Page 1

LANDSFORD CANAL STATE PARK (PICTURED) IS A SHORT DRIVE FROM ROCK HILL AND FEATURES LOVELY FALL COLORS AS WELL AS A BALD EAGLE'S NEST VIEWABLE FROM THE TRAIL.

Photo Credit: Rebecca Sutton

70 eussI

RHR

8102 llaF/remmuS

READER

HILL

ROCK

RHR


YOUR AD HERE full page, half page, quarter page, skyscraper, native advertising, & more!

GET SEEN BY THOUSANDS OF ROCK HILL READERS! Link to your website and/or social media pages, offer discounts or coupons!

FOR RATES: rockhillreader@gmail.com


03 Editor's Note 04 Food for Thought 07 RHSO 09 Historical Interpretation 13 Of Interest 14 Artist, Pianist, Auto Phil 17 Bald Eagles in our Backyard 20 Victorian Tea in the Hill 22 Goldenrod in YC 25 Invasion of the Stink Bug 26 Headstones 28Â Credits

: r e b m e m e R Daylight saving time ends at 2:00 AM on Sunday, November 4


editor's note

Welcome back, Rock Hill Readers! After taking the summer off and reworking some goals for RHR, we are making our comeback with a more focused magazine that offers the information you've asked for! The magazine will now be published bimonthly, with special additions in between. So, this issue covers the tail end of summer and the entrance of fall. Next time around, you will see more fall with the addition of winter, and so on. I was recently introduced to the amazing music scene in York County, but it just doesn't get enough exposure. So, we are getting together with local bands, musicians, and production folks to bring their talent to you in

As always, keep an eye on our website for blog updates and our Facebook page for shared information. If you haven't subscribed yet, please make sure and do so! That way, you'll get each new issue delivered right to your inbox. Don't forget to contact us to inquire about advertisement information and please let me know if you have an event you would like us to share! I hope you all had a lovely summer and are looking forward to the cooler weather and time with family. I know I am! But I'll still be hard at work behind the screen to bring you the next edition of the Rock Hill Reader!

the form of stories. We also will include information on upcoming music for you to attend!

Rebecca Sutton FOUNDER


Food for thought It’s acorn season in Rock Hill. You know, those startling pings that sound like bombs going off in your yard as they hit roofs, sheds, and other outbuildings? The sound is music to all local squirrels’ ears and they come a running, scurrying up and down your yard’s oak tree to harvest, harvest, harvest! Furry critters aren't the only ones who should be harvesting the delicious fruit of the oak tree. We can take a page right out of the history books and imitate our ancestors, the Catawba Indians, or look further back to prehistoric peoples for methods of using acorns. Before grocery stores and our reliance on white flour, acorns served as naturally gluten free staple in many ways. Native American women would roast acorns then grind them into flour for various uses. They also leached and dried them for similar purposes. Piedmont Indians, for example, would dig large pits where they stored hickory nuts and acorns. According to a dissertation by Brooke Michelle Bauer entitled “Being Catawba: The World of Sally New River”, From A.D. 900 to 1540, “Piedmont Indian women gathered at the temporary camp known today as Ashe Ferry, one of many sites where women collected and roasted acorns in late fall to early winter.” Ashe’s Ferry is a local landmark where an archaeological dig took place in 2010 during the replacement of the SC Highway 5 bridge across the Catawba River. The dig uncovered such roasting pits and storage basins used by native peoples.

4


Acorns A local source of food :

That being said, the traditional use of acorn has fallen by the wayside, but with the popularity of pricey gluten-free foods, people are looking to nature for inexpensive alternatives. Just like our ancestors, folks are beginning to make their own food once again. The process is much more involved than a seasonal backyard garden full of tomatoes and watermelon and borders on homesteading practices where foraging is sometimes needed to survive. Regardless, the practice is a fantastic way to use what Mother Nature gives us and to get back in touch with the earth. There is something so rewarding about making one’s own food.

Tannins are the bitterness and astringency in a nut, and acorns are especially potent when it comes to this bitterness - so don't eat one off the tree. If you want to try making your own acorn flour this fall, find a white oak tree, as they are far more edible than the red oaks when it comes to tannins. Still, some oaks bear acorns so low in bitter tannins that they supposedly can be eaten raw. Legend says that California Indians fought over these trees, which makes some sense because one mature Valley Oak, for example, can drop 2,000 pounds of acorns in a really good year. A ton of sweet acorns may well be worth fighting over.

In order to make acorn products, however, one must be knowledgeable about the bitter tannins. Maybe you’ve heard of tanning; the process that the treats skins and hides of animals to produce leather. The older generations may remember getting the hides “tanned”. The allusion in this expression is to a spanking that will change one's skin, just as chemicals tan animal hides.

There are a number of steps involved in gathering and processing the acorns and Native Americans did not have the technology we have today, so they utilized manual methods and nature. The following steps are the traditional ways, but you can use modern gadgets and on-demand running water to make the process quicker and easier.

5


THE CATAWBA INDIANS AND ACORNS acorns are still an easily sourced ingredient that can be used in everyday baked goods and soups.

