new Pope. In 421 Constantius was proclaimed Augustus alongside the childless Honorius, but died later that year. The widow Placidia then became very close to her half brother, but they were eventually forced from the Western Empire in disgrace due to circulating rumours of incestuous love. They escaped to the Eastern Empire and were received warmly by the Emperor Theodosius. Honorius died shortly after, leaving the Western Empire without a ruler. After several attempts by various men to gain the position, including Joannes who was killed in 425, Valentinian III, aged 4, was put forward. Placidia became the regent of the Empire until he was 18 and fit to rule. In the later years of her life, the threat posed by Attila the Hun threat grew more and more imposing. In 450 her daughter Iusta Grata Honoria wrote to Atilla asking him to rescue her from an unwanted marriage a Roman senator being arranged for her by the imperial family. She had included her engagement ring in the letter, and Attila interpreted this as a wedding proposal. He contacted Valentinian, accepting the offer and asking for the entire Western Empire as a dowry. The shocked Valentinian wrote to Atilla retracting the offer and quickly married Honoria off to Flavius Bassus Herculanus. Atilla insisted on the validity of his claim to Honoria, and used the premise of collecting his bride to ravage Italy from 451 to 453. Placidia however did not live to see this, as she died in 450.

223


864. Valentinian III AV Tremissis. Ravenna or Rome, circa AD 455. DN PLA VALENTIANVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / Cross within wreath; COMOB below. C 49; RIC 2070; LRC 845; Depeyrot 47/7. 1.49g, 14mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

500

865. Leo I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 465-466. D N LEO PERPET AVG, helmeted, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust three quarters facing, holding spear over right shoulder and shield, decorated with horseman motif, on left arm / VICTORIA AVGGG A, Victory standing left, holding long jewelled cross; star in right field, CONOB in exergue. MIRB 3b; LRC 527; Depeyrot 93/1; RIC 605. 4.39g, 21mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Scarce.

500

Unique Exagium Solidi of Leo I

866. Leo I Æ Exagium Solidi. AD 457-474. Diademed and draped bust right / Leonis monogram. Cf. Bendall, Weights 16 (facing bust). 1.46g, 11mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Apparently unique exagium for Leo, which are otherwise known with frontal facing heads.

2,000

867. Libius Severus AV Tremissis. Mediolanum, AD 462. D N LIBIVS SEVERVS PERPE AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / Cross within wreath; COMOB below. C. 21; RIC 2728; LRC –; Depeyrot 28/1. 1.47g, 14mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 72, 16 May 2013, lot 802; Ex Numismatik Lanz 141, 26 May 2008, lot 860.

224

2,000


Rare Anthemius Tremissis

868. Anthemius AV Tremissis. Uncertain mint, AD 468. DN ANTHEMIVS PF AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / Cross within wreath; COMOB in exergue. RIC 2841; Depeyrot 71/5. 1.44g, 13mm, 5h. Fleur De Coin. Very Rare, and exceptional for the issue.

7,000

Anthemius has been described as the last capable Western Roman emperor; in his five year reign he attempted to restore the failing empire by challenging the resurgent Visigothic domain in Gaul and Spain, and by launching a campaign to reclaim North Africa from the Vandals. A competent general, Anthemius was appointed by the Eastern emperor Leo to the vacant throne of the West with the consent of Ricimer, the powerful magister militum who had already done away with the three previous emperors. Anthemius was despatched with a large and well-equipped army led by the competent and respected Marcellinus, the military ruler of the region of Dalmatia. Leo thus obtained for himself an able and independent colleague in the West who could potentially reverse the disturbing trend of barbarian warlords ruling through weak puppet emperors. Despite being promoted by Anthemius to act as a counterbalance to Ricimer, Marcellinus was prevented from participating in the campaign of 468 against the Vandals in Africa. This campaign was to be one of the greatest military undertakings of all time, a combined amphibious operation of over a thousand ships and one hundred thousand soldiers. With the removal of this experienced commander, and the ineffective leadership of Basiliscus which resulted in a catastrophic loss at Cape Bon, in which some seventy percent of the Roman force was lost, the West lost its last best chance to regain Africa from the Vandals, and perhaps prevent its demise. Marcellinus himself was murdered in Sicily soon after, probably at Ricimer’s instigation. Two years later a similarly fated attempt was made to reclaim Gaul from the Visigoths which resulted in the loss of Anthemius’ son and three other Roman generals. Despite having married his daughter to Ricimer in 467, the relationship between the magister militum and the emperor had always been one doomed to enmity, and by 472 this had deteriorated into open war. Anthemius, blockaded in Rome for five months, eventually saw his last remaining loyal army defeated while attempting to break through and relieve his position. He fled to St. Peter’s basilica where he was captured and beheaded. Geiseric, the king of the Vandals, once expressed his surprise and satisfaction that the Romans would themselves remove from the world all of his most formidable antagonists.

869. Zeno AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 476-91. D N ZENO PERP AVG, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust facing holding spear and shield / VICTORIA AVGGG Δ, Victory standing left, supporting long jewelled cross, star in right field, CONOB in exergue. RIC 905. 4.46g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

225

750


MIGRATION PERIOD Among the Very Finest Known

870.

Ostrogoths, Athalaric Æ 20 Nummi. Municipal coinage of Rome, AD 526-534. INVICTA ROMA, draped bust of Roma to right, wearing crested helmet, pendant earring and necklace / She-wolf standing to left, head turned back to watch the two infants Romulus and Remus suckling; two stars flanking Chi-Rho above, mark of value XX below. Hahn, MIB 71c (Theoderich); Kraus 29; Metlich 84b. 6.64g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Very Rare, and one of the very finest surviving coins from the reign of Athalaric. An exceptional example of the type, struck from dies of what may almost be described as fine.

5,000

Athalaric was the grandson of Theoderic ‘the Great’, who had been ordered by the Eastern emperor Zeno to overthrow Odoacer, the barbarian self-styled King of Italy who finally brought the Western Roman Empire to an end by deposing Romulus Augustus. While Theoderic had promoted the separation of Arian and Roman peoples (and forbidding intermarriage), he stressed the importance of racial harmony, and did much to preserve Roman culture. Seeking to restore some of the lost glory of Rome, Theoderic ruled Italy for its most peaceful and prosperous period since Valentinian I more than a century earlier, until his death in 526. Theoderic died with no male children. His daughter Amalasuntha had received a Roman education, and he had selected as her husband Eutharic, an Ostrogoth of royal lineage who was living obscurely in Spain. The marriage was celebrated in AD 515, and Athalaric was born three years later. Theoderic destined this infant to be his successor. Athalaric had received a Roman education, and upon the death of his grandfather, he ascended to the throne of Italy at the age of ten. His mother Amalasuntha held the reins of government as regent during her son’s minority, though the Gothic nobles soon insisted on Athalaric being brought up in the ways of his own people. However Athalaric was of a weak and degenerate nature, and the Gothic youths with whom he associated soon led him into precocious debauchery which ruined his health. He died in 534 at the age of eighteen. Now queen, Amalasuntha made her cousin Theodahad partner of her throne with the intent of strengthening her position. Theodahad however, fostered the disaffection of the Goths and ensured that Amalasuntha was imprisoned on the island of Martana in lake Bolsena, where shortly thereafter she was murdered in her bath.

226


Unique Suevic Kingdom Tremissis

871.

Suevic kingdom of Gallaecia AV Tremissis. Time of Hermeric, Rechila and Rechiar. Bracara Augusta, AD 425455. In the name of Valentinian III. DN VΛLTININΛT, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right with prominent jewelled fibula and jewelled paludamentum over left shoulder; all within beaded border / Cross pattée within double wreathed circles, flanked by two lateral beaded and curved rectangles; in left rectangle, ligate BR; wreath ties above and CONOB in exergue; the whole composition within beaded border. For the contemporary analogous tremisses see J.M. Peixoto Cabral and D.M. Metcalf, A moeda sueva - Suevic Coinage, Porto 1997, p. 285, 3-6 (retrograde BR) and p. 289, 1-2 (inverted BR); W. Reinhart, ‘Die Münzen des Schwebenreiches’, in Mittailungen der bayerischen Numismatiischen Gesellschaft 55, 1937, pp. 151-190, pl. 35, 54 pl. 36, 67 (inverted BR), pl. 36 70-3 (BR retrograde); A. Gomez, Moedas portuguesas, Lisboa 2003, p.45, 02.5 (ligate BR retrograde, valued at € 7,500); for B-R as a mint mark cf. RIC X, 3786 (siliqua in the name of Rechiar, ‘ivssv rechiari reges’) and Dix Noonan Webb sale 27 September 2007, 2861 (Solidus in the name of Honorius); for generic group of tremisses without BR cf. MEC I, 286-92. 1.28g, 16mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Unique variant.

6,000

The generic term Suevi is applied to a group of West Germanic peoples of whom the most important were the Alamanni, which settled in south-western Germany in what is now called Schwaben (Swabia). In 406 much of the tribe joined the Vandals, Quadi and Alans in breaching the Roman frontier at Mainz and launching an invasion of Gaul. In their company the Suevi crossed the Pyrenees in 409 and settled in the western half of the Roman province of Gallæcia (modern-day Galicia in Spain and northern Portugal) where, swearing loyalty to the Emperor Honorius, they obtained the status of foederati in about 410/11. By the 430s their king Hermeric had established a virtually independent state around the Roman capital of Gallæcia, Bracara Augusta (modern Braga). The indigenous Hispano-Roman population did not take kindly to the new settlers and it was not until the mid-5th century that the situation became more peaceful. Hermeric abdicated in favour of his son Rechila in 438, and on the death of Rechila in 448 his bellicose and ambitious son Rechiar, newly converted to Catholicism, inherited the crown. Rechiar died in 455 after being defeated by the Visigothic king Theodoric II. Subsequently the Suevian kingdom in Gallæcia was divided in two, with the boundary line at the River Minho, with different kings ruling each side of the river. The last king of the Suevi, Andeca, was defeated by the forces of the Visigothic king Leovigild in 585.

