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F OU N DE D 18 8 5 Fiat Lux


F OU N DE D 18 8 5 Fiat Lux

Scott Morris Desig ned by Amanda Bardwell

Winter Park I Miami I Santa Barbara


Rollins: Fiat Lux © 2015 Rollins College www.rollins.edu

All rights reserved. No portion of this book may be copied or distributed without express written permission of Rollins College and Story Farm. Published in the United States by Story Farm. www.story-farm.com

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data available upon request. ISBN 978-0-9905205-5-9 Printed in China Editorial director: Ashley Fraxedas Art director: Amanda Bardwell Rollins College chief photographer: Scott Cook Photo research: Christy Marks Editorial advisors: Julian Chambliss, Hoyt Edge, Lorrie Kyle ’70, Jack Lane ‘06H, Maurice O’Sullivan, Thaddeus Seymour ’90H Copy editors: Eva Dougherty, Mick Lochridge Indexing: Amy Hall Production management: Tina Dahl Editorial assistant: Marcela Oliveira Rollins College Marketing & Communications Tom Hope, Associate Vice President of Marketing and Communications Laura Cole ’04 ’08MLS, editorial director Meredith Wellmeier, assistant editorial director Tom May, creative director Rollins College Archives and Special Collections Wenxian Zhang, Head of Archives and Special Collections Darla Moore ’09MLS, archival specialist

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 First Edition, March 2015


WELCOME TO ROLLINS COLLEGE. In 2015, I was given the honor of being named the 15th president of Rollins College. Before accepting this position, my wife Peg and I visited Rollins to get a feel of the place. Of course, any first-time visitor can’t help but be struck by the spectacular beauty of the campus. But on subsequent visits what struck me even more was the community’s passion for the College and desire to see it thrive and succeed. That energy is palpable. I’ve spent my career, over 30 years, in traditional liberal arts colleges. I’m very proud of that work and will always be a champion of that style of education. But what we understand to be liberal education is a much more dynamic and globally engaged project than it has been in the past. Now we must focus on preparing students for lives of responsible leadership in a diverse and interdependent world. One of the things that attracted me to Rollins is that it has that broader base, a broader platform as a foundation. In the following pages, you will be introduced to the people, ideas, and achievements of a remarkable institution. But while Rollins honors the past, it is not stuck in it. It challenges itself to build on the foundation of those who have come before us while recognizing, as they did, the continuingly evolving nature of higher education. Rollins is ideally situated to be a global liberal arts college in the 21st century. We bring faculty, students, and staff together from diverse backgrounds and points of view, providing a rich learning environment that promotes sharing varied perspectives and ideas. The campus, situated as it is in Central Florida, makes the task of building this kind of diversity, this kind of campus community, highly achievable. We are rightly proud of our past, yet the more I get to know the students, alumni, faculty, and staff of Rollins, the more confident I am that our best years are ahead of us, that we are committed to being as good a steward of our time as our predecessors were of theirs, and that when the next chapter of our history is written, the new generation will look back with the same pride we feel and say “Fiat Lux”—the light continues to be shared.

GRANT CORNWELL President


F iat L u x 7


64

96

36 190

8 F iat L u x

262


Table

of

Contents 156

232

10 36 82 96 130 158 190 232 260 275

Chapter One

LET THERE BE LIFE : IN THE BEGINNING

Chapter Two

THE LIGHT OF KNOWLEDGE : A LIBERAL ARTS TRADITION

Chapter Three

THE LIGHT OF LEARNING : ACHIEVEMENT IN ACADEMICS

Chapter Four

THE LIGHT OF ARTISTIC EXCELLENCE : A STORIED PROMINENCE IN THE ARTS

Chapter Five

THE LUMINOUS CAMPUS : POSTCARD PERFECTION

Chapter Six

LEADING LIGHTS : ROLLINS’ STARS

Chapter Seven

CAMPUS LIGHTS : LIVING THE ROLLINS LIFE

Chapter Eight

SHARING THE LIGHT: SERVING OTHERS

Chapter Nine

CIT Y LIGHTS : TOWN AND GOWN

Photography Credits AND INDEX

F iat L u x 9


10 F iat L u x


There Light Let

be

IN THE BEGINNING

“My desire is to found ... a college thorough and complete in its courses of study and illustrate by practice the doctrine of ‘the Education of the South at the South.’ I ask you, gentlemen, to discuss thoroughly the question. ‘Shall an effort be made to found a college in Florida’?”