Gathering the acorns from September to October, Native Americans climbed trees and used long slender poles to beat down the acorns. From there the acorns were then dried in their shells. This process typically took anywhere from a few weeks to months, making the nuts last for a few years in this condition, which is how the Native Americans stored them in order to keep a two year supply on hand. Today, we can freeze just about anything, so this step has often been negated by all but true homesteaders. After the drying period is over, the acorns were cracked to remove the nutmeat. The acorns were then ground or pounded into a fine acorn flour. Today, we might use a hammer and a brick to break the nut open and then a processor to grind the acorns, but Native Americans used small handheld stone pestles. The flour is then leached to remove the

tannic acid. In some areas, leaching was traditionally done by digging a shallow sand pit near a creek, one of the methods Catawba women used at Ashe’s Ferry. The location, by the way, was considered an “acorn camp”, as native peoples did not reside there, only used the area as a parching facility. The flour was then spread in the bottom of one of the pits and water was continuously poured over it until the tannins were leached out and the flour was sweet. It would take several hours of pouring to leach the flour. Other options were to tie the acorn mush into a sack and let it sit in a fast running stream for several days. Before nutritionally similar maize replaced acorns as a source of starch in ancient diets, the Catawba Indians used acorn meal as a thin soup or a thick mush. Additionally,

they made biscuits, cookies, and bread from the acorn flour. Despite our modern adoption of store-bought flours, acorns are still an easily sourced ingredient that can be used in everyday baked goods and soups. Like the native's transition from acorns to maize, we have realized that crops and storebought goods are much easier to acquire than tree nuts and don’t require nearly as much energy. However, with the popularization of gluten-free foods and DIY methods, contemporary folks are bringing back a native tradition and learning to appreciate an ancient form of foraging and utilization of nature.

6


September 8th 2018 marked a momentous event the inaugural concert of the Rock Hill Symphony Orchestra aptly dubbed Opening Fireworks ,

,

:

,

”.

The first audience of the RHSO witnessed energy passion and raw power on the Rawlinson Road Middle School Auditorium stage that night A few speeches started out the evening One by Mayor Gettys who appropriately quoted John F Kennedy a prolific supporter of the arts and many mentions of various volunteers and donors The audience then settled in for what became a momentous night Starting with the Star Spangled Banner the orchestra led by Dr David Rudge immediately grabbed the audience s attention ,

,

.

.

,

.

,

,

.

.

,

,

.

,

The air was electric and the crowd was excited And while all the music was superbly performed with energy and professionalism the stars of the event were Marina Lomazov and her piano a Russian soloist who led the season with Tchaikovsky s powerful Piano Concerto No 1 .

,

,

,

.

.

Maestro Rudge engaged the orchestra as well as the audience The end result of his talent and ability to work with the orchestra produced an extremely engaging musical event The audience became aware of the subtle and deep connection between the conductor s symphony of movements and the music emanating from the players .

.

.

During intermission attendees rushed to confer with one another on the venue and performers They were pleased to exchange information on the affordable price for such an event and the nearness of the venue I ll put them up against Charlotte Symphony was one comment And it s close another woman said ,

.

, “ ’

,”

!”

.

.

.

7


UPCOMING RHSO PERFORMANCES RHSO came to fruition thanks to board member and vice president Erin Harper McManus and friend Essena Setaro a violinist connected to the Columbia music scene The pair saw the need in our community for a symphony which aids in establishing Rock Hill s status as a foremost cultural district a title the city was given by S C Arts Commission in 2017

Saturday February 23 2019 ,

,

 

William Terwilliger violin Andrew Cooperstock piano David Rudge conductor ,

,

RHSO ,

,

Beethoven Egmont Overture Mendelssohn Double Concerto for Piano Violin and Strings Dvorak Symphony No 9 From the New World :

:

,

,

:

.

"

"

,

Saturday May 11 2019 ,

.

,

.

.

.

Rock Hill Reader contributor Martha Benn Macdonald created a beautiful floral arrangement for the occasion that featured sunflowers and the unique use of dried okra wheat and sorghum stalks she found growing on a recent trip to Georgetown South Carolina ,

Janet Sung violin David Rudge conductor ,

,

,

Mozart Overture to The Magic Flute :

Faure Pavane Bruch Violin Concerto No 1 Beethoven Symphony No 5 :

:

.

:

.

,

.

,


White Family Collection - Historic Rock Hill / Digitized and enhanced by RootsandRecall.com

The Joys of Being Hattie Isabella Lindsay White or Interpreting Her---or Others-- a Consideration hose fi st husba d, Ba

BY DR. MARTHA BENN MACDONALD

he fi st cousi

 As I look back o e the a ious   o e

a school teache

ho

histo ical e ues, each i the fo clothi g, yself

o ologue

of a

ith pe iod

usic, da ci g, sto ytelli g,

ga es, a d

uch,

o de i g

uch

o e, I fi d

hich pe so I

especially e joyed b i gi g to life a d

histo ic to

ho taught i se e al

sa d

Lafayette

et the Ma

he he isited Rich o d,

Vi gi ia, i Octobe of also k e

uis de

4 she p obably

Edga Alla Poe a d his siste ,

Rosalie, fo Cathe i e Edga i

as bo

i

, a d Rosalie i

MacKe zie Poe,

ho

as a poet,

, ; Rosalie usicia ,

a d teache ; a d Hattie Isabella Li dsay

hy.