872. Visigothic kingdom of Hispania, Reccesvinthus AV Tremissis. Cordoba, AD 649-672. + RECCES VIN:VSRX, facing head of king within beaded circle / + CORPORA PATRICA, cross potent on three steps within beaded circle. Cf. CNV 444.1; Miles 362b. 1.39g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare, only one example cited in CNV.

227

6,000


873. Visigothic kingdom of Hispania, Egica and Wittiza AV Tremissi. Cesaragusta, AD 694-702. + IDMNHEGICΛPH, long cross potent between confronted busts of Egica and Wittiza / + VVITTIZAPH’, cross monogram S-R + CG. Cf, CNV 587; Miles 460. 1.24g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Rare.

3,000

874. Merovingian, Novo Vico (Neuvy-Bouin, Deux-Sévres) AV pale gold Tremissis. Circa AD 730-735. + NIAVIAS-GVICO (or similar), stylised head in profile made up of pellets with three pellets for eye / + APOL-ENOMO, anchor cross with pellet in three quarters, pellet in crescent and bar below. Unpublished in the standard references. 1.23g, 14mm, 6h. Mint State. Apparently unique and unpublished.

2,000

For a tentative identification of the issuing authority as Novo Vico (Neuvy-Bouin) cf. Belfort 3246-70 and Prou 2332; for a similar obverse portrait style cf. G. Depeyrot, Le numéraire mérovingien, L’âge du denier, Moneta 22, 2001, p. 106, 4, pl. 16 = Belfort 3621 (Pectatis, Poitiers). The moneyer’s Greek name Apoleno is clearly engraved and unknown to Belfort, Prou and Depeyrot.

COINS OF THE BYZANTINE EMPIRE

875. Anastasius I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 507-518. D N ANASTASIVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding shield with horseman device on left shoulder, spear in right hand over right shoulder / VICTORIA AVGGG B, Victory standing left holding long staff surmounted by christogram, star in left field, CONOB in exergue. DOC 7h; MIBE 7; Sear 5. 4.45g, 20mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine. Beautiful mint lustre.

750

876. Justinian I Æ 40 Nummi. Cyzicus, year 12 = AD 538/539. D N IVSTINIANVS PP AVI, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right / Large M between ANNO and XII; officina A, KYZ in exergue. MIBE 120; Sear 207. 23.54g, 42mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Superbly well preserved for the issue.

250

877. Maurice Tiberius AV Solidus. Carthage, AD 590-1. D N mAVRIT b PP AV AN Θ, helmeted, draped and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger in right hand / VICTORIA AV AGG N Θ, angel standing facing, holding christogram in right hand, and globus cruciger in left hand, CONOB in exergue. DOC 223; MIBE 25a; Sear 548. 4.45g, 19mm, 6h. Virtually Mint State; two small scratches in obverse right field below cheek. A remarkably well struck and preserved example. Struck on a broad flan, and well framed. Ex Argenor Numismatique, 23 April 1999, lot 169.

228

1,250


878. Phocas AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 602-610. dN FOCAS PERP AVG, draped and cuirassed facing bust, wearing crown without pendilia, holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA [AVGV], angel standing facing, holding staff surmounted by chi-rho and globus cruciger; CONOB in exergue. MIBE 9; DOC 10; Sear 620. 4.38g, 21mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

200

879. Phocas AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 602-610. dN FOCAS PERP AVG, draped and cuirassed facing bust, wearing crown without pendilia, holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA AVGV S, angel standing facing, holding staff surmounted by chi-rho and globus cruciger; CONOB in exergue. MIBE 9; DOC 10; Sear 620. 4.41g, 22mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

200

880. Phocas AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 602-610. dN FOCAS PERP AVG, draped and cuirassed facing bust, wearing crown without pendilia, holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA AVGV Z, angel standing facing, holding staff surmounted by chi-rho and globus cruciger; CONOB in exergue. MIBE 9; DOC 10; Sear 620. 4.37g, 21mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

250

881. Heraclius AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 637-638. Heraclius, with long beard and moustache, Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas, both beardless, standing facing, each crowned and holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA AVGV and officina letter E, cross potent on three steps, monogram in left field, A in right field, CONOB in exergue. Sear 764; MIB 45. 4.42g, 19mm, 7h. Good, Extremely Fine. An exceptional example of this type.

800

882. Heraclius, with Heraclius Constantine AR Hexagram. Constantinople, AD 632-635. Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine seated facing on double throne, both holding globus cruciger; cross above / Cross potent set on globe set on three steps. DOC 61; MIB 134; Sear 795. 6.82g, 25mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Some die rust on reverse.

229

100


883

884 883. Heraclius, with Heraclius Constantine AR Hexagram. Constantinople, AD 632-635. Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine seated facing on double throne, both holding globus cruciger; cross above / Cross potent set on globe set on three steps; K to right. DOC 64; MIB 140; Sear 798. 6.25g, 23mm, 1h. Good Fine – Near Very Fine. 100 884. Heraclius, with Heraclius Constantine AR Hexagram. Constantinople, AD 632-635. Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine seated facing on double throne, both holding globus cruciger; cross above / Cross potent set on globe set on three steps; K to right. DOC 64; MIB 140; Sear 798. 6.52g, 27mm, 6h. Very Fine. 150

886

885

885. Constans II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 649-650. Bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger / Cross potent on three steps, H in right field, CONOB+ in exergue. Sear 952; MIB 19. 4.47g, 20mm, 12h. As struck. Some die rust on reverse. 200 886. Constans II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 650-1. dN CONSƮANƮINVS PP AVG, bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA AVGV and officina letter Δ, cross potent on three steps, CONOB in exergue. Sear 953; MIB 20. 4.46g, 19mm, 6h. Mint State. Scratch to reverse right field. 400

887

888

887. Constans II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 650-1. dN CONSƮANƮINVS PP AVG, bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA AVGV and officina letter H, cross potent on three steps, CONOB in exergue. Sear 953; MIB 20. 4.49g, 20mm, 7h. Mint State. 500 Ex Roma Numismatics IV, 30 September 2012, lot 801. 888. Constans II AV Solidus. Constantinople, circa AD 651-652. dN CONSƮANƮINVS PP AVG, bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA AVGV A, cross potent on three steps, CONOBI in exergue. MIB 22var; DOC -: Sear 955. 4.40g, 21mm, 6h. As struck; graffiti on reverse. 200

889

890

889. Constans II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 651-4. dN CONSƮANƮINVS PP AVG, bust facing, with long beard and moustache, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA AVGV and officina letter (retrograde Z), cross potent on three steps, CONOB in exergue. Sear 956; MIB 23. 4.49g, 20mm, 6h. Mint State. 300 From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Roma Numismatics IV, 30 September 2012, lot 817. 890. Constans II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 654-9. dN CONSƮANƮINVS C CONSƮAI, facing busts of Constans, on left with long beard, and Constantine IV, beardless, each wearing crown and chlamys; between their heads, a cross / VICTORIA AVGV and officina letter B, cross potent on three steps, CONOB in exergue. Sear 959; MIB 26. 4.46g, 20mm, 6h. Near Mint State. 500 From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Roma Numismatics IV, 30 September 2012, lot 839.

230


891. Constans II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 654-9. dN CONSƮANƮINVS C CONSƮANƮINVS, facing busts of Constans, on left with long beard, and Constantine IV, beardless, each wearing crown and chlamys; between their heads, a cross / VICTORIA AVGV and officina letter Δ, cross potent on three steps, CONOBI in exergue. Sear 960; MIB 28. 4.50g, 20mm, 7h. Mint State. 500 From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Roma Numismatics IV, 30 September 2012, lot 843.

892. Constans II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 662-7. dN CONSƮANVS, facing busts of Constans, on left with long beard, plumed helmet and chlamys, and Constantine IV, beardless, wearing crown and chlamys; between their heads, a cross / VICTORIA AVGV and officina letter (retrograde Z), cross potent on three steps between facing, standing figures of Heraclius, on left, and Tiberius, on right, both beardless, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger, CONOB in exergue. Sear 964; MIB 31. 4.46g, 19mm, 7h. Mint State. 500 From the Mark Gibbons Collection; Ex Roma Numismatics IV, 30 September 2012, lot 847.

893. Constans II AV Tremissis. Constantinople, AD 641-668. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / Cross potent, CONOB in exergue. MIB 51; DOC 45; Sear 984. 1.44g, 16mm, 6h. As struck.