LUCY CROSS The mother of Rollins College had a dream and tenacity.

F iat L u x 11


R

ollins College began as a vision

To some that may sound quaint or

to bring the light of education to

old-fashioned, but that vision built an

a place where there was no such

institution that changed tens of thousands

light. That vision was pursued with fierce

of lives, helped found a town, played a role in

determination. It wasn’t easy—it hasn’t been

the growth of a major city and has affected

easy at many junctures in Rollins’ history—but

people across the globe.

all obstacles paled in comparison to the importance of the mission.

Fiat Lux, Rollins’ motto, taken from the first chapter of Genesis, proved accurate.

Fiat Lux, Rollins’ motto, taken from the first chapter of Genesis, proved accurate. The idea was simple yet profound. Education

Rollins has come a long way while remaining

illuminates the path to the good life. A good

faithful to its vision, and it continues to carry

life in every regard—intellectually, civically,

that vision of light into the future. There is

morally and spiritually. And every human

an impressive list of “firsts” associated with

being deserves the chance to attain this under-

Rollins. Topping that list: Rollins was the first

standing of the good life.

recognized college in Florida.

12 F iat L u x


LET THERE BE LIGHT IN THE BEGINNING

F iat L u x 13


“In 1885, Florida represented America’s last frontier ... Central Florida was sparsely settled, dotted here and there with small villages. People the local inhabitants called ‘crackers’ worked pioneer farms.”

JACK LANE ’06 H Rollins College: A Centennial History, former Weddell Professor Emeritus of American History and college historian

“In 1884, Florida possessed only eight county high schools. These schools operated from two to five months a year.” 14 F iat L u x


LET THERE BE LIGHT IN THE BEGINNING

It is hard to be in Winter Park, or anywhere

of the students attending them could not

in Central Florida for that matter, and

read. One observer at the time concluded

grasp just how rural and isolated it was at

that 45 of every 100 voters were illiterate.

the time of Rollins’ founding. But that was

Several private academies were scattered

precisely the reason Lucy Cross, who came

throughout the state, but Florida could

to be known as “The Mother of Rollins,”

claim no colleges. This was “just the kind

believed the area was the perfect location for

of virgin educational field that had been

a college.

historically so appealing to the Congrega-

In 1884, Florida possessed only eight

tionalists’ sense of mission,” Professor Jack

county high schools. Elementary and high

Lane explains. “These conditions served as a

schools operated from two to five months a

magnet that attracted such lay missionaries

year with wholly inadequate facilities. Most

as Lucy Cross.”

THOUGH PRIMITIVE, the area was full of undeniable beauty, reminding naturalists like William Bartram of a kind of paradise. Nestled among five pristine lakes, Winter Park was a gem.

F iat L u x 15


Lucy CROSS

was comfortably teaching at Wellesley College when she felt called to share the light of education in the hinterlands. She headed south to Daytona Beach to found an elementary school.

While she tended her rose garden one afternoon, something on a much larger scale seized her imagination.

16 F iat L u x


LET THERE BE LIGHT IN THE BEGINNING

MOTHER OF ROLLINS “Lucy Cross provided the spark. As it turned out, the time was right and the right people were on hand to kindle it.”

1925

“Hope sprang in my heart and an idea in my mind,” Lucy Cross wrote. The idea was Rollins College, and Lucy Cross was not one to take no for an answer where duty was involved.