White f o  Histo ical i di iduals po t ayed i clude Ke

, died du i g the Wa

bet ee the States; Cathe i e St atto Ladd,

I ha e i te p eted fo audie ces at

o igi al d a atic

Rosbo ough also

ho

I ha e

y g eat au t, Ma tha

edy Rosbo ough Va Ness,

Yo k ille, South Ca oli a, a

usic teache a d the daughte of a docto a da

othe

Mayflower.

hose a cesto s sailed o The

9


No , that’s a tall order I’ e gi e

teachers. She a d her husba d, a artist,

self. What do ou thi k? All of these

taught at Bratto s ille, i Chester ille, at

o e li ed i the i etee th ce tur i the South a d suffered duri g the War bet ee the States, so e

ore so tha others. E cept

for

great au t, the

ere all teachers.

The

ere all i the arts, either as pai ters,

usicia s, or poets, a d all had childre , e cept for Rosalie Poe.

Feaster ille, a d i Wi

sboro. I fact,

ou’re o Co gress Street i Wi

great au t, Martha Ke

Rosborough Va Ness, delighted fro

ed

e because

father’s stories, I felt as if I k e

sboro, go

to the Fairfield Cou t Museu . This origi all her school

as

here she cared about

the eeds of each stude t. A poet, pla

right, e spaper jour alist, teacher,

a d

other, she

as al a s bus a d

e gaged. Her schools, like  Portra i g

he

a

for ou g

ladies across the South, i cluded lesso s i gra

ar, spelli g, arith etic, perhaps

geo etr ,

usic, pe

a ship, e broider ,

her. Her first husba d died duri g…or

astro o

shortl …after the

pai ti g lesso s. Duri g her fi al ears, Mrs.

li ed

ith her

ar. She a d their so

other,

great, great

, a d da ci g. Her husba d ga e

Ladd suffered fro

euralgia

hich left her

gra d other, at the old ho e-place i

bli d. Despite that, she co ti ued to be

Fairfield Cou t , South Caroli a, icti s of

i terested i for er stude ts. I i terpreted

Sher a ’s Ar

Catheri e Stratto Ladd at Historic

. As a child, she a d

great

gra d other, Mar Rosborough, atte ded

Bratto s ille a d at the Fairfield Cou t

Catheri e Ladd’s Acade

Museu

South Caroli a. I o hich

i Wi

ed a theore

au t had do e

hile she

sboro, pai ti g as a

stude t at the school I ga e the pai ti g to the

useu

i Wi

sboro . U like

ore

oder la guage

o the back la

hich

e produced

o e bright October

or i g i 2007.

great

gra d other, Martha re arried after the ar. She beca e the

a d tra slated o e of her pla s i to

ife of J.H. Va Ness, a

 Portra i g Rosalie Poe i Rich o d, Virgi ia, ho e er,

as o e of the highlights

pro i e t photographer a d artist. The had

of

se eral childre a d o

i structor for 52 ears, but I’ e had a passio

ed a dog

hich

father, as a child

ho

ould later beco e a

ophthal ologist

ho sa ed the e esight of

life. I ha e bee a college E glish

for dra a si ce

t i a d I produced

pla s i our base e t. I e jo bri gi g

Dori Sa ders, decided eeded his ba gs

people fro

tri

dra atic

o ologues. Rosalie Poe’s stor

Dadd , at the age of fi e, cut his ba gs.

spoke to

e.

 Probabl

 Although I

ed. Certai the little dog could ot see,

ore e gagi g tha i terpreti g

great au t, ho e er,

as portra i g

Rosalie

of Rich o d, Virgi ia,

died

o e of South Caroli a’s

ould beco e

ost belo ed

as ot a orpha , as she

as, I

as e tre el sh as a child. I i agi e

Catheri e Stratto Ladd, a ati e ho

a page i a book to life through

as as

ell. E e though her

he Rosalie

other

as a ear old, the little

girl certai l , like her t o brothers, ca e to

ġĠ


k o

about her tale ted

a d acted i

other

surre der at Appo atto Court House a d

ho sa g

li ed for

ajor cities o the East Coast.

a

ears follo i g the

ar at the

So e historia s ha e dared to suggest that

Co federate Soldiers’ Ho e i Rich o d a d

Rosalie

because

as dull of co prehe sio . That

i furiates

e. Rosalie

taught pia o a d pe

as er tale ted. She a ship; she

father had told

stories about the

a

ar, stories he’d heard

gro i g up, I i agi ed

rote

e so

self i Rich o d

duri g those ears.

poetr a d pai ted o ha dkerchiefs. She adored her brother a d suffered terribl after his death. Mrs. Cle la , sa