200

895

894

894. Constans II AR Hexagram. Constantinople, AD 642-647. Crowned, draped, and cuirassed facing bust, and holding globus cruciger / Cross potent set on globe set on three steps. DOC 48; MIB 142; Yannopoulos 1-37; Sear 989, 6.91g, 24mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, good metal. 200 895. Constans II AR Hexagram. Constantinople, AD 648-652. Crowned and cuirassed bust facing, wearing chlamys, and holding globus cruciger / Cross potent set on globe set on three steps. DOC 50; MIB 144; Yannopoulos 67-84; Sear 991. 6.30g, 23mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, good metal. 150

896 897 896. Constans II AR Hexagram. Constantinople, AD 648-652. Crowned and cuirassed bust facing, wearing chlamys, and holding globus cruciger / Cross potent set on globe set on three steps. DOC 50; MIB 144; Yannopoulos 67-84; Sear 991. 6.77g, 22mm, 7h. Extremely Fine, good metal. 150 897. Constans II AR Hexagram. Constantinople, AD 654-659. Crowned facing busts of Constans and Constantine IV; cross in field above / Cross potent set on globe set on three steps. DOC 54; MIB 149; Sear 995. 6.02g, 23mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. 100

231


898

899 898. Constans II AR Hexagram. Constantinople, AD 654-659. Crowned facing busts of Constans and Constantine IV; cross in field above / Cross on globe on three steps; B to right. DOC 55; Sear 996. 6.40g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine, exceptional for the type.

500

899. Constans II AR Hexagram. Constantinople, AD 654-659. Crowned facing busts of Constans and Constantine IV; cross in field above / Cross on globe on three steps; C to right. Sear 997; MIB 151. 6.64g, 27mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

100

900

901 900. Constans II AR Hexagram. Constantinople, AD 659-668. Draped facing busts of Constans II, wearing plumed helmet, and Constantine IV, wearing crown; cross above / Cross potent set on three steps; crowned and draped figures of Heraclius and Tiberius standing facing to either side, each holding globus cruciger. DOC 57; MIB 152; Yannopoulos 189-223; Sear 998. 6.49g, 23mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

100

901. Constans II AR Hexagram. Constantinople, AD 659-668. Draped facing busts of Constans II, wearing plumed helmet, and Constantine IV, wearing crown; cross above / Cross potent set on three steps; crowned and draped figures of Heraclius and Tiberius standing facing to either side, each holding globus cruciger. DOC 57; MIB 152; Yannopoulos 189-223; Sear 998. 6.39g, 26mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine, area of flat striking.

100

902. Constans II AR Hexagram. Thessalonica or Syracuse, AD 659-668. d N CONSTANTI C CON, facing busts of Constans II, with long beard, to left and Constantine IV, beardless, to right, each wearing chlamys and crown cruciger, the former with plume; between heads, cross / DEYS ADIYTA ROmANIS, Cross potent on three steps between facing standing figures of Heraclius left and Tiberius right, both beardless, each wearing crown and chlamys and holding globus cruciger; Θ below. Sear 1022 (Thessalonica). 5.79g, 22mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

903

400

904

903. Constans II AR Hexagram. Thessalonica or Syracuse, AD 659-668. d N CONSTANTI C CON, facing busts of Constans II, with long beard, to left and Constantine IV, beardless, to right, each wearing chlamys and crown cruciger, the former with plume; between heads, cross / DEYS ADIYTA ROmANIS, Cross potent on three steps between facing standing figures of Heraclius left and Tiberius right, both beardless, each wearing crown and chlamys and holding globus cruciger; Θ below. Sear 1022 (Thessalonica). 6.38g, 23mm, 6h. Very Fine. Very Rare. 250 904. Constans II AR Hexagram. Thessalonica or Syracuse, AD 659-668. d N CONSTANTI C CON, facing busts of Constans II, with long beard, to left and Constantine IV, beardless, to right, each wearing chlamys and crown cruciger, the former with plume; between heads, cross / DEYS ADIYTA ROmANIS, Cross potent on three steps between facing standing figures of Heraclius left and Tiberius right, both beardless, each wearing crown and chlamys and holding globus cruciger; Θ below. Sear 1022 (Thessalonica). 6.33g, 24mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Very Rare. 300

232


Fourth Known Example

905. Constans II AR Hexagram. Constantinople, AD 666-668. VICTORIA AVGV, facing bust, with long beard and moustache, wearing crown with frontal plume and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger / Constantine IV (in centre), Heraclius (on right) and Tiberius (on left) all standing facing, each wearing crown and chlamys and holding globus cruciger; S in right field. DOC -; MIB -; Sear -; Cf. Nomos 9, 21 October 2014, lot 320, Rauch 96, 10 December 2014, lot 647 and Gorny & Mosch 228, 9 March 2015, lot 756. 6.66g, 24mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. The fourth known example of this interesting type.

3,000

This hexagram was struck late in what was a tumultuous and turbulent reign. It bears a similar design to the emperor’s late solidi, with the bearded Constans on the obverse and his three sons on the reverse (cf. DOC 42-43 and MIB 41-42). That so few are extant today suggests that it was minted in very small numbers, perhaps in part due to the emperor’s sudden death. A precocious and dynamic ruler, Constans ascended to the purple at the age of 11 after the murder of his father in 641. Throughout his reign there was constant political and religious disorder. Invasions threatened the empire, Armenia and Asia Minor were invaded by the Muslims and Egypt was abandoned, although Sicily and Constantinople were preserved. The young emperor had immediately to establish his power and strength against his enemies, and he did so by making sure his navy and army were unyielding. The Christological doctrine of Monotheletism, being the idea that Christ had two natures, but one will, had had the Church divided for quite some time before the accession of Constans: monks, priests and even the Pope were persistently fighting for or against its acceptance. Although the 17 year old emperor lacked much of an opinion or interest in the subject, he could clearly see the potential for it to have an adverse effect on the stability of the empire, and therefore issued the Type of Constans in 648. This imperial edict condemned the discussion of the concept in any form in an effort to defuse the problem. Constans actively maintained the law and persecuted those who spoke out against Monotheletism, bringing a semblance of peace to the subject and effectively passing the discussion on for his successors to settle. Having moved to live in Syracuse on Sicily, rumours that the capital of the Empire would be formally moved to the island were ill-received, and in September 668 Constans was murdered while bathing, according to Theophilus of Edessa, by his chamberlain using a bucket.

906. Constantine IV AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 674-681. Fragmentary legend, d N CΛNVS P, bust facing, wearing helmet with frontal plume and cuirass, holding spear and shield with horseman motif / VICTOA AVGV Є, cross potent on three steps, between Heraclius and Tiberius, both beardless and wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger, CONOB in exergue. DOC 8; MIB 7a; Sear 1154. 4.44g, 19mm, 6h. As Struck. Lustrous.

350

907. Leo III the Isaurian, with Constantine V AV Tremissis. Syracuse, AD 735-741. D L-ЄON P A, crowned facing bust of Leo, wearing chlamys pinned at right shoulder, holding globus cruciger in right hand and akakia in left / D N CONSTANTIN, crowned facing bust of Constantine, beardless, wearing chlamys pinned at right shoulder, holding Cross potent in right hand and akakia in left. Sear 1528A; DOC 51. 1.21g, 17mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

908. Constantine V, with Leo IV, AV Solidus. Syracuse, AD 751-775. Crowned and draped facing busts of Constantine, bearded, and Leo IV, beardless, crowns topped with crosses; cross above / Crowned and draped facing bust of Leo III, wearing short beard and loros, holding Cross potent on base, crown topped with cross. DOC 15; Füeg -; Sear 1565. 3.89g, 20mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin. Exceptional for the type.

233

3,000


909. Irene, Sole Reign, AV Solidus. Syracuse, circa AD 797-802. IREN BASIL, facing crowned bust of Irene wearing loros, holding globus cruciger in right hand and cruciform sceptre in left, pellet in outer left field / IREBASILIS, same type as obverse, but C in field left, I in right. DOC –; Spahr –; Sear –; D’Andrea, Faranda, Vichi 240; Anastasi 455. 3.77g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

5,000

Struck after 797, this solidus from the mint at Syracuse shows one of two known types depicting Irene on both the obverse and reverse, and marks a distinct shift from the types of her predecessors. Gone is the cross-on-steps reverse type, or figures of deceased members of the dynasty, to be replaced by two facing busts of Irene. Here we have Irene proclaiming herself Empress and sole ruler in the most public way possible. However, after just five years on the throne she herself was deposed and replaced by her Minister of Finance, Nicephorus.

910. Theophilus AV Solidus. Syracuse, circa AD 829-830. Bearded bust facing, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding Cross potent / Bearded bust facing, wearing crown and loros, and holding globus cruciger. DOC 24; Spahr 422; Sear 1670. 3.89g, 16mm, 6h. Mint State.

500

911. Theophilus AV Solidus. Syracuse, circa AD 829-830. Bearded bust facing, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding Cross potent / Bearded bust facing, wearing crown and loros, and holding globus cruciger. DOC 24; Spahr 422; Sear 1670. 3.88g, 16mm, 5h. As Struck.

600

912. Basil I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 870-871. + IhS XPS REX REGNANTIVM*, Christ, nimbate, seated facing, wearing chiton, raising hand in benediction and holding Gospels / bASILIOS ET CONSTANT AVGG b, crowned facing busts of Basil, with short beard and loros, and Constantine, beardless and wearing chlamys, holding patriarchal cross between them. DOC 2; Sear 1704. 4.36g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Slight scrapes to reverse.