F iat L u x 17


“I DO NOT DARE TO GO HOME AND FACE MISS CROSS IF I DO NOT READ THIS PAPER.” Those were the words that

creating a college was not

C.M. Bingham, Cross’ pastor,

even on the official agenda.

spoke to the first Florida

But Bingham, who was the

Congregational Association

moderator, knew Lucy Cross

meeting that was held in

well, and he read the paper

Winter Park. Discussion of

she had prepared anyway.

Ladies DORMITORY

Cloverleaf Cottage opened for residency in 1891. It had cost $19,577 to construct.

It had fifty-six rooms, thirteen of which were not furnished or occupied until 1904.

Edward

HOOKER & FAMILY

Based on Bingham’s reading of Cross’ paper, it was decided a committee should be appointed to study the prospect of establishing a college. 18 F iat L u x


LET THERE BE LIGHT IN THE BEGINNING

The task of building a college

the circumstances were

in a state that had no colleges

discouraging, the group of

and very little in the way of

people who got Rollins off the

education at any level was

ground, with their tenacity

daunting, to say the least,

and passion, turned out to be

but the idea caught fire. If

more than a match for them.

C.M.

BINGHAM

F iat L u x 19


1893

STUDENTS BOAT across Lake Virginia. In the background are the few buildings comprising the Rollins campus.

One of those captivated by Lucy Cross’

store, Ergood’s, and no church. While

vision was Edward P. Hooker, descen-

plans were made to build a church,

dant of the famous Thomas Hooker,

Hooker held services in White’s

who was considered the “Father of

Hall, which occupied the top floor of

Connecticut” and one of the leading

Ergood’s. Hooker was a formidable

Puritan founders of the United States.

man, the man needed to make Rollins

Edward Hooker and his family had

a reality. The committee to explore

moved to Winter Park in 1883. Winter

the possibility of establishing a college

Park could barely be considered a

asked Hooker to write up a paper on

hamlet at that time—there was one

the topic.

Hooker was the man needed to make Rollins a reality. 20 F iat L u x


LET THERE BE LIGHT IN THE BEGINNING

“The outlook is grand and glorious. ... We love the state to which we have come; these genial skies, these clear, sparkling lakes, the souls of the people who dwell among the forests. We rejoice at the arrival of those who crowd the steamboats and cars. We are a little before them and we bid them welcome. We rejoice in the privilege of laying foundations for the future.”

EDWARD P. HOOKER One of Rollins’ key founders and its first president F iat L u x 21


Oliver E.

CHAPMAN

Frederick W. LYMAN

Hooker wanted Rollins in Winter Park,

As a newspaper reported, they believed

and one of his parishioners, a remarkable

they could create “a first-class resort for

entrepreneur named Frederick W. Lyman,

Northern and Southern men of wealth,

joined him in the effort. This fortuitous

where, amidst orange groves and beautiful

pairing made all the difference.

lakes and luxuries,” there would arise “a

Lyman had recently gone into business with two real estate promoters, Loring

community of grand winter homes. ...” Lyman understood that one way to

Chase and Oliver E. Chapman, to form

ensure this would happen would be to bring

the Winter Park Land Company. They

a college to Winter Park. He presented his

purchased some 600 acres between

view to Chase and Chapman, as well as to

Maitland and Orlando and bordering Lake

Francis B. Knowles, who would become one

Virginia and Lake Osceola.

of Rollins’ most generous benefactors.

22 F iat L u x


LET THERE BE LIGHT IN THE BEGINNING

Early HOUSE

Oliver Everett Chapman built this house overlooking Lake Osceola in 1882. It was later called Twitchell House and was located at the rear of Interlachen and Canton avenues.