, his

other-i -

Li dsa ’s

to it that Rosalie did ot i herit a

of her brother’s

he Rich o d

as bur ed, Rosalie, like so

a

others,

as

destitute a d i po erished. She died at the Epipha

he she

as 64

ears old. I rece tl i terpreted her at the Edgar Alla Poe Museu , a

other

ho ca e to York ille, the North, to teach at

the York ille Acade

ight ha e k o

Catheri e Ladd. I do ot k o , but it is possible. Whe her

other arri ed i the

84 ’s, Catheri e Ladd

Episcopal Church Ho e for the

Poor i Washi gto , D.C.

self if Hattie Isabella

South Caroli a, fro

o e , ho e er s all the

a ou t, a d duri g the War

 No , I asked

ea their paths

did ’t cross. I do ’t belie e that e er as docu e ted. So eti es,

i tuiti g as

historical e ue i Rich o d.

as o lo ger at

Bratto s ille. That does ot acti it

ar elous

e look at the li es of people i

histor see s appropriate. We  Creati g a origi al dra atic a d

o ologue

aki g her perso alit co e to life

thrilli g. Because she pia ist, a d Because i Lee’s Ar

uch

ore, I ide tified as

ust ask,

Might she ha e do e such a d such? Where as she? What

ere her i terests?

as a teacher, poet,

great gra dfather a d

as

id

ith hi

ith her.

 Did Hattie co e b trai or coach fro

as a surgeo

York ille to teach

usic at A

at the

White’s Pi e Gro e Acade

Hutchiso i Rock Hill?

11


The stor goes that A A dre , sa

’s seco d so ,

Hattie a d fell i lo e

He proposed, a d the

ere

re e ber this lo el

ith her.

arried. A

childhood; u fortu atel , it

Hattie

reaso s. Like her, I a

There are so

the daughter of a a ha e kept her

o a bugg ride to see

a

ere i York a d i Rock Hill as

i terpreti g Miss Hattie for a u ber of

father co pa

as tor do

i the a e of progress, as so

lo el ro a ce, ’est-ce pas? I ha e e jo ed

doctor. I i agi e that she

a sio fro

as a

usicia , a d I a a

houses

ell . Miss a

usicia .

si ilarities, a d I a

blessed to see these co

ectio s. I

additio , desce da ts of the Bratto fa il

patie ts i the cou tr .

li ed e t door for ears. M t i sister a d I gre

 Like Miss Hattie, I e jo gi i g parties. O e of her desce da ts told

e that duri g

up pla i g softball a d ridi g bic cles

ith Dr. Rufus Bratto

ho toda is a

ph sicia i Flore ce, South Caroli a.

the ears follo i g her husba d’s death, she

          Because she li ed so lo g she died

e tertai ed the eighborhood childre i the

arou d

i g co pleted i Visitors ga es,

of the

a sio .

clothi g fro

ould ha e e jo ed refresh e ts, usic, a d stories. She probabl

shared

ths fro

, Hattie Isabella

the Classics, fa il sagas,

a ha e

or

the differe t periods. Weari g

period clothi g has al a s appealed to

e.

It’s just fu . As a aside, I do

o der,

she to co e to life,

ould sa about

hat she

ere

e e ts i histor , a d Bible stories. She had

Goat-Yoga a d Car Displa s o the grass

gro

la

up i the First Presb teria Church i

York ille, a d she

as a acti e

e ber of

surrou di g the White Ho e. Are there

ot other

a s to

ake raise

o e ?

the First Presb teria Church i Rock Hill.

          I e jo i terpreti g Catheri e

Her desce da t also related that she liked to

Stratto Ladd, Rosalie Poe, a d Hattie

share her k o ledge of astro o

Isabella Li dsa White for a u ber of

o e ight

he she

a d that

as looki g at the

oo ,

reaso s. The

ere teachers,

she

as sure so eo e had crept i to her

poets, a d

roo

a d cra led u der her bed. Heari g a

bee e riched b their prese ce, a d I hope,

oise, she ju ped up a d ra to the porch,

uch,

uch

usicia s,

dear readers, that this

called i to the ight, a d retur ed to bed,

that.

hopi g the perso had a ished. She bega

          Before I perfor

barri g the door.

ore. Our li es ha e e oir re eals

o e of

dra atic

o ologues, I ask the audie ce to put a a their cell pho es a d tr to fi d o e teacher

 Was so eo e reall u der the bed? Who

ho

the

a reso ate

ith. As a college

as it? Could it ha e bee a ghost? We’ll

i structor a d tutor, I ha e lear ed

e er k o .

so ethi g fro histor , a d I a

 Dr. Li dsa , ser ed i the Ci il War Dr. Rufus Bratto Bratto fa il

each of these ladies i grateful.

ith

desce da t of the historic ho li ed

ith his fa il i a

gorgeous brick ho e o Co gress Street I

Martha Ju e the t e t -se e th,

ġĢ


OF EST R E T IN THIS R E B O T C O

,

IMAGINE STEAM FESTIVAL

October 27 2018 from 11am to 4pm in Old Town Rock Hill SC The iMAGINE STEAM Festival to showcases pre K 12 education and career pathways in Science Technology Arts Engineering and Math STEAM through fun hands on learning The purpose of this street festival is to ignite the interest of students and families from across York Chester and Lancaster Counties in STEAM learning and career pathways imaginesteamfest org Price Free ,

,

-

,

,

,

(

,

)

-

SHAKESPEARE CAROLINA PRESENTS GEORGE A ROMERO S NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD LIVE

.