400

913. Nicephorus II AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 963-969. + IhS XΓS REX REGNANTInm, bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus crown and holding codex / + ΘЄOTOC’b’HΘ’hICHF,dЄSP’, Virgin wearing nimbus crown and Nicephorus wearing loros, holding patriarchal cross between them. DOC 4; Sear 1778. 4.41g, 22mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

750

234


914. Nicephorus II AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 963-969. + IhS XΓS REX REGNANTInm, bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus crown and holding codex / + ΘЄOTOC’b’HΘ’hICHF,dЄSP’, Virgin wearing nimbus crown and Nicephorus wearing loros, holding patriarchal cross between them. DOC 4; Sear 1778. 4.39g, 21mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine.

1,500

915. Romanus III AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1028-1034. +IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTINM, Christ enthroned facing, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels / ΘCЄ bOHΘ RWMANW, the Virgin, nimbate on right, and Romanus, bearded to left, both standing facing; the Virgin wears pallium and mophorium, and with her right hand crowns the emperor, who wears saccos and loros, and holds globus cruciger in left hand; MΘ between their heads. DOC 1; Sear 1819. 4.43g, 24mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

400

916. Romanus III AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1028-1034. +IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTINM, Christ enthroned facing, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels / ΘCЄ bOHΘ RWMANW, the Virgin, nimbate on right, and Romanus, bearded to left, both standing facing; the Virgin wears pallium and mophorium, and with her right hand crowns the emperor, who wears saccos and loros, and holds globus cruciger in left hand; MΘ between their heads. DOC 1; Sear 1819. 4.42g, 25mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

400

917. Romanus III AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1028-1034. +IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTINM, Christ enthroned facing, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels / ΘCЄ bOHΘ RWMANW, the Virgin, nimbate on right, and Romanus, bearded to left, both standing facing; the Virgin wears pallium and mophorium, and with her right hand crowns the emperor, who wears saccos and loros, and holds globus cruciger in left hand; MΘ between their heads. DOC 1; Sear 1819. 4.38g, 23mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

235

450


918. Romanus III AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1028-1034. +IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTINM, Christ enthroned facing, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction and holding book of Gospels in left / ΘCЄ bOHΘ RWMANW, the Virgin, nimbate on right, and Romanus, bearded to left, both standing facing; the Virgin wears pallium and mophorium, and with her right hand crowns the emperor, who wears saccos and loros, and holds globus cruciger in left hand; MΘ between their heads. DOC 1; Sear 1819. 4.35g, 23mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

500

919. Constantine IX AV Tetarteron Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1042-1055. Facing bust of Christ Pantokrator, wearing nimbus crown, holding book of Gospels / Crowned bust facing, wearing jewelled chlamys, holding labarum in right hand, globus cruciger in left. DOC 6; Sear 1833. 3.95g, 17mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

1,000

921 920 920. Constantine X AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1059-1067. +IhS IXS REX REGNANTINM, Christ, nimbate, seated facing on straight-backed throne, raising hand in benediction, holding Gospels / + KѠN RACΛ O ΔOVKAC, Isaac standing facing, wearing crown and loros, holding labarum with pellet on shaft, and globus cruciger. DOC 1; Sear 1847. 4.31g, 27mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 200 921. Constantine X AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1059-1067. + IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTINM, Christ seated facing on throne with curved arms / + KѠN RACΛ O ΔOVKAC, the Virgin, nimbate, crowning the Emperor; M between their heads and Θ in upper right field. Sear 1848; DOC 2. 4.26g, 28mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. 250

922 923 922. Romanus IV AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1068-1071. Michael (in centre) Constantius (on left) and Andronicus (on right) all standing facing on dotted exergual band, all beardless, and all wearing Crowns, saccos and loros and holding globus cruciger and akakia / Christ standing facing on footstool, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, and crowning Romanus (on left) and Eudocia (on right), each wearing saccos and loros and holding globus cruciger; IC-XC across fields. Sear 1861; DOC 2. 4.36g, 28mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 200 923. Romanus IV AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1068-1071. Michael (in centre) Constantius (on left) and Andronicus (on right) all standing facing on footstools, all beardless, and all wearing Crowns, saccos and loros and holding globus cruciger and akakia / Christ standing facing on footstool, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, and crowning Romanus (on left) and Eudocia (on right), each wearing saccos and loros and holding globus cruciger; IC-XC across fields. Sear 1859; DOC 1. 4.40g, 26mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. 300

924. Michael VII AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, 1071-1078. Christ seated facing on straight-backed throne, IC-XC across fields / Crowned facing bust of Michael, holding labarum and globus cruciger. DOC 1; Sear 1869. 4.43g, 28mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

236

250


925. Byzantine circa 4th century AD Æ weight of three nomismata. Cross above large N Γ; all within ornate archway / Two concentric circles. Bendall 99. 17mm, 12.62g. Very Fine, some silver inlay remaining.

100

From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

926. Byzantine 5th-6th Century AD Weight of 3 Unciae. Uniface, square weight with slightly curved edges leading to a slightly bevelled top edge ornamented with engraved designs. At the centre, on a double line base enriched with garlands below, are the facing busts of two nimbate, crowned and draped imperial figures, their faces inlaid with silver and their robes with copper; around the busts is an inlaid copper laurel wreath and there are inlaid silver ornaments at 12, 3, 6 and 9 o’clock; in each of the two upper corners of the weight is an engraved flower with an inlaid silver centre; in each of the bottom two corners is the inlaid silver letter Γ (= 3) The reverse is plain with some file marks as made. C.f. Bendall 61 ff. L. Holland, ‘An Unusual Bronze Coin-Weight from Caesarea-Maritima,’ IAPN p. 94 and pl. 30, 2 (this piece). 80.40g, 34 x 35 x 9mm. Extremely Fine, displaying original patina as found but with the top surface cleaned to reveal the design and the original golden-brown colour of the bronze, the red of the copper and the grey silver. Very Rare. A remarkable example of late Roman - early Byzantine metal work. Ex LHS 102, 29 April 2008, lot 473.

10,000

927. Byzantine circa 5th-7th century AD Æ weight. Large cross, Γ-B across / Blank. Cf. Gorny & Mosch 156, 5 March 2007, 2564. 52.63, 27mm. Very Fine. From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

200

928. Byzantine circa 7th century AD Æ weight of one nomisma (solidus). Large N in field, circular indentations around / Blank. 4.50g, 14mm. Very Fine. From the Mark Gibbons Collection.

237

100


929. Byzantine Apotropaic Medalette of St George. 12th century AD. Θ ΓΕΟ-Γ-ΙΟ-C, Bust of St George facing, wearing nimbus, tunic, cuirass and sagion, holding spear and shield; to left, W/P; dotted border / Large E C within dotted border. For analogous high Byzantine iconographic style cf. Manuel I Tetarteron, DOC 18; Sear 1975. 4.31g, 17mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Extremely Rare.

250

Such medallette’s are of a personal nature and may have been fitted into pendants, oil lamp handles or ornate cross arms, but the high artistic style of this piece might be the product of the imperial mint or workshop. St. George, a Roman soldier of circa AD 275-303, was one of the most popular military saints of the Christian East as one of the fourteen Holy Helpers and the patron of soldiers. It is almost universally accepted that he suffered martyrdom under Diocletian at Diospolis in Palestine in about AD 300-303. All other legends which have grown up around him may safely be regarded as fictitious, including the story of the dragon, which probably originated in Italy in comparatively recent times and has since then been a source of inspiration to artists worldwide. The crusaders certainly gave great impetus to his devotion in the West, as the very model of knighthood. He became the patron saint of many countries and institutions including: Savoy, Portugal, Aragon, Germany, Genoa, Venice and England, where his cult is bound up with British history, traditions and popular myths.

930. Byzantine Lead Seal. Justinian I, AD 537-565. DN IVSTINIANVS PP AV, draped bust of the emperor with halo, wearing crown with pendant and pearls / Victory standing right, holding two wreaths, a cross in each field. Zacos I 3c (beardless var.). 5.79g, 21mm, 6h. 270

931. Byzantine Lead Seal. Phocas, AD 607-609. The Virgin Mary, nimbate, holding Christ; a cross in each field / D N FOCAS PERP AVG, draped and crowned bust of the emperor facing. Zacos I 8 (Var. with d instead of O or D.); for date see MIBE 9. 19.92g, 27mm, 6h. 600

932. Byzantine Lead Seal. Phocas, AD 607-609. The Virgin Mary, nimbate, holding Christ; a cross in each field / D N FOCAS PERP AVG, draped and crowned bust of the emperor facing. Zacos I 8. 20.05g, 29mm, 12h. Finely detailed.