Tireless in his efforts, Lyman reported on how a town that was still in its earliest planning stages won out over larger, more prominent competitors. “Everyone was expected to give,” Lyman

$13,000. Mount Dora came in with $35,000

stated. “No sum was too large to ask for and

and 10 acres on Lake Dora, but nothing

none too small to receive. Every loyal Winter

approached the commitment from Winter

Parkite felt that no place in the state could

Park. In addition to funding, there were

offer natural advantages comparable to hers;

generous donations of land. The Winter Park

Providence had done its part with lavish

Land Company provided a campus site on the

hand, and they must do theirs no less freely.”

bucolic shore of Lake Virginia. Alonzo Rollins

They did. The men collected a total of

donated two large orange groves, along with

$114,180, while Jacksonville offered a meager

his initial gift of $50,000.

F iat L u x 23


1888 24 F iat L u x

ROLLINS CAMPUS One of the earliest photos taken: The main buildings (from left) are Knowles Hall, Pinehurst Cottage and the dining hall. The fence around the campus was constructed to keep grazing cows out—or so the legend says.


LET THERE BE LIGHT IN THE BEGINNING

On April 28, 1885, at nine o’clock in the morning, Rollins College was incorporated at Lyman’s bank in Sanford. Lyman was elected president of the corporation, while Hooker was elected president of the faculty.

F iat L u x 25


WITH THE AMBITIOUS GOAL OF STARTING CLASSES IN THE COMING FALL, Winter Park prevailed,

did not pan out, but Knowles

and Hooker immediately

added $5,000 to his pledge.

prepared to go to New

With that gift, there was

England to find teachers

a total of $10,000 for the

and funding.

purpose of building a class-

Francis B. Knowles gave

room, which would be named

Hooker introductions to his

in honor of the donor. Hooker

friends in Massachusetts

then collected enough

in order to raise money.

pledges to begin construction

Funding from these friends

of a dormitory.

1886

KNOWLES HALL Knowles Hall was just one example of Francis B. Knowles’ generosity. Frederick W. Lyman carefully courted and assembled a team of benefactors that came through each time it was necessary. Knowles was ever dependable.

26 F iat L u x

Francis B.

KNOWLES


LET THERE BE LIGHT IN THE BEGINNING

DR. BARROWS’ SURVEY CLASS Rex Beach (kneeling at left) helps his classmates in Nathan Barrows’ survey class in 1894. Barrows was a professor of mathematics and also a charter trustee. From left: Rex Beach, Fred Ensminger, Ruth Ford, Albert Barrows, Fitz Frank, unidentified man, Barrows, Walter Fairchild and unidentified man.

Alonzo ROLLINS

While Hooker and Lyman

Nathan Barrows, professor

continued seeking funds,

of mathematics and physics;

Loring Chase, a charter

Annie Morton, instructor in

trustee, oversaw construction.

history and later principal

George Rand, a Boston archi-

of the training department;

tect residing in Winter Park,

William W. Lloyd, professor

Although Alonzo Rollins died in 1887 and only saw Rollins in its infancy, his backing led to the college being named after him. drew up plans, and George

of ancient languages and

Rollins, brother of Alonzo,

principal of the preparatory

supervised the project.

school; and Louise Abbott,

By August, Hooker had

assistant principal of the

assembled Rollins’ faculty:

training department. F iat L u x 27


Ergood’s STORE AND HALL Ergood’s Store and Hall was built in 1886. One of the town’s earliest buildings, it stood near the corner of Park Avenue and Lincoln Street. The second floor, White’s Hall, was planned to be Rollins’ first classroom.

PROFESSOR LANE PAINTS THE HECTIC SCENE WELL: As the first day of classes approached,

middle of October the college officers

the realization dawned that nothing

still had no place to house or teach

would be ready. Hooker, therefore,

students.

delayed the opening date to November 4.

Knowles made another donation, of

On October 6, Barrows arrived to

$2,000, but the needs were far greater.

relieve Chase of the preliminary work

Without more funds, Chase reported,

of opening the college, just as students

they could not get more men to work

began registering in surprisingly large

on the building. He believed they could

numbers. Chase wrote to Lyman that

have registered 150 students, but

Orlando was sending a “big delegation

Rollins wound up with only 70, as it

almost every day.” But as late as the

simply wasn’t ready for more.