,

.

.

.

'

:

October 27 2018 from 7pm 10pm Legal Remedy Brewery Rock Hill SC The play lovingly examines the film the period it was made in and it s undying influence on the horror genre All the iconic moments from the film are hilariously re visited along with an entirely new journey for our beloved characters from the farmhouse Event Info 803 524 1185 Ages 13 Price 10 ,

-

.

,

.

,

.

-

,

.

: (

:

)

+

-

: $

:

CRAFTED BAVARIAN PRETZEL BEER STEINS –

October 14 2018 2 4 PM Celebrate Oktoberfest at the Arts Council s CRAFTED at Legal Remedy Brewing with Katherine Petke Create a hand built clay beer stein with a pocket for your pretzels while sampling a flight of Legal Remedy s favorite seasonal brews 803 328 2787 Ages 21 Price 25 www yorkcountyarts org ,

-

 

'

OKTOBERFEST Saturday October 20 4 00pm to 10 00pm Join us for a Bavarian Street Festival celebrating the autumn season Featuring live music German food and beers a kids zone and more ,

:

:

!

,

'

,

,

!

!

-

,

'

. (

)

-

:

: $

.

.

+

GOT SOMETHING

?

email rockhillreader gmail com with your event to submit it for the next edition @

.

!

13


Artist, Pianist, and Auto Phil

BY DR MARTHA BENN MACDONALD .

If you want to know more about an artist at his easel and a musician at his piano in the twentieth century in Rock Hill you might find the following article on Edwin Harrison Stultz engaging especially when you remember that he took his pretty dark green and cream Plymouth Belvedere to Germany in 1955 a year after he was graduated from Presbyterian College in Clinton South Carolina ,

,

,

,

.

Cars just like art and music fascinated Ed when he was a little boy He was born on Hampton Street In the second grade Ed told his parents ,

,

.

.

,

,

that he wanted to be an artist whereupon his father smiled I ll buy whatever supplies you need Eddie also told them that he wanted to play the piano whereupon his mother took him to Woolworth one of Rock Hill s earliest dime stores where a toy piano made of mahogany wood mesmerized him And with Christmas coming following his birthday on Halloween the man with the white hair beard red suit and big black boots of course lugged that little piano down the chimney and enjoyed the oatmeal peanut butter cookies no doubt baked by Mary

White Quite often Ed played with her grandson George and other children in what has become known as one of Rock Hill s historic neighborhoods .

,

,

.”

,

.

,

,”

.

,

,

,

-

,

,

.

,

,

In the third grade the family moved to Marion Street where Ed recalled his mother adorning the marble mantle top with a stable and village which lighted up and brightened the living room And then one day the doorbell rang and when Ed answered it he was absolutely spellbound an upright piano with a huge carving of columns on each end stood on the porch Yet 14 ,

,

,

,

,

,

,

:

.


he was sure it wasn t for him When his parents heard their son telling the postman to take the piano back because it was not for the Stultz family they ran to the door and redirected the bewildered man ’

.

,

.

At once Ed began taking piano lessons from Miss Georgia Dickert choir director and organist at the historic First Presbyterian Church where the Stultzes were members She also founded the Juvenile Music Club and gave piano lessons During his childhood Ed and his dad enjoyed the annual pilgrimage in the ,

,

,

.

.

,

Studebaker to the woods to cut down the Christmas tree His childhood was a happy one He has fond memories of the houses on Hampton and Marion but his treasured home was on East Main Street across from the old Reed home which later became my father s office 332 East Main Street .

.

,

:

.

When Ed was recovering from an appendicitis he had a lot of time to sketch and paint He remembered Mrs Reed bringing him a small roll of canvas From his bed he made an easel and he painted flowers columns like the ones on the ,

.

.

.

,

,

,

house cars and much much more Several years later during his time in Europe Ed took pictures of whatever especially engaged him and from these photos he began sketching pictures for note cards These pictures portrayed historic buildings flowers birds churches and more ,

,

,

.

,

,

,

,

.

,

,

,

,

.

Piano was not the only musical instrument Ed enjoyed He played the clarinet and joined the ROTC Band and during his years at Presbyterian College where he majored in math and history and sang in the choir In addition to art and music he became .

.

,

15


more interested in cars His first car was a Ford convertible that his parents bought from his Uncle Miller Magill .

.

Following commencement at Presbyterian College he joined the army and reported in 1954 to Fort Benning Georgia for Officers Training In 1955 he headed to Germany where he served as platoon leader and took that Belvedere After about twelve months he was transferred to Seventh Army Headquarters to serve on the Headquarters General Staff When he returned from Europe he was still ,

,

,

’

.

,

.

,

.

,

in the Reserves and was promoted to Captain He became a statistician at Bowater where he worked for 35 years During this time he sang in the First Presbyterian Church Choir performed in concerts in Rock Hill and beyond and served as Clerk of Session four times in twenty years He was also an active member of the Rock Hill Music Club He currently lives in Gainesville Florida with his son .