550

933. Byzantine Lead Seal. Heraclius, 616-625 AD. The Virgin, nimbate, holding a medallion of the baby Jesus against her chest; a cross in each field / dd NN hERACLIVS ET HERA CONST A, crowned busts of Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine, cross above. Zacos I 12a-d; for date see MIBE 11-20. 15.98g, 26mm, 6h. 400

238


934

935

934. Byzantine Lead Seal. Constans II, AD 659-668. The Virgin, nimbate, standing facing, holding a medallion of Christ against her chest; a cross in each field / Heraclius, Constans II, Constantin IV, and Tiberius standing facing; Constans II wears a helmet and long beard, the three sons are beardless and wear crowns, and all are holding a globus cruciger. Zacos I 20a. 32.94g, 30mm, 6h. 550 935. Byzantine Lead Seal. Leontius, Indictions 9 and 10, AD 695-698. (George, apo hypaton ?), Apotheke of the Imperial Commercia of Nikaia (?). Emperor standing facing holding globus cruciger; in field I and Θ / ΑΠΟΘΗ KΕ CΤΟΒΑ CIΛΗΚΟΝΚΟ MEPΚΙΟN ΝΗΚΗ.... Cf. Zacos I, 193-4. 26.81g, 35mm, 12h. 200

936. Byzantine Lead Seal. Basil II, Bulgaroktonos, AD 976-1025. EMMA NOVHΛ, bust of Christ facing, holding Book of Gospels / BACI Λ AVTOC, bust of the emperor with a crown decorated with pendant, loros, holding globus cruciger. Zacos I 75e. 12.63g, 23mm, 6h. 300

937. Byzantine Lead Seal. Constantine IX, AD 1042-1055. EMMA NOVHΛ, bust of Christ facing, holding Book of Gospels; IC-XC across fields / CWNSTANT BASILEVS, bust of the emperor facing, wearing crown and loros, and holding globus cruciger and sceptre. Zacos I 79a. 33.29g, 38mm, 6h. 400

938

939

938. Byzantine Lead Seal. Isaac I Comnenus, AD 1057-1059. EMMA NOVHΛ, bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus crown, holding Book of Gospels; IC-XC across fields / ICAAKIOC BACIΛEVC RWM, crowned bust of the emperor facing, wearing armour, holding sword and globus cruciger. Zacos I 86b-c. 24.92g, 32mm, 6h. 200 939. Byzantine Lead Seal. Eudocia, May-December AD 1067. EMMA NOVHΛ, Christ, nimbate, seated facing, holding Book of Gospels, IC-XC across fields / EVΔOKI MIX S [KWNCT], Michael VII, holding globus cruciger and akakia, Eudocia holding sceptre, and Constantius holding labarum and globus cruciger, all standing facing. Zacos I 91. 32.63g, 34mm, 6h. 550

940

941

940. Byzantine Lead Seal. Romanus IV Diogenes, AD 1068-1071. PWMAN S EVΔOKIA, Christ, nimbate, standing facing, blessing Romanos IV and Eudocia, who both hold globus cruciger; IC-XC across fields / KWN MX ANΔ, Constantius, with globus cruciger and akakia, Michael VII, holding military standard, and Andronikos, holding globus cruciger and akakia, all standing facing on footstools. Zacos I 93a. 23.63g, 29mm, 6h. 550 941. Byzantine Lead Seal. Romanus IV Diogenes, AD 1068-1071. PWMAN S EVΔOKIA, Christ, nimbate, standing facing, blessing Romanos IV and Eudocia, who both hold globus cruciger; IC-XC across fields / KWN MX ANΔ, Constantius, with globus cruciger and akakia, Michael VII, holding military standard, and Andronikos, holding globus cruciger and akakia, all standing facing on footstools. Zacos I 93a. 23.62g, 32mm, 6h. 500

239


942

943

942. Byzantine Lead Seal. Romanus IV Diogenes, AD 1068-1071. PWMAN S EVΔOKIA, Christ, nimbate, standing facing, blessing Romanos IV and Eudocia, who both hold globus cruciger; IC-XC across fields / KWN MX ANΔ, Constantius, with globus cruciger and akakia, Michael VII, holding military standard, and Andronikos, holding globus cruciger and akakia, all standing facing on footstools. Zacos I 93c. 29.05g, 33mm, 6h. 600 943. Byzantine Lead Seal. Nicephorus III, Botaniates, AD 1078-1081. Bust of Christ facing, holding book of Gospels; IC-XP across fields / NIKEΦOP [ΔECΠOT] TW BOTANIATH, emperor standing facing, wearing loros and crown, holding military standard and globus cruciger. Zacos I 98. 21.65g, 30mm, 6h. 250

944. Byzantine Lead Seal. Nicephorus III, Botaniates, AD 1078-1081. Bust of Christ facing, holding Book of Gospels, IC-XP across fields / NIKEΦOP ΔECΠT TW BOTANIATH, the emperor standing facing, wearing loros and crown, and holding labarum and globus cruciger. Zacos I 98; Prosopography of the Byzantine World, Nikephoros 3 Seal 108, 739. 19.84g, 31mm, 12h. Finely detailed.

250

945. Byzantine Lead Seal. Alexius III, AD 1195-1203. Uncertain legend, nimbate St. Constantine standing to front, wearing crown and loros, holding long sceptre / Uncertain legend, Emperor standing facing. For general type cf. DOC, Byzantine Seals 6, p. 186, 96.2. 27.18g, 44mm, 12h. Fine.

946

200

947

946. Byzantine Lead Seal. Theodore II Ducas-Lascaris, AD 1254-1258. St. Theodoros Stratelates standing facing with lance and shield, around (= O AΓIOC) ΘΕ Ο ΔW POC-O CTPA TH Λ A THC / ANAKTO ΠΑΙΔΑ ΔOVKA N AΘΛHTA CKE ΠOIC ΘΕΟΔWPON ΛACKAPIN TON BACILEA in metric verse. Zacos I 2755a; Stavrakos p. 235, 506; Prosopography of the Byzantine World, Theodoros 2 Seal 1807. 23.77g, 33mm, 6h. Rare.

300

947. Byzantine Lead Seal. Theodora, wife of Michael VIII Palaeologus, AD 1258-1282. Enthroned Virgin Mary with Christ in her lap, MHP (ligate)-ΘV across fields / Empress with a large crown, decorated with a pendant, holding sceptre, in left field ΘΕΟ ΔWPA EVCE BECTA TH AV ΓOVCTA (sic), in right ΔOVK AINA H ΠΑΛ ΑΙΟΛΟ ΓHNA. Zacos I 122d (var.); Triton XI, 2008, 1207 (var.). 27.63g, 35mm, 6h. Rare Variant.

240

500


948 949 948. Byzantine Lead Seal. Andronicus II Palaeologus, circa AD 1282-1295. Christ standing facing on dias, holding Book of Gospels; IC-XC across fields / ANΔPONIKOC ΔECΠOT HC O ΠΑΛΑΕΟΛΟΓOC, emperor standing facing, holding sceptre and akakia. Zacos I 123. 23.47g, 30mm, 6h. 950 949. Byzantine Lead Seal. Andronicus II Palaeologus, circa AD 1282-1328. IC–XC, Christ nimbate standing to front before a low thokos, wearing tunic, blessing with right hand and holding book of Gospels in left / ΑΝΔΡΟΝ… HCOΠΑΛΕΟΛΟΓΟC, Emperor wearing crown and loros, holding cruciform sceptre and akakia, the end of the loros falls over his left arm. 28.29g, 30mm, 12h. Cf. Zakos I, 12 800

950 951 950. Byzantine Lead Seal. Nicephorus Botaniates, Kouropalates, about AD 1074-1077. St. Demetrios with lance and shield, (= O AΓIOC) Δ H M HT P I O C / + K (CPI) E BOH ΘEI TW CW ΔOVΛW NIKH ΦOPW KOVPO ΠΑΛATH TW BOTANEI ATH. Zacos 2690; Prosopography of the Byzantine World, Nikephoros 3 Seal 853. 14.09g, 29mm, 6h. Rare.

600

The future emperor (reigned as Nikephoros III Botaniates AD 1078-1081) appears here as the head of the Imperial Palace, one of the highest offices in the court. 951. Byzantine Lead Seal. O Α ΓΙ ΟC – ΔΗ ΜΗ ΤΡΙ ΟC, St. Demetrios in military dress standing facing holding spear and shield / ΓΡΑΦΙCΣ ΣΕΒΑCΤOΛΕΟΝ ΤΟCΤΟΓVΡΑΔ OΜVΡΟΒΛVΤΑ ΜΕΓΙCTERVR... ΟCΓ… ? Zacos II –, for type cf. 428, 438, 447, 468, 497, 523, 633, 636 and 672. 29.24g, 39mm, 12h. 250

952

953 952. Byzantine Lead Seal. George Palaeologus, circa AD 1094-1119. Θ (EOTO) KE BOHΘEI TW CW ΔOVΛW, bust of the Virgin Mary, nimbate, with raised hands and wearing a medallion with the bust of Christ against her chest, MHP (ligate)-ΘV across fields / ΓEWPΓI W CEBASTW TW ΠΑΛΑΙ ΟΛΟΓW. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus II 548; Prosopography of the Byzantine World p. 107, 103, Georgios 61, 5598. 15.02g, 28mm, 6h. Small hole below face on obverse.