28 F iat L u x


LET THERE BE LIGHT IN THE BEGINNING

“The college had no place to

“Fairly fixed” meant that they had

accommodate even this number of

secured White’s Hall above Ergood’s—

students,” Lane points out. “Chase

one of only three buildings in Winter

later acknowledged that as the day of

Park, and the same hall where Hooker

opening drew near, he and Hooker

had started his church—for classroom

Before opening day, Chase wrote Lyman and said that things were “fairly fixed.” were at their ‘wits’ end.’ The weeks

space. The Larrabee house at Morse

before opening found Hooker and

Boulevard and New York Avenue

Chase scurrying around Winter Park,

would serve as a boys’ dormitory; the

arranging for rooms and trying to

Ward cottage on Osceola Street would

locate classrooms.”

be for the girls.

1892 FENCING CLASS

was a part of Light Gymnastics. Grace Livingston Hill was the instructor.

F iat L u x 29


CONGREGATIONAL MISSION The mission to advance education was the foundation of Rollins College. The church that Hooker pastored served as the first classroom.

Everything was set ... until it turned out that the plaster had not yet dried on the newly renovated White’s Hall. 30 F iat L u x


LET THERE BE LIGHT IN THE BEGINNING

CHASE DECLARED WHITE’S HALL UNSAFE AND SUGGESTED USING HOOKER’S STILLUNFINISHED CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. The church had no pews—they

were sitting in a freight car several

were using boards set on small

blocks away.

barrels—but Hooker agreed with

Lloyd commandeered a crew of

Chase it was their best option as a

young men who moved the church

temporary classroom.

pews to the sidewalls and unloaded

“Tonight as I write (10 p.m.), our whole force of carpenters is there setting up desks and partitions,” Chase wrote.

the desks in time for the arrival of the first students. At nine that morning, the Congregational Church bell in

The Orange County Reporter

Hooker’s unfinished church tolled

records that opening day,

for the start of classes. Rollins

November 4, 1885, was a “typical

College had no buildings. It had 70

Florida fall day, with sunny skies

students and a handful of profes-

and mild temperatures.”

sors. The vision that Lucy Cross

It did not seem so to William

pursued so adamantly, and that

Lloyd, one of the new professors,

Hooker, Lyman, Chase, Knowles,

who entered the Congregational

Alonzo Rollins and others fostered

Church an hour before students

with urgency, intelligence and grit,

were to arrive and discovered that

had been born.

the newly ordered school desks

1956

Fiat Lux. Let there be light.

CHAPEL BELL

On November 4, 1885, Hooker’s

Congregational Church bell rang out the news of the start of Rollins College. The bell would end up in Knowles Memorial Chapel tower to ring again. F iat L u x 31


THE GREATNESS OF SPIRIT THAT ENABLED THE FOUNDERS TO ENGENDER THAT LIGHT PERMEATES ROLLINS COLLEGE TO THIS DAY. It may be seen in the accom-

same bell that tolled for Rollins’

plishments of students, faculty

first classes from Edward Hooker’s

and alumni, and the programs

unfinished church continues to

Rollins has crafted to carry that

ring out from its new home in

light all over the world. It may

Knowles Memorial Chapel.

be witnessed in the felicitous

Every year, new students gather

relationship between Rollins and

in Knowles Chapel, where they are

Winter Park. It is even located in

commissioned to carry the light

Rollins’ architecture.

anew with these words: May the

The bond between the Rollins

aim of our learning be not only to

founding, present and future

enlighten our own lives, but also

remains vibrant.

to share this light with those who

That was the idea behind Rollins’ founding—to discover new ways

need it most. That was Lucy Cross’ vision.

of keeping faith with the mission

And it continues to be Rollins

of carrying the light. Fittingly, the

College’s vision.

32 F iat L u x


LET THERE BE LIGHT IN THE BEGINNING

F iat L u x 33


34 F iat L u x


F iat L u x 35


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