.

,

,

,

.

.

,

,

Dr. Martha Benn Macdonald, a native of Rock Hill, is a retired college English instructor, storyteller, published writer, dancer, and musician. She also does floral arrangements, lives in her childhood home, gardens, and walks miles daily with her beloved Australian Cream Labradoodle, Lord Byron.


BALD EAGLES

OUR AREA IS HOME TO THE MAJESTIC BIRD OF PREAY. By Rebecca Sutto

Just o er the York Cou ty boarder, i La dsford Ca al State Park resides a fierce surprise. The bald eagle has bee our cou try's atio al bird of the U ited States si ce

J

ust off the lo g stretch of high ay k o as Cata ba Ri er Road or U.S. H y , estled o a cur e of the Cata ba Ri er lies La dsford Ca al State Park. This ge of a park is co prised of early acres of a di erse group of historic a d atural attractio s. Duri g the o ths of May a d Ju e, La dsford bursts to life ith thousa ds of rocky shoals spider lilies hich ca be see fro the shore as ell as a o erlook here the Ca al Trail e ds a d the Nature Trail picks up. Ho e er, i the fall, there is a other rare, ajestic site. Visitors ca choose o e of three paths: Ca al, Nature, a d Eagle Poi t trails. For this isit, e reco e d 

17


the Eagle Poi t Trail, a . 5- ile trail that begi s at the back of the useu a d e ds at the orth e d of the pic ic area. The trail’s total tra el ti e is about 5 i utes. Alo g the Ca al Trail is a short, see i gly ysterious path that leads to a dead e d at ¼ ile. Aptly a ed, at the tip of Eagle Poi t Trail resides the bald eagle. If you’re lucky, you ca see the rare, ajestic bird of prey esti g. I Ju e you ight e e catch the fledgli g eagles lea e the est after te to t el e eeks i the est. But i South Caroli a’s fall seaso , est buildi g begi s. This occurs to o ths ahead of breedi g seaso , hich is i No e ber. Dece ber is he egg layi g usually occurs, but ca ra ge fro No e ber to March. Bald eagles est i forested areas close to ater. Lucky for us, La dsford has both. They also choose the tallest li i g tree, a d isitors ca clearly see the La dsford bald eagle’s pi e i the ooded area at the e d of the trail. Si ce eagles add up to a foot i height a d dia eter of aterial to their est each year, it is easy to see this local bird’s abode. A pair of eagles ay use a est u til the est itself beco es so large that the tree ca o lo ger support it. I such a case, the pair ight build a est i the sa e territory, earby the pre ious est.

18


IN 2016, SCDNR MONITORED MORE THAN 350 BALD EAGLE NESTS

Bald eagles i South Caroli a retur to the sa e esti g territor ear after ear, so ou are al ost guara teed to catch a gli pse of o e at La dsford. But is it the sa e eagle? The a s er is es, ith fe e ceptio s. For e a ple, if o e eagle part er dies, the sur i i g part er ill recruit a e ate. Also, if the est pro es to be u successful, it is u likel that eagle ill retur . Assu i g othi g of the sort occurs, a d si ce eagles ha e stro g est fidelit , the are ost likel to retur to that sa e locatio each ear. Si ce the locatio of the La dsford Ca al State Park’s has bee successful, it is safe to assu e the are ’t goi g a here a ti e soo .

Accordi g to South Caroli a’s DNR ebsite, i , South Caroli a ra ked t elfth i the atio i ter s of the u bers of esti g bald eagle pairs. Si ce 9 , occupied esti g territories i creased fro to o er i . Though u bers of bald eagle pairs are i creasi g sig ifica tl , e are still luck to ha e a pair esti g i earb La dsford Ca al State Park, just o er the York Cou t li e i Chester, a i ute dri e fro the ce ter of Rock Hill.

19


Historic Armstrong-Mauldin House, 607 Aiken Avenue Friday, November 30 at 12:30 Saturday, December 1 at 12:30 Sunday, December 2 at 12:30

Adults $25; Children 12 and under, $12 With Servers i Victoria attire Traditio al Christ as usic Traditional Full English Tea featuring a generous assortment of delectables including savories, English scones, a variety of sweet treats and Twinings tea. Seating is limited - Advance reservations required Deadline: Wednesday, November 28, Checks, MasterCard and Visa accepted. Call Betty, 803.415.7278 or our Clubhouse, 803.328.8888, Leave a message and your call will be returned.

Featuring items from local artisans and vendors with Christmas themed gifts, decorations and delicious homemade holiday treats. THE BOUTIQUE WILL BE OPEN ONE HOUR PRIOR TO AND AFTER EACH TEA

Our Sugar Plum fairy

Visit our website: www.womansclubofrockhill.org Also visit us on Facebook: Woman’s Club of Rock Hill The Victorian Teas are ChristmasVille events See www.ChristmasVilleRockHill.com Proceeds benefit Woman’s Club Community Service Programs and preservation and upkeep of the Armstrong-Mauldin House and gardens. The Club is a 501(c)3 organization.


STORIES We love Rock Hillians and we love writing about them Stories in the RHR are about our friends and neighbors People you now ,

!