200

George came from the famous family of Palaeologus, the dynasty that were later to rule on the Byzantine throne. He was a senior general and a close confidant of the Emperor Alexius I Comnenus (AD 1081-1118), to whom he also had a family relationship through marriage. 953. Byzantine Lead Seal. George Palaeologus, circa AD 1094-1119. Bust of the Virgin Mary, nimbate, with raised hands and wearing a medallion with the bust of Christ against her chest, MHP (ligate)-ΘV across fields / CΦPAΓIC ΓEWPΓIOV CEBASTOV TOV ΠΑΛΑΙΟΛΟ ΓOV. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus II 549; Prosopography of the Byzantine World, Georgios 61 Seal 5599. 26.90g, 33mm, 6h. 350

954. Byzantine Lead Seal. David Comnenus, grandson of Andronicus I Comnenus, AD 1204-1214. King David, crowned and nimbate, holding lotustipped sceptre and akakia, seated facing on a stool in three-quarter view above a star-studded dais, ΔΑ (ΒΙ) Δ RACI ΛEVC - O ΠPO ΦVTH C across fields / ΔΑ (ΒΙ) Δ RACIΛEV ACΦΑΛEC ΓPA ΦWN KVPOC ΔΑ (ΒΙ) Δ KOMNHNOV RACIΛEΓΓO NOV ΓINOV in metric verse. Zacos I 2754a; Jordanov, Corpus -; Prosopography of the Byzantine World, David Komnenos Seal 3059. 68.33g, 46mm, 12h. David Comnenus (born AD 1184) was a grandson of the last Comnenen Emperor Andronicus I Comnenus (AD 1183-1185). Together with his brother Alexius he survived the brutal fall of his grandfather. While his brother Alexius I established a long dynastic rule in Trebizond, David moved further west to Paphlagonia, the ancestral home of his family. In the fight against Theodoros Laskaris (AD 1208-1222), the founder of the Empire of Nicaea, David even allied with the Latins. Finally, he fell in 1214 in the defense of Sinope against the Rum Seljuk Turks. 1,500

241


955. Byzantine Lead Seal. Constantine Comnenus, 12th century AD. St. Theodore standing facing, holding spear and shield, ΘE OΔW POC - P Γ / [C] KEΠ [OIC M] e MAPTV [C] KOMNHNON KWNCTAN TINON. See Yordanov, Corpus II 344; Prosopography of the Byzantine World, Constantine 20494 Seal 5423. 11.39g, 29mm, 6h.

250

956. Byzantine Lead Seal. George Comnenus, 12th century AD. CΦPAΓIC KOMNHNOV ΠATPOΘΕΝ ΓEOPΓIOV / ΠΑΛΑΙΟΛΟ ΓOV AVΘΙ Δ Δ ΑΛΛΑ ΠΑΓV OΘEN. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus -. 53.30g, 43mm, 6h. Extremely Rare.

550

This seal may be due to the same person who also emphasises on other seals at that time the dual family lineage of Comnenus and Palaeologus, but with the emphasis here on the family of Palaeologus.

957

958

957. Byzantine Lead Seal. Theodore Dokeianos, 12th-13th century AD. St. Theodore Stratelates standing facing, holding lance and shield, O A ΓIOC ΘΕΟ ΔW PO C, O CTPA THΛA THC / Around ΘΕΟΔWPOC O ΔOKEIANOC, triangle with flat top. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus -; Prosopography of the Byzantine World -. 34.73g, 38mm, 12h. 400 958. Byzantine Lead Seal. Stephanos, Patrikios and Genikos Kommerkiarios, apothecaries of the first and second Cappadocia. Under Constans II, AD 659-668. Draped busts of Heraclius and Constantine IV, both crowned and holding globus cruciger, CTEΦANOV ΠAT PIKIOV KAI ΓEN IKOV KOMM EPKIA / Draped busts of Heraclius and Tiberius, both crowned with globus cruciger, PIOV AΠΟΘHK HC KAΠΠΑΔ OKIAC A (= ΠPWTHC) K Al B (= ΔEVTEPAC). Zacos I 142. 28.66g, 32mm, 6h. 400

959. Byzantine Lead Seal. Hypatos and Genikos Kommerkiarios, the two apothecaries of Cilicia (?). Under Justinian II, AD 688-689. IOVΛIANOV [AΠO VΠATWN], emperor standing facing, wearing crown and holding globus cruciger, I-B across fields / S ΓENI KOV KOM MEPKIAPIOV AΠΟΘIKIC A [...] K[...]. Zacos I -. 34.40g, 40mm, 6h. Very Rare.

300

960. Byzantine Lead Seal. Synetos and Nicetas, Hypatos and Genikos Kommerkiarios. Apothecaries under Philippicus, AD 711-712. CVNETOV NIKHTA VΠATWN S [...], emperor standing facing, wearing loros and crown, and holding globus cruciger and sceptre; I-I across fields / ΓENIK WN KOMME PKIAPIWN A ΠΟΘEHKHC [...]AMCΠO[...] [...]OV S ΛVΔ. Zacos I -. 22.56g, 32mm, 6h. Extremely Rare.

242

650


961. Byzantine Lead Seal. Oikonomos of the Hagia Sophia. Circa mid-11th century AD. HAΓIA COΦIA, the Virgin, nimbate and enthroned, holding Christ on her lap; five emperors to left, and four to right, all wearing crowns and holding akaia; MHP (ligate) - Θ across fields / + Θ (EO) V CO ΦIAC OIKONO MEIOV ΛΟΓOVC EΓW KPATVNWN TOVC VΠHKOOVC CKEΠW in metric verse. Zacos I, title page of plates; Spink 132, 25th May1999, lot 208. 105.17g, 55mm, 12h. Finely detailed. Extremely Rare.

8000

962. Byzantine Lead Seal. Ekdikoi of the Hagia Sophia. 11t-12th century AD. + VΠEPAΓIA ΘEOTOKE BOHΘEI, Theotokos and Justinian I standing facing, holding a model of the Hagia Sophia, above and below H A Γ I A C E Φ I A, C-Φ across fields / + TOIC ΘE OCEBCETA TOIC ΠPEC BVTEPOIC KAI EKKΛH CEKΔIK (OIC), leaf ornaments above and below. Zacos II 63. 97.43g, 54mm, 11h. 5000

963. Byzantine Lead Seal. Ekdikoi of the Hagia Sophia. 11-12th century AD. Θ (EOTO) KE BOHΘEI IOVCTINIANO (V) ΔECΠ (OTHN), Theotokos and Justinian I standing facing, holding a model of the Hagia Sophia, (HA) ΓI A C E Φ I O vertically below / + TOIC ΘEO CEBECTA TOIC ΠPECBVTEPOIC KAI EKKΛH CEKDIK (OIC), ornament of flower of five points between lateral leaves above. Zacos II 70a. 168.39g, 79mm, 12h. 5000

243


964

965

964. Byzantine Lead Seal. Theodore, Metropolitan of Tarsus, 2nd half of the 7th century AD. Bust of St. Paul, AΓ O IO C Π AV ΛO C, TAPC OV / Cross monogram, ΘΕΟΔWPOV MHTPOΠΟΛITOV. Corpus V 2 1537; Zacos I 2965a. 14.88g, 27mm, 6h. 200 965. Byzantine Lead Seal. Theodore, Metropolitan of Tarsus, 2nd half of the 7th century AD. Bust of St. Paul, AΓ O IO C, Π AV ΛO C, TAPC OV / Cross monogram for ΘΕΟΔWPOV MHTPOΠΟΛITOV. Laurent, Corpus V 2 1537; Zacos I 2965A (Fig. To Pl. 227). 15.69g, 24mm, 6h. 200

966

967

966. Byzantine Lead Seal. Daniel, Metropolitan of Cyzicus, 9th century AD. Θ (EOTO) KE BOHΘEI, the Virgin, nimbate, standing facing, holding Christ on her left arm / TW CW DOVΛW ΔA NIHΛ MHTP OΠΟΛIT (H) K VZIKOV. Zacos -. 8.80g, 23mm, 6h. 250 967. Byzantine Lead Seal. Joseph, Metropolitan of Caria, 10th-11th century AD. Bust of the winged Archangel Michael three-quarters facing, holding globe and sceptre, M IX O / Cross monogram for IWCH-Φ, in the interstices M (HT) PO ΠO L (ITH) [KA] -RI (AC). Zacos II 536. 6.83g, 21mm, 6h. Rare.

300

968. Byzantine Lead Seal. Antonios III Stoudites, Archiepiskopos of Constantinople Opel, AD 974-980. ΘEOTOKE BOHΘEI, the Virgin, nimbate, standing facing, holding Christ on left arm / ANTWNIW APXIEΠICKO ΠW KWNCTAN TINOVΠΟΛEWC NEAC PWMHC, ornamented with flowers above and below. Zacos -. 26.26g, 38mm, 6h. Extremely Rare, perhaps unpublished. Large crease.

400

969. Byzantine Lead Seal. Markos, Metropolitan of Adrian Opel, 11th-12th century AD. Bust of Paul right, holding scroll, and Peter left holding crosstipped sceptre; O ΠAV ΛOC above Paul, O ΠETPOC above Peter / THC AΔPIANOV ΠOIMENOC CΓPAΓIC MAPKOV. Zacos -. 10.66g, 27mm, 5h. A seal of the Archbishop Markos was not previously known. This piece is thus an important link for the Notitia of this church.

200

970. Byzantine Lead Seal. Nicetas, Bishop, 8-9th century AD. Cross monogram ΘEOTOKE BOHΘEI (monogram Zacos I XLIV), in the interstices TW CW ΔOV-LW / NIKH TA EΠHCK OΠOV N (I) KE [...] [...] NΘHN. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus -. 57.30g, 34mm, 6h. Extremely Rare.

244

200


971. Byzantine Lead Seal. Germanos, 7th century AD. Bust of the Virgin Mary with image of Christ on her chest / Cross monogram ΓEPMANOV(?). Zacos I see PI. 230 no. 66-67. 7.43g, 21mm, 6h. 200

972

973

972. Byzantine Lead Seal. 8-9th century AD. Bust of the Virgin Mary with image of Christ on chest, in left field cross monogram ΘEOTOKE, in right BOHΘEI / VΠEPAΓ (IA) ΘEOT (OKE) BOHΘ (EI) TW CW ΔOVΛW, patriarchal cross on three steps. 12.32g, 26mm, 6h. 200 973. Byzantine Lead Seal. Nicephorus, Protospathatarios, 11th century AD. Θ (EOTO) KE B (OH) Θ (EI) NIK (H) F (O) P (W), bust of the Virgin, nimbate, wearing a medallion with the bust of Christ against her chest, MTP (ligate)-ΘV across fields / ACΠΑ Θ (A) P (IW) S TW ΠATIPH [...] TO KACT MONT. 20.38g, 26mm, 6h. 350

974

975

974. Byzantine Lead Seal. Thomas Klasmatas, 11th century AD. The Virgin Mary, nimbate, standing facing, holding Christ on her left arm, MHP (ligate)ΘV across fields / Rosette above legend, ΘWMA ΦVΛATTE KΛACMATA TPAΦAC KOPH. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus -; Prosopography of the Byzantine World - (cf. Ioannes 287). 17.68g, 29mm, 6h. Finely detailed. Extremely Rare.