...

!

ARTS With so much going on nearby why go to Charlotte You ll find select listings of local events in the arts that are going on in and around Rock Hill ,

?

'

.

HISTORTY Our surveys indicate that our readers love to read about local history Check out the various narratives and historical info that is fun to read .

.

e b i r c s sub ! y a d o t

r.com e d a e r l l i h www.rock

FOOD

Between the southern Food Junkie and various recipes local products and food festivals there is plenty to drool over in RHR s pages ,

,

,

'

.


GOLDENROD IN YORK COUNTY HOW TO SPOT IT, AND WHAT TO DO WITH IT While other, more northern states are welcoming cooler weather and the entrance of crisp fall days, allergy season is in full swing here in the South. Driving on country roads, you might notice tall, stalky plants and think they are ragweed. But, as it turns out, it’s not ragweed at all! It's a similar looking plant called goldenrod, and several communities surrounding Rock Hill have an abundance of it. Being the new-to-herbs novice I am, I got rather excited and decided to learn a little more about what our area has to offer. One major contributor to hay fever is ragweed. The dust-inducing plant grows along the sides of roads and highways and plugs our heads up just looking at it. Goldenrod is a plant that looks like ragweed, but has subtle features that differentiate itself from its doppelganger. These plants that grow all over York County are often confused with each other. First, while goldenrod grows literally right next to ragweed, is much prettier. When in full bloom, the heady flowers weight the stalks down with brilliant yellow buds. Much prettier than its arch nemesis ragweed, which doesn't hold a candle to this healthful herb. That's right, I said herb! But more on that in a minute. Second, the leaf structure is probably the most obvious differentiating feature of the plant. Instead of long, singular leaves like the goldenrod plant, ragweed has fern-like leaves that come to many points. Lastly, and the most interesting difference is this: even though goldenrod has bright yellow flowers that makes some of us may cringe due to our association of the color of pollen, goldenrod’s pollen is actually quite sticky. This means that no, it will not cause you to suffer from allergies like the ragweed plant. Better; it can be picked or uprooted and brought into your home as a bouquet or medicine! The healing properties of goldenrod are numerous according to Penn State: “Historically, goldenrod (Solidago canadensis or Solidago virgaurea) has been used on the skin to heal wounds. It has also been used as a diuretic, meaning it helps the body get rid of excess fluid. The name solidago means "to make whole." It is used in Europe to treat urinary tract inflammation and to prevent or treat kidney stones."

22


Goldenrod has also been used to treat tuberculosis, diabetes, enlargement of the liver, gout, hemorrhoids, internal bleeding, asthma, and arthritis. In folk medicine, it is used as a mouth rinse to treat inflammation of the mouth and throat. And though you may not currently suffer from kidney stones or other urinary disorders, you may run into someone who does. Besides, I just love the taste of tea, and this makes a tasty one when mixed with a little peppermint leaf. Surprisingly, the goldenrod plant can actually help seasonal allergy sufferers and those with cat dander allergies when consumed as a tea or tincture. In fact, many herbs like goldenrod are often made into teas for various reasons. Additionally, it is packed with a higher amount of antioxidants than green tea. And it's found right in our backyard! Look for goldenrod in meadows, fields, and open woods and along trailsides and waysides. Antioxidant goldenrod tea for allergies, bladder stones, kidney infections, and diarrhea: Goldenrod tea is slightly sweet and astringent with a hint of volatile oils. The longer you brew it and the more herbs you use the stronger the medicine properties will be. For a pleasing beverage start with 1-2 teaspoons of goldenrod leaves/flowers per 8 ounces of water. Increase the steeping time and dosage as needed. 1-3 ounces of herb can be used per day.

Ģģ


GOLDENROD TEA

Antioxidant goldenrod tea for allergies bladder stones kidney infections and more ,

,

Goldenrod tea is slightly sweet and astringent with a hint of volatile oils The longer you brew it and the more herbs you use the stronger the medicine properties will be For a pleasing beverage start with 1 2 teaspoons of goldenrod leaves flowers per 8 ounces of water Increase the steeping time and dosage as needed 1 3 ounces of herb can be used per day .

.

-

/

.

.

.

-

The information provided on this site is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition .

.

.

,

:

Learn how to harvest goldenrod with this video from Homesteading Ways

24


INVASION OF THE STINK BUG! BY REBECCA SUTTON They creep They crawl And the stink The brown marmorated stink bug seems to be showing up everywhere this fall While not uncommon the invasion yes invasion is being felt throughout York County This smelly bug affectionately referred to as the stink bug is an invasive species which releases a foul odor when threatened or squashed But why are our homes inundated with this untouchable creature and what do we do about it .

.

!

.

,

-

,

-

.

,

.

?

animals that could otherwise eat the critters scientists are working on ways to deter the bug from eating valuable crops Scientists are learning about ways to produce pheromones in trap crops to lure the bugs away from cash crops said Dorothea Tholl a professor of biological sciences in the College of Science and a Fralin Life Science Institute affiliate ,

.