250

975. Byzantine Lead Seal. Romanos Skleros, Kouropalates, circa AD 1065. Archangel Michael holding lotus-tipped sceptre and globus cruciger, M IX A / K (VPI) EB (OH) Θ (EI) TW CW ΔOVL (W) PWMANW KOV POΠΑΛATH TW SKΛH PW. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus -; Prosopography of the Byzantine World - (see Romano 104 Seal. 7). 31.13g, 37mm, 6h. Extremely Rare. Romanos Skleros was the brother of Mary Skleraina, the notorious mistress of Emperor Constantine IX Monomachos (AD 1042-1055).

976

450

977

976. Byzantine Lead Seal. Iconographic seal with Archangel Michael, 11-12th century AD. Bust of the Virgin, nimbate, wearing a medallion with the bust of Christ against her chest, MHP (ligate)-ΘV across fields, Θ [EOTO] KE R [OH] ΘEI / Bust of the Archangel Michael holding lotus-tipped sceptre, around [...] XI T API. 6.74g, 24mm, 6h. Very Rare.

200

977. Byzantine Lead Seal. Iconographic seal with Mary and the Apostles, 11th-12th century AD. Bust of Virgin Mary with Christ on her left arm, MHP (ligate)-ΘV across fields / Busts of the Apostles; Peter on left holding scroll, Paul on right holding Book of Gospels, Π E TP, Π AV ΛO, between the heads O AΓIOC. 12.04g, 26mm, 6h. Rare.

300

978. Byzantine Lead Seal. Iconographic seal with holy representation. Theodore and Demetrios in style of Christ Deisis, O AΓIOC ΘE O ΔW PO C ΔI MH, medallion with bust of Christ, IC-XC across upper fields / Invocative five-line inscription between ornaments. Zacos-. 29.42g, 33mm, 6h. 500

245


979. Byzantine Lead Seal. Iconographic seal with saint, 11-12th century AD. Bust of Theotokos with his hands half raised in front of his chest, MHP (ligate)-ΘV across fields / Bust of a saint with maphorion holding a cross with his right hand to his chest, H A ΓI O - [...]. 17.66g, 25mm, 6h. Very Rare.

980

200

981

980. Byzantine Lead Seal. Giagoupes, 12th century AD. Bust of the Virgin Mary, nimbate, with raised hands and wearing a medallion with the bust of Christ against her chest, MHP (ligate)-ΘV across fields / Θ (EOTO) KE BOH ΘEI TW CW ΔOVΛW ΓΙ ΑΓOVΠH. 25.06g, 32mm, 6h. Giagoupes is the name of a family of Turkish origin, which were prevalent at the turn of the 13th and 14th century. The most famous Basileos Giagoupes can be seen on a painting from the time of Andronicus II in the Church of St. George in the Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia. This seal proves that the family were present in the 12th century. 550 981. Byzantine Lead Seal. Giagoupes, 12th century AD. Bust of the Virgin Mary, nimbate, with raised hands and wearing a medallion with the bust of Christ against her chest, MHP (ligate)-ΘV across fields / Θ (EOTO) KE BOH ΘEI TW CW ΔOVΛW ΓΙ ΑΓOVΠH. 21.32g, 32mm, 6h. 250

982. Byzantine Lead Seal. Nicephorus Alyates, Kanikleios. Mid-13th century AD. The Virgin, nimbate, standing facing, holding nimbate Christ in her arms, MHP (ligate) ΘV-IC XC across fields / TOV KA [NI] KΛEIOV TAC Γ PAΦAC AΛVATOV H ΠAPΘENOC ΦV ΛATTE TOV NI KHΦOPOV, with vines in exergue. Laurent, Corpus II 228; Zacos -; Seibt - Zarnitz 3.1.3. 42.92g, 36mm, 6h. The Alyates family owes its rise to the military successes of some of their relatives in the 10th and 11th centuries. Later the family had much success in high civilian agencies. This includes Nicephorus, who, under John III (AD 1222-1254) came to the Imperial Chancellery, and then later under Theodoros II (AD 1254-1258) he became the ‘epi tou kanikleiou’ (FJ Dölger described the office as “Imperial Inkwell Keeper”). One aspect of this position was to assist the emperor with his signature on documents, whereby a considerable proximity to the emperor arose. Unfortunately Nicephorus fell out of the ruler’s favour. As a result, his tongue was cut out. However, he was rehabilitated by Michael VIII (AD 1261-1282) and reinstated in his office. Closely associated with this is the inscription on the back of the seal (“Virgin [Mary], keep the writings of Kanikleios Nikephoros Alyates”). 1,250

983. Byzantine Lead Seal. Theophylaktos Ergodotos, Hypatos and Ethnarch, 11th-12th century AD. Archangel Michael standing facing, holding sceptre and globus cruciger, X A X M / AP X (I) CTPA THΓE BOH ΘEI ΘΕΟΦVΛ (A) KTW VΠATW S EΘNAPXH TO EPΓΟΔO TH. Laurent, Corpus -; Zacos -; Seibt - Zarnitz -. 22.35g, 36mm, 6h. Very Rare.

400

984. Byzantine Lead Seal. Michael, Krites. + ANAΘΕΟΝΘΟCCWΓΕΝΟCTIATW…?, nimbate and winged bust of St. Michael facing wearing imperial vestments, sceptre and globus cruciger / + MIXΗΛ ΑCΠΘΠΤ ΓΚΘΚΡΙΤ ΕΠΤΙSΔΡΗ ΝΤΙΤΗΘΕΦ ΑΚΤΚΟΙΤ ΜCΜΩCΤ ΤΙC. Zacos I-II –, for type cf. Zacos II, 845. 15.50g, 26mm, 12h. 250

246


986

985

985. Byzantine Lead Seal. Michael Euthymius, Magistros, and Krites, 11-12th century AD. Bust of winged Archangel Michael with sceptre and globus cruciger, M I X A / K (CPI) EB (OH) Θ (EI) MIXAHΛ MAΓICTPW BECT S KPIT TWN ΘPAKH CIWN TW TOV EVΘVMIOV. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus -. 14.39g, 27mm, 6h. Very Rare.

450

986. Byzantine Lead Seal. Nikephoros Melissenos, magistros, vestarches and kapetano. Bust of the Virgin, nimbate, facing, holding nimbate bust of Christ / [+ ΘΚΕΡ] NIKHΦOP ΜΑΓΙCΤPI ΡΕCTΑΡΧ SK AΠΕTANO TW ΜΕΑCΝ. Zacos I, 2697. 12.38g, 24mm, 12h. 200

987

988

987. Byzantine Lead Seal. Iconographic Christian seal, 7-8th century AD. Busts of two canonized soldiers / Cross monogram naming the seal holder with the letters AOCTV Φ (CTEΦANON). 12.08g, 28mm, 6h. Extremely Rare.

200

988. Byzantine Lead Seal. Nicephorus, Protokouropalates, 11th century AD. St. Demetrios, on left, holding lance and parazonium, and St. George, on right, holding lance and shield, [...] T P [...] Γ E W [...] / K (CPI) E BOHΘ (EI) NIKHΦOPW AKOVPOΠΑ ΛATH TW MOΔHNW. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus -. 7.60g, 24mm, 6h. Extremely Rare.

250

989. Byzantine Lead Seal. Basil Apokapes, Bestarches and Katepano of Baasprakanias, AD 1064. St. Basil with commandments, O A ΓI O C, B A CI ΛEI OC / K (VPI) EB (OH) Θ (EI) BACIΛEIW BECTAPXH S KATEΠANW BA ACΠPAKAN (I) AC TW AΠO KAΠOI, among this two sheets. Laurent, Corpus -; Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus II 40. 30.15g, 35mm, 6h. 675

990. Byzantine Lead Seal. Iconographic seal with invocation, 11th-12th century AD. Bust of St. George with lance and shield, (= O AΓIOC) ΓE-O P ΓI / Five-line inscription. 9.11g, 22mm, 6h. Rare.

200

991. Byzantine Lead Seal. Charpes Sara sites, circa 11th centrury AD. St. John Prodromos with cross sceptre, (= O AΓIOC) IW O ΠPO-Δ P O M O C / ΦVΛA TTE K (VRI) ET W CW ΔOV ΛW XAPΠH TW CAPACI TH. Laurent, Corpus -; Zacos -; Lanz 154, 2012, 611. 21.32g, 30mm, 6h. Very Rare.