'

With cooler weather the stink bug begins to look for shelter in tree hollows However according to Eric Benson an entomologist at Clemson University the warm weather that has extended into the fall is partly to blame for the invasion as it has lengthened the time the bugs had to feed and reproduce and are only now starting to find shelter ,

.

,

,

,

.

' -

,

,

.

Meanwhile what are we to do Experts suggest not killing or squashing the bug lest we smell the stench of its death and utilizes more humane methods of eradicating them Killing them may prove to be more frustrating as other bugs may feed on the dead carcasses Sweeping brown marmorated stink bug is our best bet but vacuuming can also help if there are many in your house Prevention is also key Since the bug can crawl in thorugh gaps open doors or torn screens making sure your property is well sealed will keep them at bay ,

?

,

,

.

,

Stink bugs are a newer problem for us as they weren t brought to the States until the 1990s and in South Carolina only six or seven years ago

.

,

,

.

.

.

,

,

They aren t exactly harmful but have been known to generate an allergic reaction in those who are sensitive to the bugs odor according to Pennsylvania State University Other than the inconvenience to us the real problem is for farmers The brown marmorated stink bug loves to feed on one of our favorite fall treats apples In addition to apples they also enjoy sweet corn figs and peaches Since the bug does not have a predator here in the States and tastes bitter to ’

,”

.

,

.

:

,

.

,

,

.

,

-

.

"THEY WEREN ’T BRO STATES UGHT T UNTIL O THE THE 19 SOUTH 90S AN CAROL D IN INA ON SEVEN L Y YEARS SIX OR AGO." 25


Headstones By Rebecca Sutton Beth Shiloh Presbyterian Church according to Farber Gravestone Collection by Jessie Lie Farber is located about five miles northeast of Yorkville on or near the great road leading from that place to Charlotte N C Yorkville was what we now know as York County The great road or the Great Wagon Road was an Indian trail utilized by the flood of Scots Irish Welsh and German immigrants who came into the two Carolinas from 1740 to 1765 Beth Shiloh s first church building erected in 1829 was a log house where Rev William C Davis presided over the congregation Today we d just say that it s located at 1184 N Shiloh Rd York SC , 

,

,

.

.”...

.

”,

,

-

,

,

.

,

,

.

.

.

,

,

,

.

Beth Shiloh is the final resting place of local Civil War soldiers like Uranus Fewell Confederate veteran of Company F 5th Regiment S C Volunteers Not only did he do hard time in Indiana s Camp Morton but he lost his brother in the Battle of 2nd Manassas His mother Margaret rests in a nearby grave ,

,

,

.

.

.

,

.

.

However down the hill and off to the right stands a low rock wall separating the main cemetery from what appears to be another less maintained burial ground Within those walls the ground is littered with leaves and large jagged rocks that hardly resemble headstones ,

,

.

,

,

.

The only indication that suggests what they are is the depth they are imbedded and the sunken areas around them .

Among other handmade fieldstone markers which were very common in early rural areas like York County stands very few legible headstones of this kind that are hand carved Occasionally an amateur probably a friend or family member of the deceased cut a stone and some of these display interesting folk carvings The remaining stones are worn down or destroyed by time and man One fieldstone in particular whose writing faces the ,

,

.

,

,

,

.

.

,

26


woods and is scratched in by hand is of A Wilson The S is backwards The date is is possibly May 3 1880 Presumably that is the date of A Wilson s death Nearby stands a second stone much easier to read J Wilson and is professionally engraved ,

.

,

.

.

.

.

.

Thus the inscribed faces of old headstones tend to face west and those on footstones east ,

.

,

.

.

The inscriptions on headstones of this day usually faced west Where there are footstones none of which could be identified in the corner one would note that those face east with mounded graves between the pairs The story goes that bodies were laid head to the west feet to the east so that at the sound of the cock s crow on the day of judgment the resurrected dead would arise to face the dawn To facilitate a visitor s reading the gravestone inscriptions withoutwalking on the grave the head and footstones were set with their carved surfaces facing away from the grave .

(

)

.

,

,

,

.

A Wilson s inscription facing the woods is directed toward the east not the west Presumably this person s body was buried so that they too would face the rising sun in the east Just as war heroes of higher stations and their mothers who could afford large elaborate stones when A Wilson rises from the dead for the resurrection they will walk alongside others in the better part of the cemetery .

,

,

,

.

.

,

,

.

,

.

,

.

27


Summer/Fall 2018

Rock Hill Reader the Magazine

issue 07

Credits

Founder,   Rebecca Sutton

Editor Contributing Writer Special Thanks Design, marketing, social media Cover Image

Catherine Sutton Dr. Martha Benn Macdonald Wade Fairey of Roots & Recall Rebecca Sutton View of trail & old bridge at Landsford Canal State Park/Credit: Rebecca Sutton

Back Page Image

View of Canal Trail at Landsford Canal State Park/Credit: Rebecca Sutton

EDITORIAL

OFFICE

Rock Hill Reader the Magazine is published independently by Rock Hill Reader Rock Hill, South Carolina  |   +(803) 810-9458 rockhillreader@gmail.com

www.rockhillreader.com

Rock Hill Reader Issue 7  
New
Advertisement