247

350


992 992 992. Byzantine Lead Seal. John Protospatharios and Mystolektes, 11th-12th century AD. St. John Theologos, standing facing, holding Book of Gospels, (= O AΓIOC) I W O ΘΕ ΟΛΟ ΓOC / IW ACΠΑΘ EPI T Γ S MVCTO ΛEKTH [...]. Zacos -. See Laurent, Corpus II. 154; Prosopography of the Byzantine World, Ioannes 20289 Seal 1661. 8.00g, 24mm, 5h. Extremely Rare. 200 993. Byzantine Lead Seal. Pantaleon, 11-12th century AD. Θ (EOTO) KE B (OH) Θ (EI) ΠANTOΛEONT, Bust of the Virgin Mary, nimbate, with raised hands and wearing a medallion with the bust of Christ against her chest, MP (ligate)-ΘV across fields / TW KAΛΟ ΨVXE, frontal bust of St. Pantaleon (Panteleëmon) holding medical instruments, (= O AΓIOC) ΠA NT E Λ EH MO N. Zacos -, cf. Zacos II 665. 9.05g, 24mm, 6h. 500

994. Byzantine Lead Seal. Pantaleon, 11-12th century AD. Θ Π ΑΝ ΤΙ- Λ Ε HΜ Ο Ν, Nimbate bust of St. Panteleëmon facing, holding medical instrument and box of medicine / […..] ΝTINOC ESPA-IC ΠΕΦΟ... ΓΡΑΦ... ΦΟ... ? Zacos II –, for type cf. 391, 424, 592, 666 and 710. 12.57g, 26mm, 12h. 300

995. Byzantine Lead Seal. Michael, 11-12th century AD. St. Nikolaos, (= O AΓIOC) N I K O Λ A O C / CKEΠOIC ΔOINON MIXAHΛ MV PORΛU TA. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus -; Prosopography of the Byzantine World -. 22.72g, 35mm, 6h. Very Rare.

996

300

997

996. Byzantine Lead Seal. Demetrios Meles Spatharios, 11th-12th century AD. St. Nikolaos, in field (= O AΓIOC) NI [K] O / Rosette leaves, seven-line inscription. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus -; Prosopography of the Byzantine World -. 15.37g, 26mm, 6h. Extremely Rare.

300

997. Byzantine Lead Seal. Nikolaos, Protospatharios, Hypatos and Krites, 11-12th century AD. St. Theodoros with spear and shield, (= O AΓIOC) Θ EW Δ OP OC / + K (CPI) EB (OH) Θ (EI) NIKOΛAW ACΠΑΘAP V ΠAT KPITH TOV BHΛOV S MOV (ligate), TOV TOV Γ [EN] IKOV. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus -. 8.42g, 27mm, 6h. Extremely Rare.

250

999

998

998. Byzantine Lead Seal. Constantine, Protospatharios, 11th-12th century AD. St. George standing facing, holding lance and shield, (= O AΓIOC) Γ E-WP ΓI O C / K (CPI) E BOHΘ (EI) TW CW ΔOVΛ (W) K [W] N ACΠA [ΘA] P SV [...] TW. Zacos -; Jordanov -; Corpus. 15.60g, 30mm, 6h. Extremely Rare.

650

999. Byzantine Lead Seal. Leon, 11th-12th century AD. Bust of a saint, holding Book of Gospels, in field (= O AΓIOC) / [...] W O CTP [...] / Four-line inscription. 21.27g, 29mm, 6h. Rare.

248

200


1000. Byzantine Lead Seal. Basil, Protoproedros and leader, 12th century AD. Bust of a saint, holding Book of Gospels / K (CPI) BOH E [Θ] (EI) BACIΛEI AΠPOEΔP [...] ΔOVKIC [...] TW AΠ [...]. Zacos -. 12.22g, 27mm, 6h. Extremely Rare.

300

1001. Byzantine Lead Seal. Theodore, 12th-13th century AD. St. George standing facing, holding lance and shield, A ΓI OS, Γ WP ΓI OS / CEBACTOV TAC ΓPAΦAC A ΘΛHTA CKEPOIC ΘΕΟΔWPOV XA EVEPITOVC TOV KETOV. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus -; Prosopography of the Byzantine World -. 41.69g, 38mm, 6h. Very Rare.

700

1002. Byzantine Lead Seal. St. George, 12th -13th century AD. St. George standing facing, holding lance and shield, O AΓIOC ΓE-WPΓI OC / CΦPAΓΙΔO CEKMAIWNAΛ ΛΗΘOVCΦEPWN ΓPAΦACEPICΦ PAΓICEMANI KAITOV. 39.64g, 37mm, 6h. Rare.

1003

600

1004

1003. Byzantine Lead Seal. Konstantinos, 12th-13th century AD. St. George standing facing, holding lance and shield, (= O + ΑΓIOC) ΓE - WP ΓI O C / Inscription. 25.36g, 38mm, 6h. Rare.

350

1004. Byzantine Lead Seal. George, 12th-13th century AD. St. John Theologos standing facing, holding Book of Gospels, (= O IAΓIOC) IW - O ΘΕ ΟΛΟ ΓO C / Seven-line inscription. 39.90g, 38mm, 6h. Rare.

350

1005. Byzantine Lead Seal. Manuel Monomachos, 13th century AD. IC-XC, nimbate Christ enthroned facing, holding Book of Gospels / EΠICΦPAΓIZ OV MANOVHΛ MONOMAXOV Π PAΧEIC ΘEOV XEIP EIC TEΛOC TAVT AC MENEIN in metric verse. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus -; Prosopography of the Byzantine World, Manuel 20130, seal 3941. 42.00g, 39mm, 6h. Very Rare.

249

450


1006. Byzantine Lead Seal. Constantinos, 13th-14th century AD. The Virgin, nimbate, standing facing with raised hands and wearing a medallion with the bust of Christ against her chest, MHP (ligate)-ΘV across fields / Rosette, seven-line inscription. 50.74g, 43mm, 6h. Obverse double struck. Very Rare.

500

1007. Byzantine Lead Seal. Constantinos, 7th century. Eagle with outspread wings, cross monogram ΘEOTOKE BOHΘEI (monogram Zacos I XLVI) / Cross monogram KWNCTANTINOV (monogram Zacos I 292). Zacos -. 18.55g, 29mm, 6h. Extremely Rare.

200

1008. Byzantine Lead Seal. George Basilikos, ‘bearer of the spatha’, 9-11th century AD. K (CPI) E BOHΘEI TW CW ΔOVLW, patriarchal cross on steps / ΓEOPΓ (I) OV [...] B (ACIΛIKW) CΠΑΘ (APO) KA NΔΙΔ (ATW) S EΠI T WN OIKIAK (WN). Zacos -. 9.64g, 24mm, 6h. Extremely Rare.

200

1009. Byzantine Lead Seal. Epiphanius and Patrikios, 8th century. Cross monogram for ΘEOTOKE BOHΘEI (monogram Zacos I XLVI), TW CW ΔOVLW / Intersection between vines EΠΙΦA NAV ΠA TPIKIW AMHN. Zacos -. 31.84g, 35mm, 6h. Extremely Rare.

1010

300

1011

1010. Byzantine Lead Seal. Sisinnios, Hypatos and Kleisouriarches, 9th century AD. Cross monogram ΘEOTOKE BOHΘEI (monogram Zacos I XLII), diagonally arranged TW COV (sic) ΔOV-ΛW / CICIN NAV VΠA TW S KL (EICOVPIAPXH) OV TOV PLAPX. Zacos -; Jordanov, Corpus -. 32.71g, 31mm, 6h. Extremely Rare.

250

1011. Byzantine Lead Seal. Christophoros Petros, circa 9th century AD. Cross monogram ΘEOTOKE BOHΘEI (monogram Zacos I XLVI), TW-CW ΔOV-ΛW / Four-line inscription. 13.97g, 29mm, 5h. Extremely Rare.

250

200


1012. Byzantine Lead Seal. Patriarchal type. MHP – ΘV, The Virgin Platytera seated facing on throne with high back, holding Christ on her knees before her / --- ΘΕΟΔWΙW ΜΑΓΙCΤPW RΕCTΑRΧ SWΡWΓΓΑ ΤΗCΑΙ ΓΩ. Zacos II –, for type cf. 16-54. 21.89g, 30mm, 12h. 250

1013. Byzantine Lead Seal. MHP monogram – ΘV across fields, nimbate bust of the Virgin facing, medallion with the head of Christ before her / Uncertain six-lined legend. For type cf. Zacos I, 2720 bis. 10.89g, 23mm, 12h.

250

MODERN AND MEDIEVAL COINS

1014. Islamic, Abbasid Caliphate, time of al-Mansur AV Dinar. AH 153 (AD 770), no mint (Iraq). ‘There is no God - Except Him - He has no equal’ (within centre in three lines) / ‘Muhammad is the messenger of God. He sent him with guidance and the true religion to reveal it to all religions even if the polytheists abhor it’ (around). ‘Muhammad is - the messenger - of God’ (within centre in three lines) ‘In the name of God, this Dinar was struck in the year 3 and 50 and 100’ (around). Bernardi 51(ab2); Album 212. 4.23g, 19mm, 5h. Boldly struck, Extremely Fine.

300

1015. Kings of Armenia, Hetoum I (1226-1270) AR Tram. Bilingual issue, naming Kaikhusru, AH 641 / AD 1243/4. King riding on horseback right; in left field above, cross; in right field above, crescent / Arabic legend in three lines: ‘The Sublime Sultan, Protector of the World and the Faith, Kaikhusru Son of Kaiqobad’. Nercessian 326. 2.85g, 23cm, 12h. Very Fine.

End of Sale

251

500


Roma Numismatics Auction IX  

Roma Numismatics Auction IX

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